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Sample records for vaccine protects monkeys

  1. Protective efficacy of multiple vaccine platforms against Zika virus challenge in rhesus monkeys.

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    Abbink, Peter; Larocca, Rafael A; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Bricault, Christine A; Moseley, Edward T; Boyd, Michael; Kirilova, Marinela; Li, Zhenfeng; Ng'ang'a, David; Nanayakkara, Ovini; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Borducchi, Erica N; Agarwal, Arshi; Brinkman, Amanda L; Cabral, Crystal; Chandrashekar, Abishek; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Jimenez, Jessica; Lee, Benjamin C; Mojta, Shanell; Molloy, Katherine; Shetty, Mayuri; Neubauer, George H; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Misamore, Johnathan; Finneyfrock, Brad; Lewis, Mark G; Alter, Galit; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-09-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for a major ongoing epidemic in the Americas and has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly. The development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is therefore an urgent global health priority. Here we demonstrate that three different vaccine platforms protect against ZIKV challenge in rhesus monkeys. A purified inactivated virus vaccine induced ZIKV-specific neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV strains from both Brazil and Puerto Rico. Purified immunoglobulin from vaccinated monkeys also conferred passive protection in adoptive transfer studies. A plasmid DNA vaccine and a single-shot recombinant rhesus adenovirus serotype 52 vector vaccine, both expressing ZIKV premembrane and envelope, also elicited neutralizing antibodies and completely protected monkeys against ZIKV challenge. These data support the rapid clinical development of ZIKV vaccines for humans. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Protective Efficacy of Adenovirus/Protein Vaccines Against SIV Challenges in Rhesus Monkeys

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    Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Brown, Eric P.; Borducchi, Erica N.; Smith, Kaitlin M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Liu, Jinyan; Shields, Jennifer; Parenteau, Lily; Whitney, James B.; Abbink, Peter; Ng’ang’a, David M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Lavine, Christy L.; Perry, James R.; Li, Wenjun; Colantonio, Arnaud D.; Lewis, Mark G.; Chen, Bing; Wenschuh, Holger; Reimer, Ulf; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Handley, Scott A.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Lorin, Clarisse; Voss, Gerald; Weijtens, Mo; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies of viral vector-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates have previously shown partial protection against stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of adenovirus serotype 26 (Ad26) vector priming followed by boosting with a purified envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Rhesus monkeys primed with Ad26 vectors expressing SIVsmE543 Env/Gag/Pol antigens and boosted with AS01B-adjuvanted SIVmac32H Env gp140 demonstrated complete protection in 50% of vaccinated animals against a series of repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SIVmac251 challenges that infected all controls. Protective efficacy correlated with the functionality of Env-specific antibody responses. Comparable protection was also observed with a similar Ad/Env vaccine against repetitive, heterologous, intrarectal SHIV-SF162P3 challenges. These data demonstrate robust protection by Ad/Env vaccines against acquisition of stringent virus challenges in rhesus monkeys. PMID:26138104

  3. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jiang

    Full Text Available Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA, alphavirus replicons (VRP, attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad, or attenuated poxvirus (Pox. These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  4. Vaccine protection against acquisition of neutralization-resistant SIV challenges in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barouch, Dan H.; Liu, Jinyan; Li, Hualin; Maxfield, Lori F.; Abbink, Peter; Lynch, Diana M.; Iampietro, M. Justin; Sanmiguel, Adam; Seaman, Michael S.; Ferrari, Guido; Forthal, Donald N.; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G.; Stablein, Donald; Pau, Maria G.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sadoff, Jerald C.; Billings, Erik A.; Rao, Mangala; Robb, Merlin L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Marovich, Mary A.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Michael, Nelson L.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical studies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidates have typically shown post-infection virological control, but protection against acquisition of infection has previously only been reported against neutralization-sensitive virus challenges. Here we demonstrate

  5. Measles vaccine expressing the secreted form of West Nile virus envelope glycoprotein induces protective immunity in squirrel monkeys, a new model of West Nile virus infection.

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    Brandler, Samantha; Marianneau, Philippe; Loth, Philippe; Lacôte, Sandra; Combredet, Chantal; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale; Desprès, Philippe; Contamin, Hugues; Tangy, Frédéric

    2012-07-15

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that emerged in North America and caused numerous cases of human encephalitis, thus urging the development of a vaccine. We previously demonstrated the efficacy of a recombinant measles vaccine (MV) expressing the secreted form of the envelope glycoprotein from WNV to prevent WNV encephalitis in mice. In the present study, we investigated the capacity of this vaccine candidate to control WNV infection in a primate model. We first established experimental WNV infection of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). A high titer of virus was detected in plasma on day 2 after infection, and viremia persisted for 5 days. A single immunization of recombinant MV-WNV vaccine elicited anti-WNV neutralizing antibodies that strongly reduced WNV viremia at challenge. This study demonstrates for the first time the capacity of a recombinant live attenuated measles vector to protect nonhuman primates from a heterologous infectious challenge.

  6. Innate anti-viral immunity is associated with the protection elicited by the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) live attenuated virus vaccine in cynomolgus monkeys.

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    Goletti, Delia; Macchia, Iole; Leone, Pasqualina; Pace, Monica; Sernicola, Leonardo; Pavone-Cossut, Maria Rosaria; Maggiorella, Maria Teresa; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Titti, Fausto

    2006-10-01

    The Delta-nef live attenuated virus vaccine approach offered in the SIV-macaque model the opportunity to identify humoral and cell-mediated immune responses associated with protection against viral infections. In addition, soluble factors different from those related to specific immune responses appear to correlate with the establishment and maintenance of the protective status. Investigated were: 1) the ability of CD8+ T cells from cynomolgus monkeys vaccinated with SIV Delta-nef and long-term protected against sequential SIVs and SHIV challenges to inhibit in vitro SHIV replication in an acute infection cell system, 2) the ability of cell-free supernatants from CD8+ T cell cultures to inhibit replication of HIV in chronically infected cells, and 3) whether the antiviral activity of CD8+ T cells correlated with IFNgamma production. Soluble factor(s) secreted by CD8+ T cells from Delta-nef vaccinated monkeys significantly inhibited SHIV replication in an autologous cell system. This effect was not dependent on beta-chemokine secretion and correlated with an increased IFNgamma production. In addition, since supernatants from CD8+ T cells inhibited HIV production in chronically infected monocytic cells, the suppressive activity was not related to the viral strain. Vaccination with the live attenuated virus induces both a CD8+ T cell-dependent antiviral activity and IFNgamma responses potentially responsible for the protection from challenge with heterologous highly pathogenic SHIV89.6P. It is conceivable that boosting the "natural" along with the antigen-specific immunity is a desirable outcome to improve the protective efficacy of any vaccine approach.

  7. A Single-Dose Recombinant Parainfluenza Virus 5-Vectored Vaccine Expressing Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) F or G Protein Protected Cotton Rats and African Green Monkeys from RSV Challenge.

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    Wang, Dai; Phan, Shannon; DiStefano, Daniel J; Citron, Michael P; Callahan, Cheryl L; Indrawati, Lani; Dubey, Sheri A; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Liang, Xiaoping; He, Biao; Espeseth, Amy S

    2017-06-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of severe respiratory disease among infants, immunocompromised individuals, and the elderly. No licensed vaccine is currently available. In this study, we evaluated two parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5)-vectored vaccines expressing RSV F (PIV5/F) or G (PIV5/G) protein in the cotton rat and African green monkey models for their replication, immunogenicity, and efficacy of protection against RSV challenge. Following a single intranasal inoculation, both animal species shed the vaccine viruses for a limited time but without noticeable clinical symptoms. In cotton rats, the vaccines elicited RSV F- or G-specific serum antibodies and conferred complete lung protection against RSV challenge at doses as low as 103 PFU. Neither vaccine produced the enhanced lung pathology observed in animals immunized with formalin-inactivated RSV. In African green monkeys, vaccine-induced serum and mucosal antibody responses were readily detected, as well. PIV5/F provided nearly complete protection against RSV infection in the upper and lower respiratory tract at a dose of 106 PFU of vaccine. At the same dose levels, PIV5/G was less efficacious. Both PIV5/F and PIV5/G were also able to boost neutralization titers in RSV-preexposed African green monkeys. Overall, our data indicated that PIV5/F is a promising RSV vaccine candidate.IMPORTANCE A safe and efficacious respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine remains elusive. We tested the recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) vectors expressing RSV glycoproteins for their immunogenicity and protective efficacy in cotton rats and African green monkeys, which are among the best available animal models to study RSV infection. In both species, a single dose of intranasal immunization with PIV5-vectored vaccines was able to produce systemic and local immunity and to protect animals from RSV challenge. The vaccines could also boost RSV neutralization antibody titers in African green monkeys

  8. Tick-Borne Langat/Mosquito-Borne Dengue Flavivirus Chimera, a Candidate Live Attenuated Vaccine for Protection against Disease Caused by Members of the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Complex: Evaluation in Rhesus Monkeys and in Mosquitoes

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    Pletnev, Alexander G.; Bray, Michael; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Speicher, Jim; Elkins, Randy

    2001-01-01

    Langat virus (LGT), strain TP21, a naturally avirulent tick-borne flavivirus, was used to construct a chimeric candidate virus vaccine which contained LGT genes for premembrane (preM) and envelope (E) glycoprotein and all other sequences derived from dengue type 4 virus (DEN4). The live virus vaccine was developed to provide resistance to the highly virulent, closely related tick-borne flaviviruses that share protective E epitopes among themselves and with LGT. Toward that end the chimera, initially recovered in mosquito cells, was adapted to grow to high titer in qualified simian Vero cells. When inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.), the Vero cell-adapted LGT TP21/DEN4 chimera remained completely attenuated for SCID mice. Significantly, the chimera protected immunocompetent mice against the most virulent tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV). Subsequently, rhesus monkeys were immunized in groups of 4 with 105 or 107 PFU of LGT strain TP21, with 105 PFU of DEN4, or with 103, 105, or 107 PFU of the chimera. Each of the monkeys inoculated with DEN4 or LGT TP21 became viremic, and the duration of viremia ranged from 1 to 5 days. In contrast, viremia was detected in only 1 of 12 monkeys inoculated with the LGT TP21/DEN4 chimera; in this instance the level of viremia was at the limit of detection. All monkeys immunized with the chimera or LGT TP21 virus developed a moderate to high level of neutralizing antibodies against LGT TP21 as well as TBEV and were completely protected against subsequent LGT TP21 challenge, whereas monkeys previously immunized with DEN4 virus became viremic when challenged with LGT TP21. These observations suggest that the chimera is attenuated, immunogenic, and able to induce a protective immune response. Furthermore, passive transfer of serum from monkeys immunized with chimera conferred significant protection to mice subsequently challenged with 100 i.p. 50% lethal doses of the highly virulent TBEV. The issue of transmissibility of the chimera

  9. Use of a Recombinant Gamma-2 Herpesvirus Vaccine Vector against Dengue Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

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    Bischof, Georg F; Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael; Shin, Young C; Domingues, Aline; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Rakasz, Eva G; Watkins, David I; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2017-08-15

    Research on vaccine approaches that can provide long-term protection against dengue virus infection is needed. Here we describe the construction, immunogenicity, and preliminary information on the protective capacity of recombinant, replication-competent rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a persisting herpesvirus. One RRV construct expressed nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), while a second recombinant expressed a soluble variant of the E protein (E85) of dengue virus 2 (DENV2). Four rhesus macaques received a single vaccination with a mixture of both recombinant RRVs and were subsequently challenged 19 weeks later with 1 × 10 5 PFU of DENV2. During the vaccine phase, plasma of all vaccinated monkeys showed neutralizing activity against DENV2. Cellular immune responses against NS5 were also elicited, as evidenced by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) tetramer staining in the one vaccinated monkey that was Mamu-A*01 positive. Unlike two of two unvaccinated controls, two of the four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA sequences in plasma after challenge. One of these two monkeys also showed no anamnestic increases in antibody levels following challenge and thus appeared to be protected against the acquisition of DENV2 following high-dose challenge. Continued study will be needed to evaluate the performance of herpesviral and other persisting vectors for achieving long-term protection against dengue virus infection. IMPORTANCE Continuing studies of vaccine approaches against dengue virus (DENV) infection are warranted, particularly ones that may provide long-term immunity against all four serotypes. Here we investigated whether recombinant rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) could be used as a vaccine against DENV2 infection in rhesus monkeys. Upon vaccination, all animals generated antibodies capable of neutralizing DENV2. Two of four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA after subsequent high-dose DENV2 challenge at 19 weeks

  10. Efficacy of a capsule conjugate vaccine against inhalational anthrax in rabbits and monkeys.

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    Chabot, Donald J; Joyce, Joseph; Caulfield, Michael; Cook, James; Hepler, Robert; Wang, Su; Vietri, Nicholas J; Ruthel, Gordon; Shoop, Wesley; Pitt, Louise; Leffel, Elizabeth; Ribot, Wilson; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2012-01-20

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is recognized as one of the most serious bioterrorism threats. The current human vaccines are based on the protective antigen component of the anthrax toxins. Concern about possible vaccine resistant strains and reliance on a single antigen has prompted the search for additional immunogens. Bacterial capsules, as surface-expressed virulence factors, are well-established components of several licensed vaccines. In a previous study we showed that an anthrax vaccine consisting of the B. anthracis poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsule covalently conjugated to the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B protected mice against parenteral B. anthracis challenge. Here we tested this vaccine in rabbits and monkeys against an aerosol spore challenge. The vaccine induced anti-capsule antibody responses in both species, measured by ELISA and a macrophage opsono-adherence assay. While rabbits were not protected against a high aerosol challenge dose, significant protection was observed in monkeys receiving the capsule conjugate vaccine. The results confirm that the capsule is a protective immunogen against anthrax, being the first non-toxin antigen shown to be efficacious in monkeys and suggest that addition of capsule may broaden and enhance the protection afforded by protective antigen-based vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. A Plasmodium vivax Plasmid DNA- and Adenovirus-Vectored Malaria Vaccine Encoding Blood-Stage Antigens AMA1 and MSP142in a Prime/Boost Heterologous Immunization Regimen Partially Protects Aotus Monkeys against Blood-Stage Challenge.

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    Obaldia, Nicanor; Stockelman, Michael G; Otero, William; Cockrill, Jennifer A; Ganeshan, Harini; Abot, Esteban N; Zhang, Jianfeng; Limbach, Keith; Charoenvit, Yupin; Doolan, Denise L; Tang, De-Chu C; Richie, Thomas L

    2017-04-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium , which are transmitted to humans by the bites of Anopheles mosquitoes. After the elimination of Plasmodium falciparum , it is predicted that Plasmodium vivax will remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality outside Africa, stressing the importance of developing a vaccine against P. vivax malaria. In this study, we assessed the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of two P. vivax antigens, apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) and the 42-kDa C-terminal fragment of merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1 42 ) in a plasmid recombinant DNA prime/adenoviral (Ad) vector boost regimen in Aotus monkeys. Groups of 4 to 5 monkeys were immunized with plasmid DNA alone, Ad alone, prime/boost regimens with each antigen, prime/boost regimens with both antigens, and empty vector controls and then subjected to blood-stage challenge. The heterologous immunization regimen with the antigen pair was more protective than either antigen alone or both antigens delivered with a single vaccine platform, on the basis of their ability to induce the longest prepatent period and the longest time to the peak level of parasitemia, the lowest peak and mean levels of parasitemia, the smallest area under the parasitemia curve, and the highest self-cure rate. Overall, prechallenge MSP1 42 antibody titers strongly correlated with a decreased parasite burden. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of immunized animals developed anemia. In conclusion, the P. vivax plasmid DNA/Ad serotype 5 vaccine encoding blood-stage parasite antigens AMA1 and MSP1 42 in a heterologous prime/boost immunization regimen provided significant protection against blood-stage challenge in Aotus monkeys, indicating the suitability of these antigens and this regimen for further development. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

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    Fact Sheet Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in humans. HBV infection is transmitted through exposure ...

  13. Comparative Immunogenicity of the Tetanus Toxoid and Recombinant Tetanus Vaccines in Mice, Rats, and Cynomolgus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT and is one of the most dreaded diseases especially in the developing countries. The current vaccine against tetanus is based on an inactivated tetanus toxin, which is effective but has many drawbacks. In our previous study, we developed a recombinant tetanus vaccine based on protein TeNT-Hc, with clear advantages over the toxoid vaccine in terms of production, characterization, and homogeneity. In this study, the titers, growth extinction, and persistence of specific antibodies induced by the two types of vaccine in mice, rats, and cynomolgus monkeys were compared. The booster vaccination efficacy of the two types of vaccines at different time points and protection mechanism in animals were also compared. The recombinant tetanus vaccine induced persistent and better antibody titers and strengthened the immunity compared with the commercially available toxoid vaccine in animals. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective recombinant tetanus vaccine to enhance the immunity of adolescents and adults as a substitute for the current toxoid vaccine.

  14. Evaluation of an intragastric challenge model for Shigella dysenteriae 1 in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for the pre-clinical assessment of Shigella vaccine formulations.

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    Islam, Dilara; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Aksomboon, Ajchara; Srijan, Apichai; Wongstitwilairoong, Boonchai; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Gettayacamin, Montip; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Mason, Carl J

    2014-06-01

    Shigellosis is a worldwide disease, characterized by abdominal pain, fever, vomiting, and the passage of blood- and mucus-streaked stools. Rhesus monkeys and other primates are the only animals that are naturally susceptible to shigellosis. A suitable animal model is required for the pre-clinical evaluation of vaccines candidates. In this study, the minimal dose of Shigella dysenteriae1 1617 strain required to produce dysentery in four of five (80% attack rate) monkeys using an escalating dose range for three groups [2 × 10(8) , 2 × 10(9) and 2 × 10(10) colony forming unit (CFU)] was determined. In addition, the monkeys were re-infected. The identified optimal challenge dose was 2 × 10(9) CFU; this dose elicited 60% protection in monkeys when they were re-challenged with a one log higher dose (2 × 10(10) CFU). The challenge dose, 2 × 10(10) CFU, produced severe dysentery in all monkeys, with one monkey dying within 24 h, elicited 100% protection when re-challenged with the same dose. All monkeys exhibited immune responses. This study concludes that the rhesus monkey model closely mimics the disease and immune response seen in humans and is a suitable animal model for the pre-clinical evaluation of Shigella vaccine candidates. Prior infection with the 1617 strain can protect monkeys against subsequent re-challenges with homologous strains. © 2013 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Plasmodium vivax thrombospondin related adhesion protein: immunogenicity and protective efficacy in rodents and Aotus monkeys

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    Angélica Castellanos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The thrombospondin related adhesion protein (TRAP is a malaria pre-erythrocytic antigen currently pursued as malaria vaccine candidate to Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a long synthetic peptide (LSP representing a P. vivax TRAP fragment involved in hepatocyte invasion was formulated in both Freund and Montanide ISA 720 adjutants and administered by IM and subcutaneous routes to BALB/c mice and Aotus monkeys. We measured specific humoral immune responses in both animal species and performed a sporozoite challenge in Aotus monkeys to assess the protective efficacy of the vaccine. After immunization both mice and Aotus seroconverted as shown by ELISA, and the specific anti-peptide antibodies cross reacted with the parasite in IFAT assays. Only two out of six immunized animals became infected after P. vivax sporozoite challenge as compared with four out of six animals from the control group. These results suggest that this TRAP fragment has protective potential against P. vivax malaria and deserves further studies as vaccine candidate.

  16. Vaccines Help Protect Us

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-23

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the importance of vaccines and how they work.  Created: 4/23/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/23/2013.

  17. Protective efficacy of a Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein-based vaccine in Aotus nancymaae is associated with antibodies to the repeat region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Yadava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that Vivax Malaria Protein 001 (VMP001, a vaccine candidate based on the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax, is immunogenic in mice and rhesus monkeys in the presence of various adjuvants. In the present study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of VMP001 formulated with a TLR9 agonist in a water-in-oil emulsion. Following immunization, the vaccine efficacy was assessed by challenging Aotus nancymaae monkeys with P. vivax sporozoites. Monkeys from both the low- and high-dose vaccine groups generated strong humoral immune responses to the vaccine (peak median titers of 291,622, and its subunits (peak median titers to the N-term, central repeat and C-term regions of 22,188; 66,120 and 179,947, respectively. 66.7% of vaccinated monkeys demonstrated sterile protection following challenge. Protection was associated with antibodies directed against the central repeat region. The protected monkeys had a median anti-repeat titer of 97,841 compared to 14,822 in the non-protected monkeys. This is the first report demonstrating P. vivax CSP vaccine-induced protection of Aotus monkeys challenged with P. vivax sporozoites.

  18. Comparison of protection from homologous cell-free vs cell-associated SIV challenge afforded by inactivated whole SIV vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Heeney (Jonathan); P. de Vries (Petra); R. Dubbes (Rob); W. Koornstra (Willem); H. Niphuis; P. ten Haaft (Peter); J. Boes (Jolande); M.E.M. Dings (Marlinda); B. Morein (Bror); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThis study attempted to determine if SIV vaccines could protect against challenge with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an SIV infected rhesus monkey. Mature Macaca mulatta were vaccinated four times with formalin inactivated SIVmac32H administered in MDP adjuvant (n = 8)

  19. Protection of aouts monkeys after immunization with recombinant antigens of Plasmodium falciparum

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    Burhard Enders

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Aotus spp. (owl monkey is one of the WHO recommended experimental models for Plasmodium falciparum blood stage infection, especially relevant for vaccination studies with asexual blood stage antigens of this parasite. For several immunization trials with purified recombinant merozoite/schizont antigens, the susceptible Aouts kenotypes II, III, IV and VI were immunized with Escherichia coli derived fusion proteins containg partial sequences of the proteins MSAI (merozoite surface antigen I, SERP (serine-strech protein and HRPII (histidine alanine rich protein II as well as with a group of recombinant antigens obtained by an antiserum raised against a protective 41 kD protein band. The subcutaneous application (3x of the antigen preparations was carried out in intact animals followed by splenectomy prior to challange, in order to increase the susceptibility of the experimental hosts to the parasite. A partial sequence of HRPII, the combination of three different fusion proteins of the 41 kD group and mixture of two sequences of SERP in the presence of the modified Al(OH3 adjuvant conferred significant protection against a challange infection with P. falciparum blood stages (2-5 x 10 (elevado a sexta potência i. RBC. Monkey immunized with the MS2-fusion protein carrying the N-terminal part of the 195 kD precursor of the major merozoite surface antigens induced only marginal protection showing some correlation between antibody titer and degree of parasitaemia. Based on the protective capacity of these recombinant antigens we have expressed two hybrid proteins (MS2/SERP/HRPII and SERP/MSAI/HRPII in E. coli containing selected partial sequences of SERP, HRPII and MSAI. Antibodies raised against both hybrid proteins in rabbits and Aotus monkeys recognize the corresponding schizont polypeptides. In two independent immunization trials using 13 animals (age 7 months to 3 years we could show that immunization of Aotus monkeys with either of the

  20. Community Immunity: How Vaccines Protect Us All

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    ... Special Issues Subscribe October 2011 Print this issue Community Immunity How Vaccines Protect Us All Send us ... time. That’s because enough people in the surrounding communities had already been vaccinated against measles. “The important ...

  1. Optimized development of a candidate strain of inactivated EV71 vaccine and analysis of its immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys.

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    Dong, Chenghong; Wang, Jingjing; Liu, Longding; Zhao, Hongling; Shi, Haijing; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Li, Qihan

    2010-12-01

    Enterovirus type 71 (EV71) is one of the main etiologic agents responsible for periodic epidemics of hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD). The prevention and control of EV71 epidemics with effective anti-viral agents and vaccines is very important for public health. Because the pathogenesis of EV71 in the human body is not completely clear and genetic variations in the virus during its replication are difficult to control, we have focused on the development of an inactivated whole-virus vaccine. In this study, we screened 16 strains isolated from different areas of China and selected one strain for the development of an inactivated EV71 vaccine. The results of our study suggest that the FY-23K-B strain, which is a candidate strain for an EV71 inactivated vaccine, satisfied the requirements of vaccine production in terms of genetic stability, biological activity, and good immunogenicity. The experimentally inactivated vaccine produced using this strain was capable of inducing an immune response and offered protection to rhesus monkeys against future virus attacks.

  2. A PfRH5-based vaccine is efficacious against heterologous strain blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum infection in aotus monkeys.

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    Douglas, Alexander D; Baldeviano, G Christian; Lucas, Carmen M; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Crosnier, Cécile; Bartholdson, S Josefin; Diouf, Ababacar; Miura, Kazutoyo; Lambert, Lynn E; Ventocilla, Julio A; Leiva, Karina P; Milne, Kathryn H; Illingworth, Joseph J; Spencer, Alexandra J; Hjerrild, Kathryn A; Alanine, Daniel G W; Turner, Alison V; Moorhead, Jeromy T; Edgel, Kimberly A; Wu, Yimin; Long, Carole A; Wright, Gavin J; Lescano, Andrés G; Draper, Simon J

    2015-01-14

    Antigenic diversity has posed a critical barrier to vaccine development against the pathogenic blood-stage infection of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. To date, only strain-specific protection has been reported by trials of such vaccines in nonhuman primates. We recently showed that P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homolog 5 (PfRH5), a merozoite adhesin required for erythrocyte invasion, is highly susceptible to vaccine-inducible strain-transcending parasite-neutralizing antibody. In vivo efficacy of PfRH5-based vaccines has not previously been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate that PfRH5-based vaccines can protect Aotus monkeys against a virulent vaccine-heterologous P. falciparum challenge and show that such protection can be achieved by a human-compatible vaccine formulation. Protection was associated with anti-PfRH5 antibody concentration and in vitro parasite-neutralizing activity, supporting the use of this in vitro assay to predict the in vivo efficacy of future vaccine candidates. These data suggest that PfRH5-based vaccines have potential to achieve strain-transcending efficacy in humans. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the Nanoparticle-Based Vaccine, SEL-068, on Nicotine Discrimination in Squirrel Monkeys.

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    Desai, Rajeev I; Bergman, Jack

    2015-08-01

    A key feature of addiction to nicotine likely resides in its ability to produce subjective effects that, in turn, may be reflected in its discriminative-stimulus properties. Vaccination against such effects of nicotine offers an intriguing therapeutic approach for smoking cessation, but a reliably effective and immunologically safe vaccine remains to be identified. Here we report on the ability of SEL-068, a nanoparticle-based vaccine that targets nicotine, to modify the discriminative-stimulus effects of nicotine in a primate species. Results indicate that squirrel monkeys vaccinated with SEL-068 failed to acquire 0.1 mg/kg nicotine discrimination but readily learned to discriminate 0.001 mg/kg of the nicotinic full agonist (+)-epibatidine ((+)-EPI). After (+)-EPI training, doses of nicotine ⩾ 0.32 mg/kg, which produced behaviorally adverse actions, still failed to substitute for the (+)-EPI training stimulus in immunized monkeys, whereas (+)-EPI and the partial agonist varenicline engendered, respectively, complete and partial substitution in all monkeys with potency comparable to their potency in non-immunized subjects. In other subjects, nicotine was trained as a discriminative-stimulus and then replaced by (+)-EPI. Subsequent vaccination with SEL-068 led to a threefold and long-lasting (>30 weeks) decrease in the potency of nicotine but not (+)-EPI or varenicline. Collectively, our results show that SEL-068 can block the development of nicotine discrimination and attenuate nicotine's effects in nicotine-experienced monkeys without altering the discriminative-stimulus properties of other nicotinic drugs. The difference in the vaccine's effects in naive and nicotine-experienced subjects provides important insight into the conditions under which immunotherapy may be effective in combating nicotine addiction.

  4. Correlates of protection for enteric vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jan; Parashar, Umesh D; Plotkin, Stanley; Louis, Jacques; Ng, Su-Peing; Desauziers, Eric; Picot, Valentina; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra

    2017-06-08

    An immunological Correlate of Protection (CoP) is an immune response that is statistically interrelated with protection. Identification of CoPs for enteric vaccines would help design studies to improve vaccine performance of licensed vaccines in low income settings, and would facilitate the testing of future vaccines in development that might be more affordable. CoPs are lacking today for most existing and investigational enteric vaccines. In order to share the latest information on CoPs for enteric vaccines and to discuss novel approaches to correlate mucosal immune responses in humans with protection, the Foundation Mérieux organized an international conference of experts where potential CoPs for vaccines were examined using case-studies for both bacterial and viral enteric pathogens. Experts on the panel concluded that to date, all established enteric vaccine CoPs, such as those for hepatitis A, Vi typhoid and poliovirus vaccines, are based on serological immune responses even though these may poorly reflect the relevant gut immune responses or predict protective efficacy. Known CoPs for cholera, norovirus and rotavirus could be considered as acceptable for comparisons of similarly composed vaccines while more work is still needed to establish CoPs for the remaining enteric pathogens and their candidate vaccines. Novel approaches to correlate human mucosal immune responses with protection include the investigation of gut-originating antibody-secreting cells (ASCs), B memory cells and follicular helper T cells from samples of peripheral blood during their recirculation. Copyright © 2017.

  5. Evaluation of a novel vaccine (HVJ-liposome/HSP65 DNA+IL-12 DNA) against tuberculosis using the cynomolgus monkey model of TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masaji; Kita, Yoko; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Kanamaru, Noriko; Hashimoto, Satomi; Nagasawa, Tetsuji; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Yoshida, Shigeto; Nishida, Yasuko; Fukamizu, Reiko; Tsunai, Yoshie; Inoue, Ruriko; Nakatani, Hitoshi; Namie, Yumi; Yamada, Junko; Takao, Kyoko; Asai, Ritsuko; Asaki, Ryoko; Matsumoto, Makoto; McMurray, David N; Dela Cruz, E C; Tan, E V; Abalos, R M; Burgos, J A; Gelber, Robert; Sakatani, Mitsunori

    2007-04-20

    We have developed a novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccine; a combination of the DNA vaccines expressing mycobacterial heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) and interleukin 12 (IL-12) delivered by the hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ)-liposome (HSP65+IL-12/HVJ). This vaccine provided remarkable protective efficacy in mouse and guinea pig models compared to the BCG vaccine, on the basis of an induction of the CTL activity and improvement of the histopathological tuberculosis lesions, respectively. Furthermore, we extended our studies to a cynomolgus monkey model, which is currently the best animal model of human tuberculosis. This novel vaccine provided a higher level of the protective efficacy than BCG based upon the assessment of mortality, the ESR, body weight, chest X-ray findings and immune responses. Furthermore, the combination of HSP65+IL-12/HVJ and BCG by the priming-booster method showed a synergistic effect in the TB-infected cynomolgus monkey (100% survival). These data indicate that our novel DNA vaccine might be useful against Mycobacterium tuberculosis for human clinical trials.

  6. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Yoneda

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G. Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi. Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  7. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  8. Prospects for broadly protective influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, John Jay

    2015-11-27

    The development of vaccines that could provide broad protection against antigenically variant influenza viruses has long been the ultimate prize in influenza research. Recent developments have pushed us closer to this goal, and such vaccines may now be within reach. This brief review outlines the current approaches to broadly protective vaccines, and the probable hurdles and roadblocks to achieving this goal. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunogenicity of CTLA4 fusion anti-caries DNA vaccine in rabbits and monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rong; Guo, Ji Hua; Fan, Ming Wen; Bian, Zhuan; Chen, Zhi; Fan, Bing; Yu, Fei; Xu, Qing An

    2006-06-12

    Enhancement of mucosal and systemic immune responses is still a challenge for the application of DNA vaccine. Here, we show anti-caries DNA vaccines, pGJA-P and pGJA-P/VAX, encoding Streptococcus mutans antigens fused to cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA4), which binds to B7 molecule expressed on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Rabbits and monkeys were immunized via intranasal or intramuscular routes. The fusion vaccine induced accelerated and increased specific antibody responses in serum and saliva compared with non-fusion DNA vaccine in rabbits. Significant specific serum IgG and salivary IgA levels could be detected in fusion vaccine-immunized monkeys. Therefore, this study demonstrates that fusing antigens to CTLA4 results in enhancing immune efficacy and strongly suggests that it may represent a promising approach to prevent dental caries or other mucosal infectious diseases. These findings also suggest that CTLA4 fusion anti-caries DNA vaccine may be effective immunogen in primates.

  10. Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sanne; Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Medina, Candida

    Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?......Vaccination scars in HIV infected patients – does vaccinia vaccination confer protection against HIV?...

  11. Optimized subunit vaccine protects against experimental leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Goto, Yasuyuki; Carter, Lauren; Bhatia, Ajay; Howard, Randall F; Carter, Darrick; Coler, Rhea N; Vedvick, Thomas S; Reed, Steven G

    2009-11-23

    Development of a protective subunit vaccine against Leishmania spp. depends on antigens and adjuvants that induce appropriate immune responses. We evaluated a second generation polyprotein antigen (Leish-110f) in different adjuvant formulations for immunogenicity and protective efficacy against Leishmania spp. challenges. Vaccine-induced protection was associated with antibody and T cell responses to Leish-110f. CD4 T cells were the source of IFN-gamma, TNF, and IL-2 double- and triple-positive populations. This study establishes the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the improved Leish-110f subunit vaccine antigen adjuvanted with natural (MPL-SE) or synthetic (EM005) Toll-like receptor 4 agonists.

  12. 3D analysis of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation in monkeys vaccinated with the first peptide inducing sterilizing immunity against human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Patarroyo

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2 and is known to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vbeta12 and Vbeta6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRbeta1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA peptide-HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria.

  13. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  14. Vaccine protection against Zika virus from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Rafael A; Abbink, Peter; Peron, Jean Pierre S; Zanotto, Paolo M de A; Iampietro, M Justin; Badamchi-Zadeh, Alexander; Boyd, Michael; Ng'ang'a, David; Kirilova, Marinela; Nityanandam, Ramya; Mercado, Noe B; Li, Zhenfeng; Moseley, Edward T; Bricault, Christine A; Borducchi, Erica N; Giglio, Patricia B; Jetton, David; Neubauer, George; Nkolola, Joseph P; Maxfield, Lori F; De La Barrera, Rafael A; Jarman, Richard G; Eckels, Kenneth H; Michael, Nelson L; Thomas, Stephen J; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-08-25

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a flavivirus that is responsible for the current epidemic in Brazil and the Americas. ZIKV has been causally associated with fetal microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction, and other birth defects in both humans and mice. The rapid development of a safe and effective ZIKV vaccine is a global health priority, but very little is currently known about ZIKV immunology and mechanisms of immune protection. Here we show that a single immunization with a plasmid DNA vaccine or a purified inactivated virus vaccine provides complete protection in susceptible mice against challenge with a strain of ZIKV involved in the outbreak in northeast Brazil. This ZIKV strain has recently been shown to cross the placenta and to induce fetal microcephaly and other congenital malformations in mice. We produced DNA vaccines expressing ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prM-Env), as well as a series of deletion mutants. The prM-Env DNA vaccine, but not the deletion mutants, afforded complete protection against ZIKV, as measured by absence of detectable viraemia following challenge, and protective efficacy correlated with Env-specific antibody titers. Adoptive transfer of purified IgG from vaccinated mice conferred passive protection, and depletion of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes in vaccinated mice did not abrogate this protection. These data demonstrate that protection against ZIKV challenge can be achieved by single-shot subunit and inactivated virus vaccines in mice and that Env-specific antibody titers represent key immunologic correlates of protection. Our findings suggest that the development of a ZIKV vaccine for humans is likely to be achievable.

  15. The virus and the vaccine: the true story of a cancer-causing monkey virus, contaminated polio vaccine, and the millions of Americans exposed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bookchin, Debbie; Schumacher, Jim

    2004-01-01

    .... But the story of the vaccine has a dark side, one that has never been fully told before... Between 1954 and 1963, close to 98 million Americans received polio vaccinations contaminated with a carcinogenic monkey virus, now known as SV40...

  16. A recombinant Hendra virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects nonhuman primates against Hendra virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mire, Chad E; Geisbert, Joan B; Agans, Krystle N; Feng, Yan-Ru; Fenton, Karla A; Bossart, Katharine N; Yan, Lianying; Chan, Yee-Peng; Broder, Christopher C; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2014-05-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic emerging virus belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae. HeV causes severe and often fatal respiratory and/or neurologic disease in both animals and humans. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral drugs approved for human use. A number of animal models have been developed for studying HeV infection, with the African green monkey (AGM) appearing to most faithfully reproduce the human disease. Here, we assessed the utility of a newly developed recombinant subunit vaccine based on the HeV attachment (G) glycoprotein in the AGM model. Four AGMs were vaccinated with two doses of the HeV vaccine (sGHeV) containing Alhydrogel, four AGMs received the sGHeV with Alhydrogel and CpG, and four control animals did not receive the sGHeV vaccine. Animals were challenged with a high dose of infectious HeV 21 days after the boost vaccination. None of the eight specifically vaccinated animals showed any evidence of clinical illness and survived the challenge. All four controls became severely ill with symptoms consistent with HeV infection, and three of the four animals succumbed 8 days after exposure. Success of the recombinant subunit vaccine in AGMs provides pivotal data in supporting its further preclinical development for potential human use. A Hendra virus attachment (G) glycoprotein subunit vaccine was tested in nonhuman primates to assess its ability to protect them from a lethal infection with Hendra virus. It was found that all vaccinated African green monkeys were completely protected against subsequent Hendra virus infection and disease. The success of this new subunit vaccine in nonhuman primates provides critical data in support of its further development for future human use.

  17. A virus-like particle vaccine for epidemic Chikungunya virus protects nonhuman primates against infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahata, Wataru; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Andersen, Hanne; Sun, Siyang; Holdaway, Heather A; Kong, Wing-Pui; Lewis, Mark G; Higgs, Stephen; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Srinivas; Nabel, Gary J

    2010-03-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has infected millions of people in Africa, Europe and Asia since this alphavirus reemerged from Kenya in 2004. The severity of the disease and the spread of this epidemic virus present a serious public health threat in the absence of vaccines or antiviral therapies. Here, we describe a new vaccine that protects against CHIKV infection of nonhuman primates. We show that selective expression of viral structural proteins gives rise to virus-like particles (VLPs) in vitro that resemble replication-competent alphaviruses. Immunization with these VLPs elicited neutralizing antibodies against envelope proteins from alternative CHIKV strains. Monkeys immunized with VLPs produced high-titer neutralizing antibodies that protected against viremia after high-dose challenge. We transferred these antibodies into immunodeficient mice, where they protected against subsequent lethal CHIKV challenge, indicating a humoral mechanism of protection. Immunization with alphavirus VLP vaccines represents a strategy to contain the spread of CHIKV and related pathogenic viruses in humans.

  18. Pre-clinical toxicity & immunobiological evaluation of DNA rabies vaccine & combination rabies vaccine in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Dinesh; Kumar, P Uday; Krishna, T Prasanna; Kalyanasundaram, S; Suresh, P; Jagadeesan, V; Hariharan, S; Naidu, A Nadamuni; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Rangarajan, P N; Srinivasan, V A; Reddy, G S; Sesikeran, B

    2013-06-01

    Pre-clinical toxicology evaluation of biotechnology products is a challenge to the toxicologist. The present investigation is an attempt to evaluate the safety profile of the first indigenously developed recombinant DNA anti-rabies vaccine [DRV (100 μg)] and combination rabies vaccine [CRV (100 μg DRV and 1.25 IU of cell culture-derived inactivated rabies virus vaccine)], which are intended for clinical use by intramuscular route in Rhesus monkeys. As per the regulatory requirements, the study was designed for acute (single dose - 14 days), sub-chronic (repeat dose - 28 days) and chronic (intended clinical dose - 120 days) toxicity tests using three dose levels, viz. therapeutic, average (2x therapeutic dose) and highest dose (10 x therapeutic dose) exposure in monkeys. The selection of the model i.e. monkey was based on affinity and rapid higher antibody response during the efficacy studies. An attempt was made to evaluate all parameters which included physical, physiological, clinical, haematological and histopathological profiles of all target organs, as well as Tiers I, II, III immunotoxicity parameters. In acute toxicity there was no mortality in spite of exposing the monkeys to 10XDRV. In sub chronic and chronic toxicity studies there were no abnormalities in physical, physiological, neurological, clinical parameters, after administration of test compound in intended and 10 times of clinical dosage schedule of DRV and CRV under the experimental conditions. Clinical chemistry, haematology, organ weights and histopathology studies were essentially unremarkable except the presence of residual DNA in femtogram level at site of injection in animal which received 10X DRV in chronic toxicity study. No Observational Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL) of DRV is 1000 ug/dose (10 times of therapeutic dose) if administered on 0, 4, 7, 14, 28 th day. The information generated by this study not only draws attention to the need for national and international regulatory

  19. Dominant CD8+ T-Lymphocyte Responses Suppress Expansion of Vaccine-Elicited Subdominant T Lymphocytes in Rhesus Monkeys Challenged with Pathogenic Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Seaman, Michael S.; Furr, Kathryn; Lifton, Michelle A.; Hulot, Sandrine L.; Autissier, Patrick; Letvin, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against a diversity of epitopes confers greater protection against a human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection than does a more focused response. To facilitate the creation of vaccine strategies that will generate cellular immune responses with the greatest breadth, it will be important to understand the mechanisms employed by the immune response to regulate the relative magnitudes of dominant and nondominant epitope-specific cellular immune responses. In this study, we generated dominant Gag p11C- and subdominant Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses in Mamu-A*01+ rhesus monkeys through vaccination with plasmid DNA and recombinant adenovirus encoding simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) proteins. Infection of vaccinated Mamu-A*01+ rhesus monkeys with a SHIV Gag Δp11C mutant virus generated a significantly increased expansion of the Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte response in the absence of secondary Gag p11C-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. These results indicate that the presence of the Gag p11C-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte response following virus challenge may exert suppressive effects on primed Env p41A-specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses. These findings suggest that immunodomination exerted by dominant responses during SHIV infection may diminish the breadth of recall responses primed during vaccination. PMID:19641002

  20. Dominant CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses suppress expansion of vaccine-elicited subdominant T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys challenged with pathogenic simian-human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R; Yeh, Wendy W; Seaman, Michael S; Furr, Kathryn; Lifton, Michelle A; Hulot, Sandrine L; Autissier, Patrick; Letvin, Norman L

    2009-10-01

    Emerging data suggest that a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response against a diversity of epitopes confers greater protection against a human immunodeficiency virus/simian immunodeficiency virus infection than does a more focused response. To facilitate the creation of vaccine strategies that will generate cellular immune responses with the greatest breadth, it will be important to understand the mechanisms employed by the immune response to regulate the relative magnitudes of dominant and nondominant epitope-specific cellular immune responses. In this study, we generated dominant Gag p11C- and subdominant Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses in Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys through vaccination with plasmid DNA and recombinant adenovirus encoding simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) proteins. Infection of vaccinated Mamu-A*01(+) rhesus monkeys with a SHIV Gag Deltap11C mutant virus generated a significantly increased expansion of the Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response in the absence of secondary Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These results indicate that the presence of the Gag p11C-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte response following virus challenge may exert suppressive effects on primed Env p41A-specific CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses. These findings suggest that immunodomination exerted by dominant responses during SHIV infection may diminish the breadth of recall responses primed during vaccination.

  1. The Peptide Vaccine Combined with Prior Immunization of a Conventional Diphtheria-Tetanus Toxoid Vaccine Induced Amyloid β Binding Antibodies on Cynomolgus Monkeys and Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of brain amyloid beta (Aβ peptides by anti-Aβ antibodies is one of the possible therapies for Alzheimer’s disease. We previously reported that the Aβ peptide vaccine including the T-cell epitope of diphtheria-tetanus combined toxoid (DT induced anti-Aβ antibodies, and the prior immunization with conventional DT vaccine enhanced the immunogenicity of the peptide. Cynomolgus monkeys were given the peptide vaccine subcutaneously in combination with the prior DT vaccination. Vaccination with a similar regimen was also performed on guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine induced anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs without chemical adjuvants, and excessive immune responses were not observed. Those antibodies could preferentially recognize Aβ40, and Aβ42 compared to Aβ fibrils. The levels of serum anti-Aβ antibodies and plasma Aβ peptides increased in both animals and decreased the brain Aβ40 level of guinea pigs. The peptide vaccine could induce a similar binding profile of anti-Aβ antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys and guinea pigs. The peptide vaccination could be expected to reduce the brain Aβ peptides and their toxic effects via clearance of Aβ peptides by generated antibodies.

  2. Protective immunity and vaccination against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effective, and universally acceptable vaccine against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  3. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeoma eOkwor

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing effective vaccines against the disease. Here we review the literature on the correlate of protective anti-Leishmania immunity and vaccination strategies against leishmaniasis with a bias emphasis on experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  4. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  5. Smallpox vaccines: targets of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The eradication of smallpox, one of the great triumphs of medicine, was accomplished through the prophylactic administration of live vaccinia virus, a comparatively benign relative of variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. Nevertheless, recent fears that variola virus may be used as a biological weapon together with the present susceptibility of unimmunized populations have spurred the development of new-generation vaccines that are safer than the original and can be produced by modern methods. Predicting the efficacy of such vaccines in the absence of human smallpox, however, depends on understanding the correlates of protection. This review outlines the biology of poxviruses with particular relevance to vaccine development, describes protein targets of humoral and cellular immunity, compares animal models of orthopoxvirus disease with human smallpox, and considers the status of second- and third-generation smallpox vaccines. Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Subunit Recombinant Vaccine Protects Against Monkeypox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-27

    smallpox, monkeypox cannot be eradicated. The virus has an unknown animal reservoir and the existence of more virulent strains is plausible. The 2003 U.S...smallpox vaccine Dryvax, a live vaccinia virus (VACV), protects against smallpox and monkeypox , but is contraindicated in immunocompromised individuals...protective Ab response. We immunized rhesus macaques with plasmid DNA encoding the monkeypox orthologs of the VACV L1R, A27L, A33R, and B5R proteins by the

  7. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects African Green monkeys from Hendra virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Zhu, Zhongyu; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Brining, Doug; Scott, Dana; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Callison, Julie; Chan, Yee-Peng; Hickey, Andrew C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Broder, Christopher C.; Rockx, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged zoonotic paramyxovirus that can cause a severe and often fatal disease in horses and humans. HeV is categorized as a biosafety level 4 agent, which has made the development of animal models and testing of potential therapeutics and vaccines challenging. Infection of African Green monkeys (AGMs) with HeV was recently demonstrated and disease mirrored fatal HeV infection in humans, manifesting as a multisystemic vasculitis with widespread virus replication in vascular tissues and severe pathologic manifestations in the lung, spleen and brain. Here, we demonstrate that m102.4, a potent HeV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody (hmAb), can protect AGMs from disease post infection (p.i.) with HeV. Fourteen AGMs were challenged intratracheally with a lethal dose of HeV and twelve subjects were infused twice with a 100 mg dose of m102.4 beginning at either 10 hr, 24 hr or 72 hr p.i. and again approximately 48 hrs later. The presence of viral RNA, infectious virus and HeV-specific immune responses demonstrated that all subjects were infected following challenge. All twelve AGMs that received m102.4 survived infection; whereas the untreated control subjects succumbed to disease on day 8 p.i.. Animals in the 72 hr treatment group exhibited neurological signs of disease but all animals started to recover by day 16 p.i.. These results represent successful post-exposure in vivo efficacy by an investigational drug against HeV and highlight the potential impact a hmAb can have on human disease. PMID:22013123

  8. The utility of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta and other non-human primate models for preclinical testing of Leishmania candidate vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grimaldi Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis causes significant morbidity and mortality, constituting an important global health problem for which there are few effective drugs. Given the urgent need to identify a safe and effective Leishmania vaccine to help prevent the two million new cases of human leishmaniasis worldwide each year, all reasonable efforts to achieve this goal should be made. This includes the use of animal models that are as close to leishmanial infection in humans as is practical and feasible. Old world monkey species (macaques, baboons, mandrills etc. have the closest evolutionary relatedness to humans among the approachable animal models. The Asian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are quite susceptible to leishmanial infection, develop a human-like disease, exhibit antibodies to Leishmania and parasite-specific T-cell mediated immune responses both in vivo and in vitro, and can be protected effectively by vaccination. Results from macaque vaccine studies could also prove useful in guiding the design of human vaccine trials. This review summarizes our current knowledge on this topic and proposes potential approaches that may result in the more effective use of the macaque model to maximize its potential to help the development of an effective vaccine for human leishmaniasis.

  9. The Role of the Antiviral APOBEC3 Gene Family in Protecting Chimpanzees against Lentiviruses from Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Etienne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-species transmissions of viruses from animals to humans are at the origin of major human pathogenic viruses. While the role of ecological and epidemiological factors in the emergence of new pathogens is well documented, the importance of host factors is often unknown. Chimpanzees are the closest relatives of humans and the animal reservoir at the origin of the human AIDS pandemic. However, despite being regularly exposed to monkey lentiviruses through hunting, chimpanzees are naturally infected by only a single simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVcpz. Here, we asked why chimpanzees appear to be protected against the successful emergence of other SIVs. In particular, we investigated the role of the chimpanzee APOBEC3 genes in providing a barrier to infection by most monkey lentiviruses. We found that most SIV Vifs, including Vif from SIVwrc infecting western-red colobus, the chimpanzee's main monkey prey in West Africa, could not antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3G. Moreover, chimpanzee APOBEC3D, as well as APOBEC3F and APOBEC3H, provided additional protection against SIV Vif antagonism. Consequently, lentiviral replication in primary chimpanzee CD4(+ T cells was dependent on the presence of a lentiviral vif gene that could antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3s. Finally, by identifying and functionally characterizing several APOBEC3 gene polymorphisms in both common chimpanzees and bonobos, we found that these ape populations encode APOBEC3 proteins that are uniformly resistant to antagonism by monkey lentiviruses.

  10. Vaccines for Your Children: Protect Your Child at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the 6 month shots, side effects, flu vaccine, and child care requirements. 7 to 11 Months Learn about ... vaccines before college. Adoption and Vaccines Learn about vaccines for international adoption, domestic adoption, ... Protect Your Child Home Pregnancy Birth 1 to 2 months 4 ...

  11. Vaccine-induced virus-neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cells do not protect macaques from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac32H (J5).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G.J. Hulskotte (Ellen); A.M. Geretti (Anna Maria); C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.P. Cranage (Martin); E. Rud; S.G. Norley (Stephen); P. de Vries (Petra); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractTo gain further insight into the ability of subunit vaccines to protect monkeys from experimental infection with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), two groups of cynomolgus macaques were immunized with either recombinant SIVmac32H-derived envelope glycoproteins (Env) incorporated into

  12. Maternal and neonatal vaccination protects newborn baboons from pertussis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfel, Jason M; Papin, James F; Wolf, Roman F; Zimmerman, Lindsey I; Merkel, Tod J

    2014-08-15

    The United States is experiencing a pertussis resurgence that resulted in a 60-year high of 48 000 cases in 2012. The majority of hospitalizations and deaths occur in infants too young to be vaccinated. Neonatal and maternal vaccination have been proposed to protect newborns until the first vaccination, currently recommended at 2 months of age. These interventions result in elevated anti-Bordetella pertussis titers, but there have been no studies demonstrating that these measures confer protection. Baboons were vaccinated with acellular pertussis vaccine at 2 days of age or at 2 and 28 days of age. To model maternal vaccination, adult female baboons primed with acellular pertussis vaccine were boosted in the third trimester of pregnancy. Neonatally vaccinated infants, infants born to vaccinated mothers, and naive infants born to unvaccinated mothers were infected with B. pertussis at 5 weeks of age. Naive infant baboons developed severe disease when challenged with B. pertussis at 5 weeks of age. Baboons receiving acellular pertussis vaccine and infants born to mothers vaccinated at the beginning of their third trimester were protected. Our results demonstrate that neonatal vaccination and maternal vaccination confer protection in the baboon model and support further study of these strategies for protection of newborns from pertussis. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2013. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Mucosal trafficking of vector-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes following vaccination of rhesus monkeys with adenovirus serotype 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Li, Hualin; Liu, Jinyan; Abbink, Peter; La Porte, Annalena; O'Brien, Kara L; Whitney, James B; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G; Barouch, Dan H

    2010-10-01

    Post hoc analysis of the phase 2b Step study evaluating a recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5)-based HIV-1 vaccine candidate suggested a potential increased risk of HIV-1 acquisition in subjects who were baseline Ad5 seropositive and uncircumcised. These concerns had a profound impact on the HIV-1 vaccine development field, although the mechanism underlying this observation remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that rAd5 vaccination of baseline Ad5-seropositive individuals may have resulted in anamnestic, vector-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes that could have trafficked to mucosal sites and served as increased targets for HIV-1 infection. Here we show that Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocyte responses at mucosal sites following rAd5-Gag/Pol/Nef vaccination were comparable in rhesus monkeys with and without baseline Ad5 immunity. Moreover, the total cellular inflammatory infiltrates and the CD3(+), CD4(+), HLA-DR(+), Ki67(+), and langerin(+) cellular subpopulations in colorectal and foreskin mucosa were similar in both groups. Thus, no greater trafficking of Ad5-specific CD4(+) T lymphocytes to mucosal target sites was observed following rAd5 vaccination of rhesus monkeys with baseline Ad5 immunity. These findings from this nonhuman primate model provide evidence against the hypothesis that recruitment of vector-specific target cells to mucosal sites led to increased HIV-1 acquisition in Ad5-seropositive, uncircumcised vaccinees in the Step study.

  14. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated H5N1 vaccine in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shufang Fan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The continued spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses among poultry and wild birds, together with the emergence of drug-resistant variants and the possibility of human-to-human transmission, has spurred attempts to develop an effective vaccine. Inactivated subvirion or whole-virion H5N1 vaccines have shown promising immunogenicity in clinical trials, but their ability to elicit protective immunity in unprimed human populations remains unknown. A cold-adapted, live attenuated vaccine with the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of an H5N1 virus A/VN/1203/2004 (clade 1 was protective against the pulmonary replication of homologous and heterologous wild-type H5N1 viruses in mice and ferrets. In this study, we used reverse genetics to produce a cold-adapted, live attenuated H5N1 vaccine (AH/AAca that contains HA and NA genes from a recent H5N1 isolate, A/Anhui/2/05 virus (AH/05 (clade 2.3, and the backbone of the cold-adapted influenza H2N2 A/AnnArbor/6/60 virus (AAca. AH/AAca was attenuated in chickens, mice, and monkeys, and it induced robust neutralizing antibody responses as well as HA-specific CD4+ T cell immune responses in rhesus macaques immunized twice intranasally. Importantly, the vaccinated macaques were fully protected from challenge with either the homologous AH/05 virus or a heterologous H5N1 virus, A/bar-headed goose/Qinghai/3/05 (BHG/05; clade 2.2. These results demonstrate for the first time that a cold-adapted H5N1 vaccine can elicit protective immunity against highly pathogenic H5N1 virus infection in a nonhuman primate model and provide a compelling argument for further testing of double immunization with live attenuated H5N1 vaccines in human trials.

  15. HIV-1 vaccines based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia protected Chinese rhesus macaques from simian HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Li, Yue; Luo, Zhenwu; Yang, Guibo; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Sun, Maosheng; Dai, Jiejie; Li, Qihan; Qin, Chuan; Shao, Yiming

    2015-03-27

    To assess the efficacy of HIV vaccines constructed from replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia virus (rTV) alone or combined with DNA in protecting Chinese rhesus macaques from homologous Simian/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (SHIV)-CN97001 challenge. The nef, gag, pol, and gp140 genes from strain CRF07_BC HIV-1 CN54 were selected to construct an HIV vaccine using the rTV or rTV/DNA vaccine. After vaccination, the vaccine and control groups were intravenously challenged with SHIV-CN97001 (32 MID50). HIV-specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies, gp70 V1V2 binding antibodies, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses were measured prospectively after vaccination with an ELISA, a virus infectivity assay in TZM-bl cells, and ELISPOT assays, respectively. Viral RNA was quantified after challenge with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and protection efficacy was determined with an analysis of CD8 lymphocyte depletion in vivo. Both rTV and DNA/rTV vaccine groups developed strong cellular and humoral responses against HIV-1 CN54 antigens, including Gag and Env, and also developed significant and persistent anti-Env antibodies and neutralizing antibodies after immunization. Both the rTV and DNA/rTV groups were significantly protected against SHIV-CN97001 or displayed lower viremia than the controls. After CD8 lymphocyte depletion, no viremia was detectable in the vaccinated monkeys, but rebounded rapidly in the control animals. Protection against infection correlated with vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies specific for homologous HIV-1 viruses. An rTV-based HIV-1 vaccine, with or without a DNA primer, provided protection from SHIV challenge in a macaque model. Replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia is a promising vector and should enable advances in HIV-1 vaccine development.

  16. Clonal focusing of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Pritha; Charini, William A; Subbramanian, Ramu A; Manuel, Edwin R; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Autissier, Patrick A; Letvin, Norman L

    2008-01-01

    To afford the greatest possible immune protection, candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines must generate diverse and long-lasting CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses. In the present study, we evaluate T-cell receptor Vbeta (variable region beta) gene usage and a CDR3 (complementarity-determining region 3) sequence to assess the clonality of epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes generated in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We found that vaccine-elicited epitope-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes have a clonal diversity comparable to those cells generated in response to SHIV infection. Moreover, we show that the clonal diversity of vaccine-elicited CD8(+) T-lymphocyte responses is dictated by the epitope sequence and is not affected by the mode of antigen delivery to the immune system. Clonal CD8(+) T-lymphocyte populations persisted following boosting with different vectors, and these clonal cell populations could be detected for as long as 4 years after SHIV challenge. Finally, we show that the breadth of these epitope-specific T lymphocytes transiently focuses in response to intense SHIV replication. These observations demonstrate the importance of the initial immune response to SHIV, induced by vaccination or generated during primary infection, in determining the clonal diversity of cell-mediated immune responses and highlight the focusing of this clonal diversity in the setting of high viral loads. Circumventing this restricted CD8(+) T-lymphocyte clonal diversity may present a significant challenge in the development of an effective HIV vaccine strategy.

