WorldWideScience

Sample records for vaccine ep hiv-1090

  1. HIV-1 Env DNA vaccine plus protein boost delivered by EP expands B- and T-cell responses and neutralizing phenotype in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Muthumani

    Full Text Available An effective HIV vaccine will most likely require the induction of strong T-cell responses, broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, and the elicitation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Previously, we demonstrated the induction of strong HIV/SIV cellular immune responses in macaques and humans using synthetic consensus DNA immunogens delivered via adaptive electroporation (EP. However, the ability of this improved DNA approach to prime for relevant antibody responses has not been previously studied. Here, we investigate the immunogenicity of consensus DNA constructs encoding gp140 sequences from HIV-1 subtypes A, B, C and D in a DNA prime-protein boost vaccine regimen. Mice and guinea pigs were primed with single- and multi-clade DNA via EP and boosted with recombinant gp120 protein. Sera were analyzed for gp120 binding and induction of neutralizing antibody activity. Immunization with recombinant Env protein alone induced low-titer binding antibodies with limited neutralization breath. In contrast, the synthetic DNA prime-protein boost protocol induced significantly higher antibody binding titers. Furthermore, sera from DNA prime-protein boost groups were able to neutralize a broader range of viruses in a panel of tier 1 clade B viruses as well as multiple tier 1 clade A and clade C viruses. Further investigation of synthetic DNA prime plus adaptive EP plus protein boost appears warranted.

  2. Testing the waters: Ethical considerations for including PrEP in a phase IIb HIV vaccine efficacy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Liza; Garner, Sam; Anude, Chuka; Ndebele, Paul; Karuna, Shelly; Holt, Renee; Broder, Gail; Handibode, Jessica; Hammer, Scott M; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E

    2015-08-01

    The field of HIV prevention research has recently experienced some mixed results in efficacy trials of pre-exposure prophylaxis, vaginal microbicides, and HIV vaccines. While there have been positive trial results in some studies, in the near term, no single method will be sufficient to quell the epidemic. Improved HIV prevention methods, choices among methods, and coverage for all at-risk populations will be needed. The emergence of partially effective prevention methods that are not uniformly available raises complex ethical and scientific questions regarding the design of ongoing prevention trials. We present here an ethical analysis regarding inclusion of pre-exposure prophylaxis in an ongoing phase IIb vaccine efficacy trial, HVTN 505. This is the first large vaccine efficacy trial to address the issue of pre-exposure prophylaxis, and the decisions made by the protocol team were informed by extensive stakeholder consultations. The key ethical concerns are analyzed here, and the process of stakeholder engagement and decision-making described. This discussion and analysis will be useful as current and future research teams grapple with ethical and scientific study design questions emerging with the rapidly expanding evidence base for HIV prevention. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. eps'/eps in the standard model

    OpenAIRE

    Fabbrichesi, Marco

    2000-01-01

    I discuss the estimate of the CP-violating ratio eps'/eps by stressing the role played by the chiral quark model in predicting the experiment and in showing that the same dynamical mechanism at work in the Delta I=1/2 rule also explains the larger value obtained for eps'/eps in this model with respect to other estimates.

  4. Electrophysiology Studies (EPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Electrophysiology Studies (EPS) Updated:Dec 21,2016 What are electrophysiology studies? Electrophysiology studies (EPS) are tests that help doctors ...

  5. Encapsulation of an EP67-Conjugated CTL Peptide Vaccine in Nanoscale Biodegradable Particles Increases the Efficacy of Respiratory Immunization and Affects the Magnitude and Memory Subsets of Vaccine-Generated Mucosal and Systemic CD8(+) T Cells in a Diameter-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuturi, Bala V K; Tallapaka, Shailendra B; Yeapuri, Pravin; Curran, Stephen M; Sanderson, Sam D; Vetro, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    The diameter of biodegradable particles used to coencapsulate immunostimulants and subunit vaccines affects the magnitude of memory CD8(+) T cells generated by systemic immunization. Possible effects on the magnitude of CD8(+) T cells generated by mucosal immunization or memory subsets that potentially correlate more strongly with protection against certain pathogens, however, are unknown. In this study, we conjugated our novel host-derived mucosal immunostimulant, EP67, to the protective MCMV CTL epitope, pp89, through a lysosomal protease-labile double arginine linker (pp89-RR-EP67) and encapsulated in PLGA 50:50 micro- or nanoparticles. We then compared total magnitude, effector/central memory (CD127/KRLG1/CD62L), and IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 secreting subsets of pp89-specific CD8(+) T cells as well as protection of naive female BALB/c mice against primary respiratory infection with MCMV 21 days after respiratory immunization. We found that decreasing the diameter of encapsulating particle from ∼5.4 μm to ∼350 nm (i) increased the magnitude of pp89-specific CD8(+) T cells in the lungs and spleen; (ii) partially changed CD127/KLRG1 effector memory subsets in the lungs but not the spleen; (iii) changed CD127/KRLG1/CD62L effector/central memory subsets in the spleen; (iv) changed pp89-responsive IFN-γ/TNF-α/IL-2 secreting subsets in the lungs and spleen; (v) did not affect the extent to which encapsulation increased efficacy against primary MCMV respiratory infection over unencapsulated pp89-RR-EP67. Thus, although not observed under our current experimental conditions with MCMV, varying the diameter of nanoscale biodegradable particles may increase the efficacy of mucosal immunization with coencapsulated immunostimulant/subunit vaccines against certain pathogens by selectively increasing memory subset(s) of CD8(+) T cells that correlate the strongest with protection.

  6. E&P Hackspace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Mie

    2012-01-01

    , og deltager i kreative byggeworkshops sammen med rigtige E&P håndværkere. FORMÅL Det overordnede formål med E&Ps living showroom er at skabe rammer for vidensdeling mellem byggefagligheder internt og eksternt, levere en vifte af input, der på forskellige niveauer inspirerer besøgende til at tænke nyt...... omkring mulighederne for moderne byggeri, arkitektur og håndværk, samt aktivt at bruge disse rammer til at påvirke, hvordan godt menneske-centreret byggeri ser ud i Danmark i fremtiden. Et besøg i E&Ps Living Showroom starter med et par sikkerhedssko, men derefter ser oplevelsesforløbet forskelligt ud alt...... efter om man er professionel, slutbruger (voksen) eller et skolebarn. De tre oplevelsesforløb er skitseret i Scenarierne A, B og C. ELEMENTER, INVENTAR OG MATERIALER Den indretning og de materialer, der møder den besøgende i Living Showroom demonstrerer E&Ps håndværkeres evner indenfor deres fag, samt...

  7. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease — reinforcing the importance of vaccines in your pet's preventive health care program. Are there risks? Any treatment carries some risk, but these risks should be weighed against the benefits of protecting your pet from potentially fatal diseases. ...

  8. Vejledning om udvendig tagisolering med EPS isoleringsmateriale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2003-01-01

    Resume af vejledning om udvendig tagisolering med EPS isoleringsmateriale, udarbejdet af Plastindustrien, EPS sektionen, i samarbejde med Dansk Brand- og Sikringsteknisk Institut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"......Resume af vejledning om udvendig tagisolering med EPS isoleringsmateriale, udarbejdet af Plastindustrien, EPS sektionen, i samarbejde med Dansk Brand- og Sikringsteknisk Institut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"...

  9. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  10. EPS-Then and Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2016-11-18

    "Slime" played a brief and spectacular role in the 19th century founded by the theory of primordial slime by Ernst Haeckel. However, that substance was never found and eventually abandoned. Further scientific attention slowly began in the 1930s referring to slime as a microbial product and then was inspired by "How bacteria stick" by Costerton et al. in 1978, and the matrix material was considered to be polysaccharides. Later, it turned out that proteins, nucleic acids and lipids were major other constituents of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), an acronym which was highly discussed. The role of the EPS matrix turns out to be fundamental for biofilms, in terms of keeping cells in proximity and allowing for extended interaction, resource capture, mechanical strength and other properties, which emerge from the life of biofilm organisms, including enhanced tolerance to antimicrobials and other stress. The EPS components are extremely complex and dynamic and fulfil many functional roles, turning biofilms into the most ubiquitous and successful form of life on Earth.

  11. QCD studies in ep collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  12. Localization of prostaglandin E(2) EP2 and EP4 receptors in the rat kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B L; Stubbe, J; Hansen, P B

    2001-01-01

    segments showed EP2 expression in descending thin limb of Henle's loop (DTL) and in vasa recta of the outer medulla. The EP4 receptor was expressed in distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) in preglomerular vessels, and in outer medullary vasa recta. Butaprost, an EP2 receptor......We investigated the localization of cAMP-coupled prostaglandin E(2) EP2 and EP4 receptor expression in the rat kidney. EP2 mRNA was restricted to the outer and inner medulla in rat kidney, as determined by RNase protection assay. RT-PCR analysis of microdissected resistance vessels and nephron......-selective agonist, dose dependently raised cAMP levels in microdissected DTL and outer medullary vasa recta specimens but had no effect in EP2-negative outer medullary collecting duct segments. Dietary salt intake did not alter EP2 expression in the kidney medulla. These results suggest that PGE(2) may act...

  13. Control of EpsE, the phosphoglycosyltransferase initiating exopolysaccharide synthesis in Streptococcus thermophilus, by EpsD tyrosine kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Minic, Zoran; Marie, Corinne; Delorme, Christine; Faurie, Jean-Michel; Mercier, Gérald; Dusko Ehrlich, Stanislav

    2007-01-01

    We studied the roles of Streptococcus thermophilus phosphogalactosyltransferase (EpsE) (the priming enzyme), tyrosine kinase (EpsD), phosphatase (EpsB), and a membrane-associated protein with no known biochemical function (EpsC) in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis. These proteins are well-conserved among bacteria and are usually encoded by clustered genes. Exopolysaccharide synthesis took place in the wild-type strain and a mutant lacking EpsB but not in mutants lacking EpsC, EpsD, or EpsE. ...

  14. Control of EpsE, the Phosphoglycosyltransferase Initiating Exopolysaccharide Synthesis in Streptococcus thermophilus, by EpsD Tyrosine Kinase▿

    OpenAIRE

    Minic, Zoran; Marie, Corinne; Delorme, Christine; Faurie, Jean-Michel; Mercier, Gérald; Ehrlich, Dusko; Renault, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We studied the roles of Streptococcus thermophilus phosphogalactosyltransferase (EpsE) (the priming enzyme), tyrosine kinase (EpsD), phosphatase (EpsB), and a membrane-associated protein with no known biochemical function (EpsC) in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis. These proteins are well-conserved among bacteria and are usually encoded by clustered genes. Exopolysaccharide synthesis took place in the wild-type strain and a mutant lacking EpsB but not in mutants lacking EpsC, EpsD, or EpsE. ...

  15. EP4 and EP2 receptor subtypes involved in colonic secretion in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosa, A.S.; Hansen, M.B.; Tilotta, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    EP receptor selective agonists were employed on stripped rat colon pre-treated with indomethacin and theophylline. Receptor-specific agonists were butaprost (EP2), sulprostone (EP1 and EP3) and PGE(1) alcohol (OH-PGE(1)) (EP4). GW627368X was used as a specific EP4 receptor antagonist. Forskolin......-induced SCC was used as a control of tissue viability. The mean basal SCC was 24.5 +/- 0.9 mu A/cm(2) (range 9.8-45.1), and mean basal slope conductance was 23.7 +/- 6.1 mS/cm(2) (range 9.7-39.8). The basal SCC decreased after pre-treatment with indomethacin and increased after pre-treatment with theophylline...

  16. "Special 2005 EPS HEPP prize colloquium"

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    Colloquium celebrating the awarding of the 2005 EPS High Energy Particle Physics prize to Heinrich Wahl and the NA31 collaboration which showed for the first time Direct CP Violation in the decay of neutral K mesons.

  17. NS/EP Implications of Electronic Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    THE PRESIDENT’S NATIONAL SECURITY TELECOMMUNICATIONS ADVISORY COMMITTEE NS/EP IMPLICATIONS OF ELECTRONIC COMMERCE JUNE 1999 Form SF298 Citation Data... Electronic Commerce Procedures Contract or Grant Number Program Element Number Authors Project Number Task Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization...99 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NS/EP Implications of Electronic Commerce 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) President’s

  18. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine - HPV; Immunization - HPV; Gardasil; HPV2; HPV4; Vaccine to prevent cervical cancer; Genital warts - HPV vaccine; Cervical dysplasia - HPV vaccine; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine; Cancer of the cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal ...

  19. Using PrEP, losing condoms? PrEP promotion may undermine safe sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaei, Kamair; Paynter, Christopher A; Juan, Shao-Chiu; Alaei, Arash

    2016-09-20

    PrEP is a crucial new tool for the prevention of HIV. However, careful attention must be paid as to whether its widespread adoption could reduce condom usage, which may in turn increase STIs in the long-run. In this article we re-assess whether PrEP uptake may influence condom usage, and we call for vigilance by public health advocates to ensure that PrEP promotion does not lead to a drop-off in safe sex practices. Most of the evidence that PrEP does not change condom usage comes from double-blind clinical trials which are focused on the biological effect of PrEP on HIV incidence. However, subjects in these trials may not change their behavior because they do not actually know if they are taking PrEP. A number of focus group studies on individuals considering taking PrEP show that many see the drug as an opportunity for increasing unprotected sex. National survey data from the CDC show that condom rates are decreasing among MSM, which are a major target group for PrEP. Furthermore, data from public health records show that STIs are increasing among MSM in some areas with relatively high PrEP uptake. There is enough evidence that PrEP is contributing to rising STI infections to warrant concern. Public health advocates must ensure that PrEP uptake does not inadvertently threaten the public's health and that thirty years of condom promotion are not wasted.

  20. REVIVING AND UPGRADING OF THE EP DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriquez, I.; Higinbotham, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    At Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, an electron beam is used to probe the fundamental properties of the nucleus. In these experiments, it is essential to know the precise energy of the beam. An important instrument along the beamline to measure the beam energy is the eP device. The device measures the scattered electron angle and the recoil proton angle of an elastic collision. From these angle measurements, the beam energy can be calculated. Many eP device components such as computer software, controls, and mechanical parts needed to be upgraded and/or replaced in order for the eP device to be operational again. A research study was conducted of the current hydrogen target and its properties as well as alternate targets for better performance. As the maximum electron beam energy incident on the eP device will soon be upgraded from 6 GeV to 12 GeV, an analysis was also done on potential changes to the position of the electron and proton detectors in order to accommodate this change. Calculations show that for the new energy upgrade, electron detectors need to be positioned at 5° above and below the beamline to measure the energy of 12 GeV. New proton detectors need to be placed at an angle of 49.2° above and below the beamline to measure energies of 6.6 GeV and 8.8 GeV. With these changes the eP device will measure the range of new energies from 2.2 GeV to 12 GeV. From the target research studies it was found that a carbon nanotube mixture with polypropylene could be the ideal target for the eP device because of its high thermal conductivity and its high hydrogen content. The changes made to the eP device demonstrate the importance of continued research and new technologies.

  1. Functional evaluation of malaria Pfs25 DNA vaccine by in vivo electroporation in olive baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nyakundi, Ruth; Kariuki, Thomas; Ozwara, Hastings; Nyamongo, Onkoba; Mlambo, Godfree; Ellefsen, Barry; Hannaman, Drew; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2013-06-28

    Plasmodium falciparum Pfs25 antigen, expressed on the surface of zygotes and ookinetes, is one of the leading targets for the development of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine (TBV). Our laboratory has been evaluating DNA plasmid based Pfs25 vaccine in mice and non-human primates. Previously, we established that in vivo electroporation (EP) delivery is an effective method to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Pfs25 in mice. In order to optimize the in vivo EP procedure and test for its efficacy in more clinically relevant larger animal models, we employed in vivo EP to evaluate the immune response and protective efficacy of Pfs25 encoding DNA vaccine in nonhuman primates (olive baboons, Papio anubis). The results showed that at a dose of 2.5mg DNA vaccine, antibody responses were significantly enhanced with EP as compared to without EP resulting in effective transmission blocking efficiency. Similar immunogenicity enhancing effect of EP was also observed with lower doses (0.5mg and 1mg) of DNA plasmids. Further, final boosting with a single dose of recombinant Pfs25 protein resulted in dramatically enhanced antibody titers and significantly increased functional transmission blocking efficiency. Our study suggests priming with DNA vaccine via EP along with protein boost regimen as an effective method to elicit potent immunogenicity of malaria DNA vaccines in nonhuman primates and provides the basis for further evaluation in human volunteers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Highlights from e-EPS: EPS and EuChems are joining forces

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   On the occasion of the EPS Council 2013 in Strasbourg, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Societies (EuCheMS) and the European Physical Society (EPS) by presidents Ulrich Schubert and Luisa Cifarelli. EuCheMS and EPS share many objectives, such as community building, scientific excellence, communication and representation of their respective members to European policy makers. The two societies recognise that issues in many fields such as education, publication, support for basic sciences and frontier research are similar in their respective disciplines. They wish to combine efforts in developing and presenting common standpoints to their mutual benefit as European representatives in chemistry ...

  3. Immunogenicity of Simulated PCECV Postexposure Booster Doses 1, 3, and 5 Years after 2-Dose and 3-Dose Primary Rabies Vaccination in Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavatchai Kamoltham

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. ID rabies PrEP with PCECV is safe and immunogenic in schoolchildren and the anamnestic response to a two booster dose vaccination series was found to be adequate one, three, and five years after a two- or three-dose primary PrEP vaccination series.

  4. Optimization of production of Microbial Exopolysaccharides (EPS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology and results: Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) of lactic acid bacteria have potential for development and exploitation as food additives and functional food ... These substances can be used as additives in the food industry to increase the productivity of the lactic strains of EPS as well as in the pharmaceutical field to ...

  5. PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that are interfering with your life, or if blood tests show that your body is reacting to PrEP ... after you have been exposed to HIV? PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) is only for people who are ...

  6. 48 CFR 504.570 - Procedures for using the EPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for using the EPS. 504.570 Section 504.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.570 Procedures for using the EPS. (a) You must use the EPS to issue any synopsis...

  7. 42 CFR 495.102 - Incentive payments to EPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incentive payments to EPs. 495.102 Section 495.102... PROGRAM Requirements Specific to the Medicare Program § 495.102 Incentive payments to EPs. (a) General...) Increase in incentive payment limit for EPs who predominantly furnish services in a geographic HPSA. In the...

  8. Extraction and Analysis of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS): Comparison of Methods and EPS Levels in Salmonella pullorum SA 1685

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production and composition for Salmonella pullorum SA 1685 exposed to artificial groundwater (AGW) has been examined utilizing three EPS extraction methods: lyophilization, ethanol, and sonication. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the robustness...

  9. EPS analysis of nominal STS-1 flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgram, D. F.; Pipher, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    The results of electrical power system (EPS) analysis of the planned Shuttle Transportation System Flight 1 mission are presented. The capability of the orbiter EPS to support the planned flight and to provide program tape information and supplementary data specifically requested by the flight operations directorate was assessed. The analysis was accomplished using the orbiter version of the spacecraft electrical power simulator program, operating from a modified version of orbiter electrical equipment utilization baseline revision four. The results indicate that the nominal flight, as analyzed, is within the capabilities of the orbiter power generation system, but that a brief, and minimal, current overload may exist between main distributor 1 and mid power controlled 1, and that inverter 9 may the overloaded for extended periods of time. A comparison of results with launch commit criteria also indicated that some of the presently existing launch redlines may be violated during the terminal countdown.

  10. e-EPS News: Light for Development

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   A central goal of the EPS International Year of Light project will be to promote optical technologies and optics education to improve the quality of life in the developing world – under the theme of ‘Light for Development’. Light plays a central role in human activities in science, technology and culture. On a fundamental scientific level, light is necessary for the existence of life itself, whilst on a more technical level, light-based technologies will underpin the future development of human society. The systematic study of the physics of light and electromagnetic waves has been central to the evolution of modern science and – in the 20th century alone – there have been many fundamental ...

  11. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-19

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  12. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  13. Vaccine hesitancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Eve; Laberge, Caroline; Guay, Maryse; Bramadat, Paul; Roy, Réal; Bettinger, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being recognized as one of the most successful public health measures, vaccination is perceived as unsafe and unnecessary by a growing number of individuals. Lack of confidence in vaccines is now considered a threat to the success of vaccination programs. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and an increasing risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. This review provides an overview of the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy. First, we will characterize vaccine hesitancy and suggest the possible causes of the apparent increase in vaccine hesitancy in the developed world. Then we will look at determinants of individual decision-making about vaccination. PMID:23584253

  14. EpsA is an essential gene in exopolysaccharide production in L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785

    OpenAIRE

    Dertli, Enes; Mayer, Melinda J.; Colquhoun, Ian J.; Narbad, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Summary L actobacillus johnsonii FI9785 has an eps gene cluster which is required for the biosynthesis of homopolymeric exopolysaccharides (EPS)?1 and heteropolymeric EPS?2 as a capsular layer. The first gene of the cluster, epsA , is the putative transcriptional regulator. In this study we showed the crucial role of epsA in EPS biosynthesis by demonstrating that deletion of epsA resulted in complete loss of both EPS?1 and EPS?2 on the cell surface. Plasmid complementation of the epsA gene fu...

  15. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  16. Will Gay and Bisexual Men Taking Oral Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Switch to Long-Acting Injectable PrEP Should It Become Available?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Steven A; Whitfield, Thomas H F; Rendina, H Jonathon; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Grov, Christian

    2017-09-14

    Oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective at reducing HIV transmission risk and is CDC recommended for many gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM). We sought to investigate awareness of and preference for using long-acting injectable PrEP (LAI-PrEP) among GBM currently taking oral PrEP (n = 104), and identify their concerns. About half of GBM had heard of LAI-PrEP, and 30.8% specifically preferred LAI-PrEP. GBM with more concerns about the level of protection and drug half-life of LAI-PrEP had lower odds of preferring LAI-PrEP. Given that daily pill adherence is a challenge for some on PrEP, it is important to investigate the degree to which those on PrEP might consider LAI-PrEP as an alternative.

  17. Epäkeskoruuvipumpun roottorin hiomakoneen kehityssuunnitelma

    OpenAIRE

    Carling, Harri

    2011-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli kehittää JFD Pumps Rotors OY:lle kattava suunnitelma uudesta epäkeskoruuvipumpun roottorin hiomakoneesta. Yrityksellä on käytössä vanha hiomakone, joka toimi suunnitelman lähtökohtana. Työn aihe tuli tarpeesta rakennuttaa useampi hiomakone erikokoisille roottoreille. Työn lähtökohtana oli analysoida vanha kone: määritellä koneen toiminta ja siinä käytetyt ratkaisuvaihtoehdot. Tämän jälkeen selvitettiin uuteen koneeseen vaadittavat toiminnot ja tämän pohjal...

  18. PrEP on Twitter: Information, Barriers, and Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Grimm, Josh

    2017-04-01

    On May 14, 2014 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorsed the drug Truvada as an HIV preventative, called pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). PrEP has been shown to dramatically reduce the risk of HIV infection, but its rate of adoption has been slow, and discourse surrounding it has been marked by stigma and uncertainty. The purpose of this study was to investigate how PrEP was discussed on Twitter. Our analysis focused on barriers to PrEP adoption and stigmatization of PrEP users. We analyzed a random sample of 1,093 top tweets about PrEP posted to Twitter a year before and a year after the CDC's endorsement. Our results showed that tweets likely reinforced uncertainty about barriers to PrEP adoption and that users employed Twitter's functionality to counter stigmatizing narratives about PrEP. We suggest that our findings illuminate both the limitations and strengths of Twitter as a mechanism for health promotion.

  19. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  20. Highlights from e-EPS: Jean-Michel Raimond wins EPS Edison-Volta Prize 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Martina Knoop, e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The European Physical Society has the pleasure to announce that the 2014 EPS Edison-Volta Prize is awarded to Jean-Michel Raimond for “seminal contribution to physics (that) have paved the way for novel explorations of quantum mechanics and have opened new routes in quantum information processing”. J.-M. Raimond’s PhD thesis was supervised by Serge Haroche at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, in the early 1980′s, and together S. Haroche, M. Brune and J.-M. Raimond have built an extremely successful research group since then. J.-M. Raimond has made seminal contributions to the development of cavity QED experiments, in particular involving circular Rydberg atoms interacting with very high-Q superc...

  1. Highlights from e-EPS: Hetland to receive EPS-PED Award for Secondary School Teaching

    CERN Multimedia

    Urbaan Titulaer

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The EPS Physics Education Division selected Karl Thorstein Hetland, West Telemark Secondary School, Norway, as this year’s recipient of its Secondary School Teaching Award. K.T. Hetland developed the Energy Network, which aims to make students energy conscious and focus on renewable energy. The Energy Network, created in 2005, consists of 15 local networks, each involving an upper secondary school and several lower secondary schools, 55 schools in all. Material from the Network is used in physics classes in a large number of schools at national level and plays a major role in recruiting university physics students. K.T. Hetland will receive his award at the International Physics Education Conference, held together with the European Physics Educati...

  2. Self-reported Recent PrEP Dosing and Drug Detection in an Open Label PrEP Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, K Rivet; Mehrotra, Megha; Avelino-Silva, Vivian I; McMahan, Vanessa; Veloso, Valdilea G; Anderson, Peter; Guanira, Juan; Grant, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Monitoring adherence to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is part of the recommended package for PrEP prescribing, yet ongoing concerns about how to do so confidently are exacerbated by gross discrepancies in reported and actual use in clinical trials. We evaluated concordance between reports of recent PrEP dosing collected via neutral interviewing and drug quantitation in the iPrEx open-label extension, where participants (n = 1172) had the choice to receive or not receive PrEP. Self-report of recent dosing (at least one PrEP dose in the past 3-day) was the most common report (84 % of participants), and among these 83 % did have quantifiable levels of drug. The vast majority of those reporting no doses in the past 3-day (16 % of the sample) did not have quantifiable levels of drug (82 %). Predictors of over-report of dosing included younger age and lower educational attainment. Monitoring recent PrEP use through neutral interviewing may be a productive approach for clinicians to consider in implementation of real-world PrEP. Strategies to capture longer term or prevention-effective PrEP use, particularly for younger cohorts, are needed.

  3. PrEP Whores and HIV Prevention: The Queer Communication of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieldenner, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been introduced as another biomedical tool in HIV prevention. Whereas other such tools-including post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and interruption of perinatal transmission-have been embraced by those impacted by HIV, PrEP has been met with more conflict, especially within the gay community and HIV organizations. The "PrEP whore" has come to designate the social value and personal practices of those taking PrEP. This study examines the "PrEP whore" discourse by using queer theory and quare theory. Within these theoretical vantage points, the study explicates four discursive areas: slut shaming, dirty/clean binaries, mourning the loss of condoms, and reclaiming the inner whore. The study illuminates possible discursive strategies that lie outside of the domains of public health and within the individual and community.

  4. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctorMost kids have no problems with the polio vaccine. However, call your doctor if your child has any reaction after getting the vaccine. Call ... Tell the doctor when (day and time) your child received the vaccine. You also should file a Vaccine Adverse Event ...

  5. Exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis by Oenococcus oeni: from genes to phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulou, Maria; Vuillemin, Marlène; Campbell-Sills, Hugo; Lucas, Patrick M; Ballestra, Patricia; Miot-Sertier, Cécile; Favier, Marion; Coulon, Joana; Moine, Virginie; Doco, Thierry; Roques, Maryline; Williams, Pascale; Petrel, Melina; Gontier, Etienne; Moulis, Claire; Remaud-Simeon, Magali; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite

    2014-01-01

    Oenococcus oeni is the bacterial species which drives malolactic fermentation in wine. The analysis of 50 genomic sequences of O. oeni (14 already available and 36 newly sequenced ones) provided an inventory of the genes potentially involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis. The loci identified are: two gene clusters named eps1 and eps2, three isolated glycoside-hydrolase genes named dsrO, dsrV and levO, and three isolated glycosyltransferase genes named gtf, it3, it4. The isolated genes were present or absent depending on the strain and the eps gene clusters composition diverged from one strain to another. The soluble and capsular EPS production capacity of several strains was examined after growth in different culture media and the EPS structure was determined. Genotype to phenotype correlations showed that several EPS biosynthetic pathways were active and complementary in O. oeni. Can be distinguished: (i) a Wzy-dependent synthetic pathway, allowing the production of heteropolysaccharides made of glucose, galactose and rhamnose, mainly in a capsular form, (ii) a glucan synthase pathway (Gtf), involved in β-glucan synthesis in a free and a cell-associated form, giving a ropy phenotype to growth media and (iii) homopolysaccharide synthesis from sucrose (α-glucan or β-fructan) by glycoside-hydrolases of the GH70 and GH68 families. The eps gene distribution on the phylogenetic tree was examined. Fifty out of 50 studied genomes possessed several genes dedicated to EPS metabolism. This suggests that these polymers are important for the adaptation of O. oeni to its specific ecological niche, wine and possibly contribute to the technological performance of malolactic starters.