  17. Clonal Focusing of Epitope-Specific CD8+ T Lymphocytes in Rhesus Monkeys following Vaccination and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Pritha; Charini, William A.; Subbramanian, Ramu A.; Manuel, Edwin R.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Autissier, Patrick A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2008-01-01

    To afford the greatest possible immune protection, candidate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines must generate diverse and long-lasting CD8+ T lymphocyte responses. In the present study, we evaluate T-cell receptor Vβ (variable region beta) gene usage and a CDR3 (complementarity-determining region 3) sequence to assess the clonality of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes generated in rhesus monkeys following vaccination and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) challenge. We found that vaccine-elicited epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes have a clonal diversity comparable to those cells generated in response to SHIV infection. Moreover, we show that the clonal diversity of vaccine-elicited CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses is dictated by the epitope sequence and is not affected by the mode of antigen delivery to the immune system. Clonal CD8+ T-lymphocyte populations persisted following boosting with different vectors, and these clonal cell populations could be detected for as long as 4 years after SHIV challenge. Finally, we show that the breadth of these epitope-specific T lymphocytes transiently focuses in response to intense SHIV replication. These observations demonstrate the importance of the initial immune response to SHIV, induced by vaccination or generated during primary infection, in determining the clonal diversity of cell-mediated immune responses and highlight the focusing of this clonal diversity in the setting of high viral loads. Circumventing this restricted CD8+ T-lymphocyte clonal diversity may present a significant challenge in the development of an effective HIV vaccine strategy. PMID:17977967

  18. Mosaic vaccines elicit CD8+ T cell responses in monkeys that confer immune coverage of diverse HIV strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Will [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Creation of a successful HIV vaccine will require the development of a strategy to generate cellular immunity with sufficient cross-clade breadth to deal with the extreme genetic diversity of the virus. Polyvalent mosaic immunogens derived from in silica recombination of natural strains of HIV are designed to induce cellular immune responses that maximally cover the sequence diversity of circulating virus isolates. Immunization of rhesus monkeys with plasmid DNA and recombinant vaccinia virus vaccine constructs expressing either consensus immunogens or polyvalent mosaic immunogens elicited a CD4+ T lymphocyte-biased response with comparably broad epitope-specific total T lymphocyte specificities. However, immunization with the mosaic immunogens induced HIV-specific CD8+ T lymphocyte responses with markedly greater depth and breadth. Therefore, the use of polyvalent mosaic immunogens is a promising strategy for a global vaccine for HIV.

  19. Safeguarding Our Health: Vaccines Protect Us All

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... own vaccinations. Some vaccines must be given before pregnancy. Rubella, for instance, can cause life-altering birth defects ... There’s no treatment, but the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine given pre-pregnancy offers prevention. Vaccines for many other common diseases ...

  20. PROTECTIVE EFFICACY OF PERTACTIN CONTAINING ACELLULAR DPT VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Fesenko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pertussis vaccination with the use of DPT vaccines is a necessary condition for fighting the infection called bordetella pertussis. At the same time, it is known that the use of whole cellular DPT vaccines is accompanied with high incidence of side effects and serious neurological complications, and, as a result, reasonable refuse from injections by the population. Creation of less reactogenic, acellular vaccines would not only permit to decrease the incidence of side effects, but also increase the efficiency of pertussis vaccination. Maximum protective effect is achieved by using threebcomponent vaccines ( 80%, containng pertactin — outer membrane protein b. pertussis. the absence of this antigen in twobcomponent DPT vaccines predetermines their significantly lower efficacy.Key words: children, pertussis, acellular DPT vaccines, pertactin.

  1. Evaluation of attenuation, immunogenicity and efficacy of a bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3) vaccine and a recombinant chimeric bovine/human PIV-3 vaccine vector in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennathur, Sridhar; Haller, Aurelia A; MacPhail, Mia; Rizzi, Tom; Kaderi, Sepideh; Fernandes, Fiona; Bicha, Leenas; Schickli, Jeanne H; Tang, Roderick S; Chen, Wendy; Nguyen, Nick; Mathie, Sharon; Mehta, Hersh; Coelingh, Kathleen L

    2003-12-01

    Restricted replication in the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys is an intrinsic property of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (bPIV-3) strains. This host range phenotype of bPIV-3 has been utilized as a marker to evaluate the attenuation of bPIV-3 vaccines for human use. Two safety, immunogenicity and efficacy studies in primates evaluated and compared three human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV-3) vaccine candidates: biologically derived bPIV-3, a plasmid-derived bPIV-3 (r-bPIV-3) and a chimeric bovine/human PIV-3 (b/hPIV-3). These studies also examined the feasibility of substituting Vero cells, cultured in the presence or absence of foetal bovine serum, for foetal rhesus lung-2 (FRhL-2) cells as the tissue culture substrate for the production of bPIV-3 vaccine. The results demonstrated that (i) Vero cell-produced bPIV-3 was as attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious as bPIV-3 vaccine grown in FRhL-2 cells, (ii) plasmid-derived bPIV-3 was as attenuated, immunogenic and efficacious as the biologically derived bPIV-3 and (iii) the b/hPIV-3 chimera displayed an intermediate attenuation phenotype and protected animals completely from hPIV-3 challenge. These results support the use of bPIV-3 vaccines propagated in Vero cells in human clinical trials and the use of b/hPIV-3 as a virus vaccine vector to express foreign viral antigens.

  2. Evaluation of a prime-boost vaccine schedule with distinct adenovirus vectors against malaria in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Ariane; Mintardjo, Ratna; Tax, Dennis; Gillissen, Gert; Custers, Jerome; Pau, Maria Grazia; Klap, Jaco; Santra, Sampa; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Letvin, Norman L.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radosević, Katarina

    2009-01-01

    A vaccine that elicits both specific antibodies and IFN-gamma-producing T cells is required to protect against pre-erythrocytic malaria. Among the most promising approaches to induce such complex immunity are heterologous prime-boost vaccination regiments, in particular ones containing liver viral

  3. Protective association between rotavirus vaccination and childhood seizures in the year following vaccination in US children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Daniel C; Baggs, James; Zerr, Danielle M; Klein, Nicola P; Yih, Katherine; Glanz, Jason; Curns, Aaron T; Weintraub, Eric; Parashar, Umesh D

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus illness has been linked to childhood seizures. We investigated whether a protective association exists between receipt of rotavirus vaccine and being hospitalized or visiting the emergency department for seizures in the year after vaccination. We retrospectively analyzed a cohort of children born after 28 February 2006 (when rotavirus vaccine was licensed in the United States) and enrolled in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) through November 2009. Seizure rates from 4 to 55 weeks following last rotavirus vaccination were compared by vaccine exposure status (fully vaccinated and unvaccinated). A time-to-event analysis using a Cox proportional hazards model was performed, accounting for time-varying covariates. We calculated the relative incidence of seizure compared by vaccine exposure status during the postexposure interval. Our cohort contained VSD data on 250 601 infants, including 186 502 children fully vaccinated (74.4%) and 64 099 (25.6%) not vaccinated with rotavirus vaccine. Rates of seizures were associated with rotavirus vaccination status. After adjusting for covariates (VSD site, age at last dose, sex, and calendar month of the index date), a statistically significant protective association was observed between a full course of rotavirus vaccination vs no vaccination for both first-ever seizures (risk ratio [RR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .73-.91) and all seizures (RR = 0.79; 95% CI, .71-.88). A full course of rotavirus vaccination was statistically associated with an 18%-21% reduction in risk of seizure requiring hospitalization or emergency department care in the year following vaccination, compared with unvaccinated children. This reduction in childhood seizures complements the well-documented vaccine-related benefit of preventing US diarrhea hospitalizations.

  4. Duration of protective immunity after a single vaccination with a live attenuated bivalent bluetongue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugunissov, Kuandyk; Yershebulov, Zakir; Barakbayev, Kainar; Bulatov, Yerbol; Taranov, Dmitriy; Amanova, Zhanat; Abduraimov, Yergali

    2015-12-01

    The prevention of bluetongue is typically achieved with mono- or polyvalent modified- live-attenuated virus (MLV) vaccines. MLV vaccines typically elicit a strong antibody response that correlates directly with their ability to replicate in the vaccinated animal. They are inexpensive, stimulate protective immunity after a single inoculation, and have been proven effective in preventing clinical bluetongue disease. In this study, we evaluated the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of a bluetongue vaccine against Bluetongue virus serotypes 4 and 16 in sheep. All the animals remained clinically healthy during the observation period. The vaccinated animals showed no clinical signs except fever (>40.8 °C) for 2-4 days. Rapid seroconversion was observed in the sheep, with the accumulation of high antibody titers in the vaccinated animals. No animal became ill after the challenge, indicating that effective protection was achieved. Therefore, this vaccine, prepared from attenuated bluetongue virus strains, is safe, immunogenic, and efficacious.

  5. Partial protection of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys against superinfection with a heterologous SIV isolate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence that individuals already infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be infected with a heterologous strain of the virus, the extent of protection against superinfection conferred by the first infection and the biologic consequences of superinfection are not well understood. We explored these questions in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/rhesus monkey model of HIV-1/AIDS. We infected cohorts of rhesus monkeys with either SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 and then exposed animals to the reciprocal virus through intrarectal inoculations. Employing a quantitative real-time PCR assay, we determined the replication kinetics of the two strains of virus for 20 weeks. We found that primary infection with a replication-competent virus did not protect against acquisition of infection by a heterologous virus but did confer relative control of the superinfecting virus. In animals that became superinfected, there was a reduction in peak replication and rapid control of the second virus. The relative susceptibility to superinfection was not correlated with CD4(+) T-cell count, CD4(+) memory T-cell subsets, cytokine production by virus-specific CD8(+) or CD4(+) cells, or neutralizing antibodies at the time of exposure to the second virus. Although there were transient increases in viral loads of the primary virus and a modest decline in CD4(+) T-cell counts after superinfection, there was no evidence of disease acceleration. These findings indicate that an immunodeficiency virus infection confers partial protection against a second immunodeficiency virus infection, but this protection may be mediated by mechanisms other than classical adaptive immune responses.

  6. Preclinical development of a dengue tetravalent recombinant subunit vaccine: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Meschino, Steven; Guan, Liming; Clements, David E; ter Meulen, Jan H; Casimiro, Danilo R; Coller, Beth-Ann G; Bett, Andrew J

    2015-08-07

    We describe here the preclinical development of a dengue vaccine composed of recombinant subunit carboxy-truncated envelope (E) proteins (DEN-80E) for each of the four dengue serotypes. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy studies in Rhesus monkeys were conducted to evaluate monovalent and tetravalent DEN-80E vaccines formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant. Three different doses and two dosing regimens (0, 1, 2 months and 0, 1, 2, and 6 months) were evaluated in these studies. We first evaluated monomeric (DEN4-80E) and dimeric (DEN4-80EZip) versions of DEN4-80E, the latter generated in an attempt to improve immunogenicity. The two antigens, evaluated at 6, 20 and 100 μg/dose formulated with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, were equally immunogenic. A group immunized with 20 μg DEN4-80E and Alhydrogel™ induced much weaker responses. When challenged with wild-type dengue type 4 virus, all animals in the 6 and 20 μg groups and all but one in the DEN4-80EZip 100 μg group were protected from viremia. Two out of three monkeys in the Alhydrogel™ group had breakthrough viremia. A similar study was conducted to evaluate tetravalent formulations at low (3, 3, 3, 6 μg of DEN1-80E, DEN2-80E, DEN3-80E and DEN4-80E respectively), medium (10, 10, 10, 20 μg) and high (50, 50, 50, 100 μg) doses. All doses were comparably immunogenic and induced high titer, balanced neutralizing antibodies against all four DENV. Upon challenge with the four wild-type DENV, all animals in the low and medium dose groups were protected against viremia while two animals in the high-dose group exhibited breakthrough viremia. Our studies also indicated that a 0, 1, 2 and 6 month vaccination schedule is superior to the 0, 1, and 2 month schedule in terms of durability. Overall, the subunit vaccine was demonstrated to induce strong neutralization titers resulting in protection against viremia following challenge even 8-12 months after the last vaccine dose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. A DIVA vaccine for cross-protection against Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearson, Bradley L; Bearson, Shawn M D; Kich, Jalusa D

    2016-03-04

    Swine are often asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella spp., a leading cause of human bacterial foodborne disease. Vaccination against Salmonella is effective for protecting animal health and enhancing food safety. However, with >2500 Salmonella serovars, current vaccines for swine offer limited cross-protection against heterologous serovars. Also, existing vaccines can interfere with surveillance programs that monitor the Salmonella status of swine herds. To overcome Salmonella vaccine limitations, we rationally designed and constructed an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine (BBS 866) by deleting multiple small regulatory RNA (sRNA) genes (omrA, omrB, rybB, micA, and invR) in combination with an rfaH mutation. We vaccinated swine intranasally at 3-weeks of age with PBS (mock-vaccinated), BBS 866 or BBS 202 (S. Typhimurium rfaH, Bearson et al., Front Vet Sci 2014;1:9.) and challenged at 7-weeks of age with virulent S. Choleraesuis, a swine pathogen. Vaccination with BBS 866 enhanced protection against S. Choleraesuis by significantly limiting the duration of fever, weight loss, the levels of circulating INFγ, and the total number of swine with S. Choleraesuis septicemia. Vaccination with either BBS 866 or BBS 202 significantly reduced S. Choleraesuis colonization of both systemic (spleen and liver) and gastrointestinal (Peyer's Patch, Ileocecal lymph nodes, and cecum) tissues. Similar to our earlier report for BBS 202, the BBS 866 vaccine strain can be used in swine without compromising the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Therefore, the attenuated S. Typhimurium BBS 866 strain, containing mutations in rfaH and multiple sRNAs, addresses the limitations of current Salmonella vaccines by providing cross-protection against Salmonella serovars in swine without interfering with established monitoring programs for Salmonella surveillance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Novel approaches to identify protective malaria vaccine candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ni eChia

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to develop vaccines against malaria have been the focus of substantial research activities for decades. Several categories of candidate vaccines are currently being developed for protection against malaria, based on antigens corresponding to the pre-erythrocytic, blood-stage or sexual stages of the parasite. Long lasting sterile protection from Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite challenge has been observed in human following vaccination with whole parasite formulations, clearly demonstrating that a protective immune response targeting predominantly the pre-erythrocytic stages can develop against malaria. However, most of vaccine candidates currently being investigated, which are mostly subunits vaccines, have not been able to induce substantial (>50% protection thus far. This is due to the fact that the antigens responsible for protection against the different parasite stages are still yet to be known and relevant correlates of protection have remained elusive. For a vaccine to be developed in a timely manner, novel approaches are required. In this article, we review the novel approaches that have been developed to identify the antigens for the development of an effective malaria vaccine.

  9. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An overview of challenges limiting the design of protective mucosal vaccines for finfish

    OpenAIRE

    Munangandu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifyin...

  11. A field vaccine trial in Tanzania demonstrates partial protection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study demonstrated a baseline level of MCF-seropositivity among cattle in northern Tanzania of 1% and showed that AlHV-1 virus-neutralizing antibodies could be induced in Tanzanian zebu shorthorn cross cattle by our attenuated vaccine, a correlate of protection in previous experimental trials. The vaccine reduced ...

  12. Kyasanur forest disease virus: viremia and challenge studies in monkeys with evidence of cross-protection by Langat virus infection [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/UiWGcy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerti V Shah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Kyasanur Forest Disease Virus (KFDV, discovered in 1957, is a member of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV complex. Diseases caused by members of the TBEV complex occur in many parts of the world. KFDV produces a hemorrhagic fever in humans in South India and fatal illnesses in both species of monkeys in the area, the black faced langur (Presbytis entellus and the bonnet macaque (Macaca radiata. Experimental infection of the langur and the bonnet macaque with early mouse passage KFDV strain P9605 resulted in a viremia of up to 11 days duration, peak viremia titers as high as 109, and death in 82 = 100% of the animals. Prolonged passage of the KFDV strain P9605 in monkey kidney tissue culture resulted in a markedly reduced virulence of the virus for both species; peak viremia titers in monkeys decreased by 2.5 to 4.0 log LD 50 (p= 0.001, and the mortality decreased to 10% (p= 0.001. In challenge experiments, monkeys previously infected with tissue-culture-adapted KFDV, or with the related Langat virus from Malaysia, were fully protected against virulent KFDV. These studies in non-human primates lend support to the idea that a live virus vaccine from a member of the TBEV complex may be broadly protective against infections by other members of the TBEV complex.

  13. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Peters

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  14. Vector transmission of leishmania abrogates vaccine-induced protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nathan C; Kimblin, Nicola; Secundino, Nagila; Kamhawi, Shaden; Lawyer, Phillip; Sacks, David L

    2009-06-01

    Numerous experimental vaccines have been developed to protect against the cutaneous and visceral forms of leishmaniasis caused by infection with the obligate intracellular protozoan Leishmania, but a human vaccine still does not exist. Remarkably, the efficacy of anti-Leishmania vaccines has never been fully evaluated under experimental conditions following natural vector transmission by infected sand fly bite. The only immunization strategy known to protect humans against natural exposure is "leishmanization," in which viable L. major parasites are intentionally inoculated into a selected site in the skin. We employed mice with healed L. major infections to mimic leishmanization, and found tissue-seeking, cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Leishmania at the site of challenge by infected sand fly bite within 24 hours, and these mice were highly resistant to sand fly transmitted infection. In contrast, mice vaccinated with a killed vaccine comprised of autoclaved L. major antigen (ALM)+CpG oligodeoxynucleotides that protected against needle inoculation of parasites, showed delayed expression of protective immunity and failed to protect against infected sand fly challenge. Two-photon intra-vital microscopy and flow cytometric analysis revealed that sand fly, but not needle challenge, resulted in the maintenance of a localized neutrophilic response at the inoculation site, and removal of neutrophils following vector transmission led to increased parasite-specific immune responses and promoted the efficacy of the killed vaccine. These observations identify the critical immunological factors influencing vaccine efficacy following natural transmission of Leishmania.

  15. Sculpting humoral immunity through dengue vaccination to enhance protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne eCrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important mosquito transmitted viral pathogens infecting humans. DENV infection produces a spectrum of disease, most commonly causing a self-limiting flu-like illness known as dengue fever; yet with increased frequency, manifesting as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Waning cross-protective immunity from any of the four dengue serotypes may enhance subsequent infection with another heterologous serotype to increase the probability of DHF. Decades of effort to develop dengue vaccines are reaching the finishing line with multiple candidates in clinical trials. Nevertheless, concerns remain that imbalanced immunity, due to the prolonged prime-boost schedules currently used in clinical trials, could leave some vaccinees temporarily unprotected or with increased susceptibility to enhanced disease. Here we develop a DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 DNA vaccine with the immunodominant cross-reactive B cell epitopes associated with immune enhancement removed. We compare wild-type (WT with this cross-reactivity reduced (CRR vaccine and demonstrate that both vaccines are equally protective against lethal homologous DENV-1 challenge. Under conditions mimicking natural exposure prior to acquiring protective immunity, WT vaccinated mice enhanced a normally sub-lethal heterologous DENV-2 infection resulting in DHF-like disease and 95% mortality in AG129 mice. However, CRR vaccinated mice exhibited redirected serotype-specific and protective immunity, and significantly reduced morbidity and mortality not differing from naïve mice. Thus, we demonstrate in an in vivo DENV disease model, that non-protective vaccine-induced immunity can prime vaccinees for enhanced DHF-like disease and that CRR DNA immunization significantly reduces this potential vaccine safety concern. The sculpting of immune memory by the modified vaccine and resulting redirection of humoral immunity provide insight into DENV vaccine induced immune

  16. Protection against soman or VX poisoning by human butyrylcholinesterase in guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, David E; Maxwell, Donald M; Koplovitz, Irwin; Clark, Connie R; Capacio, Benjamin R; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Federko, James M; Luo, Chunyuan; Saxena, Ashima; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Olson, Carl

    2005-12-15

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBuChE), purified from outdated human plasma, is being evaluated for efficacy against nerve agents in guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. Previous studies in rodents and nonhuman primates demonstrated that pretreatment of animals with enzymes that can scavenge nerve agents could provide significant protection against behavioral and lethal effects of nerve agent intoxication. In preparation for evaluation of efficacy of HuBuChE prior to initiating an investigational new drug (IND) application, the pharmacokinetics of HuBuChE were evaluated in guinea pigs and in cynomolgus monkeys. HuBuChE was injected intramuscularly (i.m.) at two doses, and blood samples were taken to follow the time-course of HuBuChE in blood for up to 168 h after administration. In guinea pigs, the two doses of HuBuChE, 19.9 and 32.5 mg/kg, produced similar times of maximal blood concentration (T(max) of 26.0 and 26.8 h, respectively) and similar elimination half-times (t(1/2) of 64.6 and 75.5 h, respectively). Enzyme levels were still 10-fold over baseline at 72 h. Based on these data, guinea pigs were administered 150 mg/kg of enzyme i.m. and challenged at T(max). Soman or VX doses were approximately 1.5, 2.0 and 2.0 x LD50 administered subcutaneously (s.c.) in sequence at 90-120 min apart. None of the animals displayed signs of organophosphorus (OP) anticholinesterase intoxication at any of the challenge levels, and all survived for the 14-day duration of the experiment. Similar experiments were carried out with cynomolgus monkeys to determine the pharmacokinetics of HuBuChE and its efficacy against soman. The complete survival of nearly all animals tested to date, coupled with the maximal blood concentration and half-life elimination profile obtained for HuBuChE after i.m. injection, provides strong support for the continued development of HuBuChE as a product to protect against nerve agents.

  17. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice : Influence of the route of vaccine administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal

  18. IMMUNE SUPPRESSION OF CHALLENGED VACCINATES AS A RIGOROUS ASSESSMENT OF STERILE PROTECTION BY LENTIVIRAL VACCINES

    OpenAIRE

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAVPV) challenge [1,2]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any i...

  19. Meta-analysis of variables affecting mouse protection efficacy of whole organism Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Thomas E; Tibi, Omar; Lin, Yu; Sayers, Samantha; Bronner, Denise N; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2013-01-01

    Vaccine protection investigation includes three processes: vaccination, pathogen challenge, and vaccine protection efficacy assessment. Many variables can affect the results of vaccine protection. Brucella, a genus of facultative intracellular bacteria, is the etiologic agent of brucellosis in humans and multiple animal species. Extensive research has been conducted in developing effective live attenuated Brucella vaccines. We hypothesized that some variables play a more important role than others in determining vaccine protective efficacy. Using Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates as study models, this hypothesis was tested by meta-analysis of Brucella vaccine studies reported in the literature. Nineteen variables related to vaccine-induced protection of mice against infection with virulent brucellae were selected based on modeling investigation of the vaccine protection processes. The variable "vaccine protection efficacy" was set as a dependent variable while the other eighteen were set as independent variables. Discrete or continuous values were collected from papers for each variable of each data set. In total, 401 experimental groups were manually annotated from 74 peer-reviewed publications containing mouse protection data for live attenuated Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates. Our ANOVA analysis indicated that nine variables contributed significantly (P-value Brucella vaccine protection efficacy: vaccine strain, vaccination host (mouse) strain, vaccination dose, vaccination route, challenge pathogen strain, challenge route, challenge-killing interval, colony forming units (CFUs) in mouse spleen, and CFU reduction compared to control group. The other 10 variables (e.g., mouse age, vaccination-challenge interval, and challenge dose) were not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The protection level of RB51 was sacrificed when the values of several variables (e.g., vaccination route, vaccine viability, and challenge pathogen strain

  20. Meta-analysis of variables affecting mouse protection efficacy of whole organism Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccine protection investigation includes three processes: vaccination, pathogen challenge, and vaccine protection efficacy assessment. Many variables can affect the results of vaccine protection. Brucella, a genus of facultative intracellular bacteria, is the etiologic agent of brucellosis in humans and multiple animal species. Extensive research has been conducted in developing effective live attenuated Brucella vaccines. We hypothesized that some variables play a more important role than others in determining vaccine protective efficacy. Using Brucella vaccines and vaccine candidates as study models, this hypothesis was tested by meta-analysis of Brucella vaccine studies reported in the literature. Results Nineteen variables related to vaccine-induced protection of mice against infection with virulent brucellae were selected based on modeling investigation of the vaccine protection processes. The variable "vaccine protection efficacy" was set as a dependent variable while the other eighteen were set as independent variables. Discrete or continuous values were collected from papers for each variable of each data set. In total, 401 experimental groups were manually annotated from 74 peer-reviewed publications containing mouse protection data for live attenuated Brucella vaccines or vaccine candidates. Our ANOVA analysis indicated that nine variables contributed significantly (P-value Brucella vaccine protection efficacy: vaccine strain, vaccination host (mouse) strain, vaccination dose, vaccination route, challenge pathogen strain, challenge route, challenge-killing interval, colony forming units (CFUs) in mouse spleen, and CFU reduction compared to control group. The other 10 variables (e.g., mouse age, vaccination-challenge interval, and challenge dose) were not found to be statistically significant (P-value > 0.05). The protection level of RB51 was sacrificed when the values of several variables (e.g., vaccination route, vaccine viability, and

  1. Seasonal influenza vaccines and hurdles to mutual protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C

    2016-12-01

    While vaccines against seasonal influenza are available, major hurdles still exist that prevent their use having any impact on epidemic spread. Recent epidemiologic data question the appropriateness of traditional vaccination timing (prior to the winter season) in many parts of the world. Furthermore, vaccine uptake in most countries even in high-risk populations does not reach the 75% target recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza viruses continually undergo antigenic variation, and both inactivated and live attenuated influenza vaccines confer only short-lived strain-specific immunity, so annual revaccination is required. Improving vaccine-induced immunity is therefore an important goal. A vaccine that could confer durable protection against emerging influenza strains could significantly reduce onward transmission. Therefore, further understanding of protective immunity against influenza (including broadly cross-protective immune mechanisms such as haemagglutinin stem-binding antibodies and T cells) offers the hope of vaccines that can confer the long-lived heterosubtypic immune responses required for mutual protection. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influenza vaccination in the elderly: seeking new correlates of protection and improved vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Janet E

    2008-12-01

    Influenza is foremost among all infectious diseases for an age-related increase in risk for serious complications and death. Determining the benefit of current influenza vaccines is largely limited to epidemiologic studies, since placebo-controlled trials of influenza vaccines are no longer considered ethical in the older adult population. Vaccine effectiveness is calculated from the relative reduction in influenza outcomes in individuals who elect to be vaccinated compared with those who do not, the assumptions for which are diverse and have led to considerable controversy as to the exact benefit of influenza vaccination in older adults. In spite of this controversy, there is no doubt that new influenza vaccine technologies are needed to improve protection and reverse the trend of rising hospitalization and death rates related to influenza in older adults despite widespread influenza vaccination programs. This article will review the challenges to new vaccine development, explore the potential correlates of protection against influenza, and describe how new vaccine technologies may improve protection against complicated influenza illness in the older adult population.

  3. Obesity Outweighs Protection Conferred by Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A; Hertz, Tomer; Johnson, Cydney; Mehle, Andrew; Krammer, Florian; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2016-08-02

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing severe influenza virus infection, making vaccination of utmost importance for this high-risk population. However, vaccinated obese animals and adults have decreased neutralizing antibody responses. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of either alum or a squalene-based adjuvant (AS03) to an influenza vaccine would improve neutralizing antibody responses and protect obese mice from challenge. Our studies demonstrate that adjuvanted vaccine does increase both neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibody levels compared to vaccine alone. Although obese mice mount significantly decreased virus-specific antibody responses, both the breadth and the magnitude of the responses against hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are decreased compared to the responses in lean mice. Importantly, even with a greater than fourfold increase in neutralizing antibody levels, obese mice are not protected against influenza virus challenge and viral loads remain elevated in the respiratory tract. Increasing the antigen dose affords no added protection, and a decreasing viral dose did not fully mitigate the increased mortality seen in obese mice. Overall, these studies highlight that, while the use of an adjuvant does improve seroconversion, vaccination does not fully protect obese mice from influenza virus challenge, possibly due to the increased sensitivity of obese animals to infection. Given the continued increase in the global obesity epidemic, our findings have important implications for public health. Vaccination is the most effective strategy for preventing influenza virus infection and is a key component for pandemic preparedness. However, vaccines may fail to provide optimal protection in high-risk groups, including overweight and obese individuals. Given the worldwide obesity epidemic, it is imperative that we understand and improve vaccine efficacy. No work to date has investigated whether adjuvants increase the

  4. Thermostable cross-protective subunit vaccine against Brucella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherwonogrodzky, John W; Barabé, Nicole D; Grigat, Michelle L; Lee, William E; Poirier, Robert T; Jager, Scott J; Berger, Bradley J

    2014-12-01

    A subunit vaccine candidate was produced from Brucella suis 145 (biovar 4; expressing both the A antigen of Brucella abortus and the M antigen of Brucella melitensis). The preparation consisted mostly of polysaccharide (PS; >90% [wt/wt]; both cell-associated PS and exo-PS were combined) and a small amount of protein (1 to 3%) with no apparent nucleic acids. Vaccinated mice were protected (these had a statistically significant reduction in bacterial colonization compared to that of unvaccinated controls) when challenged with representative strains of three Brucella species most pathogenic for humans, i.e., B. abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis. As little as 1 ng of the vaccine, without added adjuvant, protected mice against B. suis 145 infection (5 × 10(5) CFU), and a single injection of 1 μg of this subunit vaccine protected mice from B. suis 145 challenge for at least 14 months. A single immunization induced a serum IgG response to Brucella antigens that remained elevated for up to 9 weeks. The use of heat (i.e., boiling-water bath, autoclaving) in the vaccine preparation showed that it was thermostable. This method also ensured safety and security. The vaccine produced was immunogenic and highly protective against multiple strains of Brucella and represents a promising candidate for further evaluation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Immune suppression of challenged vaccinates as a rigorous assessment of sterile protection by lentiviral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigo, Jodi K; Durkin, Shannon; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Tagmyer, Tara; Cook, Sheila J; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2007-01-15

    We previously reported that an experimental live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine, containing a mutated S2 accessory gene, provided protection from disease and detectable infection after virulent virus (EIAV(PV)) challenge [Li F, Craigo JK, Howe L, Steckbeck JD, Cook S, Issel C, et al. A live-attenuated equine infectious anemia virus proviral vaccine with a modified S2 gene provides protection from detectable infection by intravenous virulent virus challenge of experimentally inoculated horses. J Virol 2003;77(13):7244-53; Craigo JK, Li F, Steckbeck JD, Durkin S, Howe L, Cook SJ, et al. Discerning an effective balance between equine infectious anemia virus attenuation and vaccine efficacy. J Virol 2005;79(5):2666-77]. To determine if attenuated EIAV vaccines actually prevent persistent infection by challenge virus, we employed a 14-day dexamethasone treatment of vaccinated horses post-challenge to suppress host immunity and amplify replication levels of any infecting EIAV. At 2 months post-challenge the horses were all protected from virulent-virus challenge, evidenced by a lack of EIA signs and detectable challenge plasma viral RNA. Upon immune suppression, 6/12 horses displayed clinical EIA. Post-immune suppression characterizations demonstrated that the attenuated vaccine evidently prevented detectable challenge virus infection in 50% of horses. These data highlight the utility of post-challenge immune suppression for evaluating persistent viral vaccine protective efficacy.

  6. HPV vaccine cross-protection: Highlights on additional clinical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vincenzo, Rosa; Ricci, Caterina; Conte, Carmine; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are administered in vaccination programs, targeted at young adolescent girls before sexual exposure, and in catch-up programs for young women in some countries. All the data indicate that HPV-virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively prevent papillomavirus infections with a high level of antibodies and safety. Since non-vaccine HPV types are responsible for about 30% of cervical cancers, cross-protection would potentially enhance primary cervical cancer prevention efforts. High levels of specific neutralizing antibodies can be generated after immunization with HPV VLPs. Immunity to HPV is type-specific. However, if we consider the phylogenetic tree including the different HPV types, we realize that a certain degree of cross-protection is possible, due to the high homology of some viral types with vaccine ones. The assessment of cross-protective properties of HPV vaccines is an extremely important matter, which has also increased public health implications and could add further value to their preventive potential. The impact of cross-protection is mostly represented by a reduction of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia CIN2-3 more than what expected. In this article we review the mechanisms and the effectiveness of Bivalent (HPV-16/-18) and Quadrivalent (HPV-6/-11/-16/-18) HPV vaccine cross-protection, focusing on the critical aspects and the potential biases in clinical trials, in order to understand how cross-protection could impact on clinical outcomes and on the new perspectives in post-vaccine era. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recombinant raccoon pox vaccine protects mice against lethal plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, J.E.; Powell, T.D.; Frank, R.S.; Moss, K.; Haanes, E.J.; Smith, S.R.; Rocke, T.E.; Stinchcomb, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Using a raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expression system, we have developed new recombinant vaccines that can protect mice against lethal plague infection. We tested the effects of a translation enhancer (EMCV-IRES) in combination with a secretory (tPA) signal or secretory (tPA) and membrane anchoring (CHV-gG) signals on in vitro antigen expression of F1 antigen in tissue culture and the induction of antibody responses and protection against Yersinia pestis challenge in mice. The RCN vector successfully expressed the F1 protein of Y. pestis in vitro. In addition, the level of expression was increased by the insertion of the EMCV-IRES and combinations of this and the secretory signal or secretory and anchoring signals. These recombinant viruses generated protective immune responses that resulted in survival of 80% of vaccinated mice upon challenge with Y. pestis. Of the RCN-based vaccines we tested, the RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1 recombinant construct was the most efficacious. Mice vaccinated with this construct withstood challenge with as many as 1.5 million colony forming units of Y. pestis (7.7??104LD50). Interestingly, vaccination with F1 fused to the anchoring signal (RCN-IRES-tPA-YpF1-gG) elicited significant anti-F1 antibody titers, but failed to protect mice from plague challenge. Our studies demonstrate, in vitro and in vivo, the potential importance of the EMCV-IRES and secretory signals in vaccine design. These molecular tools provide a new approach for improving the efficacy of vaccines. In addition, these novel recombinant vaccines could have human, veterinary, and wildlife applications in the prevention of plague. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. History of meningococcal vaccines and their serological correlates of protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vipond, Caroline; Care, Rory; Feavers, Ian M

    2012-05-30

    For over a hundred years Neisseria meningitidis has been known to be one of the major causes of bacterial meningitis. However, effective vaccines were not developed until the latter part of the 20th century. The first of these were based on purified high molecular weight capsular polysaccharides and more recently the development of glycoconjugate vaccines has made paediatric immunisation programmes possible. The prevention of group B meningococcal disease has remained a challenge throughout this period. This review charts the history of the development of meningococcal vaccines and the importance of serological correlates of protection in their evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of protective antigens for vaccination against systemic salmonellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk eBumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent medical need for improved vaccines with broad serovar coverage and high efficacy against systemic salmonellosis. Subunit vaccines offer excellent safety profiles but require identification of protective antigens, which remains a challenging task. Here, I review crucial properties of Salmonella antigens that might help to narrow down the number of potential candidates from more than 4000 proteins encoded in Salmonella genomes, to a more manageable number of 50-200 most promising antigens. I also discuss complementary approaches for antigen identification and potential limitations of current pre-clinical vaccine testing.

  10. The protein DIIIC-2, aggregated with a specific oligodeoxynucleotide and adjuvanted in alum, protects mice and monkeys against DENV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Lázaro; Marcos, Ernesto; Izquierdo, Alienys; Lazo, Laura; Valdés, Iris; Ambala, Peris; Ochola, Lucy; Hitler, Rikoi; Suzarte, Edith; Álvarez, Mayling; Kimiti, Prisilla; Ndung'u, James; Kariuki, Thomas; Guzmán, María Guadalupe; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the ability of the chimeric protein DIIIC-2 (domain III of the dengue envelope protein fused to the capsid protein of dengue-2 virus), to induce immunity and protection in mice, when it is highly aggregated with a non-defined oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) and adjuvanted in alum. In this work, three different defined ODNs were studied as aggregating agents. Our results suggest that the nature of the ODN influences the capacity of protein DIIIC-2 to activate cell-mediated immunity in mice. Consequently, the ODN 39M was selected to perform further experiments in mice and nonhuman primates. Mice receiving the preparation 39M-DIIIC-2 were solidly protected against dengue virus (DENV) challenge. Moreover, monkeys immunized with the same preparation developed neutralizing antibodies, as measured by four different neutralization tests varying the virus strains and the cell lines used. Two of the immunized monkeys were completely protected against challenge, whereas the third animal had a single day of low-titer viremia. This is the first work describing the induction of short-term protection in monkeys by a formulation that is suitable for human use combining a recombinant protein from DENV with alum.

  11. Protection from Hendra virus infection with Canarypox recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume-Vasselin, Vanessa; Lemaitre, Laurent; Dhondt, Kévin P; Tedeschi, Laurence; Poulard, Amelie; Charreyre, Catherine; Horvat, Branka

    2016-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is an emerging zoonotic pathogen, which causes severe respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans and horses. Since its first appearance in 1994, spillovers of HeV from its natural reservoir fruit bats occur on almost an annual basis. The high mortality rate in both humans and horses and the wide-ranging reservoir distribution are making HeV a serious public health problem, especially for people exposed to sick horses. This study has aimed to develop an efficient low-cost HeV vaccine for horses based on Canarypox recombinant vector expressing HeV glycoproteins, attachment glycoprotein (G) and fusion protein (F). This vaccine was used to immunise hamsters and then challenged intraperitoneally with HeV 3 weeks later. The higher tested dose of the vaccine efficiently prevented oropharyngeal virus shedding and protected animals from clinical disease and virus-induced mortality. Vaccine induced generation of seroneutralising antibodies and prevented virus-induced histopathological changes and a production of viral RNA and antigens in animal tissues. Interestingly, some vaccinated animals, including those immunised at a lower dose, were protected in the absence of detectable specific antibodies, suggesting the induction of an efficient virus-specific cellular immunity. Finally, ponies immunised using the same vaccination protocol as hamsters developed strong seroneutralising titres against both HeV and closely related Nipah virus, indicating that this vaccine may have the ability to induce cross-protection against Henipavirus infection. These data suggest that Canarypox-based vectors encoding for HeV glycoproteins present very promising new vaccine candidate to prevent infection and shedding of the highly lethal HeV.

  12. Protective Immunity and Vaccination Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Okwor, Ifeoma; Mou, Zhirong; Liu, Dong; Uzonna, Jude

    2012-01-01

    Although a great deal of knowledge has been gained from studies on the immunobiology of leishmaniasis, there is still no universally acceptable, safe, and effective vaccine against the disease. This strongly suggests that we still do not completely understand the factors that control and/or regulate the development and sustenance of anti-Leishmania immunity, particularly those associated with secondary (memory) immunity. Such an understanding is critically important for designing safe, effect...

  13. Protective effect of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe

    2018-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus in swine herds represents a major problem for the swine industry and poses a constant threat for the emergence of novel pandemic viruses and the development of more effective influenza vaccines for pigs is desired. By optimizing the vector backbone and using a needle......-free delivery method, we have recently demonstrated a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine that induces a broad immune response, including both humoral and cellular immunity. Objectives To investigate the protection of our polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in a pig challenge study. Methods By intradermal...... needle-free delivery to the skin, we immunized pigs with two different doses (500 μg and 800 μg) of an influenza DNA vaccine based on six genes of pandemic origin, including internally expressed matrix and nucleoprotein and externally expressed hemagglutinin and neuraminidase as previously demonstrated...

  14. An Overview of Challenges Limiting the Design of Protective Mucosal Vaccines for Finfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munang’andu, Hetron Mweemba; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2015-01-01

    Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein, it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish. PMID:26557121

  15. An overview of challenges limiting the design of protective mucosal vaccines for finfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetron Mweemba Munang'andu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Research in mucosal vaccination in finfish has gained prominence in the last decade in pursuit of mucosal vaccines that would lengthen the duration of protective immunity in vaccinated fish. However, injectable vaccines have continued to dominate in the vaccination of finfish because they are perceived to be more protective than mucosal vaccines. Therefore, it has become important to identify the factors that limit developing protective mucosal vaccines in finfish as an overture to identifying key areas that require optimization in mucosal vaccine design. Some of the factors that limit the success for designing protective mucosal vaccines for finfish identified in this review include the lack optimized protective antigen doses for mucosal vaccines, absence of immunostimulants able to enhance the performance of non-replicative mucosal vaccines, reduction of systemic antibodies due to prolonged exposure to oral vaccination and the lack of predefined correlates of protective immunity for use in the optimization of newly developed mucosal vaccines. This review also points out the need to develop prime-boost vaccination regimes able to induce long-term protective immunity in vaccinated fish. By overcoming some of the obstacles identified herein it is anticipated that future mucosal vaccines shall be designed to induce long-term protective immunity in finfish.

  16. Prevention of infectious diseases by public vaccination and individual protection

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xiao-Long; Small, Michael; Fu, Xinchu; Jin, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    In the face of serious infectious diseases, governments endeavour to implement containment measures such as public vaccination at a macroscopic level. Meanwhile, individuals tend to protect themselves by avoiding contacts with infections at a microscopic level. However, a comprehensive understanding of how such combined strategy influences epidemic dynamics is still lacking. We study a susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model with imperfect vaccination on dynamic contact networks, where the macroscopic intervention is represented by random vaccination of the population and the microscopic protection is characterised by susceptible individuals rewiring contacts from infective neighbours. In particular, the model is formulated both in populations without and then with demographic effects. Using the pairwise approximation and the probability generating function approach, we investigate both dynamics of the epidemic and the underlying network. For populations without demography, the emerging degree correla...

  17. Long-term protection of hepatitis B vaccination among Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    INTRODUCTION. Immunization is the most effective way to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and, hence, the development of acute and chronic hepatitis B. Sero-protection after vaccination, defined as. HBsAb ≥ 10 mIU/mL, is achieved in over 95% of all vaccinees1. Ideally, the antibody response is determined ...

  18. Immune control of an SIV challenge by a T-cell-based vaccine in rhesus monkeys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; O'Brien, K.L.; Lynch, D.M.; Simmons, N.L.; Porte, A. La; Riggs, A.M.; Abbink, P.; Coffey, R.T.; Grandpre, L.E.; Seaman, M.S.; Landucci, G.; Forthal, D.N.; Montefiori, D.C.; Carville, A.; Mansfield, K.G.; Havenga, M.J.; Pau, M.G.; Goudsmit, J.; Barouch, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    A recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vector-based vaccine for HIV-1 has recently failed in a phase 2b efficacy study in humans. Consistent with these results, preclinical studies have demonstrated that rAd5 vectors expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag failed to reduce peak or

  19. Coxsackievirus A 16 infection does not interfere with the specific immune response induced by an enterovirus 71 inactivated vaccine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Qi, Sudong; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; He, Zhanlong; Zhao, Yuan; Lu, Shuaiyao; Yu, Wenhai; Li, Qihan

    2014-07-31

    Hand, foot and mouth disease is usually caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A 16 (CA16), which are members of the Picornaviridae family. In the present study, the characteristics of the immune response induced by an EV71 inactivated vaccine (made from human diploid cells) were explored in the presence of CA16 infection, based on the previously established neonatal rhesus monkey model. The typical clinical manifestations, including body temperature, viral viremia and virus shedding in the mouth, pharynx and feces, were characterized. A specific neutralizing antibody assay showed that the specific immune response induced by the EV71 inactivated vaccine was active against EV71 but not against CA16. No remarkable fluctuation in proinflammatory cytokine release was identified in the serum of immunized monkeys with EV71 vaccine and CA16 infections subsequently. The results showed that the specific immune response induced by the EV71 inactivated vaccine is effective against EV71 infection but is not affected by CA16 infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Incompletely matched influenza vaccine still provides protection in frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Anna S; Moffatt, Cameron R M; Rosewell, Alexander; Dwyer, Dominic E; Lindley, Richard I; Booy, Robert; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2010-01-08

    A cluster-randomised controlled trial of antiviral treatment to control influenza outbreaks in aged-care facilities (ACFs) provided an opportunity to assess VE in the frail, institutionalised elderly. Data were pooled from five influenza outbreaks in 2007. Rapid testing methods for influenza were used to confirm outbreaks and/or identify further cases. Vaccination coverage among ACF residents ranged from 59% to 100%, whereas it was consistently low in staff (11-33%). The attack rates for laboratory-confirmed influenza in residents ranged from 9% to 24%, with the predominate strain determined to be influenza A. Sequencing of the hemagglutinin gene from a sub-sample demonstrated an incomplete match with the 2007 southern hemisphere influenza vaccine. Influenza VE was estimated to be 61% (95%CI 6%, 84%) against laboratory-confirmed influenza, 51% (95%CI -16%, 79%) against influenza-like illness, 82% (95%CI 27%, 96%) against pneumonia-related and influenza-related hospitalisations and 71% (95%CI -28%, 95%) against death from all causes. This supports the continued policy of targeted vaccination of the institutionalised, frail elderly. There is also reassurance that influenza vaccine can be effective against disease and severe outcomes, despite an incomplete vaccine match. This benefit is additional to protection from antivirals.

  1. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy.Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge.The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  2. Enhanced protection against FMDV in cattle after prime- boost vaccination based on mucosal and inactivated FMD vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Manar E; El-Deeb, Ayman H; Zeidan, Sayed M; Hussein, Hussein A; Abu-El-Naga, Hany I

    2017-10-01

    Improved immunization and control strategies and platforms are greatly needed for foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and mucosal vaccines propose an effective strategy for the control FMDV by blocking viral entry. In this study, several immunization strategies, using two FMDV vaccine formulations, including Montanide ISA 206 oil-based FMD inactivated vaccine and Montanide IMS 1313 VG N PR-based concentrated semi-purified FMD mucosal vaccine, were applied. Results of intranasal immunization with the prepared FMD mucosal vaccine, given once or twice, induced IgA levels in both nasal and salivary secretions besides a high response of lymphocyte proliferation with protection levels reaching 20% and 40%, respectively, in a challenge trial in cattle. Immunization with Montanide 206 inactivated FMD vaccine was capable of inducing 80% protection whereas prime-boost strategy based on the administration of mucosal vaccine followed by inactivated vaccine appeared to be the most potent strategy by achieving 100% protection against an FMDV challenge. Indeed, the study reports the efficacy of the prepared IMS 1313 FMD mucosal vaccine and the possible use of this vaccine in the context of different vaccination strategies to control FMDV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. MVA.85A boosting of BCG and an attenuated, phoP deficient M. tuberculosis vaccine both show protective efficacy against tuberculosis in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Verreck

    Full Text Available Continuous high global tuberculosis (TB mortality rates and variable vaccine efficacy of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG motivate the search for better vaccine regimes. Relevant models are required to downselect the most promising vaccines entering clinical efficacy testing and to identify correlates of protection.Here, we evaluated immunogenicity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rhesus monkeys with two novel strategies: BCG boosted by modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing antigen 85A (MVA.85A, and attenuated M. tuberculosis with a disrupted phoP gene (SO2 as a single-dose vaccine. Both strategies were well tolerated, and immunogenic as evidenced by induction of specific IFNgamma responses. Antigen 85A-specific IFNgamma secretion was specifically increased by MVA.85A boosting. Importantly, both MVA.85A and SO2 treatment significantly reduced pathology and chest X-ray scores upon infectious challenge with M. tuberculosis Erdman strain. MVA.85A and SO2 treatment also showed reduced average lung bacterial counts (1.0 and 1.2 log respectively, compared with 0.4 log for BCG and significant protective effect by reduction in C-reactive protein levels, body weight loss, and decrease of erythrocyte-associated hematologic parameters (MCV, MCH, Hb, Ht as markers of inflammatory infection, all relative to non-vaccinated controls. Lymphocyte stimulation revealed Ag85A-induced IFNgamma levels post-infection as the strongest immunocorrelate for protection (spearman's rho: -0.60.Both the BCG/MVA.85A prime-boost regime and the novel live attenuated, phoP deficient TB vaccine candidate SO2 showed significant protective efficacy by various parameters in rhesus macaques. Considering the phylogenetic relationship between macaque and man and the similarity in manifestations of TB disease, these data support further development of these primary and combination TB vaccine candidates.

  4. High Antigen Dose Is Detrimental to Post-Exposure Vaccine Protection against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Billeskov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis (TB, causes 1.8M deaths annually. The current vaccine, BCG, has failed to eradicate TB leaving 25% of the world’s population with latent Mtb infection (LTBI, and 5–10% of these people will reactivate and develop active TB. An efficient therapeutic vaccine targeting LTBI could have an enormous impact on global TB incidence, and could be an important aid in fighting multidrug resistance, which is increasing globally. Here we show in a mouse model using the H56 (Ag85B-ESAT-6-Rv2660 TB vaccine candidate that post-exposure, but not preventive, vaccine protection requires low vaccine antigen doses for optimal protection. Loss of protection from high dose post-exposure vaccination was not associated with a loss of overall vaccine response magnitude, but rather with greater differentiation and lower functional avidity of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells. High vaccine antigen dose also led to a decreased ability of vaccine-specific CD4 T cells to home into the Mtb-infected lung parenchyma, a recently discovered important feature of T cell protection in mice. These results underscore the importance of T cell quality rather than magnitude in TB-vaccine protection, and the significant role that antigen dosing plays in vaccine-mediated protection.

  5. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice: influence of the route of vaccine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-11-01

    Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal virus infection in mice. Whole inactivated virus-induced cross-protection was found to be mediated primarily by flu-specific CD8+ T cells. As it has been demonstrated that the route of vaccine administration strongly influences both the quantity and quality of vaccine-induced immunity, in this study, we determined which route of WIV administration induces optimal heterosubtypic cross-protection. We compared the magnitude of the immune response and heterosubtypic protection against lethal A/PR/8/34 (H1N1) infection after subcutaneous (SC), intramuscular (IM), and intranasal (IN) vaccination with A/NIBRG-14 (H5N1) WIV. Subcutaneous and IM administration was superior to IN administration of influenza WIV in terms of flu-specific CD8+ T-cell induction and protection of mice against lethal heterosubtypic challenge. Surprisingly, despite the very low flu-specific CD8+ T-cell responses detected in IN-vaccinated mice, these animals were partially protected, most likely due to cross-reactive IgA antibodies. The results of this study show that the magnitude of WIV-induced flu-specific CD8+ T-cell activity depends on the applied vaccination route. We conclude that parenteral administration of WIV vaccine, in particular IM injection, is superior to IN vaccine delivery for the induction of heterosubtypic cross-protection and generally appears to elicit stronger immune responses than mucosal vaccination with WIV. © 2013 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  7. Rapid outer-surface protein C DNA tattoo vaccination protects against Borrelia afzelii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, A; Mason, L M K; Oei, A; de Wever, B; van der Poll, T; Bins, A D; Hovius, J W R

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia afzelii is the predominant Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe. Currently there is no human vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, and most research focuses on recombinant protein vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. DNA tattooing is a novel vaccination method that can be applied in a rapid vaccination schedule. We vaccinated C3H/HeN mice with B. afzelii strain PKo OspC (outer-surface protein C) using a codon-optimized DNA vaccine tattoo and compared this with recombinant protein vaccination in a 0-2-4 week vaccination schedule. We also assessed protection by DNA tattoo in a 0-3-6 day schedule. DNA tattoo and recombinant OspC vaccination induced comparable total IgG responses, with a lower IgG1/IgG2a ratio after DNA tattoo. Two weeks after syringe-challenge with 5 × 10(5) B. afzelii spirochetes most vaccinated mice had negative B. afzelii tissue DNA loads and all were culture negative. Furthermore, DNA tattoo vaccination in a 0-3-6 day regimen also resulted in negative Borrelia loads and cultures after challenge. To conclude, DNA vaccination by tattoo was fully protective against B. afzelii challenge in mice in a rapid vaccination protocol, and induces a favorable humoral immunity compared to recombinant protein vaccination. Rapid DNA tattoo is a promising vaccination strategy against spirochetes.

  8. Multiple vaccinations with UV- attenuated cercariae in pig enhance protective immunity against Schistosoma japonicum infection as compared to single vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dandan; Tian, Fang; Wu, Haiwei; Gao, Yanan; Wu, Jingjiao; Zhang, Donghui; Ji, Minjun; McManus, Donald P; Driguez, Patrick; Wu, Guanling

    2011-06-10

    Schistosomiasis japonica is a major public health problem in the endemic areas of China, the Philippines, and Indonesia. To date, a vaccine has not been developed against this disease but immunization with UV-attenuated cercariae can induce a high level of protective immunity in Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc crossbred pigs. To compare the efficacy of a single vaccination and multiple vaccinations with UV-attenuated Schistosoma japonicum cercariae, two groups of pigs received either one or three exposures to 10,000 cercariae attenuated with 400 μw UV. Pigs with a single immunization had a 59.33% reduction in adult worm burden, a 89.87% reduction in hepatic eggs and a 86.27% reduction in fecal eggs at eight weeks post-challenge (P vaccinated groups were higher than in the infection-control group. Triple vaccinations resulted in higher levels of antibodies, especially IgG2, compared with a single vaccination and IFN-γ levels increased with repeated immunization with UV-irradiated cercariae. The high levels of protection against S. japonicum infection can be achieved with a UV-attenuated vaccine in pigs, and that three vaccinations were possibly more effective than a single vaccination. Moreover, triple vaccinations evoked a more vigorous IFN-γ response and a stronger antibody-mediated response, especially an increase in the levels of IgG2 antibodies.

  9. VACCINES. A mucosal vaccine against Chlamydia trachomatis generates two waves of protective memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stary, Georg; Olive, Andrew; Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Gondek, David; Alvarez, David; Basto, Pamela A; Perro, Mario; Vrbanac, Vladimir D; Tager, Andrew M; Shi, Jinjun; Yethon, Jeremy A; Farokhzad, Omid C; Langer, Robert; Starnbach, Michael N; von Andrian, Ulrich H

    2015-06-19

    Genital Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infection induces protective immunity that depends on interferon-γ-producing CD4 T cells. By contrast, we report that mucosal exposure to ultraviolet light (UV)-inactivated Ct (UV-Ct) generated regulatory T cells that exacerbated subsequent Ct infection. We show that mucosal immunization with UV-Ct complexed with charge-switching synthetic adjuvant particles (cSAPs) elicited long-lived protection in conventional and humanized mice. UV-Ct-cSAP targeted immunogenic uterine CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs), whereas UV-Ct accumulated in tolerogenic CD11b(-)CD103(+) DCs. Regardless of vaccination route, UV-Ct-cSAP induced systemic memory T cells, but only mucosal vaccination induced effector T cells that rapidly seeded uterine mucosa with resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells). Optimal Ct clearance required both T(RM) seeding and subsequent infection-induced recruitment of circulating memory T cells. Thus, UV-Ct-cSAP vaccination generated two synergistic memory T cell subsets with distinct migratory properties. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Development of fowl cholera vaccine: I. Protection of Pasteurella multocida local isolate vaccine against challenge of homologous and heterologous strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida locally isolated from chicken and ducks (BCC 299, BCC 2331, DY1, DY2, 12TG, 15TG andimported strains (BCC 1359, 1362; HEDDLESTON group 1 and 6 respectively had been tested for its pathogenicity in theprevious study. The aims of this experiment were to study the preparation of local isolate pasteurellosis vaccines and to determine the protective effect of that vaccines in chicken against the highly pathogenic local isolates of P. multocida. Killed monovalent, bivalent and polyvalent pasteurellosis vaccines were prepared and each was adjunvanted with aluminum hydroxide gel at a final concentration of 1.5% and the cell concentration was equal to the No 10 of MacFarland tube standard. Each of the vaccine prepared was used to vaccinated on a group of six week old of layer chicken (8 per group. Each chicken was subcutaneously injected with 0.2 ml of vaccine, four weeks later each was boostered with similar vaccine with the same dose. Two weeks after giving the boostered vaccine each group of chicken were challenged, half with life bacterium of P. Multocida BCC 2331 and other with DY2. Any chick which survive after challenge was designated as protected by vaccination. Before vaccination 1 ml of blood was drawn from each of chicken and then two weeks apart up to challenge. Serum from each sample was separated and kept in deep freeze until tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Chicken vaccinated with killed whole cell P. multocida vaccines of monovalent (BCC 2331 or DY2 and bivalent (BCC 2331 + DY2 were protected against challenge with live bacterium of either BCC 2331 or DY2 at rate 67-100%. There was no protection in chicken vaccinated with either BCC 299, DY1, 12TG, 15TG, BCC 1359, or 1362 killed vaccine. Similarly no protection of chicken vaccinated with either DY1 + BCC299, 12TG + 15TG or BCC 1359 + BCC 1362 bivalent vaccines. The protection rate of the polyvalent local isolate vaccine was at average 50-75%. All

  11. An Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Ebola Vaccine, FILORAB1, Adjuvanted With Glucopyranosyl Lipid A in Stable Emulsion Confers Complete Protection in Nonhuman Primate Challenge Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Reed F; Kurup, Drishya; Hagen, Katie R; Fisher, Christine; Keshwara, Rohan; Papaneri, Amy; Perry, Donna L; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B; Wang, Jonathan T; Ter Meulen, Jan; Wirblich, Christoph; Schnell, Matthias J

    2016-10-15

    The 2013-2016 West African Ebola virus (EBOV) disease outbreak was the largest filovirus outbreak to date. Over 28 000 suspected, probable, or confirmed cases have been reported, with a 53% case-fatality rate. The magnitude and international impact of this EBOV outbreak has highlighted the urgent need for a safe and efficient EBOV vaccine. To this end, we demonstrate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of FILORAB1, a recombinant, bivalent, inactivated rabies virus-based EBOV vaccine, in rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys. Our results demonstrate that the use of the synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A in stable emulsion (GLA-SE) as an adjuvant increased the efficacy of FILORAB1 to 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge, with no to mild clinical signs of disease. Furthermore, all vaccinated subjects developed protective anti-rabies virus antibody titers. Taken together, these results support further development of FILORAB1/GLA-SE as an effective preexposure EBOV vaccine. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Efficacy of chimeric Pestivirus vaccine candidates against Classical Swine Fever: protection and DIVA characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eble, P.L.; Geurts, Y.; Quak, J.; Moonen-Leusen, H.W.M.; Blome, S.; Hofmann, M.A.; Koenen, F.; Beer, M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently no live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccines against classical swine fever (CSF) are available. The aim of this study was to investigate whether chimeric pestivirus vaccine candidates (CP7_E2alf, Flc11 and Flc9) are able to protect pigs against clinical signs,

  13. Short- and long-term immunogenicity and protection induced by non-replicating smallpox vaccine candidates in mice and comparison with the traditional 1st generation vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier-Rembert, Audrey; Drillien, Robert; Tournier, Jean-Nicolas; Garin, Daniel; Crance, Jean-Marc

    2008-03-25

    This study assessed three non-replicating smallpox vaccine candidates (modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), NYVAC and HR) for their immunogenicity and ability to protect mice against an intranasal cowpox virus challenge and compared them with the traditional replicating vaccine. A single immunisation with the non-replicating vaccines induced a complete protection from death at short-term, but was not fully protective when mice were challenged 150 days post-vaccination with protection correlated with the specific neutralizing antibodies and CD4(+) T-cells responses. Prime-boost vaccination enabled effective long-term protection from death for mice vaccinated with MVA, but protection from disease and CD4(+) T-cell level were lower than the ones induced by the traditional vaccine over the long-term period. Further investigations are necessary with MVA to determine the optimal conditions of immunisation to induce at long-term immunogenicity and protection observed with the 1st generation smallpox vaccine.

  14. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  15. Universal vaccine against influenza virus: linking TLR signaling to anti-viral protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Nicole; Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Jegerlehner, Andrea; Dietmeier, Klaus; Maudrich, Melanie; Pumpens, Paul; Saudan, Philippe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2012-04-01

    A vaccine protecting against all influenza strains is a long-sought goal, particularly for emerging pandemics. As previously shown, vaccines based on the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 (M2e) may protect against all influenza A strains. Here, we demonstrate that M2e-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) protect mice from a lethal influenza infection. To be protective, antibodies had to be able to bind to Fc receptors and fix complement. Furthermore, mAbs of IgG2c isotype were protective in mice, while antibodies of identical specificity, but of the IgG1 isotype, failed to prevent disease. These findings readily translated into vaccine design. A vaccine targeting M2 in the absence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 ligand primarily induced IgG1, whilst the same vaccine linked to a TLR7 ligand yielded high levels of IgG2c antibodies. Although both vaccines protected mice from a lethal challenge, mice treated with the vaccine containing a TLR7 ligand showed significantly lower morbidity. In accordance with these findings, vaccination of TLR7(-/-) mice with a vaccine containing a TLR7 ligand did not result in protection from a lethal challenge. Hence, the innate immune system is required to direct isotype switching toward the more protective IgG2a/c antibodies. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Potential Role of Specific Antibodies as Important Vaccine Induced Protective Mechanism against Aeromonas salmonicida in Rainbow Trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer Villumsen, Kasper; Dalsgaard, Inger; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    . In this study we have examined the protection against infection with a Danish strain of A. salmonicida in both vaccinated and non-vaccinated rainbow trout. A commercial and an experimental auto-vaccine were tested. The protective effects of the vaccines were evaluated through an A. salmonicida challenge 18...... weeks post vaccination. Both vaccines resulted in a significantly increased survival in the vaccinated fish during a 28 day challenge period relative to non-vaccinated fish (P = 0.01 and P = 0.001 for the commercial and experimental vaccine, respectively). Throughout the entire experiment, the presence...

  17. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Bundibugyo ebolavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics for human use. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV-based vaccine vectors, which encode an EBOV glycoprotein in place of the VSV glycoprotein, have shown 100% efficacy against homologous Sudan ebolavirus (SEBOV or Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV challenge in NHPs. In addition, a single injection of a blend of three rVSV vectors completely protected NHPs against challenge with SEBOV, ZEBOV, the former Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus, and Marburg virus. However, recent studies suggest that complete protection against the newly discovered Bundibugyo ebolavirus (BEBOV using several different heterologous filovirus vaccines is more difficult and presents a new challenge. As BEBOV caused nearly 50% mortality in a recent outbreak any filovirus vaccine advanced for human use must be able to protect against this new species. Here, we evaluated several different strategies against BEBOV using rVSV-based vaccines. Groups of cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with a single injection of a homologous BEBOV vaccine, a single injection of a blended heterologous vaccine (SEBOV/ZEBOV, or a prime-boost using heterologous SEBOV and ZEBOV vectors. Animals were challenged with BEBOV 29-36 days after initial vaccination. Macaques vaccinated with the homologous BEBOV vaccine or the prime-boost showed no overt signs of illness and survived challenge. In contrast, animals vaccinated with the heterologous blended vaccine and unvaccinated control animals developed severe clinical symptoms consistent with BEBOV infection with 2 of 3 animals in each group succumbing. These data show that complete protection against BEBOV will likely require incorporation of BEBOV glycoprotein into the vaccine or employment of a prime-boost regimen. Fortunately, our results demonstrate that heterologous rVSV-based filovirus vaccine

  18. Genetic Diversity and Protective Efficacy of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neafsey, Daniel E; Juraska, Michal; Bedford, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine targets the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum and has partial protective efficacy against clinical and severe malaria disease in infants and children. We investigated whether the vaccine efficacy was specific to certain parasite genotypes...... efficacy. Conclusions These results suggest that among children 5 to 17 months of age, the RTS,S vaccine has greater activity against malaria parasites with the matched circumsporozoite protein allele than against mismatched malaria. The overall vaccine efficacy in this age category will depend...... protein had on vaccine efficacy against first episodes of clinical malaria within 1 year after vaccination. Results In the per-protocol group of 4577 RTS,S/AS01-vaccinated participants and 2335 control-vaccinated participants who were 5 to 17 months of age, the 1-year cumulative vaccine efficacy was 50...

  19. Schistosome syntenin partially protects vaccinated mice against Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C Figueiredo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by several species of trematode of the genus Schistosoma. The disease affects more than 200 million people in the world and causes up to 280,000 deaths per year, besides having high morbidity due to chronic illness that damages internal organs. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control disease is a combination of drug treatment and immunization with an anti-schistosome vaccine. Among the most promising molecules as vaccine candidates are the proteins present in the tegument and digestive tract of the parasite.In this study, we describe for the first time Schistosoma mansoni syntenin (SmSynt and we evaluate its potential as a recombinant vaccine. We demonstrate by real-time PCR that syntenin is mainly expressed in intravascular life stages (schistosomula and adult worms of the parasite life cycle and, by confocal microscopy, we localize it in digestive epithelia in adult worms and schistosomula. Administration of siRNAs targeting SmSynt leads to the knock-down of syntenin gene and protein levels, but this has no demonstrable impact on parasite morphology or viability, suggesting that high SmSynt gene expression is not essential for the parasites in vitro. Mice immunization with rSmSynt, formulated with Freund's adjuvant, induces a Th1-type response, as suggested by the production of IFN-γ and TNF-α by rSmSynt-stimulated cultured splenocytes. The protective effect conferred by vaccination with rSmSynt was demonstrated by 30-37% reduction of worm burden, 38-43% reduction in the number, and 35-37% reduction in the area, of liver granulomas.Our report is the first characterization of syntenin in Schistosoma mansoni and our data suggest that this protein is a potential candidate for the development of a multi-antigen vaccine to control schistosomiasis.

  20. Positive correlation between Aeromonas salmonicida vaccine antigen concentration and protection in vaccinated rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss evaluated by a tail fin infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, M. H.; Skov, J.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), are able to raise a protective immune response against Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) following injection vaccination with commercial vaccines containing formalin-killed bacteria, but the protection is often suboptimal under Danish mari...... bacteria. The infection method proved to be efficient and could differentiate efficacies of different vaccines. It was shown that protection and antibody production in exposed fish were positively correlated to the AS antigen concentration in the vaccine.......Rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), are able to raise a protective immune response against Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) following injection vaccination with commercial vaccines containing formalin-killed bacteria, but the protection is often suboptimal under Danish...... mariculture conditions. We elucidated whether protection can be improved by increasing the concentration of antigen (formalin-killed bacteria) in the vaccine. Rainbow trout juveniles were vaccinated by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection with a bacterin of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain 090710...

  1. DNA vaccine protects ornamental koi (Cyprinus carpio koi) against North American spring viremia of carp virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmenegger, E.J.; Kurath, G.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) in the United States constitutes a potentially serious alien pathogen threat to susceptible fish stocks in North America. A DNA vaccine with an SVCV glycoprotein (G) gene from a North American isolate was constructed. In order to test the vaccine a challenge model utilizing a specific pathogen-free domestic koi stock and a cold water stress treatment was also developed. We have conducted four trial studies demonstrating that the pSGnc DNA vaccine provided protection in vaccinated fish against challenge at low, moderate, and high virus doses of the homologous virus. The protection was significant (p vaccine construct containing a luciferase reporter gene and to non-vaccinated controls in fish ranging in age from 3 to 14 months. In all trials, the SVCV-G DNA immunized fish were challenged 28-days post-vaccination (546 degree-days) and experienced low mortalities varying from 10 to 50% with relative percent survivals ranging from 50 to 88%. The non-vaccinated controls and mock construct vaccinated fish encountered high cumulative percent mortalities ranging from 70 to 100%. This is the first report of a SVCV DNA vaccine being tested successfully in koi. These experiments prove that the SVCV DNA (pSGnc) vaccine can elicit specific reproducible protection and validates its potential use as a prophylactic vaccine in koi and other vulnerable North American fish stocks.

  2. Impact of vaccine protection against multiple HPV types on the cost-effectiveness of cervical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupé, Veerle M H; Bogaards, Johannes A; Meijer, Chris J L M; Berkhof, Johannes

    2012-02-27

    Cross-protection against non-HPV16/18 types and the emergence of broad spectrum vaccines protecting against multiple HPV types will influence the cost-effectiveness of future screening. To assess this influence we used an individual-based simulation model describing the relation between 14 HPV types and cervical disease, allowing the occurrence of multiple type infections. Screening scenarios for vaccinated women were evaluated, firstly for HPV16/18 vaccination with partial cross-protection against HPV 31, 33, 45 and 58 and secondly, for broad spectrum vaccination against 5-13 HPV types. The vaccine-induced incidence reduction of type-specific infection was varied from 0 to 95% in the cross-protection setting and set at 100% in the setting of broad spectrum vaccines. Scenarios of either cytology or HPV DNA screening were considered under varying lifetime number of screening rounds. At a cost-effectiveness threshold of €20,000/QALY, four times HPV DNA screening between 30 and 60 years was the selected scenario in addition to HPV16/18 vaccination, whether or not cross-protection was conferred (€6707 and €9994/QALY, respectively). In the absence of cross-protection, a fifth screening round might be considered (ICER €22,967/QALY). In addition to broad spectrum vaccination, one screen during lifetime was cost-effective up to an 11-valent vaccine. If the vaccine-induced type-specific incidence reduction was lowered to 99%, one screen during lifetime was cost-effective even in addition to 13-valent vaccination. In conclusion, in a cohort of HPV16/18 vaccinated women, four rounds of HPV DNA screening is cost-effective. One screen during lifetime remains cost-effective in addition to broad spectrum vaccination offering protection against many high-risk HPV types. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy, duration of immunity and cross protection after HPV vaccination: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Boccalini, Sara; Bechini, Angela

    2009-05-29

    The efficacy and immunogenicity of HPV vaccines has proven excellent in several phase 2 and phase 3 trials involving tens of thousand women. A decrease in antibody titres was observed in follow-up studies of vaccinees, with initial sharp decline reaching a plateau in the longer term. Only few subjects lost their antibodies during the 5-6 years after vaccination. However, no breakthrough disease occurred even in those subjects. The administration of a challenge dose of quadrivalent vaccine at month 60 of follow-up resulted in a strong anamnestic response. The mechanism by which vaccination confers protection and the reasons for continuing vaccine efficacy remain to be elucidated. The same applies to the possibility of inducing an anamnestic response following viral challenge via genital mucosa. Data strongly suggest that both vaccines can have a variable level of cross protection against HPV types genetically and antigenically-closely related to vaccine types. Demonstration of cross protection against combined endpoints (CIN2/3 and AIS) for combined HPV types, and, as a single type, for HPV-31, has been reached for the quadrivalent vaccine, and there is evidence of cross protection against HPV 31 and 45 persistent infections (as single types) for the bivalent vaccine. Assays used for antibody detection were different for the two vaccines, and standardisation of methods for anti-HPV L1 protein detection is presently underway. The possibility to use universally accepted tests for antibody measurement would make comparison between vaccines and among different studies much easier.

  4. Respiratory and oral vaccination improves protection conferred by the live vaccine strain against pneumonic tularemia in the rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Elizabeth; Smith, Le'Kneitah P; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Barry, Eileen M; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-10-01

    Tularemia is a severe, zoonotic disease caused by a gram-negative bacterium, Francisella tularensis We have previously shown that rabbits are a good model of human pneumonic tularemia when exposed to aerosols containing a virulent, type A strain, SCHU S4. We further demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS), an attenuated type B strain, extended time to death when given by scarification. Oral or aerosol vaccination has been previously shown in humans to offer superior protection to parenteral vaccination against respiratory tularemia challenge. Both oral and aerosol vaccination with LVS were well tolerated in the rabbit with only minimal fever and no weight loss after inoculation. Plasma antibody titers against F. tularensis were higher in rabbits that were vaccinated by either oral or aerosol routes compared to scarification. Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4. LVS given by scarification extended time to death compared to mock-vaccinated controls. One orally vaccinated rabbit did survive aerosol challenge, however, only aerosol vaccination extended time to death significantly compared to scarification. These results further demonstrate the utility of the rabbit model of pneumonic tularemia in replicating what has been reported in humans and macaques as well as demonstrating the utility of vaccination by oral and respiratory routes against an aerosol tularemia challenge. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Analysis of hepatitis B vaccination behavior and vaccination willingness among migrant workers from rural China based on protection motivation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rugang; Li, Youwei; Wangen, Knut R; Maitland, Elizabeth; Nicholas, Stephen; Wang, Jian

    2016-05-03

    With China's accelerating urbanization, migrant workers comprise up to 40% of the urban population of China's largest cities. More mobile than non-migrant urban dwellers, migrants are more likely to contract and spread hepatitis B (HB) than non-migrants. Due to the mandatory system of household registration (hukou), migrants are less likely to be covered by national HB immunization programs and also to have more limited access to public health services where they work than non-migrants. Migrants form a significant sub-group in all Chinese cities posing unique public policy vaccination challenges. Using protection motivation theory (PMT), we developed and measured HB cognitive variables and analyze the factors affecting HB vaccination behavior and willingness to vaccinate by migrant workers. We propose public policy interventions to increase HB vaccination rates of migrant workers. We developed a questionnaire to collect information on the HB vaccination characteristics of 1684 respondents from 6 provinces and Beijing. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create PMT variables and a binary logistic regression model was used to analyze the factors affecting migrant workers' HB vaccination behavior and willingness to vaccinate. Vulnerability and response-efficacy were significant PMT cognition factors determining HB vaccination behavior. The HB vaccination rate for migrants decreased with increasing age and was smaller for the primary education than the high education group. The vaccination rate of the medical insurance group was significantly greater than the non-insured group, and the vaccination probability was significantly higher for the self-rated good health compared to the self-rated poor health group. Geographical birth location mattered: the vaccination rate for Beijing city and Ningxia province migrants were higher than for Hebei province and the vaccination rate was lower for migrants born far from health facilities compared to those located middle

  6. Measurements of Immune Responses for Establishing Correlates of Vaccine Protection Against HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Burgers, Wendy A.; Manrique, Amapola; Masopust, David; McKinnon, Lyle R.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Rolland, Morgane; BLISH, Catherine; Chege, Gerald K.; Curran, Rhonda; Fischer, William; Herrera, Carolina; Sather, D. Noah

    2012-01-01

    Well-defined correlates of protective immunity are an essential component of rational vaccine development. Despite years of basic science and three HIV vaccine efficacy trials, correlates of immunological protection from HIV infection remain undefined. In December 2010, a meeting of scientists engaged in basic and translational work toward developing HIV-1 vaccines was convened. The goal of this meeting was to discuss current opportunities and optimal approaches for defining correlates of pro...

  7. Protective efficacy of two new anti-caries DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinghua; Yang, Xuechao; Xu, Qing-An; Bian, Zhuan; Chen, Zhi; Fan, Mingwen

    2009-12-09

    As we know, the catalytic region of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) is a key region responsible for sucrose-dependent adherence of cariogenic bacteria to teeth. In this study, we evaluate the potential of the catalytic region to enhance the immunogenicity of the anti-caries DNA vaccine. We construct two new anti-caries DNA plasmids pGJGAC/VAX and pGJGA-5C/VAX by cloning different styles of the catalytic regions of GTFs into the previous plasmid pGJA-P/VAX. One is the 1.1 kb full length catalytic region of S. sobrinus GTF-I, the other is its catalytic core sequence which is conserved in the GTFs from mutans streptococci and plays a central role in the enzymatic activities of sucrose splitting and glucan synthesis. The results of caries protection experiment indicate that compared to pGJA-P/VAX, immunization with both new plasmids provides more effective protection against cariogenic bacteria, especially against S. sobrinus. The plasmid encoding full length catalytic region could provide more effective protection against cariogenic bacteria than that encoding catalytic core conserved sequence even though the differences are not very dramatic.

  8. Development of cross-protective influenza A vaccines based on cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Christiaan Soema

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza strains has spurred the vaccine development community to look for other influenza vaccine concepts, which have the ability to elicit cross-protective immune responses.One of the concepts that is currently been worked on are influenza vaccines inducing influenza-specific T cell responses. T cells are able to lyse infected host cells, thereby clearing the virus. More interestingly, these T cells can recognize highly conserved epitopes of internal influenza proteins, making cellular responses less vulnerable to antigenic variability. T cells are therefore cross-reactive against many influenza strains, and thus are a promising concept for future influenza vaccines. Despite their potential, there are currently no T cell based IAV vaccines on the market. Selection of the proper antigen, appropriate vaccine formulation and evaluation of the efficacy of T cell vaccines remains challenging, both in preclinical and clinical settings.In this review, we will discuss the current developments in influenza T cell vaccines, focusing on existing protein-based and novel peptide-based vaccine formulations. Furthermore, we will discuss the feasibility of influenza T cell vaccines and their possible use in the future.

  9. Gene-deleted live-attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi parasites as vaccines to protect against Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Valdéz, Fernando J; Pérez Brandán, Cecilia; Ferreira, Arturo; Basombrío, Miguel Ángel

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is now becoming global, mainly due to congenital transmission, and so far, there are no prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines available to either prevent or treat Chagas disease. Therefore, different approaches aimed at identifying new protective immunogens are urgently needed. Live vaccines are likely to be more efficient in inducing protection, but safety issues linked with their use have been raised. The development of improved protozoan genetic manipulation tools and genomic and biological information has helped to increase the safety of live vaccines. These advances have generated a renewed interest in the use of genetically attenuated parasites as vaccines against Chagas disease. This review discusses the protective capacity of genetically attenuated parasite vaccines and the challenges and perspectives for the development of an effective whole-parasite Chagas disease vaccine.

  10. Does Oral Vaccination Protect Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Against Enteric Red Mouth Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish....... The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge with Y. ruckeri. The rainbow trout were given oral vaccinations...... with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Seven groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w/ booster (4 months post...

  11. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Neumann, Lukas; Otani, Maki

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce...... immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth...... disease (ERM). Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health) or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were...

  12. Oral and Anal vaccination against enteric red mouth disease protection against yersiniosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate in many years. Recently both M-cells and dendritic cells have been found in fish and it is therefore likely that antigens can be taken up from the intestine and induce immunity in orally and anally vaccinated...... fish. The objective for this project is to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout against Yersinia ruckeri O1 (biotype 1) causing Enteric Red Mouth disease (ERM) can protect rainbow trout against a subsequent experimental bath challenge.The rainbow trout were given oral...... vaccinations with AquaVacTM ERM Oral vet. (MSD animal health) or an experimental vaccine based on formalin killed Yersinia ruckeri O1, (biotype 1) bacteria. Eight groups were studied: 1) Control group (no vaccination, no infection), 2) infected control, 3) experimental vaccine, 4) experimental vaccine w...

  13. Basophils help establish protective immunity induced by irradiated larval vaccination for filariasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrero, Marina N.; Morris, C. Paul; Mitre, Blima K.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mueller, Ellen; Karasuyama, Hajime; Mitre, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Basophils are increasingly recognized as playing important roles in the immune response towards helminths. In this study, we evaluated the role of basophils in vaccine-mediated protection against filariae, tissue-invasive parasitic nematodes responsible for diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. Protective immunity and immunological responses were assessed in BALB/c mice vaccinated with irradiated L3 stage larvae and depleted of basophils with weekly injections of anti-CD200R3 antibody. Depletion of basophils after administration of the vaccination regimen but before challenge infection did not alter protective immunity. In contrast, basophil depletion initiated prior to vaccination and continued after challenge infection significantly attenuated the protective effect conferred by vaccination. Vaccine-induced cellular immune responses to parasite antigen were substantially decreased in basophil-depleted mice, with significant decreases in CD4+ T-cell production of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, skin mast cell numbers, which increased significantly after vaccination with irradiated L3 larvae, were unchanged after vaccination in basophil-depleted mice. These findings demonstrate that basophils help establish the immune responses responsible for irradiated L3 vaccine protection. PMID:23777951

  14. Mucosal BCG Vaccination Induces Protective Lung-Resident Memory T Cell Populations against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Carolina; Zedler, Ulrike; Kühl, Anja A.; Lozza, Laura; Saikali, Philippe; Sander, Leif E.; Vogelzang, Alexis; Kupz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), yet its moderate efficacy against pulmonary TB calls for improved vaccination strategies. Mucosal BCG vaccination generates superior protection against TB in animal models; however, the mechanisms of protection remain elusive. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have been implicated in protective immune responses against viral infections, but the role of TRM cells following mycobacterial infection is unknown. Using a mouse model of TB, we compared protection and lung cellular infiltrates of parenteral and mucosal BCG vaccination. Adoptive transfer and gene expression analyses of lung airway cells were performed to determine the protective capacities and phenotypes of different memory T cell subsets. In comparison to subcutaneous vaccination, intratracheal and intranasal BCG vaccination generated T effector memory and TRM cells in the lung, as defined by surface marker phenotype. Adoptive mucosal transfer of these airway-resident memory T cells into naive mice mediated protection against TB. Whereas airway-resident memory CD4+ T cells displayed a mixture of effector and regulatory phenotype, airway-resident memory CD8+ T cells displayed prototypical TRM features. Our data demonstrate a key role for mucosal vaccination-induced airway-resident T cells in the host defense against pulmonary TB. These results have direct implications for the design of refined vaccination strategies. PMID:27879332

  15. Quantitative assessment of the impact of partially protective anti-schistosomiasis vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi A Alsallaq

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass drug administration (MDA of praziquantel has been the intervention of choice against schistosomiasis but with limited success in interrupting the transmission. The development of anti-Schistosoma vaccines is underway. Our objective is to quantify the population-level impact of anti-Schistosoma vaccines when administered alone and in combination with mass drug administration (MDA and determine factors in vaccine design and public health implementation that optimize vaccination role in schistosomiasis control and elimination.We developed a deterministic compartmental model simulation of schistosomiasis transmission in a high-risk Kenyan community, including stratification by age, parasite burden, and vaccination status. The modeled schistosomiasis vaccines differed in terms of vaccine duration of protection (durability and three biological efficacies. These are vaccine susceptibility effect (SE of reducing person's susceptibility to Schistosoma acquisition, vaccine mortality effect (ME of reducing established worm burden and vaccine fecundity effect (FE of reducing egg release by mature worms. We quantified the population-level impact of vaccination over two decades under diverse vaccination schemes (childhood vs. mass campaigns, with different age-targeting scenarios, different risk settings, and with combined intervention with MDA. We also assessed the sensitivity of our predictions to uncertainties in model parameters. Over two decades, our base case vaccine with 80% SE, FE, and ME efficacies, 10 years' durability, provided by mass vaccination every 10 years, reduced host prevalence, mean intensity, incidence, and patent snail prevalence to 31%, 20 eggs/10-ml sample/person, 0.87 worm/person-year, and 0.74%, from endemic-state values of 71%, 152, 3.3, and 0.98%, respectively. Lower impact was found when coverage did not encompass all potential contaminators, and childhood-only vaccination schemes showed delayed and lower impact. In lower

  16. Quantitative assessment of the impact of partially protective anti-schistosomiasis vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsallaq, Ramzi A; Gurarie, David; Ndeffo Mbah, Martial; Galvani, Alison; King, Charles

    2017-04-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) of praziquantel has been the intervention of choice against schistosomiasis but with limited success in interrupting the transmission. The development of anti-Schistosoma vaccines is underway. Our objective is to quantify the population-level impact of anti-Schistosoma vaccines when administered alone and in combination with mass drug administration (MDA) and determine factors in vaccine design and public health implementation that optimize vaccination role in schistosomiasis control and elimination. We developed a deterministic compartmental model simulation of schistosomiasis transmission in a high-risk Kenyan community, including stratification by age, parasite burden, and vaccination status. The modeled schistosomiasis vaccines differed in terms of vaccine duration of protection (durability) and three biological efficacies. These are vaccine susceptibility effect (SE) of reducing person's susceptibility to Schistosoma acquisition, vaccine mortality effect (ME) of reducing established worm burden and vaccine fecundity effect (FE) of reducing egg release by mature worms. We quantified the population-level impact of vaccination over two decades under diverse vaccination schemes (childhood vs. mass campaigns), with different age-targeting scenarios, different risk settings, and with combined intervention with MDA. We also assessed the sensitivity of our predictions to uncertainties in model parameters. Over two decades, our base case vaccine with 80% SE, FE, and ME efficacies, 10 years' durability, provided by mass vaccination every 10 years, reduced host prevalence, mean intensity, incidence, and patent snail prevalence to 31%, 20 eggs/10-ml sample/person, 0.87 worm/person-year, and 0.74%, from endemic-state values of 71%, 152, 3.3, and 0.98%, respectively. Lower impact was found when coverage did not encompass all potential contaminators, and childhood-only vaccination schemes showed delayed and lower impact. In lower prevalence

  17. Long-term protection of hepatitis B vaccination among Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Objective: to detect the long-term immunogenicity of the vaccine in Egyptian children after five and ten years of vaccination. Methods: Two hundreds healthy children were recruited. They were divided into two ...

  18. Ineffectiveness of rabies vaccination alone for post-exposure protection against rabies infection in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Shoufeng; Li, Lietao; Hu, Rongliang; Lin, Haixiang; Liu, Hua; Liu, Fang; Shao, Hui; Liu, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Most reported vaccination failures among rabies-exposed patients were due to fail to timely co-administer rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Considering that such protection failure might be caused by low antigen titers in the vaccine, scientists improved antigen titers to 4.0 IU or even higher, yet the failure remained. Therefore, it becomes vital to develop more efficacious vaccine against rabies. In our evaluation of a novel PIKA rabies vaccine, we used multiple animal models (beagles, golden hamsters and Kunming mice) to mimic post-exposure scenarios. All animals were challenged with wild-type rabies virus, followed by vaccination with either rabies vaccines commercially available or PIKA rabies vaccines. As 100% of animals survived after administration of traditional rabies vaccines and rabies immunoglobulin, 80% of animals survived with rabies immunoglobulin alone. Strikingly, animals receiving traditional rabies vaccines alone showed extremely low survival rates, indicating insignificant benefit for exposed animals (p > 0.05, compared to unvaccinated control groups). To the contrary, 40-80% of animals receiving the experimental PIKA rabies vaccines were protected (p rabies, but only receiving rabies vaccination, could be meaningless. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunological and protective effects of diepitopic subunit dental caries vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel J; King, William F; Rivero, Joy; Taubman, Martin A

    2005-05-01

    As a prelude to development of broader-spectrum vaccines for dental caries, we explored the immune potential of constructs combining epitopes from mutans streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTF) and glucan binding protein B (GbpB). Two diepitopic peptide constructs were synthesized in a multiple antigenic peptide (MAP) format. Both constructs contained SYI, a 20-mer GbpB peptide that included a sequence having major histocompatibility complex class II binding characteristics. One diepitopic construct (SYI-CAT) also contained a 22-mer sequence from the catalytic domain of GTF. Another diepitopic construct (SYI-GLU) contained a 22-mer sequence from the glucan binding domain of GTF. To assess the ability of each construct to induce antibody reactive with GbpB and GTF native proteins, rats were injected subcutaneously with SYI-CAT, SYI-GLU, or the constituent monoepitopic constructs. Only the SYI-CAT construct induced significant levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody to both pathogenesis-associated proteins. Also, immunization with SYI-CAT significantly (P caries after immunization with SYI-CAT, SYI, or CAT MAP constructs, followed by infection with Streptococcus mutans strain SJr. Dental caries were lower in each peptide-immunized group than in the sham-injected group. The level of protection after SYI-CAT immunization was similar to that after immunization with constituent MAP constructs. In another experiment, rats were infected with Streptococcus sobrinus strain 6715 under an identical protocol. Significant protection was observed on buccal surfaces in both SYI-CAT and CAT construct-immunized, but not in the SYI construct-immunized, groups. Thus, addition of the GbpB-derived SYI peptide to the GTF-derived CAT peptide construct not only enhanced the immunological response to CAT and GTF epitopes, but also extended the protective effect of the construct to include both S. mutans and S. sobrinus.

  1. Immunological and Protective Effects of Diepitopic Subunit Dental Caries Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel J.; King, William F.; Rivero, Joy; Taubman, Martin A.

    2005-01-01

    As a prelude to development of broader-spectrum vaccines for dental caries, we explored the immune potential of constructs combining epitopes from mutans streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTF) and glucan binding protein B (GbpB). Two diepitopic peptide constructs were synthesized in a multiple antigenic peptide (MAP) format. Both constructs contained SYI, a 20-mer GbpB peptide that included a sequence having major histocompatibility complex class II binding characteristics. One diepitopic construct (SYI-CAT) also contained a 22-mer sequence from the catalytic domain of GTF. Another diepitopic construct (SYI-GLU) contained a 22-mer sequence from the glucan binding domain of GTF. To assess the ability of each construct to induce antibody reactive with GbpB and GTF native proteins, rats were injected subcutaneously with SYI-CAT, SYI-GLU, or the constituent monoepitopic constructs. Only the SYI-CAT construct induced significant levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibody to both pathogenesis-associated proteins. Also, immunization with SYI-CAT significantly (P caries after immunization with SYI-CAT, SYI, or CAT MAP constructs, followed by infection with Streptococcus mutans strain SJr. Dental caries were lower in each peptide-immunized group than in the sham-injected group. The level of protection after SYI-CAT immunization was similar to that after immunization with constituent MAP constructs. In another experiment, rats were infected with Streptococcus sobrinus strain 6715 under an identical protocol. Significant protection was observed on buccal surfaces in both SYI-CAT and CAT construct-immunized, but not in the SYI construct-immunized, groups. Thus, addition of the GbpB-derived SYI peptide to the GTF-derived CAT peptide construct not only enhanced the immunological response to CAT and GTF epitopes, but also extended the protective effect of the construct to include both S. mutans and S. sobrinus. PMID:15845483

  2. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field.

  3. Influenza Vaccines: From Surveillance Through Production to Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Pritish K.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza is an important contributor to population and individual morbidity and mortality. The current influenza pandemic with novel H1N1 has highlighted the need for health care professionals to better understand the processes involved in creating influenza vaccines, both for pandemic as well as for seasonal influenza. This review presents an overview of influenza-related topics to help meet this need and includes a discussion of the burden of disease, virology, epidemiology, viral surveillance, and vaccine strain selection. We then present an overview of influenza vaccine—related topics, including vaccine production, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, influenza vaccine misperceptions, and populations that are recommended to receive vaccination. English-language articles in PubMed published between January 1, 1970, and October 7, 2009, were searched using key words human influenza, influenza vaccines, influenza A, and influenza B. PMID:20118381

  4. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Z.Q. [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Greenberg, L. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ertl, H.C., E-mail: ertl@wistar.upenn.edu [The Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rupprecht, C.E. [The Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Manhattan, KS (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre (Saint Kitts and Nevis)

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  5. Poor immune responses of newborn rhesus macaques to measles virus DNA vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Fernando P; Lydy, Shari L; Lee, Sok-Hyong; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Adams, Robert J; Robinson, Harriet L; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-02-01

    A vaccine that would protect young infants against measles could facilitate elimination efforts and decrease morbidity and mortality in developing countries. However, immaturity of the immune system is an important obstacle to the development of such a vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccines expressing the measles virus (MeV) hemagglutinin (H) protein or H and fusion (F) proteins, previously shown to protect juvenile macaques, were used to immunize groups of 4 newborn rhesus macaques. Monkeys were inoculated intradermally with 200 μg of each DNA at birth and at 10 months of age. As controls, 2 newborn macaques were similarly vaccinated with DNA encoding the influenza virus H5, and 4 received one dose of the current live attenuated MeV vaccine (LAV) intramuscularly. All monkeys were monitored for development of MeV-specific neutralizing and binding IgG antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These responses were poor compared to the responses induced by LAV. At 18 months of age, all monkeys were challenged intratracheally with a wild-type strain of MeV. Monkeys that received the DNA vaccine encoding H and F, but not H alone, were primed for an MeV-specific CD8(+) CTL response but not for production of antibody. LAV-vaccinated monkeys were protected from rash and viremia, while DNA-vaccinated monkeys developed rashes, similar to control monkeys, but had 10-fold lower levels of viremia. We conclude that vaccination of infant macaques with DNA encoding MeV H and F provided only partial protection from MeV infection.

  6. Oral and anal vaccination confers full protection against enteric redmouth disease (ERM in rainbow trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rømer Villumsen

    Full Text Available The effect of oral vaccines against bacterial fish diseases has been a topic for debate for decades. Recently both M-like cells and dendritic cells have been discovered in the intestine of rainbow trout. It is therefore likely that antigens reaching the intestine can be taken up and thereby induce immunity in orally vaccinated fish. The objective of this project was to investigate whether oral and anal vaccination of rainbow trout induces protection against an experimental waterborne infection with the pathogenic enterobacteria Yersinia ruckeri O1 biotype 1 the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM. Rainbow trout were orally vaccinated with AquaVac ERM Oral (MERCK Animal Health or an experimental vaccine bacterin of Y. ruckeri O1. Both vaccines were tested with and without a booster vaccination four months post the primary vaccination. Furthermore, two groups of positive controls were included, one group receiving the experimental oral vaccine in a 50 times higher dose, and the other group receiving a single dose administered anally in order to bypass the stomach. Each group was bath challenged with 6.3 × 10(8 CFU/ml Y. ruckeri, six months post the primary vaccination. The challenge induced significant mortality in all the infected groups except for the groups vaccinated anally with a single dose or orally with the high dose of bacterin. Both of these groups had 100% survival. These results show that a low dose of Y. ruckeri bacterin induces full protection when the bacterin is administered anally. Oral vaccination also induces full protection, however, at a dose 50 times higher than if the fish were to be vaccinated anally. This indicates that much of the orally fed antigen is digested in the stomach before it reaches the second segment of the intestine where it can be taken up as immunogenic antigens and presented to lymphocytes.

  7. HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIP IN MONKEYS ADMINSTERED LIVE TULAREMIA VACCINE VIA THE DERMAL OR RESPIRATORY ROUTE AND SUBSEQUENTLY CHALLENGED

    Science.gov (United States)

    strain occurred in nonvaccinated controls than in vaccinees. Focal accululation of monocytic cells in the pulmonary parenchyma was first observed in... nonvaccinated controls, animals vaccinated dermally, and animalsnimals vaccinated aerogenically, on the first, third, and fifth day respectively, after...challenge. In contrast to septicemia and fatal diesease in nonvaccinated controls within seven days after challenge, a reduction in number of SCHU S4

  8. Multiserotype protection elicited by a combinatorial prime-boost vaccination strategy against bluetongue virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Calvo-Pinilla

    Full Text Available Bluetongue virus (BTV belongs to the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae. The development of vector-based vaccines expressing conserved protective antigens results in increased immune activation and could reduce the number of multiserotype vaccinations required, therefore providing a cost-effective product. Recent recombinant DNA technology has allowed the development of novel strategies to develop marker and safe vaccines against BTV. We have now engineered naked DNAs and recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA expressing VP2, VP7 and NS1 proteins from BTV-4. IFNAR((-/- mice inoculated with DNA/rMVA-VP2,-VP7-NS1 in an heterologous prime boost vaccination strategy generated significant levels of antibodies specific of VP2, VP7, and NS1, including those with neutralizing activity against BTV-4. In addition, vaccination stimulated specific CD8(+ T cell responses against these three BTV proteins. Importantly, the vaccine combination expressing NS1, VP2 and VP7 proteins of BTV-4, elicited sterile protection against a lethal dose of homologous BTV-4 infection. Remarkably, the vaccine induced cross-protection against lethal doses of heterologous BTV-8 and BTV-1 suggesting that the DNA/rMVA-VP2,-VP7,-NS1 marker vaccine is a promising multiserotype vaccine against BTV.

  9. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Wolfberry, or goji berry, has been shown to improve immune response including enhanced antibody production in response to vaccination in the aged; however, it is not known if this effect of wolfberry would tran...

  10. Matrix-M (TM) adjuvation broadens protection induced by seasonal trivalent virosomal influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, Freek; Saeland, Eirikur; Baart, Matthijs; Koldijk, Martin; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Koudstaal, Wouter; Lövgren Bengtsson, Karin; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radošević, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and therefore it remains a high priority to develop more broadly protective vaccines. Adjuvation of current seasonal influenza vaccines has the potential to achieve this goal. Methods: To assess the immune

  11. One Dose of HPV Vaccine May Protect against Cervical Cancer | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A single dose of the cancer-fighting human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Cervarix™ appears to induce an immune response that remains stable in the blood four years after vaccination. This may be enough to protect women from two strains of HPV and, u

  12. Development of vaccines against Plasmodium falciparum malaria: taking lessons from naturally acquired protective immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2007-01-01

    The acquisition of substantial anti-malarial protection in people naturally exposed to P. falciparum is often cited as evidence that malaria vaccines can be developed, but is rarely used to guide the development. We are pursuing the development of vaccines based on antigens and immune responses...

  13. Influenza vaccination in the elderly: seeking new correlates of protection and improved vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    McElhaney, Janet E

    2008-01-01

    Influenza is foremost among all infectious diseases for an age-related increase in risk for serious complications and death. Determining the benefit of current influenza vaccines is largely limited to epidemiologic studies, since placebo-controlled trials of influenza vaccines are no longer considered ethical in the older adult population. Vaccine effectiveness is calculated from the relative reduction in influenza outcomes in individuals who elect to be vaccinated compared with those who do ...

  14. Strong protection induced by an experimental DIVA subunit vaccine against bluetongue virus serotype 8 in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jenna; Hägglund, Sara; Bréard, Emmanuel; Riou, Mickaël; Zohari, Siamak; Comtet, Loic; Olofson, Ann-Sophie; Gélineau, Robert; Martin, Guillaume; Elvander, Marianne; Blomqvist, Gunilla; Zientara, Stéphan; Valarcher, Jean Francois

    2014-11-20

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infections in ruminants pose a permanent agricultural threat since new serotypes are constantly emerging in new locations. Clinical disease is mainly observed in sheep, but cattle were unusually affected during an outbreak of BTV seroype 8 (BTV-8) in Europe. We previously developed an experimental vaccine based on recombinant viral protein 2 (VP2) of BTV-8 and non-structural proteins 1 (NS1) and NS2 of BTV-2, mixed with an immunostimulating complex (ISCOM)-matrix adjuvant. We demonstrated that bovine immune responses induced by this vaccine were as good or superior to those induced by a classic commercial inactivated vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the experimental vaccine in cattle and, based on the detection of VP7 antibodies, assessed its DIVA compliancy following virus challenge. Two groups of BTV-seronegative calves were subcutaneously immunized twice at a 3-week interval with the subunit vaccine (n=6) or with adjuvant alone (n=6). Following BTV-8 challenge 3 weeks after second immunization, controls developed viremia and fever associated with other mild clinical signs of bluetongue disease, whereas vaccinated animals were clinically and virologically protected. The vaccine-induced protection was likely mediated by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers directed against VP2 and perhaps by cellular responses to NS1 and NS2. T lymphocyte responses were cross-reactive between BTV-2 and BTV-8, suggesting that NS1 and NS2 may provide the basis of an adaptable vaccine that can be varied by using VP2 of different serotypes. The detection of different levels of VP7 antibodies in vaccinated animals and controls after challenge suggested a compliancy between the vaccine and the DIVA companion test. This BTV subunit vaccine is a promising candidate that should be further evaluated and developed to protect against different serotypes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of potential protective mechanisms on the development of live rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard L; Clark, H Fred; Offit, Paul A

    2010-09-01

    Rotaviruses cause extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide, thus corroborating the need for a vaccine that is effective in all socioeconomic environments. Vaccines evaluated in clinical trials have all been live attenuated rotaviruses that are delivered orally to mimic the excellent protection observed after natural infection. The mechanisms by which these vaccine candidates or wild-type rotaviruses elicit protection are not fully understood. During the 1980s, several candidate vaccines provided little protection, particularly in developing countries, and were discontinued. Two, however, are in the process of being licensed worldwide, and several others are undergoing clinical trials. Development of live rotavirus vaccines has been highly influenced by views regarding the importance of serotype-specific neutralizing antibody. Development of several candidate vaccines is based on the concept that neutralizing antibody is the primary determinant of protection. These candidates, including 1 of the 2 being licensed worldwide (RotaTeq), are composed of multiple rotavirus strains representative of the major human rotavirus serotypes. The other group of candidates has been developed based on the theory that protection is not solely dependent on neutralizing antibody. These candidates are composed of single rotavirus strains and include the other vaccine being licensed worldwide (Rotarix). Studies that provide the basis for each approach will be presented and discussed.

  16. Embryo vaccination of chickens using a novel adjuvant formulation stimulates protective immunity against Eimeria maxima infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our previous study demonstrated that chickens immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein vaccine emulsified in a Quil A/cholesterol/DDA/Carbopol (QCDC) adjuvant developed partial protection against experimental avian coccidiosis compared with animals immunized with profili...

  17. Modelling the economic value of cross- and sustained-protection in vaccines against cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarteau, Nadia; Standaert, Baudouin

    2010-01-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are on the market. Based on expected differences in sustained- and cross-protection between the two vaccines, their long-term economic value is modelled and compared for France, Ireland and Italy. A Markov cohort model reproducing the natural history of HPV infections, screening and vaccination, is adapted to country-specific data. Two hypothetical HPV vaccines (VA and VB) are compared. At baseline VA provides lifetime protection against HPV-16 and 10-year protection against HPV-18 before waning. VB is the same as VA with a 10-year protection against HPV-6 and 11. Sustained- and cross-protection is varied over wide ranges in VA to define the levels that could make VA cost-effective or dominant compared with VB. Under baseline conditions VB dominates VA. VA becomes cost-effective when the difference in cross-protection alone reaches 13-15% (undiscounted), and 22-44% (discounted). A combination of sustained- and cross-protection is required for VA to dominate VB (discounted). The results are dependent upon country, the base-case value and the discount applied. Realistic additional sustained- and cross-protection in one HPV vaccine may confer benefits that offset the economic value of protection against low-risk HPV in the other. The results are country specific.

  18. Vaccination of goats with fresh extract from Sarcoptes scabiei confers partial protective immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Protective immunity has been known to develop in animals infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. However, our previous attempt to induce protective immunity in goats by vaccination with fractions of soluble or insoluble mite proteins had been unsuccessful. Degradation or denaturation of protective antigens occurred during vaccine preparation was suggested as one possible cause of the failure. In this study, mite proteins that used to immunise animals were prepared rapidly in order to prevent protein degradation or denaturation. About 150 mg of freshly isolated mites were rapidly homogenised, centrifuged then separated into supernatant and pellet fractions. Twenty-eight goats were allocated equally into 4 groups. Group-1 goats were vaccinated with the whole mite homogenate supernatant, group 2 with the supernatant, group 3 with the pellet, and group 4 with PBS (unvaccinated control. Vaccination was conducted three times, with three-week intervals between vaccinations, using Quil A as adjuvant, and each vaccination using fresh mite homogenates. One week after the last vaccination, all animals were challenged with approximately 2000 live mites. The severity of lesions, scored from 0 (no lesions to 5 (>75% infested auricle affected, were determined one day, two days, then every week after challenge. Mite challenge caused the development of skin lesions in all animals. No significant differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were observed in regards to the severity of lesions. However, the mite densities in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (P=0.015 than those in unvaccinated control. This study indicates that the protective antigens of S. scabiei are liable to degradation or denaturation and exist in a very low concentration or have vary low antigenicity. This implies isolation of the protective antigens by the conventional approach, fracionation of the whole mite proteins and testing each fractions in vaccination trials, is

  19. Dynamic profiles of neutralizing antibody responses elicited in rhesus monkeys immunized with a combined tetravalent DTaP-Sabin IPV candidate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingbo; Ma, Yan; Xu, Yinhua; Yang, Huijuan; Shi, Li; Che, Yanchun; Liao, Guoyang; Jiang, Shude; Zhang, Shumin; Li, Qihan

    2014-02-19

    The World Health Organization has recommended that a Sabin inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) should gradually and synchronously replace oral polio vaccines for routine immunizations because its benefits in eliminating vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis have been reported in different phases of clinical trials. It is also considered important to explore new tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-Sabin IPV (DTaP-sIPV) candidate vaccines for possible use in developing countries. In this study, the immunogenicity of a combined tetravalent DTaP-sIPV candidate vaccine was investigated in primates by evaluating the neutralizing antibody responses it induced. The dynamic profiles of the antibody responses to each of the separate antigenic components and serotypes of Sabin IPV were determined and their corresponding geometric mean titers were similar to those generated by the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-conventional IPV (DTaP-cIPV), the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), and Sabin IPV vaccines in the control groups. This implies that protective immunogenic effects are conferred by this combined tetravalent formulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intranasal DNA Vaccine for Protection against Respiratory Infectious Diseases: The Delivery Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Yuen, Pak-Wai; Lam, Jenny Ka-Wing

    2014-07-10

    Intranasal delivery of DNA vaccines has become a popular research area recently. It offers some distinguished advantages over parenteral and other routes of vaccine administration. Nasal mucosa as site of vaccine administration can stimulate respiratory mucosal immunity by interacting with the nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT). Different kinds of DNA vaccines are investigated to provide protection against respiratory infectious diseases including tuberculosis, coronavirus, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) etc. DNA vaccines have several attractive development potential, such as producing cross-protection towards different virus subtypes, enabling the possibility of mass manufacture in a relatively short time and a better safety profile. The biggest obstacle to DNA vaccines is low immunogenicity. One of the approaches to enhance the efficacy of DNA vaccine is to improve DNA delivery efficiency. This review provides insight on the development of intranasal DNA vaccine for respiratory infections, with special attention paid to the strategies to improve the delivery of DNA vaccines using non-viral delivery agents.

  1. Protective efficacy of a lipid antigen vaccine in a guinea pig model of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Layre, Emilie; Clark, Simon; Prandi, Jacques; Rayner, Emma; Lepore, Marco; de Libero, Gennaro; Williams, Ann; Puzo, Germain; Gilleron, Martine

    2017-03-07

    The bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) vaccine, the only licensed vaccine against TB, displays partial and variable efficacy, thus making the exploitation of novel vaccination strategies a major priority. Most of the current vaccines in pre-clinical or clinical development are based on the induction of T cells recognizing protein antigens. However, a large number of T cells specific for mycobacterial lipids are induced during infection, suggesting that lipid-based vaccines might represent an important component of novel sub-unit vaccines. Here, we investigated whether immunization with defined mycobacterial lipid antigens induces protection in guinea pigs challenged with M. tuberculosis. Two purified mycobacterial lipid antigens, the diacylated sulfoglycolipids (Ac2SGL) and the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol dimannosides (PIM2) were formulated in biophysically characterized liposomes made of dimethyl-dioctadecyl-ammonium (DDA) and synthetic trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB). In three protection trials, a reduction of bacterial load in the spleen of inoculated animals was consistently observed compared to the unvaccinated group. Moreover, a reduction in the number of lesions and severity of pathology was detected in the lungs and spleen of the lipid vaccine group compared to unvaccinated controls. As the degree of protection achieved is similar to that observed using protein antigens in the same guinea pig model, these promising results pave the way to future investigations of lipid antigens as subunit vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a Salmonella cross-protective vaccine for food animal production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heithoff, Douglas M; House, John K; Thomson, Peter C; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Intensive livestock production is associated with increased Salmonella exposure, transmission, animal disease, and contamination of food and water supplies. Modified live Salmonella enterica vaccines that lack a functional DNA adenine methylase (Dam) confer cross-protection to a diversity of salmonellae in experimental models of murine, avian, ovine, and bovine models of salmonellosis. However, the commercial success of any vaccine is dependent upon the therapeutic index, the ratio of safety/efficacy. Herein, secondary virulence-attenuating mutations targeted to genes involved in intracellular and/or systemic survival were introduced into Salmonella dam vaccines to screen for vaccine candidates that were safe in the animal and the environment, while maintaining the capacity to confer cross-protective immunity to pathogenic salmonellae serotypes. Salmonella dam mgtC, dam sifA, and dam spvB vaccine strains exhibited significantly improved vaccine safety as evidenced by the failure to give rise to virulent revertants during the infective process, contrary to the parental Salmonella dam vaccine. Further, these vaccines exhibited a low grade persistence in host tissues that was associated with reduced vaccine shedding, reduced environmental persistence, and induction of cross-protective immunity to pathogenic serotypes derived from infected livestock. These data indicate that Salmonella dam double mutant vaccines are suitable for commercial applications against salmonellosis in livestock production systems. Reducing pre-harvest salmonellae load through vaccination will promote the health and productivity of livestock and reduce contamination of livestock-derived food products, while enhancing overall food safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of the minimum protective dose for bluetongue virus serotype 2 and 8 vaccines in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Modumo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent outbreaks of bluetongue virus (BTV serotypes 2 and 8 in many European countries provided an opportunity to investigate the possibility of improving the safety of the modified live vaccines administered mainly in South Africa. Modified live vaccines (MLV released at a titre of 5 x 104 PFU/mL, raised concerns and prompted the need to determine the minimum titre which will still be protective and also safe. The BTV serotypes 2 and 8 vaccines were produced at the following titres: 102 PFU/mL, 103 PFU/mL and 104 PFU/mL, and were injected into 24 sheep which were then monitored. Blood was collected on days 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 25, 28 and 4 months post vaccination, for seroconversion and viraemia studies. These sheep were later challenged at 4 months post vaccination using BTV infected cell culture material, they were then observed and bled and again tested for viraemia. There was no viraemia post vaccination, however, a febrile reaction did occur and seroconversion was demonstrated at low titres for both BTV 2 and 8. Although viraemia was demonstrated post challenge, sheep vaccinated with the low titre BTV 2 vaccine showed more than a 90% protection index at a lower titre of 103 PFU/mL, compared with BTV 8 that showed a protection index above 90% at all the titres used. It is recommended that for BTV 2 vaccine, sheep should be vaccinated at a titre of 103 PFU/mL and at a titre of 102 PFU/mL with BTV 8 vaccine.

  4. Who's Not Protected in the Herd? Factors Associated with Vaccine-Type HPV in Unvaccinated Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C; Ding, L; Gorbach, P M; Franco, E L; Kahn, J A

    2017-09-21

    Evidence suggests that vaccine-type human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence may decrease in unvaccinated women after HPV vaccine introduction, indicating herd protection. The aim of this study was to determine factors associated with vaccine-type HPV (i.e. absence of herd protection) after vaccine introduction. We conducted three cross-sectional studies from 2006-2014 (n = 1180): wave 1 (2006-2007), wave 2 (2009-2010), and wave 3 (2013-2014). Participants were recruited from a hospital-based teen health center and a community health department. We recruited 13-26 year-old young women; those included in this analysis had not received an HPV vaccine. The outcome measure was infection with at least one vaccine-type HPV (HPV6, 11, 16, 18). Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that in wave 1 (before vaccine introduction), history of anal intercourse (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1-3.0), age 18-21 vs 13-17 years (OR = 2.1, CI = 1.2-3.6), and Black/multiracial vs White race (OR = 1.8, CI = 1.1-3.0) were associated with vaccine-type HPV in unvaccinated women. In wave 2, no variables were associated with HPV. In wave 3, sexually transmitted infection history (OR = 3.6, CI = 1.3-9.7) was associated with HPV. We did not identify a consistent set of modifiable risk factors associated with vaccine-type HPV after vaccine introduction across the three study waves, underscoring the urgency of vaccination for primary HPV prevention and the limitations of relying on herd protection. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Microneedle delivery of trivalent influenza vaccine to the skin induces long-term cross-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Lee, Su-Hwa; Choi, Won-Hyung; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Goo, Tae-Won; Lee, Ju-Hie; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2016-12-01

    A painless self-immunization method with effective and broad cross-protection is urgently needed to prevent infections against newly emerging influenza viruses. In this study, we investigated the cross-protection efficacy of trivalent influenza vaccine containing inactivated A/PR/8/34 (H1N1), A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2) and B/Lee/40 after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with this vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin provided 100% protection against lethal challenges with heterologous pandemic strain influenza A/California/04/09, heterogeneous A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 viruses 8 months after boost immunization. Cross-reactive serum IgG antibody responses against heterologous influenza viruses A/California/04/09, A/Philippines/2/82 and B/Victoria/287 were induced at high levels. Hemagglutination inhibition titers were also maintained at high levels against these heterogeneous viruses. Microneedle vaccination induced substantial levels of cross-reactive IgG antibody responses in the lung and cellular immune responses, as well as cross-reactive antibody-secreting plasma cells in the spleen. Viral loads in the lung were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced. All mice survived after viral challenges. These results indicate that skin vaccination with trivalent vaccine using a microneedle array could provide protection against seasonal epidemic or new pandemic strain of influenza viruses.

  6. DNA Vaccination in the Skin Using Microneedles Improves Protection Against Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun; O, Eunju; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA vaccination in the skin using microneedles improves protective immunity compared to conventional intramuscular (IM) injection of a plasmid DNA vaccine encoding the influenza hemagglutinin (HA). In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated the expression of a reporter gene delivered to the skin using a solid microneedle patch coated with plasmid DNA. Vaccination at a low dose (3 µg HA DNA) using microneedles generated significantly stronger humoral immune responses and better protective responses post-challenge compared to IM vaccination at either low or high (10 µg HA DNA) dose. Vaccination using microneedles at a high (10 µg) dose further generated improved post-challenge protection, as measured by survival, recall antibody-secreting cell responses in spleen and bone marrow, and interferon (IFN)-γ cytokine T-cell responses. This study demonstrates that DNA vaccination in the skin using microneedles induces higher humoral and cellular immune responses as well as improves protective immunity compared to conventional IM injection of HA DNA vaccine. PMID:22508490

  7. Protective Live Oral Brucellosis Vaccines Stimulate Th1 and Th17 Cell Responses ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Beata; Skyberg, Jerod A.; Yang, Xinghong; Thornburg, Theresa; Walters, Nancy; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Zoonotic transmission of brucellosis often results from exposure to Brucella-infected livestock, feral animals, or wildlife or frequently via consumption of unpasteurized milk products or raw meat. Since natural infection of humans often occurs by the oral route, mucosal vaccination may offer a means to confer protection for both mucosal and systemic tissues. Significant efforts have focused on developing a live brucellosis vaccine, and deletion of the znuA gene involved in zinc transport has been found to attenuate Brucella abortus. A similar mutation has been adapted for Brucella melitensis and tested to determine whether oral administration of ΔznuA B. melitensis can confer protection against nasal B. melitensis challenge. A single oral vaccination with ΔznuA B. melitensis rapidly cleared from mice within 2 weeks and effectively protected mice upon nasal challenge with wild-type B. melitensis 16M. In 83% of the vaccinated mice, no detectable brucellae were found in their spleens, unlike with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-dosed mice, and vaccination also enhanced the clearance of brucellae from the lungs. Moreover, vaccinated gamma interferon-deficient (IFN-γ−/−) mice also showed protection in both spleens and lungs, albeit protection that was not as effective as in immunocompetent mice. Although IFN-γ, interleukin 17 (IL-17), and IL-22 were stimulated by these live vaccines, only RB51-mediated protection was codependent upon IL-17 in BALB/c mice. These data suggest that oral immunization with the live, attenuated ΔznuA B. melitensis vaccine provides an attractive strategy to protect against inhalational infection with virulent B. melitensis. PMID:21768283

  8. Lack of correlation between serum rotavirus antibody titers and protection following vaccination with reassortant RRV vaccines. US Rotavirus Vaccine Efficacy Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R L; Bernstein, D I

    1995-09-01

    In a large placebo-controlled efficacy trial of the rhesus tetravalent (RRV-TV) and serotype 1 monovalent (RRV-S1) rotavirus vaccines in multiple sites throughout the United States, protection against rotavirus disease over a 2-year period was found to be 57 and 40%, respectively (Bernstein et al., J. Am. Med. Assoc., 1995, 273, 1191-1196). Sera collected from a subset of subjects during this trial were used to determine possible correlations between rotavirus antibody responses after vaccination and protection. Between 82% (RRV-S1) and 92% (RRV-TV) of the vaccinees seroconverted by at least one of the six antibody assays performed (i.e. rotavirus IgA and neutralizing antibody to RRV and serotype 1-4 human rotaviruses). Rises in neutralizing antibody were due primarily to RRV. The seroconversion rate was only 18-22% to each of the four human rotavirus serotypes following RRV-TV vaccination and was only 43% to serotype 1 human rotavirus after RRV-S1 administration. Furthermore, no correlate of immunity against rotavirus infection or disease was identifiable based on seroconversion to any of the antibodies measured. Likewise, no consistent relationship was found between the titers of any of these six antibodies following vaccination and protection against rotavirus, thus suggesting that serum antibody titers will not be useful markers of protection with these reassortant RRV vaccines. In addition, vaccinated subjects did not develop higher titers of neutralizing antibody to human rotaviruses following a subsequent natural rotavirus illness, a further indication that only weak immune responses to human rotaviruses were stimulated by vaccination with the RRV reassortants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Combination of Protein and Viral Vaccines Induces Potent Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses and Enhanced Protection from Murine Malaria Challenge▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchings, Claire L.; Birkett, Ashley J.; Moore, Anne C.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2007-01-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circums...