  6. Exopolysaccharide (EPS synthesis by Oenococcus oeni: from genes to phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimopoulou

    Full Text Available Oenococcus oeni is the bacterial species which drives malolactic fermentation in wine. The analysis of 50 genomic sequences of O. oeni (14 already available and 36 newly sequenced ones provided an inventory of the genes potentially involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS biosynthesis. The loci identified are: two gene clusters named eps1 and eps2, three isolated glycoside-hydrolase genes named dsrO, dsrV and levO, and three isolated glycosyltransferase genes named gtf, it3, it4. The isolated genes were present or absent depending on the strain and the eps gene clusters composition diverged from one strain to another. The soluble and capsular EPS production capacity of several strains was examined after growth in different culture media and the EPS structure was determined. Genotype to phenotype correlations showed that several EPS biosynthetic pathways were active and complementary in O. oeni. Can be distinguished: (i a Wzy-dependent synthetic pathway, allowing the production of heteropolysaccharides made of glucose, galactose and rhamnose, mainly in a capsular form, (ii a glucan synthase pathway (Gtf, involved in β-glucan synthesis in a free and a cell-associated form, giving a ropy phenotype to growth media and (iii homopolysaccharide synthesis from sucrose (α-glucan or β-fructan by glycoside-hydrolases of the GH70 and GH68 families. The eps gene distribution on the phylogenetic tree was examined. Fifty out of 50 studied genomes possessed several genes dedicated to EPS metabolism. This suggests that these polymers are important for the adaptation of O. oeni to its specific ecological niche, wine and possibly contribute to the technological performance of malolactic starters.

  7. Overview of microalgal extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Zheng, Yi

    2016-11-15

    Microalgae have been studied as natural resources for a number of applications, most particularly food, animal feed, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In addition to the intracellular compounds of interest, microalgae can also excrete various extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) into their immediate living environment during their life cycle to form a hydrated biofilm matrix. These microalgal EPS mainly consist of polysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Most notably, EPS retain their stable matrix structure and form a 3-D polymer network for cells to interact with each other, and mediate their adhesion to surfaces. EPS also play a role as extracellular energy and carbon sinks. They are also abundant source of structurally and compositionally diverse biopolymers which possess unique bioactivities for special high-value applications, specifically as antivirals, antitumor agents, antioxidants, anticoagulants and anti-inflammatories. Their superior rheological properties also make microalgal EPS particularly useful in mechanical engineering (e.g., biolubricants and drag reducers) and food science/engineering (e.g., thickener and preservatives) applications. The chemical composition and structure of EPS appear to correlate with their applications, but the fundamentals of such relationship are not well understood. This article summarizes previous research on microalgal EPS derived from green algae, diatoms and red algae, including compositions/functions/structure, production, and potential applications. The importance of exopolysaccharides and EPS proteins, with their particular metabolic characteristics, are also described because of their potential high-value applications. This review concludes with potential future research areas of microalgal EPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by Serratia sp.1 using wastewater sludge as raw material and flocculation activity of the EPS produced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezawada, J; Hoang, N V; More, T T; Yan, S; Tyagi, N; Tyagi, R D; Surampalli, R Y

    2013-10-15

    Growth profile and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production of Serratia sp.1 was studied in shake flask fermentation for 72 h using wastewater sludge as raw material. Maximum cell concentration of 6.7 × 10(9) cfu/mL was obtained at 48 h fermentation time. EPS dry weight, flocculation activity and dewaterability of different EPS (tightly bound or TB-EPS, loosely bound or LB-EPS and broth-EPS or B-EPS) were also measured. The highest concentration of LB-EPS (2.45 g/L) and TB-EPS (0.99 g/L) were attained at 48 h of fermentation. Maximum flocculation activity and dewaterability (ΔCST) of TB-EPS (76.4%, 14.5s and 76.5%, 15.5s), LB-EPS (67.8%, 8.1s and 64.7%, 7.6s) and broth EPS (61%, 6.1s and 70.4%, 6.8s) were obtained at 36 and 48 h of growth. Higher flocculation activity and dewaterability were achieved with TB-EPS than with the two other EPS. Characterization of TB-EPS and LB-EPS was done in terms of their protein and carbohydrate content. Protein content was much higher in TB-EPS where as carbohydrate content was only slightly higher in TB-EPS than LB-EPS. Morphology of the Serratia strain after fermentation in sludge and TSB was observed under a scanning electron microscope and the cell size was found to be bigger in the sludge medium than the TSB medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining biomedical preventions for HIV: Vaccines with pre-exposure prophylaxis, microbicides or other HIV preventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholl, Janet M

    2016-12-01

    Biomedical preventions for HIV, such as vaccines, microbicides or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretroviral drugs, can each only partially prevent HIV-1 infection in most human trials. Oral PrEP is now FDA approved for HIV-prevention in high risk groups, but partial adherence reduces efficacy. If combined as biomedical preventions (CBP) an HIV vaccine could provide protection when PrEP adherence is low and PrEP could prevent vaccine breakthroughs. Other types of PrEP or microbicides may also be partially protective. When licensed, first generation HIV vaccines are likely to be partially effective. Individuals at risk for HIV may receive an HIV vaccine combined with other biomedical preventions, in series or in parallel, in clinical trials or as part of standard of care, with the goal of maximally increasing HIV prevention. In human studies, it is challenging to determine which preventions are best combined, how they interact and how effective they are. Animal models can determine CBP efficacy, whether additive or synergistic, the efficacy of different products and combinations, dose, timing and mechanisms. CBP studies in macaques have shown that partially or minimally effective candidate HIV vaccines combined with partially effective oral PrEP, vaginal PrEP or microbicide generally provided greater protection than either prevention alone against SIV or SHIV challenges. Since human CBP trials will be complex, animal models can guide their design, sample size, endpoints, correlates and surrogates of protection. This review focuses on animal studies and human models of CBP and discusses implications for HIV prevention.

  10. Healthcare Access and PrEP Continuation in San Francisco and Miami After the US PrEP Demo Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblecki-Lewis, Susanne; Liu, Albert; Feaster, Daniel; Cohen, Stephanie E; Cardenas, Gabriel; Bacon, Oliver; Andrew, Erin; Kolber, Michael A

    2017-04-15

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for prevention of HIV infection has demonstrated efficacy in randomized controlled trials and in demonstration projects. For PrEP implementation to result in significant reductions in HIV incidence for men who have sex with men in the United States, sufficient access to PrEP care and continued engagement outside of demonstration projects is required. We report the results of a follow-up survey of 173 former participants from the Miami and San Francisco sites of the US PrEP Demo Project, administered 4-6 months after study completion. Survey respondents continued to frequently access medical care and had a high incidence of sexually transmitted infections after completion of the Demo Project, indicating ongoing sexual risk behavior. Interest in continuing PrEP was high with 70.8% indicating that they were "very interested" in continuing PrEP. Among respondents, 39.9% reported continuation of PrEP after completion of the Demo Project, largely through their primary care providers and frequently at low or no cost. Variability in access and engagement was seen, with participants from the San Francisco site, those with medical insurance, and those with a primary care provider at the end of the Demo Project more likely to successfully obtain PrEP medication. Two respondents reported HIV seroconversion in the period between study completion and the follow-up survey. Additional effort to increase equitable access to PrEP outside of demonstration projects is needed to realize the potential impact of this evidence-based prevention intervention.

  11. Clinician Attitudes Toward CDC Interim Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Guidance and Operationalizing PrEP for Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Michelle; Zimet, Gregory; Kahn, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prior to issuing formal HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) clinical practice guidelines in 2014, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had released interim guidance for oral PrEP use among adults. Because oral PrEP may be used off-label for youth and may soon be indicated for minor adolescents, we examined the potential adoption of the interim guidance among clinicians who care for HIV-infected and at-risk youth. Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 US clinicians who were recruited through an adolescent HIV research network. The theory-driven interview guide, consisting primarily of open-ended questions, assessed demographics, familiarity with the guidance, attitudes toward the guidance, and attitudes toward the use of the guidance for adult and adolescent patients. Transcripts were analyzed using framework analysis. Most clinicians (11/15) reported that the guidance was compatible with their practice, although several reported that some aspects, particularly frequency of follow-up visits, needed to be tailored to meet their patients' needs. We found variability in clinician reported characteristics of appropriate PrEP candidates (e.g., youth with substance use and mental health issues were noted to be both suitable and unsuitable PrEP candidates) and PrEP use in serodiscordant couples (e.g., whether PrEP would be recommended to a patient whose HIV-infected partner is virally suppressed). Clinician reported steps for initiation, monitoring, and discontinuing PrEP were largely consistent with the guidance. The observed variability in clinician practice with regard to oral PrEP may be reduced through interventions to educate clinicians about the content and rationale for guideline recommendations. PMID:25692683

  12. The Safety of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine for HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Individuals With Active Hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Marc M; Schechter, Mauro; Liu, Albert Y; McManhan, Vanessa M; Guanira, Juan V; Hance, Robert J; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Mayer, Kenneth H; Grant, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) prevents HIV infection. The safety and feasibility of HIV PrEP in the setting of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were evaluated. The Iniciativa Profilaxis Pre-Exposición study randomized 2499 HIV-negative men and transgender women who have sex with men to once-daily oral FTC/TDF versus placebo. Hepatitis serologies and transaminases were obtained at screening and at the time PrEP was discontinued. HBV DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction, and drug resistance was assessed by population sequencing. Vaccination was offered to individuals susceptible to HBV infection. Of the 2499 participants, 12 (0.5%; including 6 randomized to FTC/TDF) had chronic HBV infection. After stopping FTC/TDF, 5 of the 6 participants in the active arm had liver function tests performed at follow-up. Liver function tests remained within normal limits at post-stop visits except for a grade 1 elevation in 1 participant at post-stop week 12 (alanine aminotransferase = 90, aspartate aminotransferase = 61). There was no evidence of hepatic flares. Polymerase chain reaction of stored samples showed that 2 participants in the active arm had evidence of acute HBV infection at enrollment. Both had evidence of grade 4 transaminase elevations with subsequent resolution. Overall, there was no evidence of TDF or FTC resistance among tested genotypes. Of 1633 eligible for vaccination, 1587 (97.2%) received at least 1 vaccine; 1383 (84.7%) completed the series. PrEP can be safely provided to individuals with HBV infection if there is no evidence of cirrhosis or substantial transaminase elevation. HBV vaccination rates at screening were low globally, despite recommendations for its use, yet uptake and efficacy were high when offered.

  13. The Safety of Tenofovir–Emtricitabine for HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Individuals With Active Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, Mauro; Liu, Albert Y.; McManhan, Vanessa M.; Guanira, Juan V.; Hance, Robert J.; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Grant, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with daily oral emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (FTC/TDF) prevents HIV infection. The safety and feasibility of HIV PrEP in the setting of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection were evaluated. Methods: The Iniciativa Profilaxis Pre-Exposición study randomized 2499 HIV-negative men and transgender women who have sex with men to once-daily oral FTC/TDF versus placebo. Hepatitis serologies and transaminases were obtained at screening and at the time PrEP was discontinued. HBV DNA was assessed by polymerase chain reaction, and drug resistance was assessed by population sequencing. Vaccination was offered to individuals susceptible to HBV infection. Results: Of the 2499 participants, 12 (0.5%; including 6 randomized to FTC/TDF) had chronic HBV infection. After stopping FTC/TDF, 5 of the 6 participants in the active arm had liver function tests performed at follow-up. Liver function tests remained within normal limits at post-stop visits except for a grade 1 elevation in 1 participant at post-stop week 12 (alanine aminotransferase = 90, aspartate aminotransferase = 61). There was no evidence of hepatic flares. Polymerase chain reaction of stored samples showed that 2 participants in the active arm had evidence of acute HBV infection at enrollment. Both had evidence of grade 4 transaminase elevations with subsequent resolution. Overall, there was no evidence of TDF or FTC resistance among tested genotypes. Of 1633 eligible for vaccination, 1587 (97.2%) received at least 1 vaccine; 1383 (84.7%) completed the series. Conclusions: PrEP can be safely provided to individuals with HBV infection if there is no evidence of cirrhosis or substantial transaminase elevation. HBV vaccination rates at screening were low globally, despite recommendations for its use, yet uptake and efficacy were high when offered. PMID:26413853

  14. EpCAM nuclear localization identifies aggressive Thyroid Cancer and is a marker for poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Christina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain (EpEx of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM and nuclear signaling by its intracellular oncogenic domain Ep-ICD has recently been implicated in increased proliferation of cancer cells. The clinical significance of Ep-ICD in human tumors remains an enigma. Methods EpEx, Ep-ICD and β-catenin immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies was conducted on 58 archived thyroid cancer (TC tissue blocks from 34 patients and correlated with survival analysis of these patients for up to 17 years. Results The anaplastic (ATC and aggressive thyroid cancers showed loss of EpEx and increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD. In contrast, the low grade papillary thyroid cancers (PTC showed membranous EpEx and no detectable nuclear Ep-ICD. The ATC also showed concomitant nuclear expression of Ep-ICD and β-catenin. Kaplan-Meier Survival analysis revealed reduced overall survival (OS for TC patients showing nuclear Ep-ICD expression or loss of membranous EpEx (p Conclusion We report reciprocal loss of membrane EpEx but increased nuclear and cytoplasmic accumulation of Ep-ICD in aggressive TC; nuclear Ep-ICD correlated with poor OS of TC patients. Thus nuclear Ep-ICD localization may serve as a useful biomarker for aggressive TC and may represent a novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic target for aggressive TC.

  15. Epidermal growth factor pathway substrate 15, Eps15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Chen, H; Iannolo, G

    1999-01-01

    . These strategies have potentially far reaching implications extending to the control of cell proliferation. In this regard, it is of note that Eps15 has the potential of transforming NIH-3T3 cells and that the eps15 gene is rearranged with the HRX/ALL/MLL gene in acute myelogeneous leukemias, thus implicating...... this protein in the subversion of cell proliferation in neoplasia....... multiple copies of the amino acid triplet Aspartate-Proline-Phenylalanine. A pool of Eps15 is localized at clathrin coated pits where it interacts with the clathrin assembly complex AP-2 and a novel AP-2 binding protein, Epsin. Perturbation of Eps15 and Epsin function inhibits receptor-mediated endocytosis...

  16. Longitudinal virtual photons and the interference terms in ep collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Jezuita-Dabrowska, U; Jezuita-Dabrowska, Urszula; Krawczyk, Maria

    2002-01-01

    The importance of the contributions of the longitudinally polarized virtual photon in ep collisions is investigated. We derive the factorization formulae for the unpolarized inclusive and semi-inclusive ep collisions in an arbitrary reference frame. The numerical calculations for the prompt photons production in the unpolarized Compton process (e p --> e gamma X) at the ep HERA collider are performed in the Born approximation. We studied various distributions in the ep centre-of-mass frame and found that the differential cross section for the longitudinally polarized intermediate photon and the term due to the interference between the longitudinal- and transverse- polarization states of the photon are small, i.e. below 10% of the cross section. Moreover, these two contributions almost cancel one another, leading to a stronger domination of the transversely polarized virtual photon, even for its large virtuality. Relevance of the resolved longitudinal photon in a jet production in DIS events at HERA is comment...

  17. Home-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP services for gay and bisexual men: An opportunity to address barriers to PrEP uptake and persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A John

    Full Text Available Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic. Despite the promise of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in reducing HIV transmission risk, barriers for uptake and persistence exist. We sought to identify whether GBM in a nationwide cohort who have not yet initiated PrEP (n = 906 would prefer to get PrEP-related care from a primary care provider (PCP compared to a specialist clinic or provider. We then sought to identify their level of interest and factors associated with preference for using home-based PrEP services (i.e., HB-PrEP, defined to participants as conducting HIV/STI self-testing from home with PrEP prescription mailing after an initial in-person clinic visit. We examined the associations of demographics, sexual HIV transmission risk, concern about frequent medical checkups associated with PrEP, health care access, and PrEP intentions with preferences for healthcare provider type and HB-PrEP. Concern about frequent medical checkups were associated with preferring a PCP for PrEP-related care, but men who perceived a barrier to bringing up the topic of PrEP with a doctor preferred a specialist clinic or provider more than a PCP. HB-PrEP was more appealing for younger men and those engaged in sexual HIV transmission risk, suggesting HB-PrEP could help reach GBM most vulnerable to HIV and in need of PrEP. HB-PrEP expansion has potential to increase PrEP uptake and persistence among GBM, particularly for men with barriers to clinic-based care and higher intentions to initiate PrEP. Clinical guidelines regarding HB-PrEP are needed to expand its use.

  18. PrEP implementation research in Africa: what is new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Frances M; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Sanders, Eduard J; Mugo, Nelly R; Guedou, Fernand A; Alary, Michel; Behanzin, Luc; Mugurungi, Owen; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Of the two million new HIV infections in adults in 2014, 70% occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Several African countries have already approved guidelines for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for individuals at substantial risk of HIV as part of combination HIV prevention but key questions remain about how to identify and deliver PrEP to those at greatest need. Throughout the continent, individuals in sero-discordant relationships, and members of key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender women and injection drug users) are likely to benefit from the availability of PrEP. In addition, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) are at substantial risk in some parts of the continent. It has been estimated that at least three million individuals in Africa are likely to be eligible for PrEP according to WHO's criteria. Tens of demonstration projects are planned or underway across the continent among a range of countries, populations and delivery settings. In each of the target populations, there are overarching issues related to (i) creating demand for PrEP, (ii) addressing supply-side issues and (iii) providing appropriate and tailored adherence support. Critical for creating demand for PrEP is the normalization of HIV prevention. Community-level interventions which engage opinion leaders as well as empowerment interventions for those at highest risk will be key. Critical to supply of PrEP is that services are accessible for all, including for stigmatized populations. Establishing accessible integrated services provides the opportunity to address other public health priorities including the unmet need for HIV testing, contraception and sexually transmitted infections treatment. National policies need to include minimum standards for training and quality assurance for PrEP implementation and to address supply chain issues. Adherence support needs to recognize that social and structural factors are likely to have an important influence

  19. PrEP implementation research in Africa: what is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances M Cowan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Of the two million new HIV infections in adults in 2014, 70% occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Several African countries have already approved guidelines for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for individuals at substantial risk of HIV as part of combination HIV prevention but key questions remain about how to identify and deliver PrEP to those at greatest need. Throughout the continent, individuals in sero-discordant relationships, and members of key populations (sex workers, men who have sex with men (MSM, transgender women and injection drug users are likely to benefit from the availability of PrEP. In addition, adolescent girls and young women (AGYW are at substantial risk in some parts of the continent. It has been estimated that at least three million individuals in Africa are likely to be eligible for PrEP according to WHO's criteria. Tens of demonstration projects are planned or underway across the continent among a range of countries, populations and delivery settings. Discussion: In each of the target populations, there are overarching issues related to (i creating demand for PrEP, (ii addressing supply-side issues and (iii providing appropriate and tailored adherence support. Critical for creating demand for PrEP is the normalization of HIV prevention. Community-level interventions which engage opinion leaders as well as empowerment interventions for those at highest risk will be key. Critical to supply of PrEP is that services are accessible for all, including for stigmatized populations. Establishing accessible integrated services provides the opportunity to address other public health priorities including the unmet need for HIV testing, contraception and sexually transmitted infections treatment. National policies need to include minimum standards for training and quality assurance for PrEP implementation and to address supply chain issues. Adherence support needs to recognize that social and structural factors are likely

  20. Generator step up transformer overvoltage protection in EPS power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrvić Jovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the current state of the overvoltage protection of generator transformers in power plants of the Power Company of Serbia (EPS and gives a critical overview of their overvoltage protection. Recommendations for the purpose of its control are provided. Improved overvoltage protection of power transformers in the EPS is suggested. A critical review of the state of earthing points of the generator transformers is also given.

  1. Safety assessment for EPS electron-proton spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, P.

    1971-01-01

    A safety analysis was conducted to identify the efforts required to assure relatively hazard free operation of the EPS and to meet the safety requirements of the program. Safety engineering criteria, principles, and techniques in applicable disciplines are stressed in the performance of the system and subsystem studies; in test planning; in the design, development, test, evaluation, and checkout of the equipment; and the operating procedures for the EPS program.

  2. Lubiprostone targets prostanoid EP4 receptors in ovine airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, AW

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Lubiprostone, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, is reported to activate ClC-2 chloride channels located in the apical membranes of a number of transporting epithelia. Lack of functioning CFTR chloride channels in epithelia is responsible for the genetic disease cystic fibrosis, therefore, surrogate channels that can operate independently of CFTR are of interest. This study explores the target receptor(s) for lubiprostone in airway epithelium. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH All experiments were performed on the ventral tracheal epithelium of sheep. Epithelia were used to measure anion secretion from the apical surface as short circuit current or as fluid secretion from individual airway submucosal glands, using an optical method. KEY RESULTS The EP4 antagonists L-161982 and GW627368 inhibited short circuit current responses to lubiprostone, while EP1,2&3 receptor antagonists were without effect. Similarly, lubiprostone induced secretion in airway submucosal glands was inhibited by L-161982. L-161982 effectively competed with lubiprostone with a Kd value of 0.058 µM, close to its value for binding to human EP4 receptors (0.024 µM). The selective EP4 agonist L-902688 and lubiprostone behaved similarly with respect to EP4 receptor antagonists. Results of experiments with H89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, were consistent with lubiprostone acting through a Gs-protein coupled EP4 receptor/cAMP cascade. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Lubiprostone-induced short-circuit currents and submucosal gland secretions were inhibited by selective EP4 receptor antagonists. The results suggest EP4 receptor activation by lubiprostone triggers cAMP production necessary for CFTR activation and the secretory responses, a possibility precluded in CF tissues. PMID:20883477

  3. RESEARCH ON POWER CHARACTERISTIC OF THE ELECTRIC FORKLIFT EPS SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yan; Xiao, Benxian

    2015-01-01

    This paper has given the structure, operating principle, and force analysis of electric power steering (EPS) system aimed at a type of forklift. Combing with forklift operating characteristic, three variable power characteristics curve based on steering wheel torque, real-time speed, and load is designed, so is the three dimensional diagram of forklift power gradient by using fuzzy rule. The dynamic model of EPS system and two-degree-of-freedom linear model of forklift dynamics are establishe...

  4. [EPS, SMP and microbial biodiversity under the oligotrophic environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Sun, Bao-Sheng; Sun, Jing-Mei; Zhang, Bin

    2009-05-15

    In order to investigate the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), soluble microbial product (SMP) and microbial biodiversity of the sludge lacking of nutrition, to provide evidence for optimizing MBR's operation and lessening membrane fouling, a series of experiments were undertaken under the oligotrophic environment using the sludge from the MBR of Tianjin University. The contents of EPS and SMP were determined, and microbial biodiversity was analyzed by PCR-DGGE technology and cloning-sequencing. Furthermore, the sequences were used for homology analysis and then the phylogenetic tree was constructed. In the initial stage, the EPS and SMP contents raised from 15.04 mg/g and 0 mg/g to 17.99 mg/g and 3.29 mg/g, respectively. Along with the experiment progress, the EPS content dropped to 2.40 mg/g; but the SMP content varied around 3.5 mg/g. This indicates that the EPS and SMP possess the buffer action towards the variation of the environment, and the microorganism can utilize the EPS and SMP under the condition of oligotrophic. Because of the utilization of the EPS and SMP, the Shannon index of the sludge raised from 0.81 to 1.09. Then, it began to decline and stabilized at 0.95 finally. The clone and sequence results reflect that the microbial structure is very rich, and most of the dominant species are uncultured bacterium. Some of the bacterium, which are mostly belong to Bacteroidetes, Flavobacterium, Saprospiraceae and Firmicutes, can degrade the EPS and SMP by secreting protein and polysaccharide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  5. Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurisicchio, Luigi, E-mail: aurisicchio@takis-it.it [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); BIOGEM scarl, via Camporeale, 83031 Ariano Irpino (AV) (Italy); Ciliberto, Gennaro [Takis, via di Castel Romano 100, 00128 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università degli studi di Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, 88100 Catanzaro (Italy)

    2011-09-22

    Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost.

  6. Structures and Logic of EP Implementation and Administration in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Grunow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes empirical observations gathered during a research project on the implementation of environmental protection (EP policies in China. The project focused on local EP in both urban and rural areas. Policy field analysis was used as a conceptual framework for structuring the observations. The paper develops in three main steps discussing the following topics: 1 Collective problems within the policy field of EP show that EP issues in general are unlike those of other policy fields. Official EP policies in China today resemble those of other countries – but they are separating issues and responsibilities, making local implementation very demanding. 2 China lags behind in its willingness and ability to implement these policies – leading to implementation gaps. To explore the causes and consequences, specific sites in China are described in an extended look at local implementation structures. It was found that although policies in China are basically the same everywhere, the structures for implementing them and the quality of their implementation vary widely with regard to resources, organization, coordination, staff qualifications, personnel placement, and other aspects. 3 Not all of the challenges hampering local implementation of environmental policies were China-specific; however, some of those which are can be described as the macro-context: an ineffective rule of law, insufficient involvement of civil society, and complicated macro-structures of public administration prevent a generally high level of successful EP implementation in China.

  7. "Support Your Client at the Space That They're in": HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Prescribers' Perspectives on PrEP-Related Risk Compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Magnus, Manya; Mayer, Kenneth H; Krakower, Douglas S; Eldahan, Adam I; Hawkins, Lauren A Gaston; Underhill, Kristen; Hansen, Nathan B; Kershaw, Trace S; Betancourt, Joseph R; Dovidio, John F

    2017-04-01

    Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and evidence that most PrEP users do not engage in risk compensation (i.e., increased risk behavior due to a perceived decrease in HIV susceptibility), some healthcare providers report patient risk compensation to be a deterrent to prescribing PrEP. Overcoming this barrier is essential to supporting PrEP access and uptake among people at risk for HIV. To inform such efforts, this qualitative study explored PrEP-related risk compensation attitudes among providers with firsthand experience prescribing PrEP. US-based PrEP providers (n = 18), most of whom were HIV specialists, were recruited through direct outreach and referral from colleagues and other participants. Individual 90-min semistructured interviews were conducted by phone or in person from September 2014 through February 2015, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Three attitudinal themes emerged: (1) providers' role is to support patients in making informed decisions, (2) risk behavior while taking PrEP does not fully offset PrEP's protective benefit (i.e., PrEP confers net protection, even with added behavioral risk), and (3) PrEP-related risk compensation is unduly stigmatized within and beyond the healthcare community. Participants were critical of other healthcare providers' negative judgment of patients and reluctance to prescribe PrEP due to anticipated risk compensation. Several providers also acknowledged an evolution in their thinking from initial ambivalence toward greater acceptance of PrEP and PrEP-related behavior change. PrEP providers' insights about risk compensation may help to address unsubstantiated concerns about PrEP-related risk compensation and challenge the acceptability of withholding PrEP on these grounds.

  8. A Model International Partnership for Community-based Research on Vaccine-preventable Diseases: the Kamphaeng Phet-AFRIMS Virology Research Unit (KAVRU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    group that invented an inactivated cell culture JEV vaccine produced in vero cells that became licensed in the US based on demonstration of...proposed hepatitis E vaccine efficacy trial in Nepal, and organized team at WRAIR to invent replacement JEV vaccine produced in vero cells Rapin Snitbahn...ScienceDirect Vaccine jou rn al hom ep age: www.elsev ier .com/ locat e/vacc ine eview model international partnership for community-based research on

  9. Vaccine Finder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... list . Showing availability for 25,354 locations. Influenza Vaccine Recommended for everyone greater than or equal to ... which one may be right for you! Flu Vaccines Protects again influenza, commonly called flu, a respiratory ...

  10. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vaccine Safety Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) New website and ...

  11. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are also common in babies with rotavirus.Before rotavirus vaccine, rotavirus disease was a common and serious health ... to 60 died. Since the introduction of the rotavirus vaccine, hospitalizations and emergency visits for rotavirus have dropped ...

  12. Development of Biomimetic Robots in the EPS Engineering Programme Capstone Project

    OpenAIRE

    silva, manuel; Malheiro, Benedita; Guedes, Pedro; Ferreira, Paulo; Ribeiro, Maria Cristina; Ferreira, Fernando José; Duarte, Abel José

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of biologically inspired robots as the capstone project of the European Project Semester (EPS) framework. EPS is a one semester student centred international programme offered by a group of European engineering schools (EPS Providers) as part of their student exchange programme portfolio. EPS is organized around a central module (the EPS project) and a set of complementary supportive modules. Project proposals refer to open multidiscipl...