  10. An antivector vaccine protects against a lethal vector-borne pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Labuda

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines that target blood-feeding disease vectors, such as mosquitoes and ticks, have the potential to protect against the many diseases caused by vector-borne pathogens. We tested the ability of an anti-tick vaccine derived from a tick cement protein (64TRP of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus to protect mice against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV transmitted by infected Ixodes ricinus ticks. The vaccine has a "dual action" in immunized animals: when infested with ticks, the inflammatory and immune responses first disrupt the skin feeding site, resulting in impaired blood feeding, and then specific anti-64TRP antibodies cross-react with midgut antigenic epitopes, causing rupture of the tick midgut and death of engorged ticks. Three parameters were measured: "transmission," number of uninfected nymphal ticks that became infected when cofeeding with an infected adult female tick; "support," number of mice supporting virus transmission from the infected tick to cofeeding uninfected nymphs; and "survival," number of mice that survived infection by tick bite and subsequent challenge by intraperitoneal inoculation of a lethal dose of TBEV. We show that one dose of the 64TRP vaccine protects mice against lethal challenge by infected ticks; control animals developed a fatal viral encephalitis. The protective effect of the 64TRP vaccine was comparable to that of a single dose of a commercial TBEV vaccine, while the transmission-blocking effect of 64TRP was better than that of the antiviral vaccine in reducing the number of animals supporting virus transmission. By contrast, the commercial antitick vaccine (TickGARD that targets only the tick's midgut showed transmission-blocking activity but was not protective. The 64TRP vaccine demonstrates the potential to control vector-borne disease by interfering with pathogen transmission, apparently by mediating a local cutaneous inflammatory immune response at the tick-feeding site.

  11. Oral Vaccination with Heat Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis Activates the Complement System to Protect against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Aranaz, Alicia; Sevilla, Iker; Villar, Margarita; Boadella, Mariana; Galindo, Ruth C.; Pérez de la Lastra, José M.; Moreno-Cid, Juan A.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Alberdi, Pilar; Santos, Gracia; Ballesteros, Cristina; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Domínguez, Lucas; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a pandemic affecting billions of people worldwide, thus stressing the need for new vaccines. Defining the correlates of vaccine protection is essential to achieve this goal. In this study, we used the wild boar model for mycobacterial infection and TB to characterize the protective mechanisms elicited by a new heat inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine (IV). Oral vaccination with the IV resulted in significantly lower culture and lesion scores, particularly in the thorax, suggesting that the IV might provide a novel vaccine for TB control with special impact on the prevention of pulmonary disease, which is one of the limitations of current vaccines. Oral vaccination with the IV induced an adaptive antibody response and activation of the innate immune response including the complement component C3 and inflammasome. Mycobacterial DNA/RNA was not involved in inflammasome activation but increased C3 production by a still unknown mechanism. The results also suggested a protective mechanism mediated by the activation of IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells by MHC I antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in response to vaccination with the IV, without a clear role for Th1 CD4+ T cells. These results support a role for DCs in triggering the immune response to the IV through a mechanism similar to the phagocyte response to PAMPs with a central role for C3 in protection against mycobacterial infection. Higher C3 levels may allow increased opsonophagocytosis and effective bacterial clearance, while interfering with CR3-mediated opsonic and nonopsonic phagocytosis of mycobacteria, a process that could be enhanced by specific antibodies against mycobacterial proteins induced by vaccination with the IV. These results suggest that the IV acts through novel mechanisms to protect against TB in wild boar. PMID:24842853

  12. HPV16/18 L1 VLP Vaccine Induces Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies that May Mediate Cross-Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, Troy J; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Dauner, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 VLP-based vaccines are protective against HPV vaccine-related types; however, the correlates of protection have not been defined. We observed that vaccination with Cervarix™ induced cross-neutralizing antibodies for HPV types for which evidence of vaccine efficacy has been demonstrated (HPV31/45) but not for other types (HPV52/58). In addition, HPV31/45 cross-neutralizing titers showed a significant increase with number of doses (HPV31, p

  13. Use of the mice passive protection test to evaluate the humoral response in goats vaccinated with Sterne 34F2 live spore vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaswana, P H; Ndumnego, O C; Koehler, S M; Beyer, W; Crafford, J E; van Heerden, H

    2017-09-07

    The Sterne live spore vaccine (34F2) is the most widely used veterinary vaccine against anthrax in animals. Antibody responses to several antigens of Bacillus anthracis have been described with a large focus on those against protective antigen (PA). The focus of this study was to evaluate the protective humoral immune response induced by the live spore anthrax vaccine in goats. Boer goats vaccinated twice (week 0 and week 12) with the Sterne live spore vaccine and naive goats were used to monitor the anti-PA and toxin neutralizing antibodies at week 4 and week 17 (after the second vaccine dose) post vaccination. A/J mice were passively immunized with different dilutions of sera from immune and naive goats and then challenged with spores of B. anthracis strain 34F2 to determine the protective capacity of the goat sera. The goat anti-PA ELISA titres indicated significant sero-conversion at week 17 after the second doses of vaccine (p = 0.009). Mice receiving undiluted sera from goats given two doses of vaccine (twice immunized) showed the highest protection (86%) with only 20% of mice receiving 1:1000 diluted sera surviving lethal challenge. The in vitro toxin neutralization assay (TNA) titres correlated to protection of passively immunized A/J mice against lethal infection with the vaccine strain Sterne 34F2 spores using immune goat sera up to a 1:10 dilution (rs ≥ 0.522, p = 0.046). This study suggests that the passive mouse protection model could be potentially used to evaluate the protective immune response in livestock animals vaccinated with the current live vaccine and new vaccines.

  14. Cross-protective vaccine efficacy of the bivalent HPV vaccine against HPV31 is associated with humoral immune responses: results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J; Pan, David Yuanji; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Cortes, Bernal; Katki, Hormuzd; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiller, John T; Gonzalez, Paula; Penrose, Kerri; Lowy, Douglas R; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the role of antibody responses as potential mechanism for the cross-protective vaccine-efficacies (VE) observed from randomized clinical trials of the HPV16/18 bivalent vaccine. Results HPV31 cases had lower HPV16 antibody levels than controls (OR 4th quartile compared with 1st quartile = 0.63; 95%CI: 0.36-1.08; p-trend = 0.03). HPV31 cases were also less likely to have detectable HPV31 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity than controls. No statistically significant differences by HPV18 antibody or HPV45 neutralization were observed among HPV45 cases and controls. Protection against HPV58 was not associated with any of the markers, confirming the specificity of our findings. Samples are from three-dose HPV vaccine recipients from the Costa Rica HPV16/18 vaccine trial. Women with a new HPV31, HPV45, or HPV58 infections over four years of follow-up were compared with randomly selected control women--with no new infection with HPV31/45/58--with respect to HPV16 and HPV18 antibody, HPV31, HPV45, and HPV58 neutralization, and HPV16 avidity. High HPV16 levels and avidity, and the ability to neutralize HPV31 were associated with protection against newly detected HPV31 infections, suggesting that the partial VE demonstrated for HPV31 is likely to be mediated at least in part through antibodies induced by HPV16/18 vaccination.

  15. [Acellular vaccines (DTPa/dTpa) against whooping cough, protection duration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo-Medrano, M Vicenta; Mendoza-García, José L; Gimeno-Gascón, Adelina; Roda-Ramón, Jorge; Cremades-Bernabeú, Israel; Antequera-Rodríguez, Pedro; Alcalá-Minagorre, Pedro J; Ortiz-de la Tabla, Victoria; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    An increase in whooping cough in most of the developed countries has been detected in the last decade. To determine whether the administration of dTpa vaccine instead of DTPa fifth dose is contributing to the appearance of these cases. A descriptive study based on cases of whooping cough reported during an epidemic period in the city of Alicante in the first 5 months of 2014. Only pertussis cases confirmed by PCR were included in the study, and only those vaccinated with 5 doses were included in the analysis of the period of protection. A total of 104 cases of pertussis confirmed by PCR were reported, with 85 cases (82%) having had 5 doses of vaccine. The mean time and standard deviation (SD) of protection was 2.1±1.1 years with dTpa, and 5.1±1.5 years with DTPa (p<.001). In the protection, adjusted for age, it was observed that, after 3 years, only 47.6% of people vaccinated with dTpa were still protected, while people vaccinated with DTPa were 100% protected (P<.001). This study found that people who were properly vaccinated against pertussis and received their last re-vaccination dose with dTpa had a shorter period of protection than those who were vaccinated with DTPa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Protection of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus four days after specific or semi-specific DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaPatra, S.E.; Corbeil, S.; Jones, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    A DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was shown to provide significant protection as soon as 4 d after intramuscular vaccination in 2 g rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) held at 15 degreesC. Nearly complete protection was also observed at late......-protection against IHNV challenge for a transient period of time, whereas a rabies virus DNA vaccine was not protective. This indication of distinct early and late protective mechanisms was not dependent on DNA vaccine doses from 0.1 to 2.5 mug....

  17. Immune complex-based vaccine for pig protection against parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roić, B; Cajavec, S; Ergotić, N; Lipej, Z; Madić, J; Lojkić, M; Pokrić, B

    2006-02-01

    The insoluble immune complexes (ICs) were prepared under the conditions of double immunodiffusion in gel, using the suspension of the ultrasound treated PK-15 cell-line infected with porcine parvovirus (PPV) containing both viral particles and viral proteins, as well as pig or rabbit anti-PPV polyclonal immune sera. The immunodiffusion performed in an agarose gel allows only viral subunits with a molecular mass equal to or less than 1000 kDa, rather than the viral particles, to diffuse through the gel and reach the point where the immunoprecipitate is to be formed. The immunoprecipitation under the conditions of the diffusion ensures the optimal, i.e. equimolar ratio of both immunoprecipitating components, antibody/antigen in the IC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the Western blot analyses showed the ICs were composed of two proteins, a protein in which molecular mass corresponded to the VP2 of the PPV and a protein with a molecular mass of the IgG. This suggests that the ICs are mainly composed of the VP2 antigen and IgG class antibodies. The potency of the IC-vaccines prepared in the form of a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion was compared with that of a commercially available, inactivated oil vaccine. The vaccination of gilts, 6 weeks before mating, with the IC containing allogeneic pig antibodies, resulted in the development of high and long-lasting anti-PPV antibody titres, similar to those generated by the licenced vaccine (P > 0.01). The content of the virus material administered by the IC was twice lower than that in the licenced vaccine. Neither systemic nor local reactions were observed in the gilts during the period of the trial with the IC vaccine. The number of viable piglets per litter varied between 9 and 12 and no signs of the PPV infection were detected. Rabbits were used as one of the alternative laboratory animal models accepted for the testing of the vaccine against the PPV. The rabbit humoral immune response

  18. Ebola Virus: Immune Mechanisms of Protection and Vaccine Development

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamathi, AM; Fahey, JL; Sands, H; Casillas, AM

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination is one of our most powerful antiviral strategies. Despite the emergence of deadly viruses such as Ebola virus, vaccination efforts have focused mainly on childhood communicable diseases. Although Ebola virus was once believed to be limited to isolated outbreaks in distant lands, forces of globalization potentiate outbreaks anywhere in the world through incidental transmission. Moreover, since this virus has already been transformed into weapongrade material, the potential exists f...

  19. Eye mucosa: an efficient vaccine delivery route for inducing protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Kyoung Yul; Han, Soo Jung; Cha, Hye-Ran; Seo, Sang-Uk; Song, Joo-Hye; Chung, So-Hyang; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2010-09-15

    The external part of the eye shares mucosa-associated common characteristics and is an obvious entry site for foreign Ags. We assessed the potential of eyedrop vaccination for effective delivery of vaccines against viral or bacterial infection in mice. Both OVA-specific IgG Ab in serum and IgA Ab in mucosal compartments were induced by eyedrops of OVA with cholera toxin (CT). Eyedrop vaccination of influenza A/PR/8 virus (H1N1) induced both influenza virus-specific systemic and mucosal Ab responses and protected mice completely against respiratory infection with influenza A/PR/8 virus. In addition, eyedrop vaccination of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains induced LPS-specific Ab and complete protection against oral challenge of virulent Salmonella. Unlike with the intranasal route, eyedrop vaccinations did not redirect administered Ag into the CNS in the presence of CT. When mice were vaccinated by eyedrop, even after the occlusion of tear drainage from eye to nose, Ag-specific systemic IgG and mucosal IgA Abs could be induced effectively. Of note, eyedrops with OVA plus CT induced organogenesis of conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue and increased microfold cell-like cells on the conjunctiva-associated lymphoid tissue in the nictitating membrane on conjunctiva, the mucosal side of the external eye. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the eyedrop route is an alternative to mucosal routes for administering vaccines.

  20. Cross-species protection: Schistosoma mansoni Sm-p80 vaccine confers protection against Schistosoma haematobium in hamsters and baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Souvik; Zhang, Weidong; Ahmad, Gul; Torben, Workineh; Alam, Mayeen U; Le, Loc; Damian, Raymond T; Wolf, Roman F; White, Gary L; Carey, David W; Carter, Darrick; Reed, Steven G; Siddiqui, Afzal A

    2014-03-05

    The ability of the Schistosoma mansoni antigen, Sm-p80, to provide cross-species protection against Schistosoma haematobium challenge was evaluated in hamster and baboon models. Pronounced reduction in worm burden (48%) and in tissue egg load (64%) was observed in hamsters vaccinated with recombinant Sm-p80 admixed with glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant-stable emulsion (GLA-SE). Similarly, in baboons, the Sm-p80/GLA-SE vaccine produced a 25% reduction in S. haematobium adult worms and decreased the egg load in the urinary bladder by 64%. A 40% and 53% reduction in fecal and urine egg output, respectively, was observed in vaccinated baboons. A balanced pro-inflammatory (Th17 and Th1) and Th2 type of response was generated after vaccination and appears indicative of augmented prophylactic efficacy. These data on cross-species protection coupled with the prophylactic, therapeutic and antifecundity efficacy against the homologous parasite, S. mansoni, reinforces Sm-p80 as a promising vaccine candidate. It is currently being prepared for GMP-compliant manufacture and for further pre-clinical development leading to human clinical trials. These results solidify the expectation that the Sm-p80 vaccine will provide relief for both the intestinal and the urinary schistosomiasis and thus will be greatly beneficial in reducing the overall burden of schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The protective rate of the feline immunodeficiency virus vaccine: An Australian field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, M E; Malik, R; Hall, E; Harris, M; Norris, J M

    2016-09-07

    A case-control field study was undertaken to determine the level of protection conferred to client-owned cats in Australia against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) using a commercial vaccine. 440 cats with outdoor access from five Australian states/territories underwent testing, comprising 139 potential cases (complete course of primary FIV vaccinations and annual boosters for three or more years), and 301 potential controls (age, sex and postcode matched FIV-unvaccinated cats). FIV status was determined using a combination of antibody testing (using point-of-care test kits) and nucleic acid amplification, as well as virus isolation in cases where results were discordant and in all suspected FIV-vaccinated/FIV-infected cats ('vaccine breakthroughs'). Stringent inclusion criteria were applied to both 'cases' and 'controls'; 89 FIV-vaccinated cats and 212 FIV-unvaccinated cats ultimately satisfied the inclusion criteria. Five vaccine breakthroughs (5/89; 6%), and 25 FIV-infected controls (25/212; 12%) were identified, giving a vaccine protective rate of 56% (95% CI -20 to 84). The difference in FIV prevalence rates between the two groups was not significant (P=0.14). Findings from this study raise doubt concerning the efficacy of Fel-O-Vax FIV® under field conditions. Screening for FIV infection may be prudent before annual FIV re-vaccination and for sick FIV-vaccinated cats. Owners should not rely on vaccination alone to protect cats against the risk of acquiring FIV infection; other measures such as cat curfews, the use of 'modular pet parks' or keeping cats exclusively indoors, are recommended. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by self-amplifying mRNA vaccines encoding bacterial antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruggi, Giulietta; Chiarot, Emiliano; Giovani, Cinzia; Buccato, Scilla; Bonacci, Stefano; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Margarit, Immaculada; Geall, Andrew; Bensi, Giuliano; Maione, Domenico

    2017-01-05

    Nucleic acid vaccines represent an attractive approach to vaccination, combining the positive attributes of both viral vectors and live-attenuated vaccines, without the inherent limitations of each technology. We have developed a novel technology, the Self-Amplifying mRNA (SAM) platform, which is based on the synthesis of self-amplifying mRNA formulated and delivered as a vaccine. SAM vaccines have been shown to stimulate robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and non-human primates against a variety of viral antigens, thus representing a safe and versatile tool against viral infections. To assess whether the SAM technology could be used for a broader range of targets, we investigated the immunogenicity and efficacy of SAM vaccines expressing antigens from Group A (GAS) and Group B (GBS) Streptococci, as models of bacterial pathogens. Two prototype bacterial antigens (the double-mutated GAS Streptolysin-O (SLOdm) and the GBS pilus 2a backbone protein (BP-2a)) were successfully expressed by SAM vectors. Mice immunized with both vaccines produced significant amounts of fully functional serum antibodies. The antibody responses generated by SAM vaccines were capable of conferring consistent protection in murine models of GAS and GBS infections. Inclusion of a eukaryotic secretion signal or boosting with the recombinant protein resulted in higher specific-antibody levels and protection. Our results support the concept of using SAM vaccines as potential solution for a wide range of both viral and bacterial pathogens, due to the versatility of the manufacturing processes and the broad spectrum of elicited protective immune response. Copyright © 2016 GSK Vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Montanide ISA™ 201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces improved immune responses and protection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Pervaiz; Kalaivanan, Ramya; Sied, Nuru; Mamo, Bedaso; Kishore, Subodh; Suryanarayana, V V S; Kondabattula, Ganesh

    2013-07-18

    Despite significant advancements in modern vaccinology, inactivated whole virus vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) remain the mainstay for prophylactic and emergency uses. Many efforts are currently devoted to improve the immune responses and protective efficacy of these vaccines. Adjuvants, which are often used to potentiate immune responses, provide an excellent mean to improve the efficacy of FMD vaccines. This study aimed to evaluate three oil adjuvants namely: Montanide ISA-201, ISA-206 (SEPPIC, France) and GAHOL (an in-house developed oil-adjuvant) for adjuvant potential in inactivated FMD vaccine. Groups of cattle (n=6) were immunized once intramuscularly with monovalent FMDV 'O' vaccine formulated in these adjuvants, and humoral (serum neutralizing antibody, IgG1 and IgG2) and cellular (lymphoproliferation) responses were measured. Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted vaccine induced earlier and higher neutralizing antibody responses as compared to the two other adjuvants. All the adjuvants induced mainly serum IgG1 isotype antibody responses against FMDV. However, Montanide ISA-201 induced relatively higher IgG2 responses than the other two adjuvants. Lymphoproliferative responses to recall FMDV antigen were relatively higher with Montanide ISA-201, although not always statistically significant. On homologous FMDV challenge at 30 days post-vaccination, 100% (6/6) of the cattle immunized with Montanide-201 adjuvanted vaccine were protected, which was superior to those immunized with ISA-206 (66.6%, 4/6) or GAHOL adjuvanted vaccine (50%, 3/6). Virus replication following challenge infection, as determined by presence of the viral genome in oropharynx and non-structural protein serology, was lowest with Montanide ISA-201 adjuvant. Collectively, these results indicate that the Montanide ISA-201 adjuvanted FMD vaccine induces enhanced immune responses and protective efficacy in cattle. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Inactivated coxsackievirus A10 experimental vaccines protect mice against lethal viral challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chaoyun; Liu, Qingwei; Zhou, Yu; Ku, Zhiqiang; Wang, Lili; Lan, Ke; Ye, Xiaohua; Huang, Zhong

    2016-09-22

    Coxsackievirus A10 (CVA10) has become one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). It is now recognized that CVA10 should be targeted for vaccine development. We report here that β-propiolactone inactivated whole-virus based CVA10 vaccines can elicit protective immunity in mice. We prepared two inactivated CVA10 experimental vaccines derived from the prototype strain CVA10/Kowalik and from a clinical isolate CVA10/S0148b, respectively. Immunization with the experimental vaccines elicited CVA10-specific serum antibodies in mice. The antisera from vaccinated mice could potently neutralize in vitro infection with either homologous or heterologous CVA10 strains. Importantly, passive transfer of the anti-CVA10 sera protected recipient mice against CVA10/Kowalik or CVA10/S0148b infections. Moreover, active immunization with the inactivated vaccines also conferred protection against homologous and heterologous infections in mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate the proof-of-concept for inactivated whole-virus based CVA10 vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine with broad protection potential against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goor, Angelica; Stromberg, Zachary R; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Chickens are a major source of protein worldwide, yet infectious diseases continue to threaten the poultry industry. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), causes colibacillosis in chickens resulting in economic loss because of treatment, condemnation of products, and death. In this study, we evaluated a recombinant antigens (rAg) vaccine combining common ExPEC surface proteins EtsC, OmpA, OmpT, and TraT for broad protective potential against APEC infections in chickens. The specific objectives were to evaluate antibody (serum) and cytokines (lymphoid organs) responses to vaccination; in vitro bactericidal ability of serum and splenocytes against multiple APEC serotypes; and in vivo protection against APEC challenge in chickens. Groups of four-day old chickens (N = 10) were vaccinated twice (two-week interval) subcutaneously with rAgs alone or in combination and CpG adjuvant or PBS (control). IgY antibody in the serum and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-β, and IL-8 in bursa, spleen, and thymus were measured using ELISA and RT-qPCR, respectively. Serum and splenocytes were tested for their bactericidal ability in vitro against multiple APEC isolates. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens were challenged with 108 CFU of APEC-O2 via air sac at 31 days post first vaccination. Vaccine protection was determined by the decrease of bacterial loads in blood and organs (lung, heart, spleen, and liver), as well as gross colibacillosis lesion scores in air sac, heart, and liver. Vaccination significantly (P APEC serotypes, and decreased bacterial loads in the heart and spleen, and gross lesion scores of the air sac, heart and liver in chickens. The vaccine reported may be used to provide broad protection against APEC strains, increasing animal welfare and food production.

  6. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine with broad protection potential against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R.; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Chickens are a major source of protein worldwide, yet infectious diseases continue to threaten the poultry industry. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), causes colibacillosis in chickens resulting in economic loss because of treatment, condemnation of products, and death. In this study, we evaluated a recombinant antigens (rAg) vaccine combining common ExPEC surface proteins EtsC, OmpA, OmpT, and TraT for broad protective potential against APEC infections in chickens. The specific objectives were to evaluate antibody (serum) and cytokines (lymphoid organs) responses to vaccination; in vitro bactericidal ability of serum and splenocytes against multiple APEC serotypes; and in vivo protection against APEC challenge in chickens. Groups of four-day old chickens (N = 10) were vaccinated twice (two-week interval) subcutaneously with rAgs alone or in combination and CpG adjuvant or PBS (control). IgY antibody in the serum and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-β, and IL-8 in bursa, spleen, and thymus were measured using ELISA and RT-qPCR, respectively. Serum and splenocytes were tested for their bactericidal ability in vitro against multiple APEC isolates. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens were challenged with 108 CFU of APEC-O2 via air sac at 31 days post first vaccination. Vaccine protection was determined by the decrease of bacterial loads in blood and organs (lung, heart, spleen, and liver), as well as gross colibacillosis lesion scores in air sac, heart, and liver. Vaccination significantly (P chickens. The vaccine reported may be used to provide broad protection against APEC strains, increasing animal welfare and food production. PMID:28837660

  7. Protective immunity to H7N9 influenza viruses elicited by synthetic DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jian; Villarreal, Daniel O; Racine, Trina; Chu, Jaemi S; Walters, Jewell N; Morrow, Matthew P; Khan, Amir S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Kobinger, Gary P; Weiner, David B

    2014-05-19

    Despite an intensive vaccine program influenza infections remain a major health problem, due to the viruses' ability to change its envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), through shift and drift, permitting influenza to escape protection induced by current vaccines or natural immunity. Recently a new variant, H7N9, has emerged in China causing global concern. First, there have been more than 130 laboratory-confirmed human infections resulting in an alarmingly high death rate (32.3%). Second, genetic changes found in H7N9 appear to be associated with enabling avian influenza viruses to spread more effectively in mammals, thus transmitting infections on a larger scale. Currently, no vaccines or drugs are effectively able to target H7N9. Here, we report the rapid development of a synthetic consensus DNA vaccine (pH7HA) to elicit potent protective immunity against the H7N9 viruses. We show that pH7HA induces broad antibody responses that bind to divergent HAs from multiple new members of the H7N9 family. These antibody responses result in high-titer HAI against H7N9. Simultaneously, this vaccine induces potent polyfunctional effector CD4 and CD8T cell memory responses. Animals vaccinated with pH7HA are completely protected from H7N9 virus infection and any morbidity associated with lethal challenge. This study establishes that this synthetic consensus DNA vaccine represents a new tool for targeting emerging infection, and more importantly, its design, testing and development into seed stock for vaccine production in a few days in the pandemic setting has significant implications for the rapid deployment of vaccines protecting against emerging infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protective Effector Cells of the Recombinant Asp f3 Anti-Aspergillosis Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Ito, James I; Kalkum, Markus

    2012-01-01

    An Aspergillus fumigatus vaccine based on recombinant Asp f3-protein has the potential to prevent aspergillosis in humans, a devastating fungal disease that is the prime obstacle to the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation. This vaccine protects cortisone acetate (CA)-immunosuppressed mice from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis via CD4(+) T cell mediators. Aside from these mediators, the nature of downstream fungicidal effectors is not well understood. Neutrophils and macrophages protect immunocompetent individuals from invasive fungal infections, and selective neutrophil depletion rendered mice susceptible to aspergillosis whereas macrophage depletion failed to increase fungal susceptibility. We investigated the effect of neutrophil depletion on rAsp f3-vaccine protection, and explored differences in pathophysiology and susceptibility between CA-immunosuppression and neutrophil depletion. In addition to being protective under CA-immunosuppression, the vaccine also had a protective effect in neutrophil-depleted mice. However, in non-immunized mice, a 10-fold higher conidial dose was required to induce similar susceptibility to infection with neutrophil depletion than with CA-immunosuppression. The lungs of non-immunized neutrophil-depleted mice became invaded by a patchy dense mycelium with highly branched hyphae, and the peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate consisted mainly of CD3(+) T cells and largely lacked macrophages. In contrast, lungs of non-immunized CA-immunosuppressed mice were more evenly scattered with short hyphal elements. With rAsp f3-vaccination, the lungs were largely clear of fungal burden under either immunosuppressive condition. We conclude that neutrophils, although important for innate antifungal protection of immunocompetent hosts, are not the relevant effectors for rAsp f3-vaccine derived protection of immunosuppressed hosts. It is therefore more likely that macrophages represent the crucial effectors of the rAsp f3-based vaccine.

  9. Host Nonresponsiveness Does not Interfere With Vaccine-Mediated Protection Against Gastric Helicobacter Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Stacey N; Mitchell, Hazel M; Sutton, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis results from the inflammation induced by chronic infection. CBA mice are nonresponsive to gastric Helicobacter infection, providing a useful model for examining host regulation of Helicobacter-induced gastritis. We examined whether gastric Helicobacter nonresponsiveness impacts upon vaccine efficacy and whether immune-mediated protection could occur in the absence of inflammation. Mice were vaccinated prior to challenge with Helicobacter felis or H. pylori. Gastritis and H. felis colonization was evaluated histologically. H. pylori colonization was quantified by colony-forming assay. Immunizations protected CBA mice against challenge with either H. felis or H. pylori. Protection against H. felis was marked by a loss of nonresponsiveness and development of an atrophic gastritis with mucus metaplasia. However, vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori was only associated with cell infiltration into the gastric mucosa. Nonresponsiveness to gastric Helicobacter infection did not interfere with vaccination-induced protection. Vaccine-induced protective immunity against H. pylori was linked with the induction of cellular infiltration, but importantly not atrophic gastritis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Group B Streptococcus: developing a correlate of protection for a vaccine against neonatal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Lala, Sanjay G; Kwatra, Gaurav; Madhi, Shabir A

    2016-06-01

    Maternal vaccination to prevent invasive Group B Streptococcus (GBS) disease in infants is an important alternative strategy to intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis. Licensure of GBS vaccines could be expedited using immunological correlates of protection. Between 2014 and 2015, we identified two studies that demonstrated an inverse association between invasive GBS disease and maternal serotype III capsular antibody levels greater than 1 μg/ml and greater than 3 μg/ml, and higher maternal antibody levels were associated with protection against serotype Ia disease. Furthermore, serotype Ia and III antibody levels greater than 3 μg/ml were associated with a reduced risk of GBS colonization in pregnant women.Experimental studies have investigated the use of GBS surface proteins as vaccine candidates. Although the immunogenic potential of pilus island and other surface proteins has been shown in animal-model studies, no association between maternal pilus island antibody levels and invasive GBS disease was demonstrated in infants. Additionally, several novel innate immune mediators that prevent GBS infection have been described in human and experimental studies. Recent studies suggest that maternal capsular antibody thresholds may be used as immunological correlates of protection for vaccine licensure. Surface proteins, as candidate vaccines or conjugates to the polysaccharide-protein vaccine, may broaden protection against invasive GBS disease.

  11. Development of cross-protective influenza a vaccines based on cellular responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soema, P.C.; Riet, van E.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza vaccines provide protection against matching influenza A virus (IAV) strains mainly through the induction of neutralizing serum IgG antibodies. However, these antibodies fail to confer a protective effect against mismatched IAV. This lack of efficacy against heterologous influenza

  12. Efficacy of rabies vaccines in dogs and cats and protection in a mouse model against European bat lyssavirus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokireki, Tiina; Jakava-Viljanen, Miia; Virtala, Anna-Maija; Sihvonen, Liisa

    2017-10-02

    Rabies is preventable by pre- and/or post-exposure prophylaxis consisting of series of rabies vaccinations and in some cases the use of immunoglobulins. The success of vaccination can be estimated either by measuring virus neutralising antibodies or by challenge experiment. Vaccines based on rabies virus offer cross-protection against other lyssaviruses closely related to rabies virus. The aim was to assess the success of rabies vaccination measured by the antibody response in dogs (n = 10,071) and cats (n = 722), as well as to investigate the factors influencing the response to vaccination when animals failed to reach a rabies antibody titre of ≥ 0.5 IU/ml. Another aim was to assess the level of protection afforded by a commercial veterinary rabies vaccine against intracerebral challenge in mice with European bat lyssavirus type 2 (EBLV-2) and classical rabies virus (RABV), and to compare this with the protection offered by a vaccine for humans. A significantly higher proportion of dogs (10.7%, 95% confidence interval CI 10.1-11.3) than cats (3.5%; 95% CI 2.3-5.0) had a vaccination antibody titre of dogs, vaccination with certain vaccines, vaccination over 6 months prior the time of antibody determination and vaccination of dogs with a size of > 60 cm or larger resulted in a higher risk of failing to reach an antibody level of at least 0.5 IU/ml. When challenged with EBLV-2 and RABV, 80 and 100% of mice vaccinated with the veterinary rabies vaccine survived, respectively. When mice were vaccinated with the human rabies vaccine and challenged with EBLV-2, 75-80% survived, depending on the booster. All vaccinated mice developed sufficient to high titres of virus-neutralising antibodies (VNA) against RABV 21-22 days post-vaccination, ranging from 0.5 to 128 IU/ml. However, there was significant difference between antibody titres after vaccinating once in comparison to vaccinating twice (P dogs and cats in their ability to reach a post vaccination

  13. Long-term protective immunity from an influenza virus-like particle vaccine administered with a microneedle patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Hye Suk; Compans, Richard W; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-09-01

    Skin vaccination with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) using microneedles has been shown to induce protection similar to or better than that induced by intramuscular immunization. In this study, we examined the long-term protective efficacy of influenza (H1N1 A/PR/8/34) VLPs after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with the vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin induced 100% protection against lethal challenge infection with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus 14 months after a single vaccine dose. Influenza virus-specific total IgG response and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers were maintained at high levels for over 1 year after microneedle vaccination. Microneedle vaccination also induced substantial levels of lung IgG and IgA antibody responses, and antibody-secreting plasma cells from spleen and bone marrow, as well as conferring effective control of lung viral loads, resulting in complete protection 14 months after vaccination. These strong and long-lasting immune responses were enabled in part by stabilization of the vaccine by formulation with trehalose during microneedle patch fabrication. Administration of the stabilized vaccine using microneedles was especially effective at enabling strong recall responses measured 4 days after lethal virus challenge, including increased HAI and antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and reduced viral titer and inflammatory response in the lung. The results in this study indicate that skin vaccination with VLP vaccine using a microneedle patch provides long-term protection against influenza in mice.

  14. Potential role of specific antibodies as important vaccine induced protective mechanism against Aeromonas salmonicida in rainbow trout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Rømer Villumsen

    Full Text Available Furunculosis caused by infection with Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida has been a known threat to aquaculture for more than a century. Efficient prophylactic approaches against this disease are essential for continued growth of salmonid aquaculture. Since the introduction of successful oil-adjuvanted vaccines in the early 1990's, a number of studies have been published on the protective as well as adverse effects of these vaccines. Most studies focus on vaccination of salmon (Salmo salar. However, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss are also very susceptible to infection and are vaccinated accordingly. In this study we have examined the protection against infection with a Danish strain of A. salmonicida in both vaccinated and non-vaccinated rainbow trout. A commercial and an experimental auto-vaccine were tested. The protective effects of the vaccines were evaluated through an A. salmonicida challenge 18 weeks post vaccination. Both vaccines resulted in a significantly increased survival in the vaccinated fish during a 28 day challenge period relative to non-vaccinated fish (P = 0.01 and P = 0.001 for the commercial and experimental vaccine, respectively. Throughout the entire experiment, the presence of specific antibodies in plasma was monitored using ELISA. A significant increase in specific antibody levels was seen in fish vaccinated with both vaccines during the 18 weeks between vaccination and challenge. Within 3 days post challenge, a significant decrease in specific antibodies occurred in vaccinated fish. A positive correlation was found between mean levels of specific antibodies pre challenge and overall survival. This correlation, along with the observed depletion of antibodies during the initial phase of infection, suggests that specific antibodies play an essential role in vaccine mediated protection against A. salmonicida in rainbow trout.

  15. Vaccination of HIV-infected pregnant women: implications for protection of their young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangor, Ziyaad; Nunes, Marta C; Kwatra, Gaurav; Lala, Sanjay G; Madhi, Shabir A

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV has resulted in reduced burden of pediatric HIV-infection, but the prevalence of maternal HIV infection remains high in sub-Saharan African countries. HIV-exposed-uninfected infants have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases than HIV-unexposed infants, particularly during the first six months of life, which in part might be due to lower levels of pathogen-specific protective antibodies acquired transplacentally from their mothers. This could be mitigated by vaccinating pregnant women to boost antibody levels; although vaccine responses among HIV-infected pregnant women might differ compared to HIV-uninfected women. We reviewed studies that compared natural and vaccine-induced antibody levels to different epitopes between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected pregnant women. Most studies reported lower baseline/pre-vaccination antibody levels in HIV-infected pregnant women, which may not be reversed by antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy. There were only few studies on vaccination of HIV-infected pregnant women, mainly on influenza virus and group B Streptococcus (GBS) vaccines. Immunogenicity studies on influenza vaccines indicated that HIV-infected pregnant women had lower vaccine induced hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers and a decreased likelihood of seroconversion compared to HIV-uninfected women; and while higher CD4+ T-lymphocyte levels were associated with better immune responses to vaccination, HIV viral load was not associated with responses. Furthermore, infants born to influenza vaccinated HIV-infected pregnant women also had lower antibody levels and a lower proportion of HIV-exposed infants had titers above the putative correlate of protection compared to HIV-unexposed infants. The immunogenicity of a CRM197-conjugated trivalent GBS vaccine was also lower in HIV-infected pregnant women compared to HIV-uninfected women, irrespective of CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts

  16. Immersion vaccination against Yersinia ruckeri O1, biotype 2 confers cross protection against Y. ruckeri O1 biotype 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Martin Kristian; Neumann, Lukas; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    A new biotype 2 of Y. ruckeri O1, which lacks motility has proven highly virulent for rainbow trout, and is causing disease in cultured trout even in fish vaccinated with commercial ERM biotype 1 vaccines. Not much is known about immunity against biotype 2, and therefore have we produced a Y....... ruckeri O1 biotype 2 immersion vaccine and tested the protection against both Y. ruckeri biotype 1 and 2 infections. Seven months post vaccination, both vaccinated and mock-vaccinated groups of rainbow trout were bath challenged with Y. ruckeri serotype O1, biotype 1 or 2. Challenge with biotype 2...... resulted in very low mortalities with no significant difference in mortality between vaccinated and mock-vaccinated fish. Challenge with biotype 1 resulted in a significantly lower mortality (P=0.0001) in the vaccinated group. This result was confirmed 15 months post vaccination (P

  17. Critical Analysis of Compositions and Protective Efficacies of Oral Killed Cholera Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Two cholera vaccines, sold as Shanchol and Dukoral, are currently available. This review presents a critical analysis of the protective efficacies of these vaccines. Children under 5 years of age are very vulnerable to cholera and account for the highest incidence of cholera cases and more than half of the resulting deaths. Both Shanchol and Dukoral are two-spaced-dose oral vaccines comprising large numbers of killed cholera bacteria. The former contains Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139 cells, and the latter contains V. cholerae O1 cells with the recombinant B subunit of cholera toxin. In a field trial in Kolkata (India), Shanchol, the preferred vaccine, protected 45% of the test subjects in all of the age groups and only 17% of the children under 5 years of age during the first year of surveillance. In a field trial in Peru, two spaced doses of Dukoral offered negative protection in children under 5 years of age and little protection (15%) in vaccinees over 6 years of age during the first year of surveillance. Little is known about Dukoral's long-term protective efficacy. Both of these vaccines have questionable compositions, using V. cholerae O1 strains isolated in 1947 that have been inactivated by heat and formalin treatments that may denature protein. Immunological studies revealed Dukoral's reduced and short-lived efficacy, as measured by several immunological endpoints. Various factors, such as the necessity for multiple doses, poor protection of children under 5 years of age, the requirement of a cold supply chain, production costs, and complex logistics of vaccine delivery, greatly reduce the suitability of either of these vaccines for endemic or epidemic cholera control in resource-poor settings. PMID:25056361

  18. Combination of protein and viral vaccines induces potent cellular and humoral immune responses and enhanced protection from murine malaria challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, Claire L; Birkett, Ashley J; Moore, Anne C; Hill, Adrian V S

    2007-12-01

    The search for an efficacious vaccine against malaria is ongoing, and it is now widely believed that to confer protection a vaccine must induce very strong cellular and humoral immunity concurrently. We studied the immune response in mice immunized with the recombinant viral vaccines fowlpox strain FP9 and modified virus Ankara (MVA), a protein vaccine (CV-1866), or a combination of the two; all vaccines express parts of the same preerythrocytic malaria antigen, the Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein (CSP). Mice were then challenged with P. berghei sporozoites to determine the protective efficacies of different vaccine regimens. Two immunizations with the protein vaccine CV-1866, based on the hepatitis B core antigen particle, induced strong humoral immunity to the repeat region of CSP that was weakly protective against sporozoite challenge. Prime-boost with the viral vector vaccines, FP9 followed by MVA, induced strong T-cell immunity to the CD8+ epitope Pb9 and partially protected animals from challenge. Physically mixing CV-1866 with FP9 or MVA and then immunizing with the resultant combinations in a prime-boost regimen induced both cellular and humoral immunity and afforded substantially higher levels of protection (combination, 90%) than either vaccine alone (CV-1866, 12%; FP9/MVA, 37%). For diseases such as malaria in which different potent immune responses are required to protect against different stages, using combinations of partially effective vaccines may offer a more rapid route to achieving deployable levels of efficacy than individual vaccine strategies.

  19. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Ki Tsoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Group A streptococcus (GAS is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates.

  20. Protection of sheep against Rift Valley fever virus and sheep poxvirus with a recombinant capripoxvirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soi, Reuben K; Rurangirwa, Fred R; McGuire, Travis C; Rwambo, Paul M; DeMartini, James C; Crawford, Timothy B

    2010-12-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an epizootic viral disease of sheep that can be transmitted from sheep to humans, particularly by contact with aborted fetuses. A capripoxvirus (CPV) recombinant virus (rKS1/RVFV) was developed, which expressed the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Gn and Gc glycoproteins. These expressed glycoproteins had the correct size and reacted with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) to native glycoproteins. Mice vaccinated with rKS1/RVFV were protected against RVFV challenge. Sheep vaccinated with rKS1/RVFV twice developed neutralizing antibodies and were significantly protected against RVFV and sheep poxvirus challenge. These findings further document the value of CPV recombinants as ruminant vaccine vectors and support the inclusion of RVFV genes encoding glycoproteins in multivalent recombinant vaccines to be used where RVF occurs.

  1. Correlates of Protection for M Protein-Based Vaccines against Group A Streptococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, Pierre R.; Frost, Hannah R. C.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is known to cause a broad spectrum of illness, from pharyngitis and impetigo, to autoimmune sequelae such as rheumatic heart disease, and invasive diseases. It is a significant cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide, but no efficacious vaccine is currently available. Progress in GAS vaccine development has been hindered by a number of obstacles, including a lack of standardization in immunoassays and the need to define human correlates of protection. In this review, we have examined the current immunoassays used in both GAS and other organisms, and explored the various challenges in their implementation in order to propose potential future directions to identify a correlate of protection and facilitate the development of M protein-based vaccines, which are currently the main GAS vaccine candidates. PMID:26101780

  2. Can VHS virus bypass the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination in rainbow trout?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sepúlveda, Dagoberto; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding viral glycoproteins have been very successful for induction of protective immunity against diseases caused by rhabdoviruses in cultured fish species. However, the vaccine concept is based on a single viral gene and since RNA viruses are known to possess high variability...... and adaptation capacity, this work aimed at evaluating whether viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), an RNA virus and member of Rhabdoviridae family, was able to evade the protective immune response induced by the DNA vaccination of rainbow trout. The experiments comprised repeated passages of a highly...... pathogenic VHSV isolate in a fish cell line in the presence of neutralizing fish serum (in vitro approach), and in rainbow trout immunized with the VHS DNA vaccine (in vivo approach). For the in vitro approach, the virus collected from the last passage (passaged virus) was as sensitive as the parental virus...

  3. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D.; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M.; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N.; Frost, Kathy L.; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K.; Maslow, Joel N.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Yao, Xiao-jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract. PMID:28589934

  4. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N; Frost, Kathy L; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K; Maslow, Joel N; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B; Kobinger, Gary P

    2017-06-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract.

  5. Mucosal immunization of rhesus monkeys against respiratory syncytial virus subgroups A and B and human parainfluenza virus type 3 by using a live cDNA-derived vaccine based on a host range-attenuated bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 vector backbone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Alexander C; Wenzke, Daniel R; McAuliffe, Josephine M; St Claire, Marisa; Elkins, William R; Murphy, Brian R; Collins, Peter L

    2002-02-01

    Reverse genetics was used to develop a two-component, trivalent live attenuated vaccine against human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroups A and B. The backbone for each of the two components of this vaccine was the attenuated recombinant bovine/human PIV3 (rB/HPIV3), a recombinant BPIV3 in which the bovine HN and F protective antigens are replaced by their HPIV3 counterparts (48). This chimera retains the well-characterized host range attenuation phenotype of BPIV3, which appears to be appropriate for immunization of young infants. The open reading frames (ORFs) for the G and F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and B were each placed under the control of PIV3 transcription signals and inserted individually or in homologous pairs as supernumerary genes in the promoter proximal position of rB/HPIV3. The level of replication of rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses in the respiratory tract of rhesus monkeys was similar to that of their parent virus rB/HPIV3, and each of the chimeras induced a robust immune response to both RSV and HPIV3. RSV-neutralizing antibody titers induced by rB/HPIV3-RSV chimeric viruses were equivalent to those induced by infection with wild-type RSV, and HPIV3-specific antibody responses were similar to, or slightly less than, after infection with the rB/HPIV3 vector itself. This study describes a novel vaccine strategy against RSV in which vaccine viruses with a common attenuated backbone, specifically rB/HPIV3 derivatives expressing the G and/or F major protective antigens of RSV subgroup A and of RSV subgroup B, are used to immunize by the intranasal route against RSV and HPIV3, which are the first and second most important viral agents of pediatric respiratory tract disease worldwide.

  6. Protection conferred by virus-like particle vaccines against respiratory syncytial virus infection in mice by intranasal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hongjing; Li, Tieling; Han, Lina; Zhu, Ping; Zhang, Peirui; Zhang, Shaogeng; Sun, Sujing; Duan, Yueqiang; Xing, Li; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Lai, Chengcai; Wen, Bohai; Wang, Xiliang; Yang, PengHui

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major pathogen in infants and the elderly, causing pneumonia and bronchiolitis. Despite decades of research, to date there is still no approved RSV vaccine available. In this study, we developed RSV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines containing an RSV fusion (F) and/or attachment (G) protein with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as the platform. The VLPs were expressed in a baculovirus system and purified by sucrose gradient centrifugation. BALB/c mice immunized intranasally (i.n.) with rNDV/RSV/F plus rNDV/RSV/G developed robust humoral, mucosal RSV-specific antibodies and cellular immune responses. Furthermore, rNDV/RSV/F plus rNDV/RSV/G provided better protection than did rNDV/RSV/F or rNDV/RSV/G alone, as shown by an obvious decrease in viral replication together with alleviation of histopathological changes in the lungs of the challenged mice. Our data demonstrate that the intranasal vaccination of combined RSV virus-like particle vaccine candidates has great potential for protection against RSV infection.

  7. Cytolethal distending toxin as virulence factor, protective antigen, and target for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagergård T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Lagergård,1 Jerry Keith21Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: This review explores the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT as a virulence factor, protective antigen, and a vaccine candidate in diseases caused by the following bacterial pathogens: Haemophilus ducreyi (HdCDT, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter jejuni, and Helicobacter hepaticus. The review highlights some of the important evidence indicating that CDT is not only a commonly invoked virulence factor involved in pathogenesis of infection caused by these bacteria, but is also a protective antigen, such that specific antibodies will neutralize cell damage caused by the toxin. This justifies the development of toxoids as vaccine candidates. The first immunogenic toxoid was produced by formaldehyde treatment of HdCDT and has been used to study the involvement of antibodies in protection against infection and its use as a future vaccine component. The development of such toxoid vaccines may facilitate the studies of protection and immunoprophylaxis in diseases caused by CDT-producing bacteria.Keywords: cytolethal distending toxin, virulence factor, protective antigen, Haemophilus ducreyi, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Campylobacter jejuni, toxoid vaccine

  8. Rationalized design of a mucosal vaccine protects againstMycobacterium tuberculosischallenge in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mushtaq; Jiao, Hongmei; Domingo-Gonzalez, Racquel; Das, Shibali; Griffiths, Kristin L; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Nagarajan, Uma M; Khader, Shabaana A

    2017-06-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) is a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. The only licensed TB vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), has variable efficacy in protecting against pulmonary TB. Thus, the development of more effective TB vaccines is critical to control the TB epidemic. Specifically, vaccines delivered through the mucosal route are known to induce Th17 responses and provide superior protection against Mtb infection. However, already tested Th17-inducing mucosal adjuvants, such as heat-labile enterotoxins and cholera toxins, are not considered safe for use in humans. In the current study, we rationally screened adjuvants for their ability to induce Th17-polarizing cytokines in dendritic cells (DCs) and determined whether they could be used in a protective mucosal TB vaccine. Our new studies show that monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), when used in combination with chitosan, potently induces Th17-polarizing cytokines in DCs and downstream Th17/Th1 mucosal responses and confers significant protection in mice challenged with a clinical Mtb strain. Additionally, we show that both TLRs and the inflammasome pathways are activated in DCs by MPL-chitosan to mediate induction of Th17-polarizing cytokines. Together, our studies put forward the potential of a new, protective mucosal TB vaccine candidate, which incorporates safe adjuvants already approved for use in humans. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. Vaccination with Recombinant Microneme Proteins Confers Protection against Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Figueiredo Pinzan

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is an important public health problem and veterinary concern. Although there is no vaccine for human toxoplasmosis, many attempts have been made to develop one. Promising vaccine candidates utilize proteins, or their genes, from microneme organelle of T. gondii that are involved in the initial stages of host cell invasion by the parasite. In the present study, we used different recombinant microneme proteins (TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 or combinations of these proteins (TgMIC1-4 and TgMIC1-4-6 to evaluate the immune response and protection against experimental toxoplasmosis in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with recombinant TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 alone conferred partial protection, as demonstrated by reduced brain cyst burden and mortality rates after challenge. Immunization with TgMIC1-4 or TgMIC1-4-6 vaccines provided the most effective protection, since 70% and 80% of mice, respectively, survived to the acute phase of infection. In addition, these vaccinated mice, in comparison to non-vaccinated ones, showed reduced parasite burden by 59% and 68%, respectively. The protective effect was related to the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by vaccination and included the release of Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12, antigen-stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and production of antigen-specific serum antibodies. Our results demonstrate that microneme proteins are potential vaccines against T. gondii, since their inoculation prevents or decreases the deleterious effects of the infection.

  10. Vaccination with Recombinant Microneme Proteins Confers Protection against Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzan, Camila Figueiredo; Sardinha-Silva, Aline; Almeida, Fausto; Lai, Livia; Lopes, Carla Duque; Lourenço, Elaine Vicente; Panunto-Castelo, Ademilson; Matthews, Stephen; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, is an important public health problem and veterinary concern. Although there is no vaccine for human toxoplasmosis, many attempts have been made to develop one. Promising vaccine candidates utilize proteins, or their genes, from microneme organelle of T. gondii that are involved in the initial stages of host cell invasion by the parasite. In the present study, we used different recombinant microneme proteins (TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6) or combinations of these proteins (TgMIC1-4 and TgMIC1-4-6) to evaluate the immune response and protection against experimental toxoplasmosis in C57BL/6 mice. Vaccination with recombinant TgMIC1, TgMIC4, or TgMIC6 alone conferred partial protection, as demonstrated by reduced brain cyst burden and mortality rates after challenge. Immunization with TgMIC1-4 or TgMIC1-4-6 vaccines provided the most effective protection, since 70% and 80% of mice, respectively, survived to the acute phase of infection. In addition, these vaccinated mice, in comparison to non-vaccinated ones, showed reduced parasite burden by 59% and 68%, respectively. The protective effect was related to the cellular and humoral immune responses induced by vaccination and included the release of Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12, antigen-stimulated spleen cell proliferation, and production of antigen-specific serum antibodies. Our results demonstrate that microneme proteins are potential vaccines against T. gondii, since their inoculation prevents or decreases the deleterious effects of the infection.

  11. Novel structurally designed vaccine for S. aureus α-hemolysin: protection against bacteremia and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Karauzum, Hatice; Sarwar, Jawad; Abaandou, Laura; Mahmoudieh, Mahta; Boroun, Atefeh R; Vu, Hong; Nguyen, Tam; Devi, V Sathya; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a human pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and life threatening sepsis and pneumonia. Efforts to develop effective vaccines against S. aureus have been largely unsuccessful, in part due to the variety of virulence factors produced by this organism. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a pore-forming toxin expressed by most S. aureus strains and reported to play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSTI and pneumonia. Here we report a novel recombinant subunit vaccine candidate for Hla, rationally designed based on the heptameric crystal structure. This vaccine candidate, denoted AT-62aa, was tested in pneumonia and bacteremia infection models using S. aureus strain Newman and the pandemic strain USA300 (LAC). Significant protection from lethal bacteremia/sepsis and pneumonia was observed upon vaccination with AT-62aa along with a Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE) that is currently in clinical trials. Passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin against AT-62aa (AT62-IgG) protected mice against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with USA300 and produced significant reduction in bacterial burden in blood, spleen, kidney, and lungs. Our Hla-based vaccine is the first to be reported to reduce bacterial dissemination and to provide protection in a sepsis model of S. aureus infection. AT62-IgG and sera from vaccinated mice effectively neutralized the toxin in vitro and AT62-IgG inhibited the formation of Hla heptamers, suggesting antibody-mediated neutralization as the primary mechanism of action. This remarkable efficacy makes this Hla-based vaccine a prime candidate for inclusion in future multivalent S. aureus vaccine. Furthermore, identification of protective epitopes within AT-62aa could lead to novel immunotherapy for S. aureus infection.

  12. Novel structurally designed vaccine for S. aureus α-hemolysin: protection against bacteremia and pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan P Adhikari

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a human pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI and life threatening sepsis and pneumonia. Efforts to develop effective vaccines against S. aureus have been largely unsuccessful, in part due to the variety of virulence factors produced by this organism. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla is a pore-forming toxin expressed by most S. aureus strains and reported to play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSTI and pneumonia. Here we report a novel recombinant subunit vaccine candidate for Hla, rationally designed based on the heptameric crystal structure. This vaccine candidate, denoted AT-62aa, was tested in pneumonia and bacteremia infection models using S. aureus strain Newman and the pandemic strain USA300 (LAC. Significant protection from lethal bacteremia/sepsis and pneumonia was observed upon vaccination with AT-62aa along with a Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE that is currently in clinical trials. Passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin against AT-62aa (AT62-IgG protected mice against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with USA300 and produced significant reduction in bacterial burden in blood, spleen, kidney, and lungs. Our Hla-based vaccine is the first to be reported to reduce bacterial dissemination and to provide protection in a sepsis model of S. aureus infection. AT62-IgG and sera from vaccinated mice effectively neutralized the toxin in vitro and AT62-IgG inhibited the formation of Hla heptamers, suggesting antibody-mediated neutralization as the primary mechanism of action. This remarkable efficacy makes this Hla-based vaccine a prime candidate for inclusion in future multivalent S. aureus vaccine. Furthermore, identification of protective epitopes within AT-62aa could lead to novel immunotherapy for S. aureus infection.

  13. Molecular adjuvant Ag85A enhances protection against influenza A virus in mice following DNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Pei, Decui; Wang, Baoning; Kuang, Yu; Ren, Laifeng; Cao, Kang; Wang, Huan; Zuo, Bin; Shao, Jingjing; Li, Sha; Li, Hong; Li, Mingyuan

    2012-12-10

    A novel DNA vaccine vector encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis secreted antigen Ag85A fused with the influenza A virus (IAV) HA2 protein epitopes, pEGFP/Ag85A-sHA2 (pAg85A-sHA2), was designed to provide protection against influenza. The antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine vector was efficiently expressed in mammalian cells, as determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and fluorescence analyses. Mice were immunized with the vaccine vector by intramuscular injection before challenge with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (PR8 virus). Sera and the splenocyte culture IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in immunized mice compared with the control mice. The novel vaccine group showed a high neutralization antibody titer in vitro. The novel vaccine vector also reduced the viral loads, increased the survival rates in mice after the PR8 virus challenge and reduced the alveolar inflammatory cell numbers. Sera IL-4 concentrations were significantly increased in mice immunized with the novel vaccine vector on Day 12 after challenge with the PR8 virus. These results demonstrated that short HA2 (sHA2) protein epitopes may provide protection against the PR8 virus and that Ag85A could strengthen the immune response to HA2 epitopes, thus, Ag85A may be developed as a new adjuvant for influenza vaccines.

  14. Molecular Adjuvant Ag85A Enhances Protection against Influenza A Virus in Mice Following DNA Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel DNA vaccine vector encoding the Mycobacterium tuberculosis secreted antigen Ag85A fused with the influenza A virus (IAV HA2 protein epitopes, pEGFP/Ag85A-sHA2 (pAg85A-sHA2, was designed to provide protection against influenza. The antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine vector was efficiently expressed in mammalian cells, as determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and fluorescence analyses. Mice were immunized with the vaccine vector by intramuscular injection before challenge with A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus (PR8 virus. Sera and the splenocyte culture IFN-γ levels were significantly higher in immunized mice compared with the control mice. The novel vaccine group showed a high neutralization antibody titer in vitro. The novel vaccine vector also reduced the viral loads, increased the survival rates in mice after the PR8 virus challenge and reduced the alveolar inflammatory cell numbers. Sera IL-4 concentrations were significantly increased in mice immunized with the novel vaccine vector on Day 12 after challenge with the PR8 virus. These results demonstrated that short HA2 (sHA2 protein epitopes may provide protection against the PR8 virus and that Ag85A could strengthen the immune response to HA2 epitopes, thus, Ag85A may be developed as a new adjuvant for influenza vaccines.