  13. Production and Characterization of the Intra- and Extracellular Carbohydrates and Polymeric Substances (EPS) of Three Sea-Ice Diatom Species, and Evidence for a Cryoprotective Role for EPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shazia N; Cresswell-Maynard, Tania; Thomas, David N; Underwood, Graham J C

    2012-12-01

    Diatoms and their associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are major constituents of the microalgal assemblages present within sea ice. Yields and chemical composition of soluble and cell-associated polysaccharides produced by three sea-ice diatoms, Synedropsis sp., Fragilariopsis curta, and F. cylindrus, were compared. Colloidal carbohydrates (CC) contained heteropolysaccharides rich in mannose, xylose, galactose, and glucose. Synedropsis sp. CC consisted mainly of carbohydrates EPS, compared to high proportions of less-soluble EPS produced by both Fragilariopsis spp. F. curta colloidal EPS contained high concentrations of amino sugars (AS). Both Fragilariopsis species had high yields of hot bicarbonate (HB) soluble EPS, rich in xylose, mannose, galactose, and fucose (and AS in F. cylindrus). All species had frustule-associated EPS rich in glucose-mannose. Nutrient limitation resulted in declines in EPS yields and in glucose content of all EPS fractions. Significant similarities between EPS fractions from cultures and different components of natural EPS from Antarctic sea ice were found. Increased salinity (52) reduced growth, but increased yields of EPS in Fragilariopsis cylindrus. Ice formation was inhibited byF. cylindrus, EPS, and by enhanced EPS content (additional xanthan gum) down to -12°C, with growth rate reduced in the presence of xanthan. Differences in the production and composition of EPS between Synedropsis sp. and Fragilariopsis spp., and the association between EPS, freezing and cell survival, supports the hypothesis that EPS production is a strategy to assist polar ice diatoms to survive the cold and saline conditions present in sea ice. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  14. Contraceptive Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Supotnitsky

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches to develop vaccines with contraceptive effect are being carried out since the 1920s. Since 1972, the contraceptive vaccines are one of the priority programs of the World Health Organization (WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Rockefeller Foundation participates in implementing the program. Openly declared objective of creating such vaccines — the regulation of the population in the Third World countries. There are currently three main directions of contraceptive vaccine design: 1 vaccines targeted at blocking the production of gametes; 2 impairing their function; 3 violating the fertilization process. Contraceptive vaccines for more than 10 years are widely used to reduce fertility and castration of wild and domestic animals. In the commercial realization there are veterinary vaccines Equity®, Improvac®, GonaCon®, Repro-BLOC (based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone; SpayVac™ and IVT-PZP® (based on zona pellucida antigens. Clinical studies have shown effective contraceptive action (in women of vaccines, in which human chorionic gonadotropin is used as an antigen. At the same time, there are found the side effects of such vaccines: for vaccines containing gonadotropin-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone as antigenic components — castration, impotence; for vaccines containing follicle stimulating hormone — oligospermia; zona pellucida antigens — irreversible oophoritis. This paper discusses approaches to detection of sterilizing components in vaccines intended for mass prevention of infectious diseases, not reported by manufacturers, and the consequences of their use. Hidden use of contraceptive vaccines, which already took place, can be detected: 1 by the presence of antibodies to their antigenic components (in unvaccinated by contraceptive vaccines people such antibodies do not exist, except infertility cases; 2 by change in the hormonal levels of the

  15. Safety and immunogenicity of chromatographically purified Vero cell rabies vaccine for intradermal pre- and post-exposure rabies prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong; Sibunruang, Suda; Tantawichien, Thanphet; Angsanakul, Jaruboot; Benjavongkulchai, Maneerat; Limsuwan, Kornvika; Udomchaisakul, Piyada; Khomvilai, Sumana; Sitprija, Visith

    2014-12-01

    Improved rabies pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and PEP) in developing countries uses an economic multi-site intradermal vaccination. To evaluate immunogenicity of chromatographically purified Vero cell vaccine (CPRV) for intradermal PrEP and PEP. The subjects received conventional PrEP with CPRV or PVRV in PrEP study or received intradermal PEP with CPRV or PVRV and rabies immunoglobulin in PEP study. All subjects who received PrEP with CPRV had protective neutralizing antibody (Nab) titers (≥0.5 IU/ml) 14 days after completing vaccination. In PEP study, Nab titers in the CPRV groups reached ≥ 0.5 IU/ml in all subjects by day 14 through day 90 after vaccination. The geometric mean titers of Nab in the CPRV groups had significantly higher titers than the PVRV group on day 14 through day 365 (p < 0.05). No serious adverse reactions were observed. CPRV is safe and immunogenic when given for intradermal PrEP and PEP.

  16. Are We Prepped for Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)? Provider Opinions on the Real-World Use of PrEP in the United States and Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Karris, Maile Y.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Anderson, Christy M.; Philip M Polgreen

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a nationwide survey regarding HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) opinions and practices of infectious diseases physicians. Providers supported PrEP, but very few had provided it. Despite CDC guidance, real-world PrEP practices were highly variable.

  17. EP component identification and measurement by principal components analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R M; McCrary, J W

    1995-04-01

    Between the acquisition of Evoked Potential (EP) data and their interpretation lies a major problem: What to measure? An approach to this kind of problem is outlined here in terms of Principal Components Analysis (PCA). An important second theme is that experimental manipulation is important to functional interpretation. It would be desirable to have a system of EP measurement with the following characteristics: (1) represent the data in a concise, parsimonous way; (2) determine EP components from the data without assuming in advance any particular waveforms for the components; (3) extract components which are independent of each other; (4) measure the amounts (contributions) of various components in observed EPs; (5) use measures that have greater reliability than measures at any single time point or peak; and (6) identify and measure components that overlap in time. PCA has these desirable characteristics. Simulations are illustrated. PCA's beauty also has some warts that are discussed. In addition to discussing the usual two-mode model of PCA, an extension of PCA to a three-mode model is described that provides separate parameters for (1) waveforms over time, (2) coefficients for spatial distribution, and (3) scores telling the amount of each component in each EP. PCA is compared with more traditional approaches. Some biophysical considerations are briefly discussed. Choices to be made in applying PCA are considered. Other issues include misallocation of variance, overlapping components, validation, and latency changes.

  18. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  19. Rotavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Maureen; Bresee, Joseph S.; Gentsch, Jon R.; Glass, Roger I.

    2000-10-01

    The past few years have seen important developments in understanding the epidemiological and virological characteristics of rotaviruses, and rapid progress has been made in rotavirus vaccine development, but further challenges remain before a vaccine is introduced into widespread use. The licensure of the first rotavirus vaccine, a tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine, in the United States in 1998, marked a significant advance in preventing the morbidity associated with rotavirus diarrhea. The association between the tetravalent rhesus-based rotavirus vaccine and intussusception has created significant hurdles as well as new opportunities to study the pathogenesis of rotavirus and rotavirus vaccine infection. Several other rotavirus vaccine candidates are in late stages of development, and results from trials have been encouraging.

  20. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  1. PrEP in Europe - expectations, opportunities and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Sheena Mary; Noseda, Veronica; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the global trend showing a decline in new HIV infections, the number reported in the World Health Organization (WHO) region of Europe is increasing. Health systems are disparate, but even countries with free access to screening and treatment observe continuing high rates of new infections in key populations, notably men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is only available in France. This commentary describes the European epidemics and healthcare settings where PrEP could be delivered, how need might be estimated for MSM and the residual barriers to access. Health systems and government commitment to HIV prevention and care, both financial and political, differ considerably between the countries that make up Europe. A common feature is that funds for prevention are a small fraction of funds for care. Although care is generally good, access is limited in the middle-income countries of Eastern Europe and central Asia, and only 19% of people living with HIV received antiretroviral therapy in 2014. It is challenging to motivate governments or civil society to implement PrEP in the context of this unmet treatment need, which is driven by limited national health budgets and diminishing assistance from foreign aid. The high-income countries of Western Europe have hesitated to embrace PrEP for different reasons, initially due to key gaps in the evidence. Now that PrEP has been shown to be highly effective in European MSM in two randomized controlled trials, it is clear that the major barrier is the cost of the drug which is still on patent, although inadequate health systems and diminishing investment in civil society are also key challenges to overcome. The momentum to implement PrEP in European countries is increasing and provides a welcome opportunity to expand and improve clinical services and civil society support focused on HIV and related infections including other sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections.

  2. ANALISIS PENGARUH ROA, EPS, FINANCIAL LEVERAGE, PROCEED TERHADAP INITIAL RETURN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andhi Wijayanto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Riset ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh ROA, EPS, Financial Leverage dan Proceed terhadap initial return. Initial return diperoleh dengan mengukur perbedaan harga pada hari pertama perdangangan di pasar sekunder dengan harga saat IPO. Penelitian ini menduga bahwa ROA, EPS, Proceed mempunyai pengaruh negatif dengan initial return, disisi lain, Financial Leverage diduga mempunyai pengaruh yang positif terhadap initial return. Data pada penelitian ini terdapat dalam prospectus perusahaan. Sampel diambil dengan menggunakan metode purposive sampling dengan dua kriteria yaitu terdiri dari perusahaan yang IPO selama periode tahun 2000-2006 dan underpriced. Dengan kriteria tersebut, 67 perusahaan dijadikan sebagai sampel. Metode analisis menggunakan regresi berganda. Hasil penelitian ini adalah Earning Per-Share (EPS, dan Proceed mempunyai pengaruh negatif dan signifikan terhadap initial return, sedangkan Return on Assets Ratio (ROA, dan Financial Leverage tidak berpengaruh signifikan terhadap initial return. This research aimed to examine the influence of ROA, EPS, Financial Leverage, and Proceed on initial return. Initial return was measured by the difference between the firm’s stock price on the first day in the secondary market and it’s IPO. This research expected that return on assets ratio (ROA, earning per-share (EPS, and proceed negatively associated with initial return. On other hand, financial leverage ratio expected to positively associate with initial return. Data in this study were obtained from company prospectus, ICMD. Sample had been taken by using purposive sampling method with two criterions such as conducted IPO during period 2000-2006 and underpriced. With criterions, 67 companies obtains as sample. The analytical methods used multiple regressions, the empirical result of this research indicate that EPS, and proceed significantly associated with initial returns. Whereas ROA, and financial leverage ratio not

  3. Contribution characteristics of the in situ extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium to Pb immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningjie; Zhang, Xuehong; Wang, Dunqiu; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Lei; Fu, Linbo

    2017-06-24

    White rot fungi have been extensively reported to have strong adsorption capacity to heavy metal ions, whereas the knowledge of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the fungus has been rarely involved. In this study, the contribution characteristics of 'the in situ EPS in Phanerochaete chrysosporium to Pb immobilization were investigated. First of all, the component and amount of EPS were investigated. It was found that the main component of EPS was carbohydrates, and highest EPS amount was produced at 5 days. In the Pb(2+) immobilization experiments, EPS was demonstrated to play a more important role in immobilizing Pb(2+) at lower initial Pb concentration. pH increase was beneficial for EPS to immobilize Pb. Higher EPS amount increased the Pb removal efficiency at a certain extent, while the specific uptake decreased. The Pb(2+) immobilization by EPS produced at 7 days was most successful.

  4. The USC-OSA-EPS section activities in optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, María.; Cambronero-López, Ferran; Aragón, Ángel L.; Delgado, Tamara; Blanco, Manuel; Gómez Varela, Ana I.; Gargallo, Ana; Williamson, Sandra; Amorín, Adán.; Sánchez-García, Ángel; Bao-Varela, Carmen; Flores-Arias, M. Teresa

    2017-08-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter and USC-EPS Young Minds Section is a group financed by The Optical Society (OSA) and the European Physical Society (EPS). It is formed by PhD and degree students from the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC) and one supervisor of the Faculty of Physics. Its main goal is to promote and diffuse Optics in the society. For this purpose, the group carries out several activities in the academic and non-academic community. The group is also committed to the professional development of our members and motivates the exposition of our work into the scientific community.

  5. Living with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS): the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Helen; Summers, Angela; Beaver, Kinta; Caress, Ann-Louise

    2014-01-01

    Although relatively rare, encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is nonetheless a major concern within the renal community. Risk of developing EPS is associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). High mortality was previously reported, although surgery has since improved outcomes. Research into EPS focuses on imaging and early detection methods, genetics, biomarkers and preventive strategies. No previous studies have examined patients' experiences of EPS. The aim of the present study was to explore the experience of patients who have undergone surgery for EPS in one center in the North of England. A qualitative phenomenological approach, involving in-depth interviews, was adopted. Nine participants were recruited out of a total of 18 eligible. Most participants were interviewed twice over a 12-month period (October 2009 to October 2010). Interpretive data analysis was conducted, following the philosophical tradition of hermeneutics, to draw out themes from the data. Data collection and analysis took place concurrently and participants were sent a summary of their first interview to allow a period of reflection prior to the subsequent interview. EPS presented the most serious challenge participants had faced since developing chronic kidney disease (CKD). Three major themes were identified, each with subcategories. The key issues for patients were related to identification of early symptoms and lack of understanding. The patients' sense of 'not being heard' by health care professionals led to a loss of trust and enhanced their feelings of uncertainty. The enormity of the surgery, the suffering, and what they had to endure had an enormous impact, but an overriding aspect of this experience was also the loss they felt for their independence and for the PD therapy over which they had control. The findings of this study highlight a number of important issues relevant to clinical practice, including lack of information and understanding of EPS, particularly its

  6. Experiment Pointing Subsystems (EPS) requirements for Spacelab missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nein, M. E.; Nicaise, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The goal of the experiment pointing subsystems (EPS) is to accommodate a broad spectrum of instrument types by providing a number of stability and control functions that greatly exceed the capability of the shuttle. These functions include target acquisition, target tracking through wide gimbal ranges, stabilization, simultaneous pointing to one or more targets, instrument rastering, and on-orbit calibration. The experiments will vary widely in size, weight, geometry, and instrument types, and many have not been completely defined. This great diversity of requirements reflects the long term plans of the user community and establishes challenging performance requirements for the EPS.

  7. Sample EP Flow Analysis of Severely Damaged Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); McCown, Andrew William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-12

    These are slides for a presentation at the working group meeting of the WESC SREMP Software Product Integration Team on sample EP flow analysis of severely damaged networks. The following topics are covered: ERCOT EP Transmission Model; Zoomed in to Houston and Overlaying StreetAtlas; EMPACT Solve/Dispatch/Shedding Options; QACS BaseCase Power Flow Solution; 3 Substation Contingency; Gen. & Load/100 Optimal Dispatch; Dispatch Results; Shed Load for Low V; Network Damage Summary; Estimated Service Areas (Potential); Estimated Outage Areas (potential).

  8. Curriculum for EPS Hockey E2-C2-juniors

    OpenAIRE

    Heinonen, Aleksi

    2017-01-01

    Coaching in hockey has changed in direction from coach-centered coaching to player-centered coaching. Nowadays it is more holistic; it is not just coaching tactics and trying to win games at all costs. The way of thinking has changed; instead of the former “what does a team need” way of thinking, nowadays it is more important to ask, “What does an individual need?” This thesis has been written for EPS Hockey E2-C2 juniors and E2-C2 coaches. The Executive Manager of EPS Hockey requested...

  9. Vaccine allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Hee

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the increasing numbers of vaccine administrations are associated with increased reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Whilst the general adverse reactions including allergic reactions caused by the vaccine itself or the vaccine components, are rare, they can in some circumstances be serious and even fatal. In accordance with many IgE-mediated reactions and immediate-type allergic reactions, the primary allergens are proteins. The proteins most often implicated in vaccine allergies are egg and gelatin, with perhaps rare reactions to yeast or latex. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the injectable influenza vaccine can be safely administered, although with appropriate precautions, to patients with severe egg allergy, as the current influenza vaccines contain small trace amounts of egg protein. If an allergy is suspected, an accurate examination followed by algorithms is vital for correct diagnosis, treatment and decision regarding re-vaccination in patients with immediate-type reactions to vaccines. Facilities and health care professionals should be available to treat immediate hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis) in all settings where vaccines are administered.

  10. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  11. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  12. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  13. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  14. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT be ... What is live, attenuated influenza vaccine-LAIV (nasal spray)?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children younger ...

  15. How EPs Record the Voice of the Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Emma; Atkinson, Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Legislation, literature and research have recently advocated the importance of establishing and representing the views of children and young people. This study aimed to establish how Educational Psychologists (EPs) in one authority ascertain and present children's views in written reports. Content analysis was undertaken on the pupils' view…

  16. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) as anti-corrosive additives for coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheerder, J.; Breur, R.; Slaghek, T.; Holtman, W.; Vennik, M.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) are a class of renewable polymers that show interesting anti-corrosive properties and could potentially be used as an alternative for zinc phosphates. When combined with a waterborne styrene-acrylic polymer dispersion (SA-1), exopolysaccharides were shown to give an

  17. The ZInEP Epidemiology Survey: background, design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Müller, Mario; Rodgers, Stephanie; Warnke, Inge; Hengartner, Michael P; Landolt, Karin; Hagenmuller, Florence; Meier, Magali; Tse, Lee-Ting; Aleksandrowicz, Aleksandra; Passardi, Marco; Knöpfli, Daniel; Schönfelder, Herdis; Eisele, Jochen; Rüsch, Nicolas; Haker, Helene; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf

    2014-12-01

    This article introduces the design, sampling, field procedures and instruments used in the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey. This survey is one of six ZInEP projects (Zürcher Impulsprogramm zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung der Psychiatrie, i.e. the "Zurich Program for Sustainable Development of Mental Health Services"). It parallels the longitudinal Zurich Study with a sample comparable in age and gender, and with similar methodology, including identical instruments. Thus, it is aimed at assessing the change of prevalence rates of common mental disorders and the use of professional help and psychiatric sevices. Moreover, the current survey widens the spectrum of topics by including sociopsychiatric questionnaires on stigma, stress related biological measures such as load and cortisol levels, electroencephalographic (EEG) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) examinations with various paradigms, and sociophysiological tests. The structure of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey entails four subprojects: a short telephone screening using the SCL-27 (n of nearly 10,000), a comprehensive face-to-face interview based on the SPIKE (Structured Psychopathological Interview and Rating of the Social Consequences for Epidemiology: the main instrument of the Zurich Study) with a stratified sample (n = 1500), tests in the Center for Neurophysiology and Sociophysiology (n = 227), and a prospective study with up to three follow-up interviews and further measures (n = 157). In sum, the four subprojects of the ZInEP Epidemiology Survey deliver a large interdisciplinary database. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. The design of an ECRH system for JET-EP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Graswinckel, M.; Hellingman, P.; Kooijman, W.; Kruijt, O. G.; Maagdenberg, J.; Ronden, D.; Stakenborg, J.; Sterk, A. B.; Tichler, J.; Alberti, S.; Goodman, T.; Henderson, M.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Fernandez, A.; Likin, K.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Novaks, S.; Piosczyk, B.; Thumm, M.; Bindslev, H.; Kaye, A.; Fleming, C.; Zohm, H.

    2003-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been designed for JET in the framework of the JET enhanced performance project (JET-EP) under the European fusion development agreement. Due to financial constraints it has been decided not to implement this project. Nevertheless, the design

  19. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; et al., [Unknown; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vázquez, M.; Wiggers, L.

    2010-01-01

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb(-1). Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4 < E-T(gamma) < 15 GeV and 0.7 < eta(gamma) < 0.9 for

  20. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Kooijman, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068449542

    2010-01-01

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb(-1). Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4

  1. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablotska, Iryna; Grulich, Andrew E; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Anand, Tarandeep; Janyam, Surang; Poonkasetwattana, Midnight; Baggaley, Rachel; van Griensven, Frits; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2016-01-01

    HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes.

  2. False outliers of the Ep,i - Eiso correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, R.; Izzo, L.; Della Valle, M.; Amati, L.; Longo, G.; Götz, D.

    2017-12-01

    Context. In the context of an in-depth understanding of GRBs and their possible use in cosmology, some important correlations between the parameters that describe their emission have been discovered, among which the "Ep,i - Eiso" correlation is the most studied. Because of this, it is fundamental to shed light on the peculiar behaviour of a few events, namely GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, that appear to be important outliers of the Ep,i - Eiso correlation. Aims: In this paper we investigate if the locations of GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, the two (apparent) outliers of the correlation, may be due to an observational bias caused by the lacking detection of the soft X-ray emissions associated with these GRBs, from respectively the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector on-board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observer and INTEGRAL, that were operating at the epoch at which the observations were carried out. We analyse the observed emission of other similar sub-energetic bursts (GRBs 060218, 100316D and 161219B) observed by Swift and whose integrated emissions match the Ep,i - Eiso relation. We simulate their integrated and time-resolved emissions as would have been observed by the same detectors that observed GRB 980425 and GRB 031203, aimed at reconstructing the light curve and spectra of these bursts. Methods: We estimate the Ep,i and the Eiso parameters from the time-resolved and total integrated simulated spectra of GRBs 060218, 100316D and 161219B as observed by BeppoSAX, BATSE, INTEGRAL, and the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) proposed for the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing (LOFT) and enhanced X-ray Timing and Polarimetry (eXTP) missions. Results: If observed by old generation instruments, GRBs 060218, 100316D, and 161219B would appear as outliers of the Ep,i-Eiso relation, while if observed with Swift or the WFM GRB 060218 would perfectly match the correlation. We also note that the instrument BAT alone (15-150 keV) did measure GRB 060218 as an outlier

  3. Effects of LPA2R, LPA3R, or EP4R agonists on luteal or endometrial function in vivo or in vitro and sirtuin or EP1R, EP2R, EP3R or EP4R agonists on endometrial secretion of PGE and PGF2αin vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPorte, Magen E; Weems, Yoshie S; Arreguin-Arevalo, Alejandro; Nett, Terry M; Tsutahara, Nicole; Sy, Tracy; Haberman, Jade; Chon, Michel; Randel, Ronald D; Weems, Charles W

    2017-06-01

    In previous work, an EP2 prostanoid receptor (EP2R) agonist in vivo increased mRNA expression of luteal LH receptors (LHR), unoccupied and occupied luteal; LHR, and circulating progesterone, while an EP3R or FPR agonist decreased; mRNA expression of luteal LHR, unoccupied and occupied luteal LHR, and; circulating progesterone. An EP4R and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) LPA2R and LPA3R agonists were reported to inhibit luteal function and sirtuins have been proposed to increase prostaglandin synthesis. The objectives were to determine; whether an EP4R, LPA2R, or LPA3R agonist affect ovine luteal function in vivo or; in vitro. In addition, whether sirtuin (SIRT)-1, 2, or 3; LPA2R or LPA3R; or EP1R, EP2R, EP3R, or EP4R agonists affect caruncular endometrial PGF2α or PGE (PGE1+PGE2) secretion in vitro. Day-10 nonpregnant ewes received a single injection of Vehicle (N = 5); an LPA2R (N = 5); LPA3R (N = 6); or EP4R (N = 5) agonist given into the interstitial tissue of the ovarian vascular pedicle adjacent to the luteal-containing ovary to determine effects on circulating progesterone, mRNA expression of luteal LHR, and luteal unoccupied and occupied LHR. In addition, agonists for LPA2R, LPA3R, EP1R, EP2R, EP3R, or EP4R or SIRT-1, SIRT-2, or SIRT-3 activators were incubated with caruncular endometrial slices in vitro to determine their effect on caruncular endometrial PGF2α, or PGE secretion. LPA2R, LPA3R, or an EP4R agonist in vivo did not affect (P ≥ 0.05) luteal weight, circulating progesterone, or occupied luteal LHR. However, an LPA2R or EP4R agonist, but; not LPA3R agonist, in vivo increased (P ≤ 0.05) mRNA expression of luteal LHR. An; LPA2R, LPA3R, or EP4R agonist increased (P ≤ 0.05) luteal unoccupied LHR, but; not occupied LHR. An LPA2R, LPA3R, or an EP4R agonist did not affect (P ≥ 0.05); luteal progesterone secretion in vitro. An LPA2R or LPA3R agonist did not affect (P ≥ 0.05) luteal PGF2α, or PGE secretion in

  4. Constitutive phosphorylation of eps8 in tumor cell lines: relevance to malignant transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matoskova, B; Wong, W T; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    eps8, a recently identified tyrosine kinase substrate, has been shown to augment epidermal growth factor (EGF) responsiveness, implicating it in EGF receptor (EGFR)-mediated mitogenic signaling. We investigated the status of eps8 phosphorylation in normal and transformed cells and the role of eps8...... in transformation. In NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing EGFR (NIH-EGFR), eps8 becomes rapidly phosphorylated upon EGF stimulation. At receptor-saturating doses of EGF, approximately 30% of the eps8 pool is tyrosine phosphorylated. Under physiological conditions of activation (i.e., at low receptor occupancy...... in NIH-EGFR cells. Overexpression of eps8 was able to transform NIH 3T3 cells under limiting conditions of activation of the EGFR pathway. Concomitant tyrosine phosphorylation of eps8 and shc, but not of rasGAP, phospholipase C-gamma, and eps15, was frequently detected in tumor cells. This suggested...

  5. Bacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS): A carrier of heavy metals in the marine food-chain

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Bhosle, N

    The ecological implications of metal binding properties of bacterial EPS and its possible role in the bioaccumulation of pollutants in the marine food-chain was investigated using a partially purified and chemically characterized microbial EPS...

  6. Purification and properties of extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notermans, S; Wieten, G; Engel, H W; Rombouts, F M; Hoogerhout, P; van Boom, J H

    1987-02-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) antigens produced by different mould species were purified and partially characterized. Purification included (NH4)2SO4 treatment, Sepharose CL-4B column chromatography and Con A-sepharose chromatography. The EPS of Penicillium digitatum, Mucor racemosus and Cladosporium cladosporioides showed high antigenic capacities. Immunologically the EPS were partially genus-specific, but cross-reactivity was observed. The EPS antigens produced by species of Penicillium, Aspergillus repens and Geotrichum candidum lost their immunological activity upon heating (100 degrees C) at pH 1.8, while the EPS antigen of M. racemosus, Rhizopus oligosporus and C. cladosporioides were stable under the same conditions. The dominant monosaccharides present in the EPS antigen were mannose, galactose and glucose. The EPS obtained from cultures of M. racemosus and R. oligosporus also contained rhamnose. In the EPS produced by Penicillium spp. and A. repens the galactose residues were determined to be immunodominant.

  7. Sensitization of TRPV1 by EP1 and IP Reveals Peripheral Nociceptive Mechanism of Prostaglandins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moriyama, Tomoko; Higashi, Tomohiro; Togashi, Kazuya; Iida, Tohko; Segi, Eri; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Tomoko; Narumiya, Shuh; Tominaga, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    .... The role of their receptors (EP and IP, respectively) in inflammation has been well documented, although the EP receptor subtypes involved in this process and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain to be elucidated...

  8. Demographic Differences in PrEP-Related Stereotypes: Implications for Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Sarit A; Gamarel, Kristi E; Surace, Anthony

    2017-05-01

    Qualitative interviews about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) stereotypes were conducted with a subsample of 160 MSM who participated in a PrEP messaging study. Negative stereotypes about PrEP users were identified by 80 % of participants. Two types of stereotypes were most common: PrEP users are HIV-infected (and lying about it), and PrEP users are promiscuous and resistant to condom use. Participants' identification of these stereotype categories differed significantly by demographic factors (i.e., race/ethnicity, education). Expanding access to PrEP requires recognizing potential differences in the experience or anticipation of PrEP-related stereotypes that might impact willingness to discuss PrEP with providers, friends, or partners.

  9. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foreign. Most preventive vaccines, including those aimed at cancer-causing viruses ( hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus ), stimulate the ... 9 through 25 for the prevention of cervical cancer caused by HPV. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines. Chronic HBV infection can lead to ...

  10. BCG Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Vanessa; Liu, Jun; Behr, Marcel A

    2014-02-01

    BCG is the collective name for a family of live attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis that are currently used as the only vaccine against tuberculosis (TB). There are two major reasons for studying the genome of these organisms: (i) Because they are attenuated, BCG vaccines provide a window into Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence, and (ii) because they have provided protection in several clinical trials and case-control studies, BCG vaccines may shed light on properties required of a TB vaccine. Since the determination of the M. tuberculosis genome in 1998, the study of BCG vaccines has accelerated dramatically, offering data on the genomic differences between virulent M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and the vaccine strains. While these findings have been rewarding for the study of virulence, there is unfortunately less accrued knowledge about protection. In this chapter, we review briefly the history of BCG vaccines and then touch upon studies over the past two decades that help explain how BCG underwent attenuation, concluding with some more speculative comments as to how these vaccines might offer protection against TB.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FRAME STRUCTURE ON SHALLOW FOUNDATION WITH EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Waluyohadi

    2015-08-01

    test results. A series of parametric study is conducted including the interface element and the variations of size of EPS. The use of EPS underneath shallow foundation do not show the correlation with the seismic response of structure if there is no interface element constructed. Variation of EPS size used were contributed to the acceleration and displacement of  structure with shallow foundation. As the larger size of EPS applied, the larger reduction of seismic responses will be obtained.

  12. PrEP awareness and decision-making for Latino MSM in San Antonio, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Moctezuma; Harris, Allyssa L

    2017-01-01

    Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has been promoted among high-risk populations as an effective HIV biomedical intervention. However, limited research is available on the significance of culturally informed biomedical interventions for Latino MSM. A total of 159 self-administered Internet surveys were completed by Latino MSM ages 21-30 in San Antonio, Texas. The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument that measured Latino MSM attitudes and beliefs towards PrEP, identify associations between demographic factors and PrEP related factors and to suggest culturally appropriate strategies for the promotion of PrEP among the Latino MSM population. Research findings revealed implications for PrEP at the structural and individual level for Latino MSM. Structural level indicators emphasized the importance for raising PrEP awareness among Latino MSM in regards to PrEP related expenses, ameliorating stigmatization of high-risk populations, enhancing access to PrEP informed medical providers, and address mistrust of the government and medical providers role on addressing health disparities among Latino MSM. Overall, the findings for individual factors emphasize the need for patient-centered interventions for Latino MSM. Latino MSM currently on PrEP require supplemental resources to enhance PrEP adherence. Latino MSM not on PrEP require alternate options for PrEP delivery and/or cognitive behavioral approaches minimizing HIV risk behavior for Latino MSM concerned with PrEP toxicity, which may require non-biomedical interventions. Integration of Latino MSM currently on PrEP as peer educators provides a valuable resource for developing culturally informed PrEP interventions for Latino MSM. Peer educators are able to share their experiential knowledge of PrEP contextualized through cultural norms, beliefs, and values.

  13. Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 and Identification of the Exopolysaccharide EPS273 Biosynthesis Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimei Wu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri 273 is a marine bacterium producing exopolysaccharide 273 (EPS273 with high anti-biofilm activity against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Here, the complete genome of P. stutzeri 273 was sequenced and the genome contained a circular 5.03 Mb chromosome. With extensive analysis of the genome, a genetic locus containing 18 genes was predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of EPS273. In order to confirm this prediction, two adjacent genes (eps273-H and eps273-I encoding glycosyltransferases and one gene (eps273-O encoding tyrosine protein kinase within the genetic locus were deleted and biosynthesis of EPS273 was checked in parallel. The molecular weight profile of EPS purified from the mutant Δeps273-HI was obviously different from that purified from wild-type P. stutzeri 273, while the corresponding EPS was hardly detected from the mutant Δeps273-O, which indicated the involvement of the proposed 18-gene cluster in the biosynthesis of EPS273. Moreover, the mutant Δeps273-HI had the biofilm formed earlier compared with the wild type, and the mutant Δeps273-O almost completely lost the ability of biofilm formation. Therefore, EPS273 might facilitate the biofilm formation for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273 while inhibiting the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa PAO1. This study can contribute to better understanding of the biosynthesis of EPS273 and disclose the biological function of EPS273 for its producing strain P. stutzeri 273.

  14. PrEP awareness and decision-making for Latino MSM in San Antonio, Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moctezuma García

    Full Text Available Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP has been promoted among high-risk populations as an effective HIV biomedical intervention. However, limited research is available on the significance of culturally informed biomedical interventions for Latino MSM. A total of 159 self-administered Internet surveys were completed by Latino MSM ages 21-30 in San Antonio, Texas. The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument that measured Latino MSM attitudes and beliefs towards PrEP, identify associations between demographic factors and PrEP related factors and to suggest culturally appropriate strategies for the promotion of PrEP among the Latino MSM population. Research findings revealed implications for PrEP at the structural and individual level for Latino MSM. Structural level indicators emphasized the importance for raising PrEP awareness among Latino MSM in regards to PrEP related expenses, ameliorating stigmatization of high-risk populations, enhancing access to PrEP informed medical providers, and address mistrust of the government and medical providers role on addressing health disparities among Latino MSM. Overall, the findings for individual factors emphasize the need for patient-centered interventions for Latino MSM. Latino MSM currently on PrEP require supplemental resources to enhance PrEP adherence. Latino MSM not on PrEP require alternate options for PrEP delivery and/or cognitive behavioral approaches minimizing HIV risk behavior for Latino MSM concerned with PrEP toxicity, which may require non-biomedical interventions. Integration of Latino MSM currently on PrEP as peer educators provides a valuable resource for developing culturally informed PrEP interventions for Latino MSM. Peer educators are able to share their experiential knowledge of PrEP contextualized through cultural norms, beliefs, and values.

  15. Combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David AG Skibinski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis vaccines into a single product has been central to the protection of the pediatric population over the past 50 years. The addition of inactivated polio, Haemophilus influenzae, and hepatitis B vaccines into the combination has facilitated the introduction of these vaccines into recommended immunization schedules by reducing the number of injections required and has therefore increased immunization compliance. However, the development of these combinations encountered numerous challenges, including the reduced response to Haemophilus influenzae vaccine when given in combination; the need to consolidate the differences in the immunization schedule (hepatitis B; and the need to improve the safety profile of the diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis combination. Here, we review these challenges and also discuss future prospects for combination vaccines.

  16. Heterogeneity of Rabies Vaccination Recommendations across Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Buchy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Asian countries bear the greatest burden of the disease, with a majority (59% of rabies-related deaths occurring in Asia. In order to promote best practices, we summarized national human vaccination guidelines across this region, to highlight differences and similarities and to discuss the aspects that would benefit from updates. National management guidelines for rabies were retrieved from various sources to extract information on rabies pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP, and PEP, booster vaccination, and route of administration. Rabies guidelines recommendations for wound management and PrEP across Asia are broadly aligned to the World Health Organization (WHO guidelines. For PEP, the 5-dose Essen, and the 4-dose Zagreb are the regimens of choice for intramuscular (IM, and the Thai Red Cross regimen for intradermal (ID, administration. Several national guidelines have yet to endorse ID vaccine administration. Most guidelines recommend rabies immunoglobulin in category III exposures. Booster recommendations are not included in all guidelines, with limited clarity on booster requirement across the spectrum of risk of rabies exposure. In conclusion, national recommendations across Asian countries differ and while some guidelines are closely aligned to the WHO recommendations, resource-saving ID administration and use of rational abbreviated schedules have yet to be endorsed.

  17. Biochemical characterization of cyanobacterial extracellular polymers (EPS) from modern marine stromatolites (Bahamas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, T; Decho, A W

    2000-11-01

    A range of biochemical characterizations were used to examine the extracellular polymeric secretions (EPS) of two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. and Oscillatoria sp., isolated from marine stromatolites, Bahamas. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was successfully used to fractionate proteins in EPS. The results suggest that cyanobacterial EPS is composed of a network of macromolecules having different biochemical properties, which may contribute to extracellular functions.

  18. 30 CFR 250.285 - How do I submit revised and supplemental EPs, DPPs, and DOCDs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I submit revised and supplemental EPs... supplemental EPs, DPPs, and DOCDs? (a) Submittal. You must submit to the Regional Supervisor any revisions and supplements to approved EPs, DPPs, or DOCDs for approval, whether you initiate them or the Regional Supervisor...

  19. Sorption of EPS to sediment particles and the effect on the rheology of sediment slurries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Brouwer, J.F.C.; Ruddy, G.K.; Jones, T.H.; Stal, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) are considered to play an important role in the stabilization of intertidal mudflats. In this study the role of EPS as a binding agent in intertidal sediments was investigated. For this purpose two EPS fractions (termed coll-SF and EDTA-SF) were isolated from

  20. Polysulfide and bio-based EP additive performance in vegetable vs. paraffinic base oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twist compression test (TCT) and 4-ball extreme pressure (EP) methods were used to investigate commercial polysulfide (PS) and bio-based polyester (PE) EP additives in paraffinic (150N) and refined soybean (SOY) base oils of similar viscosity. Binary blends of EP additive and base oil were investiga...

  1. Characterization of the Mineral Fraction Associated to Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS) in Anaerobic Granular Sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abzac, D' P.; Bordas, F.; Joussein, E.; Hullebusch, E.; Lens, P.N.L.; Guibaud, G.

    2010-01-01

    The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from four anaerobic granular sludges contain an important mineral fraction (20-77% of the EPS dry weight). The composition of the mineral fraction of EPS depends strongly of the extraction method applied and to a lesser extend of the origin of

  2. The Role of Healthcare Providers in the Roll-Out of PrEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakower, Douglas S.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review To review the most recent studies assessing the preparedness of healthcare practitioners to provide anti-HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and to suggest areas for future implementation research. Recent Findings As PrEP is a bio-behavioral intervention, healthcare providers are likely to play a critical role in implementing PrEP in care settings. Studies suggest that many specialized providers are aware of PrEP and support its provision as a public health intervention, though knowledge and acceptance are less among generalists. Therefore, utilization of PrEP by clinicians has been limited to a few early adopters. Concerns about the efficacy and long-term safety of PrEP, and perceived barriers to prescribing PrEP, could limit prescribing behaviors and intentions. Resistance to performing routine HIV risk assessments by clinicians is an additional barrier to implementing PrEP, though innovative tools to help clinicians routinely perform risk assessments are being developed. Summary Interventions are needed to engage a broader array of healthcare providers in PrEP provision. Utilizing a framework based on diffusion of innovation theory, this review proposes strategies that can be implemented and evaluated to increase PrEP prescribing by healthcare providers. If resources are invested in training clinicians to provide PrEP, then these stakeholders could enhance the use of PrEP as part of a prevention package by primary providers. PMID:26417953

  3. Finding the balance : EpCaM signaling in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    EpCAM is een celadhesie molecuul op het epitheel, het weefsel dat het oppervlak van het lichaam bekleedt. Het is ontdekt als tumormarker. Maar hoe EpCAM precies werkt is onduidelijk. UMCG-promovendus Ulrike Schnell onderzocht het mechanisme van EpCAM signalering in tumorcellen en bij cellen met

  4. Should Earnings per Share (EPS) Be Taught as a Means of Comparing Intercompany Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Charles E.; Clark, Stanley J.; Smith, W. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Accounting standards state that the purpose of presenting earnings per share (EPS) is to provide financial statement users with information on the performance of a single entity. Yet, several textbook authors go further to state that EPS can be used to make comparisons among firms. In this article, the authors show that although EPS comparisons…

  5. A maladaptive role for EP4 receptors in mouse mesangial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-xia Yang

    Full Text Available Roles of the prostaglandin E2 E-prostanoid 4 receptor (EP4 on extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation induced by TGF-β1 in mouse glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs remain unknown. Previously, we have identified that TGF-β1 stimulates the expression of FN and Col I in mouse GMCs. Here we asked whether stimulation of EP4 receptors would exacerbate renal fibrosis associated with enhanced glomerular ECM accumulation. We generated EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- mice, cultured primary WT, EP4(Flox/Flox and EP4(+/- GMCs, AD-EP4 transfected WT GMCs (EP4 overexpression and AD-Cre transfected EP4(Flox/Flox GMCs (EP4 deleted. We found that TGF-β1-induced cAMP and PGE2 synthesis decreased in EP4 deleted GMCs and increased in EP4 overexpressed GMCs. Elevated EP4 expression in GMCs augmented the coupling of TGF-β1 to FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling, while TGF-β1 induced FN, Col I expression and COX2/PGE2 signaling were down-regulated in EP4 deficiency GMCs. 8 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx, WT and EP4(+/- mice exhibited markedly increased accumulation of ECM compared with sham-operated controls. Albuminuria, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (BUN and Cr concentrations were significantly increased in WT mice as compared to those of EP4(+/- mice. Urine osmotic pressure was dramatically decreased after 5/6 Nx surgery in WT mice as compared to EP4(+/- mice. The pathological changes in kidney of EP4(+/- mice was markedly alleviated compared with WT mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant reductions of Col I and FN in the kidney of EP4(+/- mice compared with WT mice. Collectively, this investigation established EP4 as a potent mediator of the pro-TGF-β1 activities elicited by COX2/PGE2 in mice GMCs. Our findings suggested that prostaglandin E2, acting via EP4 receptors contributed to accumulation of ECM in GMCs and promoted renal fibrosis.

  6. Reference buildings for EP calculation studies. Comparison of the EP requirements among Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Herdt, P.; Van Orshoven, D. [Belgian Building Research Institute BBRI, Brussels (Belgium); Pejter, J. [ENVIROS, Prague (Czech Republic); Engelund Thomsen, K. [Danish Building Research Institute, Hoersholm (Denmark); Shemeikka, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Lahmidi, H. [Centre Scientifique et Technique du Batiment, Marne la Vallee (France); Erhorn, H.; Erhorn-Kluttig, H. [Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Stuttgart (Germany); Papaglastra, M.; Santamouris, M. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Zinzi, M.; Citterio, M.; Romeo, C. [Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie l' Energia e l' Ambiente ENEA, Rome (Italy); Spiekman, M.; Westerlaken, N. [Nederlandse Organisatie voor Toegepast-Natuurwetenschappelijk Onderzoek TNO, Delft (Netherlands); Schild, P. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Oslo (Norway); Panek, A. [Narodowa Agencja Poszanowania Energii, Warsaw (Poland); Alvarez, S. [Asociacion de Investigacion y Cooperacion Industrial de Andalucia, Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The choice of the building geometry is often one of the first determinations during comparison studies of national energy performance requirement levels among countries in Europe. With this in mind one of the subtasks of ASIEPI has been to gather a set of reference buildings to be able to perform pilots in the comparison study. Two things became clear once we started: on one hand we found that developing an instrument for comparison of EP requirement levels included much more challenging research than the comparison of building shapes. In fact we realized that it was more sensible to use very simple houses to do the comparison with, to minimize the noise created by complex geometry, errors and misunderstandings. On the other hand we also realized that for various calculation studies on European level a set of reference buildings could be very useful. With this in mind we decided not to use the reference buildings for the development of our instrument but still develop the set of reference buildings. The aim of the set of reference buildings is to give an idea of typical houses build in Europe. When we make calculations on European level, we often extrapolate the results of one house, without the realization that houses in Finland might look totally different from houses in Spain. Of course it is not possible to determine one typical house for a whole country. But with this report a handle is given for information on the variety of typical houses in Europe. During the collection of information, we noticed that different countries use different methods to calculate building areas, for instance some countries use outer measure, where others use inner measures or heart-to-heart (centre-to-centre) measures. To be able to compare the measures of the different houses in the reference set we gathered two types of measures: measures determined in accordance with the national approach of the specific country and measures determined in a uniform way for all buildings, being a

  7. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines Print The meningococcal vaccines protect ...

  8. Adsorption of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in different sludges: Effect of EPS fractional polarity on binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liangliang; Li, Yang; Noguera, Daniel R; Zhao, Ningbo; Song, Yue; Ding, Jing; Zhao, Qingliang; Cui, Fuyi

    2017-01-05

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in sludge samples played a major role in heavy metals removal during wastewater treatment. In this study, the binding quality, adsorption mechanism, as well as the chemical fractional contribution of the sludge EPS from activated sludge, anaerobic granular sludge and anaerobic flocculent sludge to the adsorption of Zn(2+) and Cu(2+) was investigated. For all three sludge samples, Cu(2+) could be more easily adsorbed than Zn(2+), and EPS extracted from the anaerobic granular sludge exhibited a relatively higher adsorption capacity than that of anaerobic flocculent sludge and activated sludge. Specifically, hydrophobic EPS of the activated sludge and anaerobic flocculent sludge was more efficient in adsorbing Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) than that of the hydrophilic EPS. However, hydrophilic EPS in anaerobic granular sludge played a greater role in heavy metals removal. The adsorption of those two heavy metals onto the unfractionated and hydrophobic EPS could be better described by the Langmuir isotherm, while Freundlich models fitted hydrophilic EPS. In addition, the effect of the heavy metals adsorption on the spectrum characteristics of the sludge EPS was also explored by analysis of FT-IR and fluorescent spectra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Are We Prepped for Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)? Provider Opinions on the Real-World Use of PrEP in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karris, Maile Y.; Beekmann, Susan E.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Anderson, Christy M.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine (Truvada) has demonstrated efficacy in placebo-controlled clinical trials involving men who have sex with men, high-risk heterosexuals, serodiscordant couples, and intravenous drug users. To assist in the real-world provision of PrEP, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released guidance documents for PrEP use. Methods. Adult infectious disease physicians were surveyed about their opinions and current practices of PrEP through the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Geographic information systems analysis was used to map out provider responses across the United States. Results. Of 1175 EIN members across the country, 573 (48.8%) responded to the survey. A majority of clinicians supported PrEP but only 9% had actually provided it. Despite CDC guidance, PrEP practices were variable and clinicians reported many barriers to its real-world provision. Conclusions. The majority of adult infectious disease physicians across the United States and Canada support PrEP but have vast differences of opinion and practice, despite the existence of CDC guidance documents. The success of real-world PrEP will likely require multifaceted programs addressing barriers to its provision and will be assisted with the development of comprehensive guidelines for real-world PrEP. PMID:24319083

  10. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) floats for surveillance of Ochlerotatus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jamesina J; Crans, Wayne J

    2003-12-01

    Blocks of expanded polystyrene (EPS) were placed in a variety of habitats to investigate their potential as an egg-collection device for container-dwelling Aedes and Ochlerotatus species. Eggs from Ochlerotatus japonicus, Oc. triseriatus, Oc. hendersoni, and Aedes albopictus were collected with EPS floats. The float provides an inexpensive, low-maintenance alternative to the Centers for Disease Control ovitrap for sampling container-dwelling mosquito species that are important vectors of disease. Eggs collected on the floats have many potential applications, including use in routine population surveillance; detection of Oc. japonicus, Ae. albopictus, and other container-dwelling species in new areas; species distribution studies; natural transovarial transmission studies; ovipositional studies; collection of local field populations for insecticide resistance assays; assessment of adulticiding efficacy; and establishment of new laboratory colonies.

  11. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   DESY and INFN physicists win 2011 Enrico Fermi prize The 2011 Enrico Fermi prize of the Italian Physical Society (Società Italiana di Fisica, SIF) has been awarded, for work in the field of experimental particle physics, to Dieter Haidt of the DESY Laboratory at Hamburg and to Antonino Pullia of the University of Milano Bicocca and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, “for their fundamental contribution to the discovery of weak neutral currents with the Gargamelle bubble chamber at CERN”. The Enrico Fermi Prize is awarded yearly to members of the society who especially honour physics by their discoveries. For more information on the prize, please visit the Italian Physical Society website.   Consultation on the future of European Uni...

  12. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   European Physical Society Physics Education Division Since 2000, the European Physical Society’s Physics Education Division has been contributing to awareness of the relevance of physics in everyday culture, to interaction amongst schools and universities and to a better quality of physics teaching at all levels. The Physics Education Division achieves this by addressing and promoting physics, the continued education of teachers, large scale educational changes – such as the Bologna process – and successful new teaching methods, taking into account differences and similarities in the European education systems. Since 2008, their More Understanding with Simple Experiments (MUSE) project has offered teachers and researchers a set of nine research-bas...

  13. Search for Leptoquark Bosons in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Leiner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-01-01

    A search for scalar and vector leptoquarks coupling to first generation fermions is performed using the e^+p and e^-p scattering data collected by the H1 experiment between 1994 and 2000. The data correspond to a total integrated luminosity of 117 pb^{-1}. No evidence for the direct or indirect production of such particles is found in data samples with a large transverse momentum final state electron or with large missing transverse momentum. Constraints on leptoquark models are established. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength, leptoquarks with masses up to 275-325 GeV are ruled out. These limits improve and supercede earlier H1 limits based on subsamples of the data used here.

  14. e-EPS News: Highlights from the European Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   Conseil de Physique Solvay centenary One hundred years ago the celebrated first Conseil de Physique Solvay took place in Brussels, with the participation of the leading physicists of the time. It marked a profound rupture between the old classical physics and the new quantum physics that described the strange behaviour of Nature at the microscopic level. The conference was one of the most important events in the advent of the quantum revolution; no such physics conference since has acquired the same legendary status. To celebrate the centenary of this unique conference, the International Solvay Institutes are organizing a series of exceptional events that will make Brussels the world capital of physics for ten days in October. For more information, please visit the S...

  15. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Nicholass, D; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Jechow, M; Pavel, N; Yagues-Molina, A G; Antonelli, S; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Bindi, M; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Polini, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Jakob, H P; Jüngst, M; Kind, O M; Nuncio-Quiroz, A E; Paul, E; Renner, R; Samson, U; Schonberg, V; Shehzadi, R; Wlasenko, M; Brook, N H; Heath, G P; Morris, J D; Capua, M; Fazio, S; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Tassi, E; Kim, J Y; Ibrahim, Z A; Kamaluddin, B; Wan-Abdullah, W A T; Ning, Y; Ren, Z; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Lukasik, J; Przybycien, M; Suszycki, L; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Adler, V; Behrens, U; Blohm, C; Bonato, A; Borras, K; Ciesielski, R; Coppola, N; Drugakov, V; Fang, S; Fourletova, J; Geiser, A; Gladkov, D; Göttlicher, P; Grebenyuk, J; Gregor, I; Haas, T; Hain, W; Huttmann, A; Kahle, B; Katkov, I I; Klein, U; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Lobodzinska, E; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Miglioranzi, S; Montanari, A; Namsoo, T; Notz, D; Rinaldi, L; Roloff, P; Rubinsky, I; Santamarta, R; Schneekloth, U; Spiridonov, A; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Theedt, T; Wolf, G; Wrona, K; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Lohmann, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Dobur, D; Karstens, F; Vlasov, N N; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Dunne, W; Forrest, M; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Papageorgiu, K; Holm, U; Klanner, R; Lohrmann, E; Schleper, P; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Sztuk, J; Stadie, H; Turcato, M; Foudas, C; Fry, C; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Matsumoto, T; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Aushev, V; Borodin, M; Kozulia, A; Lisovyi, M; Son, D; De Favereau, J; Piotrzkowski, K; Barreiro, F; Glasman, C; Jiménez, M; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Ron, E; Soares, M; Terron, J; Zambrana, M; Corriveau, F; Liu, C; Walsh, R; Zhou, C; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Dolgoshein, B A; Sosnovtsev, V; Stifutkin, A; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Gladilin, L K; Khein, L A; Korzhavina, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Zotkin, D S; Zotkin, S A; Abt, I; Büttner, C; Caldwell, A; Kollar, D; Schmidke, W B; Sutiak, J; Grigorescu, G; Keramidas, A; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Pellegrino, A; Tiecke, H; Vázquez, M; Wiggers, L; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Lee, A; Ling, T Y; Allfrey, P D; Bell, M A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Fos-ter, B; Korcsak-Gorzo, K; Oliver, K; Patel, S; Roberfroid, V; Robertson, A; Straub, P B; Uribe-Estrada, C; Walczak, R; Bellan, P; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Oh, B Y; Raval, A; Ukleja, J; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, G; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Cole, J E; Hart, J C; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Ingbir, R; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Smith, O; Stern, A; Kuze, M; Maeda, J; Hori, R; Kagawa, S; Okazaki, N; Shimizu, S; Tawara, T; Hamatsu, R; Kaji, H; Kitamura, S; Ota, O; Ri, Y D; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Arneodo, M; Costa, M; Ruspa, M; Fourletov, S; Martin, J F; Stewart, T P; Boutle, S K; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Jones, T W; Loizides, J H; Wing, M; Brzozowska, B; Ciborowski, J; Grzelak, G; Kulinski, P; Luzniak, P; Malka, J; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Zarnecki, A F; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Giller, I; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Rosin, M; Brownson, E; Danielson, T; Everett, A; Kcira, D; Reeder, D D; Ryan, P; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Wolfe, H; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Cui, Y; Hartner, G; Menary, S; Noor, U; Standage, J; Whyte, J

    2005-01-01

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb-1. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q^2 7.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5 < eta^jet < 1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton.

  16. Search for lepton flavour violation in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, A. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Alexa, C. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)]|[National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2007-02-15

    A search for the lepton flavour violating processes ep{yields}{mu}X and ep{yields}{tau}X is performed with the H1 experiment at HERA. Final states with a muon or tau and a hadronic jet are searched for in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 66.5 pb{sup -1} for e{sup +}p collisions and 13.7 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 319 GeV. No evidence for lepton flavour violation is found. Limits are derived on the mass and the couplings of leptoquarks inducing lepton flavour violation in an extension of the Buchmueller-Rueckl-Wyler effective model. Leptoquarks produced in ep collisions with a coupling strength of {lambda}=0.3 and decaying with the same coupling strength to a muon-quark pair or a tau-quark pair are excluded at 95% confidence level up to masses of 459 GeV and 379 GeV, respectively. (orig.)

  17. e-EPS News: Consultation on European Research, Innovation & Gender

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2011-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing an article by the e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a new collaboration between the two publications.   EPS members have been invited to take part in a Public Consultation on the Future of Gender and Innovation in Europe. The consultation, which is intended to complement the EC Green Paper ‘From Challenges to Opportunities: Towards a Common Strategic Framework for EU Research and Innovation Funding’, will be published and discussed during the first European Gender Summit in Brussels on 8-9 November this year. It is hoped that the consultation – which is being coordinated by genSET and the organisers of the European Gender Summit – will create a better understanding of how Europe might benefit from a more effective mainstreaming of the gender dimension in research, innovation and scientific systems. Responses from the co...

  18. INVESTIGATING THE Ep, i –Eiso CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Amati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between the spectral peak photon energy, Ep, and the radiated energy or luminosity (i.e., the “Amati relation” and other correlations derived from it is one of the central and most debated topics in GRB astrophysics, with implications for physics and the geometry of prompt emission, the identification and understanding of various classes of GRBs (short/long, XRFs,sub-energetic, and GRB cosmology. Fermi is exceptionally suited to provide, also in conjunction with Swift observations, a significant step forward in this field of research. Indeed, one of the main goals of Fermi/GBM is to make accurate measurements of Ep, by exploiting its unprecedented broad energy band from ~8 keV to ~30MeV; in addition, for a small fraction of GRBs, the LAT can extend the spectral measurements up to the GeV energy range, thus allowing a reliable estimate of the bolometric radiated energy/luminosity. We provide a review, an update and a discussion of the impact of Fermi observations in the investigation, understanding and testing of the Ep,i –Eiso (“Amati” relation.

  19. The endocytic adaptor Eps15 controls marginal zone B cell numbers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Pozzi

    Full Text Available Eps15 is an endocytic adaptor protein involved in clathrin and non-clathrin mediated endocytosis. In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster lack of Eps15 leads to defects in synaptic vesicle recycling and synapse formation. We generated Eps15-KO mice to investigate its function in mammals. Eps15-KO mice are born at the expected Mendelian ratio and are fertile. Using a large-scale phenotype screen covering more than 300 parameters correlated to human disease, we found that Eps15-KO mice did not show any sign of disease or neural deficits. Instead, altered blood parameters pointed to an immunological defect. By competitive bone marrow transplantation we demonstrated that Eps15-KO hematopoietic precursor cells were more efficient than the WT counterparts in repopulating B220⁺ bone marrow cells, CD19⁻ thymocytes and splenic marginal zone (MZ B cells. Eps15-KO mice showed a 2-fold increase in MZ B cell numbers when compared with controls. Using reverse bone marrow transplantation, we found that Eps15 regulates MZ B cell numbers in a cell autonomous manner. FACS analysis showed that although MZ B cells were increased in Eps15-KO mice, transitional and pre-MZ B cell numbers were unaffected. The increase in MZ B cell numbers in Eps15 KO mice was not dependent on altered BCR signaling or Notch activity. In conclusion, in mammals, the endocytic adaptor protein Eps15 is a regulator of B-cell lymphopoiesis.

  20. A mathematical model of quorum sensing regulated EPS production in biofilm communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Biofilms are microbial communities encased in a layer of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS matrix provides several functional purposes for the biofilm, such as protecting bacteria from environmental stresses, and providing mechanical stability. Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication mechanism used by several bacterial taxa to coordinate gene expression and behaviour in groups, based on population densities. Model We mathematically model quorum sensing and EPS production in a growing biofilm under various environmental conditions, to study how a developing biofilm impacts quorum sensing, and conversely, how a biofilm is affected by quorum sensing-regulated EPS production. We investigate circumstances when using quorum-sensing regulated EPS production is a beneficial strategy for biofilm cells. Results We find that biofilms that use quorum sensing to induce increased EPS production do not obtain the high cell populations of low-EPS producers, but can rapidly increase their volume to parallel high-EPS producers. Quorum sensing-induced EPS production allows a biofilm to switch behaviours, from a colonization mode (with an optimized growth rate), to a protection mode. Conclusions A biofilm will benefit from using quorum sensing-induced EPS production if bacteria cells have the objective of acquiring a thick, protective layer of EPS, or if they wish to clog their environment with biomass as a means of securing nutrient supply and outcompeting other colonies in the channel, of their own or a different species. PMID:21477365

  1. Hepatitis A outbreak in HIV-infected MSM and in PrEP-using MSM despite a high level of immunity, Lyon, France, January to June 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charre, Caroline; Ramière, Christophe; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Chidiac, Christian; Zoulim, Fabien; Godinot, Matthieu; Koffi, Joseph; Scholtès, Caroline; Livrozet, Jean-Michel; Cotte, Laurent

    2017-01-01

    Since 2016, an increase in the number of hepatitis A cases affecting mainly men who have sex with men (MSM) has been reported in low endemic countries in Europe. We calculated the attack rate in Lyon, France, in populations considered at high-risk: HIV-infected MSM and HIV-negative MSM receiving HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). In these populations, high level of immunity did not prevent the outbreak, indicating that vaccination should be reinforced, particularly in younger individuals. PMID:29208161

  2. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): a review of current knowledge of oral systemic HIV PrEP in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Christoph D; Boesecke, Christoph; Zink, Alexander; Jessen, Heiko; Stellbrink, Hans-Jürgen; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Esser, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Despite established HIV prevention strategies and broadly available diagnostic strategies in developed western countries, rates of HIV new infections remain high. Alternative strategies for HIV prevention, particularly among men who have sex with men (MSM), are crucial. HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been discussed as one additional option that this review seeks to explore. An online search identifying PrEP-relevant literature from 1st January 2010 to 1st August, 2015 was performed. The iPrEx study, first published in 2010, demonstrated a reduction in relative risk (RRR) of HIV seroconversion of 44 % for continuous PrEP with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC) in MSM. The efficacy of PrEP has been confirmed for continuous PrEP in the PROUD study and for intermittent PrEP in the IPERGAY study (RRR = 86 % in both studies). The PrEP was well tolerated in all studies, and the evolution of HIV resistance has been low. Compensatory increased sexual risk behavior was not observed in recent studies. In contrast to the high efficacy of risk reduction for HIV transmission in MSM, the results of TDF PrEP and TDF/FTC PrEP studies using microbicidal agents or pills among heterosexual women were different (RRR 6-75 %). Continuous and intermittent PrEP demonstrated high efficacy in preventing HIV seroconversion, notably among MSM. PrEP was well tolerated. Adherence was critical for high efficacy in all studies. Further studies to evaluate implementation strategies and cost-effectiveness in different risk populations are needed as well as drug approval in Europe.