  15. MDCK cell-cultured influenza virus vaccine protects mice from lethal challenge with different influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Yao, Zhidong; Zhang, Liangyan; Li, Junli; Xing, Li; Wang, Xiliang

    2012-06-01

    Influenza epidemics are major health concern worldwide. Vaccination is the major strategy to protect the general population from a pandemic. Currently, most influenza vaccines are manufactured using chicken embroynated eggs, but this manufacturing method has potential limitations, and cell-based vaccines offer a number of advantages over the traditional method. We reported here using the scalable bioreactor to produce pandemic influenza virus vaccine in a Madin-Darby canine kidney cell culture system. In the 7.5-L bioreactor, the cell concentration reached to 3.2 × 10(6) cells/mL and the highest virus titers of 256 HAU/50 μL and 1 × 10(7) TCID50/mL. The HA concentration was found to be 11.2 μg/mL. The vaccines produced by the cell-cultured system induced neutralization antibodies, cross-reactive T-cell responses, and were protective in a mouse model against different lethal influenza virus challenge. These data indicate that microcarrier-based cell-cultured influenza virus vaccine manufacture system in scalable bioreactor could be used to produce effective pandemic influenza virus vaccines.

  16. Combinatorial synthetic peptide vaccine strategy protects against hypervirulent CovR/S mutant streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Manisha; Mortensen, Rasmus; Calcutt, Ainslie

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of virulence responder/sensor (CovR/S) mutant group A streptococci (GAS) are serious human pathogens of multiple M protein strains that upregulate expression of virulence factors, including the IL-8 protease Streptococcus pyogenes cell envelope proteinase (SpyCEP), thus blunting neutrophil......-mediated killing and enabling ingress of bacteria from a superficial wound to deep tissue.We previously showed that a combination vaccine incorporating J8-DT (conserved peptide vaccine from theM protein) and a recombinant SpyCEP fragment protects against CovR/S mutants. To enhance the vaccine's safety profile, we...

  17. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle vaccine protects nonhuman primates from intramuscular and aerosol challenge with ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew S; Kuehne, Ana I; Barth, James F; Ortiz, Ramon A; Nichols, Donald K; Zak, Samantha E; Stonier, Spencer W; Muhammad, Majidat A; Bakken, Russell R; Prugar, Laura I; Olinger, Gene G; Groebner, Jennifer L; Lee, John S; Pratt, William D; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I; Smith, Jonathan F; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M

    2013-05-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine.

  18. Augmented particle trapping and attenuated inflammation in the liver by protective vaccination against Plasmodium chabaudi malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dkhil Mohamed A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date all efforts to develop a malaria vaccine have failed, reflecting the still fragmentary knowledge about protective mechanisms against malaria. In order to evaluate if vaccination changes responses of the anti-malaria effectors spleen and liver to blood stage malaria, BALB/c mice succumbing to infection with Plasmodium chabaudi were compared to those surviving after vaccination. Methods Mice were vaccinated with host cell plasma membranes isolated from P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes. Hepatic and splenic capacity to trap particulate material was determined after injection of fluorescent polystyrol beads. Hepatic gene expression was measured using real-time RT-PCR and Northern blotting. Results Survival of BALB/c mice was raised from 0% to 80% and peak parasitaemia was decreased by about 30% by vaccination. Vaccination boosted particle trapping capacity of the liver during crisis when splenic trapping is minimal due to spleen 'closing'. It also attenuated malaria-induced inflammation, thus diminishing severe damages and hence liver failure. Vaccination increased hepatic IFN-γ production but mitigated acute phase response. Vaccination has a complex influence on infection-induced changes in expression of hepatic nuclear receptors (CAR, FXR, RXR, and PXR and of the metabolic enzymes Sult2a and Cyp7a1. Although vaccination decreased CAR mRNA levels and prevented Cyp7a1 suppression by the CAR ligand 1,2-bis [2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy]benzene (TCPOBOP on day 8 p.i., Sult2a-induction by TCPOBOP was restored. Conclusion These data support the view that the liver is an essential effector site for a vaccine against blood stage malaria: vaccination attenuates malaria-induced inflammation thus improving hepatic metabolic activity and particle trapping activity of the liver.

  19. [Effect of immune modulation on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal'nik, B V; Ponomareva, T S; Deriabin, P N; Denisova, T G; Mel'nikova, N N; Tugambaev, T I; Atshabar, B B; Zakarian, S B

    2014-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of the effect of polyoxidonium and betaleukin on immunogenic and protective activity of a live plague vaccine in model animal experiments. Plague vaccine EV, polyoxidonium, betaleukin, erythrocytic antigenic diagnosticum for determination of F1 antibodies and immune reagents for detection of lymphocytes with F1 receptors (LFR) in adhesive test developed by the authors were used. The experiments were carried out in 12 rabbits and 169 guinea pigs. Immune modulation accelerated the appearance and disappearance of LFR (early phase) and ensured a more rapid and intensive antibody formation (effector phase). Activation by betaleukin is more pronounced than by polyoxidonium. The more rapid and intensive was the development of early phase, the more effective was antibody response to the vaccine. Immune modulation in the experiment with guinea pigs significantly increased protective activity of the vaccine. The use of immune modulators increased immunogenic (in both early and effector phases of antigen-specific response) and protective activity of the EV vaccine. A connection between the acceleration of the first phase of antigen-specific response and general intensity of effector phase of immune response to the EV vaccine was detected. ,

  20. Chimeric hemagglutinin influenza virus vaccine constructs elicit broadly protective stalk-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Pica, Natalie; Hai, Rong; Margine, Irina; Palese, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Current influenza virus vaccine strategies stimulate immune responses toward the globular head domain of the hemagglutinin protein in order to inhibit key steps of the virus life cycle. Because this domain is highly variable across strains, new vaccine formulations are required in most years. Here we demonstrate a novel vaccine strategy that generates immunity to the highly conserved stalk domain by using chimeric hemagglutinin constructs that express unique head and stalk combinations. By repeatedly immunizing mice with constructs that expressed the same stalk but an irrelevant head, we specifically stimulated a stalk-directed response that provided broad-based heterologous and heterosubtypic immunity in mice. Notably, our vaccination scheme provides a universal vaccine approach that protects against challenge with an H5 subtype virus. Furthermore, through in vivo studies using passively transferred antibodies or depletion of CD8(+) T cells, we demonstrated the critical role that humoral mechanisms of immunity play in the protection observed. The present data suggest that a vaccine strategy based on the stalk domain of the hemagglutinin protein could be used in humans to broadly protect against a variety of influenza virus subtypes.

  1. Immunogenicity and protection efficacy of subunit-based smallpox vaccines using variola major antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Wang, Shixia; Zhang, Chuanyou; Chou, Te-Hui; Kishko, Michael; Lu, Shan

    2008-02-05

    The viral strain responsible for smallpox infection is variola major (VARV). As a result of the successful eradication of smallpox with the vaccinia virus (VACV), the general population is no longer required to receive a smallpox vaccine, and will have no protection against smallpox. This lack of immunity is a concern due to the potential for use of smallpox as a biological weapon. Considerable progress has been made in the development of subunit-based smallpox vaccines resulting from the identification of VACV protective antigens. It also offers the possibility of using antigens from VARV to formulate the next generation subunit-based smallpox vaccines. Here, we show that codon-optimized DNA vaccines expressing three VARV antigens (A30, B7 and F8) and their recombinant protein counterparts elicited high-titer, cross-reactive, VACV neutralizing antibody responses in mice. Vaccinated mice were protected from intraperitoneal and intranasal challenges with VACV. These results suggest the feasibility of a subunit smallpox vaccine based on VARV antigen sequences to induce immunity against poxvirus infection.

  2. A DNA vaccine expressing PB1 protein of influenza A virus protects mice against virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košík, Ivan; Krejnusová, Ingrid; Práznovská, Margaréta; Poláková, Katarína; Russ, Gustáv

    2012-05-01

    Although influenza DNA vaccine research has focused mainly on viral hemagglutinin and has led to promising results, other virion proteins have also shown some protective potential. In this work, we explored the potential of a DNA vaccine based on the PB1 protein to protect BALB/c mice against lethal influenza A virus infection. The DNA vaccine consisted of pTriEx4 plasmid expressing PB1. As a positive control, a pTriEx4 plasmid expressing influenza A virus HA was used. Two weeks after three subcutaneous doses of DNA vaccine, the mice were challenged intranasally with 1 LD50 of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1) virus, and PB1- and HA-specific antibodies, survival rate, body weight change, viral mRNA load, infectious virus titer in the lungs, cytokines IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10, and granzyme-B were measured. The results showed that (i) the PB1-expressing DNA vaccine provided a fair protective immunity in the mouse model and (ii) viral structural proteins such as PB1 represent promising antigens for DNA vaccination against influenza A.

  3. A DNA vaccine delivered by dermal electroporation fully protects cynomolgus macaques against Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Wilkinson, Eric R; Shaia, Carl I; Facemire, Paul R; Bell, Todd M; Bearss, Jeremy J; Shamblin, Joshua D; Wollen, Suzanne E; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-12-02

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an ambisense RNA virus in the Arenaviridae family and is the etiological agent of Lassa fever, a severe hemorrhagic disease endemic to West and Central Africa. 1,2 There are no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines available to prevent Lassa fever. 1,2 in our previous studies, we developed a gene-optimized DNA vaccine that encodes the glycoprotein precursor gene of LASV (Josiah strain) and demonstrated that 3 vaccinations accompanied by dermal electroporation protected guinea pigs from LASV-associated illness and death. Here, we describe an initial efficacy experiment in cynomolgus macaque nonhuman primates (NHPs) in which we followed an identical 3-dose vaccine schedule that was successful in guinea pigs, and a follow-on experiment in which we used an accelerated vaccination strategy consisting of 2 administrations, spaced 4 weeks apart. In both studies, all of the LASV DNA-vaccinated NHPs survived challenge and none of them had measureable, sustained viremia or displayed weight loss or other disease signs post-exposure. Three of 10 mock-vaccinates survived exposure to LASV, but all of them became acutely ill post-exposure and remained chronically ill to the study end point (45 d post-exposure). Two of the 3 survivors experienced sensorineural hearing loss (described elsewhere). These results clearly demonstrate that the LASV DNA vaccine combined with dermal electroporation is a highly effective candidate for eventual use in humans.

  4. Inclusion of the benefits of enhanced cross-protection against cervical cancer and prevention of genital warts in the cost-effectiveness analysis of human papillomavirus vaccination in the Netherlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Westra, Tjalke A; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Dorsman, Sara; Tutuhatunewa, Eric D; de Vrij, Edwin L; Nijman, Hans W; Daemen, Toos; Wilschut, Jan C; Postma, Maarten J

    2013-01-01

    .... Both vaccines provide cross-protection against HPV-types not included in the vaccines. In particular, the bivalent vaccine provides additional protection against HPV 31, 33, and 45 and the quadrivalent vaccine against HPV31...

  5. DNA Vaccination of the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) Provides Partial Protection Against Lethal Challenge with West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    thousands of human neurologic disease cases between 1999 and 2006, thousands of cases of equine encephalitis, and millions of deaths of native and...with rabies vaccine used to vaccinate wild raccoons and foxes (13). In addition, a vaccine is needed to protect valuable collections of captive birds

  6. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  7. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  8. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  9. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... the mechanisms for manipulating the immune system, tumor immunotherapy, especially, targeting angiogenesis ... delivery system for transfection. The effects of resulting vaccine and underlying mechanism were investigated in ..... Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of T-cadherin in human hepatocellular ...

  10. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting angiogenesis is an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. The vascular endothelialcadherin (VE-cad) regulated angiogenesis is a potential target for anti-angiogenesis. Here, we develop a fusion vaccine plasmid DNA pSec-MBD2-VE-cad from VE-cad and murine beta defensin2 (MBD2) to induce immunity for ...

  11. Ebola virus: immune mechanisms of protection and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Fahey, John L; Sands, Heather; Casillas, Adrian M

    2003-04-01

    Vaccination is one of our most powerful antiviral strategies. Despite the emergence of deadly viruses such as Ebola virus, vaccination efforts have focused mainly on childhood communicable diseases. Although Ebola virus was once believed to be limited to isolated outbreaks in distant lands, forces of globalization potentiate outbreaks anywhere in the world through incidental transmission. Moreover, since this virus has already been transformed into weapon-grade material, the potential exists for it to be used as a biological weapon with catastrophic consequences for any population vulnerable to attack. Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is a syndrome that can rapidly lead to death within days of symptom onset. The disease directly affects the immune system and vascular bed, with correspondingly high mortality rates. Patients with severe disease produce dangerously high levels of inflammatory cytokines, which destroy normal tissue and microcirculation, leading to profound capillary leakage, renal failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Vaccine development has been fraught with obstacles, primarily of a biosafety nature. Case reports of acutely ill patients with EHF showing improvement with the transfusion of convalescent plasma are at odds with animal studies demonstrating further viral replication with the same treatment. Using mRNA extracted from bone marrow of Ebola survivors, human monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus surface protein have been experimentally produced and now raise the hope for the development of a safe vaccine.

  12. Superior protection conferred by inactivated whole virus vaccine over subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Mutoloki, Stephen; Evensen, Øystein

    2012-06-06

    Salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV-3) is an emerging pathogen in Norwegian salmon farming and causes severe annual losses. We studied the immunogenicity and protective ability of subunit and DNA vaccines based on E1 and E2 spike proteins of salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV-3), and compared these to an experimental inactivated, whole virus (IWV) vaccine in Atlantic salmon. The antigens were delivered as water-in-oil emulsions for the subunit and inactivated vaccines and non-formulated for the DNA vaccines. The IWV and the E2 subunit prime-boost groups had circulating neutralizing antibodies at challenge, correlating with high protection against lethal challenge and 3-log(10) reduction of virus titer in heart for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 subunit vaccine also conferred significant protection against mortality, but did not correlate with neutralizing antibody levels. Protection against pathology in internal organs was only seen for the IWV group. Prime-boost with E1 and E2 DNA vaccines showed marginal protection in terms of reduction of viral replication in target organs and protection against mortality was not different from controls. The IWV group showed significant upregulation of IFNγ and IL2 mRNA expression at 4 weeks post challenge possibly indicating that other mechanisms in addition to antibody responses play a role in mediating protection against infection. This is the first report comparing the immunogenicity and protection against mortality for IWV vaccines and spike protein subunit and DNA vaccines against salmonid alphavirus infection in Atlantic salmon. The IWV vaccine has superior immunogenicity over sub-unit and DNA vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Jong Seok [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yu-Jin [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Animal and Plant Quarantine Agency, Gyeonggi-do, Gimcheon, Gyeongsangbukdo (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Minkyoung [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kang, Sang-Moo, E-mail: skang24@gsu.edu [Center for Inflammation, Immunity & Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. - Highlights: • Combined RSV FFG VLP vaccine is effective in inducing F specific responses. • FFG VLP vaccine confers RSV neutralizing activity and viral control in cotton rats. • Cotton rats with RSV FFG VLP vaccination do not show vaccine-enhanced disease. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP vaccine induce F specific antibody secreting cell responses. • Cotton rats with FFG VLP do not induce lung cellular infiltrates and Th2 cytokine.

  14. Introduction of translation stop condons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, Kyle A.; Conway, Carla M.; Kurath, Gael

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine.

  15. Introduction of translation stop codons into the viral glycoprotein gene in a fish DNA vaccine eliminates induction of protective immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, K.A.; Conway, C.M.; Kurath, G.

    2006-01-01

    A highly efficacious DNA vaccine against a fish rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), was mutated to introduce two stop codons to prevent glycoprotein translation while maintaining the plasmid DNA integrity and RNA transcription ability. The mutated plasmid vaccine, denoted pIHNw-G2stop, when injected intramuscularly into fish at high doses, lacked detectable glycoprotein expression in the injection site muscle, and did not provide protection against lethal virus challenge 7 days post-vaccination. These results suggest that the G-protein itself is required to stimulate the early protective antiviral response observed after vaccination with the nonmutated parental DNA vaccine. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  16. Host immunity in the protective response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paessler Slobodan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed initial cell, cytokine and complement depletion studies to investigate the possible role of these effectors in response to vaccination with heat-killed Burkholderia mallei in a susceptible BALB/c mouse model of infection. Results While protection with heat-killed bacilli did not result in sterilizing immunity, limited protection was afforded against an otherwise lethal infection and provided insight into potential host protective mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that mice depleted of either B cells, TNF-α or IFN-γ exhibited decreased survival rates, indicating a role for these effectors in obtaining partial protection from a lethal challenge by the intraperitoneal route. Additionally, complement depletion had no effect on immunoglobulin production when compared to non-complement depleted controls infected intranasally. Conclusion The data provide a basis for future studies of protection via vaccination using either subunit or whole-organism vaccine preparations from lethal infection in the experimental BALB/c mouse model. The results of this study demonstrate participation of B220+ cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α in protection following HK vaccination.

  17. Construction of Eimeria tenella multi-epitope DNA vaccines and their protective efficacies against experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Huang, Xinmei; Li, Xiangrui

    2015-08-15

    The search for effective vaccines against chicken coccidiosis remains a challenge because of the complex organisms with multiple life cycle stages of Eimeria. Combination of T-cell epitopes from different stages of Eimeria life cycle could be an optimal strategy to overcome the antigen complexity of the parasite. In this study, 4 fragments with concentrated T-cell epitopes from the sporozoite antigen SO7 and the merozoite antigen MZ5-7 of Eimeria tenella were cloned into eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in different forms, with or without chicken cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ genes as genetic adjuvants, to construct multistage, multi-epitope DNA vaccines against Eimeria tenella. Transcription and expression of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines in vivo were detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot. On the basis of survival rate, lesion score, body weight gain, oocyst decrease ratio and the anti-coccidial index (ACI), Animal experiments were carried out to evaluate the protective efficacy against Eimeria tenella. Results showed the constructed DNA vaccines were transcribed and translated successfully in vivo. Animal experiment showed that the multi-epitopes DNA vaccines were more effective to stimulate immune response than single fragment. Compared with the DNA vaccines composed with less T-cell epitopes, DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 containing 4 fragments with concentrated T-epitopes provided the highest ACI of 180.39. DNA vaccines composed of antigens from two developmental stages were more effective than the single-stage ones. Especially DNA vaccine pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2 provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 180.39. Furthermore, cytokines IL-2 or IFN-γ could improve the efficacy of the multi-epitope DNA vaccines significantly. Overall, pVAX1-m1-m2-s1-s2-IFN-γ provided the most effective protection with the ACI of 189.92. The multi-epitope DNA vaccines revealed in this study provide new candidates for Eimeria vaccine development

  18. Protective properties of vaccinia virus-based vaccines: skin scarification promotes a nonspecific immune response that protects against orthopoxvirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Amanda D; Adams, Mathew M; Lindsey, Scott F; Swetnam, Daniele M; Manning, Brandi R; Smith, Andrew J; Burrage, Andrew M; Wallace, Greg; MacNeill, Amy L; Moyer, Richard W

    2014-07-01

    The process of vaccination introduced by Jenner generated immunity against smallpox and ultimately led to the eradication of the disease. Procedurally, in modern times, the virus is introduced into patients via a process called scarification, performed with a bifurcated needle containing a small amount of virus. What was unappreciated was the role that scarification itself plays in generating protective immunity. In rabbits, protection from lethal disease is induced by intradermal injection of vaccinia virus, whereas a protective response occurs within the first 2 min after scarification with or without virus, suggesting that the scarification process itself is a major contributor to immunoprotection. importance: These results show the importance of local nonspecific immunity in controlling poxvirus infections and indicate that the process of scarification should be critically considered during the development of vaccination protocols for other infectious agents. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Superior protection elicited by live-attenuated vaccines in the murine model of paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pallab; Shippy, Daniel C; Talaat, Adel M

    2015-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteric infection in ruminants with severe economic impact on the dairy industry in the USA and worldwide. Currently, available vaccines have limited protective efficacy against disease progression and does not prevent spread of the infection among animals. Because of their ability to elicit wide-spectrum immune responses, we adopted a live-attenuated vaccine approach based on a sigH knock-out strain of M. paratuberculosis (ΔsigH). Earlier analysis of the ΔsigH mutant in mice indicated their inadequate ability to colonize host tissues, unlike the isogenic wild-type strain, validating the role of this sigma factor in M. paratuberculosis virulence. In the present study, we evaluated the performance of the ΔsigH mutant compared to inactivated vaccine constructs in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. The presented analysis indicated that ΔsigH mutant with or without QuilA adjuvant is capable of eliciting strong immune responses (such as interferon gamma-γ, IFN-γ) suggesting their immunogenicity and ability to potentially initiate effective vaccine-induced immunity. Following a challenge with virulent strains of M. paratuberculosis, ΔsigH conferred protective immunity as indicated by the reduced bacterial burden accompanied with reduced lesions in main body organs (liver, spleen and intestine) usually infected with M. paratuberculosis. More importantly, our data indicated better ability of the ΔsigH vaccine to confer protection compared to the inactivated vaccine constructs even with the presence of oil-adjuvant. Overall, our approach provides a rational basis for using live-attenuated mutant strains to develop improved vaccines that elicit robust immunity against this chronic infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Primates living outside protected habitats are more stressed: the case of black howler monkeys in the Yucatán Peninsula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Rangel-Negrín

    Full Text Available The non-invasive monitoring of glucocorticoid hormones allows for the assessment of the physiological effects of anthropogenic disturbances on wildlife. Variation in glucocorticoid levels of the same species between protected and unprotect areas seldom has been measured, and the available evidence suggests that this relationship may depend on species-specific habitat requirements and biology. In the present study we focused on black howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra, a canopy-dwelling primate species, as a case study to evaluate the physiological consequences of living in unprotected areas, and relate them with intragroup competition and competition with extragroup individuals. From February 2006 to September 2007 we collected 371 fecal samples from 21 adults belonging to five groups (two from protected and three from unprotected areas in Campeche, Mexico. We recorded agonistic interactions within groups and encounters with other groups (1,200 h of behavioral observations, and determined fecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM concentrations with radioimmunoassays. We used linear mixed models and Akaike's information criterion to choose the best model explaining variation in FGM concentrations between protected and unprotected areas calculated from five categorical variables: habitat type (protected vs. unprotected, participation in agonistic interactions, intergroup encounters, sex and female reproductive state, and season. The best model included habitat type, the interaction between habitat type and agonism, and the interaction between habitat type and season. FGM concentrations were higher in unprotected habitats, particularly when individuals were involved in agonistic interactions; seasonal variation in FGM concentrations was only detected in protected habitats. High FGM concentrations in black howler monkeys living in unprotected habitats are associated with increased within-group food competition and probably associated with exposure to

  1. Possible mechanisms of protection elicited by candidate rotavirus vaccines as determined with the adult mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    Rotaviruses cause extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide each year, supporting the need for a vaccine that is effective against rotavirus disease in all socioeconomic environments. Vaccines evaluated in clinical trials have all been live viruses that are delivered orally to mimic the excellent protection against severe rotavirus disease consistently observed after natural infection. The mechanisms by which either these vaccine candidates or natural rotavirus infections elicit protection are poorly understood. Therefore, it is not surprising that several of these candidate vaccines have provided little or no protection and have been discontinued. Two candidate vaccines are presently in phase III trials. These two were developed on the basis of very different views regarding the importance of one specific immune effector, that is, serotype-specific neutralizing antibody. One of these candidates (RotaTeq) is composed of five bovine/human reassortant rotavirus strains containing neutralization proteins representative of dominant human serotypes. The other candidate (Rotarix) is composed of only a single strain of human rotavirus. Very recent data obtained with Rotarix support the suggestion that factors other than neutralizing antibody can play important roles in protection against rotavirus disease after live rotavirus immunization. These results must be confirmed in subsequent studies in different locales with circulating rotaviruses belonging to a variety of serotypes in order to establish there overall applicability. Mechanisms by which rotavirus immunization with live viruses or other immunogens elicit protection have been most extensively examined in an adult mouse model and were reported to be multi-factorial. That is, CD8 and CD4 T cells as well as B cells were all found to play significant roles. The importance of each lymphocyte population as effectors of protection was found to be dependent on the immunogen and the route of immunization. The results of

  2. Design and Construction of Shrimp Antiviral DNA Vaccines Expressing Long and Short Hairpins for Protection by RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Aparna; Pathakota, Gireesh-Babu; Annam, Pavan-Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines present the aquaculture industry with an effective and economically viable method of controlling viral pathogens that drastically affect productivity. Since specific immune response is rudimentary in invertebrates, the presence of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in shrimps provides a promising new approach to vaccination. Plasmid DNA vaccines that express short or long double stranded RNA in vivo have shown protection against viral diseases. The design, construction and considerations for preparing such vaccines are discussed.

  3. Protective efficacy afforded by live Pasteurella multocida vaccines in chickens is independent of lipopolysaccharide outer core structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Marina; John, Marietta; Edmunds, Mark; Wright, Amy; Ford, Mark; Turni, Conny; Blackall, P J; Cox, Andrew; Adler, Ben; Boyce, John D

    2016-03-29

    Pasteurella multocida is a major animal pathogen that causes a range of diseases including fowl cholera. P. multocida infections result in considerable losses to layer and breeder flocks in poultry industries worldwide. Both killed whole-cell and live-attenuated vaccines are available; these vaccines vary in their protective efficacy, particularly against heterologous strains. Moreover, until recently there was no knowledge of P. multocida LPS genetics and structure to determine precisely how LPS structure affects the protective capacity of these vaccines. In this study we show that defined lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants presented as killed whole-cell vaccines elicited solid protective immunity only against P. multocida challenge strains expressing highly similar or identical LPS structures. This finding indicates that vaccination of commercial flocks with P. multocida killed cell formulations will not protect against strains producing an LPS structure different to that produced by strains included in the vaccine formulation. Conversely, protective immunity conferred by vaccination with live P. multocida strains was found to be largely independent of LPS structure. Birds vaccinated with a range of live mutants belonging to the L1 and L3 LPS genotypes, each expressing a specific truncated LPS structure, were protected against challenge with the parent strain. Moreover, birds vaccinated with any of the five LPS mutants belonging to the L1 LPS genotype were also protected against challenge with an unrelated strain and two of the five groups vaccinated with live LPS mutants belonging to the L3 genotype were protected against challenge with an unrelated strain. In summary, vaccination with live P. multocida aroA mutants producing full-length L1 or L3 LPS or vaccination with live strains producing shortened L1 LPS elicited strong protective immunity against both homologous and heterologous challenge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vesicular stomatitis virus-based ebola vaccine is well-tolerated and protects immunocompromised nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Geisbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV is a significant human pathogen that presents a public health concern as an emerging/re-emerging virus and as a potential biological weapon. Substantial progress has been made over the last decade in developing candidate preventive vaccines that can protect nonhuman primates against EBOV. Among these prospects, a vaccine based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV is particularly robust, as it can also confer protection when administered as a postexposure treatment. A concern that has been raised regarding the replication-competent VSV vectors that express EBOV glycoproteins is how these vectors would be tolerated by individuals with altered or compromised immune systems such as patients infected with HIV. This is especially important as all EBOV outbreaks to date have occurred in areas of Central and Western Africa with high HIV incidence rates in the population. In order to address this concern, we evaluated the safety of the recombinant VSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein (VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP in six rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV. All six animals showed no evidence of illness associated with the VSVDeltaG/ZEBOVGP vaccine, suggesting that this vaccine may be safe in immunocompromised populations. While one goal of the study was to evaluate the safety of the candidate vaccine platform, it was also of interest to determine if altered immune status would affect vaccine efficacy. The vaccine protected 4 of 6 SHIV-infected macaques from death following ZEBOV challenge. Evaluation of CD4+ T cells in all animals showed that the animals that succumbed to lethal ZEBOV challenge had the lowest CD4+ counts, suggesting that CD4+ T cells may play a role in mediating protection against ZEBOV.

  5. Design and development of a novel vaccine for protection against Lyme borreliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstedt, Pär; Hanner, Markus; Schüler, Wolfgang; Meinke, Andreas; Lundberg, Urban

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no Lyme borreliosis vaccine available for humans, although it has been shown that the disease can be prevented by immunization with an OspA-based vaccine (LYMErix). Outer surface protein A (OspA) is one of the dominant antigens expressed by the spirochetes when present in a tick. The Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe express different OspA serotypes on their surface, B. burgdorferi (serotype 1), B. afzelii (serotype 2), B. garinii (serotypes, 3, 5 and 6) and B. bavariensis (serotype 4), while only B. burgdorferi is present in the US. In order to target all these pathogenic Borrelia species, we have designed a multivalent OspA-based vaccine. The vaccine includes three proteins, each containing the C-terminal half of two OspA serotypes linked to form a heterodimer. In order to stabilize the C-terminal fragment and thus preserve important structural epitopes at physiological temperature, disulfide bonds were introduced. The immunogenicity was increased by introduction of a lipidation signal which ensures the addition of an N-terminal lipid moiety. Three immunizations with 3.0 µg adjuvanted vaccine protected mice from a challenge with spirochetes expressing either OspA serotype 1, 2 or 5. Mice were protected against both challenge with infected ticks and in vitro grown spirochetes. Immunological analyses (ELISA, surface binding and growth inhibition) indicated that the vaccine can provide protection against the majority of Borrelia species pathogenic for humans. This article presents the approach which allows for the generation of a hexavalent vaccine that can potentially protect against a broad range of globally distributed Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis.

  6. Design and development of a novel vaccine for protection against Lyme borreliosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Comstedt

    Full Text Available There is currently no Lyme borreliosis vaccine available for humans, although it has been shown that the disease can be prevented by immunization with an OspA-based vaccine (LYMErix. Outer surface protein A (OspA is one of the dominant antigens expressed by the spirochetes when present in a tick. The Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe express different OspA serotypes on their surface, B. burgdorferi (serotype 1, B. afzelii (serotype 2, B. garinii (serotypes, 3, 5 and 6 and B. bavariensis (serotype 4, while only B. burgdorferi is present in the US. In order to target all these pathogenic Borrelia species, we have designed a multivalent OspA-based vaccine. The vaccine includes three proteins, each containing the C-terminal half of two OspA serotypes linked to form a heterodimer. In order to stabilize the C-terminal fragment and thus preserve important structural epitopes at physiological temperature, disulfide bonds were introduced. The immunogenicity was increased by introduction of a lipidation signal which ensures the addition of an N-terminal lipid moiety. Three immunizations with 3.0 µg adjuvanted vaccine protected mice from a challenge with spirochetes expressing either OspA serotype 1, 2 or 5. Mice were protected against both challenge with infected ticks and in vitro grown spirochetes. Immunological analyses (ELISA, surface binding and growth inhibition indicated that the vaccine can provide protection against the majority of Borrelia species pathogenic for humans. This article presents the approach which allows for the generation of a hexavalent vaccine that can potentially protect against a broad range of globally distributed Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis.

  7. A semi-synthetic whole parasite vaccine designed to protect against blood stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddam, Ashwini Kumar; Reiman, Jennifer M; Zaman, Mehfuz; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Toth, Istvan; Good, Michael F

    2016-10-15

    Although attenuated malaria parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs) are promising vaccine candidates, their application in humans may be restricted for ethical and regulatory reasons. Therefore, we developed an organic microparticle-based delivery platform as a whole parasite malaria-antigen carrier to mimic pRBCs. Killed blood stage parasites were encapsulated within liposomes that are targeted to antigen presenting cells (APCs). Mannosylated lipid core peptides (MLCPs) were used as targeting ligands for the liposome-encapsulated parasite antigens. MLCP-liposomes, but not unmannosylated liposomes, were taken-up efficiently by APCs which then significantly upregulated expression of MHC-ll and costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. Two such vaccines using rodent model systems were constructed - one with Plasmodium chabaudi and the other with P. yoelii. MLCP-liposome vaccines were able to control the parasite burden and extended the survival of mice. Thus, we have demonstrated an alternative delivery system to attenuated pRBCs with similar vaccine efficacy and added clinical advantages. Such liposomes are promising candidates for a human malaria vaccine. Attenuated whole parasite-based vaccines, by incorporating all parasite antigens, are very promising candidates, but issues relating to production, storage and safety concerns are significantly slowing their development. We therefore developed a semi-synthetic whole parasite malaria vaccine that is easily manufactured and stored. Two such prototype vaccines (a P. chabaudi and a P. yoelii vaccine) have been constructed. They are non-infectious, highly immunogenic and give good protection profiles. This semi-synthetic delivery platform is an exciting strategy to accelerate the development of a licensed malaria vaccine. Moreover, this strategy can be potentially applied to a wide range of pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine failed to protect rhesus macaques from intravenous or genital mucosal infection but delayed disease in intravenously exposed animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutjipto, S.; Pedersen, N.C.; Miller, C.J.; Gardner, M.B.; Hanson, C.V.; Gettie, A.; Jennings, M.; Higgins, J.; Marx, P.A. (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Eight rhesus macaques were immunized four times over a period of 8 months with a psoralen-UV-light-inactivated whole simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine adjuvanted with threonyl muramyl dipeptide. Eight unvaccinated control animals received adjuvant alone. Only the vaccinated animals made antibodies before challenge exposure to the viral core and envelope as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Ten days after the final immunization, one-half of the vaccinated and nonvaccinated monkeys were challenged exposed intravenously (i.v.) and one-half were challenge exposed via the genital mucosa with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus. All of the nonvaccinated control monkeys became persistently infected. In spite of preexisting neutralizing antibodies and an anamnestic antibody response, all of the immunized monkeys also became persistently infected. However, there was evidence that the clinical course in immunized i.v. infected animals was delayed. All four mock-vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed animals died with disease from 3 to 9 months postchallenge. In contrast, only one of four vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed monkeys had died by 11 months postchallenge.

  9. Smallpox DNA Vaccine Protects Nonhuman Primates Against Lethal Monkeypox

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Initial series Boostd No. oflesionse Disease severity Day of death postchallenge Dosing expt CH42 F/5.8 Neg. cont. 0, 3, 6, 11 ND 5 108 0 Gravef 6 CH03...Disease Control and Prevention. 2003. Multistate outbreak of monkeypox—Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, 2003. Morb. Mortal . Wkly. Rep. 52:537–540. 3...vaccination program: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Im- munization Practices. Morb. Mortal . Wkly. Rep. 52:282–284. 4. Centers for Disease

  10. Long-Term Protective Immunity from an Influenza Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Administered with a Microneedle Patch

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Kim, Yeu-Chun; Song, Jae-Min; Hwang, Hye Suk; Compans, Richard W.; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Skin vaccination with influenza virus-like particles (VLPs) using microneedles has been shown to induce protection similar to or better than that induced by intramuscular immunization. In this study, we examined the long-term protective efficacy of influenza (H1N1 A/PR/8/34) VLPs after skin vaccination using microneedle patches coated with the vaccine. Microneedle vaccination of mice in the skin induced 100% protection against lethal challenge infection with influenza A/PR/8/34 virus 14 month...

  11. Protective oral vaccination against infectious salmon anaemia virus in Salmo salar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruffo, Mario; Maturana, Carlos; Kambalapally, Swetha; Larenas, Julio; Tobar, Jaime A

    2016-07-01

    Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is a systemic disease caused by an orthomyxovirus, which has a significant economic impact on the production of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Currently, there are several commercial ISA vaccines available, however, those products are applied through injection, causing stress in the fish and leaving them susceptible to infectious diseases due to the injection process and associated handling. In this study, we evaluated an oral vaccine against ISA containing a recombinant viral hemagglutinin-esterase and a fusion protein as antigens. Our findings indicated that oral vaccination is able to protect Atlantic salmon against challenge with a high-virulence Chilean isolate. The oral vaccination was also correlated with the induction of IgM-specific antibodies. On the other hand, the vaccine was unable to modulate expression of the antiviral related gene Mx, showing the importance of the humoral response to the disease survival. This study provides new insights into fish protection and immune response induced by an oral vaccine against ISA, but also promises future development of preventive solutions or validation of the current existing therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Extended protection capabilities of an immature dendritic-cell targeting malaria sporozoite vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Zavala, Fidel; Gordy, James; Zhang, Hong; Markham, Richard B

    2017-04-25

    Mouse studies evaluating candidate malaria vaccines have typically examined protective efficacy over the relatively short time frames of several weeks after the final of multiple immunizations. The current study examines the protective ability in a mouse model system of a novel protein vaccine construct in which the adjuvant polyinosinic polycytidilic acid (poly(I:C)) is used in combination with a vaccine in which the immature dendritic cell targeting chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP3α), is fused to the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Two vaccinations, three weeks apart, elicited extraordinarily high, MIP3α-dependent antibody responses. MIP3α was able to target the vaccine to the CCR6 receptor found predominantly on immature dendritic cells and significantly enhanced the cellular influx at the vaccination site. At three and 23 weeks after the final of two immunizations, mice were challenged by intravenous injection of 5×10 3 transgenic Plasmodium berghei sporozoites expressing P. falciparum CSP, a challenge dose approximately one order of magnitude greater than that which is encountered after mosquito bite in the clinical setting. A ninety-seven percent reduction in liver sporozoite load was observed at both time points, 23 weeks being the last time point tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of passages during Japanese BCG vaccine production on genetic stability and protective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masaaki; Udagawa, Tadashi; Sugawara, Isamu; Iwama, Kenji; Honda, Ikuro; Fujita, Isao; Hashimoto, Akira; Yano, Ikuya; Yamamoto, Saburo

    2012-02-14

    Many genetic differences have been found among currently available BCG vaccines. To avoid continued accumulation of phenotypic or genotypic changes in the strains, WHO and most national regulatory authorities request that the vaccine should not be prepared by more than 12 passages from the master seed lot. However, it has recently been reported that genetic changes occur even during the passage for vaccine production. In this study, the genetic stability of Japanese BCG vaccine production using currently available PCR methods and protective efficacy using a guinea-pig model during the passages were examined. The results showed that there were no significant differences between the seed lot, the product manufactured by normal procedures, and the 20th passage product. These results indicate that the maximum number of passages as currently required by WHO for BCG vaccine production is adequate for the Japanese vaccine, and that new genetic tools may help to examine the quality control of the BCG vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Immunogenic multistage recombinant protein vaccine confers partial protection against experimental toxoplasmosis mimicking natural infection in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Gedik

    2016-01-01

    To generate a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis, multistage vaccines and usage of challenging models mimicking natural route of infection are critical cornerstones. In this study, we generated a BAG1 and GRA1 multistage vaccine that induced strong immune response in which the protection was not at anticipated level. In addition, the murine model was orally challenged with tissue cysts to mimic natural route of infection.

  15. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Derbise

    Full Text Available No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably.The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50 caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50. Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1- Y. pestis.VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single

  16. Complete Protection against Pneumonic and Bubonic Plague after a Single Oral Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbise, Anne; Hanada, Yuri; Khalifé, Manal; Carniel, Elisabeth; Demeure, Christian E

    2015-01-01

    No efficient vaccine against plague is currently available. We previously showed that a genetically attenuated Yersinia pseudotuberculosis producing the Yersinia pestis F1 antigen was an efficient live oral vaccine against pneumonic plague. This candidate vaccine however failed to confer full protection against bubonic plague and did not produce F1 stably. The caf operon encoding F1 was inserted into the chromosome of a genetically attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis, yielding the VTnF1 strain, which stably produced the F1 capsule. Given orally to mice, VTnF1 persisted two weeks in the mouse gut and induced a high humoral response targeting both F1 and other Y. pestis antigens. The strong cellular response elicited was directed mostly against targets other than F1, but also against F1. It involved cells with a Th1-Th17 effector profile, producing IFNγ, IL-17, and IL-10. A single oral dose (108 CFU) of VTnF1 conferred 100% protection against pneumonic plague using a high-dose challenge (3,300 LD50) caused by the fully virulent Y. pestis CO92. Moreover, vaccination protected 100% of mice from bubonic plague caused by a challenge with 100 LD50 Y. pestis and 93% against a high-dose infection (10,000 LD50). Protection involved fast-acting mechanisms controlling Y. pestis spread out of the injection site, and the protection provided was long-lasting, with 93% and 50% of mice surviving bubonic and pneumonic plague respectively, six months after vaccination. Vaccinated mice also survived bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by a high-dose of non-encapsulated (F1-) Y. pestis. VTnF1 is an easy-to-produce, genetically stable plague vaccine candidate, providing a highly efficient and long-lasting protection against both bubonic and pneumonic plague caused by wild type or un-encapsulated (F1-negative) Y. pestis. To our knowledge, VTnF1 is the only plague vaccine ever reported that could provide high and durable protection against the two forms of plague after a single oral

  17. Human papillomavirus vaccines and the potential for cross-protection between related HPV types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Kevin A

    2007-11-01

    The majority of human papillomavirus (HPV) belong to the genus alpha-papillomavirus, which can be further subdivided into species and then strains. Approximately 200 strains of HPV have been identified, and the whole genomes of approximately 100 strains have been (discovered) and completely sequenced. Between 13 and 18 HPV strains have been characterized as conferring a high oncogenic risk, with 12 of these strains belonging to the HPV species 7 (HPV-18, -39, -45, -59, -68) and species 9 (HPV-16, -31, -33, -35, -52, -58, -67). While strains belonging to the same species are phylogenetically related, they may differ biologically. The available data on whether natural HPV infection infers cross protection against other related strains from the same species are equivocal. There are data to indicate that following HPV infection, there appears to be a reduced risk of contracting the same strain of HPV. However, there is also evidence to indicate that natural infection with HPV does not confer group-specific immune protection or general protection from reinfection with genital HPV mucosal types. Recent studies conducted with HPV vaccines show data on cross-protection against related HPV strains. In vitro experiments with serum from recipients of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV-6/8/16/18) show neutralization of HPV 45 pseudovirions. Cross-protection following vaccination of women (n=776) with three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV-16/18) demonstrated that, over a period of up to 4.5 years, long-term vaccine efficacy was observed for HPV-16 and -18, and vaccine efficacy was also observed against incident infection with HPV-31 and -45. These findings are supported by the results of a large study (n=18,644) in women aged 15 to 25 years vaccinated with the adjuvant bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV-16/18). Over a period of 6 months, cross-protection was observed against persistent infections with HPV-45, -31 and -52, and at 12 months, modest protection was demonstrated against

  18. Tuberculosis Susceptibility and Vaccine Protection Are Independently Controlled by Host Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clare M; Proulx, Megan K; Olive, Andrew J; Laddy, Dominick; Mishra, Bibhuti B; Moss, Caitlin; Gutierrez, Nuria Martinez; Bellerose, Michelle M; Barreira-Silva, Palmira; Phuah, Jia Yao; Baker, Richard E; Behar, Samuel M; Kornfeld, Hardy; Evans, Thomas G; Beamer, Gillian; Sassetti, Christopher M

    2016-09-20

    The outcome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and the immunological response to the bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine are highly variable in humans. Deciphering the relative importance of host genetics, environment, and vaccine preparation for the efficacy of BCG has proven difficult in natural populations. We developed a model system that captures the breadth of immunological responses observed in outbred individual mice, which can be used to understand the contribution of host genetics to vaccine efficacy. This system employs a panel of highly diverse inbred mouse strains, consisting of the founders and recombinant progeny of the "Collaborative Cross" project. Unlike natural populations, the structure of this panel allows the serial evaluation of genetically identical individuals and the quantification of genotype-specific effects of interventions such as vaccination. When analyzed in the aggregate, our panel resembled natural populations in several important respects: the animals displayed a broad range of susceptibility to M. tuberculosis, differed in their immunological responses to infection, and were not durably protected by BCG vaccination. However, when analyzed at the genotype level, we found that these phenotypic differences were heritable. M. tuberculosis susceptibility varied between lines, from extreme sensitivity to progressive M. tuberculosis clearance. Similarly, only a minority of the genotypes was protected by vaccination. The efficacy of BCG was genetically separable from susceptibility to M. tuberculosis, and the lack of efficacy in the aggregate analysis was driven by nonresponsive lines that mounted a qualitatively distinct response to infection. These observations support an important role for host genetic diversity in determining BCG efficacy and provide a new resource to rationally develop more broadly efficacious vaccines. Tuberculosis (TB) remains an urgent global health crisis, and the efficacy of the currently used TB

  19. Protective effects of oral microencapsulated Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccine prepared by co-spray drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J H; Weng, C N; Liao, C W; Yeh, K S; Pan, M J

    2003-01-01

    The efficacy of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae oral vaccine was investigated in microsphere dosage form. A co-spray drying process was used to apply an encapsulating material, Eudragit L30 D-55, to microspheres containing Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens. The microspheres were generally effective (>93%) with protein release at pH 7.4, but almost none were released at pH 1.2, for 3 hr in an in vitro dissolution test. An SPF-swine model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the microspheres as an oral vaccine, and the related immune responses. The serum's systemic IgG against M. hyopneumoniae was evoked by ELISA analysis, after a 2nd immunization of all pigs. The vaccinated groups' mean lesion score was significantly lower after the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae challenge than that of the nonvaccinated/challenged groups (Poral microspheres vaccine prepared by a co-spray drying method can provide effective protection against M. hyopneumoniae infection in pigs.

  20. No evidence for cross-protection of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against HPV-6/11 positivity in female STI clinic visitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J.; King, Audrey J.; van der Sande, Marianne A B; Donken, Robine; Leussink, Suzan; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Hoebe, Christian J P A; Bogaards, Johannes A.; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    OBJECTIVES: Data from a vaccine trial and from post-vaccine surveillance in the United Kingdom have suggested that the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine offers cross-protection against HPV-6/11 and protection against anogenital warts (AGW). We studied the effect of the bivalent vaccine on genital HPV-6/11

  1. Zika virus protection by a single low-dose nucleoside-modified mRNA vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Norbert; Hogan, Michael J; Pelc, Rebecca S; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Andersen, Hanne; DeMaso, Christina R; Dowd, Kimberly A; Sutherland, Laura L; Scearce, Richard M; Parks, Robert; Wagner, Wendeline; Granados, Alex; Greenhouse, Jack; Walker, Michelle; Willis, Elinor; Yu, Jae-Sung; McGee, Charles E; Sempowski, Gregory D; Mui, Barbara L; Tam, Ying K; Huang, Yan-Jang; Vanlandingham, Dana; Holmes, Veronica M; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Higgs, Stephen; Hensley, Scott E; Madden, Thomas D; Hope, Michael J; Karikó, Katalin; Santra, Sampa; Graham, Barney S; Lewis, Mark G; Pierson, Theodore C; Haynes, Barton F; Weissman, Drew

    2017-03-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently emerged as a pandemic associated with severe neuropathology in newborns and adults. There are no ZIKV-specific treatments or preventatives. Therefore, the development of a safe and effective vaccine is a high priority. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has emerged as a versatile and highly effective platform to deliver vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins. Here we demonstrate that a single low-dose intradermal immunization with lipid-nanoparticle-encapsulated nucleoside-modified mRNA (mRNA-LNP) encoding the pre-membrane and envelope glycoproteins of a strain from the ZIKV outbreak in 2013 elicited potent and durable neutralizing antibody responses in mice and non-human primates. Immunization with 30 μg of nucleoside-modified ZIKV mRNA-LNP protected mice against ZIKV challenges at 2 weeks or 5 months after vaccination, and a single dose of 50 μg was sufficient to protect non-human primates against a challenge at 5 weeks after vaccination. These data demonstrate that nucleoside-modified mRNA-LNP elicits rapid and durable protective immunity and therefore represents a new and promising vaccine candidate for the global fight against ZIKV.

  2. Targeted expression of anthrax protective antigen by Lactobacillus gasseri as an anthrax vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Durmaz, Evelyn; Zadeh, Mojgan; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya; Gramarossa, Matthew; Cohran, Valeria; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2010-08-01

    Induction of protective immunity against pathogenic microbes, including Bacillus anthracis, requires efficient vaccines that potentiate antibody avidity and increase T-cell longevity. We recently reported that the delivery of targeted B. anthracis protective antigen (PA) genetically fused to a DC-binding peptide (DCpep) by Lactobacillus acidophilus induced mucosal and systemic immunity against B. anthracis challenge in mice. Improvement of this oral vaccine strategy was attempted by use of the high copy and genetically stable q-replicating vector, pTRKH2, for expression of the targeted PA fusion protein in Lactobacillus gasseri, a common human commensal microbe, to vaccinate animals against anthrax Sterne infection. Oral application of L. gasseri expressing the PA-DCpep fusion proteins elicited robust PA-neutralizing antibody and T-cell mediated immune responses against anthrax Sterne challenge, resulting in complete animal survival. Collectively, this improved expression vaccine strategy reduced the number of inoculations and length of the boosting period, leading to animal protection via efficacious bacterial adjuvanticity and safe oral delivery of this vaccine to mucosal immune cells, including dendritic cells. Lactobacillus-based delivery offers tremendous practical advantages. Recombinant antigens such as PA would not require chemical coupling agents, and the recombinant bacteria can be administered orally where upon both mucosal and systemic immune responses are elicited.

  3. Zika virus protection by a single low dose nucleoside modified mRNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Norbert; Hogan, Michael J.; Pelc, Rebecca S.; Muramatsu, Hiromi; Andersen, Hanne; DeMaso, Christina R.; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Sutherland, Laura L.; Scearce, Richard M.; Parks, Robert; Wagner, Wendeline; Granados, Alex; Greenhouse, Jack; Walker, Michelle; Willis, Elinor; Yu, Jae-Sung; McGee, Charles E.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Mui, Barbara L.; Tam, Ying K.; Huang, Yan-Jang; Vanlandingham, Dana; Holmes, Veronica M.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Sahu, Sujata; Lifton, Michelle; Higgs, Stephen; Hensley, Scott E.; Madden, Thomas D.; Hope, Michael J.; Karikó, Katalin; Santra, Sampa; Graham, Barney S.; Lewis, Mark G.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Weissman, Drew

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has recently emerged as an explosive pandemic associated with severe neuropathology in newborns and adults1. There are no ZIKV-specific treatments or preventatives; thus, development of a safe and effective vaccine is a high priority. Messenger RNA (mRNA) has emerged as a versatile and highly effective platform to deliver vaccine antigens and therapeutic proteins2,3. Here, we demonstrate that a single low-dose intradermal immunization with lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated nucleoside-modified mRNA (mRNA-LNP) encoding the pre-membrane and envelope (prM-E) glycoproteins of a 2013 ZIKV outbreak strain elicited potent and durable neutralizing antibody responses in mice and non-human primates. Immunization with 30 μg of nucleoside-modified ZIKV mRNA-LNPs protected mice from ZIKV challenges at 2 weeks or 5 months post-vaccination, and a single dose of 50 μg was sufficient to protect non-human primates from a challenge at 5 weeks post-vaccination. These data demonstrate that nucleoside-modified mRNA-LNPs elicit rapid and durable protective immunity and thus represent a new and promising vaccine candidate for the global fight against ZIKV. PMID:28151488

  4. A novel MVA vectored Chikungunya virus vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger-Lucarelli, James; Chu, Haiyan; Aliota, Matthew T; Partidos, Charalambos D; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging arbovirus associated with febrile illness often accompanied by rash and arthralgia that may persist for several years. Outbreaks are associated with high morbidity and create a public health challenge for countries affected. Recent outbreaks have occurred in both Europe and the Americas, suggesting CHIKV may continue to spread. Despite the sustained threat of the virus, there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapy against CHIKV. Therefore, it is critical to develop a vaccine that is both well tolerated and highly protective. In this study, we describe the construction and characterization of a modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) virus expressing CHIKV E3 and E2 proteins (MVA-CHIK) that protected several mouse models from challenge with CHIKV. In particular, BALB/c mice were completely protected against viremia upon challenge with CHIKV after two doses of MVA-CHIK. Additionally, A129 mice (deficient in IFNα/β) were protected from viremia, footpad swelling, and mortality. While high anti-virus antibodies were elicited, low or undetectable levels of neutralizing antibodies were produced in both mouse models. However, passive transfer of MVA-CHIK immune serum to naïve mice did not protect against mortality, suggesting that antibodies may not be the main effectors of protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. Furthermore, depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T-cells from vaccinated mice resulted in 100% mortality, implicating the indispensable role of CD4(+) T-cells in the protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. The results presented herein demonstrate the potential of MVA to effectively express CHIKV E3-E2 proteins and generate protective immune responses. Our findings challenge the assumption that only neutralizing antibodies are effective in providing protection against CHIKV, and provides a framework for the development of novel, more effective vaccine strategies to combat CHIKV.

  5. A novel MVA vectored Chikungunya virus vaccine elicits protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Weger-Lucarelli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a re-emerging arbovirus associated with febrile illness often accompanied by rash and arthralgia that may persist for several years. Outbreaks are associated with high morbidity and create a public health challenge for countries affected. Recent outbreaks have occurred in both Europe and the Americas, suggesting CHIKV may continue to spread. Despite the sustained threat of the virus, there is no approved vaccine or antiviral therapy against CHIKV. Therefore, it is critical to develop a vaccine that is both well tolerated and highly protective.In this study, we describe the construction and characterization of a modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA virus expressing CHIKV E3 and E2 proteins (MVA-CHIK that protected several mouse models from challenge with CHIKV. In particular, BALB/c mice were completely protected against viremia upon challenge with CHIKV after two doses of MVA-CHIK. Additionally, A129 mice (deficient in IFNα/β were protected from viremia, footpad swelling, and mortality. While high anti-virus antibodies were elicited, low or undetectable levels of neutralizing antibodies were produced in both mouse models. However, passive transfer of MVA-CHIK immune serum to naïve mice did not protect against mortality, suggesting that antibodies may not be the main effectors of protection afforded by MVA-CHIK. Furthermore, depletion of CD4(+, but not CD8(+ T-cells from vaccinated mice resulted in 100% mortality, implicating the indispensable role of CD4(+ T-cells in the protection afforded by MVA-CHIK.The results presented herein demonstrate the potential of MVA to effectively express CHIKV E3-E2 proteins and generate protective immune responses. Our findings challenge the assumption that only neutralizing antibodies are effective in providing protection against CHIKV, and provides a framework for the development of novel, more effective vaccine strategies to combat CHIKV.

  6. A Chlamydomonas-derived Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 vaccine induces specific tumor protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia C Demurtas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The E7 protein of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV type 16, being involved in malignant cellular transformation, represents a key antigen for developing therapeutic vaccines against HPV-related lesions and cancers. Recombinant production of this vaccine antigen in an active form and in compliance with good manufacturing practices (GMP plays a crucial role for developing effective vaccines. E7-based therapeutic vaccines produced in plants have been shown to be active in tumor regression and protection in pre-clinical models. However, some drawbacks of in whole-plant vaccine production encouraged us to explore the production of the E7-based therapeutic vaccine in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, an organism easy to grow and transform and fully amenable to GMP guidelines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An expression cassette encoding E7GGG, a mutated, attenuated form of the E7 oncoprotein, alone or as a fusion with affinity tags (His6 or FLAG, under the control of the C. reinhardtii chloroplast psbD 5' UTR and the psbA 3' UTR, was introduced into the C. reinhardtii chloroplast genome by homologous recombination. The protein was mostly soluble and reached 0.12% of total soluble proteins. Affinity purification was optimized and performed for both tagged forms. Induction of specific anti-E7 IgGs and E7-specific T-cell proliferation were detected in C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with total Chlamydomonas extract and with affinity-purified protein. High levels of tumor protection were achieved after challenge with a tumor cell line expressing the E7 protein. CONCLUSIONS: The C. reinhardtii chloroplast is a suitable expression system for the production of the E7GGG protein, in a soluble, immunogenic form. The production in contained and sterile conditions highlights the potential of microalgae as alternative platforms for the production of vaccines for human uses.

  7. Live attenuated influenza vaccine provides superior protection from heterologous infection in pigs with maternal antibodies without inducing vaccine associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Control of swine influenza A virus (IAV) in the US is hindered since inactivated vaccines do not provide robust cross-protection against the multiple antigenic variants co-circulating in the field. Vaccine efficacy can be further limited when administered to young pigs that possess maternally deriv...

  8. Vaccination with a gE-negative bovine herpesvirus type 1 vaccine confers insufficient protection to a bovine herpesvirus type 5 challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, A.D.; Spilki, F.R.; Franco, A.C.; Esteves, P.A.; Hubner, S.O.; Driemeier, D.; Oliveira, A.P.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Roehe, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, cross-protection to bovine herpesvirus type 5 (BHV-5) induced by bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) vaccination was examined following inoculation of rabbits and calves with a glycoprotein E (gE)-negative BHV-1 vaccine and subsequent challenge with BHV-5. Rabbits (n = 5) and

  9. From individual to herd protection with pneumococcal vaccines: the contribution of the Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine implementation strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivaldo Linares-Pérez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is currently undergoing advanced clinical evaluation prior to its planned introduction in Cuba. The implementation of the pneumococcal vaccination strategy has been designed with consideration of the need to maximize both its direct and indirect effects. A novel approach is suggested, which addresses preschool children as the first-line target group to generate herd immunity in infants and to have an impact on transmission at the community level. The clinical evaluation pipeline is described herein, including evaluations of effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and impact. The scientific contribution of the Cuban strategy could support a paradigm shift from individual protection to a population effect based on a rigorous body of scientific evidence.

  10. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Joseph W; Zaitseva, Marina; Kapnick, Senta; Fisher, Robert W; Mikolajczyk, Malgorzata G; Ballantyne, John; Golding, Hana; Hooper, Jay W

    2011-09-20

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP) with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV) immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5) protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV) whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV). Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  11. Polyclonal antibody cocktails generated using DNA vaccine technology protect in murine models of orthopoxvirus disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballantyne John

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we demonstrated that DNA vaccination of nonhuman primates (NHP with a small subset of vaccinia virus (VACV immunogens (L1, A27, A33, B5 protects against lethal monkeypox virus challenge. The L1 and A27 components of this vaccine target the mature virion (MV whereas A33 and B5 target the enveloped virion (EV. Results Here, we demonstrated that the antibodies produced in vaccinated NHPs were sufficient to confer protection in a murine model of lethal Orthopoxvirus infection. We further explored the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce immunogen-specific polyclonal antibodies that could then be combined into cocktails as potential immunoprophylactic/therapeutics. Specifically, we used DNA vaccines delivered by muscle electroporation to produce polyclonal antibodies against the L1, A27, A33, and B5 in New Zealand white rabbits. The polyclonal antibodies neutralized both MV and EV in cell culture. The ability of antibody cocktails consisting of anti-MV, anti-EV, or a combination of anti-MV/EV to protect BALB/c mice was evaluated as was the efficacy of the anti-MV/EV mixture in a mouse model of progressive vaccinia. In addition to evaluating weight loss and lethality, bioimaging technology was used to characterize the spread of the VACV infections in mice. We found that the anti-EV cocktail, but not the anti-MV cocktail, limited virus spread and lethality. Conclusions A combination of anti-MV/EV antibodies was significantly more protective than anti-EV antibodies alone. These data suggest that DNA vaccine technology could be used to produce a polyclonal antibody cocktail as a possible product to replace vaccinia immune globulin.