  3. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  4. Flu Vaccine Safety Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Flu Vaccine Safety Information Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español ... of flu vaccines monitored? Egg Allergy Are flu vaccines safe? Flu vaccines have good safety record. Hundreds ...

  5. Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Thimerosal in Flu Vaccine Questions & Answers Language: English (US) Español Recommend on ... or fungi from contaminating the vaccine. Do flu vaccines contain thimerosal? Flu vaccines in multi-dose vials ...

  6. Vaccine Basics (Smallpox)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Side Effects of Vaccination Who Should Get a Smallpox Vaccination? Bioterrorism The Threat Preparedness Detection and Response Bioterrorism ... Revaccinees Examples of Major or “Take” Reactions to Smallpox Vaccination Vaccine Adverse Reaction Images Laboratory Personnel Specimen Collection ...

  7. Your child's first vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... multi.html . CDC review information for Multi Pediatric Vaccines: Your Child's First Vaccines: What you need to know (VIS): ... of that vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccines if your child has ever had a severe reaction after any ...

  8. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  9. Risk factors associated with encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis in Dutch EPS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Mario R; Sampimon, Denise E; Lingsma, Hester F; Fieren, Marien W; Looman, Caspar W N; Zietse, Robert; Weimar, Willem; Betjes, Michiel G H

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) with a multifactorial pathophysiology and possible increasing incidence. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the independent associations of PD duration, age, dialysis fluids, and kidney transplantation with EPS. A multicenter case-control study was performed in the Netherlands from 1 January 1996 until 1 July 2007. The population comprised 63 patients with EPS and 126 control patients. Control patients were selected from the national registry and were matched for date of PD start. Associations were analyzed using a log linear regression model. Primary outcome was appearance of EPS. Compared with control patients, patients with EPS were younger at the start of PD (34.7 ± 15.4 years vs. 51.5 ± 14.7 years, p EPS patients than in control patients (78.7 ± 37.8 months vs. 32.8 ± 24 months, p EPS patients (32.7 ± 23.3 months vs. 18.1 ± 15.7 months, p = 0.006). Compared with control patients, more EPS patients underwent kidney transplantation (47 vs. 59, p EPS increased in the year after transplantation to 7.5% from 1.75%. In multivariate regression analysis, cumulative PD duration, age at PD start, transplantation, time from last transplantation to EPS, calendar time, time on icodextrin, and ultrafiltration failure were independently associated with EPS. Transfer from PD to hemodialysis for reasons other than suspected EPS could not be identified as a risk factor for EPS. Duration of PD, age at PD start, kidney transplantation, time since last transplantation, ultrafiltration failure, and time on icodextrin were associated with a higher risk of EPS.

  10. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  11. Social Justice and HIV Vaccine Research in the Age of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Treatment as Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Theodore C.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given competing priorities to support broad implementation of HIV treatment and prevention measures, including TasP and PrEP. We argue that there is prima facie reason to believe that a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine would offer a distinct set of ethically significant benefits not provided by current HIV treatment or prevention methods. It is thereby possible to justify continued support for HIV vaccine research despite tension with priorities for treatment, prevention, and other research. We then consider a counter-argument to such a justification based on the uncertainty of successfully developing a safe and effective preventive HIV vaccine. Finally, we discuss how HIV vaccine research might now be ethically designed and conducted given the new preventive options of TasP and PrEP, focusing on the ethically appropriate standard of prevention for HIV vaccine trials. PMID:24033297

  12. Human Vaccines & Immunotherapeutics: News

    OpenAIRE

    Riedmann, Eva M.

    2013-01-01

    Long-term effectiveness shown for Merck’s chickenpox vaccine Again—no link between vaccines and autism Experimental ovarian cancer vaccine successful in phase 1 Sinovac’s HFMD vaccine meets phase 3 study goal A vaccine for long-suffering cat allergy patients Vaccines are key to breaking infectious disease-malnutrition cycle Cancer vaccine failures due to the adjuvant IFA? Novartis’ typhoid vaccine make good progress

  13. Decrease in zinc adsorption onto soil in the presence of EPS-rich and EPS-poor Pseudomonas aureofaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdova, O Yu; Pokrovsky, O S; Lapitskiy, S A; Shirokova, L S; González, A G; Demin, V V

    2014-12-01

    The adsorption of Zn onto the humic and illuvial horizons of the podzol soil in the presence of soil bacteria was studied using a batch-reactor technique as a function of the pH (from 2 to 9) and the Zn concentration in solution (from 0.076mM to 0.760mM). Exopolysaccharides-forming aerobic heterotrophs Pseudomonas aureofaciens were added at 0.1 and 1.0gwetL(-1) concentrations to two different soil horizons, and Zn adsorption was monitored as a function of the pH and the dissolved-Zn concentration. The pH-dependent adsorption edge demonstrated more efficient Zn adsorption by the humic horizon than the mineral horizon at otherwise similar soil concentrations. The Zn adsorption onto the EPS-poor strain was on slightly lower than that onto EPS-rich bacteria. Similar differences in the adsorption capacities between the soil and bacteria were also detected by "langmuirian" constant-pH experiments conducted in soil-Zn and bacteria-Zn binary systems. The addition of 0.1gwetL(-1)P. aureofaciens to a soil-bacteria system (4gdryL(-1)soil) resulted in statistically significant decrease in the adsorption yield, which was detectable from both the pH-dependent adsorption edge and the constant-pH isotherm experiments. Increasing the amount of added bacteria to 1gwetL(-1) further decreased the overall adsorption in the full range of the pH. This decrease was maximal for the EPS-rich bacteria and minimal for the EPS-poor bacteria (a factor of 2.8 and 2.2 at pH=6.9, respectively). These observations in binary and ternary systems were further rationalized by linear-programming modeling of surface equilibria that revealed the systematic differences in the number of binding sites and the surface-adsorption constant of zinc onto the two soil horizons with and without bacteria. The main finding of this work is that the adsorption of Zn onto the humic soil-bacteria system is lower than that in pure, bacteria-free soil systems. This difference is statistically significant (pEPS

  14. Increased exopolysaccharide production in Lactococcuc lactis due to increased levels of expression of the NIZO B40 eps gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, I.C.; Kranenburg, van R.; Kanning, M.W.; Chong, B.F.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2003-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) play an important role in the rheology and texture of fermented food products. This is the first report demonstrating that homologous overexpression of a complete eps gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis leads to increased EPS production levels. A ninefold-elevated EPS plasmid

  15. Visualization and analysis of EPS glycoconjugates of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus metallicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiyong; Neu, Thomas R; Zhang, Yutong; Bellenberg, Sören; Kuhlicke, Ute; Li, Qian; Sand, Wolfgang; Vera, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated colonies of microorganisms embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). As EPS mediate the contact between cells and surfaces, an understanding of their composition and production is of particular interest. In this study, the EPS components of Sulfolobus metallicus DSM 6482(T) forming biofilms on elemental sulfur (S(0)) were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In order to visualize cell and EPS distributions, biofilm cells were stained with various dyes specific for glycoconjugates, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Biofilm cells on S(0) were heterogeneously distributed and characterized as individual cells, microcolonies, and large clusters up to a hundred micrometers in diameter. The glycoconjugates in biofilms were detected by fluorescence lectin-binding analysis (FLBA). Screening of 72 commercially available lectins resulted in the selection of 21 lectins useful for staining biofilms of S. metallicus (T). Capsular EPS from planktonic cells were mainly composed of carbohydrates and proteins. In contrast, colloidal EPS from planktonic cells were dominated by carbohydrates. Proteins were found to be major components in EPS from biofilms on S(0). Using specific probes combined with CLSM, we showed that extracellular proteins and nucleic acids were present in the EPS matrix. Finally, we showed that S. metallicus (T) cells were embedded in a flexible EPS matrix. This study provides new insights into archaeal biofilms and EPS composition and properties with respect to their interactions with S(0).

  16. Long-term outcome of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) patients in a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahatsu, Aya; Hamada, Chieko; Kaneko, Kayo; Io, Hiroaki; Nakata, Junichiro; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is the most serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) with a high mortality rate. The objective of the present study was to determine the clinical characteristics, the incidence rate, and the long-term outcome of EPS patients compared with control patients. Two hundred and seventy patients with end-stage kidney disease were started on PD from 1987 to 2013 in the Juntendo University Hospital. EPS was diagnosed by clinical findings, radiological findings, and macroscopic inspection at the time of laparoscopy or surgical operation. Patient medical records were analyzed retrospectively, including clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, treatment modality, and outcomes. Using a Kaplan-Meier analysis, we compared the survival rate between EPS patients and control PD patients, matched for age, gender, diabetes, and duration of PD. Among 270 PD patients, 13 patients (4.8 %) developed EPS. The mean duration of PD was 120.5 ± 42.8 months. There were no significant difference in demographic findings between EPS and control PD patients. Among the EPS patients, seven patients died, of which four deaths were directly attributed to EPS. All four patients that had had surgical enterolysis were doing well and had no recurrences. No significant difference in the survival rate between EPS and control PD patients was observed in the Kaplan-Meier analysis. There was no significant difference in the survival rate between EPS patients and control PD patients. It appears that an early diagnosis by laparoscopy and accurate treatment, including surgical enterolysis, might improve mortality.

  17. Composition of EPS fractions from suspended sludge and biofilm and their roles in microbial cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Fang, Fang; Chen, You-Peng; Shen, Yu; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Ji-Xiang; Li, Chun; Guo, Jin-Song; Liu, Shao-Yang; Huang, Yang; Li, Shan; Gao, Xu; Yan, Peng

    2014-12-01

    The adhesion and aggregation properties of microbial cell are closely related to extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In this work, the composition and physicochemical characteristics of EPS in biofilm and suspended sludge (S-sludge) were determined to evaluate their roles in microbial cell aggregation. Raman spectroscopy and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra have been employed to reveal each EPS fraction in different composition. The flocculating capacity of each EPS fraction in the S-sludge shows extraordinary activity, comparing its counterpart in biofilm. Microbial cell surfaces present high hydrophobicity and increased zeta potentials upon EPS extraction. In addition, the respective contribution of EPS to cell aggregating was elucidated. The contribution of combined SEPS and LB-EPS was 23% for S-sludge sample, whereas that was negligible for biofilm sample. The contribution of LB-EPS and TB-EPS were 16% and 30% for S-sludge sample, and -6% and negligible for biofilm sample, respectively. Therefore, EPS promoted the S-sludge cells to aggregate, while in contrast, they showed a negligible or negative effect on the biofilm cells aggregating. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Composition and aggregation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in hyperhaline and municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Gao, Jun-Min; Chen, You-Peng; Yan, Peng; Dong, Yang; Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Zeng, Ni; Zhang, Peng

    2016-05-25

    As important constituents of activated sludge flocs, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play significant roles in pollutants adsorption, the formation and maintenance of microbial aggregates, and the protection of microbes from external environmental stresses. In this work, EPS in activated sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (M-WWTP) with anaerobic/anoxic/oxic (A(2)/O) process and a hyperhaline wastewater treatment plant (H-WWTP) with anaerobic/oxic (A/O) process were extracted by ultrasound method. The proteins and polysaccharides contents in EPS were determined by using a modified Lowry method and anthrone colorimetry respectively to analyze the detail differences in two types of WWTPs. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated proteins and polysaccharides were the dominant components of the two types of EPS, and the aromatic protein-like substances accounted for a larger proportion in EPS proteins. The results of the aggregation test indicated that EPS were good for the sludge aggregation, and the EPS in oxic sludge were more beneficial to sludge aggregation than that in anoxic sludge. Anoxic sludge EPS in H-WWTP showed a negligible effect on sludge aggregation. Comparative study on EPS of different tanks in the M-WWTP and H-WWTP was valuable for understanding the characteristics of EPS isolated from two typical wastewater treatment processes.

  19. Enhancing PrEP Access for Black and Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina; Golub, Sarit A

    2016-12-15

    Implementation of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) programs for populations with highest incidence is critical to reducing new infections in the United States. Black and Latino men who have sex with men (BLMSM) are disproportionately burdened by HIV. We examined differences in perceived barriers and facilitators to PrEP access for BLMSM compared with other men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM who met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria for PrEP (n = 491) completed measures of barriers and facilitators to PrEP at the systems, provider, and individual levels. Multivariate analyses examined differences by race/ethnicity, adjusting for other sociodemographic factors. Compared with other MSM, BLMSM (56% of the sample) were more likely to have public insurance and to access health care via public clinics [adjusted odds ratio(aOR) 3.2, P PrEP (aOR 3.7, P PrEP stigma (aOR 2.3, P PrEP efficacy (aOR 1.6, P PrEP use. Findings suggest specific points of multilevel intervention to increase PrEP access for BLMSM and increase representation of BLMSM along the PrEP continuum of care.

  20. Sorption of ferrous and ferric iron by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from acidophilic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jaime M; Muñoz, Jesús; González, Felisa; Blázquez, Maria L; Ballester, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of acidophilic bacteria Acidiphilium 3.2Sup(5) and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, harvested from the ecosystem of the Tinto River (Huelva, Spain), was investigated. EPS from mixed cultures of both bacteria (EPS(mixed)) and pure cultures of A. 3.2Sup(5) (EPS(pure)) were extracted with ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), electron photoemission (XPS), x-ray diffraction (DRX), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). EPS pure were loaded, in sorption tests, with Fe(II) and Fe(III). The results obtained indicate that the biochemical composition and structure of EPS(mixed) was very similar to that of EPS(pure). Besides, results indicate that EPS(mixed) adsorbed Fe(II) and Fe(III) by preferential interaction with the carboxyl group, which favored the formation of Fe(II)/Fe(III) oxalates. These species were also formed in EPS(pure) loaded with Fe(II)/Fe(III). All this behavior suggested that the sorption of iron by EPS(mixed) was similar to sorption of EPS(pure), which fitted the Freundlich model. Thus, the iron uptake of EPS(mixed) reached 516.7 ± 23.4 mg Fe/g-EPS at an initial concentration of 2.0 g/L of Fe(total) and Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio of 1.0.

  1. Understanding HIV Care Provider Attitudes Regarding Intentions to Prescribe PrEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Amanda D.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Tang, Wenze; Willis, Sarah; Jordan, Heather; Villamizar, Kira; Kharfen, Michael; Kolber, Michael A.; Rodriguez, Allan; Metsch, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising approach to reducing HIV incidence. Thus garnering the support of HIV providers, who are most familiar with antiretrovirals and likely to encounter patients in HIV serodiscordant relationships, to scale-up PrEP implementation is essential. We sought to determine whether certain subgroups of HIV providers were more likely to intend to prescribe PrEP. Methods Surveys were administered to HIV providers in Miami, Florida and Washington, DC. Composite scores were developed to measure PrEP knowledge, experience, and likelihood of prescribing. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to stratify provider attitudes toward PrEP. Results Among 142 HIV providers, 73.2% had cared for more than 20 HIV-infected patients in the prior 3 months; 17% had ever prescribed PrEP. LCA identified two classes of providers (entropy 0.904); Class 1 (n=95) found PrEP less effective and perceived barriers to prescribing it; Class 2 (n=47) perceived PrEP as moderately effective and perceived fewer barriers to prescribing it. Compared to Class 2, Class 1 had significantly less experience with PrEP delivery (t(22.7)=2.88, p=0.009) and was significantly less likely to intend to prescribe to patients with multiple sex partners (20% vs. 43%, p=0.04) and those with a drug use history (7% vs. 24%, p=0.001). Conclusions While most HIV providers found PrEP to be effective, those considering it less effective had limited knowledge and experience with PrEP and had lesser intentions to prescribe. Provider training regarding whom should receive PrEP and addressing potential barriers to PrEP provision are needed if this HIV prevention method is to be optimized. PMID:26247895

  2. EPS-LASSO: Test for High-Dimensional Regression Under Extreme Phenotype Sampling of Continuous Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chao; Fang, Jian; Shen, Hui; Wang, Yu-Ping; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2018-01-25

    Extreme phenotype sampling (EPS) is a broadly-used design to identify candidate genetic factors contributing to the variation of quantitative traits. By enriching the signals in extreme phenotypic samples, EPS can boost the association power compared to random sampling. Most existing statistical methods for EPS examine the genetic factors individually, despite many quantitative traits have multiple genetic factors underlying their variation. It is desirable to model the joint effects of genetic factors, which may increase the power and identify novel quantitative trait loci under EPS. The joint analysis of genetic data in high-dimensional situations requires specialized techniques, e.g., the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO). Although there are extensive research and application related to LASSO, the statistical inference and testing for the sparse model under EPS remain unknown. We propose a novel sparse model (EPS-LASSO) with hypothesis test for high-dimensional regression under EPS based on a decorrelated score function. The comprehensive simulation shows EPS-LASSO outperforms existing methods with stable type I error and FDR control. EPS-LASSO can provide a consistent power for both low- and high-dimensional situations compared with the other methods dealing with high-dimensional situations. The power of EPS-LASSO is close to other low-dimensional methods when the causal effect sizes are small and is superior when the effects are large. Applying EPS-LASSO to a transcriptome-wide gene expression study for obesity reveals 10 significant body mass index associated genes. Our results indicate that EPS-LASSO is an effective method for EPS data analysis, which can account for correlated predictors. The source code is available at https://github.com/xu1912/EPSLASSO. hdeng2@tulane.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Nuclear Ep-ICD expression is a predictor of poor prognosis in "low risk" prostate adenocarcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet Assi

    Full Text Available Molecular markers for predicting prostate cancer (PCa that would have poor prognosis are urgently needed for a more personalized treatment for patients. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule results in shedding of the extracellular domain (EpEx and release of its intracellular domain (Ep-ICD which triggers oncogenic signaling and might correlate to tumor aggressiveness. This study aimed to explore the potential of Ep-ICD and EpEx to identify PCa that have poor prognosis.Immunohistochemical analysis of Ep-ICD and EpEx was carried out in normal prostate tissues (n = 100, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH, n = 83, and prostate cancer (n = 249 using domain specific antibodies. The expression of Ep-ICD and EpEx was correlated with clinico- pathological parameters and disease free survival (DFS.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in PCa in comparison with BPH and normal prostate tissues (p = 0.006, p < 0.001 respectively. For patients who had PCa with Gleason Score less than 7, preserved nuclear Ep-ICD emerged as the most significant marker in multivariate analysis for prolonged DFS, where these patients did not have recurrence during follow up of up to 12 years (p = 0.001.Reduced expression of nuclear Ep-ICD was associated with shorter disease free survival in patients with a Gleason Score less than 7 and may be useful in identifying patients likely to have aggressive tumors with poor prognosis. Furthermore, nuclear Ep-ICD can differentiate between normal and prostate cancer tissues for ambiguous cases.

  4. Search for Excited Quarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A search for excited quarks is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 475 pb^-1. The electroweak decays of excited quarks q* -> q gamma, q* -> q Z and q* -> q W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for first generation excited quark production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on q* production cross sections and on the ratio f/Lambda of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited quark searches.

  5. Search for First Generation Leptoquarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2011-10-25

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb^-1. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength lambda=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  6. E.P.S. HUAYCO: CATÁLOGO

    OpenAIRE

    Mariotti, Francisco; Luy, María; Noriega, Rosario; Zevallos, Mariela; Salazar, Juan Javier; Rodríguez, Herbert; Williams, Armando; Morais, Federico

    2015-01-01

    ARTE AL PASO E.P.S. HUAYCO **************** [Catálogo, p. 1] MANIFIESTO DEL FESTIVAL DE ARTE TOTAL CONTACTA 79. REALIZADO EN BARRANCO. JULIO – 1979. LIMA - PERÚ Las artes tradicionales, la evolución de nuestras expresiones artísticas populares, las artes aplicadas, las técnicas modernas de masificación integradas como acto conceptual con los rituales de la vida diaria, sólo se justifican si logran dinamizar las relaciones del desarrollo histórico rompiendo la inercia de una creatividad toler...

  7. Remember the water--a comment on EPS colligative properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, K; Wybrandt, L; Nielsen, P H

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between water and activated sludge components was examined. Reevaluation of published data on freezing point depression, drying rates and dewatering has been performed. The basis of this has been the assumption that the water/sludge relationship is considered to be a colligative effect. Since the results indicate this to be the case, we suggest that the published concepts of "pools of water" are false. Data on swelling properties of EPS as a function of pH suggests that the colligative properties are largely determined by the counterions of charged polymers and surfaces.

  8. Search for first generation leptoquarks in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-07-15

    A search for first generation scalar and vector leptoquarks produced in ep collisions is performed by the H1 experiment at HERA. The full H1 data sample is used in the analysis, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 446 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for the production of leptoquarks is observed in final states with a large transverse momentum electron or with large missing transverse momentum, and constraints on leptoquark models are derived. For leptoquark couplings of electromagnetic strength {lambda}=0.3, first generation leptoquarks with masses up to 800 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level. (orig.)

  9. The design of an ECRH system for JET-EP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoeven, A.G.A.; Bongers, W.A.; Elzendoorn, B.S.Q.

    2003-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been designed for JET in the framework of the JET enhanced performance project (JET-EP) under the European fusion development agreement. Due to financial constraints it has been decided not to implement this project. Nevertheless, the design...... the control of neo-classical tearing modes. The paper will concentrate on: the power-supply and modulation system, including series IGBT switches, to enable independent control of each gyrotron and an all-solid-state body power supply to stabilize the gyrotron output power and to enable fast modulations up...

  10. Imagerie mentale en sport et applications en EPS

    OpenAIRE

    Robin, Nicolas; Flochlay, Carine

    2017-01-01

    International audience; L’imagerie mentale, pratiquée depuis longtemps dans le domaine sportif, et avec des effets avérés sur la réussite, peut également être bénéfique dans le domaine de l’EPS. L’intérêt de ce moyen est de représenter un excellent complément pour l’apprentissage d’habiletés motrices, de techniques, de séquences ou d’enchainements de mouvements.

  11. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  12. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  13. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines: The Basics Adult Vaccination Resources for Healthcare Professionals ... Influenza vaccine each year to protect against seasonal flu Tdap vaccine to protect against whooping cough and ...

  14. Hookworm vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemert, David J; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Hotez, Peter J

    2008-01-15

    Hookworm infection caused by the soil-transmitted nematodes Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale is one of the most common parasitic infections worldwide. Although not directly responsible for substantial mortality, it causes significant morbidity in the form of chronic anemia and protein malnutrition. Current global control efforts based on periodic mass anthelmintic administration are unsustainable, and new control strategies must be developed. This review describes progress in the development of vaccines against hookworm infection, including the preclinical and initial clinical testing of the N. americanus Ancylostoma Secreted Protein-2 Hookworm Vaccine. Plans call for eventual development of a vaccine that will combine at least 2 hookworm antigens--one targeting the larval stage of the life cycle and another targeting the adult worm living in the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Mucosal vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Mevyn; Diniz, Mariana O; Roussel, Helene; Tran, Thi; Ferreira, Luis CS; Badoual, Cecile; Tartour, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The mucosal immune system displays several adaptations reflecting the exposure to the external environment. The efficient induction of mucosal immune responses also requires specific approaches, such as the use of appropriate administration routes and specific adjuvants and/or delivery systems. In contrast to vaccines delivered via parenteral routes, experimental, and clinical evidences demonstrated that mucosal vaccines can efficiently induce local immune responses to pathogens or tumors located at mucosal sites as well as systemic response. At least in part, such features can be explained by the compartmentalization of mucosal B and T cell populations that play important roles in the modulation of local immune responses. In the present review, we discuss molecular and cellular features of the mucosal immune system as well as novel immunization approaches that may lead to the development of innovative and efficient vaccines targeting pathogens and tumors at different mucosal sites. PMID:25424921

  16. Rome III functional dyspepsia subdivision in PDS and EPS: recognizing postprandial symptoms reduces overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, F; Holvoet, L; Tack, J

    2015-08-01

    The Rome III consensus proposed to subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) into two groups: meal-related dyspepsia or postprandial distress syndrome (PDS), and meal-unrelated dyspepsia or epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). However, in clinical practice, overlap between both has been reported to be as high as 50%, thereby hampering clinical applicability. Although EPS is referred to as meal-unrelated dyspepsia, relationship of symptoms to meal ingestion in this category is not formally addressed in the Rome III criteria. The aim of our study was to investigate whether taking into account the relationship of epigastric pain and nausea to meal ingestion may help to improve separation between EPS and PDS. Consecutive ambulatory tertiary-care patients with epigastric symptoms filled out Rome III gastro-duodenal questionnaires with supplementary questions. Those fulfilling Rome III FD criteria and a negative endoscopy were identified and subdivided into 'pure' PDS patients (i.e., meeting criteria for PDS without EPS symptoms), 'pure' EPS (i.e., meeting criteria for EPS without PDS symptoms), and overlapping PDS-EPS (i.e., symptoms of both PDS and EPS). Out of 1029 patients coming to endoscopy, 199 patients (73% females, 45.9 ± 1.0 years, BMI: 23.7 ± 0.35) fulfilled Rome III FD diagnostic criteria, and could be subdivided into pure PDS (69% females, 49 ± 2 years, BMI: 24.2 ± 0.61), pure EPS (59% females, 47.4 ± 2 years, BMI: 23.2 ± 0.97) and overlapping PDS-EPS (64% females, age 43 ± 5 years, BMI: 26 ± 0.46). Compared with pure EPS patients, the overlap PDS-EPS patients were characterized by a higher occurrence of postprandial epigastric pain (70% vs 31%, p EPS patients reported a higher occurrence of postprandial nausea (23% vs 0%, p EPS, and 36% overlapping PDS-EPS patients. EPS and PDS symptoms frequently coexist in FD patients, with postprandial symptoms substantially contributing to the overlap. A more rigorous linking of postprandially occurring symptoms to PDS

  17. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Zablotska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion: Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion of MSM who are aware of PrEP are willing to use it. Key PrEP implementation barriers include poor knowledge about PrEP, limited access to PrEP, weak or non-existent HIV prevention programmes for MSM and other key populations, high cost of PrEP, stigma and discrimination against key populations and restrictive laws in some countries. Only several clinical trials, demonstration projects and a few larger-scale implementation studies have been implemented so far in Thailand and Australia. However, novel approaches to PrEP implementation have emerged: researcher-, facility- and community-led models of care, with PrEP services for fee and for free. The WHO consolidated guidelines on HIV testing, treatment and prevention call for an expanded access to PrEP worldwide and have provided guidance on PrEP implementation in the region. Some countries like Australia have released national PrEP guidelines. There are growing community leadership and consultation processes to initiate PrEP implementation in Asia and the Pacific. Conclusions: Countries of the Asia-Pacific region will benefit from adding PrEP to their HIV prevention packages, but for many this is a critical step that requires resourcing. Having an impact on the HIV epidemic requires investment. The next years should see the region transitioning from limited PrEP implementation projects to growing access to PrEP and expansion of HIV prevention programmes.

  18. Social Justice and HIV Vaccine Research in the Age of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis and Treatment as Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Theodore C.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The advent of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and treatment as prevention (TasP) as means of HIV prevention raises issues of justice concerning how most fairly and equitably to apportion resources in support of the burgeoning variety of established HIV treatment and prevention measures and further HIV research, including HIV vaccine research. We apply contemporary approaches to social justice to assess the ethical justification for allocating resources in support of HIV vaccine research given...

  19. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Takayuki [KEK; Funahashi, Y. [KEK; Hayano, H. [KEK; Kato, Seigo [KEK; Nishiwaki, Michiru [KEK; Sawabe, Motoaki [KEK; Ueno, Kenji [KEK; Watanabe, K. [KEK; Antoine, Claire [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Berry, Stefurn [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Eozenou, F. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Gasser, Y. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Visentin, B. [CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette; Clemens, William A. [JLAB; Geng, Rongli [JLAB; Manus, Robert [JLAB; Tyagi, Puneet [GUAS/AS, Ibaraki

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  20. Comparative Research on EPS Extraction from Mechanical Dewatered Sludge with Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyun Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to find a suitable extracellular polymer substance (EPS extraction method for mechanical dewatered sludge, four different methods including EDTA extraction, alkali extraction, acid extraction, ultrasonic extraction method have been used in extracting EPS from belt filter dewatered sludge. The contents of polysaccharide and proteins extracted from the dewatered sludge by different extraction methods are also analyzed. The results indicated that EDTA method and alkali extraction method are more suitable for dewatered sludge with more EPS content and less cell damage, while sulfuric acid extraction and ultrasonic extraction were poorer with obvious cell lysis shown by higher DNA content in extracted EPS. Contents of proteins and polysaccharide in EPS extracted from mechanical dewatered sludge, is at the contents between that in EPS extracted from activated sludge and anaerobic digestion sludge.

  1. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cholera, hepatitis-B, and many more are in the process of development. Food vaccines may also help to suppress autoimmunity disorders such as Type-1 Diabetes. Key words: Edible vaccines, oral vaccines, antigen expression, food vaccines. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 2 (12), pp. 679-683, December 2003 ...

  2. Green revolution vaccines, edible vaccines | Tripurani | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible vaccines are sub-unit vaccines where the selected genes are introduced into the plants and the transgenic plant is then induced to manufacture the encoded protein. Edible vaccines are mucosal-targeted vaccines where stimulation of both systematic and mucosal immune network takes place. Foods under study ...

  3. PrEP Use During Periods of HIV Risk Among East African Women in Serodiscordant Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyra, Maria; Haberer, Jessica E; Heffron, Renee; Kidoguchi, Lara; Brown, Elizabeth R; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Asiimwe, Stephen; Celum, Connie; Katabira, Elly; Mugo, Nelly R; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-09-29

    PrEP is efficacious for African women at risk for HIV, but data on adherence outside of clinical trials are sparse. We describe the persistence and execution of PrEP use among women participating in a large open-label PrEP demonstration project, particularly during periods of HIV risk. & Methods: 310 HIV-uninfected women in HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda were offered and accepted PrEP. Electronic monitoring caps were used to measure daily PrEP adherence. Time on PrEP while at risk for HIV (when the HIV-infected partner was on ART PrEP were calculated and compared among older and younger (PrEP during their entire risk period and 24% stopped but re-started PrEP during their risk period. While on PrEP, women took ≥6 doses/week for 78% of weeks (67% of weeks for women PrEP successfully over sustained periods of risk. While young women had lower adherence than older women, they achieved strong protection, suggesting women can align PrEP use to periods of risk and imperfect adherence can still provide substantial benefit.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License 4.0 (CCBY-NC), where it is permissible to download, share, remix, transform, and buildup the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be used commercially without permission from the journal.

  4. Integral Benchmark Data for Nuclear Data Testing Through the ICSBEP & IRPhEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2013-10-01

    The status of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was last discussed directly with the nuclear data community at ND2007. Since ND2007, integral benchmark data that are available for nuclear data testing have increased significantly. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP is discussed and selected benchmark configurations that have been added to the ICSBEP and IRPhEP Handbooks since ND2007 are highlighted.

  5. Highlights from e-EPS: Physics for fun

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   For many who measure time according to a university calendar, summer is a time to unwind. My experience, however, is that it is rare to find physics departments empty over the summer break. Many of us use the vacation period without classes to catch up with research, and I imagine that a colleague of mine speaks for many when he says that summer provides him with the freedom to do the physics he wants to do, and this is all the break needed to prepare for the next academic year! This reminds me a little of the Wobbling Plate story in “Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman”? When Richard Feynman had just started at Cornell following his time at Los Alamos, he felt burned out, and was wondering why he did not feel the same enthusiasm for physics t...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against accumulation-associated protein affect EPS biosynthesis and enhance bacterial accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Hu

    Full Text Available Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn(2+-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5 were generated. MAb(18B6 inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9 enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb(18B6, which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb(25C11 and MAb(20B9. Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections.

  7. PREFACE: The EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Roger

    2008-03-01

    HEPP2007, the EPS High Energy Particle Physics Conference, was held in Manchester from July 19-26 2007. It brought together 580 delegates across the whole subject: from string theorists to detector technologists, from young postgraduate students to senior professors. Geographically they came from the UK, from the rest of Europe, from North America, and from the rest of the world. It covered the whole spectrum of the subject, not only accelerator-based experiments but also its astrophysical and cosmological aspects. The parallel and plenary talks can be found in these proceedings. A key feature of the conference, as always, was the award of the prizes: this year the EPS prize was awarded to Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa for their explanation of CP violation with a 6 quark model—Kobayashi came to accept it in person. The Gribov medal went to Niklas Beisert, the outreach prize to Richard Jacobsson and Charles Timmermans and the Young Physicist prizer to I Furic, G Gomez-Ceballos and S Menzemer. Parallel sessions were held in Manchester University, and plenary talks were held in the Bridgewater Hall in Manchester Town centre, a magnificent modern venue whose positive and co-operative staff enabled the conference to make the most of the impressive surroundings. We were able to put the hall to its proper purpose one evening with a concert by the Fairey Band—one of the distinctive brass bands who form part of the rich musical tradition of the North of England, and came as something new and different to many of the delegates. The conference ran smoothly and successfully, thanks largely to hard work by the local organising committee who devoted a lot of time to planning, producing ideas, and anticipating potential problems. Many of them were not from Manchester itself but from other universities and laboratories in the North of England, so their dedication was especially appreciated. The EPS committee also played a major part, by the selection of plenary

  8. Interactions of EPS with soil minerals: A combination study by ITC and CLSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Di; Ma, Wenting; Jin, Zhaoxia; Wang, Yixuan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Pseudomonas putida on montmorillonite, kaolinite and goethite was investigated as a function of pH using batch studies coupled with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Characterization by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that the extracted EPS contained carboxyl, phosphoryl, amino, and hydroxyl on functional groups as well as polysaccharides, protein and nucleic acid on components. The mass fraction of EPS adsorption on minerals decreased with the final pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. The mass fraction of EPS-N adsorption varied with pH values and was higher than that of EPS-C or EPS-P on montmorillonite and kaolinite, while the mass fraction of EPS-P adsorption was the highest on goethite. CLSM results further demonstrated that proteins were predominantly distributed on the montmorillonite and kaolinite surfaces, while nucleic acids were mainly on the goethite surface. ITC results revealed that the adsorption process in all mineral systems was exothermic, and pH altered the heat effect of EPS-mineral reactions. The data obtained in this study would facilitate a better understanding of the adsorption mechanisms of EPS on minerals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional groups characteristics of EPS in biofilm growing on different carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Fang, Fang; Gao, Xu; Li, Chun

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), including soluble EPS, loosely bound EPS and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), in biofilms growing on different carriers from a CANON system to elucidate their different compositions and characteristics. The zeta potentials of all EPS fractions of the two samples were decreased systematically. The soft combination packing (SCP) was more hydrophilic than activated carbon fiber (ACF), and it obtained a significantly higher biomass. However, Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the same EPS fraction had similar functional groups between two carriers. Especially for the TB-EPS, total amount and the contents of proteins and polysaccharides in the SCP sample were much higher than those in the ACF sample. Moreover, the TB-EPS fraction of the SCP sample had better bioflocculation activity compared with that of the ACF sample. Therefore the result demonstrated that the characteristics of EPS varied from carrier to carrier. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-02-09

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L(-1)) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L(-1)), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs.

  11. The EP-3E vs. the BAMS UAS: An Operating and Support Cost Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    autonomy. In early 2011, the Navy decided that it would replace its EP-3E Airborne Reconnaissance Integrated Electronic System ( Aries ) II, which is...be of significant concern. 3. EP-3E History and Role a. EP-3E History First introduced in 1969, the EP-3E ARIES I specialized in tactical signal...overall life cycle cost for aircraft ( Valerdi , n.d.). For this reason, O&S costs were chosen for this comparative evaluation. See Table 2. 28 Table 2

  12. The Importance of Sexual History Taking for PrEP Comprehension Among Young People of Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Sarit A; Gamarel, Kristi E; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina

    2017-05-01

    Despite demonstrated efficacy, uptake of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) remains low, especially among highest priority populations. This study examined four PrEP messaging factors hypothesized to impact comprehension of PrEP educational information: (1) modality (video versus in-person message delivery); (2) frame (risk versus health focus); (3) specificity (gist versus verbatim efficacy information); and (4) sexual history (administered either before or after PrEP education). We examined message comprehension among 157 young people of color (YPoC) eligible for PrEP, using a series of multiple choice questions. Overall, 65.6 % (n = 103) got all message comprehension questions correct. In multivariate analyses, engaging in a sexual history before receiving PrEP education was associated with increased odds of message comprehension (aOR 2.23; 95 % CI 1.06-4.72). This effect was even stronger among those who received PrEP education via video (aOR 3.53; 95 % CI 1.16-10.81) compared to via health educator. This research underscores the importance of sexual history-taking as part of PrEP education and clinical practice for YPoC, and suggests that engaging patients in a sexual history prior to providing them with PrEP education may be key to increasing comprehension.

  13. Sequestration of nanoparticles by an EPS matrix reduces the particle-specific bactericidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Kang, Fuxing; Gao, Yanzheng; Mao, Xuewei; Hu, Xiaojie

    2016-02-01

    Most artificial nanomaterials are known to exhibit broad-spectrum bactericidal activity; however, the defence mechanisms that bacteria use based on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to detoxify nanoparticles (NPs) are not well known. We ruled out the possibility of ion-specific bactericidal activity by showing the lack of equivalent dissolved zinc and silicon toxicity and determined the particle-specific toxicity of ZnO and SiO2 nanoparticles (ZnONPs/SiO2NPs) through dialysis isolation experiments. Surprisingly, the manipulation of the E. coli EPS (i.e., no EPS manipulation or EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation) showed that their particle-specific bactericidal activity could be antagonized by NP-EPS sequestration. The survival rates of pristine E. coli (no EPS manipulation) reached 65% (ZnONPs, 500 mg L-1) and 79% (SiO2NPs, 500 mg L-1), whereas survival rates following EPS removal by sonication/centrifugation were 11% and 63%, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with fluorescence micro-titration analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that protein-like substances (N-H and C-N in amide II) and secondary carbonyl groups (C=O) in the carboxylic acids of EPS acted as important binding sites that were involved in NP sequestration. Accordingly, the amount and composition of EPS produced by bacteria have important implications for the bactericidal efficacy and potential environmental effects of NPs.

  14. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  15. Valuing vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  16. DNA Vaccines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research interests include: eukaryotic gene expres- sion and infectious diseases. Keywords. DNA vaccine, immune response, antibodies, infectious diseases. GENERAL I ... T -cells: Lymphocytes that differentiate primarily in the thymus and are central to the control and ... enhance DNA delivery into skeletal muscle.

  17. Immune Regulatory Effects of Enteromorphaclathrata Polysaccharides on Nd Attenuated Vaccine in a Chicken Model Infected with Reticuloendotheliosis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Sun

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV infection has frequently affected the poultry industry in recent years. The infection with REV weakens the immune responses of the infected poultry. It is reported that Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides are capable of regulating immune function. In order to investigate the immuno regulatory effects of Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides (EPS on the response of REV-infected broilers to a live attenuated Newcastle disease (ND vaccine. Broilers were intraperitoneally injected with REV at one day of age, subcutaneously infected with EPS at 2 days of age, and vaccinated by nasal drip with a live attenuated ND (Lasota strain vaccine at 5 days of age. Immune organ index, secretory immunoglobulinA (SIgA, peripheral blood heterophil to lymphocyte ratios (H/L ratio, peripheral blood lymphocyte transformation rates, and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2 levels were measured at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, and 56 days of age. The results showed that EPS increased the immune organ index, and the secretion of small intestine secretory immunoglobulin A, serum ND antibody titers, blood H/L ratio, peripheral blood lymphocyte transformation rates, and IL-2 and IFN-γ levels. These results indicate that EPS are able to enhance the immune responses of chickens both to REV infection and to ND vaccination. Therefore, Enteromorphaclathrata polysaccharides can be considered as an immune regulator in the future.

  18. LAS FARC-EP, ¿DEGRADACIÓN DE LA LUCHA?. (ARE FARC-EP A DEGRADATION OF FIGHT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Mojica Noreña

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo presenta resultados de una investigación que busca brindar elementos que den cuenta de la validez o sustento y justificación del apelativo de Terrrorista al grupo aramado de las FARC – EP. grupo insurgente alzado en Armas en Colombia y protagonista del conflicto interno en Colombia ya hace más de 45 años No solo es importante ver cuál es el contexto en el que surgen estos calificativos, sino sentar las bases para un estudio riguroso del caso apoyándose en datos que confirmen las tesis aquí planteadas.Abstract:This article presents the research results whose aim is to provide elements that report the validity or the support and the justification of the nickname of Terrorist to the FARC - EP group. It is an armed insurgent group in Colombia and main figure of the internal conflict in Colombia for more than 45 years. Not only is it important to see the context in which these nicknames appear, but also to lay the foundations for a rigorous analysis of the case by relying on the data that confirm the theses raised in this study.

  19. Investigation of extracellular polymer substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of activated sludge from different municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ge; Ye, Fenxia; Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the chemical constituents of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of eight different sludge flocs from seven full-scale wastewater treatment plants. The physicochemical properties included floc properties (floc size, turbidity and effluent suspended solids (ESS) content of the supernatant), sludge volume index, capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration. The relationships between the chemical constituents of EPS and the flocculation, settleability and dewaterability of sludge flocs were also assessed. The results showed that higher amounts of EPS were found in the municipal sludge flocs than in the industrial sludges. The content of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) was much greater than that of loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS). The amounts of total EPS, LB-EPS, TB-EPS and protein in LB-EPS were strongly related to ESS. The ratios of total protein to EPS and total carbohydrate to EPS showed positive correlation to the flocs size. It was surprising that there was no correlation between settleability or dewaterability and the chemical constituents of EPS.

  20. Progress in HIV vaccine research: an outsider's view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the potential for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP and treatment as prevention (TasP to have a significant impact on HIV transmission, there is broad agreement that a safe and effective preventive vaccine remains an essential tool for ending the AIDS epidemic. To date, progress towards a vaccine has been painstaking. Nevertheless, recent progress has opened up promising new leads. Results of the STEP and RV-144 trials provide novel insights that may lead to improved design of candidate vaccines. In addition, the identification of highly potent, broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from some infected patients suggests novel approaches to generating protective immunity. Refinements in our understanding of the gp120 structure and its interaction with CD4 also provide opportunities for improving immunogen design. Although the challenges remain daunting, these advances have instilled a renewed sense of optimism into the field.

  1. The Prostaglandin E2 Receptor EP4 Regulates Obesity-Related Inflammation and Insulin Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Yasui

    Full Text Available With increasing body weight, macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue. There, activated macrophages secrete numerous proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, giving rise to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Prostaglandin E2 suppresses macrophage activation via EP4; however, the role of EP4 signaling in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus remains unknown. In this study, we treated db/db mice with an EP4-selective agonist, ONO-AE1-329, for 4 weeks to explore the role of EP4 signaling in obesity-related inflammation in vivo. Administration of the EP4 agonist did not affect body weight gain or food intake; however, in the EP4 agonist-treated group, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance were significantly improved over that of the vehicle-treated group. Additionally, administration of the EP4 agonist inhibited the accumulation of F4/80-positive macrophages and the formation of crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, and the adipocytes were significantly smaller. The treatment of the EP4 agonist increased the number of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, and in the stromal vascular fraction of white adipose tissue, which includes macrophages, it markedly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Further, EP4 activation increased the expression of adiponectin and peroxidase proliferator-activated receptors in white adipose tissue. Next, we examined in vitro M1/M2 polarization assay to investigate the impact of EP4 signaling on determining the functional phenotypes of macrophages. Treatment with EP4 agonist enhanced M2 polarization in wild-type peritoneal macrophages, whereas EP4-deficient macrophages were less susceptible to M2 polarization. Notably, antagonizing peroxidase proliferator-activated receptor δ activity suppressed EP4 signaling-mediated shift toward M2 macrophage polarization. Thus, our results demonstrate that EP4 signaling plays a critical role in obesity-related adipose tissue

  2. Regulation of EPS production in Lactobacillus casei LC2W through metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Huang, Y; Liu, Z; You, C; Guo, B

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus casei LC2W is an exopolysaccharide(EPS)-producing strain with probiotic effects. The low efficiency and unclear regulation mechanism of EPS biosynthesis have become main constraints for its application in food industry. To investigate the major rate-limiting factors of EPS biosynthesis and to improve its yield, metabolic engineering was applied to this strain. Eight relevant genes related to central metabolism, sugar-nucleotides supply, glycosyltransferase and cofactor engineering were cloned and overexpressed. The results suggested that nox, pfk, rfbB and galT genes were the largest contributors to EPS biosynthesis in this study, which elevated EPS yield by 46·0, 20, 17·4 and 19·6% respectively. Notably, under aerobic condition which was not a suitable condition for lactobacilli to grow in, recombinant strain LC-nox achieved the highest EPS yield of 263·7 mg l(-1) , which was increased by 75% compared to that of the starting strain. The oxygen stress was excluded since the phenomenon was not observed in the control strain under the same condition. Therefore, it was probably that higher NADH oxidase activity led to a decreased NADH availability and reduced lactate concentration, which resulted in the elevation of EPS yield. This study contributed to the understanding of EPS biosynthesis in Lact. casei through metabolic engineering and provided a starting point for introducing cofactor engineering into this strain. Overexpression of NADH oxidase was found to have a most significant effect on the EPS production. It is the first report that EPS could be accumulated to such a high level under aerobic condition in lactobacilli. Our results provided a novel strategy for the improvement of EPS production in lactic acid bacteria. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Bacterial cell surface properties: role of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Yang, Shanshan; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) on the comprehensive surface properties of four bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Streptococcus suis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida). The removal of LB-EPS from bacterial surfaces by high-speed centrifugation (12,000×g) was confirmed by SEM images. Viability tests showed that the percentages of viable cells ranged from 95.9% to 98.0%, and no significant difference was found after treatment (P>0.05). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of phosphodiester, carboxylic, phosphate, and amino functional groups on bacteria surfaces, and the removal of LB-EPS did not alter the types of cell surface functional groups. Potentiometric titration results suggested the total site concentrations on the intact bacteria were higher than those on LB-EPS free bacteria. Most of the acidity constants (pKa) were almost identical, except the increased pKa values of phosphodiester groups on LB-EPS free S. suis and E. coli surfaces. The electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic diameters of the intact and LB-EPS free bacteria were statistically unchanged (P>0.05), indicating LB-EPS had no influence on the net surface charges and size distribution of bacteria. However, LB-ESP could enhance cell aggregation processes. The four LB-EPS free bacteria all exhibited fewer hydrophobicity values (26.1-65.0%) as compared to the intact cells (47.4-69.3%), suggesting the removal of uncharged nonpolar compounds (e.g., carbohydrates) in LB-EPS. These findings improve our understanding of the changes in cell surface characterizations induced by LB-EPS, and have important implications for assessing the role of LB-EPS in bacterial adhesion and transport behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica in monovalent and divalent salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pingting; Long, Guoyu; Ni, Jinren; Tong, Meiping

    2009-08-01

    The deposition kinetics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on silica surfaces were examined in both monovalent and divalent solutions under a variety of environmentally relevant ionic strength and pH conditions by employing a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (DCM-D). Soluble EPS (SEPS) and bound EPS (BEPS) were extracted from four bacterial strains with different characteristics. Maximum favorable deposition rates (k(fa)) were observed for all EPS at low ionic strengths in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions. With the increase of ionic strength, k(fa) decreased due to the simultaneous occurrence of EPS aggregation in solutions. Deposition efficiency (alpha; the ratio of deposition rates obtained under unfavorable versus corresponding favorable conditions) for all EPS increased with increasing ionic strength in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions, which agreed with the trends of zeta potentials and was consistent with the classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Comparison of alpha for SEPS and BEPS extracted from the same strain showed that the trends of alpha did not totally agree with trends of zeta potentials, indicating the deposition kinetics of EPS on silica surfaces were not only controlled by DLVO interactions, but also non-DLVO forces. Close comparison of alpha for EPS extracted from different sources showed alpha increased with increasing proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Subsequent experiments for EPS extracted from the same strain but with different proteins to polysaccharides ratios and from activated sludge also showed that alpha were largest for EPS with greatest proteins to polysaccharides ratio. Additional experiments for pure protein and solutions with different pure proteins to pure saccharides ratios further corroborated that larger proteins to polysaccharides ratio resulted in greater EPS deposition.

  5. Epimedium polysaccharide and propolis flavone can synergistically stimulate lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and enhance the immune responses to ND vaccine in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yunpeng; Hu, Yuanliang; Wang, Deyun; Guo, Zhenhuan; Zhao, Xiaona; Guo, Liwei; Zhao, Biao; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yuanlei; Nguyen, The Luong

    2010-08-01

    Four prescriptions, epimedium flavone plus propolis flavone (EF-PF), epimedium flavone plus propolis extracts (EF-PE), epimedium polysaccharide plus propolis flavone (EP-PF) and epimedium polysaccharide plus propolis extracts (EP-PE), were prepared and their immune-enhancing effects were compared. In test in vitro, the effects of them on chicken peripheral lymphocyte proliferation were determined by MTT method. The results showed that EP-PF group presented the highest stimulating index at most concentrations. In immune test, 300 14-day-old chickens were randomly divided into six groups and vaccinated with ND vaccine except for blank control (BC) group, re-challenged at 28 days of age. At the same time of the first vaccination, the chickens in four experimental groups were injected, respectively, with four prescriptions. The changes of the lymphocyte proliferation and antibody titer were determined. On day 28 after the first vaccination, the chickens except for BC group were challenged with NDV, the immune protective effect was observed. The results displayed that in EP-PF group, the antibody titers, lymphocyte proliferation and protective rate were the highest, the morbidity and mortality were the lowest. In dose test, 14-day-old chickens were randomly divided into five groups. The treatment and determinations were the same as the immune test except that the chickens in experimental groups were injected, respectively, with high, medium and low doses of EP-PF. The results revealed that in medium dose group, the antibody titers, lymphocyte proliferation and protective rate were the highest, the morbidity and mortality were the lowest. These results indicated that EP and PF possessed synergistically immune enhancement, EP-PF had the best efficacy, especially at medium dose, and would be expected to exploit into a new-type immunopotentiator. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Inhibition of lysyl oxidase by prostaglandin E2 via EP2/EP4 receptors in human amnion fibroblasts: Implications for parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Wangsheng; Li, Wenjiao; Shu, Qun; Chen, Zi-Jiang; Myatt, Leslie; Sun, Kang

    2016-03-15

    The underlying mechanism leading to rupture of the membranes at parturition is not fully understood. Lysyl oxidase (LOX) cross-links collagen fibrils thereby increasing the tensile strength of the membranes. Thus, understanding the regulation of LOX expression may be of crucial importance for elucidation of the process of rupture of the fetal membranes. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), mainly produced in the amnion, plays crucial roles during human parturition. However it is not known whether PGE2 regulates LOX expression in the fetal membranes. Using primary human amnion fibroblasts, we showed that addition of PGE2 decreased LOX mRNA and protein levels, which were blocked by inhibition of EP2/EP4 receptors and the receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway. EP2/EP4 receptor agonists and stimulators of the cAMP/PKA pathway consistently decreased LOX expression. Furthermore, PGE2 induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, a key enzyme in PGE2 production, via an EP2 and EP4 receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway. Small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of COX-2 expression significantly increased the basal expression of LOX. In addition, an increase in COX-2 and a reciprocal decrease in LOX abundance occurred in amnion tissue following labor at term. In conclusion, we have revealed a feed-forward loop of induction of COX-2 and reduction in LOX expression by PGE2 acting via an EP2/EP4 receptor-coupled cAMP/PKA pathway in human amnion fibroblasts toward the end of gestation, which may play a significant role in the rupture of fetal membranes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-09-15

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}. Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudo- rapidity ranges 45 GeV. Differential cross sections are presented for inclusive isolated photon production as functions of Q{sup 2}, x, E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} and {eta}{sup {gamma}}. Leading-logarithm parton-shower Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative QCD predictions give a reasonable description of the data over most of the kinematic range. (orig.)

  8. Highlights from e-EPS: Coordinated Access to Light sources

    CERN Multimedia

    e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    The CALIPSO project, which runs until May 2015, will contribute to the effective exploitation of European synchrotrons and free electron lasers. CALIPSO (Coordinated Access to Light sources to Promote Standards and Optimisation) includes 20 partners forming one of the largest Research Networks in the world.   e-EPS interviewed M. Bertolo, CALIPSO project manager and his assistant C. Blasetti. Which challenges are addressed by CALIPSO? CALIPSO’s goal is to optimize the exploitation of the European synchrotrons and Free Electron Lasers. With respect to previous projects funded by the European Commission, it foresees significant improvements in integration, innovation and user-friendliness in all three areas of networking, transnational access and instrumentation. The Transnational Access program potentially benefits a community of 25,000 estimated users offering free open access to 12 synchrotrons and 5 free electron lasers solely based on scientific merit. In ad...

  9. Search for excited electrons in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania)]|[Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2008-05-15

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full e{sup {+-}}p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb{sup -1}. The electroweak decays of excited electrons e{sup *} {yields}e{gamma}, e{sup *} {yields}eZ and e{sup *} {yields}{nu}W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for excited electron production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on e{sup *} production cross sections and on the ratio f/{lambda} of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited electron searches. The e{sup *} production via contact interactions is also addressed for the first time in ep collisions. (orig.)

  10. Neutronics analysis for integration of ITER diagnostics port EP10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colling, Bethany, E-mail: bethany.colling@ccfe.ac.uk [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Eade, Tim [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joyce, Malcolm J. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Pampin, Raul; Seyvet, Fabien [Fusion for Energy, Josep Pla 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Turner, Andrew [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Udintsev, Victor [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2016-11-01

    Shutdown dose rate calculations have been performed on an integrated ITER C-lite neutronics model with equatorial port 10. A ‘fully shielded’ configuration, optimised for a given set of diagnostic designs (i.e. shielding in all available space within the port plug drawers), results in a shutdown dose rate in the port interspace, from the activation of materials comprising equatorial port 10, in excess of 2000 μSv/h. Achieving dose rates of 100 μSv/h or less, as required in areas where hands-on maintenance can be performed, in the port interspace region will be challenging. A combination of methods will need to be implemented, such as reducing mass and/or the use of reduced activation steel in the port interspace, optimisation of the diagnostic designs and shielding of the port interspace floor. Further analysis is required to test these options and the ongoing design optimisation of the EP10 diagnostic systems.

  11. E-P instability in the NSNS accumulator ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-08-01

    It has been speculated that the intensity limitation observed in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is caused by a coherent instability induced by the presence of pockets of electrons generated by scattering with the molecules of the vacuum residual gas. A theoretical explanation of the e-p instability of course does exist, and is similar to the one developed for the ion-induced instability in electron storage rings. Considering the large beam power (3 MW) involved in the NSNS Accumulator Ring, and the consequences caused by even a small amount of beam loss, we need to carefully assess the effects of electrons that may be generated in the vacuum chamber.

  12. Muon Pair Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, C.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Yan, W.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of two isolated muons up to high di-muon masses are measured in ep collisions at HERA with the H1 detector in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 71 pb^-1 at a centre of mass energy of sqrt{s} = 319 GeV. The results are in good agreement with Standard Model predictions, the dominant process being photon-photon interactions. Additional muons or electrons are searched for in events with two high transverse momentum muons using the full data sample corresponding to 114 pb^-1, where data at sqrt{s} = 301 GeV and sqrt{s} = 319 GeV are combined. Both the di-lepton sample and the tri-lepton sample agree well with the predictions.

  13. Vaccine Adverse Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... the primary immunization series in infants Report Adverse Event Report a Vaccine Adverse Event Contact FDA (800) ...

  14. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Childhood Vaccine Schedule Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of Contents ... please turn Javascript on. When to Vaccinate What Vaccine Why Birth (or any age if not previously ...

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  16. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home | About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs ...

  17. Current Vaccine Shortages and Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... value="Submit" /> Related Links Vaccines & Immunizations Current Vaccine Shortages & Delays Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... vaccination are included in this update. Chart of Vaccines* in Delay or Shortage National Vaccine Supply Shortages ...

  18. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    AMP-dependent. However, on the basis of recent reports, it was hypothesized in the current study that increased cAMP levels are not necessary for AQP2 membrane targeting. The role and dynamics of cAMP signaling on AQP2 membrane targeting in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney and mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD14) cells......Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be c...... was examined using selective agonists against the V2R (dDAVP), EP2 (butaprost) and EP4 (CAY10580). During EP2 stimulation, AQP2 membrane targeting continually increased during 80 min of stimulation; whereas cAMP levels reached a plateau after 10 min. EP4 stimulation caused a rapid and transient increase in AQP...

  19. Effect of EPS Content on Activated Sludge Reduction in Process of Predation by T. tubifex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yingjie; Ai, Cuiling; Zhang, Guochun

    2017-12-01

    A Sludge reduction in a conventional activated sludge process combined with a membrane biofilm inoculated with T. tubifex was investigated. The influence of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted in forms of LB-EPS and TB-EPS respectively on the surface properties of biomass was studied. Results showed that variations of polysaccharides and protein along with the increasing of EPS feeding would affect the existence of T. tubifex. When the amount of EPS varied from 10 to 50μg/mg, the specific resistance of a sludge suspension was obtained from 3.5×107 to 1.4×107 S2/g. Meanwhile, polysaccharides content in EPS was to be positively correlated with the SSR of sludge suspension whereas protein content would be not. Anyway, it can be argued that an increase in LB-EPS not TB-EPS may affect the performance of activated sludge reduction with efficiency about 40.1% to 31.6%.