  12. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A vaccine combining two Leishmania braziliensis proteins offers heterologous protection against Leishmania infantum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Mariana C; Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Costa, Lourena E; Lage, Letícia M R; Carvalho, Ana Maria R S; Ludolf, Fernanda; Santos, Thaís T O; Roatt, Bruno M; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, two Leishmania braziliensis proteins, one hypothetical and the eukaryotic initiation factor 5a (EiF5a), were cloned and used as a polyproteins vaccine for the heterologous protection of BALB/c mice against infantum infection. Animals were immunized with the antigens separately or in association, and in both cases saponin was used as an adjuvant. In the results, spleen cells from mice inoculated with the individual or polyproteins vaccine and lately challenged produced significantly higher levels of protein- and parasite-specific IFN-γ, IL-12, and GM-CSF, when both a capture ELISA and flow cytometry assays were performed. Evaluating the parasite load by a limiting dilution as well as by RT-PCR, these animals presented significant reductions in the parasite number in all evaluated organs, when compared to the control (saline and saponin) groups. The best protection was reached when the polyproteins vaccine was employed. Protection was associated with the IFN-γ production against parasite extracts, which was mediated by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and correlated with the antileishmanial nitrite production. In this context, this vaccine combining two L. braziliensis proteins was able to induce a heterologous protection against VL, and could be considered in future studies to be tested against other Leishmania species or in other mammalian hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adjuvanted multi-epitope vaccines protect HLA-A*1101 transgenic mice against Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    We created and tested multi-epitope DNA or protein vaccines with TLR4 ligand emulsion adjuvant (gluco glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant in a stable emulsion (GLA-SE)) for their ability to protect against Toxoplasma gondii in HLA transgenic mice. Our constructs each included five of our best down selecte...

  15. Burkholderia mallei CLH001 Attenuated Vaccine Strain Is Immunogenic and Protects against Acute Respiratory Glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Christopher L; Mott, Tiffany M; Muruato, Laura A; Sbrana, Elena; Torres, Alfredo G

    2016-08-01

    Burkholderia mallei is the causative agent of glanders, an incapacitating disease with high mortality rates in respiratory cases. Its endemicity and ineffective treatment options emphasize its public health threat and highlight the need for a vaccine. Live attenuated vaccines are considered the most viable vaccine strategy for Burkholderia, but single-gene-deletion mutants have not provided complete protection. In this study, we constructed the select-agent-excluded B. mallei ΔtonB Δhcp1 (CLH001) vaccine strain and investigated its ability to protect against acute respiratory glanders. Here we show that CLH001 is attenuated, safe, and effective at protecting against lethal B. mallei challenge. Intranasal administration of CLH001 to BALB/c and NOD SCID gamma (NSG) mice resulted in complete survival without detectable colonization or abnormal organ histopathology. Additionally, BALB/c mice intranasally immunized with CLH001 in a prime/boost regimen were fully protected against lethal challenge with the B. mallei lux (CSM001) wild-type strain. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael; Brühl, Peter; Kreil, Thomas R; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Barrett, P Noel

    2010-02-23

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  17. A whole virus pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine is highly immunogenic and protective in active immunization and passive protection mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otfried Kistner

    Full Text Available The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus challenge. The immunogenicity in this model was comparable to that of a whole virus H5N1 vaccine, which had previously been demonstrated to induce high levels of seroprotection in clinical studies. The efficacy of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine in protecting against live virus challenge was also seen to be equivalent to that of the H5N1 vaccine. The protective efficacy of the H1N1 vaccine was also confirmed using a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID mouse model. It was demonstrated that mouse and guinea pig immune sera elicited following active H1N1 vaccination resulted in 100% protection of SCID mice following passive transfer of immune sera and lethal challenge. The immune responses to a whole virus pandemic H1N1 and a split seasonal H1N1 vaccine were also compared in this study. It was demonstrated that the whole virus vaccine induced a balanced Th-1 and Th-2 response in mice, whereas the split vaccine induced mainly a Th-2 response and only minimal levels of Th-1 responses. These data supported the initiation of clinical studies with the same low doses of whole virus vaccine that had previously been demonstrated to be immunogenic in clinical studies with a whole virus H5N1 vaccine.

  18. SEVERAL MUCOSAL VACCINATION ROUTES CONFER IMMUNITY AGAINST ENTERIC REDMOUTH DISEASE IN RAINBOW TROUT, BUT THE PROTECTIVE MECHANISMS ARE DIFFERENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neumann, Lukas; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Kragelund Strøm, Helene

    Vaccination is a keystone in prophylactic strategies preventing outbreaks of fish pathogenic bacterial diseases in aquaculture. The first commercial fish vaccine consisted of a bacterin of Yersinia ruckeri serotype O1 biotype 1. The vaccine has been very successful and has been used for more than...... 35 years. A vast experience has been gained concerning the applications of the vaccine, which can be utilized through several mucosal immunization routes such as bath, oral and anal application, all resulting in significantly increased survival compared to un-vaccinated control groups during bath...... antibodies. Further, plasma from bath vaccinated fish kills significantly more Y. ruckeri in vitro than plasma from un-vaccinated control fish. Increased plasma antibody titer against Y. ruckeri seems to be an important part of the protective immune response obtained post bath vaccination. These results all...

  19. Does vaccination ensure protection? Assessing diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels in a population of healthy children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Ewelina; Wysocki, Jacek; Kałużna, Ewelina; Świątek-Kościelna, Bogna; Wysocka-Leszczyńska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Vaccination effectiveness is proven when the disease does not develop after a patient is exposed to the pathogen. In the case of rare diseases, vaccination effectiveness is assessed by monitoring specific antibody levels in the population. Such recurrent analyses allow the evaluation of vaccination programs. The primary schedule of diphtheria and tetanus vaccinations is similar in various countries, with differences mainly in the number and timing of booster doses. The aim of the study was to assess diphtheria and tetanus antibody concentrations in a population of healthy children. Diphtheria and tetanus antibody levels were analyzed in a group of 324 children aged 18 to 180 months. All children were vaccinated in accordance with the Polish vaccination schedule. Specific antibody concentrations greater than 0.1 IU/mL were considered protective against tetanus or diphtheria. Levels above 1.0 were considered to ensure long-term protection. Protective levels of diphtheria antibodies were found in 229 patients (70.46%), and of tetanus in 306 patients (94.15%). Statistically significant differences were found in tetanus antibody levels in different age groups. Mean concentrations and the percentage of children with high tetanus antibody titers increased with age. No similar correlation was found for diphtheria antibodies. High diphtheria antibody levels co-occurred in 72% of the children with high tetanus antibody levels; 95% of the children with low tetanus antibody levels had low levels of diphtheria antibodies. The percentage of children with protective diphtheria antibody levels is lower than that in the case of tetanus antibodies, both in Poland and abroad, but the high proportion of children without diphtheria protection in Poland is an exception. This is all the more puzzling when taking into account that Polish children are administered a total of 5 doses containing a high concentration of diphtheria toxoid, at intervals shorter than 5 years. The

  20. Low dose vaccination with attenuated Francisella tularensis strain SchuS4 mutants protects against tularemia independent of the route of vaccination.

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    Dedeke Rockx-Brouwer

    Full Text Available Tularemia, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a severe, sometimes fatal disease. Interest in tularemia has increased over the last decade due to its history as a biological weapon. In particular, development of novel vaccines directed at protecting against pneumonic tularemia has been an important goal. Previous work has demonstrated that, when delivered at very high inoculums, administration of live, highly attenuated strains of virulent F. tularensis can protect against tularemia. However, lower vaccinating inoculums did not offer similar immunity. One concern of using live vaccines is that the host may develop mild tularemia in response to infection and use of high inoculums may contribute to this issue. Thus, generation of a live vaccine that can efficiently protect against tularemia when delivered in low numbers, e.g. <100 organisms, may address this concern. Herein we describe the ability of three defined, attenuated mutants of F. tularensis SchuS4, deleted for FTT0369c, FTT1676, or FTT0369c and FTT1676, respectively, to engender protective immunity against tularemia when delivered at concentrations of approximately 50 or fewer bacteria. Attenuated strains for use as vaccines were selected by their inability to efficiently replicate in macrophages in vitro and impaired replication and dissemination in vivo. Although all strains were defective for replication in vitro within macrophages, protective efficacy of each attenuated mutant was correlated with their ability to modestly replicate and disseminate in the host. Finally, we demonstrate the parenteral vaccination with these strains offered superior protection against pneumonic tularemia than intranasal vaccination. Together our data provides proof of principle that low dose attenuated vaccines may be a viable goal in development of novel vaccines directed against tularemia.

  1. Cancer testis antigen vaccination affords long-term protection in a murine model of ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Chiriva-Internati

    Full Text Available Sperm protein (Sp17 is an attractive target for ovarian cancer (OC vaccines because of its over-expression in primary as well as in metastatic lesions, at all stages of the disease. Our studies suggest that a Sp17-based vaccine can induce an enduring defense against OC development in C57BL/6 mice with ID8 cells, following prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. This is the first time that a mouse counterpart of a cancer testis antigen (Sp17 was shown to be expressed in an OC mouse model, and that vaccination against this antigen significantly controlled tumor growth. Our study shows that the CpG-adjuvated Sp17 vaccine overcomes the issue of immunologic tolerance, the major barrier to the development of effective immunotherapy for OC. Furthermore, this study provides a better understanding of OC biology by showing that Th-17 cells activation and contemporary immunosuppressive T-reg cells inhibition is required for vaccine efficacy. Taken together, these results indicate that prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations can induce long-standing protection against OC and delay tumor growth, suggesting that this strategy may provide additional treatments of human OC and the prevention of disease onset in women with a family history of OC.

  2. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant adenovirus encoding nucleoprotein provides potent protection against influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccines that target the highly variable surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase cause inconvenience of having vaccination every year. For this reason, development of universal vaccines targeting conserved viral components is needed. In this study, we generated recombinant adenovirus (rAd vaccine encoding nucleoprotein (NP of A/PR/8/34 influenza virus, designated rAd/NP. BALB/c mice were immunized intranasally or sublingually with rAd/NP vaccine and subsequently challenged with lethal doses of heterologous as well as homologous influenza viruses. We found that intranasal immunization of rAd/NP elicited strong mucosal IgA responses as well as stronger CD8 T-cell responses toward immunodominant K(d-restricted NP147-155 epitope than sublingual immunization. Importantly, only single intranasal but not sublingual immunization of rAd/NP provides potent protection against both homologous and heterologous influenza virus challenges. These results suggest that recombinant rAd/NP could be a universal vaccine candidate for mucosal administration against influenza virus.

  3. A semisynthetic carbohydrate-lipid vaccine that protects against S. pneumoniae in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallari, Marco; Stallforth, Pierre; Kalinichenko, Artem; Rathwell, Dominea C K; Gronewold, Thomas M A; Adibekian, Alexander; Mori, Lucia; Landmann, Regine; Seeberger, Peter H; De Libero, Gennaro

    2014-11-01

    Severe forms of pneumococcal meningitis, bacteraemia and pneumonia result in more than 1 million deaths each year despite the widespread introduction of carbohydrate-protein conjugate vaccines against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Here we describe a new and highly efficient antipneumococcal vaccine design based on synthetic conjugation of S. pneumoniae capsule polysaccharides to the potent lipid antigen α-galactosylceramide, which stimulates invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells when presented by the nonpolymorphic antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Mice injected with the new lipid-carbohydrate conjugate vaccine produced high-affinity IgG antibodies specific for pneumococcal polysaccharides. Vaccination stimulated germinal center formation; accumulation of iNKT cells with a T follicular helper cell phenotype; and increased frequency of carbohydrate-specific, long-lived memory B cells and plasmablasts. This new lipid-carbohydrate vaccination strategy induced potent antipolysaccharide immunity that protected against pneumococcal disease in mice and may also prove effective for the design of carbohydrate-based vaccines against other major bacterial pathogens.

  4. Protective immunity induced by a recombinant BCG vaccine encoding the cyclophilin gene of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qinlei; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gong, Pengtao; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Guocai; Yang, Ju; Li, He; Wang, Nan; Zhang, Xichen

    2013-12-09

    The investigation of Toxoplasma gondii virulence factors can elucidate the immunopathology of T. gondii infection and identify potential candidates for effective human vaccines. The adjuvant is an important component of an effective vaccine. In this study, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis was used as a live vaccine vector with both antigen and adjuvant characteristics. Following amplification of the T. gondii cyclophilin gene, the shuttle expression plasmid pMV261-TgCyP and integrative expression plasmid pMV361-TgCyP were constructed, and their expression was stimulated after transfection into BCG. Both recombinant plasmids were highly immunogenic. Greater proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was observed in the rBCG-vaccinated groups compared to the control groups. The levels of Th1-type IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12 were significantly increased following immunisation with the rBCG vaccines via the i.v. or oral route, which indicated that catalytic activity against T. gondii infection was generated in the mice. rBCGpMV361-TgCyP i.v. inoculation resulted in a higher protection efficiency, as demonstrated by the increased survival time and survival rate (17%) of BALB/c mice. The present study demonstrates that a BCG vector expressing a target antigen, TgCyP, represent an alternative system for the production of effective vaccines to prevent toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of probiotics and coccidiosis vaccine enhances protection against an Eimeria challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzi, Miranda M; Abdelrahman, Wael; van-Heerden, Kobus; Mohnl, Michaela; Barrett, Nathaniel W; Dalloul, Rami A

    2016-11-08

    Coccidiosis is endemic in the commercial broiler industry capable of inflicting devastating economic losses to poultry operations. Vaccines are relatively effective in controlling the disease; their efficacy could potentially be improved with concurrent use of probiotics as evaluated in this study using an Eimeria challenge. Day of hatch 400 Cobb-500 male broilers were assigned to one of four treatment groups including control (CON), vaccine-only gel application (VNC), probiotic-only gel application (NPC), and vaccine-plus-probiotic gel application (VPC). Birds were placed in floor pens (6 replicate pens/treatment, 16-17 birds/pen). NPC and VPC birds received the probiotics in the water on days 2-4, 8, 14-20, 22, 29, and 34-36. On day 15, birds were mildly challenged with 0.5 mL of a mixed oral inoculum of Eimeria sp. prepared with the coccidiosis vaccine at 10× the vaccination dose. Performance measurements were recorded on first day and weekly afterwards, and lesion scores were evaluated 6 days post-challenge. Overall, the probiotics and coccidiosis vaccine resulted in an enhanced protective effect against the challenge, with VPC birds exhibiting lower lesion scores in the duodenum than VNC or NPC birds. Birds in the VPC treatment also demonstrated higher weight gains during days 1-15, days 7-15, and days 21-28 when compared to the VNC birds. These results suggest that the combination of probiotics and coccidiosis vaccines could enhance performance and provide an additional protective effect against a mixed Eimeria challenge.

  6. Protective value of immune responses developed in goats vaccinated with insoluble proteins from Sarcoptes Scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines developed from certain membrane proteins lining the lumen of arthropod’s gut have been demonstrated effective in the control of some arthropod ectoparasites. A similar approach could also be applied to Sarcoptes scabiei since this parasite also ingests its host immunoglobulins. To evaluate immune protection of the membrane proteins, insoluble mite proteins were fractionated by successive treatment in the solutions of 1.14 M NaCl, 2% SB 3-14 Zwitterion detergent, 6 M urea, 6 M guanidine-HCl and 5% SDS. Five groups of goats (6 or 7 goats per group were immunised respectively with the protein fractions. Vaccination was performed 6 times, each with a dosage of 250 μg proteins, and 3 week intervals between vaccination. Group 6 (7 goats received PBS and adjuvant only, and served as an unvaccinated control. One week after the last vaccination, all goats were challenged with 2000 live mites on the auricles. The development of lesions were examined at 1 day, 2 days, and then every week from week 1 to 8. All animals were bled and weighed every week, and at the end of the experiment, skin scrapings were collected to determine the mite burden. Antibody responses induced by vaccination and challenge were examined by ELISA and Western blotting. This experiment showed that vaccination with the insoluble-protein fractions resulted in the development of high level of specific antibodies but the responses did not have any protective value. The severity of lesions and mite burden in the vaccinated animals were not different from those in the unvaccinated control.

  7. Protection against bovine tuberculosis induced by oral vaccination of cattle with Mycobacterium bovis BCG is not enhanced by co-administration of mycobacterial protein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedlock, D Neil; Aldwell, Frank E; Vordermeier, H Martin; Hewinson, R Glyn; Buddle, Bryce M

    2011-12-15

    Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) delivered to calves by the oral route in a formulated lipid matrix has been previously shown to induce protection against bovine tuberculosis. A study was conducted in cattle to determine if a combination of a low dose of oral BCG and a protein vaccine could induce protective immunity to tuberculosis while not sensitising animals to tuberculin. Groups of calves (10 per group) were vaccinated by administering 2 × 10(7)colony forming units (CFU) of BCG orally or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and a protein vaccine comprised of M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) formulated with the adjuvants Chitin and Gel 01 and delivered by the intranasal route, or CFP formulated with Emulsigen and the TLR2 agonist Pam(3)CSK(4) and administered by the subcutaneous (s.c.) route. Two further groups were vaccinated with the CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) vaccines alone. Positive control groups were given 10(8)CFU oral BCG or 10(6)CFU s.c. BCG while a negative control group was non-vaccinated. All animals were challenged with M. bovis 15 weeks after vaccination and euthanized and necropsied at 16 weeks following challenge. Groups of cattle vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU or 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG showed significant reductions in seven, three and four pathological or microbiological disease parameters, respectively, compared to the results for the non-vaccinated group. There was no evidence of protection in calves vaccinated with the combination of oral BCG and CFP/Emulsigen/Pam(3)CSK(4) or oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01 or vaccinated with the protein vaccines alone. Positive responses in the comparative cervical skin test at 12 weeks after vaccination were only observed in animals vaccinated with s.c. BCG, 10(8)CFU oral BCG or a combination of 2 × 10(7)CFU oral BCG and CFP/Chitin/Gel 01. In conclusion, co-administration of a protein vaccine, administered by either systemic or mucosal routes with oral

  8. The Vaccine Candidate Vibrio cholerae 638 Is Protective against Cholera in Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luis; Jidy, Manuel Díaz; García, Hilda; Rodríguez, Boris L.; Fernández, Roberto; Año, Gemma; Cedré, Bárbara; Valmaseda, Tania; Suzarte, Edith; Ramírez, Margarita; Pino, Yadira; Campos, Javier; Menéndez, Jorge; Valera, Rodrigo; González, Daniel; González, Irma; Pérez, Oliver; Serrano, Teresita; Lastre, Miriam; Miralles, Fernando; del Campo, Judith; Maestre, Jorge Luis; Pérez, José Luis; Talavera, Arturo; Pérez, Antonio; Marrero, Karen; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae 638 is a living candidate cholera vaccine strain attenuated by deletion of the CTXΦ prophage from C7258 (O1, El Tor Ogawa) and by insertion of the Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase A gene into the hemagglutinin/protease coding sequence. This vaccine candidate was previously found to be well tolerated and immunogenic in volunteers. This article reports a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted to test short-term protection conferred by 638 against subsequent V. cholerae infection and disease in volunteers in Cuba. A total of 45 subjects were enrolled and assigned to receive vaccine or placebo. The vaccine contained 109 CFU of freshly harvested 638 buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3, while the placebo was buffer alone. After vaccine but not after placebo intake, 96% of volunteers had at least a fourfold increase in vibriocidal antibody titers, and 50% showed a doubling of at least the lipopolysaccharide-specific immunoglobulin A titers in serum. At 1 month after vaccination, five volunteers from the vaccine group and five from the placebo group underwent an exploratory challenge study with 109 CFU of ΔCTXΦ attenuated mutant strain V. cholerae 81. Only two volunteers from the vaccine group shed strain 81 in their feces, but none of them experienced diarrhea; in the placebo group, all volunteers excreted the challenge strain, and three had reactogenic diarrhea. An additional 12 vaccinees and 9 placebo recipients underwent challenge with 7 × 105 CFU of virulent strain V. cholerae 3008 freshly harvested from a brain heart infusion agar plate and buffered with 1.3% NaHCO3. Three volunteers (25%) from the vaccine group and all from the placebo group shed the challenge agent in their feces. None of the 12 vaccinees but 7 volunteers from the placebo group had diarrhea, and 2 of the latter exhibited severe cholera (>5,000 g of diarrheal stool). These results indicate that at 1 month after ingestion of a single oral dose (109 CFU) of strain

  9. Protection level of an intermediate vaccine against gumboro disease in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    León R., Natalia; Laboratorio de Patología Aviar, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; Icochea D., Eliana; Laboratorio de Patología Aviar, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima-Perú.; González V., Rosa; Laboratorio de Patología Aviar, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Perales C., Rosa; Laboratorio de Histología, Embriología y Patología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the protection conferred by a vaccine against Gumboro disease in laying hens. Three hundred Isa Brown one-day-old chicks were equally distributed in three groups. Groups A and B were vaccinated, twice, at 9 and 24 days old with an intermediate-intermediate strain (2512), and group C remained unvaccinated. Groups B and C were challenged at 32 days old with the F52/70 strain through the eye. Bursal index, bursa/spleen relationship and microscopic lesions of the bursa, splee...

  10. Lack of cross-protection against Bordetella holmesii after pertussis vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Weyrich, Laura S; Lavine, Jennie S; Karanikas, Alexia T; Harvill, Eric T

    2012-11-01

    Bordetella holmesii, a species closely related to B. pertussis, has been reported sporadically as a cause of whooping cough-like symptoms. To investigate whether B. pertussis-induced immunity is protective against infection with B. holmesii, we conducted an analysis using 11 human respiratory B. holmesii isolates collected during 2005-2009 from a highly B. pertussis-vaccinated population in Massachusetts. Neither whole-cell (wP) nor acellular (aP) B. pertussis vaccination conferred protection against these B. holmesii isolates in mice. Although T-cell responses induced by wP or aP cross-reacted with B. holmesii, vaccine-induced antibodies failed to efficiently bind B. holmesii. B. holmesii-specific antibodies provided in addition to wP were sufficient to rapidly reduce B. holmesii numbers in mouse lungs. Our findings suggest the established presence of B. holmesii in Massachusetts and that failure to induce cross-reactive antibodies may explain poor vaccine-induced cross-protection.

  11. Intranasal nanoemulsion-based inactivated respiratory syncytial virus vaccines protect against viral challenge in cotton rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Konek, Jessica J; Makidon, Paul E; Landers, Jeffrey J; Cao, Zhengyi; Malinczak, Carrie-Anne; Pannu, Jessie; Sun, Jennifer; Bitko, Vira; Ciotti, Susan; Hamouda, Tarek; Wojcinski, Zbigniew W; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Fattom, Ali; Baker, James R

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus is a leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants, the elderly and individuals with compromised immune systems. Despite decades of research, there is currently no available vaccine for RSV. Our group has previously demonstrated that intranasal immunization of mice with RSV inactivated by and adjuvanted with W805EC nanoemulsion elicits robust humoral and cellular immune responses, resulting in protection against RSV infection. This protection was achieved without the induction of airway hyper-reactivity or a Th2-skewed immune response. The cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus has been used for years as an excellent small animal model of RSV disease. Thus, we extended these rodent studies to the more permissive cotton rat model. Intranasal immunization of the nanoemulsion-adjuvanted RSV vaccines induced high antibody titers and a robust Th1-skewed cellular response. Importantly, vaccination provided sterilizing cross-protective immunity against a heterologous RSV challenge and did not induce marked or severe histological effects or eosinophilia in the lung after viral challenge. Overall, these data demonstrate that nanoemulsion-formulated whole RSV vaccines are both safe and effective for immunization in multiple animal models.

  12. Genetic vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus provides protection without disease potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Teresa R; Rangel, David; Graham, Barney S; Brough, Douglas E; Gall, Jason G

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of infectious lower respiratory disease in infants and the elderly. As there is no vaccine for RSV, we developed a genetic vaccine approach that induced protection of the entire respiratory tract from a single parenteral administration. The approach was based on adenovirus vectors derived from newly isolated nonhuman primate viruses with low seroprevalence. We show for the first time that a single intramuscular (IM) injection of the replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the RSV fusion (F0) glycoprotein induced immune responses that protected both the lungs and noses of cotton rats and mice even at low doses and for several months postimmunization. The immune response included high titers of neutralizing antibody that were maintained ≥ 24 weeks and RSV-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The vectors were as potently immunogenic as a human adenovirus 5 vector in these two key respiratory pathogen animal models. Importantly, there was minimal alveolitis and granulocytic infiltrates in the lung, and type 2 cytokines were not produced after RSV challenge even under conditions of partial protection. Overall, this genetic vaccine is highly effective without potentiating immunopathology, and the results support development of the vaccine candidate for human testing.

  13. Live attenuated nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus vaccine provides broad cross protection against new variant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T-H; Kim, M-S; Jang, J-H; Lee, D-H; Park, J-K; Youn, H-N; Lee, J-B; Park, S-Y; Choi, I-S; Song, C-S

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections cause great economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide, and the emergence of new variant strains complicates disease control. The present study investigated the genetic and protectotypic features of newly emerged Korean IBV strains. A phylogenetic analysis showed that several recent isolates formed 2 different clusters (new cluster 1 and 2), which were distinct from other preexisting clusters. New cluster 1 IBV strains represented recombinants between Korean nephropathogenic strain KM91 and the QXIBV strain. New cluster 2 IBV strains showed low amino acid homology (vaccines (H120 and K2 strain) against these new isolates. In cross-protection studies, the H120 strain did not provide sufficient protection against these variants. However, highly attenuated nephropathogenic IBV vaccine, K2 strain, provided significantly higher levels of protection against variants compared with chickens vaccinated with H120 (P vaccine could be helpful for the reduction of economic losses caused by newly evolving IBV recombinants (new cluster 1) and variants (new cluster 2).

  14. Efficacy of strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection and vertical transmission against Brucella abortus in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Ariful; Khatun, Mst Minara; Baek, Byeong-Kirl; Lee, Sung-Il

    2009-09-01

    Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1. Virgin female SD rats (n = 48) two months of age were divided into two groups: one group (n = 24) received RB51 vaccine intraperitoneally with 3 x 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) and the other group (n = 24) was used as non-vaccinated control. Non-vaccinated and RB51-vaccinated rats were challenged with 1.5 x 10(9) CFU of virulent B. abortus biotype 1 six weeks after vaccination. Three weeks after challenge, all rats were bred. Verification of RB51-vaccine induced protection in SD rats was determined by bacteriological, serological and molecular screening of maternal and fetal tissues at necropsy. The RB51 vaccine elicited 81.25% protection in SD rats against infection with B. abortus biotype 1. Offspring from rats vaccinated with RB51 had a decreased (p RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

  15. Intranasal vaccination with leishmanial antigens protects golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) against Leishmania (Viannia) Braziliensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva-Couto, Luzinei; Ribeiro-Romão, Raquel Peralva; Saavedra, Andrea Franco; da Silva Costa Souza, Beatriz Lilian; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; Gomes-Silva, Adriano; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Pinto, Eduardo Fonseca

    2015-01-01

    Previous results have shown that oral and intranasal administration of particulate Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis antigens (LaAg) partially protects mice against L. amazonensis infection. However, vaccination studies on species of the subgenus Viannia, the main causative agent of cutaneous and mucosal leishmaniasis in the Americas, have been hampered by the lack of easy-to-handle bio-models that accurately mimic the human disease. Recently, we demonstrated that the golden hamster is an appropriate model for studying the immunopathogenesis of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. (Viannia) braziliensis. Using the golden hamster model, our current study investigated whether the protective effect of intranasal immunisation with LaAg can be extended to L. braziliensis infection. Golden hamsters vaccinated with either two intranasal (IN) doses of LaAg (10 µg) or two intramuscular doses of LaAg (20 µg) were challenged 2 weeks post-vaccination with L. braziliensis. The results showed that IN immunisation with LaAg significantly reduced lesion growth and parasitic load as well as serum IgG and IgG2 levels. At the experimental endpoint on day 114 post-infection, IN-immunised hamsters that were considered protected expressed IFN-γ and IL10 mRNA levels that returned to uninfected skin levels. In contrast to the nasal route, intramuscular (IM) immunisation failed to provide protection. These results demonstrate for the first time that the nasal route of immunisation can induce cross protection against L. braziliensis infection.

  16. Vaccination with Leishmania histone H1-pulsed dendritic cells confers protection in murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agallou, Maria; Smirlis, Despina; Soteriadou, Ketty P; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2012-07-20

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniases affecting millions of people worldwide often resulting in death despite optimal therapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of effective anti-infective vaccine(s). In the present study, we evaluated the prophylactic value of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs) pulsed with the Leishmania (L.) infantum histone H1. We developed fully mature BM-DCs characterized by enhanced capacity of IL-12 production after ex vivo pulsing with GST-LeishH1. Intravenous administration of these BM-DCs in naive BALB/c mice resulted in antigen-specific spleenocyte proliferation and IgG1 isotype antibody production and conferred protection against experimental challenge with L. infantum independently of CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) co-administration. Protection was associated with a pronounced enhancement of parasite-specific IFNγ-producing cells and reduction of cells producing IL-10, whereas IL-4 production was comparable in protected and non-protected mice. The polarization of immune responses to Th1 type was further confirmed by the elevation of parasite-specific IgG2a/IgG1 ratio in protected mice. The above data indicate the immunostimulatory capacity of Leishmania histone H1 and further support its exploitation as a candidate protein for vaccine development against leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Intranasal delivery of nanoparticle-based vaccine increases protection against S. pneumoniae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, Brittney [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States); Thamake, Sanjay [Radio-Isotope Therapy of America Foundation (United States); Vishwanatha, Jamboor; Jones, Harlan P., E-mail: harlan.jones@unthsc.edu [University of North Texas Health Science Center, Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Nanoparticle (NP) technologies are becoming commonplace in the development of vaccine delivery systems to protect against various diseases. The current study determined the efficacy of intranasal delivery of a 234 {+-} 87.5 nm poly lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticle vaccine construct in establishing protection against experimental respiratory pneumococcal infection. Nanoparticles encapsulating heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae (NP-HKSP) were retained in the lungs 11 days following nasal administration compared to empty NP. Immunization with NP-HKSP produced significant resistance against S. pneumoniae infection compared to administration of HKSP alone. Increased protection correlated with a significant increase in antigen-specific Th1-associated IFN-{gamma} cytokine response by pulmonary lymphocytes. This study establishes the efficacy of NP-based technology as a non-invasive and targeted approach for nasal-pulmonary immunization against pulmonary infections.

  18. Successful vaccination strategies that protect aged mice from lethal challenge from influenza virus and heterologous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Timothy; Whitmore, Alan; Long, Kristin; Ferris, Martin; Rockx, Barry; Funkhouser, William; Donaldson, Eric; Gralinski, Lisa; Collier, Martha; Heise, Mark; Davis, Nancy; Johnston, Robert; Baric, Ralph S

    2011-01-01

    Newly emerging viruses often circulate as a heterogeneous swarm in wild animal reservoirs prior to their emergence in humans, and their antigenic identities are often unknown until an outbreak situation. The newly emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and reemerging influenza virus cause disproportionate disease in the aged, who are also notoriously difficult to successfully vaccinate, likely due to immunosenescence. To protect against future emerging strains, vaccine platforms should induce broad cross-reactive immunity that is sufficient to protect from homologous and heterologous challenge in all ages. From initial studies, we hypothesized that attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particle (VRP) vaccine glycoproteins mediated vaccine failure in the aged. We then compared the efficacies of vaccines bearing attenuated (VRP(3014)) or wild-type VEE glycoproteins (VRP(3000)) in young and aged mice within novel models of severe SARS-CoV pathogenesis. Aged animals receiving VRP(3000)-based vaccines were protected from SARS-CoV disease, while animals receiving the VRP(3014)-based vaccines were not. The superior protection for the aged observed with VRP(3000)-based vaccines was confirmed in a lethal influenza virus challenge model. While the VRP(3000) vaccine's immune responses in the aged were sufficient to protect against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge, our data suggest that innate defects within the VRP(3014) platform mediate vaccine failure. Exploration into the mechanism(s) of successful vaccination in the immunosenescent should aid in the development of successful vaccine strategies for other viral diseases disproportionately affecting the elderly, like West Nile virus, influenza virus, norovirus, or other emerging viruses of the future.

  19. Antigen sparing and enhanced protection using a novel rOv-ASP-1 adjuvant in aqueous formulation with influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiu; Fisher, Erin M; Hensley, Scott E; Lustigman, Sara; Murasko, Donna M; Shen, Hao

    2014-05-13

    Influenza is one of the most common infectious diseases endangering the health of humans, especially young children and the elderly. Although vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza, frequent mutations in viral surface antigens, low protective efficacy of the influenza vaccine in the elderly, slow production process and the potential of vaccine supply shortage during a pandemic are significant limitations of current vaccines. Adjuvants have been used to enhance the efficacy of a variety of vaccines; however, no adjuvant is included in current influenza vaccines approved in the United States. In this study, we found that a novel adjuvant, rOv-ASP-1, co-administrated with inactivated influenza vaccine using an aqueous formulation, substantially improved the influenza-specific antibody response and protection against lethal infection in a mouse model. rOv-ASP-1 enhanced the magnitude of the specific antibody response after immunization with low doses of influenza vaccine, allowing antigen-sparring by 10-fold. The rOv-ASP-1 formulated vaccine induced a more rapid response and a stronger Th1-associated antibody response compared to vaccine alone and to the vaccine formulated with the adjuvant alum. Importantly, rOv-ASP-1 significantly enhanced cross-reactive antibody responses and protection against challenge with an antigenically distinct strain. These results demonstrate that rOv-ASP-1 is an effective adjuvant that: (1) accelerates and enhances the specific antibody response induced by influenza vaccine; (2) allows for antigen sparing; and (3) augments a Th1-biased and cross-reactive antibody response that confers protection against an antigenically distinct strain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, John M; Warfield, Kelly L; Wells, Jay B; Unfer, Robert C; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Nichols, Donald K; Aman, M Javad; Bavari, Sina

    2016-04-08

    Marburg virus (MARV) was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing the glycoprotein (GP), matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP) generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ) challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  1. Virus-Like Particle Vaccination Protects Nonhuman Primates from Lethal Aerosol Exposure with Marburgvirus (VLP Vaccination Protects Macaques against Aerosol Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Dye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus (MARV was the first filovirus to be identified following an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever disease in Marburg, Germany in 1967. Due to several factors inherent to filoviruses, they are considered a potential bioweapon that could be disseminated via an aerosol route. Previous studies demonstrated that MARV virus-like particles (VLPs containing the glycoprotein (GP, matrix protein VP40 and nucleoprotein (NP generated using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system could protect macaques from subcutaneous (SQ challenge with multiple species of marburgviruses. In the current study, the protective efficacy of the MARV VLPs in conjunction with two different adjuvants: QS-21, a saponin derivative, and poly I:C against homologous aerosol challenge was assessed in cynomolgus macaques. Antibody responses against the GP antigen were equivalent in all groups receiving MARV VLPs irrespective of the adjuvant; adjuvant only-vaccinated macaques did not demonstrate appreciable antibody responses. All macaques were subsequently challenged with lethal doses of MARV via aerosol or SQ as a positive control. All MARV VLP-vaccinated macaques survived either aerosol or SQ challenge while animals administered adjuvant only exhibited clinical signs and lesions consistent with MARV disease and were euthanized after meeting the predetermined criteria. Therefore, MARV VLPs induce IgG antibodies recognizing MARV GP and VP40 and protect cynomolgus macaques from an otherwise lethal aerosol exposure with MARV.

  2. Monkey Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Christine Horvatis

    2012-01-01

    A ballerina, a gladiator, a camper, a baseball player, a surfer, and a shopper; these are just a few of the amazing monkeys that the author's seventh graders created from papier-mache. This project provided an opportunity for students to express themselves through the creation of sculptural characters based on their own interests, hobbies, and…

  3. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare L Kinnear

    Full Text Available Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  4. Vaccination Method Affects Immune Response and Bacterial Growth but Not Protection in the Salmonella Typhimurium Animal Model of Typhoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Clare L; Strugnell, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding immune responses elicited by vaccines, together with immune responses required for protection, is fundamental to designing effective vaccines and immunisation programs. This study examines the effects of the route of administration of a live attenuated vaccine on its interactions with, and stimulation of, the murine immune system as well as its ability to increase survival and provide protection from colonisation by a virulent challenge strain. We assess the effect of administration method using the murine model for typhoid, where animals are infected with S. Typhimurium. Mice were vaccinated either intravenously or orally with the same live attenuated S. Typhimurium strain and data were collected on vaccine strain growth, shedding and stimulation of antibodies and cytokines. Following vaccination, mice were challenged with a virulent strain of S. Typhimurium and the protection conferred by the different vaccination routes was measured in terms of challenge suppression and animal survival. The main difference in immune stimulation found in this study was the development of a secretory IgA response in orally-vaccinated mice, which was absent in IV vaccinated mice. While both strains showed similar protection in terms of challenge suppression in systemic organs (spleen and liver) as well as survival, they differed in terms of challenge suppression of virulent pathogens in gut-associated organs. This difference in gut colonisation presents important questions around the ability of vaccines to prevent shedding and transmission. These findings demonstrate that while protection conferred by two vaccines can appear to be the same, the mechanisms controlling the protection can differ and have important implications for infection dynamics within a population.

  5. Evaluation of the protective immunity of a novel subunit fusion vaccine in a murine model of systemic MRSA infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Fei Zuo

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common commensal organism in humans and a major cause of bacteremia and hospital acquired infection. Because of the spread of strains resistant to antibiotics, these infections are becoming more difficult to treat. Therefore, exploration of anti-staphylococcal vaccines is currently a high priority. Iron surface determinant B (IsdB is an iron-regulated cell wall-anchored surface protein of S. aureus. Alpha-toxin (Hla is a secreted cytolytic pore-forming toxin. Previous studies reported that immunization with IsdB or Hla protected animals against S. aureus infection. To develop a broadly protective vaccine, we constructed chimeric vaccines based on IsdB and Hla. Immunization with the chimeric bivalent vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses. When the protective efficacy of the chimeric bivalent vaccine was compared to that of individual proteins in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection, the bivalent vaccine showed a stronger protective immune response than the individual proteins (IsdB or Hla. Based on the results presented here, the chimeric bivalent vaccine affords higher levels of protection against S. aureus and has potential as a more effective candidate vaccine.

  6. Protective immunity and lack of histopathological damage two years after DNA vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Corbeil, Serge; Elliott, Diane G.; Anderson, Eric D.; LaPatra, Scott E.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine pIHNw-G encodes the glycoprotein of the fish rhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Vaccine performance in rainbow trout was measured 3, 6, 13, 24, and 25 months after vaccination. At three months all fish vaccinated with 0.1 μg pIHNw-G had detectable neutralizing antibody (NAb) and they were completely protected from lethal IHNV challenge with a relative percent survival (RPS) of 100% compared to control fish. Viral challenges at 6, 13, 24, and 25 months post-vaccination showed protection with RPS values of 47–69%, while NAb seroprevalence declined to undetectable levels. Passive transfer experiments with sera from fish after two years post-vaccination were inconsistent but significant protection was observed in some cases. The long-term duration of protection observed here defined a third temporal phase in the immune response to IHNV DNA vaccination, characterized by reduced but significant levels of protection, and decline or absence of detectable NAb titers. Examination of multiple tissues showed an absence of detectable long-term histopathological damage due to DNA vaccination.

  7. Adenovirus-vectored drug-vaccine duo as a potential driver for conferring mass protection against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Tarbet, E Bart; Toro, Haroldo; Tang, De-chu C

    2011-11-01

    The disease-fighting power of vaccines has been a public health bonanza credited with the worldwide reduction of mortality and morbidity. The goal to further amplify its power by boosting vaccine coverage requires the development of a new generation of rapid-response vaccines that can be mass produced at low costs and mass administered by nonmedical personnel. The new vaccines also have to be endowed with a higher safety margin than that of conventional vaccines. The nonreplicating adenovirus-vectored vaccine holds promise in boosting vaccine coverage because the vector can be rapidly manufactured in serum-free suspension cells in response to a surge in demand, and noninvasively administered by nasal spray into human subjects in compliance with evolutionary medicine. In contrast to parenteral injection, noninvasive mucosal vaccination minimizes systemic inflammation. Moreover, pre-existing adenovirus immunity does not interfere appreciably with the potency of an adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine. Nasal administration of adenovirus vectors encoding pathogen antigens is not only fear-free and painless, but also confers rapid and sustained protection against mucosal pathogens as a drug-vaccine duo since adenovirus particles alone without transgene expression can induce an anti-influenza state in the airway. In addition to human vaccination, animals can also be mass immunized by this class of vectored vaccines.

  8. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    that development of PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect specifically against severe malaria syndromes-in particular PAM-is feasible. This review summarizes the evidence that VSAs are important targets of NAI, discusses why VSA-based vaccines might be feasible despite the extensive intra- and interclonal variation...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria.......There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs), such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria...

  9. The role of Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens in protective immunity and vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2010-01-01

    that development of PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect specifically against severe malaria syndromes-in particular PAM-is feasible. This review summarizes the evidence that VSAs are important targets of NAI, discusses why VSA-based vaccines might be feasible despite the extensive intra- and interclonal variation...... of VSAs, and how vaccines based on this type of antigens fit into the current global strategy to reduce, eliminate and eventually eradicate the burden of malaria.......There is substantial immuno-epidemiological evidence that the parasite-encoded, so-called variant surface antigens (VSAs) such as PfEMP1 on the surface of infected erythrocytes (IEs) are important-in some cases probably decisive-determinants of clinical outcome of P. falciparum malaria...

  10. Maximizing protection from use of oral cholera vaccines in developing country settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sachin N; Cravioto, Alejandro; Sur, Dipika; Kanungo, Suman

    2014-01-01

    When oral vaccines are administered to children in lower- and middle-income countries, they do not induce the same immune responses as they do in developed countries. Although not completely understood, reasons for this finding include maternal antibody interference, mucosal pathology secondary to infection, malnutrition, enteropathy, and previous exposure to the organism (or related organisms). Young children experience a high burden of cholera infection, which can lead to severe acute dehydrating diarrhea and substantial mortality and morbidity. Oral cholera vaccines show variations in their duration of protection and efficacy between children and adults. Evaluating innate and memory immune response is necessary to understand V. cholerae immunity and to improve current cholera vaccine candidates, especially in young children. Further research on the benefits of supplementary interventions and delivery schedules may also improve immunization strategies. PMID:24861554

  11. Identification of surrogates of protection against yersiniosis in immersion vaccinated Atlantic salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Bridle

    Full Text Available Simple cost-effective bacterins are the earliest and most successfully used commercial vaccines in fish. In particular, those prepared from Yersinia ruckeri have proven effective at controlling Enteric Red Mouth Disease (ERM and yersiniosis in rainbow trout and Atlantic salmon, respectively. However, the emergence of outbreaks of ERM caused by atypical biotypes of Y. ruckeri and reports of vaccine failure resulting in mass mortality of hatchery Atlantic salmon has reinvigorated interest in vaccines against fish bacterial diseases. Therefore the objective of this study was to identify surrogates of protection against yersiniosis using cDNA microarray to characterise the response of host genes in the gills of unvaccinated and vaccinated Atlantic salmon challenged with Y. ruckeri. Differentially expressed genes were identified using two-way ANOVA and restricted to those with >2.5-fold change at P<0.05. Using cDNA microarray we identified the expression of 6 genes in response to infection and 4 genes associated with the protective host response to yersiniosis. Analysis by real-time PCR confirmed that three immunologically relevant genes, namely a cathelicidin (47-fold and a C-type lectin (19-fold increased in response to yersiniosis. Including collagenase (17-fold increase, an important tissue remodelling and repair enzyme, these genes represent 3 of 6 non-protective and/or pathological responses to yersiniosis. Genes associated with the protective host response included an immunoglobulin gene and a selenoprotein that showed significant fold changes (15-fold increases each, highlighting the importance of antibody-mediated protection against yersiniosis. These findings provide much needed knowledge of the host-pathogen interaction in response to bacterial infection and immunisation in fish. Significantly, we identified a transcriptional biosignature consisting of predominantly immune-relevant genes (14 up and 3 down-regulated in the gills of Atlantic

  12. Sterile protection against human malaria by chemoattenuated PfSPZ vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordmüller, Benjamin; Surat, Güzin; Lagler, Heimo; Chakravarty, Sumana; Ishizuka, Andrew S; Lalremruata, Albert; Gmeiner, Markus; Campo, Joseph J; Esen, Meral; Ruben, Adam J; Held, Jana; Calle, Carlos Lamsfus; Mengue, Juliana B; Gebru, Tamirat; Ibáñez, Javier; Sulyok, Mihály; James, Eric R; Billingsley, Peter F; Natasha, K C; Manoj, Anita; Murshedkar, Tooba; Gunasekera, Anusha; Eappen, Abraham G; Li, Tao; Stafford, Richard E; Li, Minglin; Felgner, Phil L; Seder, Robert A; Richie, Thomas L; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G

    2017-02-23

    A highly protective malaria vaccine would greatly facilitate the prevention and elimination of malaria and containment of drug-resistant parasites. A high level (more than 90%) of protection against malaria in humans has previously been achieved only by immunization with radiation-attenuated Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) sporozoites (PfSPZ) inoculated by mosquitoes; by intravenous injection of aseptic, purified, radiation-attenuated, cryopreserved PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Vaccine'); or by infectious PfSPZ inoculated by mosquitoes to volunteers taking chloroquine or mefloquine (chemoprophylaxis with sporozoites). We assessed immunization by direct venous inoculation of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved, non-irradiated PfSPZ ('PfSPZ Challenge') to malaria-naive, healthy adult volunteers taking chloroquine for antimalarial chemoprophylaxis (vaccine approach denoted as PfSPZ-CVac). Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ of PfSPZ Challenge at 28-day intervals were well tolerated and safe, and prevented infection in 9 out of 9 (100%) volunteers who underwent controlled human malaria infection ten weeks after the last dose (group III). Protective efficacy was dependent on dose and regimen. Immunization with 3.2 × 10(3) (group I) or 1.28 × 10(4) (group II) PfSPZ protected 3 out of 9 (33%) or 6 out of 9 (67%) volunteers, respectively. Three doses of 5.12 × 10(4) PfSPZ at five-day intervals protected 5 out of 8 (63%) volunteers. The frequency of Pf-specific polyfunctional CD4 memory T cells was associated with protection. On a 7,455 peptide Pf proteome array, immune sera from at least 5 out of 9 group III vaccinees recognized each of 22 proteins. PfSPZ-CVac is a highly efficacious vaccine candidate; when we are able to optimize the immunization regimen (dose, interval between doses, and drug partner), this vaccine could be used for combination mass drug administration and a mass vaccination program approach to eliminate malaria from geographically defined areas.

  13. Roles of adjuvant and route of vaccination in antibody response and protection engendered by a synthetic matrix protein 2-based influenza A virus vaccine in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cudic Mare

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The M2 ectodomain (M2e of influenza A virus (IAV strains that have circulated in humans during the past 90 years shows remarkably little structural diversity. Since M2e-specific antibodies (Abs are capable of restricting IAV replication in vivo but are present only at minimal concentration in human sera, efforts are being made to develop a M2e-specific vaccine. We are exploring a synthetic multiple antigenic peptide (MAP vaccine and here report on the role of adjuvants (cholera toxin and immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide and route of immunization on Ab response and strength of protection. Results Independent of adjuvants and immunization route, on average 87% of the M2e-MAP-induced Abs were specific for M2e peptide and a variable fraction of these M2e(pep-specific Abs (average 15% cross-reacted with presumably native M2e expressed by M2-transfected cells. The titer of these cross-reactive M2e(pep-nat-specific Abs in sera of parenterally immunized mice displayed a sigmoidal relation to level of protection, with EC50 of ~20 μg Ab/ml serum, though experiments with passive M2e(pep-nat Abs indicated that serum Abs did not fully account for protection in parenterally vaccinated mice, particularly in upper airways. Intranasal vaccination engendered stronger protection and a higher proportion of G2a Abs than parenteral vaccination, and the strength of protection failed to correlate with M2e(pep-nat-specific serum Ab titers, suggesting a role of airway-associated immunity in protection of intranasally vaccinated mice. Intranasal administration of M2e-MAP without adjuvant engendered no response but coadministration with infectious IAV slightly enhanced the M2e(pep-nat Ab response and protection compared to vaccination with IAV or adjuvanted M2e-MAP alone. Conclusion M2e-MAP is an effective immunogen as ~15% of the total M2e-MAP-induced Ab response is of desired specificity. While M2e(pep-nat-specific serum Abs have an important

  14. Vaccination using live attenuated Leishmania donovani centrin deleted parasites induces protection in dogs against Leishmania infantum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Jacqueline Araújo; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Santiago, Helton da Costa; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Souza, Daniel Menezes; Passos, Lívia Silva Araújo; de Mendonça, Ludmila Zanandreis; Lemos-Giunchetti, Denise da Silveira; Ricci, Natasha Delaqua; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Giunchetti, Rodolfo Cordeiro; Bueno, Lilian Lacerda; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Nakhasi, Hira L; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-03

    Live attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites such as LdCen(-/-) have been shown elicit protective immunity against leishmanial infection in mice and hamster models. Previously, we have reported on the induction of strong immunogenicity in dogs upon vaccination with LdCen(-/-) including an increase in immunoglobulin isotypes, higher lymphoproliferative response, higher frequencies of activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T cells, increased secretion of TNF-α and IL-12/IL-23p40 and, finally, decreased secretion of IL-4. To further explore the potential of LdCen(-/-) parasites as vaccine candidates, we performed a 24-month follow up of LdCen(-/-) immunized dogs after challenge with virulent Leishmania infantum, aiming determination of parasite burden by qPCR, antibody production (ELISA) and cellular responses (T cell activation and cytokine production) by flow cytometry and sandwich ELISA. Our data demonstrated that vaccination with a single dose of LdCen(-/-) (without any adjuvant) resulted in the reduction of up to 87.3% of parasite burden after 18 months of virulent challenge. These results are comparable to those obtained with commercially available vaccine in Brazil (Leishmune(®)). The protection was associated with antibody production and CD4(+) and CD8(+) proliferative responses, as well as T cell activation and significantly higher production of IFN-γ, IL-12/IL-23p40 and TNF-α, which was comparable to responses induced by immunization with Leishmune(®), with significant differences when compared to control animals (Placebo). Moreover, only animals immunized with LdCen(-/-) expressed lower levels of IL-4 when compared to animals vaccinated either with Leishmune(®) or PBS. Our results support further studies aiming to demonstrate the potential of genetically modified live attenuated L. donovani vaccine to control L. infantum transmission in endemic areas for CVL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New gorilla adenovirus vaccine vectors induce potent immune responses and protection in a mouse malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, Keith; Stefaniak, Maureen; Chen, Ping; Patterson, Noelle B; Liao, Grant; Weng, Shaojie; Krepkiy, Svetlana; Ekberg, Greg; Torano, Holly; Ettyreddy, Damodar; Gowda, Kalpana; Sonawane, Sharvari; Belmonte, Arnel; Abot, Esteban; Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R; Moormann, Ann; Vulule, John; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L; Brough, Douglas E; Bruder, Joseph T

    2017-07-03

    A DNA-human Ad5 (HuAd5) prime-boost malaria vaccine has been shown to protect volunteers against a controlled human malaria infection. The potency of this vaccine, however, appeared to be affected by the presence of pre-existing immunity against the HuAd5 vector. Since HuAd5 seroprevalence is very high in malaria-endemic areas of the world, HuAd5 may not be the most appropriate malaria vaccine vector. This report describes the evaluation of the seroprevalence, immunogenicity and efficacy of three newly identified gorilla adenoviruses, GC44, GC45 and GC46, as potential malaria vaccine vectors. The seroprevalence of GC44, GC45 and GC46 is very low, and the three vectors are not efficiently neutralized by human sera from Kenya and Ghana, two countries where malaria is endemic. In mice, a single administration of GC44, GC45 and GC46 vectors expressing a murine malaria gene, Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite protein (PyCSP), induced robust PyCSP-specific T cell and antibody responses that were at least as high as a comparable HuAd5-PyCSP vector. Efficacy studies in a murine malaria model indicated that a prime-boost regimen with DNA-PyCSP and GC-PyCSP vectors can protect mice against a malaria challenge. Moreover, these studies indicated that a DNA-GC46-PyCSP vaccine regimen was significantly more efficacious than a DNA-HuAd5-PyCSP regimen. These data suggest that these gorilla-based adenovectors have key performance characteristics for an effective malaria vaccine. The superior performance of GC46 over HuAd5 highlights its potential for clinical development.

  16. Novel G3/DT adjuvant promotes the induction of protective T cells responses after vaccination with a seasonal trivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Kreijtz, Joost H C M; Geelhoed-Mieras, Martina M; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Nieuwkoop, Nella J; van de Vijver, David A M C; Fouchier, Ron A M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Morein, Bror; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2014-09-29

    Vaccines used against seasonal influenza are poorly effective against influenza A viruses of novel subtypes that may have pandemic potential. Furthermore, pre(pandemic) influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic, which can be overcome by the use of adjuvants. A limited number of adjuvants has been approved for use in humans, however there is a need for alternative safe and effective adjuvants that can enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines and that promote the induction of broad-protective T cell responses. Here we evaluated a novel nanoparticle, G3, as an adjuvant for a seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in a mouse model. The G3 adjuvant was formulated with or without steviol glycosides (DT, for diterpenoid). The use of both formulations enhanced the virus-specific antibody response to all three vaccine strains considerably. The adjuvants were well tolerated without any signs of discomfort. To assess the protective potential of the vaccine-induced immune responses, an antigenically distinct influenza virus strain, A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (A/PR/8/34), was used for challenge infection. The vaccine-induced antibodies did not cross-react with strain A/PR/8/34 in HI and VN assays. However, mice immunized with the G3/DT-adjuvanted vaccine were partially protected against A/PR/8/34 infection, which correlated with the induction of anamnestic virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses that were not observed with the use of G3 without DT. Both formulations induced maturation of human dendritic cells and promoted antigen presentation to a similar extent. In conclusion, G3/DT is a promising adjuvant formulation that not only potentiates the antibody response induced by influenza vaccines, but also induces T cell immunity which could afford broader protection against antigenically distinct influenza viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multivalent HA DNA vaccination protects against highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza infection in chickens and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rao

    Full Text Available Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 in avian species increase the risk of reassortment and adaptation to humans. The ability to contain its spread in chickens would reduce this threat and help maintain the capacity for egg-based vaccine production. While vaccines offer the potential to control avian disease, a major concern of current vaccines is their potency and inability to protect against evolving avian influenza viruses.The ability of DNA vaccines encoding hemagglutinin (HA proteins from different HPAI H5N1 serotypes was evaluated for its ability to elicit neutralizing antibodies and to protect against homologous and heterologous HPAI H5N1 strain challenge in mice and chickens after DNA immunization by needle and syringe or with a pressure injection device. These vaccines elicited antibodies that neutralized multiple strains of HPAI H5N1 when given in combinations containing up to 10 HAs. The response was dose-dependent, and breadth was determined by the choice of the influenza virus HA in the vaccine. Monovalent and trivalent HA vaccines were tested first in mice and conferred protection against lethal H5N1 A/Vietnam/1203/2004 challenge 68 weeks after vaccination. In chickens, protection was observed against heterologous strains of HPAI H5N1 after vaccination with a trivalent H5 serotype DNA vaccine with doses as low as 5 microg DNA given twice either by intramuscular needle injection or with a needle-free device.DNA vaccines offer a generic approach to influenza virus immunization applicable to multiple animal species. In addition, the ability to substitute plasmids encoding different strains enables rapid adaptation of the vaccine to newly evolving field isolates.

  18. A Novel Vaccine against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever Protects 100% of Animals against Lethal Challenge in a Mouse Model

    OpenAIRE

    Buttigieg, Karen R.; Dowall, Stuart D.; Stephen Findlay-Wilson; Aleksandra Miloszewska; Emma Rayner; Roger Hewson; Carroll, Miles W.

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. Between 15-70% of reported cases are fatal. There is no approved vaccine available, and preclinical protection in vivo by an experimental vaccine has not been demonstrated previously. In the present study, the attenuated poxvirus vector, Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara, was used to develop a recombinant candidate vaccine expressing the CCHF viru...

  19. A novel vaccine against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever protects 100% of animals against lethal challenge in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen R Buttigieg

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. Between 15-70% of reported cases are fatal. There is no approved vaccine available, and preclinical protection in vivo by an experimental vaccine has not been demonstrated previously. In the present study, the attenuated poxvirus vector, Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara, was used to develop a recombinant candidate vaccine expressing the CCHF virus glycoproteins. Cellular and humoral immunogenicity was confirmed in two mouse strains, including type I interferon receptor knockout mice, which are susceptible to CCHF disease. This vaccine protected all recipient animals from lethal disease in a challenge model adapted to represent infection via a tick bite. Histopathology and viral load analysis of protected animals confirmed that they had been exposed to challenge virus, even though they did not exhibit clinical signs. This is the first demonstration of efficacy of a CCHF vaccine.