  20. Exploiting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) controlling strategies for performance enhancement of biological wastewater treatments: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yahui; Huang, Jinhui; Zeng, Guangming; Gu, Yanling; Chen, Yaoning; Hu, Yi; Tang, Bi; Zhou, Jianxin; Yang, Ying; Shi, Lixiu

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are present both outside of the cells and in the interior of microbial aggregates, and account for a main component in microbial aggregates. EPS can influence the properties and functions of microbial aggregates in biological wastewater treatment systems, and specifically EPS are involved in biofilm formation and stability, sludge behaviors as well as sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) granulation whereas they are also responsible for membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors (MBRs). EPS exhibit dual roles in biological wastewater treatments, and hence the control of available EPS can be expected to lead to changes in microbial aggregate properties, thereby improving system performance. In this review, current updated knowledge with regard to EPS basics including their formation mechanisms, important properties, key component functions as well as sub-fraction differentiation is given. EPS roles in biological wastewater treatments are also briefly summarized. Special emphasis is laid on EPS controlling strategies which would have the great potential in promoting microbial aggregates performance and in alleviating membrane fouling, including limitation strategies (inhibition of quorum sensing (QS) systems, regulation of environmental conditions, enzymatic degradation of key components, energy uncoupling etc.) and elevation strategies (enhancement of QS systems, addition of exogenous agents etc.). Those strategies have been confirmed to be feasible and promising to enhance system performance, and they would be a research niche that deserves further study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Folly of Making EPS Comparisons across Companies: Do Accounting Textbooks Send the Correct Message?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Timothy P.; Hora, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates why EPS comparisons across companies are meaningless. An example is provided showing how a company with a higher ROE than another company may have a lower EPS simply from having a lower book value per share (and more shares outstanding) than the comparison company. While ROE comparisons across companies can be useful,…

  2. Prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 contributes to inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Ren; Amaya, Fumimasa; Barrett, Lee; Wang, Haibin; Takada, Junji; Samad, Tarek A; Woolf, Clifford J

    2006-12-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is both an inflammatory mediator released at the site of tissue inflammation and a neuromodulator that alters neuronal excitability and synaptic processing. The effects of PGE(2) are mediated by four G-protein-coupled EP receptors (EP1-EP4). Here we show that the EP4 receptor subtype is expressed by a subset of primary sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and that its levels, but not that of the other EP1-3 subtypes, increase in the DRG after complete Freund' adjuvant-induced peripheral inflammation. Administration of both an EP4 antagonist [AH23848, (4Z)-7-[(rel-1S,2S,5R)-5-((1,1'-biphenyl-4-yl)methoxy)-2-(4-morpholinyl)-3-oxocyclopentyl]-4-heptenoic acid] and EP4 knockdown with intrathecally delivered short hairpin RNA attenuates inflammation-induced thermal and mechanical behavioral hypersensitivity, without changing basal pain sensitivity. AH23848 also reduces the PGE(2)-mediated sensitization of capsaicin-evoked currents in DRG neurons in vitro. These data suggest that EP4 is a potential target for the pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain.

  3. Role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofouling of reverse osmosis membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Moshe; Kang, Seoktae; Elimelech, Menachem

    2009-06-15

    This study elucidates the mechanisms by which extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) impact permeate water flux and salt rejection during biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. RO fouling experiments were conducted with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, EPS extracted from PAO1 biofilms, and dead PAO1 cells fixed in formaldehyde. While a biofouling layer of dead bacterial cells decreases salt rejection and permeate flux by a biofilm-enhanced osmotic pressure mechanism, the EPS biofouling layer adversely impacts permeate flux by increasing the hydraulic resistance to permeate flow. During controlled fouling experiments with extracted EPS in a simulated wastewater solution, polysaccharides adsorbed on the RO membranes much more effectively than proteins (adsorption efficiencies of 61.2-88.7% and 11.6-12.4% for polysaccharides and proteins, respectively). Controlled fouling experiments with EPS in sodium chloride solutions supplemented with 0.5 mM calcium ions (total ionic strength of 15 mM) indicate that calcium increases the adsorption efficiency of polysaccharides and DNA by 2- and 3-fold, respectively. The increased adsorption of EPS onto the membrane resulted in a significant decrease in permeate water flux. Corroborating with these calcium effects, atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements demonstrated that addition of calcium ions to the feed solution results in a marked increase in the adhesion forces between a carboxylated particle probe and the EPS layer. The increase in the interfacial adhesion forces is attributed to specific EPS-calcium interactions that play a major role in biofouling of RO membranes.

  4. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer ...

  5. 30 CFR 250.226 - What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) information must accompany the EP? 250.226 Section 250.226 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.226 What Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA...

  6. Mapping of the molecular determinants involved in the interaction between eps15 and AP-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iannolo, G; Salcini, A E; Gaidarov, I

    1997-01-01

    eps15, a substrate for the epidermal growth factor receptor and other receptor tyrosine kinases, possesses a discrete domain structure with protein-binding properties. It interacts with a number of cellular proteins through an evolutionarily conserved protein-binding domain, the eps15 homology do...

  7. Integrating HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Into Routine Preventive Health Care to Avoid Exacerbating Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Krakower, Douglas S; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-12-01

    More than 3 decades since its emergence in the United States, HIV continues to spread and disproportionately affect socially marginalized groups. Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a highly effective prevention strategy federally approved since 2012, could fundamentally alter the course of the epidemic. However, PrEP's potential has not been fully realized, in part because health care providers have been slow to adopt PrEP in clinical practice and have been selective in their discussion of PrEP with patients. This nonstandardized approach has constrained PrEP access. PrEP access has not only been inadequate but also inequitable, with several groups in high need showing lower rates of uptake than do their socially privileged counterparts. Recognizing these early warning signs that current approaches to PrEP implementation could exacerbate existing HIV disparities, we call on health professionals to integrate PrEP into routine preventive health care for adult patients-particularly in primary care, reproductive health, and behavioral health settings. Drawing on the empirical literature, we present 4 arguments for why doing so would improve access and access equity, and we conclude that the benefits clearly outweigh the challenges.

  8. Ethical public health issues for the use of informal PrEP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Julien

    2017-09-03

    This article presents the phenomenon of the use of informal pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), also known colloquially as 'wild PrEP'. The related ethical public health issues of the use of informal PrEP are discussed. From the approach of an ethical framework of risk reduction in public health, the main objective of this article is to encourage health-related practices and policies that do not stop the informal access to PrEP, but rather promote the wellbeing of users by providing them with the necessary knowledge and resources related to PrEP and HIV prevention (i.e. getting regularly tested for HIV if one is to take PrEP). As each country has its own policies with respect to PrEP and access to healthcare services, this article does not explore specific locations but rather highlights different global ethical key points on how to approach the use of informal PrEP with the goal of promoting HIV prevention among individuals at high risk for HIV infection.

  9. Clinical Treatment Options Infectious Diseases: Update on PrEP Implementation, Adherence, and Advances in Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblecki-Lewis, Susanne; Cohen, Stephanie; Liu, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective and evidence-based HIV-prevention option and is recommended for individuals with substantial risk for HIV infection [1]. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that daily oral PrEP dramatically reduces the risk of HIV infection when it is taken as directed. Concerns regarding widespread emergence of antiretroviral resistance attributable to PrEP and behavioral disinhibition have to date not been observed in clinical trials and open-label demonstration projects. PrEP has great potential as part of an HIV risk reduction strategy and barriers to wider implementation including community education, prescriber availability, and elimination of financial barriers should be aggressively pursued. Adherence is critical to PrEP efficacy and has varied across study populations; developing and refining ways of measuring and supporting adherence is essential to the success of PrEP. Evaluation of long-acting medications and alternative formulations for PrEP is underway and may lead to the wider implementation and impact of PrEP. PMID:25931990

  10. 76 FR 52952 - Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Student Services Contract EP-11-D-000403 Yin Gu; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection... Student Services Contract EP- 11-D-000403 Yin Gu in accordance with 40 CFR 2.307(h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2...

  11. The Eps15 C. elegans homologue EHS-1 is implicated in synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Hilliard, M A; Croce, A

    2001-01-01

    implicated Eps15 in endocytosis, its function in the endocytic machinery remains unclear. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans gene, zk1248.3 (ehs-1), is the orthologue of Eps15 in nematodes, and that its product, EHS-1, localizes to synaptic-rich regions. ehs-1-impaired worms showed temperature...

  12. Bidirectional modulation of endogenous EpCAM expression to unravel its function in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; Huisman, C.; Stolzenburg, S.; Kazemier, H. G.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; Blancafort, P.; Rots, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on most carcinomas. Dependent on the tumour type, its overexpression is either associated with improved or worse patient survival. For ovarian cancer, however, the role of EpCAM remains unclear. Methods: Cell survival of

  13. 42 CFR 495.10 - Participation requirements for EPs, eligible hospitals, and CAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals, and CAHs. 495.10 Section 495.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM General Provisions § 495.10 Participation requirements for EPs, eligible hospitals, and CAHs. (a) An eligible hospital, CAH or EP must submit in a manner specified by CMS...

  14. 42 CFR 495.6 - Meaningful use objectives and measures for EPs, eligible hospitals, and CAHs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE PROGRAM General Provisions § 495.6 Meaningful use objectives and... meet the definition of a meaningful EHR user. (2) Exclusion for non-applicable objectives. (i) An EP... four (and not five) objectives of the EP's choice from such paragraph to meet the definition of a...

  15. [Study on the stratification components of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in activated sludge and their variation characteristics in physicochemical properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Dong-Qin; Wang, Yi-Li

    2012-10-01

    To study extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in activated sludge, EPS were extracted by cation exchange resin (CER) method as the total EPS, and stratified through centrifugation and ultrasound into three fractions: slime, LB-EPS and TB-EPS from the outside to the inside. The contents of proteins (PN), polysaccharides (PS) and DNA were determined separately. Furthermore, their variation characteristics in physicochemical properties along with the solution conditions were also investigated. Results showed that the maximum contents of PN, PS and DNA were found in the TB-EPS fraction. The hydrophilic components of the total EPS and its fractions had a higher concentration than the hydrophobic components, and PN showed a higher hydrophobicity than PS. The PS/PN ratio had a great influence on Zeta potentials and isoelectric point values of EPS. That is to say, the greater PS/PN ratio of EPS was, the smaller Zeta potentials for the total EPS or its fractions and the higher isoelectric point values for EPS fractions were. All Zeta potentials of EPS solutions presented a general decrease trend with increasing pH. The corresponding isoelectric point values were 2.9 for the total EPS, 2.2 for the slime, 2. 3 for the LB-EPS and 1.3 for the TB-EPS, respectively. The increase in ionic strength resulted in the tendency of straight climb with the increase in the conductivity of EPS solutions, while the corresponding Zeta potentials tended to reach stable negative values after a rapid increase. In addition, when temperature went up (EPS solutions decreased, then gradually kept unchanged in the range from 40 degrees C to 60 degrees C.

  16. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  17. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  18. Epothilone B enhances surface EpCAM expression in ovarian cancer Hey cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Shohreh; Yang, Chia-Ping Huang; Goldberg, Gary L; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2010-11-01

    Epothilone B (EpoB), like Taxol, stabilizes microtubules resulting in an inhibition of microtubule dynamic instability. The drug is being evaluated in phase III clinical trials. An EpoB analog, Ixabepilone, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer. Epithelial cell adhesion antigen (EpCAM) expression is significantly higher in epithelial ovarian cancer cells compared to normal cells. The effects of EpoB and other microtubule-interacting agents on surface EpCAM expression were studied. Biochemical methods, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were used to identify EpCAM expression on the surface of the ovarian cancer cell line, Hey, after exposure to EpoB. The relationship between EpoB-mediated surface EpCAM expression and EpoB-induced α-tubulin acetylation, a surrogate marker for stable microtubules, in Hey cells also was investigated. Nanomolar concentrations of EpoB, Taxol, discodermolide or vinblastine caused a marked increase in surface EpCAM expression in Hey cells. Alpha-tubulin acetylation was increased following treatment with Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide, but not with vinblastine, indicating that drug-enhanced surface EpCAM expression does not correlate with tubulin acetylation or stabilization. Unexpectedly, EpoB did not have a significant effect on EpCAM mRNA expression, nor did it alter the level of total cellular EpCAM in Hey cells. The results indicate that disruption of the microtubule cytoskeleton is associated with the redistribution of cell surface antigens in ovarian cancer cells. The increase in cell surface EpCAM antigen density may facilitate the antibody targeting of EpCAM-positive ovarian cancer cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Flood Forecasting Based on Multiple EPS -- is it Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, J.; Pappenberger, F.; Bartholmes, J.; Kalas, M.; Bogner, K.; de Roo, A.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrological community is looking increasingly at the use of ensemble prediction systems instead of single (deterministic) forecasts to increase flood warning times. International initiatives and research projects such as THORPEX, HEPEX, PREVIEW, or MAP-DPHASE foster successfully the interdisciplinary dialogue between the meteorological and hydrological communities. The European Flood Alert System (EFAS) is a pre-operational example of an early flood warning system based on multiple EPS and poor-man's ensembles weather inputs. EFAS research focuses on the exploration of the EPS stream flow information, their visualisation for different end user communities and their application in risk-based decision-making. EFAS further provides a platform for further research on flash floods, droughts and climate change. Here results from a 2 year statistical skill score analysis from EFAS are presented and complemented with a case study on flooding that took place in Romania in 2007. The research focuses on the benefit of using multiple EPS. Data from eight global medium-range EPS have been extracted from the Thorpex Interactive Global Grand Ensemble (TIGGE) archive to compare the performance of single EPS versus multiple EPS. The case study showed clearly the potential benefit of using multiple EPS instead of relying on single EPS that might entirely miss an event. The study is completed by running additional EPS with different resolutions and leadtimes. Monthly forecasts are explored as first indicators for potential floods while the limited area model EPS (COSMO-LEPS) with much higher spatial resolution but only 5 days lead time are explored for better quantitative forecasts. As first assessment an outlook contrasting the computational demands with the apparent benefit is given together with a few thoughts on developments that should be addressed in the near future.

  20. Extracellular Polymeric Substances of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EPS-A) Induced Apoptosis in Astrocytes of Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ying; Xue, Xing; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang; Ren, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this study, extracellular polymeric substances of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (EPS-A) were investigated in order to explore their effect on astrocytes of zebrafish and potential risk for environment. Astrocytes were treated with varying concentrations of EPS-A, the results showed that EPS-A inhibited astrocytes growth in a dose-and time-dependent manner. With the concentrations of EPS-A increasing, the adherent ability of astrocytes decreased and the number of astrocytes floating in the culture medium increased. When treated with 2.35 µg/mL EPS-A, EPS-A induced cell cycle arrest and made the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and then led to astrocytes apoptosis. The results suggested that EPS-A could pose a threat to zebrafish and represent risk for environment, so regularly monitoring the presence of EPS-A was very important in nutrient-rich freshwaters when A. flos-aquae blooms broke out.

  1. Men who have sex with men starting pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) are at risk of HCV infection: evidence from the Amsterdam PrEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoornenborg, Elske; Achterbergh, Roel C A; Schim Van Der Loeff, Maarten F; Davidovich, Udi; Hogewoning, Arjan; Vries, Henry J C de; Schinkel, Janke; Prins, Maria; Laar, Thijs J W van de

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognised as an emerging sexually transmitted infection (STI) among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). However, HIV-negative MSM at high risk for HIV might also be at increased risk for HCV. We studied the HCV prevalence in HIV-negative MSM who start pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in Amsterdam. Phylogenetic analysis was used to compare HCV strains obtained from HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM. At enrolment in the Amsterdam PrEP (AMPrEP) demonstration project, HIV-negative MSM were tested for the presence of HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. If positive for HCV RNA, an HCV NS5B gene fragment (709 bp) was sequenced and compared with HCV isolates from HIV-positive MSM (n = 223) and risk groups other than MSM (n = 153), using phylogenetic analysis. Of 375 HIV-negative MSM enrolled in AMPrEP, 18 (4.8%, 95%CI 2.9%-7.5%) of participants were anti-HCV and/or HCV RNA positive at enrolment; 15/18 (83%) had detectable HCV RNA. HCV genotyping showed genotype 1a (73%), 4d (20%) and 2b (7%). All HCV-positive MSM starting PrEP were part of MSM-specific HCV clusters containing MSM with and without HIV. HCV prevalence among HIV-negative MSM who started PrEP was higher than previously reported. All HIV-negative HCV-positive MSM were infected with HCV strains already circulating among HIV-positive MSM. The increasing overlap between sexual networks of HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM might result in an expanding HCV-epidemic irrespective of HIV-status. Hence, routine HCV testing should be offered to MSM at high risk for HIV, especially for those enrolling in PrEP programs.

  2. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  3. Challenges in Translating PrEP Interest Into Uptake in an Observational Study of Young Black MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolle, Charlotte-Paige; Rosenberg, Eli S; Siegler, Aaron J; Sanchez, Travis H; Luisi, Nicole; Weiss, Kevin; Cutro, Scott; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick S; Kelley, Colleen F

    2017-11-01

    HIV incidence among US young, black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) is high, and structural barriers (eg lack of health insurance) may limit access to Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Research studies conducted with YBMSM must ensure access to the best available HIV prevention methods, including PrEP. We implemented an optional, nonincentivized PrEP program in addition to the standard HIV prevention services in a prospective, observational cohort of HIV-negative YBMSM in Atlanta, GA. Provider visits and laboratory costs were covered; participant insurance plans and/or the manufacturer assistance program were used to obtain drugs. Factors associated with PrEP initiation were assessed with prevalence ratios and time to PrEP initiation with Kaplan-Meier methods. Of 192 enrolled YBMSM, 4% were taking PrEP at study entry. Of 184 eligible men, 63% indicated interest in initiating PrEP, 10% reported no PrEP interest, and 27% wanted to discuss PrEP again at a future study visit. Of 116 interested men, 46% have not attended a PrEP initiation appointment. Sixty-three men (63/184; 34%) initiated PrEP; 11/63 (17%) subsequently discontinued PrEP. The only factor associated with PrEP initiation was reported sexually transmitted infection in the previous year (prevalence ratio 1.50, 95% confidence interval: 1.002 to 2.25). Among interested men, median time to PrEP initiation was 16 weeks (95% confidence interval: 7 to 36). Despite high levels of interest, PrEP uptake may be suboptimal among YBMSM in our cohort even with amelioration of structural barriers that can limit use. PrEP implementation as the standard of HIV prevention care in observational studies is feasible; however, further research is needed to optimize uptake for YBMSM.

  4. Vaccination in food allergic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    allergy: • Vaccines produced in embryonated eggs, such as yellow fever vaccine, influenza vaccine and rabies vaccine. Yellow fever vaccine is most likely to contain significant amounts of egg protein. • Vaccines produced in chick fibroblast cell cultures, such as measles and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines, do not.

  5. Biosynthesis of selenium rich exopolysaccharide (Se-EPS) by Pseudomonas PT-8 and characterization of its antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuhong; Zhang, Jiajia; Liu, Zhaofang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jiang; Li, Yao Olive

    2016-05-20

    Biosynthesis of organo-selenium is achieved by submerged fermentation of selenium-tolerant Pseudomonas PT-8. The end product of metabolic process is selenium-bearing exopolysaccharide (Se-EPS), which contains a higher content of uronic acid than the exopolysaccharide (EPS) by the strain without selenium in the culture medium. Selenium content in Se-EPS reached a maximum yield of 256.7 mg/kg when using an optimized culture condition. Crude Se-EPS was purified into two fractions-a pH neutral Se-EPS-1 and an acidic Se-EPS-2. Structure and chemical composition of Se-EPS-2 were investigated by chromatographic analyses. Results showed that Se-EPS-2 was a homogenous polysaccharide with molecular weight of 7.3 kDa, consisting of monosaccharides, rhamnose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose with a molar ratio of 19.58:19.28:5.97:18.99:23.70:12.48, respectively. Compared to the EPS, the content of rhamnose in Se-EPS increased and molecular weight decreased. The Se-EPS had strong scavenging actions on DPPH•, •OH and •O2(-), which is much higher than the EPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Is Ep-CAM Expression a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Han

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The present findings suggest that Ep-CAM expression may be associated with CRC carcinogenesis, while the loss of Ep-CAM expression is correlated with the progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis of CRC. Ep-CAM expression may be a useful biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of CRC.

  7. The impact of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on HIV epidemics in Africa and India: A simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.J. Vissers (Debby); H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène); N.J.D. Nagelkerke (Nico); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); S.J. de Vlas (Sake)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising new HIV prevention method, especially for women. An urgent demand for implementation of PrEP is expected at the moment efficacy has been demonstrated in clinical trials. We explored the long-term impact of PrEP on HIV

  8. 30 CFR 250.214 - What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What geological and geophysical (G&G... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.214 What geological and geophysical (G&G) information must accompany the EP? The following G&G information must accompany your EP: (a) Geological...

  9. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Schneck

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far-including the gold standard CellSearch-rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM. But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47 was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3 and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA, collagen I, laminin for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69% from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1-24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  10. STXM and NanoSIMS investigations on EPS fractions before and after adsorption to goethite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Eusterhues, Karin; Thieme, Jürgen; Ciobota, Valerian; Höschen, Carmen; Mueller, Carsten W; Küsel, Kirsten; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen; Totsche, Kai U

    2013-04-02

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are expected to be an important source for the formation of mineral-organic associations in soil. Because such formations affect the composition of mobile and immobile organic matter as well as the reactivity of minerals, we investigated the composition of EPS before and after adsorption to goethite. Raman measurements on EPS extracted from Bacillus subtilis distinguished four fractions rich in proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, or lipids and proteins. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy identified three different EPS-fractions that varied in their composition in proteins, nonaromatic proteins, and polysaccharides. Reaction of EPS with goethite led to a preferential adsorption of lipids and proteins. The organic coverage was heterogeneous, consisting of ~100 × 200 nm large patches of either lipid-rich or protein-rich material. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry showed a strong S enrichment in aggregates of ~400 nm in the goethite adsorbed EPS. From our simplified model system, we learned that only a small portion (EPS was immobilized via adsorption to goethite. This fraction formed a coating of subμm spaced protein-rich and lipid-rich domains, i.e., of two materials which will strongly differ in their reactive sites. This will finally affect further adsorption, the particle mobility and eventually also colloidal stability.

  11. Influence of extraction method on size exclusion chromatography fingerprints of EPS from wastewater sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourven, I; Simon, S; Guibaud, G

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were separated using two serial-linked size exclusion chromatography (SEC) columns to obtain detailed fingerprints. The chromatographic profile results were influenced by the nature of biological sludge (activated sludges, anaerobic granules, anaerobic flocculated sludges). Furthermore, our results highlight that EPS fingerprints are also highly dependent on the extraction method. If physical extractions modify only the relative absorbance of the chromatographic peaks, heating during extraction induces significant modifications of the fingerprints, probably owing to better organic matter extraction efficiency as well as an increase in hydrolysis for some compounds but not for EPS extracted from anaerobic granular sludges. This confirms that thermal treatment is a proper method to extract EPS from anaerobic granular sludges. The use of chemical extraction results in major changes on the EPS fingerprints. This work demonstrates that some chromatographic peaks are due to residues from the chemical reagent (such as EDTA, glutaraldehyde) which can modify or form complexes with some EPS macromolecules. As a result, due to its sensitivity to sludge origin and/or extraction procedure, SEC appears to be a suitable tool for an accurate qualitative EPS characterization.

  12. Assessment of Morphology, Activity, and Infiltration of Astrocytes on Marine EPS-Imbedded Electrospun PCL Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seul Ki Min

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering using a biomaterial including bioactive compounds has been researched as a way to restore injured neural systems. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS extracted from marine seaweeds have been known to produce positive effects on physiological activities in human tissues. In this study, an electrospun nanofiber containing brown seaweed EPS was proven to be a candidate biomaterial for neural tissue engineering. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP as a specific marker protein increased in the astrocytes cultured on the polycaprolactone (PCL nanofiber containing EPS (EPS-PCL nanofiber, compared with PCL nanofiber. The upregulation of GFAP indicates that the EPS-PCL nanofiber induced astrocyte activation, which supports physiological agents favorable to restore injured neural tissue. Astrocytes could infiltrate into the EPS-PCL nanofiber mat without toxicity, comparable to PCL nanofiber. These results imply that EPS-PCL nanofiber could be a useful biomaterial to regulate astrocyte activity at a molecular level and could be considered as a novel therapeutic material for neural tissue engineering.

  13. Merkel cell polyomavirus recruits MYCL to the EP400 complex to promote oncogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC frequently contains integrated copies of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA that express a truncated form of Large T antigen (LT and an intact Small T antigen (ST. While LT binds RB and inactivates its tumor suppressor function, it is less clear how ST contributes to MCC tumorigenesis. Here we show that ST binds specifically to the MYC homolog MYCL (L-MYC and recruits it to the 15-component EP400 histone acetyltransferase and chromatin remodeling complex. We performed a large-scale immunoprecipitation for ST and identified co-precipitating proteins by mass spectrometry. In addition to protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A subunits, we identified MYCL and its heterodimeric partner MAX plus the EP400 complex. Immunoprecipitation for MAX and EP400 complex components confirmed their association with ST. We determined that the ST-MYCL-EP400 complex binds together to specific gene promoters and activates their expression by integrating chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq and RNA-seq. MYCL and EP400 were required for maintenance of cell viability and cooperated with ST to promote gene expression in MCC cell lines. A genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen confirmed the requirement for MYCL and EP400 in MCPyV-positive MCC cell lines. We demonstrate that ST can activate gene expression in a EP400 and MYCL dependent manner and this activity contributes to cellular transformation and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

  14. Upregulation of prostaglandin receptor EP1 expression involves its association with cyclooxygenase-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapita Sood

    Full Text Available While many signals cause upregulation of the pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase -2 (COX-2, much less is known about mechanisms that actively downregulate its expression. We have recently shown that the prostaglandin EP1 receptor reduces the expression of COX-2 in a pathway that facilitates its ubiquitination and degradation via the 26S proteasome. Here we show that an elevation of COX-2 intracellular levels causes an increase in the endogenous expression of prostaglandin EP1. The increase in EP1 levels does not occur at the transcriptional level, but is rather associated with complex formation between the receptor and COX-2, which occurs both in vitro and in mammalian tissues. The EP1-COX-2 complex is disrupted following binding of arachidonic acid to COX-2 and accompanied by a parallel reduction in EP1 levels. We propose that a transient interaction between COX-2 and EP1 constitutes a feedback loop whereby an increase in COX-2 expression elevates EP1, which ultimately acts to downregulate COX-2 by expediting its proteasomal degradation. Such a post translational mechanism may serve to control both the ligand-generating system of COX-2 and its reception system.

  15. Monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 reliably discriminates between microcystic adnexal carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahl, Dieter; Sellheyer, Klaus

    2007-10-01

    Sclerosing cutaneous neoplasms often represent a diagnostic challenge. The monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 recognizes two glycopolypeptides found in most human epithelial cells. It is diagnostically highly reliable in the differentiation between basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. In this study, we report its application in the differential diagnosis of microcystic adnexal carcinoma, desmoplastic trichoepithelioma and basal cell carcinoma. Biopsy samples from 28 sclerosing and infiltrating basal cell carcinomas, 13 microcystic adnexal carcinomas and 16 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were examined after immunohistochemical staining with Ber-EP4. Ber-EP4 did not label any of the microcystic adnexal carcinomas, whereas all 28 basal cell carcinomas were Ber-EP4 positive. Twenty-seven of the 28 showed moderate or strong staining intensity, with the majority being strong. Only one basal cell carcinoma was weakly positive. Twelve of the 16 desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas were immunoreactive with Ber-EP4 and the staining was more variable than those of basal cell carcinomas. Ber-EP4 reliably differentiates microcystic adnexal carcinoma from basal cell carcinoma to the same extent as it distinguishes the latter tumor from squamous cell carcinoma. While it stains the majority of desmoplastic trichoepitheliomas, these tumors still have to be considered in the differential diagnosis with microcystic adnexal carcinoma, when Ber-EP4 is applied.