  20. A novel vaccine against Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever protects 100% of animals against lethal challenge in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttigieg, Karen R; Dowall, Stuart D; Findlay-Wilson, Stephen; Miloszewska, Aleksandra; Rayner, Emma; Hewson, Roger; Carroll, Miles W

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. Between 15-70% of reported cases are fatal. There is no approved vaccine available, and preclinical protection in vivo by an experimental vaccine has not been demonstrated previously. In the present study, the attenuated poxvirus vector, Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara, was used to develop a recombinant candidate vaccine expressing the CCHF virus glycoproteins. Cellular and humoral immunogenicity was confirmed in two mouse strains, including type I interferon receptor knockout mice, which are susceptible to CCHF disease. This vaccine protected all recipient animals from lethal disease in a challenge model adapted to represent infection via a tick bite. Histopathology and viral load analysis of protected animals confirmed that they had been exposed to challenge virus, even though they did not exhibit clinical signs. This is the first demonstration of efficacy of a CCHF vaccine.

  1. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, L.; Lorenzen, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides Protection by 4 days post...... vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination...... against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site...

  2. Suppressing active replication of a live attenuated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine does not abrogate protection from challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Benjamin; Fiebig, Uwe; Hohn, Oliver [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Plesker, Roland; Coulibaly, Cheick; Cichutek, Klaus; Mühlebach, Michael D. [Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen (Germany); Bannert, Norbert; Kurth, Reinhard [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Norley, Stephen, E-mail: NorleyS@rki.de [Robert Koch-Institut, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Although safety concerns preclude the use of live attenuated HIV vaccines in humans, they provide a useful system for identifying the elusive correlates of protective immunity in the SIV/macaque animal model. However, a number of pieces of evidence suggest that protection may result from prior occupancy of susceptible target cells by the vaccine virus rather than the immune response. To address this, we developed a Nef-deletion variant of an RT-SHIV whose active replication could be shut off by treatment with RT-inhibitors. Groups of macaques were inoculated with the ∆Nef-RT-SHIV and immune responses allowed to develop before antiretroviral treatment and subsequent challenge with wild-type SIVmac239. Vaccinated animals either resisted infection fully or significantly controlled the subsequent viremia. However, there was no difference between animals undergoing replication of the vaccine virus and those without. This strongly suggests that competition for available target cells does not play a role in protection. - Highlights: • A Nef-deleted RT-SHIV was used as a live attenuated vaccine in macaques. • Vaccine virus replication was shut down to investigate its role in protection. • Ongoing vaccine virus replication did not appear to be necessary for protection. • An analysis of T- and B-cell responses failed to identify a correlate of protection.

  3. Vaccination with Enzymatically Cleaved GPI-Anchored Proteins from Schistosoma mansoni Induces Protection against Challenge Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente P. Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flatworm Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease that occurs throughout the developing world. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization with an antischistosomiasis vaccine combined with drug treatment. In the search for potential vaccine candidates, numerous tegument antigens have been assessed. As the major interface between parasite and mammalian host, the tegument plays crucial roles in the establishment and further course of schistosomiasis. Herein, we evaluated the potential of a GPI fraction, containing representative molecules located on the outer surface of adult worms, as vaccine candidate. Immunization of mice with GPI-anchored proteins induced a mixed Th1/Th2 type of immune response with production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and low levels of IL-5 into the supernatant of splenocyte cultures. The protection engendered by this vaccination protocol was confirmed by 42% reduction in worm burden, 45% reduction in eggs per gram of hepatic tissue, 29% reduction in the number of granulomas per area, and 53% reduction in the granuloma fibrosis. Taken together, the data herein support the potential of surface-exposed GPI-anchored antigens from the S. mansoni tegument as vaccine candidate.

  4. Laser microporation of the skin: prospects for painless application of protective and therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to muscle and subcutaneous tissue, the skin is easily accessible and provides unique immunological properties. Increasing knowledge about the complex interplay of skin-associated cell types in the development of cutaneous immune responses has fueled efforts to target the skin for vaccination as well as for immunotherapy. This review provides an overview on skin layers and their resident immunocompetent cell types. Advantages and shortcomings of standard methods and innovative technologies to circumvent the outermost skin barrier are addressed. Studies employing fractional skin ablation by infrared lasers for cutaneous delivery of drugs, as well as high molecular weight molecules such as protein antigens or antibodies, are reviewed, and laserporation is introduced as a versatile transcutaneous vaccination platform. Specific targeting of the epidermis or the dermis by different laser settings, the resulting kinetics of uptake and transport and the immune response types elicited are discussed, and the potential of this transcutaneous delivery platform for allergen-specific immunotherapy is demonstrated. Needle-free and painless vaccination approaches have the potential to replace standard methods due to their improved safety and optimal patient compliance. The use of fractional laser devices for stepwise ablation of skin layers might be advantageous for both vaccination against microbial pathogens, as well as immunotherapeutic approaches, such as allergen-specific immunotherapy. Thorough investigation of the underlying immunological mechanisms will help to provide the knowledge for a rational design of transcutaneous protective/therapeutic vaccines.

  5. Vaccination with enzymatically cleaved GPI-anchored proteins from Schistosoma mansoni induces protection against challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Vicente P; Pinheiro, Carina S; Figueiredo, Barbara C P; Assis, Natan R G; Morais, Suellen B; Caliari, Marcelo V; Azevedo, Vasco; Castro-Borges, William; Wilson, R Alan; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2012-01-01

    The flatworm Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke parasite that causes schistosomiasis, a debilitating disease that occurs throughout the developing world. Current schistosomiasis control strategies are mainly based on chemotherapy, but many researchers believe that the best long-term strategy to control schistosomiasis is through immunization with an antischistosomiasis vaccine combined with drug treatment. In the search for potential vaccine candidates, numerous tegument antigens have been assessed. As the major interface between parasite and mammalian host, the tegument plays crucial roles in the establishment and further course of schistosomiasis. Herein, we evaluated the potential of a GPI fraction, containing representative molecules located on the outer surface of adult worms, as vaccine candidate. Immunization of mice with GPI-anchored proteins induced a mixed Th1/Th2 type of immune response with production of IFN-γ and TNF-α, and low levels of IL-5 into the supernatant of splenocyte cultures. The protection engendered by this vaccination protocol was confirmed by 42% reduction in worm burden, 45% reduction in eggs per gram of hepatic tissue, 29% reduction in the number of granulomas per area, and 53% reduction in the granuloma fibrosis. Taken together, the data herein support the potential of surface-exposed GPI-anchored antigens from the S. mansoni tegument as vaccine candidate.

  6. An inactivated influenza D virus vaccine partially protects cattle from respiratory disease caused by homologous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Huntimer, Lucas; Falkenberg, Shollie; Henningson, Jamie; Lechtenberg, Kelly; Halbur, Tom

    2017-02-01

    Originally isolated from swine, the proposed influenza D virus has since been shown to be common in cattle. Inoculation of IDV to naïve calves resulted in mild respiratory disease histologically characterized by tracheitis. As several studies have associated the presence of IDV with acute bovine respiratory disease (BRD), we sought to investigate the efficacy of an inactivated IDV vaccine. Vaccinated calves seroconverted with hemagglutination inhibition titers 137-169 following two doses. Non-vaccinated calves challenged with a homologous virus exhibited signs of mild respiratory disease from days four to ten post challenge which was significantly different than negative controls at days five and nine post challenge. Peak viral shedding of approximately 5 TCID50/mL was measured in nasal and tracheal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids four to six days post challenge. Viral titers were significantly (Prespiratory epithelium of the nasal turbinates and trachea by immunohistochemistry from all unvaccinated calves but in significantly fewer vaccinates. Inflammation characterized by neutrophils was observed in the nasal turbinate and trachea but not appreciably in lungs. Together these results support an etiologic role for IDV in BRD and demonstrate that partial protection is afforded by an inactivated vaccine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Whole Virus Pandemic Influenza H1N1 Vaccine Is Highly Immunogenic and Protective in Active Immunization and Passive Protection Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kistner, Otfried; Crowe, Brian A.; Wodal, Walter; Kerschbaum, Astrid; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Sabarth, Nicolas; Falkner, Falko G.; Mayerhofer, Ines; Mundt, Wolfgang; Reiter, Manfred; Grillberger, Leopold; Tauer, Christa; Graninger, Michael; Sachslehner, Alois; Schwendinger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The recent emergence and rapid spread of a novel swine-derived H1N1 influenza virus has resulted in the first influenza pandemic of this century. Monovalent vaccines have undergone preclinical and clinical development prior to initiation of mass immunization campaigns. We have carried out a series of immunogenicity and protection studies following active immunization of mice, which indicate that a whole virus, nonadjuvanted vaccine is immunogenic at low doses and protects against live virus c...

  8. Dietary wolfberry supplementation enhances the protective effect of flu vaccine against influenza challenge in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaogang; Wang, Junpeng; Niu, Xinli; Smith, Donald; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2014-02-01

    Current vaccines for influenza do not fully protect the aged against influenza infection. Although wolfberry (goji berry) has been shown to improve immune response, including enhanced antibody production, after vaccination in the aged, it is not known if this effect would translate to better protection after influenza infection, nor is its underlying mechanism well understood. To address these issues, we conducted a study using a 2 × 2 design in which aged male mice (20-22 mo) were fed a control or a 5% wolfberry diet for 30 d, then immunized with an influenza vaccine or saline (control) on days 31 and 52 of the dietary intervention, and finally challenged with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 virus. Mice fed wolfberry had higher influenza antibody titers and improved symptoms (less postinfection weight loss) compared with the mice treated by vaccine alone. Furthermore, an in vitro mechanistic study showed that wolfberry supplementation enhanced maturation and activity of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) in aged mice, as indicated by phenotypic change in expression of DC activation markers major histocompatibility complex class II, cluster of differentiation (CD) 40, CD80, and CD86, and functional change in DC production of cytokines interleukin-12 and tumor necrosis factor-α as well as DC endocytosis. Also, adoptive transfer of wolfberry-treated bone marrow DCs (loaded with ovalbumin(323-339)-peptide) promoted antigen-specific T cell proliferation as well as interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production in CD4(+) T cells. In summary, our data indicate that dietary wolfberry enhances the efficacy of influenza vaccination, resulting in better host protection to prevent subsequent influenza infection; this effect may be partly attributed to improved DC function.

  9. Immunization with a recombinant fowlpox virus expressing a hepatitis C virus core-E1 polyprotein variant, protects mice and African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) against challenge with a surrogate vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lajonchere, Liz; Amador-Cañizares, Yalena; Frías, Roberto; Milian, Yoamel; Musacchio, Alexis; Guerra, Ivis; Acosta-Rivero, Nelson; Martínez, Gillian; Castro, Jorge; Puentes, Pedro; Cosme, Karelia; Dueñas-Carrera, Santiago

    2008-10-01

    HCV (hepatitis C virus) is a worldwide health problem nowadays. No preventive vaccine is available against this pathogen, and therapeutic treatments currently in use have important drawbacks, including limited efficacy. In the present work a recombinant fowlpox virus, FPCoE1, expressing a truncated HCV core-E1 polyprotein, was generated. FPCoE1 virus generally failed to elicit a humoral immune response against HCV antigens in BALB/c mice. By contrast, mice inoculated with FPCoE1 elicited a positive interferon-gamma secretion response against HCV core in ex-vivo ELISPOT (enzyme-linked immunospot) assays. Remarkably, mice inoculated with FPCoE1 significantly controlled viraemia in a surrogate challenge model with vvRE, a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing HCV structural antigens. In fact, 40% of the mice had no detectable levels of vvRE in their ovaries. Administration of FPCoE1 in vervet monkeys [Chlorocebus (formerly Cercophitecus) aethiops sabaeus] induced lymphoproliferative response against HCV core and E1 proteins in 50% of immunized animals. Monkeys immunized with FPCoE1 had no detectable levels of vvRE in their blood, whereas monkeys inoculated with FP9, the negative control virus, had detectable levels of vvRE in blood up to 7 days after challenge. In conclusion, recombinant fowlpox virus FPCoE1 is able to induce an anti-HCV immune response in mice and monkeys. This ability could be rationally employed to develop effective strategies against HCV infection by using FPCoE1 in combination with other vaccine candidates or antiviral treatments.

  10. Vaccination with a ΔnorD ΔznuA Brucella abortus mutant confers potent protection against virulent challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Clapp, Beata; Thornburg, Theresa; Hoffman, Carol; Pascual, David W

    2016-10-17

    There remains a need for an improved livestock vaccine for brucellosis since conventional vaccines are only ∼70% efficacious, making some vaccinated animals susceptible to Brucella infections. To address this void, a vaccine capable of evoking protective immunity, while still being sufficiently attenuated to produce minimal disease, is sought. In this pursuit, the ΔnorD ΔznuA B. abortus-lacZ (termed as znBAZ) was developed to be devoid of functional norD and znuA B. abortus genes, and to contain the lacZ as a marker gene. The results show that znBAZ is highly attenuated in mouse and human macrophages, and completely cleared from mouse spleens within eight weeks post-vaccination. Producing less splenic inflammation, znBAZ is significantly more protective than the conventional RB51 vaccine by more than four orders of magnitude. Vaccination with znBAZ elicits elevated numbers of IFN-γ + , TNF-α + , and polyfunctional IFN-γ + TNF-α + CD4 + and CD8 + T cells in contrast to RB51-vaccinated mice, which show reduced numbers of proinflammatory cytokine-producing T cells. These results demonstrate that znBAZ is a highly efficacious vaccine candidate capable of eliciting diverse T cell subsets that confer protection against parenteral challenge with virulent, wild-type B. abortus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A recombinant rabies vaccine expressing the trimeric form of the glycoprotein confers enhanced immunogenicity and protection in outbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koraka, Penelope; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Cox, Manon; Chubet, Rick; Amerongen, Geert van; Lövgren-Bengtsson, Karen; Martina, Byron E E; Roose, Jouke; Rottier, Peter J M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-08-06

    Rabies is a disease characterized by an invariably lethal encephalitis of viral origin that can be controlled by preventive vaccination programs of wildlife, domestic animals and humans in areas with a high risk of exposure. Currently available vaccines are expensive, cumbersome to produce and require intensive immunization and booster schemes to induce and maintain protective immunity. In the present study, we describe the development of candidate recombinant subunit rabies vaccines based on the glycoprotein G of the prototype rabies virus (RABV-G) expressed either as a monomer (RABV-mG) or in its native trimeric configuration (RABV-tG), with or without Matrix-M™ adjuvant. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the respective candidate vaccines were tested in outbred NIH Swiss albino mice. The RABV-tG candidate vaccine proved to be superior to the RABV-mG vaccine candidate both in terms of immunogenicity and efficacy. The relatively poor immunogenicity of the RABV-mG vaccine candidate was greatly improved by the addition of the adjuvant. A single, low dose of RABV-tG in combination with Matrix-M™ induced high levels of high avidity neutralizing antibodies and protected all mice against challenge with a lethal dose of RABV. Consequently RABV-tG used in combination with Matrix-M™ is a promising vaccine candidate that overcomes the limitations of currently used vaccines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Supramolecular peptide hydrogel adjuvanted subunit vaccine elicits protective antibody responses against West Nile virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Brian M; Beasley, David W C; Rudra, Jai S

    2016-11-04

    A crucial issue in vaccine development is to balance safety with immunogenicity. The low immunogenicity of most subunit antigens warrants a search for adjuvants able to stimulate both cell-mediated and humoral immunity. In recent years, successful applications of nanotechnology and bioengineering in the field of vaccine development have enabled the production of novel adjuvant technologies. In this work, we investigated totally synthetic and supramolecular peptide hydrogels as novel vaccine adjuvants in conjunction with the immunoprotective envelope protein domain III (EIII) of West Nile virus as an immunogen in a mouse model. Our results indicate that, compared to the clinically approved adjuvant alum, peptide hydrogel adjuvanted antigen elicited stronger antibody responses and conferred significant protection against mortality after virus challenge. The high chemical definition and biocompatibility of self-assembling peptide hydrogels makes them attractive as immune adjuvants for the production of subunit vaccines against viral and bacterial infections where antibody-mediated protection is desirable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flagellin enhances saliva IgA response and protection of anti-caries DNA vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, W; Li, Y H; Liu, F; Yang, J Y; Zhou, D H; Chen, Y Q; Zhang, Y; Yang, Y; He, B X; Han, C; Fan, M W; Yan, H M

    2012-03-01

    We and others have shown that anti-caries DNA vaccines, including pGJA-P/VAX, are promising for preventing dental caries. However, challenges remain because of the low immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In this study, we used recombinant flagellin protein derived from Salmonella (FliC) as a mucosal adjuvant for anti-caries DNA vaccine (pGJA-P/VAX) and analyzed the effects of FliC protein on the serum PAc-specific IgG and saliva PAc-specific IgA antibody responses, the colonization of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) on rat teeth, and the formation of caries lesions. Our results showed that FliC promoted the production of PAc-specific IgG in serum and secretory IgA (S-IgA) in saliva of rats by intranasal immunization with pGJA-P/VAX plus FliC. Furthermore, we found that enhanced PAc-specific IgA responses in saliva were associated with the inhibition of S. mutans colonization of tooth surfaces and endowed better protection with significant fewer caries lesions. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that recombinant FliC could enhance specific IgA responses in saliva and protective ability of pGJA-P/VAX, providing an effective mucosal adjuvant candidate for intranasal immunization of an anti-caries DNA vaccine.

  14. Immunogenicity and protective effects of inactivated Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) vaccines in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-yang, Zhengliang; Wang, Peiran; Huang, Xiaohong; Cai, Jia; Huang, Youhua; Wei, Shina; Ji, Huasong; Wei, Jingguang; Zhou, Yongcan; Qin, Qiwei

    2012-10-01

    Vaccination is one of the best methods against viral diseases. In this study, experimental inactivated Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV) vaccines were prepared, and immunogenicity and protection against virus infection of the vaccines were investigated in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Two kinds of vaccines, including β-propiolactone (BPL) inactivated virus at 4°C for 12 h and formalin inactivated virus at 4°C for 12 d, was highly protective against the challenge at 30-day post-vaccination and produced relative percent of survival rates of 91.7% and 100%, respectively. These effective vaccinations induced potent innate immune responses mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs). It is noteworthy that ISGs, such as Mx and ISG15, were up-regulated only in the effective vaccine groups, which suggested that type I IFN system may be the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity. Moreover, effective vaccination also significantly up-regulated of the expression of MHC class I gene and produced substantial amount of specific serum antibody at 4 weeks post-vaccination. Taken together, our results clearly demonstrated that effective vaccination in grouper induced an early, nonspecific antiviral immunity, and later, a specific immune response involving both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of an experimental irradiated oocyst vaccine to protect broiler chicks against avian coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterer, Raymond H; Jenkins, Mark C; Miska, Katarzyna B; Barfield, Ruth C

    2014-09-01

    The current study investigates the use of irradiated oocysts to protect broiler chicks, raised on litter, from infection with multiple species of Eimeria. In order to determine the optimum radiation dose for each Eimeria species, 1-day-old chicks were immunized with oocysts of Eimeria maxima, Eimeria acervulina, or Eimeria tenella exposed to gamma radiation ranging from 0-500 Gy. The litter oocyst counts at 7 days postimmunization, and the effect on weight gain following a challenge infection, decreased with an optimum dose between 150-200 Gy. Based on this finding, broiler chicks were immunized with a mixture of E. maxima, E. acervulina, and E tenella that had been exposed to 150 or 200 Gy. This resulted in more than a 100-fold reduction in litter oocyst counts and significant protection from a challenge infection, as measured by improved weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). Immunization of birds with oocysts receiving 200 Gy was less effective in providing protection from a challenge infection. An additional formulation of vaccines containing two different oocyst doses of the three species that had been irradiated with 150 Gy were evaluated in their ability to attenuate oocyst output and convey protection to challenge. Results were similar with both high and low numbers of irradiated oocysts. Immunized chicks shed less oocysts at 7 days postimmunization and were protected from negative effects of challenge infection as measured by FCR, changes in weight gain, lesion scores, and measurement of body composition. However, the level of protection was somewhat less than that achieved by immunization with nonirradiated oocysts. The overall conclusion is that an irradiated oocyst vaccine developed in this study can effectively protect chicks that are raised on litter from challenge infection with multiple species of Eimeria, comparable to vaccines with virulent or precocious strains.

  16. Cross-protection by co-immunization with influenza hemagglutinin DNA and inactivated virus vaccine using coated microneedles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Compans, Richard W; Kang, Sang-Moo; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2013-12-10

    The need for annual revaccination against influenza is a burden on the healthcare system, leads to low vaccination rates and makes timely vaccination difficult against pandemic strains, such as during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. In an effort toward achieving a broadly protective vaccine that provides cross-protection against multiple strains of influenza, this study developed a microneedle patch to co-immunize with A/PR8 influenza hemagglutinin DNA and A/PR8 inactivated virus vaccine. We hypothesize that this dual component vaccination strategy administered to the skin using microneedles will provide cross-protection against other strains of influenza. To test this hypothesis, we developed a novel coating formulation that did not require additional excipients to increase coating solution viscosity by using the DNA vaccine itself to increase viscosity and thereby enable thick coatings of DNA vaccine and inactivated virus vaccine on metal microneedles. Co-immunization in this way not only generated robust antibody responses against A/PR8 influenza but also generated robust heterologous antibody responses against pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza in mice. Challenge studies showed complete cross-protection against lethal challenge with live pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus. Control experiments using A/PR8 inactivated influenza virus vaccine with placebo DNA coated onto microneedles produced lower antibody titers and provided incomplete protection against challenge. Overall, this is the first study showing DNA solution as a microneedle coating agent and demonstrating cross-protection by co-immunization with inactivated virus and DNA vaccine using coated microneedles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Strains for Broad Protection against Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Maddux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are difficult to treat, producing a burden on healthcare and the economy. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes, cause infections outside of the intestine, and are causative agents of hospital-acquired infections. Developing a prevention strategy against this pathogen is challenging due to its antibiotic resistance and antigenic diversity. E. coli common pilus (ECP is frequently found in ExPEC strains and may serve as a common antigen to induce protection against several ExPEC serotypes. In addition, live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV strains have been used to prevent Salmonella infection and can also be modified to deliver foreign antigens. Thus, the objective of this study was to design a RASV to produce ECP on its surface and assess its ability to provide protection against ExPEC infections. To constitutively display ECP in a RASV strain, we genetically engineered a vector (pYA4428 containing aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and E. coli ecp genes and introduced it into RASV χ9558. RASV χ9558 containing an empty vector (pYA3337 was used as a control to assess protection conferred by the RASV strain without ECP. We assessed vaccine efficacy in in vitro bacterial inhibition assays and mouse models of ExPEC-associated human infections. We found that RASV χ9558(pYA4428 synthesized the major pilin (EcpA and tip pilus adhesin (EcpD on the bacterial surface. Mice orally vaccinated with RASV χ9558(pYA3337 without ECP or χ9558(pYA4428 with ECP, produced anti-Salmonella LPS and anti-E. coli EcpA and EcpD IgG and IgA antibodies. RASV strains showed protective potential against some E. coli and Salmonella strains as assessed using in vitro assays. In mouse sepsis and urinary tract infection challenge models, both vaccines had significant protection in some internal organs. Overall, this work showed that RASVs can elicit

  18. A DNA vaccine directed against a rainbow trout rhabdovirus induces early protection against a nodavirus challenge in turbot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerset, I.; Lorenzen, Ellen; Lorenzen, Niels

    2003-01-01

    encoding the capsid protein of AHNV revealed no protective properties against the nodavirus challenge. Histological examination of muscle tissue sections from the vaccine injection site showed that the DNA vaccine against VHSV triggered a pronounced inflammatory response in turbot similar to what has...

  19. New USDA licensed avian influenza vaccine (rHVT-AI) for protection against H5 avian influenza and usage discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, a new avian influenza vaccine was licensed by USDA for use in the United States for protection of commercial poultry. The vaccine is a recombinant herpes virus of turkeys expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5 subtype avian influenza virus belonging to the 2.2 clade of the H5N1 highly ...

  20. IL-22-induced antimicrobial peptides are key determinants of mucosal vaccine-induced protection against H. pylori in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyat, M; Bouzourene, H; Ouyang, W; Iovanna, J; Renauld, J-C; Velin, D

    2017-01-01

    Despite the recent description of the mucosal vaccine-induced reduction of Helicobacter pylori natural infection in a phase 3 clinical trial, the absence of immune correlates of protection slows the final development of the vaccine. In this study, we evaluated the role of interleukin (IL)-22 in mucosal vaccine-induced protection. Gastric IL-22 levels were increased in mice intranasally immunized with urease+cholera toxin and challenged with H. felis, as compared with controls. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a peak of CD4 + IL-22 + IL-17 + T cells infiltrating the gastric mucosa occurred in immunized mice in contrast to control mice. The inhibition of the IL-22 biological activity prevented the vaccine-induced reduction of H. pylori infection. Remarkably, anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) extracted from the stomachs of vaccinated mice, but not from the stomachs of non-immunized or immunized mice, injected with anti-IL-22 antibodies efficiently killed H. pylori in vitro. Finally, H. pylori infection in vaccinated RegIIIβ-deficient mice was not reduced as efficiently as in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that IL-22 has a critical role in vaccine-induced protection, by promoting the expression of AMPs, such as RegIIIβ, capable of killing Helicobacter. Therefore, it can be concluded that urease-specific memory Th17/Th22 cells could constitute immune correlates of vaccine protection in humans.

  1. Immunity induced shortly after DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against rhabdoviruses protects against heterologous virus but not against bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lorenzen, Ellen; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2002-01-01

    It was recently reported that DNA vaccination of rainbow trout fingerlings against viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) induced protection within 8 days after intramuscular injection of plasmid DNA. In order to analyse the specificity of this early immunity, fish were vaccinated with plasmi...

  2. The potential impact of an HIV vaccine with limited protection on HIV incidence in Thailand: a modeling study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, N.J.; Hontelez, J.A.; Vlas, S.J. de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The RV144 trial on the ALVAC/AIDSVAX candidate HIV vaccine, carried out in Thailand, showed short-lived protection against infection. METHODS: Using a deterministic compartmental model we explored the potential impact of this vaccine on heterosexual HIV transmission in Thailand. Both

  3. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  4. Two-dose strategies for human papillomavirus vaccination: how well do they need to protect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Choi, Yoon Hong; Laprise, Jean-François; Boily, Marie-Claude; Drolet, Mélanie; Brisson, Marc

    2014-05-30

    Two-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine schedules may provide short-term protection but their long-term population impact is unknown. Two models of HPV transmission and associated cervical disease (squamous and glandular, neoplasia and cancer) were fitted to data from England and Canada on HPV epidemiology, sexual behaviour, cervical screening outcomes and cervical cancer incidence. Models suggest that at 40-80% coverage, if two-dose schedules protect vaccinees for 20 years, then the benefits of the third dose are small. If two doses protect for 10 years, then the third dose may prevent as many cancers as the first two. At 80% coverage, numbers needed to receive a third dose to prevent an additional cancer are 5900-110,000 (England), 3000-5100 (Canada) with 20 years two-dose protection, and 2000-5300 (England), 760-950 (Canada) with 10 years two-dose protection. Results enable decision makers to quantify risks associated with two-dose schedules despite remaining uncertainties in vaccine duration and cross-protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. NS1-Truncated Live Attenuated Virus Vaccine Provides Robust Protection to Aged Mice from Viral Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Natalie; Langlois, Ryan A.; Krammer, Florian; Margine, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Immunological changes associated with age contribute to the high rates of influenza virus morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Compounding this problem, aged individuals do not respond to vaccination as well as younger, healthy adults. Efforts to increase protection to this demographic group are of utmost importance, as the proportion of the population above the age of 65 is projected to increase in the coming decade. Using a live influenza virus with a truncated nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), we are able to stimulate cellular and humoral immune responses of aged mice comparable to levels seen in young mice. Impressively, a single vaccination provided protection following stringent lethal challenge in aged mice. PMID:22787224

  6. Poly I:C adjuvanted inactivated swine influenza vaccine induces heterologous protective immunity in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Milton; Wang, Zhao; Sreenivasan, Chithra C; Hause, Ben M; Gourapura J Renukaradhya; Li, Feng; Francis, David H; Kaushik, Radhey S; Khatri, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Swine influenza is widely prevalent in swine herds in North America and Europe causing enormous economic losses and a public health threat. Pigs can be infected by both avian and mammalian influenza viruses and are sources of generation of reassortant influenza viruses capable of causing pandemics in humans. Current commercial vaccines provide satisfactory immunity against homologous viruses; however, protection against heterologous viruses is not adequate. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of an intranasal Poly I:C adjuvanted UV inactivated bivalent swine influenza vaccine consisting of Swine/OH/24366/07 H1N1 and Swine/CO/99 H3N2, referred as PAV, in maternal antibody positive pigs against an antigenic variant and a heterologous swine influenza virus challenge. Groups of three-week-old commercial-grade pigs were immunized intranasally with PAV or a commercial vaccine (CV) twice at 2 weeks intervals. Three weeks after the second immunization, pigs were challenged with the antigenic variant Swine/MN/08 H1N1 (MN08) and the heterologous Swine/NC/10 H1N2 (NC10) influenza virus. Antibodies in serum and respiratory tract, lung lesions, virus shedding in nasal secretions and virus load in lungs were assessed. Intranasal administration of PAV induced challenge viruses specific-hemagglutination inhibition- and IgG antibodies in the serum and IgA and IgG antibodies in the respiratory tract. Importantly, intranasal administration of PAV provided protection against the antigenic variant MN08 and the heterologous NC10 swine influenza viruses as evidenced by significant reductions in lung virus load, gross lung lesions and significantly reduced shedding of challenge viruses in nasal secretions. These results indicate that Poly I:C or its homologues may be effective as vaccine adjuvants capable of generating cross-protective immunity against antigenic variants/heterologous swine influenza viruses in pigs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis-Discovery and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas eGannavaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, sub-unit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in L. donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen1-/- in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated

  8. Immune protection duration and efficacy stability of DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaokai; Zhao, Xiaofang; Xu, Lixin; Yan, Ruofeng; Li, Xiangrui

    2017-04-01

    In our previous study, an effective DNA vaccine encoding Eimeria tenella TA4 and chicken IL-2 was constructed. In the present study, the immunization dose of the DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 was further optimized. With the optimized dose, the dynamics of antibodies induced by the DNA vaccine was determined using indirect ELISA. To evaluate the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were intramuscularly immunized twice and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella at 5, 9, 13, 17 and 21weeks post the last immunization (PLI) separately. To evaluate the efficacy stability of the DNA vaccine, two-week-old chickens were immunized with 3 batches of the DNA vaccine, and the induced efficacy was evaluated by challenging with E. tenella. The results showed that the optimal dose was 25μg. The induced antibody level persisted until 10weeks PPI. For the challenge time of 5 and 9weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs of 182.28 and 162.23 beyond 160, showing effective protection. However, for the challenge time of 13, 17 and 21weeks PLI, the immunization resulted in ACIs below 160 which means poor protection. Therefore, the immune protection duration of the DNA vaccination was at least 9weeks PLI. DNA immunization with three batches DNA vaccine resulted in ACIs of 187.52, 191.57 and 185.22, which demonstrated that efficacies of the three batches DNA vaccine were effective and stable. Overall, our results indicate that DNA vaccine pVAX1.0-TA4-IL-2 has the potential to be developed as effective vaccine against coccidiosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of a DNA Vaccine Specific for the 64 kDa Protective Antigen of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Middlebrooks, Bobby L

    2007-01-01

    The gene for the protective antigen of E. rhusiopathiae will be inserted into a eukaryotic vector both for the production of a DNA vaccine and for large scale production of the recombinant protein (in vitro...

  10. Latency antigen α-crystallin based vaccination imparts a robust protection against TB by modulating the dynamics of pulmonary cytokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Ruchi; Khera, Aparna; Gupta, Umesh D; Katoch, V M; Ramanathan, V D; Tyagi, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    ...-crystallin, a prominent latency antigen. We show that "rBCG prime-DNA boost" strategy (R/D) confers a markedly superior protection along with reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination in guinea pigs...

  11. The case for PfEMP1-based vaccines to protect pregnant women against Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines are very cost-effective tools in combating infectious disease mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, vaccines efficiently protecting against infection with malaria parasites are not available and are not likely to appear in the near future. An alternative strategy would be vaccines...... protecting against the disease and its consequences rather than against infection per se, by accelerating the development of the protective immunity that is normally acquired after years of exposure to malaria parasites in areas of stable transmission. This latter strategy is being energetically pursued...... to develop a vaccine protecting pregnant women and their offspring against mortality and morbidity caused by the accumulation of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes in the placenta. It is based on a detailed understanding of the parasite antigen and the host receptor involved in this accumulation...

  12. Variable BCG efficacy in rhesus populations: Pulmonary BCG provides protection where standard intra-dermal vaccination fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreck, Frank A W; Tchilian, Elma Z; Vervenne, Richard A W; Sombroek, Claudia C; Kondova, Ivanela; Eissen, Okke A; Sommandas, Vinod; van der Werff, Nicole M; Verschoor, Ernst; Braskamp, Gerco; Bakker, Jaco; Langermans, Jan A M; Heidt, Peter J; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Kralingen, Klaas W; Thomas, Alan W; Beverley, Peter C L; Kocken, Clemens H M

    2017-05-01

    M.bovis BCG vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) notoriously displays variable protective efficacy in different human populations. In non-human primate studies using rhesus macaques, despite efforts to standardise the model, we have also observed variable efficacy of BCG upon subsequent experimental M. tuberculosis challenge. In the present head-to-head study, we establish that the protective efficacy of standard parenteral BCG immunisation varies among different rhesus cohorts. This provides different dynamic ranges for evaluation of investigational vaccines, opportunities for identifying possible correlates of protective immunity and for determining why parenteral BCG immunisation sometimes fails. We also show that pulmonary mucosal BCG vaccination confers reduced local pathology and improves haematological and immunological parameters post-infection in animals that are not responsive to induction of protection by standard intra-dermal BCG. These results have important implications for pulmonary TB vaccination strategies in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the Protective Efficacy of DNA and Baculovirus-Derived Protein Vaccines for EBOLA Virus in Guinea Pigs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mellquist-Riemenschneider, Jenny L; Garrison, Aura R; Geisbert, Joan B; Saikh, Kamal U; Heidebrink, Kelli D

    2003-01-01

    .... Previously, a priming dose of a DNA vaccine expressing the glycoprotein (GP) gene of MARV followed by boosting with recombinant baculovirus-derived GP protein was found to confer protective immunity to guinea pigs (Hevey et al., 2001...

  14. Monovalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Nonhuman Primates Against Infection with Multiple Marburg Viruses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Swenson, Dana L; Warfield, Kelly L; Larsen, Tom; Alves, D. A; Coberley, Sadie S; Bavari, Sina

    2008-01-01

    .... Guinea pigs vaccinated with marburgvirus (m)VLPs or inactivated MARV (iMARV) develop homologous humoral and T cell responses and are completely protected from a lethal homologous MARV challenge...

  15. Protection against bubonic and pneumonic plague with a single dose microencapsulated sub-unit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvin, Stephen J; Eyles, James E; Howard, Kenneth A; Ravichandran, Easwaran; Somavarappu, Satyanarayan; Alpar, H Oya; Williamson, E Diane

    2006-05-15

    Protection against virulent plague challenge by the parenteral and aerosol routes was afforded by a single administration of microencapsulated Caf1 and LcrV antigens from Yersinia pestis in BALB/c mice. Recombinant Caf1 and LcrV were individually encapsulated in polymeric microspheres, to the surface of which additional antigen was adsorbed. The microspheres containing either Caf1 or LcrV were blended and used to immunise mice on a single occasion, by either the intra-nasal or intra-muscular route. Both routes of immunisation induced systemic and local immune responses, with high levels of serum IgG being developed in response to both vaccine antigens. In Elispot assays, secretion of cytokines by spleen and draining lymph node cells was demonstrated, revealing activation of both Th1 and Th2 associated cytokines; and spleen cells from animals immunised by either route were found to proliferate in vitro in response to both vaccine antigens. Virulent challenge experiments demonstrated that non-invasive immunisation by intra-nasal instillation can provide strong systemic and local immune responses and protect against high level challenge. Microencapsulation of these vaccine antigens has the added advantage that controlled release of the antigens occurs in vivo, so that protective immunity can be induced after only a single immunising dose.

  16. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaaijk Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed.

  17. Is a single dose of meningococcal serogroup C conjugate vaccine sufficient for protection? experience from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The first meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccine was licensed in 1999 and introduced in the United Kingdom. Countries that have implemented the MenC vaccine since then in their national immunisation programmes use different schedules. Nevertheless, all involved countries seem to experience substantial declines in the incidence of MenC disease. Discussion Since 2001, the MenC conjugate vaccine has been implemented in the Netherlands by offering a single dose to all children aged 14 months. Prior to the introduction of the vaccine into the national immunisation programme, a catch-up vaccination campaign was initiated in which a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine was offered to all children aged from 14 months up to and including 18 years. Since then, there has been no report of any case of MenC disease among immunocompetent vaccinees. Administration of a single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine after infancy could be beneficial considering the already complex immunisation schedules with large numbers of vaccinations in the first year of life. The present paper deals with the advantages and critical aspects of a single dose of the MenC conjugate vaccine. Summary A single dose of MenC conjugate vaccine at the age of 14 months in combination with a catch up vaccine campaign appeared to be a successful strategy to prevent MenC disease in the Netherlands, thereby confirming that a single dose of the vaccine could sufficiently protect against disease. Nevertheless, this approach can only be justified in countries with a relatively low incidence of serogroup C meningococcal disease in the first year of life. Furthermore, a good surveillance programme is recommended for timely detection of vaccine breakthroughs and outbreaks among non-vaccinees, since long-term protection after a single dose in the second year of life cannot currently be guaranteed. PMID:22316426

  18. Sun protection to improve vaccine effectiveness in children in a high ambient ultraviolet radiation and rural environment: an intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caradee Y. Wright

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination is a mainstay of preventive healthcare, reducing the incidence of serious childhood infections. Ecological studies have demonstrated an inverse association between markers of high ambient ultraviolet (UV radiation exposure (e.g., sunny season, low latitude of residence and reduction in the vaccination-associated immune response. Higher sun exposure on the day prior to and spanning the day of vaccination has been associated with a reduced antigen-specific immune response independent of skin pigmentation. The South African Department of Health’s Expanded Programme on Immunisation provides free vaccinations in government primary health care clinics. In some areas, these clinics may have only a small waiting room and patients wait outside in full sun conditions. In rural areas, patients may walk several kilometres to and from the clinic. We hypothesised that providing sun protection advice and equipment to mothers of children (from 18 months who were waiting to be vaccinated would result in a more robust immune response for those vaccinated. Methods We conducted an intervention study among 100 children receiving the booster measles vaccination. We randomised clinics to receive (or not sun protection advice and equipment. At each clinic we recorded basic demographic data on the child and mother/carer participants, their sun exposure patterns, and the acceptability and uptake of the provided sun protection. At 3–4 weeks post-vaccination, we measured measles IgG levels in all children. Discussion This is the first intervention study to assess the effect of sun protection measures on vaccine effectiveness in a rural, real-world setting. The novel design and rural setting of the study can contribute much needed evidence to better understand sun exposure and protection, as well as factors determining vaccine effectiveness in rural Africa, and inform the design of immunisation programmes. (TRN PACTCR201611001881114, 24

  19. Intranasal H5N1 vaccines, adjuvanted with chitosan derivatives, protect ferrets against highly pathogenic influenza intranasal and intratracheal challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex J Mann

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective efficacy of two intranasal chitosan (CSN and TM-CSN adjuvanted H5N1 Influenza vaccines against highly pathogenic avian Influenza (HPAI intratracheal and intranasal challenge in a ferret model. Six groups of 6 ferrets were intranasally vaccinated twice, 21 days apart, with either placebo, antigen alone, CSN adjuvanted antigen, or TM-CSN adjuvanted antigen. Homologous and intra-subtypic antibody cross-reacting responses were assessed. Ferrets were inoculated intratracheally (all treatments or intranasally (CSN adjuvanted and placebo treatments only with clade 1 HPAI A/Vietnam/1194/2004 (H5N1 virus 28 days after the second vaccination and subsequently monitored for morbidity and mortality outcomes. Clinical signs were assessed and nasal as well as throat swabs were taken daily for virology. Samples of lung tissue, nasal turbinates, brain, and olfactory bulb were analysed for the presence of virus and examined for histolopathological findings. In contrast to animals vaccinated with antigen alone, the CSN and TM-CSN adjuvanted vaccines induced high levels of antibodies, protected ferrets from death, reduced viral replication and abrogated disease after intratracheal challenge, and in the case of CSN after intranasal challenge. In particular, the TM-CSN adjuvanted vaccine was highly effective at eliciting protective immunity from intratracheal challenge; serologically, protective titres were demonstrable after one vaccination. The 2-dose schedule with TM-CSN vaccine also induced cross-reactive antibodies to clade 2.1 and 2.2 H5N1 viruses. Furthermore ferrets immunised with TM-CSN had no detectable virus in the respiratory tract or brain, whereas there were signs of virus in the throat and lungs, albeit at significantly reduced levels, in CSN vaccinated animals. This study demonstrated for the first time that CSN and in particular TM-CSN adjuvanted intranasal vaccines have the potential to protect against significant

  20. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kohli Michele; Lawrence Donna; Haig Jennifer; Anonychuk Andrea; Demarteau Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of ...

  1. A genetically engineered live attenuated vaccine of Coccidioides posadasii protects BALB/c mice against coccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jianmin; Chen, Xia; Selby, Dale; Hung, Chiung-Yu; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Cole, Garry T

    2009-08-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (also known as San Joaquin Valley fever) is an occupational disease. Workers exposed to outdoor dust which contains spores of the soil-inhabiting fungus have a significantly increased risk of respiratory infection. In addition, people with compromised T-cell immunity, the elderly, and certain racial groups, particularly African-Americans and Filipinos, who live in regions of endemicity in the southwestern United States have an elevated incidence of symptomatic infection caused by inhalation of spores of Coccidioides posadasii or Coccidioides immitis. Recurring epidemics and escalation of medical costs have helped to motivate production of a vaccine against valley fever. The major focus has been the development of a defined, T-cell-reactive, recombinant protein vaccine. However, none of the products described to date have provided full protection to coccidioidal disease-susceptible BALB/c mice. Here we describe the first genetically engineered, live, attenuated vaccine that protects both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice against coccidioidomycosis. Two chitinase genes (CTS2 and CTS3) were disrupted to yield the attenuated strain, which was unable to endosporulate and was no longer infectious. Vaccinated survivors mounted an immune response characterized by production of both T-helper-1- and T-helper-2-type cytokines. Histology revealed well-formed granulomas and markedly diminished inflammation. Significantly fewer organisms were observed in the lungs of survivors than in those of nonvaccinated mice. Additional investigations are required to further define the nature of the live, attenuated vaccine-induced immunity against Coccidioides infection.

  2. Effective Protection Induced by a Monovalent DNA Vaccine against Dengue Virus (DV Serotype 1 and a Bivalent DNA Vaccine against DV1 and DV2 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DV is the causal pathogen of dengue fever, which is one of the most rapidly spread mosquito-borne disease worldwide and has become a severe public health problem. Currently, there is no specific treatment for dengue; thus, a vaccine would be an effective countermeasure to reduce the morbidity and mortality. Although, the chimeric Yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine has been approved in some countries, it is still necessary to develop safer, more effective, and less costly vaccines. In this study, a DNA vaccine candidate pVAX1-D1ME expressing the prME protein of DV1 was inoculated in BALB/c mice via intramuscular injection or electroporation, and the immunogenicity and protection were evaluated. Compared with traditional intramuscular injection, administration with 50 μg pVAX1-D1ME via electroporation with three immunizations induced persistent humoral and cellular immune responses and effectively protected mice against lethal DV1 challenge. In addition, immunization with a bivalent vaccine consisting of pVAX1-D1ME and pVAX1-D2ME via electroporation generated a balanced IgG response and neutralizing antibodies against DV1 and DV2 and could protect mice from lethal challenge with DV1 and DV2. This study sheds new light on developing a dengue tetravalent DNA vaccine.

  3. Baculovirus-vectored multistage Plasmodium vivax vaccine induces both protective and transmission-blocking immunities against transgenic rodent malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Masanori; Iyori, Mitsuhiro; Blagborough, Andrew M; Fukumoto, Shinya; Funatsu, Tomohiro; Sinden, Robert E; Yoshida, Shigeto

    2014-10-01

    A multistage malaria vaccine targeting the pre-erythrocytic and sexual stages of Plasmodium could effectively protect individuals against infection from mosquito bites and provide transmission-blocking (TB) activity against the sexual stages of the parasite, respectively. This strategy could help prevent malaria infections in individuals and, on a larger scale, prevent malaria transmission in communities of endemicity. Here, we describe the development of a multistage Plasmodium vivax vaccine which simultaneously expresses P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (PvCSP) and P25 (Pvs25) protein of this species as a fusion protein, thereby acting as a pre-erythrocytic vaccine and a TB vaccine, respectively. A new-concept vaccine platform based on the baculovirus dual-expression system (BDES) was evaluated. The BDES-Pvs25-PvCSP vaccine displayed correct folding of the Pvs25-PvCSP fusion protein on the viral envelope and was highly expressed upon transduction of mammalian cells in vitro. This vaccine induced high levels of antibodies to Pvs25 and PvCSP and elicited protective (43%) and TB (82%) efficacies against transgenic P. berghei parasites expressing the corresponding P. vivax antigens in mice. Our data indicate that our BDES, which functions as both a subunit and DNA vaccine, can offer a promising multistage vaccine capable of delivering a potent antimalarial pre-erythrocytic and TB response via a single immunization regimen. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Herd protection by a bivalent killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine in the slums of Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohammad; Sur, Dipika; You, Young Ae; Kanungo, Suman; Sah, Binod; Manna, Byomkesh; Puri, Mahesh; Wierzba, Thomas F; Donner, Allan; Nair, G Balakrish; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Dhingra, Mandeep Singh; Deen, Jacqueline L; Lopez, Anna Lena; Clemens, John

    2013-04-01

    We evaluated the herd protection conferred by an oral cholera vaccine using 2 approaches: cluster design and geographic information system (GIS) design. Residents living in 3933 dwellings (clusters) in Kolkata, India, were cluster-randomized to receive either cholera vaccine or oral placebo. Nonpregnant residents aged≥1 year were invited to participate in the trial. Only the first episode of cholera detected for a subject between 14 and 1095 days after a second dose was considered. In the cluster design, indirect protection was assessed by comparing the incidence of cholera among nonparticipants in vaccine clusters vs those in placebo clusters. In the GIS analysis, herd protection was assessed by evaluating association between vaccine coverage among the population residing within 250 m of the household and the occurrence of cholera in that population. Among 107 347 eligible residents, 66 990 received 2 doses of either cholera vaccine or placebo. In the cluster design, the 3-year data showed significant total protection (66% protection, 95% confidence interval [CI], 50%-78%, PGIS approach, the risk of cholera among placebo recipients was inversely related to neighborhood-level vaccine coverage, and the trend was highly significant (PGIS approach but not the cluster design approach, likely owing to considerable transmission of cholera between clusters, which would vitiate herd protection in the cluster analyses. NCT00289224.

  5. Active immunizations with peptide-DC vaccines and passive transfer with antibodies protect neutropenic mice against disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong

    2016-01-04

    We previously report that peptide-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination, which targeting two peptides (Fba and Met6) expressed on the cell surface of Candida albicans, can induce high degree of protection against disseminated candidiasis in immunocompetent mice. Passive transfer of immune sera from the peptide immunized mice or peptide-related monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that protection was medicated by peptide-specific antibodies. In this study the efficacy of active and passive immunization against disseminated candidiasis was tested in mice with cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia. Peptide-DC vaccines were given to mice prior to induction of neutropenia. We show active immunization with either Fba or Met6 peptide-DC vaccine significantly improved the survival and reduced the fungal burden of disseminated candidiasis in those immunocompromised mice. Importantly, we show that administration of two protective monoclonal antibodies also protect neutropenic mice against the disease, implying possibility of developing a successful passive immunotherapy strategy to treat the disease and protect against disseminated candidiasis. The results of this study are crucial as they address the fundamental questions as to whether the synthetic peptide vaccine induced immunity protects the host during a neutropenic episode. We anticipate that this peptide-vaccine study will serve as the foundation of future investigations into new peptide vaccines comprised of cell surface peptides from other medically important Candida species, as well as other fungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 1918 pandemic H1N1 DNA vaccine protects ferrets against 2007 H1N1 virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, Karoline; Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    Influenza vaccines with the ability to induce immune responses cross-reacting with drifted virus variants would be of great advantage for vaccine development against seasonal and emerging new strains. We demonstrate that gene gun administrated DNA vaccine encoding HA and NA and/or NP and M proteins...... of the H1N1 pandemic virus from 1918 induce protection in ferrets against infection with a H1N1 (A/New Caledonia/20/99(H1N1)) virus which was included in the conventional vaccine for the 2006-2007 season. The viruses are separated by a time interval of 89 years and differ by 21.2% in the HA1 protein....... These results suggest not only a unique ability of the DNA vaccines, but perhaps also natural infection, to induce cross-protective responses against even extremely drifted virus variants....

  7. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  8. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Schnee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS. In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G encoding messenger RNA (mRNA to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  9. Formalin-Inactivated Coxiella burnetii Phase I Vaccine-Induced Protection Depends on B Cells To Produce Protective IgM and IgG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Schoenlaub, Laura; Elliott, Alexandra; Mitchell, William; Zhang, Yan

    2013-01-01

    To further understand the mechanisms of formalin-inactivated Coxiella burnetii phase I (PI) vaccine (PIV)-induced protection, we examined if B cell, T cell, CD4+ T cell, or CD8+ T cell deficiency in mice significantly affects the ability of PIV to confer protection against a C. burnetii infection. Interestingly, compared to wild-type (WT) mice, PIV conferred comparable levels of protection in CD4+ T cell- or CD8+ T cell-deficient mice and partial protection in T cell-deficient mice but did not provide measurable protection in B cell-deficient mice. These results suggest that PIV-induced protection depends on B cells. In addition, anti-PI-specific IgM was the major detectable antibody (Ab) in immune sera from PIV-vaccinated CD4+ T cell-deficient mice, and passive transfer of immune sera from PIV-vaccinated CD4+ T cell-deficient mice conferred significant protection. These results suggest that T cell-independent anti-PI-specific IgM may contribute to PIV-induced protection. Our results also suggested that PIV-induced protection may not depend on complement activation and Fc receptor-mediated effector functions. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that both IgM and IgG from PIV-vaccinated WT mouse sera were able to inhibit C. burnetii infection in vivo, but only IgM from PIV-vaccinated CD4+ T cell-deficient mouse sera inhibited C. burnetii infection. Collectively, these findings suggest that PIV-induced protection depends on B cells to produce protective IgM and IgG and that T cell-independent anti-PI-specific IgM may play a critical role in PIV-induced protection against C. burnetii infection. PMID:23545296

  10. Vaccine induced Hepatitis A and B protection in children at risk for cystic fibrosis associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Esther, Charles R; Leigh, Margaret W; Dellon, Elisabeth P

    2013-01-30

    Hepatitis A (HAV) and Hepatitis B (HBV) infections can cause serious morbidity in patients with liver disease, including cystic fibrosis associated liver disease (CFALD). HAV and HBV vaccinations are recommended in CFALD, and maintenance of detectable antibody levels is also recommended with chronic liver disease. A better understanding of factors predicting low HAV and HBV antibodies may help physicians improve protection from these viruses in CFALD patients. We examined HAV and HBV vaccine protection in children at risk for CFALD. Clinical and vaccine histories were reviewed, and HAV and HBV antibody titers measured. Those with no vaccination history or low HAV or HBV titers received primary or booster vaccinations, and responses were measured. Thirty-four of 308 children were at risk for CFALD per project criteria. Ten had previous HAV vaccination, of which 90% had positive anti-HAV antibodies. Thirty-three of 34 had previously received primary HBV vaccination (most in infancy), but only 12 (35%) had adequate anti-HBs levels (≥10mIU/mL). Children with adequate anti-HBs levels were older at first HBV vaccine (median 2.3 vs. 0.1 years, pvaccine (median 4.0 vs. 0.8 years, p=0.01). Fourteen of 19 (74%) responded to HBV boosters. Z-scores for BMI at HBV booster were significantly lower in booster non-responders (p=0.04). Children at increased risk of CFALD have inadequate HAV and HBV antibody levels, and HBV antibody protection can be enhanced through vaccine boosters. HBV antibody titers should be assessed in CFALD patients with a history of vaccination, particularly in those who received HBV vaccines in infancy or who are malnourished. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA vaccines elicit durable protective immunity against individual or simultaneous infections with Lassa and Ebola viruses in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kathleen A; Wilkinson, Eric R; Wollen, Suzanne E; Shamblin, Joshua D; Zelko, Justine M; Bearss, Jeremy J; Zeng, Xiankun; Broderick, Kate E; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2017-12-02

    We previously developed optimized DNA vaccines against both Lassa fever and Ebola hemorrhagic fever viruses and demonstrated that they were protective individually in guinea pig and nonhuman primate models. In this study, we vaccinated groups of strain 13 guinea pigs two times, four weeks apart with 50 µg of each DNA vaccine or a mock vaccine at discrete sites by intradermal electroporation. Five weeks following the second vaccinations, guinea pigs were exposed to lethal doses of Lassa virus, Ebola virus, or a combination of both viruses simultaneously. None of the vaccinated guinea pigs, regardless of challenge virus and including the coinfected group, displayed weight loss, fever or other disease signs, and all survived to the study endpoint. All of the mock-vaccinated guinea pigs that were infected with Lassa virus, and all but one of the EBOV-infected mock-vaccinated guinea pigs succumbed. In order to determine if the dual-agent vaccination strategy could protect against both viruses if exposures were temporally separated, we held the surviving vaccinates in BSL-4 for approximately 120 days to perform a cross-challenge experiment in which guinea pigs originally infected with Lassa virus received a lethal dose of Ebola virus and those originally infected with Ebola virus were infected with a lethal dose of Lassa virus. All guinea pigs remained healthy and survived to the study endpoint. This study clearly demonstrates that DNA vaccines against Lassa and Ebola viruses can elicit protective immunity against both individual virus exposures as well as in a mixed-infection environment.

  12. The protective efficacy of chimeric SO7/IL-2 DNA vaccine against coccidiosis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongyan; Qiu, Baofeng; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Song, Xiaokai; Li, Xiangrui

    2013-06-01

    The protective efficacy of recombinant vaccines encoding an Eimeria refractile body antigen SO7 was assessed in broiler chickens following oral infection with Eimeria tenella. The SO7 and chicken IL-2 genes were cloned into the expression vector pVAX1 consecutively to construct DNA vaccines pVAX-SO7 and pVAX-SO7-IL-2. Expression of SO7 and IL-2 gene transcripts and proteins encoded by the plasmid DNAs in vivo was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Chickens were inoculated with 100 μg of plasmids pVAX-SO7 or pVAX-SO7-IL-2, or 200 μg of recombinant SO7 protein or chicken IL-2 protein by leg intramuscular injection. At 28days of age, all chickens except the unchallenged control group were challenged orally with 5×10(4) sporulated oocysts of E. tenella. All chickens were euthanized to determine the effects of immunization on the 7th day post-challenge. The results showed that both DNA vaccines containing the SO7 gene and the recombinant SO7 protein could obviously alleviate body weight loss and cecal lesions compared with unvaccinated and challenged control. These findings also suggested that chicken IL-2 could effectively enhance the immunity of SO7 against E. tenella challenge compared with vaccination using pVAX-SO7 alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant-derived vaccine protects target animals against a viral disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Kristian; Uttenthal, Åse; Jones, T.D.

    1997-01-01

    The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion of oligonucle......The successful expression of animal or human virus epitopes on the surface of plant viruses has recently been demonstrated. These chimeric virus particles (CVPs) could represent a cost-effective and safe alternative to conventional animal cell-based vaccines. We report the insertion...... was established by the demonstration that one subcutaneous injection of 1 mg of the CVPs in mink conferred protection against clinical disease and virtually abolished shedding of virus after challenge with virulent MEV, demonstrating the potential utility of plant CVPs as the basis for vaccine development....... The epitope used occurs in three different virus species-MEV, canine parvovirus, and feline panleukopenia virus-and thus the same vaccine could be used in three economically important viral hosts-mink, dogs, and cats, respectively....

  14. Highly immunogenic prime–boost DNA vaccination protects chickens against challenge with homologous and heterologous H5N1 virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Stachyra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs cause huge economic losses in the poultry industry because of high mortality rate in infected flocks and trade restrictions. Protective antibodies, directed mainly against hemagglutinin (HA, are the primary means of protection against influenza outbreaks. A recombinant DNA vaccine based on the sequence of H5 HA from the H5N1/A/swan/Poland/305-135V08/2006 strain of HPAIV was prepared. Sequence manipulation included deletion of the proteolytic cleavage site to improve protein stability, codon usage optimization to improve translation and stability of RNA in host cells, and cloning into a commercially available vector to enable expression in animal cells. Naked plasmid DNA was complexed with a liposomal carrier and the immunization followed the prime–boost strategy. The immunogenic potential of the DNA vaccine was first proved in broilers in near-to-field conditions resembling a commercial farm. Next, the protective activity of the vaccine was confirmed in SPF layer-type chickens. Experimental infections (challenge experiments indicated that 100% of vaccinated chickens were protected against H5N1 of the same clade and that 70% of them were protected against H5N1 influenza virus of a different clade. Moreover, the DNA vaccine significantly limited (or even eliminated transmission of the virus to contact control chickens. Two intramuscular doses of DNA vaccine encoding H5 HA induced a strong protective response in immunized chicken. The effective protection lasted for a minimum 8 weeks after the second dose of the vaccine and was not limited to the homologous H5N1 virus. In addition, the vaccine reduced shedding of the virus.

  15. Protection from hemolytic uremic syndrome by eyedrop vaccination with modified enterohemorrhagic E. coli outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Sub Choi

    Full Text Available We investigated whether eyedrop vaccination using modified outer membrane vesicles (mOMVs is effective for protecting against hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS caused by enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC O157:H7 infection. Modified OMVs and waaJ-mOMVs were prepared from cultures of MsbB- and Shiga toxin A subunit (STxA-deficient EHEC O157:H7 bacteria with or without an additional waaJ mutation. BALB/c mice were immunized by eyedrop mOMVs, waaJ-mOMVs, and mOMVs plus polymyxin B (PMB. Mice were boosted at 2 weeks, and challenged peritoneally with wild-type OMVs (wtOMVs at 4 weeks. As parameters for evaluation of the OMV-mediated immune protection, serum and mucosal immunoglobulins, body weight change and blood urea nitrogen (BUN/Creatinin (Cr were tested, as well as histopathology of renal tissue. In order to confirm the safety of mOMVs for eyedrop use, body weight and ocular histopathological changes were monitored in mice. Modified OMVs having penta-acylated lipid A moiety did not contain STxA subunit proteins but retained non-toxic Shiga toxin B (STxB subunit. Removal of the polymeric O-antigen of O157 LPS was confirmed in waaJ-mOMVs. The mice group vaccinated with mOMVs elicited greater humoral and mucosal immune responses than did the waaJ-mOMVs and PBS-treated groups. Eyedrop vaccination of mOMVs plus PMB reduced the level of humoral and mucosal immune responses, suggesting that intact O157 LPS antigen can be a critical component for enhancing the immunogenicity of the mOMVs. After challenge, mice vaccinated with mOMVs were protected from a lethal dose of wtOMVs administered intraperitoneally, conversely mice in the PBS control group were not. Collectively, for the first time, EHEC O157-derived mOMV eyedrop vaccine was experimentally evaluated as an efficient and safe means of vaccine development against EHEC O157:H7 infection-associated HUS.

  16. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines Print The meningococcal vaccines protect ...

  17. Evidence for single-dose protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine-Review of the Costa Rica HPV vaccine trial and future research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Aimée R; Herrero, Rolando; Sampson, Joshua N; Porras, Carolina; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Chanock, Stephen; Jimenez, Silvia; Schussler, John; Gail, Mitchell H; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Kemp, Troy J; Cortes, Bernal; Pinto, Ligia A; Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula

    2018-01-20

    The Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT), a phase III randomized clinical trial, provided the initial data that one dose of the HPV vaccine could provide durable protection against HPV infection. Although the study design was to administer all participants three doses of HPV or control vaccine, 20% of women did not receive the three-dose regimens, mostly due to involuntary reasons unrelated to vaccination. In 2011, we reported that a single dose of the bivalent HPV vaccine could be as efficacious as three doses of the vaccine using the endpoint of persistent HPV infection accumulated over the first four years of the trial; findings independently confirmed in the GSK-sponsored PATRICIA trial. Antibody levels after one dose, although lower than levels elicited by three doses, were 9-times higher than levels elicited by natural infection. Importantly, levels remained essentially constant over at least seven years, suggesting that the observed protection provided by a single dose might be durable. Much work has been done to assure these non-randomized findings are valid. Yet, the group of recipients who received one dose of the bivalent HPV vaccine in the CVT and PATRICIA trials was small and not randomly selected nor blinded to the number of doses received. The next phase of research is to conduct a formal randomized, controlled trial to evaluate the protection afforded by a single dose of HPV vaccine. Complementary studies are in progress to bridge our findings to other populations, and to further document the long-term durability of antibody response following a single dose. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Intradermal vaccination with un-adjuvanted sub-unit vaccines triggers skin innate immunity and confers protective respiratory immunity in domestic swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luduec, Jean-Benoît; Debeer, Sabine; Piras, Fabienne; Andréoni, Christine; Boudet, Florence; Laurent, Philippe; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Dubois, Bertrand

    2016-02-10

    Intradermal (ID) vaccination constitutes a promising approach to induce anti-infectious immunity. This route of immunization has mostly been studied with influenza split-virion vaccines. However, the efficacy of ID vaccination for sub-unit vaccines in relation to underlying skin innate immunity remains to be explored for wider application in humans. Relevant animal models that more closely mimic human skin immunity than the widely used mouse models are therefore necessary. Here, we show in domestic swine, which shares striking anatomic and functional properties with human skin, that a single ID delivery of pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoproteins without added adjuvant is sufficient to trigger adaptive cellular and humoral immune responses, and to confer protection from a lethal respiratory infection with PRV. Analysis of early events at the skin injection site revealed up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes and accumulation of inflammatory DC. We further show that the sustained induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes results from the combined effects of skin puncture, liquid injection in the dermis and viral antigens. These data highlight that immune protection against respiratory infection can be induced by ID vaccination with a subunit vaccine and reveal that adjuvant requirements are circumvented by the mechanical and antigenic stress caused by ID injection, which triggers innate immunity and mobilization of inflammatory DC at the immunization site. ID vaccination with sub-unit vaccines may thus represent a safe and efficient solution for protection against respiratory infections in swine and possibly also in humans, given the similarity of skin structure and function in both species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Rabies Virus Antibodies from Oral Vaccination as a Correlate of Protection against Lethal Infection in Wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Moore

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Both cell-mediated and humoral immune effectors are important in combating rabies infection, although the humoral response receives greater attention regarding rabies prevention. The principle of preventive vaccination has been adopted for strategies of oral rabies vaccination (ORV of wildlife reservoir populations for decades to control circulation of rabies virus in free-ranging hosts. There remains much debate about the levels of rabies antibodies (and the assays to measure them that confer resistance to rabies virus. In this paper, data from published literature and our own unpublished animal studies on the induction of rabies binding and neutralizing antibodies following oral immunization of animals with live attenuated or recombinant rabies vaccines, are examined as correlates of protection against lethal rabies infection in captive challenge settings. Analysis of our studies suggests that, though serum neutralization test results are expected to reflect in vivo protection, the blocking enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA result at Day 28 was a better predictor of survival. ELISA kits may have an advantage of greater precision and ability to compare results among different studies and laboratories based on the inherent standardization of the kit format. This paper examines current knowledge and study findings to guide meaningful interpretation of serology results in oral baiting monitoring.

  20. Protection from SARS coronavirus conferred by live measles vaccine expressing the spike glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriou, Nicolas; Callendret, Benoît; Lorin, Valérie; Combredet, Chantal; Marianneau, Philippe; Février, Michèle; Tangy, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    The recent identification of a novel human coronavirus responsible of a SARS-like illness in the Middle-East a decade after the SARS pandemic, demonstrates that reemergence of a SARS-like coronavirus from an animal reservoir remains a credible threat. Because SARS is contracted by aerosolized contamination of the respiratory tract, a vaccine inducing mucosal long-term protection would be an asset to control new epidemics. To this aim, we generated live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine (MV) candidates expressing either the membrane-anchored SARS-CoV spike (S) protein or its secreted soluble ectodomain (Ssol). In mice susceptible to measles virus, recombinant MV expressing the anchored full-length S induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies and fully protected immunized animals from intranasal infectious challenge with SARS-CoV. As compared to immunization with adjuvanted recombinant Ssol protein, recombinant MV induced stronger and Th1-biased responses, a hallmark of live attenuated viruses and a highly desirable feature for an antiviral vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Protective immunization against melanoma by gp100 DNA-HVJ-liposome vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, W Z; Kaneda, Y; Huang, S; Morishita, R; Hoon, D

    1999-10-01

    DNA-based vaccine immunization effectively induces both humoral and cell-mediated immunity to antigens and can confer protection against numerous infectious diseases as well as some cancers. Human and mouse melanomas consistently express the tumor-associated antigen interacted with the melanogenesis pathway. Gp100 is immunogenic and has been shown to induce both antibody and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses in humans. To explore the potential use of DNA immunization to induce melanoma-specific immune responses, we assessed HVJ-AVE liposome incorporated with plasmid DNA encoding human gp100. The gp100 DNA vaccine was used in a mouse melanoma model to assess immunity against the B16 melanoma of C57BL/6 mice. Intramuscular injection of the DNA-HVJ-AVE liposomes induced both anti-gp100 antibody and CTL responses. Gp100 DNA-HVJ-AVE liposome immunization significantly delayed tumor development in mice challenged with B16 melanoma cells. Mice immunized with gp100 DNA-HVJ-AVE liposomes survived longer compared with control mice immunized with HVJ-AVE liposome alone. These results indicate that immunization with human gp100 DNA by HVJ-AVE liposomes can induce protective immunity against melanoma in this pre-clinical mouse model. This strategy may provide an effective approach for vaccine therapy with tumor-associated antigens against human melanoma.

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Esquivel-Soto, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropr......Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers......-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels...... of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination...

  4. DNA Vaccines delivered by dermal electroporation elicit durable protective immunity against individual or simultaneous infections with lassa and ebola viruses in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-22

    DNA vaccines elicit durable protective immunity against individual or simultaneous 1  infections with Lassa and Ebola viruses in guinea pigs 2  3...previously developed optimized DNA vaccines against both Lassa fever and Ebola 15  hemorrhagic fever viruses and demonstrated that they were protective...with 50 µg of each DNA vaccine or a mock 18  vaccine at discrete sites by intradermal electroporation. Five weeks following the 19  second

  5. DNA Vaccines: Protective Immunizations by Parenteral, Mucosal, and Gene-Gun Inoculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynan, Ellen F.; Webster, Robert G.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Haynes, Joel R.; Santoro, Joseph C.; Robinson, Harriet L.

    1993-12-01

    Plasmid DNAs expressing influenza virus hemagglutinin glycoproteins have been tested for their ability to raise protective immunity against lethal influenza challenges of the same subtype. In trials using two inoculations of from 50 to 300 μg of purified DNA in saline, 67-95% of test mice and 25-63% of test chickens have been protected against a lethal influenza challenge. Parenteral routes of inoculation that achieved good protection included intramuscular and intravenous injections. Successful mucosal routes of vaccination included DNA drops administered to the nares or trachea. By far the most efficient DNA immunizations were achieved by using a gene gun to deliver DNA-coated gold beads to the epidermis. In mice, 95% protection was achieved by two immunizations with beads loaded with as little as 0.4 μg of DNA. The breadth of routes supporting successful DNA immunizations, coupled with the very small amounts of DNA required for gene-gun immunizations, highlight the potential of this remarkably simple technique for the development of subunit vaccines.

  6. Protective response to subunit vaccination against intranasal Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Gregory C; Deeraksa, Arpaporn; Qazi, Omar; Judy, Barbara M; Taylor, Katherine; Propst, Katie L; Duffy, Angie J; Johnson, Kate; Kitto, G Barrie; Brown, Katherine A; Dow, Steven W; Torres, Alfredo G; Estes, D Mark

    2010-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei and B. pseudomallei are Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, responsible for the diseases glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Furthermore, there is currently no vaccine available against these Burkholderia species. In this study, we aimed to identify protective proteins against these pathogens. Immunization with recombinant B. mallei Hcp1 (type VI secreted/structural protein), BimA (autotransporter protein), BopA (type III secreted protein), and B. pseudomallei LolC (ABC transporter protein) generated significant protection against lethal inhaled B. mallei ATCC23344 and B. pseudomallei 1026b challenge. Immunization with BopA elicited the greatest protective activity, resulting in 100% and 60% survival against B. mallei and B. pseudomallei challenge, respectively. Moreover, sera from recovered mice demonstrated reactivity with the recombinant proteins. Dendritic cells stimulated with each of the different recombinant proteins showed distinct cytokine patterns. In addition, T cells from immunized mice produced IFN-γ following in vitro re-stimulation. These results indicated therefore that it was possible to elicit cross-protective immunity against both B. mallei and B. pseudomallei by vaccinating animals with one or more novel recombinant proteins identified in B. mallei.

  7. Combined virus-like particle and fusion protein-encoding DNA vaccination of cotton rats induces protection against respiratory syncytial virus without causing vaccine-enhanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Park, Soojin; Kwon, Young-Man; Lee, Youri; Ko, Eun-Ju; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Yu-Jin; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Cho, Minkyoung; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-07-01

    A safe and effective vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) should confer protection without causing vaccine-enhanced disease. Here, using a cotton rat model, we investigated the protective efficacy and safety of an RSV combination vaccine composed of F-encoding plasmid DNA and virus-like particles containing RSV fusion (F) and attachment (G) glycoproteins (FFG-VLP). Cotton rats with FFG-VLP vaccination controlled lung viral replication below the detection limit, and effectively induced neutralizing activity and antibody-secreting cell responses. In comparison with formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) causing severe RSV disease after challenge, FFG-VLP vaccination did not cause weight loss, airway hyper-responsiveness, IL-4 cytokines, histopathology, and infiltrates of proinflammatory cells such as eosinophils. FFG-VLP was even more effective in preventing RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation than live RSV infections. This study provides evidence that FFG-VLP can be developed into a safe and effective RSV vaccine candidate. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Biomarkers of safety and immune protection for genetically modified live attenuated leishmania vaccines against visceral leishmaniasis - discovery and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen(-/-) in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  9. Biomarkers of Safety and Immune Protection for Genetically Modified Live Attenuated Leishmania Vaccines Against Visceral Leishmaniasis – Discovery and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dey, Ranadhir; Avishek, Kumar; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Salotra, Poonam; Nakhasi, Hira L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite intense efforts there is no safe and efficacious vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis, which is fatal and endemic in many tropical countries. A major shortcoming in the vaccine development against blood-borne parasitic agents such as Leishmania is the inadequate predictive power of the early immune responses mounted in the host against the experimental vaccines. Often immune correlates derived from in-bred animal models do not yield immune markers of protection that can be readily extrapolated to humans. The limited efficacy of vaccines based on DNA, subunit, heat killed parasites has led to the realization that acquisition of durable immunity against the protozoan parasites requires a controlled infection with a live attenuated organism. Recent success of irradiated malaria parasites as a vaccine candidate further strengthens this approach to vaccination. We developed several gene deletion mutants in Leishmania donovani as potential live attenuated vaccines and reported extensively on the immunogenicity of LdCentrin1 deleted mutant in mice, hamsters, and dogs. Additional limited studies using genetically modified live attenuated Leishmania parasites as vaccine candidates have been reported. However, for the live attenuated parasite vaccines, the primary barrier against widespread use remains the absence of clear biomarkers associated with protection and safety. Recent studies in evaluation of vaccines, e.g., influenza and yellow fever vaccines, using systems biology tools demonstrated the power of such strategies in understanding the immunological mechanisms that underpin a protective phenotype. Applying similar tools in isolated human tissues such as PBMCs from healthy individuals infected with live attenuated parasites such as LdCen−/− in vitro followed by human microarray hybridization experiments will enable us to understand how early vaccine-induced gene expression profiles and the associated immune responses are coordinately regulated in normal

  10. Protection of vaccinated mice against pneumonic tularemia is associated with an early memory sentinel-response in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Cohen, Hila; Elia, Uri; Rotem, Shahar; Bercovich-Kinori, Adi; Bar-Haim, Erez; Chitlaru, Theodor; Cohen, Ofer

    2017-12-15

    Francisella tularensis is the intracellular bacterial pathogen causing the respiratory life-threatening disease tularemia. Development of tularemia vaccines has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the correlates of immunity. Moreover, the importance of lung cellular immunity in vaccine-mediated protection against tularemia is a controversial matter. Live attenuated vaccine strains of F. tularensis such as LVS (Live Vaccine Strain), elicit an immune response protecting mice against subsequent challenge with the virulent SchuS4 strain, yet the protective immunity against pulmonary challenge is limited in its efficacy and longevity. We established a murine intra-nasal immunization model which distinguishes between animals fully protected, challenged at 4 weeks post double-vaccination (200 inhalation Lethal Dose 50%, LD50, of SchuS4), and those which do not survive the lethal SchuS4 infection, challenged at 8 weeks post double vaccination. Early in the recall immune response in the lung (before day 3), disease progression and bacterial dissemination differed considerably between protected and non-protected immunized mice. Pre-challenge analysis, revealed that protected mice, exhibited significantly higher numbers of lung Ft-specific memory T cells compared to non-protected mice. Quantitative PCR analysis established that a higher magnitude, lung T cells response was activated in the lungs of the protected mice already at 24 h post-challenge. The data imply that an early memory response within the lung is strongly associated with protection against the lethal SchuS4 bacteria presumably by restricting the dissemination of the bacteria to internal organs. Thus, future prophylactic strategies to countermeasure F. tularensis infection may require modulation of the immune response within the lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hendra virus vaccine, a one health approach to protecting horse, human, and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah; Pallister, Jackie; Klein, Reuben; Feng, Yan-Ru; Haining, Jessica; Arkinstall, Rachel; Frazer, Leah; Huang, Jin-An; Edwards, Nigel; Wareing, Mark; Elhay, Martin; Hashmi, Zia; Bingham, John; Yamada, Manabu; Johnson, Dayna; White, John; Foord, Adam; Heine, Hans G; Marsh, Glenn A; Broder, Christopher C; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, the emergence of several highly pathogenic zoonotic diseases in humans has led to a renewed emphasis on the interconnectedness of human, animal, and environmental health, otherwise known as One Health. For example, Hendra virus (HeV), a zoonotic paramyxovirus, was discovered in 1994, and since then, infections have occurred in 7 humans, each of whom had a strong epidemiologic link to similarly affected horses. As a consequence of these outbreaks, eradication of bat populations was discussed, despite their crucial environmental roles in pollination and reduction of the insect population. We describe the development and evaluation of a vaccine for horses with the potential for breaking the chain of HeV transmission from bats to horses to humans, thereby protecting horse, human, and environmental health. The HeV vaccine for horses is a key example of a One Health approach to the control of human disease.

  12. [Generation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus-like Particle Vaccine and Preliminary Evaluation of Its Protective Efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfang; Du, Ruikun; Huang, Shaomei; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Jinliang; Zhu, Bibo; Wang, Hualin; Deng, Fei; Cao, Shengbo

    2016-03-01

    The cDNA fragment of JEV prME gene was cloned into the baculovirus shuttle vector (bacmid) to construct a recombinant baculovirus vector, defined as AcBac-prME. Then the recombinant baculovirus Ac-prME was obtained by transfecting Sf9 cells with AcBac-prME. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence results indicated that both prM and E proteins were efficiently expressed in Sf9 cells. Electron microscopy suggested that prME was assembled into JEV-VLPs. To further evaluate the potential of JEV-VLPs as vaccine, the mice were immunized with JEV-VLPs and then challenged with lethal JEV. The results of mice survival and pathological changes demonstrated that the JEV-VLPs performed complete protection against JEV-P3 strain and relieved pathological changes in the mice brain significant. This study suggest that JEV-VLPs would be a potential vaccine for Japanese encephalitis virus.

  13. A DNA Vaccine That Targets Hemagglutinin to Antigen-Presenting Cells Protects Mice against H7 Influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Tor Kristian; Zhou, Fan; Cox, Rebecca; Bogen, Bjarne; Grødeland, Gunnveig

    2017-12-01

    Zoonotic influenza H7 viral infections have a case fatality rate of about 40%. Currently, no or limited human to human spread has occurred, but we may be facing a severe pandemic threat if the virus acquires the ability to transmit between humans. Novel vaccines that can be rapidly produced for global distribution are urgently needed, and DNA vaccines may be the only type of vaccine that allows for the speed necessary to quench an emerging pandemic. Here, we constructed DNA vaccines encoding the hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza A/chicken/Italy/13474/99 (H7N1). In order to increase the efficacy of DNA vaccination, HA was targeted to either major histocompatibility complex class II molecules or chemokine receptors 1, 3, and 5 (CCR1/3/5) that are expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APC). A single DNA vaccination with APC-targeted HA significantly increased antibody levels in sera compared to nontargeted control vaccines. The antibodies were confirmed neutralizing in an H7 pseudotype-based neutralization assay. Furthermore, the APC-targeted vaccines increased the levels of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, and a single DNA vaccination could confer protection against a lethal challenge with influenza A/turkey/Italy/3889/1999 (H7N1) in mice. In conclusion, we have developed a vaccine that rapidly could contribute protection against a pandemic threat from avian influenza. IMPORTANCE Highly pathogenic avian influenza H7 constitute a pandemic threat that can cause severe illness and death in infected individuals. Vaccination is the main method of prophylaxis against influenza, but current vaccine strategies fall short in a pandemic situation due to a prolonged production time and insufficient production capabilities. In contrast, a DNA vaccine can be rapidly produced and deployed to prevent the potential escalation of a highly pathogenic influenza pandemic. We here demonstrate that a single DNA delivery of hemagglutinin from an H7 influenza could mediate full

  14. Sylvatic plague vaccine partially protects prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.) in field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Tripp, Daniel W.; Russell, Robin E.; Abbott, Rachel C.; Richgels, Katherine; Matchett, Marc R.; Biggins, Dean E.; Griebel, Randall; Schroeder, Greg; Grassel, Shaun M.; Pipkin, David R.; Cordova, Jennifer; Kavalunas, Adam; Maxfield, Brian; Boulerice, Jesse; Miller, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    Sylvatic plague, caused by Yersinia pestis, frequently afflicts prairie dogs (Cynomys spp.), causing population declines and local extirpations. We tested the effectiveness of bait-delivered sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) in prairie dog colonies on 29 paired placebo and treatment plots (1–59 ha in size; average 16.9 ha) in 7 western states from 2013 to 2015. We compared relative abundance (using catch per unit effort (CPUE) as an index) and apparent survival of prairie dogs on 26 of the 29 paired plots, 12 with confirmed or suspected plague (Y. pestis positive carcasses or fleas). Even though plague mortality occurred in prairie dogs on vaccine plots, SPV treatment had an overall positive effect on CPUE in all three years, regardless of plague status. Odds of capturing a unique animal were 1.10 (95% confidence interval [C.I.] 1.02–1.19) times higher per trap day on vaccine-treated plots than placebo plots in 2013, 1.47 (95% C.I. 1.41–1.52) times higher in 2014 and 1.19 (95% C.I. 1.13–1.25) times higher in 2015. On pairs where plague occurred, odds of apparent survival were 1.76 (95% Bayesian credible interval [B.C.I.] 1.28–2.43) times higher on vaccine plots than placebo plots for adults and 2.41 (95% B.C.I. 1.72–3.38) times higher for juveniles. Our results provide evidence that consumption of vaccine-laden baits can protect prairie dogs against plague; however, further evaluation and refinement are needed to optimize SPV use as a management tool.

  15. Opsonic and protective properties of antibodies raised to conjugate vaccines targeting six Staphylococcus aureus antigens.

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    Clarissa Pozzi

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections for which a vaccine is greatly desired. Antigens found on the S. aureus outer surface include the capsular polysaccharides (CP of serotype 5 (CP5 or 8 (CP8 and/or a second antigen, a β-(1→6-polymer of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. Antibodies specific for either CP or PNAG antigens have excellent in vitro opsonic killing activity (OPKA, but when mixed together have potent interference in OPKA and murine protection. To ascertain if this interference could be abrogated by using a synthetic non-acetylated oligosaccharide fragment of PNAG, 9GlcNH(2, in place of chemically partially deacetylated PNAG, three conjugate vaccines consisting of 9GlcNH(2 conjugated to a non-toxic mutant of alpha-hemolysin (Hla H35L, CP5 conjugated to clumping factor B (ClfB, or CP8 conjugated to iron-surface determinant B (IsdB were used separately to immunize rabbits. Opsonic antibodies mediating killing of multiple S. aureus strains were elicited for all three vaccines and showed carbohydrate antigen-specific reductions in the tissue bacterial burdens in animal models of S. aureus skin abscesses, pneumonia, and nasal colonization. Carrier-protein specific immunity was also shown to be effective in reducing bacterial levels in infected lungs and in nasal colonization. However, use of synthetic 9GlcNH(2 to induce antibody to PNAG did not overcome the interference in OPKA engendered when these were combined with antibody to either CP5 or CP8. Whereas each individual vaccine showed efficacy, combining antisera to CP antigens and PNAG still abrogated individual OPKA activities, indicating difficulty in achieving a multi-valent vaccine targeting both the CP and PNAG antigens.

  16. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

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    Viktoria Stab

    Full Text Available The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV and Influenza A Virus (IAV are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  17. Protective efficacy and immunogenicity of a combinatory DNA vaccine against Influenza A Virus and the Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stab, Viktoria; Nitsche, Sandra; Niezold, Thomas; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, Michael; Wiechers, Andrea; Tippler, Bettina; Hannaman, Drew; Ehrhardt, Christina; Uberla, Klaus; Grunwald, Thomas; Tenbusch, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and Influenza A Virus (IAV) are both two major causative agents of severe respiratory tract infections in humans leading to hospitalization and thousands of deaths each year. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of a combinatory DNA vaccine in comparison to the single component vaccines against both diseases in a mouse model. Intramuscular electroporation with plasmids expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV and the F protein of RSV induced strong humoral immune responses regardless if they were delivered in combination or alone. In consequence, high neutralizing antibody titers were detected, which conferred protection against a lethal challenge with IAV. Furthermore, the viral load in the lungs after a RSV infection could be dramatically reduced in vaccinated mice. Concurrently, substantial amounts of antigen-specific, polyfunctional CD8⁺ T-cells were measured after vaccination. Interestingly, the cellular response to the hemagglutinin was significantly reduced in the presence of the RSV-F encoding plasmid, but not vice versa. Although these results indicate a suppressive effect of the RSV-F protein, the protective efficacy of the combinatory vaccine was comparable to the efficacy of both single-component vaccines. In conclusion, the novel combinatory vaccine against RSV and IAV may have great potential to reduce the rate of severe respiratory tract infections in humans without increasing the number of necessary vaccinations.

  18. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

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    Mark S Pearson

    Full Text Available The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1 and IgG(3 from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1, suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  19. Enhanced protective efficacy of a chimeric form of the schistosomiasis vaccine antigen Sm-TSP-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Mark S; Pickering, Darren A; McSorley, Henry J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Tribolet, Leon; Dougall, Annette M; Hotez, Peter J; Loukas, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The large extracellular loop of the Schistosoma mansoni tetraspanin, Sm-TSP-2, when fused to a thioredoxin partner and formulated with Freund's adjuvants, has been shown to be an efficacious vaccine against murine schistosomiasis. Moreover, Sm-TSP-2 is uniquely recognised by IgG(1) and IgG(3) from putatively resistant individuals resident in S. mansoni endemic areas in Brazil. In the present study, we expressed Sm-TSP-2 at high yield and in soluble form in E. coli without the need for a solubility enhancing fusion partner. We also expressed in E. coli a chimera called Sm-TSP-2/5B, which consisted of Sm-TSP-2 fused to the immunogenic 5B region of the hookworm aspartic protease and vaccine antigen, Na-APR-1. Sm-TSP-2 formulated with alum/CpG showed significant reductions in adult worm and liver egg burdens in two separate murine schistosomiasis challenge studies. Sm-TSP-2/5B afforded significantly greater protection than Sm-TSP-2 alone when both antigens were formulated with alum/CpG. The enhanced protection obtained with the chimeric fusion protein was associated with increased production of anti-Sm-TSP-2 antibodies and IL-4, IL-10 and IFN-γ from spleen cells of vaccinated animals. Sera from 666 individuals from Brazil who were infected with S. mansoni were screened for potentially deleterious IgE responses to Sm-TSP-2. Anti-Sm-TSP-2 IgE to this protein was not detected (also shown previously for Na-APR-1), suggesting that the chimeric antigen Sm-TSP-2/5B could be used to safely and effectively vaccinate people in areas where schistosomes and hookworms are endemic.

  20. Protection against infectious bursal disease virulent challenge conferred by a recombinant avian adeno-associated virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozo, F; Villegas, P; Estevez, C; Alvarado, I R; Purvis, L B; Williams, S

    2008-06-01

    The development and use of recombinant vaccine vectors for the expression of poultry pathogens proteins is an active research field. The adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a replication-defective virus member of the family Parvoviridae that has been successfully used for gene delivery in humans and other species. In this experiment, an avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) expressing the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) VP2 protein (rAAAV-VP2) was evaluated for protection against IBDV-virulent challenge. Specific pathogen free (SPF) birds were inoculated with rAAAV-VP2 or with a commercial intermediate IBDV vaccine and then challenged with the Edgar strain. IBDV-specific antibody levels were observed in all vaccinated groups; titers were higher for the commercial vaccine group. The live, commercial vaccine induced adequate protection against morbidity and mortality; nevertheless, initial lymphoid depletion and follicular atrophy related to active viral replication was observed as early as day 14 and persisted up to day 28, when birds were challenged. No bursal tissue damage due to rAAAV-VP2 vaccination was observed. Eight-out-of-ten rAAAV-VP2-vaccinated birds survived the challenge and showed no clinical signs. The bursa:body weight ratio and bursa lesion scores in the rAAAV-VP2 group indicated protection against challenge. Therefore, transgenic expression of the VP2 protein after rAAAV-VP2 vaccination induced protective immunity against IBDV challenge in 80% of the birds, without compromising the bursa of Fabricius. The use of rAAAV virions for gene delivery represents a novel approach to poultry vaccination.

  1. Transcriptional changes induced by candidate malaria vaccines and correlation with protection against malaria in a human challenge model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunachie, Susanna; Berthoud, Tamara; Hill, Adrian V S; Fletcher, Helen A

    2015-09-29

    The complexity of immunity to malaria is well known, and clear correlates of protection against malaria have not been established. A better understanding of immune markers induced by candidate malaria vaccines would greatly enhance vaccine development, immunogenicity monitoring and estimation of vaccine efficacy in the field. We have previously reported complete or partial efficacy against experimental sporozoite challenge by several vaccine regimens in healthy malaria-naïve subjects in Oxford. These include a prime-boost regimen with RTS,S/AS02A and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the CSP antigen, and a DNA-prime, MVA-boost regimen expressing the ME TRAP antigens. Using samples from these trials we performed transcriptional profiling, allowing a global assessment of responses to vaccination. We used Human RefSeq8 Bead Chips from Illumina to examine gene expression using PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) from 16 human volunteers. To focus on antigen-specific changes, comparisons were made between PBMC stimulated with CSP or TRAP peptide pools and unstimulated PBMC post vaccination. We then correlated gene expression with protection against malaria in a human Plasmodium falciparum malaria challenge model. Differentially expressed genes induced by both vaccine regimens were predominantly in the IFN-γ pathway. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed antigen-specific effects on genes associated with IFN induction and proteasome modules after vaccination. Genes associated with IFN induction and antigen presentation modules were positively enriched in subjects with complete protection from malaria challenge, while genes associated with haemopoietic stem cells, regulatory monocytes and the myeloid lineage modules were negatively enriched in protected subjects. These results represent novel insights into the immune repertoires involved in malaria vaccination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  3. Altered adjuvant of foot-and-mouth disease vaccine improves immune response and protection from virus challenge

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    Min-Eun Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD generally use oil adjuvants. For better immunization and safety, an adjuvant should be selected only after careful consideration. In this study, we produced vaccines for O, A, and Asia1 serotypes by mixing oil adjuvants, Emulsigen-D (ED, ISA 201, and ISA 206 with and without an aluminum hydroxide (AL gel and measured their immunogenicity and safety to obtain information regarding critical differences (survival or weight loss of vaccine quality in mice; the goal of this test was to overcome the difficulties associated with experiments large or medium-sized animals. The groups immunized with the vaccines containing only the oil adjuvants (ED, ISA 201, and ISA 206 had similar or higher levels of neutralizing antibodies and structural protein antibodies for the FMD virus (FMDV than the groups immunized with the vaccines including the oil adjuvants mixed with the gel. However, in a challenge test using a mouse model, the protection rate showed the highest results in ISA 201 and ISA 206 mixed with AL. The mice immunized with vaccines containing ED showed temporary weight loss in the early postvaccination stages. Cell-mediated immunity was formed relatively strongly in the group vaccinated with vaccines including ISA 201 and ISA 206. We proposed that combinations of these adjuvants represent candidates for future FMD vaccines.

  4. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC) and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included). A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. Results In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY) at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity). In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Conclusions Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by implementing each

  5. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohli Michele

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV types −16 and −18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. Methods A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included. A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. Results In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity. In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Conclusions Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by

  6. Modeling the impact of the difference in cross-protection data between a human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine and a human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Michele; Lawrence, Donna; Haig, Jennifer; Anonychuk, Andrea; Demarteau, Nadia

    2012-10-13

    In Canada, two vaccines that have demonstrated high efficacy against infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types -16 and -18 are available. The HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine provides protection against genital warts (GW) while the HPV-16/18 vaccine may provide better protection against other oncogenic HPV types. In this analysis, the estimated clinical and economic benefit of each of these vaccines was compared in the Canadian setting. A Markov model of the natural history of HPV infection among women, cervical cancer (CC) and GW was used to estimate the impact of vaccinating a cohort of 100,000 12-year-old females on lifetime outcomes and healthcare system costs (no indirect benefit in males included). A budget impact model was used to estimate the impact of each vaccine by province. In the base case, vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 48 additional CC cases, and 16 additional CC deaths, while vaccination with the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was predicted to prevent 6,933 additional GW cases. Vaccination with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was estimated to save 1 additional discounted quality adjusted life year (QALY) at an overall lower lifetime cost to the healthcare system compared to the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (assuming vaccine price parity). In sensitivity analyses, the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine was associated with greater QALYs saved when the cross-protection efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine was reduced, or the burden of GW due to HPV-6/11 was increased. In most scenarios with price parity, the lifetime healthcare cost of the strategy with the HPV-16/18 vaccine was predicted to be lower than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. In the probabilistic sensitivity analyses, the HPV-16/18 vaccine provided more QALY benefit than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine in 49.2% of scenarios, with lower relative lifetime costs in 83.5% of scenarios. Overall, the predicted lifetime healthcare costs and QALYs saved by implementing each of the vaccines are similar. Vaccination

  7. Major role for CD8 T cells in the protection against Toxoplasma gondii following dendritic cell vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, R; Zagani, R; Dimier-Poisson, I

    2009-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, a worldwide zoonosis for which an effective vaccine is needed. Vaccination with pulsed dendritic cells is very efficient but their use in a vaccination protocol is unconceivable. Nevertheless, unravelling the induced effector mechanisms is crucial to design new vaccine strategies. We vaccinated CBA/J mice with parasite extract-pulsed dendritic cells, challenged them with T. gondii cysts and carried out in vivo depletion of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes to study the subsequent cellular immune response and protective mechanisms. CD4(+) lymphocytes were poorly implicated either in spleen and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cytokine secretion or in mice protection. By contrast, the increasing number of intracerebral cysts and depletion of CD8(+) cells were strongly correlated, revealing a prominent role for CD8(+) lymphocytes in the protection of mice. Splenic CD8(+) lymphocytes induce a strong Th1 response controlled by a Th2 response whereas CD8(+) cells from MLNs inhibit both Th1 and Th2 responses. CD8(+) cells are the main effectors following dendritic cell vaccination and Toxoplasma infection while CD4(+) T cells only play a minor role. This contrasts with T. gondii infection which elicits the generation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that provide protective immunity.

  8. Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against two different rhabdoviruses, VHSV and IHNV, induces specific divalent protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Delgado, Lourdes; Lorenzen, Ellen; Bovo, Giuseppe; Evensen, Øystein; Lapatra, Scott; Lorenzen, Niels

    2009-02-18

    DNA vaccines encoding the glycoprotein genes of the salmonid rhabdoviruses VHSV and IHNV are very efficient in eliciting protective immune responses against their respective diseases in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The early anti-viral response (EAVR) provides protection by 4 days post vaccination and is non-specific and transient while the specific anti-viral response (SAVR) is long lasting and highly specific. Since both VHSV and IHNV are endemic in rainbow trout in several geographical regions of Europe and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) on the Pacific coast of North America, co-vaccination against the two diseases would be a preferable option. In the present study we demonstrated that a single injection of mixed DNA vaccines induced long-lasting protection against both individual and a simultaneous virus challenge 80 days post vaccination. Transfected muscle cells at the injection site expressed both G proteins. This study confirms the applied potential of using a combined DNA vaccination for protection of fish against two different rhabdoviral diseases.

  9. Molecular smallpox vaccine delivered by alphavirus replicons elicits protective immunity in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W; Ferro, Anthony M; Golden, Joseph W; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2009-12-11

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 1970s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 x 10(6)pfu of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine.

  10. Impact of competitive non-protective antigens in a booster killed vaccine on seroconversions to protective antigens of Newcastle disease virus in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie K. Barbour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the impact of competitive non-protective antigens in a bivalent killed vaccine of Newcastle disease virus and infectious bronchitis (IB virus on seroconversions against protective fusion protein of Newcastle disease (ND virus (NDV, in free-range layers primed by live ND-clone 30 and IB-H120 vaccines. The experimental design included two free-range layer farms in which sera of randomly chosen layers were collected on two occasions from each of the two farms namely: at the time of administration of the killed booster vaccine (23 weeks of age and three weeks later. The Western immunoblotting technique was used to react the individual pooled sera collected at different times from each farm with antigens used in priming, namely those of the ND-clone 30 virus and the IB-H120 virus. The optical density bands formed by reactions were compared statistically between seroconverted antibodies at 23 weeks with those of layers aged 26 weeks. The killed booster vaccine offered a significant seroconversion on both farms to the non-protective L-protein (248.0 kDa of NDV and on one of the two farms to the non-protective NDV-matrix protein (40.0 kDa (p<0.05. However, seroconversion to the protective fusion protein of NDV (60 kDa failed on both farms (p<0.05. In addition, on one farm, a statistical significance was revealed by the killed booster vaccine seroconversion to non-protective IBV-nucleocapsid protein (510 kDa and, on the other farm, to another non-protective IBV-glycoprotein (28.0 kDa (p<0.05. The impact of competitive seroconversions to non-protective antigens and seroconversion failures to low molecular weights of NDV protective fusion protein is discussed.

  11. An adenovirus-vectored nasal vaccine confers rapid and sustained protection against anthrax in a single-dose regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Jex, Edward; Feng, Tsungwei; Sivko, Gloria S; Baillie, Leslie W; Goldman, Stanley; Van Kampen, Kent R; Tang, De-chu C

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax, and its spores have been developed into lethal bioweapons. To mitigate an onslaught from airborne anthrax spores that are maliciously disseminated, it is of paramount importance to develop a rapid-response anthrax vaccine that can be mass administered by nonmedical personnel during a crisis. We report here that intranasal instillation of a nonreplicating adenovirus vector encoding B. anthracis protective antigen could confer rapid and sustained protection against inhalation anthrax in mice in a single-dose regimen in the presence of preexisting adenovirus immunity. The potency of the vaccine was greatly enhanced when codons of the antigen gene were optimized to match the tRNA pool found in human cells. In addition, an adenovirus vector encoding lethal factor can confer partial protection against inhalation anthrax and might be coadministered with a protective antigen-based vaccine.

  12. Vaccination of macaques with adjuvanted formalin-inactivated influenza A virus (H5N1) vaccines: Protection against H5N1 challenge without disease enhancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Ruat (Caroline); C. Caillet (Catherine); A. Bidaut (Alexandre); J.H. Simon (James); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe investigated the ability of adjuvanted, inactivated split-virion influenza A virus (H5N1) vaccines to protect against infection and demonstrated that the disease exacerbation phenomenon seen with adjuvanted formaldehyde-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus and measles virus

  13. Liposomes containing anti-idiotypic antibodies: an oral vaccine to induce protective secretory immune responses specific for pathogens of mucosal surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, S.; Mestecky, J; Childers, N. K.; Michalek, S M

    1990-01-01

    By using a gnotobiotic rat model system to study the induction of protective immune responses by anti-idiotype (anti-id) vaccines specific for antibodies directed at the cariogenic microorganism Streptococcus mutans, it was shown that administration of such an anti-id vaccine provided partial protection against dental caries after challenge with virulent microorganisms. Protective effects were first demonstrated by direct parenteral administration of the anti-id vaccine into salivary gland re...

  14. Self Amplifying RNA Vaccines for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Induce Robust Protective Immunogenicity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    Dupuy,b Clayton W. Beard,a,1 Carolyn M. Six,b Connie S. 3 Schmaljohn,b Peter Mason,c,2 Andrew J. Geall,a,3 Jeffery B. Ulmer,a and Dong Yua 4 a GSK...Annu Rev 698 Microbiol. 2001;55:235-53. 699 [2] Pittman PR, Makuch RS, Mangiafico JA, Cannon TL, Gibbs PH, Peters CJ. Long-term 700 duration of... Reed DS, Lind CM, Lackemeyer MG, Sullivan LJ, Pratt WD, Parker MD. Genetically 705 engineered, live, attenuated vaccines protect nonhuman primates

  15. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z Q; Greenberg, L; Ertl, H C; Rupprecht, C E

    2014-02-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral Vaccination Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic Plant Expressing Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    34 Anal. Biochem. 169:227-223. 10. Gould, J., M. Devey, 0. Hasegawa, E.C. Ulian, G. Peterson, and R.H. Smith (1991) "Transformation of Zea mays L. using...Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic Plant Expressing Protective Antigen PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karen K. Oishi CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: CropTech/Vet...COVERED I September 1996 Final - Phase I, 15 Auxg 95-14 Aug 96 4. TITLE AND 9UBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Oral Vaccination Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic

  17. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  18. Vaccine Protection against Bacillus cereus-Mediated Respiratory Anthrax-Like Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, So-Young; Maier, Hannah; Schroeder, Jay; Richter, G. Stefan; Elli, Derek; Musser, James M.; Quenee, Lauriane E.; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus strains harboring a pXO1-like virulence plasmid cause respiratory anthrax-like disease in humans, particularly in welders. We developed mouse models for intraperitoneal as well as aerosol challenge with spores of B. cereus G9241, harboring pBCXO1 and pBC218 virulence plasmids. Compared to wild-type B. cereus G9241, spores with a deletion of the pBCXO1-carried protective antigen gene (pagA1) were severely attenuated, whereas spores with a deletion of the pBC218-carried protective antigen homologue (pagA2) were not. Anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA) immunization raised antibodies that bound and neutralized the pagA1-encoded protective antigen (PA1) but not the PA2 orthologue encoded by pagA2. AVA immunization protected mice against a lethal challenge with spores from B. cereus G9241 or B. cereus Elc4, a strain that had been isolated from a fatal case of anthrax-like disease. As the pathogenesis of B. cereus anthrax-like disease in mice is dependent on pagA1 and PA-neutralizing antibodies provide protection, AVA immunization may also protect humans from respiratory anthrax-like death. PMID:23319564

  19. Protection by BCG vaccine against tuberculosis: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangtani, Punam; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Ariti, Cono; Beynon, Rebecca; Pimpin, Laura; Fine, Paul E M; Rodrigues, Laura C; Smith, Peter G; Lipman, Marc; Whiting, Penny F; Sterne, Jonathan A

    2014-02-01

    Randomized trials assessing BCG vaccine protection against tuberculosis have widely varying results, for reasons that are not well understood. We examined associations of trial setting and design with BCG efficacy against pulmonary and miliary or meningeal tuberculosis by conducting a systematic review, meta-analyses, and meta-regression. We identified 18 trials reporting pulmonary tuberculosis and 6 reporting miliary or meningeal tuberculosis. Univariable meta-regression indicated efficacy against pulmonary tuberculosis varied according to 3 characteristics. Protection appeared greatest in children stringently tuberculin tested, to try to exclude prior infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or sensitization to environmental mycobacteria (rate ratio [RR], 0.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], .18-.37), or infants (RR, 0.41; 95% CI, .29-.58). Protection was weaker in children not stringently tested (RR, 0.59; 95% CI, .35-1.01) and older individuals stringently or not stringently tested (RR, 0.88; 95% CI, .59-1.31 and RR, 0.81; 95% CI, .55-1.22, respectively). Protection was higher in trials further from the equator where environmental mycobacteria are less and with lower risk of diagnostic detection bias. These associations were attenuated in a multivariable model, but each had an independent effect. There was no evidence that efficacy was associated with BCG strain. Protection against meningeal and miliary tuberculosis was also high in infants (RR, 0.1; 95% CI, .01-.77) and children stringently tuberculin tested (RR, 0.08; 95% CI, .03-.25). Absence of prior M. tuberculosis infection or sensitization with environmental mycobacteria is associated with higher efficacy of BCG against pulmonary tuberculosis and possibly against miliary and meningeal tuberculosis. Evaluations of new tuberculosis vaccines should account for the possibility that prior infection may mask or block their effects.

  20. Epitope analysis and protection by a ROP19 DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used bioinformatics approaches to identify B-cell and T-cell epitopes on the ROP19 protein of Toxoplasma gondii. Then, we constructed plasmids with ROP19 (pEGFP-C1-ROP19 and injected them into BALB/c mice to test the immunoprotection induced by this vaccine candidate. The results showed that immunization with pEGFP-C1-ROP19 induced effective cellular and humoral immune responses in mice; specifically, high serum levels of T. gondii-specific IgG and increased interferon-gamma production by splenocytes. Furthermore, the mice vaccinated with pROP19 had significantly fewer brain cysts (583 ± 160 than the mice injected with phosphate-buffered saline (1350 ± 243 or with the control plasmid, pEGFP-C1 (1300 ± 167. Compared with PBS-treated mice, those immunized with pROP19 had only 43% of the number of brain cysts. These results suggest that the DNA vaccine encoding ROP19 induced a significant immune response and provided protection against a challenge with T. gondii strain PRU cysts.

  1. A multivalent and cross-protective vaccine strategy against arenaviruses associated with human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya F Kotturi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Arenaviruses are the causative pathogens of severe hemorrhagic fever and aseptic meningitis in humans, for which no licensed vaccines are currently available. Pathogen heterogeneity within the Arenaviridae family poses a significant challenge for vaccine development. The main hypothesis we tested in the present study was whether it is possible to design a universal vaccine strategy capable of inducing simultaneous HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against 7 pathogenic arenaviruses (including the lymphocytic choriomeningitis, Lassa, Guanarito, Junin, Machupo, Sabia, and Whitewater Arroyo viruses, either through the identification of widely conserved epitopes, or by the identification of a collection of epitopes derived from multiple arenavirus species. By inoculating HLA transgenic mice with a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACVs expressing the different arenavirus proteins, we identified 10 HLA-A02 and 10 HLA-A03-restricted epitopes that are naturally processed in human antigen-presenting cells. For some of these epitopes we were able to demonstrate cross-reactive CD8+ T cell responses, further increasing the coverage afforded by the epitope set against each different arenavirus species. Importantly, we showed that immunization of HLA transgenic mice with an epitope cocktail generated simultaneous CD8+ T cell responses against all 7 arenaviruses, and protected mice against challenge with rVACVs expressing either Old or New World arenavirus glycoproteins. In conclusion, the set of identified epitopes allows broad, non-ethnically biased coverage of all 7 viral species targeted by our studies.

  2. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Yoshimi; Caposio, Patrizia; Parkins, Christopher J; Botto, Sara; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees) are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes. We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV) vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP) of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL)). MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL) induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months) CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection. This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  3. A replicating cytomegalovirus-based vaccine encoding a single Ebola virus nucleoprotein CTL epitope confers protection against Ebola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimi Tsuda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV are a serious human health concern in Central Africa. Great apes (gorillas/chimpanzees are an important source of EBOV transmission to humans due to increased hunting of wildlife including the 'bush-meat' trade. Cytomegalovirus (CMV is an highly immunogenic virus that has shown recent utility as a vaccine platform. CMV-based vaccines also have the unique potential to re-infect and disseminate through target populations regardless of prior CMV immunity, which may be ideal for achieving high vaccine coverage in inaccessible populations such as great apes.We hypothesize that a vaccine strategy using CMV-based vectors expressing EBOV antigens may be ideally suited for use in inaccessible wildlife populations. To establish a 'proof-of-concept' for CMV-based vaccines against EBOV, we constructed a mouse CMV (MCMV vector expressing a CD8+ T cell epitope from the nucleoprotein (NP of Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV (MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL. MCMV/ZEBOV-NP(CTL induced high levels of long-lasting (>8 months CD8+ T cells against ZEBOV NP in mice. Importantly, all vaccinated animals were protected against lethal ZEBOV challenge. Low levels of anti-ZEBOV antibodies were only sporadically detected in vaccinated animals prior to ZEBOV challenge suggesting a role, at least in part, for T cells in protection.This study demonstrates the ability of a CMV-based vaccine approach to protect against an highly virulent human pathogen, and supports the potential for 'disseminating' CMV-based EBOV vaccines to prevent EBOV transmission in wildlife populations.

  4. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  5. Two Novel Salmonella Bivalent Vaccines Confer Dual Protection against Two Salmonella Serovars in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinxin; Dai, Qinlong; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-01-01

    Newport lethal challenge. All of the mice in the three vaccine-immunized groups survived the lethal Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. In contrast, SLT26 (pCZ11) and SLT27 (pCZ11) conferred full protection against lethal Salmonella Newport challenge, but SLT25 (pCZ11) provided only 50% heterologous protection. Thus, we developed two novel Salmonella bivalent vaccines, SLT26 (pCZ11) and SLT27 (pCZ11), suggesting that the delivery of a heterologous O-antigen in attenuated Salmonella strains is a prospective approach for developing Salmonella vaccines with broad serovar coverage. PMID:28929089

  6. Two Novel Salmonella Bivalent Vaccines Confer Dual Protection against Two Salmonella Serovars in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Zhao

    2017-09-01

    Salmonella Newport lethal challenge. All of the mice in the three vaccine-immunized groups survived the lethal Salmonella Typhimurium challenge. In contrast, SLT26 (pCZ11 and SLT27 (pCZ11 conferred full protection against lethal Salmonella Newport challenge, but SLT25 (pCZ11 provided only 50% heterologous protection. Thus, we developed two novel Salmonella bivalent vaccines, SLT26 (pCZ11 and SLT27 (pCZ11, suggesting that the delivery of a heterologous O-antigen in attenuated Salmonella strains is a prospective approach for developing Salmonella vaccines with broad serovar coverage.

  7. Duration of protection against hepatitis A for the current two-dose vaccine compared to a three-dose vaccine schedule in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczniak, Gregory A.; Thomas, Timothy K.; Bulkow, Lisa R.; Negus, Susan E.; Zanis, Carolyn L.; Bruce, Michael G.; Spradling, Philip R.; Teshale, Eyasu H.; McMahon, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatitis A is mostly a self-limiting disease but causes substantial economic burden. Consequently, United States Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices recommends inactivated hepatitis A vaccination for all children beginning at age 1 year and for high risk adults. The hepatitis A vaccine is highly effective but the duration of protection is unknown. Methods We examined the proportion of children with protective hepatitis A antibody levels (anti-HAV ≥20 mIU/mL) as well as the geometric mean concentration (GMC) of anti-HAV in a cross sectional convenience sample of individuals aged 12–24 years, who had been vaccinated with a two-dose schedule in childhood, with the initial dose at least 5 years ago. We compared a subset of data from persons vaccinated with two-doses (720 EL.U.) at age 3–6 years with a demographically similar prospective cohort that received a three-dose (360 EL.U.) schedule and have been followed for 17 years. Results No significant differences were observed when comparing GMC between the two cohorts at 10 (P = 0.467), 12 (P = 0.496), and 14 (P = 0.175) years post-immunization. For the three-dose cohort, protective antibody levels remain for 17 years and have leveled-off over the past 7 years. Conclusion The two- and three-dose schedules provide similar protection >14 years after vaccination, indicating a booster dose is not needed at this time. Plateauing anti-HAV GMC levels suggest protective antibody levels may persist long-term. PMID:23470239

  8. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detail...

  9. Antibody quality and protection from lethal Ebola virus challenge in nonhuman primates immunized with rabies virus based bivalent vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E Blaney

    Full Text Available We have previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV vaccine platform based on (a replication-competent rabies virus (RABV, (b replication-deficient RABV, or (c chemically inactivated RABV expressing EBOV glycoprotein (GP. Mouse studies demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of these live or inactivated RABV/EBOV vaccines. Here, we evaluated these vaccines in nonhuman primates. Our results indicate that all three vaccines do induce potent immune responses against both RABV and EBOV, while the protection of immunized animals against EBOV was largely dependent on the quality of humoral immune response against EBOV GP. We also determined if the induced antibodies against EBOV GP differ in their target, affinity, or the isotype. Our results show that IgG1-biased humoral responses as well as high levels of GP-specific antibodies were beneficial for the control of EBOV infection after immunization. These results further support the concept that a successful EBOV vaccine needs to induce strong antibodies against EBOV. We also showed that a dual vaccine against RABV and filoviruses is achievable; therefore addressing concerns for the marketability of this urgently needed vaccine.

  10. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can mediate vaccine-induced protection against Coccidioides immitis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierer, Joshua; Waters, Crystal; Walls, Lorraine

    2006-05-01

    To determine which lymphocytes are required for vaccine-induced immunity to coccidioidomycosis, we used a temperature-sensitive mutant of Coccidioides immitis to immunize mice lacking subsets of lymphocytes or specific cytokines and infected the mice 4 weeks later with virulent C. immitis. After 2 weeks, we determined the number of fungi in their lungs and spleens. Vaccine-induced immunity required alpha beta T lymphocytes. beta -2 microglobulin knockout (KO) mice were protected by immunization, and we transferred protection using CD4+ T cells from immunized mice. However, vaccination also protected CD4+ KO mice, which suggests that CD8+ T cells played a role in vaccine-induced immunity, even though they were not required. We adaptively transferred protection using spleen cells from immunized CD4+ KO mice to nonimmune B6 mice, but CD8+ -depleted spleen cells did not protect against infection. Recipients of spleen cells from immunized CD4+ KO mice had 6 times more tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- alpha mRNA in their lungs than did mice that received nonimmune spleen cells, and TNF receptor-1 KO mice were not fully protected by immunization. These results show that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can protect against coccidioidomycosis and that TNF- alpha is a necessary component of the acquired immune response.

  11. PROTECTIVE ACTIVITY STUDY OF A CANDIDATE VACCINE AGAINST ROTAVIRUS INFECTION BASED ON RECOMBINANT PROTEIN FliCVP6VP8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Dukhovlinov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus infection is among leading causes of severe diarrhea which often leads to severe dehydration, especially, in children under 5 years old. In Russia, the incidence of rotavirus infection is constantly increased, due to higher rates of actual rotavirus infection cases and improved diagnostics of the disease. Immunity to rotavirus is unstable, thus causing repeated infections intra vitam. Anti-infectious resistance in reconvalescents is explained by induction of specific IgM, IgG, and, notably, IgA antibodies. Due to absence of market drugs with direct action against rotavirus, a rational vaccination is considered the most effective way to control the disease. Currently available vaccines for prevention of rotavirus infection are based on live attenuated rotavirus strains, human and/or animal origin, which replicate in human gut. Their implementation may result into different complications. Meanwhile, usage of vaccines based on recombinant proteins is aimed to avoid risks associated with introduction of a complete virus into humans. In this paper, we studied protective activity of candidate vaccines against rotavirus.In this work we studied protective activity of a candidate vaccine against rotavirus infection based on recombinant FliCVP6VP8 protein which includes VP6 and VP8, as well as components of Salmonella typhimurium flagellin (FliC as an adjuvant. Different components are joined by flexible bridges. Efficiency of the candidate vaccine was studied in animal model using Balb/c mice. We have shown high level of protection which occurs when the candidate vaccine is administered twice intramuscularly. Complete protection of animals against mouse rotavirus EDC after intramuscular immunization with a candidate vaccine was associated with arising rotavirus-specific IgA and IgG antibodies in serum and intestine of immunized animals. The efficacy of candidate vaccine based on recombinant protein FliCVP6VP8 against rotavirus infection was

  12. Protection of bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against rabies following topical or oronasal exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stading, Ben; Ellison, James A; Carson, William C; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli Subbian; Rocke, Tonie E; Osorio, Jorge E

    2017-10-01

    Rabies is an ancient neglected tropical disease that causes tens of thousands of human deaths and millions of cattle deaths annually. In order to develop a new vaccine for potential use in bats, a reservoir of rabies infection for humans and animals alike, an in silico antigen designer tool was used to create a mosaic glycoprotein (MoG) gene using available sequences from the rabies Phylogroup I glycoprotein. This sequence, which represents strains more likely to occur in bats, was cloned into raccoonpox virus (RCN) and the efficacy of this novel RCN-MoG vaccine was compared to RCN-G that expresses the glycoprotein gene from CVS-11 rabies or luciferase (RCN-luc, negative control) in mice and big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus). Mice vaccinated and boosted intradermally with 1 x 107 plaque forming units (PFU) of each RCN-rabies vaccine construct developed neutralizing antibodies and survived at significantly higher rates than controls. No significant difference in antibody titers or survival was noted between rabies-vaccinated groups. Bats were vaccinated either oronasally (RCN-G, RCN-MoG) with 5x107 PFU or by topical application in glycerin jelly (RCN-MoG, dose 2x108 PFU), boosted (same dose and route) at 46 days post vaccination (dpv), and then challenged with wild-type big brown variant RABV at 65 dpv. Prior to challenge, 90% of RCN-G and 75% of RCN-MoG oronasally vaccinated bats had detectable levels of serum rabies neutralizing antibodies. Bats from the RCN-luc and topically vaccinated RCN-MoG groups did not have measurable antibody responses. The RCN-rabies constructs were highly protective and not significantly different from each other. RCN-MoG provided 100% protection (n = 9) when delivered oronasally and 83% protection (n = 6) when delivered topically; protection provided by the RCN-G construct was 70% (n = 10). All rabies-vaccinated bats survived at a significantly (P ≤ 0.02) higher rate than control bats (12%; n = 8). We have demonstrated the efficacy of

  13. Protection of bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against rabies following topical or oronasal exposure to a recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stading, Ben; Ellison, James A.; Carson, William C.; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli Subbian; Rocke, Tonie E.; Osorio, Jorge E.

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is an ancient neglected tropica