  16. Limitations of Ber-EP4 for distinction of Bowen disease from basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Marta; Toberer, Ferdinand; Enk, Alexander H; Hassel, Jessica C

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic differentiation between Bowen disease a variant of squamous cell carcinoma in situ (SCCIS) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) can be difficult on the basis of hematoxylin and eosin (routine) staining in small or fragmented biopsy samples. Ber-EP4 staining is diagnostically reliable for differentiation between BCC and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma [Dasgeb et al. Biomark Cancer, 5: 7, (2013); Tellechea et al. Am J Dermatopathol, 15: 452 (1993)]. The objective of this study was to determine the usefulness of Ber-EP4 staining for differentiation of SCCIS from BCC. Here, we performed immunohistochemistry with a Ber-EP4 antibody in 76 cases of Bowen type of SCCIS. As positive controls we selected 16 cases of BCC. A positive reaction was obtained for Ber-EP4 in the secretory portion of eccrine and apocrine glands and in follicular germinative cells at the lower end of catagen hairs of normal skin tissue. All BCC samples tested were positive. Of the Bowen type SCCIS samples, 26.3% reacted positively (at least 5% positive staining of neoplastic cells). In 3/76 cases (3.9%) more than 50% of the tumor cells expressed Ber-EP4. We conclude that Ber-EP4 expression is not always helpful to distinguish between Bowen type of SCCIS and BCC, as Ber-EP4 expression in Bowen type SCCIS is not infrequent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The future of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdener, Ayşe Elif; Park, Tae Eun; Kalabalik, Julie; Gupta, Rachna

    2017-05-01

    People at high risk for HIV acquisition should be offered pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC) is currently the only medication recommended for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in people at high risk for HIV acquisition. This article will review medications currently under investigation and the future landscape of PrEP therapy. Areas covered: This article will review clinical trials that have investigated nontraditional regimens of TDF/FTC, antiretroviral agents from different drug classes such as integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTI), nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) as potential PrEP therapies. Expert commentary: Currently, there are several investigational drugs in the pipeline for PrEP against HIV infection. Increased utilization of PrEP therapy depends on provider identification of people at high risk for HIV transmission. Advances in PrEP development will expand options and access for people and reduce the risk of HIV acquisition.

  18. PrEP as Peri-conception HIV Prevention for Women and Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffron, Renee; Pintye, Jillian; Matthews, Lynn T; Weber, Shannon; Mugo, Nelly

    2016-06-01

    Daily oral tenofovir (TDF)-based pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention strategy and recommended for men and women with substantial risk of HIV acquisition. The peri-conception period, the stage prior to pregnancy when condom use is necessarily reduced, has elevated HIV risk that can be mitigated by PrEP use. Data from a randomized trial suggest that peri-conception PrEP use by HIV-seronegative women does not increase the risk of pregnancy loss, birth defects or congenital anomalies, preterm birth, or infant growth faltering. Women considering PrEP use throughout pregnancy must weigh the known increased risk of HIV acquisition with unknown risks of drug effects on infant growth. PrEP has been used safely by HIV-seronegative men with HIV-seropositive female partners who have become pregnant. As an effective user-controlled HIV prevention strategy, PrEP offers autonomy and empowerment for HIV prevention and can be recommended alongside antiretroviral therapy, fertility screening, vaginal self-insemination, intercourse timed to peak fertility, medically assisted reproduction, and other safer conception strategies to provide multiple options. The integration of PrEP into safer conception programs is warranted and will safely reduce HIV transmission to women, men, and children during the peri-conception period.

  19. History of vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  20. History of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  1. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Barcodes Related Link Vaccines & Immunizations Immunization Schedules Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select One PDF [336K] RTF [260K] Recommend ... of that vaccine. Tell the person giving the vaccines if your child has ever had a severe reaction after any ...

  2. Activating prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP4 increases secreted mucin from airway goblet cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaba, Tomohiro; Komiya, Kosaku; Suzaki, Isao; Kozaki, Yuji; Tamaoki, Jun; Rubin, Bruce K

    2017-11-09

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a ligand of the E-type prostanoid receptors, EP1-4. PGE2 secretion is increased in the airways of patients with asthma by secretory phospholipases A2, which also increases MUC5AC mucin in goblet cells. We hypothesized that PGE2 would also increase MUC5AC mRNA and secreted protein through specific EP receptor activation. We sought to assess the effect of specific EP receptor activation on MUC5AC secretion from ciliated-enriched cells or goblet-enriched cells induced by IL-13. We develop an enriched goblet cell epithelium by growing normal human bronchial epithelial cells at air liquid interface for 14 days in the presence of IL-13. We examined exposure to 4 specific EP receptor agonists at 24 h and 14 days in cells grown with or without IL-13 exposure, and measured MUC5AC mRNA and secreted protein, as well as airway culture morphology, and EP receptor expression. In ciliated-enriched cells grown in the absence of IL-13, the EP4 receptor agonist modestly increased both MUC5AC mRNA and secretion (p receptor agonist greatly increased both MUC5AC mRNA and protein (p receptor had no effect on secreted mucin. EP4 receptor mRNA and protein were significantly increased in goblet-enriched cells, while the other receptor mRNA were decreased. We conclude that PGE2 stimulates airway mucin production predominantly by EP4 receptor activation in association with increased EP4 receptor expression. This may contribute to mucus hypersecretion as seen in severe asthma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Interactions of Plutonium with Pseudomonas sp. Strain EPS-1W and Its Extracellular Polymeric Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Mark A; Jiao, Yongqin; Dai, Zurong; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B

    2016-12-15

    Safe and effective nuclear waste disposal, as well as accidental radionuclide releases, necessitates our understanding of the fate of radionuclides in the environment, including their interaction with microorganisms. We examined the sorption of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) to Pseudomonas sp. strain EPS-1W, an aerobic bacterium isolated from plutonium (Pu)-contaminated groundwater collected in the United States at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) in Nevada. We compared Pu sorption to cells with and without bound extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Wild-type cells with intact EPS sorbed Pu(V) more effectively than cells with EPS removed. In contrast, cells with and without EPS showed the same sorption affinity for Pu(IV). In vitro experiments with extracted EPS revealed rapid reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV). Transmission electron microscopy indicated that 2- to 3-nm nanocrystalline Pu(IV)O2 formed on cells equilibrated with high concentrations of Pu(IV) but not Pu(V). Thus, EPS, while facilitating Pu(V) reduction, inhibit the formation of nanocrystalline Pu(IV) precipitates. Our results indicate that EPS are an effective reductant for Pu(V) and sorbent for Pu(IV) and may impact Pu redox cycling and mobility in the environment. Additionally, the resulting Pu morphology associated with EPS will depend on the concentration and initial Pu oxidation state. While our results are not directly applicable to the Pu transport situation at the NNSS, the results suggest that, in general, stationary microorganisms and biofilms will tend to limit the migration of Pu and provide an important Pu retardation mechanism in the environment. In a broader sense, our results, along with a growing body of literature, highlight the important role of microorganisms as producers of redox-active organic ligands and therefore as modulators of radionuclide redox transformations and complexation in the subsurface. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Activation of prostaglandin EP receptors by lubiprostone in rat and human stomach and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassil, A K; Borman, R A; Jarvie, E M; McArthur-Wilson, R J; Thangiah, R; Sung, E Z H; Lee, K; Sanger, G J

    2008-05-01

    Lubiprostone (Amitiza), a possible ClC-2 channel opener derived from prostaglandin E(1) and indicated for the treatment of constipation, increases chloride ion transport and fluid secretion into the intestinal lumen. As lubiprostone may also directly modulate gastrointestinal motility, we investigated its actions and the possible involvement of prostaglandin EP receptor activation on rat and human isolated gastrointestinal preparations. Rat and human isolated preparations were mounted in tissue baths for isometric recording. The effects of lubiprostone on muscle tension and on electrically stimulated, neuronal contractions were investigated in the absence and presence of EP receptor antagonists. In rat and human stomach longitudinal muscle, lubiprostone induced a contraction (pEC(50) of 7.0+/-0.0, n=4 and 6.4+/-0.2, n=3, respectively), which was inhibited by pretreatment with the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1)A 300 nM (pEC(50) reduced to 6.2+/-0.2, n=6), but not by the EP(3) or EP(4) receptor antagonists (L-798106 and GW627368X, respectively, 1 microM, P>0.05). Lubiprostone also reduced electrically stimulated, neuronal contractions in rat and human colon circular muscle preparations (pIC(50) of 8.9+/-0.4, n=7 and 8.7+/-0.9, n=6, respectively), an effect mediated pre-junctionally. This effect was reduced by the EP(4) receptor antagonist (pIC(50) of 6.7+/-1.1, n=7 and 7.7+/-0.4, n=6, respectively) but not by EP(1) or EP(3) receptor antagonists. In rats and humans, lubiprostone contracts stomach longitudinal muscle and inhibits neuronally mediated contractions of colon circular muscle. Experiments are now needed to determine if this additional activity of lubiprostone contributes to its clinical efficacy and/or side-effect profile.

  5. Polymorphisms in the prostaglandin receptor EP2 gene confers susceptibility to tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Li; Zhang, Qing; Luo, Liu-Lin; Yue, Jun; Zhao, Yan-Lin; Han, Min; Liu, Li-Rong; Xiao, He-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an important lipid mediator of the inflammatory immune response during acute and chronic infections. PGE2 modulates a variety of immune functions via four receptors (EP1-EP4), which mediate distinct PGE2 effects. Mice lacking EP2 are more susceptible to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), have a higher bacterial load, and increase size and number of granulomatous lesions. Our aim was to assess whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in EP2 increase the risk of tuberculosis. DNA re-sequencing revealed five common EP2 variants in the Chinese Han population. We sequenced the EP2 gene from 600 patients and 572 healthy controls to measure SNP frequencies in association with tuberculosis infections (TB) within the population. The rs937337 polymorphism is associated with increased risk to tuberculosis (p=0.0044, odds ratio [OR], 1.67; 95% confidential interval,1.22-2.27). The rs937337 AA genotype and the rs1042618 CC genotype were significantly associated with TB. An estimation of the frequencies of haplotypes revealed a single protective haplotype GACGC for tuberculosis (p=0.00096, odds ratio [OR], 0.56; 95% confidential interval, 0.41-0.77). Furthermore, we determined that the remaining SNPs of EP2 were nominally associated with clinical patterns of disease. We identified genetic polymorphisms in EP2 associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis within a Chinese population. Our data support that EP2 SNPs are genetic predispositions of increased susceptibility to TB and to different clinical patterns of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. VACCINATION SAFETY: MODERN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.К. Tatochenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination aided disease control over infection pathology among the children led to elimination of smallpox and poliomyelitis, drastic decrease of the tuberculous meningitis recurrences, tetanus, measles and other infection diseases and their complications. At the same time, Russia is still afraid to apply certain vaccines. The reasons for that are mainly subjective. This is the unjustified caution related to the fear that it may cause severe vaccine associated complications. The data in view of the lecture indicates the safety of the vaccinal prevention procedures and measures for the prevention of their complications.Key words: vaccinal prevention, vaccination complications, vaccination safety, children.

  7. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Loktionova, N.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst. (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Brandt, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cholewa, A.; Deak, M.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Knutsson, A.; Kraemer, M.; Kutak, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, J.; Marti, Ll.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Toll, T.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Driesch, M. von den; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy] (and others)

    2010-11-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  8. Diffractive Dijet Photoproduction in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Andreev, V.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A.W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, M.U.; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Tabasco, J.E.Ruiz; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A.Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb^-1. The events are of the type ep -> eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x_gamma of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models.

  9. Strange Nucleon Form Factors from ep and vp Elastic Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, S.F. [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces NM 88003 (United States)]. e-mail: pate@nmsu.edu

    2007-12-15

    The recent parity-violating ep forward-scattering elastic asymmetry data from Jefferson Lab (HAPPEx and G0), when combined with the vp elastic cross section data from Brookhaven (E734), permit an extraction of the strangeness contribution to the vector and axial nucleon form factors for momentum transfers in the range 0.45 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. These results, combined with the recent determination of the strange vector form factors at Q{sup 2} = 0.1 GeV{sup 2} (SAMPLE, HAPPEx, PVA4, G0) have been interpreted in terms of uudss{sup -} configurations very different from the kaon-loop configurations usually associated with strangeness in the nucleon. New experiments are being proposed to improve the state of our knowledge of the vp elastic cross section -- these new experiments will push the range of Q{sup 2} to much lower values, and greatly increase the precision of the vp elastic data. One outcome of this can be a measurement of the strangeness contribution to the nucleon spin, {delta}s. Nuclear targets (e.g. C or Ar) are to be used in these neutrino experiments, and so a deep understanding of the nuclear physics, particularly in regard to final state effects, is needed before the potential of these precision experiments can be fully realized. (Author)

  10. La justicia transicional del posacuerdo con las FARC-EP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Abuchaibe

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tras doce años de introducido por primera vez el discurso de la justicia transicional en el país, la firma del acuerdo de paz entre el Gobierno nacional y las farc-ep plantea la necesidad de analizar este instrumento, eminentemente político, a la luz del desarrollo de políticas públicas e instrumentos previos sustentados en la justicia transicional y el derecho constitucional a la paz. Para ello se hace un recorrido crítico sobre la justicia transicional en Colombia y la coherencia e integralidad del contenido de las medidas previas, con los postulados y contenidos del acuerdo. Se parte de la hipótesis de que en Colombia existe un marco constitucional transicional que obliga a integrar los esfuerzos en una política de justicia transicional única, concatenada e integral, que garantice la seguridad jurídica de lo pactado, el fortalecimiento institucional y el goce efectivo de los derechos de las víctimas del conflicto armado.

  11. Diffractive photoproduction of dijets in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-09-15

    Diffractive photoproduction of dijets was measured with the ZEUS detector at the ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 77.2 pb{sup -1}. The measurements were made in the kinematic range Q{sup 2}<1 GeV{sup 2}, 0.207.5 and 6.5 GeV, respectively, and to lie in the pseudorapidity range -1.5<{eta}{sup jet}<1.5. Differential cross sections were compared to perturbative QCD calculations using available parameterisations of diffractive parton distributions of the proton. (orig.)

  12. Diffractive dijet photoproduction in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2010-03-15

    Measurements are presented of single and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction based on a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 47 pb{sup -1}. The events are of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the hadronic system X contains at least two jets and is separated by a large rapidity gap from the system Y, which consists of a leading proton or low-mass proton excitation. The dijet cross sections are compared with QCD calculations at next-to-leading order and with a Monte Carlo model based on leading order matrix elements with parton showers. The measured cross sections are smaller than those obtained from the next-to-leading order calculations by a factor of about 0.6. This suppression factor has no significant dependence on the fraction x{sub {gamma}} of the photon four-momentum entering the hard subprocess. Ratios of the diffractive to the inclusive dijet cross sections are measured for the first time and are compared with Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  13. Vaccination in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    significant losses in aquacultural enterprises but vaccination methods implemented since the 1990s have demonstrated their role as one of the most efficient disease control strategies. These have been particularly successful with regard to bacterial diseases in Norwegian salmon farming where multivalent...... vaccines have reduced the need for usage of antibiotics with more than 99 % since the 1980s. Fish can be vaccinated by three different administration routes: injection, immersion and oral vaccination. Injection vaccination (intraperitoneal injection of vaccine) is the most time consuming and labor...... intensive method, which however, provides the best protection of the fish. Immersion vaccination is used for immunization of a high number of small fish is cost-efficient and fast (30 sec immersion into vaccine). Oral vaccination (vaccine in feed) is the least efficient. As in higher vertebrates fish...

  14. Oncolytic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsedawy, Noura B; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-10-01

    Oncolytic viruses are ideal platforms for tumor vaccination because they can mediate the direct in situ killing of tumor cells that release a broad array of tumor antigens and alarmins or danger signals thereby cross-priming antitumor cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which mediate the indirect killing of uninfected cells. The balance between the direct and indirect killing phases of oncolytic virotherapy is the key to its success and can be manipulated by incorporating various immunomodulatory genes into the oncolytic virus genome. Recently, the interim analysis of a large multicenter Phase III clinical trial for Talimogene laherparepvec, a granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-armed oncolytic herpes simplex virus, revealed significant improvement in objective response and durable response rates over control arm and a trend toward improved overall survival. Meanwhile, newer oncolytics are being developed expressing additional immunomodulatory transgenes to further enhance cross-priming and the generation of antitumor CTLs and to block the immunosuppressive actions of the tumor microenvironment. Since oncolytic vaccines can be engineered to kill tumor cells directly, modulate the kinetics of the antitumor immune response and reverse the immunosuppressive actions of the tumor, they are predicted to emerge as the preferred immunotherapeutic anticancer weapons of the future.

  15. A Preliminary Measurement of the Left-Right Parity-Violating ep Asymmetry at E158

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biesiada, J.

    2005-04-11

    This thesis investigates the parity-violating ep asymmetry based on the Run I data produced in Spring of 2002 by the E158 experiment, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main scientific objective of the experiment is the precision measurement of the weak mixing angle of the Standard Model. The ep asymmetry is an important background in the experiment and theoretically interesting in its own right, providing insights into the structure of the proton. The analysis centers upon identifying systematic error and consistency. The definite measurement of the ep asymmetry will await the final reprocessing of the data set during the Fall of 2002.

  16. PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region: opportunities, implementation and barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Iryna Zablotska; Grulich, Andrew E; Nittaya Phanuphak; Tarandeep Anand; Surang Janyam; Midnight Poonkasetwattana; Rachel Baggaley; Frits van Griensven; Ying-Ru Lo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: HIV epidemics in the Asia-Pacific region are concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM) and other key populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention intervention and could be a potential game changer in the region. We discuss the progress towards PrEP implementation in the Asia-Pacific region, including opportunities and barriers. Discussion: Awareness about PrEP in the Asia-Pacific is still low and so are its levels of use. A high proportion...

  17. Further case of Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome due to a deletion in EP300.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foley, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a heterogeneous disorder with approximately 45-55% of patients showing mutations in the CREB binding protein and a further 3% of patients having mutations in EP300. We report a male child with a deletion of exons 3-8 of the EP300 gene who has RSTS. He has a milder skeletal phenotype, a finding that has been described in other cases with EP300 mutations. The mother suffered from pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome in the pregnancy. She subsequently developed a mullerian tumor of her cervix 6 years after the birth of her son.

  18. Should I Convince My Partner to Go on Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)? The Role of Personal and Relationship Factors on PrEP-Related Social Control among Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Steven A; Starks, Tyrel J; Rendina, H Jonathon; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-20

    An estimated 35-68% of new HIV infections among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM) are transmitted through main partnerships. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly effective in reducing HIV seroconversion, yet PrEP uptake has been modest. PrEP-naïve GBM with HIV-negative, PrEP-naïve main partners enrolled in One Thousand Strong (n = 409), a U.S. national cohort of GBM, were asked about (1) the importance of partner PrEP use and (2) their willingness to convince their partner to initiate PrEP. On average, participants thought partner PrEP was only modestly important and were only moderately willing to try to convince their partner to initiate PrEP. Personal PrEP uptake willingness and intentions were the strongest indicators of partner PrEP outcomes. Being in a monogamish relationship arrangement (as compared to a monogamous arrangement) and the experience of intimate partner violence victimization were associated with increased willingness to persuade a partner to initiate PrEP.

  19. Overview of the 2014 Edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford; Ian Hill

    2014-10-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) is a widely recognized world class program. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Integral data from the IRPhEP Handbook is used by reactor safety and design, nuclear data, criticality safety, and analytical methods development specialists, worldwide, to perform necessary validations of their calculational techniques. The IRPhEP Handbook is among the most frequently quoted reference in the nuclear industry and is expected to be a valuable resource for future decades.

  20. The expression of prostaglandin receptors EP3 and EP4 in human cervix in post-term pregnancy differs between failed and successful labor induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Nathalie; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Stephansson, Olof; Masironi, Britt; Vladic Stjernholm, Ylva; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor; Sahlin, Lena

    2014-02-01

    To investigate expression and localization of prostaglandin receptors EP1-4 and FP and localization of stromal factors CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), furin, calgranulin B and ALOX15 (arachidonate 15-lipooxygenase) in human cervical tissue from post-term women with failed or successful labor induction after prostaglandin priming. Experimental prospective clinical study. Tertiary obstetric care center. Twenty-six women giving birth post-term, with failed or successful labor induction, and a control group consisting of 19 women with spontaneous onset of labor and delivery at term. Biopsies were obtained from post-term women with successful (responders; R) and failed (non-responders; NR) labor induction. Women with spontaneous delivery at term were included as controls (C). mRNA expression was determined with real time PCR, protein expression and localization with immunohistochemistry. Comparisons of mRNA and protein expressions between post-term pregnancies with failed and successful labor induction as well as term controls. EP4 mRNA expression was down-regulated concomitant with an up-regulation of EP3 mRNA expression in cervix from the NR group as compared with the R group. In stroma, immunoreactivity of the EP4 protein was increased in the NR group as compared with R and C groups. Failure of cervical ripening, after local application of prostaglandins for labor induction, may be caused by the increased expression of EP3 and concomitant decrease in EP4 expression. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Treatment of an Unusual Non-Tooth Related Enamel Pearl (EP) and 3 Teeth-Related EPs with Localized Periodontal Disease Without Teeth Extractions: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardiñas López, Simón; Warren, Roger N; Bromage, Timothy G; Matei, Ioana Chesnoiu; Khouly, Ismael

    2015-09-01

    Enamel may be found ectopically as enamel pearls (EPs), which are frequently associated with advanced localized periodontal (LP) destruction. This study presents a case in which an unusual non-tooth-related enamel pearl and three teeth-related enamel pearls with LP disease were found and treated without teeth extractions. A 47-year-old female patient presented at the New York University College of Dentistry with four EPs, three of which were associated with periodontal pockets and/or bleeding on probing (BOP), and one of them not related to any tooth. Periodontal therapy included scaling and root planing and open flap debridement with removal of the EPs. Two pearls were histologically analyzed by polarizing microscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Clinical periodontal parameters, including probing depth and BOP, were measured. All enamel found in the pearls had the same general morphologic appearance when examined by a SEM. The non-tooth-related pearl could be classified as Rodriguez Ponte "adamantinóidea" pearl. Probing depths at 3 months and 9 months after EP removal diminished considerably. Only after the treatment was there no BOP. Before treatment it was in some areas, as shown in Table 1. The LP related to the EP was resolved. The authors conclude that early recognition of enamel pearls is important in the prevention of periodontal destruction, and removal of EPs by a surgical approach as an adjunct to mechanical periodontal treatment resulted in resolution of the LP. The authors state that this is the first time an "adamantinóideas" pearl is being reported on clinically in the literature.

  2. A comprehensive study into fouling properties of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) extracted from bulk sludge and cake sludge in a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Tian, Yu; Li, Zhipeng; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    This study focused on the fouling behaviors of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in a mesophilic anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) to obtain the relations of EPS specific constituents with membrane fouling. It was found that for the EPS extracted from bulk sludge, the LB-EPS induced the largest flux decline; however, for EPS extracted from cake sludge, the S-EPS caused the highest flux decline. The preferential rejection fraction by membrane further confirmed that the greater flux decline was exhibited with the higher percent rejection of EPS fractions. The adhesion and cohesion interactions of EPS fractions and membranes could explain the different rejection rates of the EPS components. The structural characteristics analysis indicated that the fouling layers of different EPS fractions with the greater loss of filterability had the smaller porosity. Further investigations demonstrated that these changes could be attributed to the different content of HPO-N in EPS fractions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. El discurso de redes internacionales de educación para la sosteniblidad (EpS): ejemplos de tensiones dialécticas

    OpenAIRE

    Sabio Collado, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Esta comunicación pretende identificar algunas tensiones dialécticas que se manifiestan en el discurso de actores de redes de EpS europeas y latinoamericanas, tales como: sistema político/educativo; rol institucional/activista; contexto global/local; dimensión espacial/temporal; evaluación/valoración de actividades; hombres/mujeres en la ciencia; y el mundo urbano/rural. Estas tensiones se ejemplificaran a partir de la experiencia de la evaluación de la red Europea Comenius SUPPORT (Partnersh...

  4. PrEP Awareness, Familiarity, Comfort, and Prescribing Experience among US Primary Care Providers and HIV Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroll, Andrew E; Walsh, Jennifer L; Owczarzak, Jill L; McAuliffe, Timothy L; Bogart, Laura M; Kelly, Jeffrey A

    2017-05-01

    HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) was FDA approved in 2012, but uptake remains low. To characterize what would facilitate health care providers' increased PrEP prescribing, we conducted a 10-city, online survey of 525 primary care providers (PCPs) and HIV providers (HIVPs) to assess awareness, knowledge, and experience with prescribing PrEP; and, comfort with and barriers to PrEP-related activities. Fewer PCPs than HIVPs had heard of PrEP (76 vs 98%), felt familiar with prescribing PrEP (28 vs. 76%), or had prescribed it (17 vs. 64%). PCPs were less comfortable than HIVPs with PrEP-related activities such as discussing sexual activities (75 vs. 94%), testing for acute HIV (83 vs. 98%), or delivering a new HIV diagnosis (80 vs. 95%). PCPs most frequently identified limited knowledge about PrEP and concerns about insurance coverage as prescribing barriers. PCPs and HIVPs differ in needs that will facilitate their PrEP prescribing. Efforts to increase PrEP uptake will require interventions to increase the knowledge, comfort, and skills of providers to prescribe PrEP.

  5. Obesity vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Mariana P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is one of the largest and fastest growing public health problems in the world. Last century social changes have set an obesogenic milieu that calls for micro and macro environment interventions for disease prevention, while treatment is mandatory for individuals already obese. The cornerstone of overweight and obesity treatment is diet and physical exercise. However, many patients find lifestyle modifications difficult to comply and prone to failure in the long-term; therefore many patients consider anti-obesity drugs an important adjuvant if not a better alternative to behavioral approach or obesity surgery. Since the pharmacological options for obesity treatment remain quite limited, this is an exciting research area, with new treatment targets and strategies on the horizon. This review discusses the development of innovative therapeutic agents, focusing in energy homeostasis regulation and the use of molecular vaccines, targeting hormones such as somatostatin, GIP and ghrelin, to reduce body weight.

  6. Quick stimulation of Alcanivorax sp. by bioemulsificant EPS2003 on microcosm oil spill simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cappello

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Oil spill microcosms experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of bioemulsificant exopolysaccharide (EPS2003 on quick stimulation of hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. Early hours of oil spill, were stimulated using an experimental seawater microcosm, supplemented with crude oil and EPS2003 (SW+OIL+EPS2003; this system was monitored for 2 days and compared to control microcosm (only oil-polluted seawater, SW+OIL. Determination of bacterial abundance, heterotrophic cultivable and hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria were carried out. Community composition of marine bacterioplankton was determined by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries. Data obtained indicated that bioemulsificant addition stimulated an increase of total bacterial abundance and, in particular, selection of bacteria related to Alcanivorax genus; confirming that EPS2003 could be used for the dispersion of oil slicks and could stimulate the selection of marine hydrocarbon degraders thus increasing bioremediation process.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 is required for ligand-regulated, but not constitutive, endocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Confalonieri, S; Salcini, A E; Puri, C

    2000-01-01

    Membrane receptors are internalized either constitutively or upon ligand engagement. Whereas there is evidence for differential regulation of the two processes, little is known about the molecular machinery involved. Previous studies have shown that an unidentified kinase substrate is required fo...... determinant, other than those contained in the receptors themselves, which is involved in the differential regulation of constitutive vs. regulated endocytosis....... for endocytosis of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the prototypical ligand-inducible receptor, but not of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical constitutively internalized receptor. Eps15, an endocytic protein that is tyrosine phosphorylated by EGFR, is a candidate for such a function...... of the EGFR, but not of the TfR. A phosphopeptide, corresponding to the phosphorylated sequence of Eps15, inhibited EGFR endocytosis, suggesting that phosphotyrosine in Eps15 serves as a docking site for a phosphotyrosine binding protein. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of Eps15 represents the first molecular...

  8. TOMS/EP UV Reflectivity Daily and Monthly Zonal Means V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/EP UV Reflectivity Daily and Monthly Zonal Means Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3 Earth Probe TOMS...

  9. Characterization of EPS compositions and microbial community in an Anammox SBBR system treating landfill leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Lei; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Shuying; Li, Baikun; Wang, Zhong; Zhang, Sujian; Zhang, Man; Peng, Yongzhen

    2017-09-23

    The biofilm system is beneficial for Anammox process designed to treat landfill leachate. In this study, the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the microbial community in an Anammox biofilm system were analyzed to determine the functions driving the biofilm's ability to treat landfill leachate. The results demonstrated that increasing influent carbon oxygen demand (COD) could stimulate EPS production. EPS helped enrich Anammox bacteria and supplied them with nutrients and enzymes, facilitating effective nitrogen removal (approximately 95%). The variation in Anammox bacteria was similar to the variation in EPS composition. In the tested Anammox Sequencing Biofilm Batch Reactor (SBBR) system, Candidatus Kuenenia was dominant among known Anammox genus, because of its high substrate affinity and because it adapts better to landfill leachate. The relative abundance of Candidatus Kuenenia in the biofilm rose from 3.26% to 12.38%, illustrating the protection and enrichment offered by the biofilm in carrying out Anammox. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer.

  11. A Precision Measurement of the Inclusive ep Scattering Cross Section at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F.D.; Alimujiang, K.; Andreev, V.; Antunovic, B.; Asmone, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; Delvax, J.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Falkiewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, M.E.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kutak, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Li, G.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Pejchal, O.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Povh, B.; Preda, T.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Shushkevich, S.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stoicea, G.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tran, T.H.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Urban, K.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; von den Driesch, M.; Wegener, D.; Wallny, R.; Wissing, Ch.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zus, R.

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the inclusive deep-inelastic neutral current e+p scattering cross section is reported in the region of four-momentum transfer squared, 12<=Q^2<=150 GeV^2, and Bjorken x, 2x10^-4<=x<=0.1. The results are based on data collected by the H1 Collaboration at the ep collider HERA at positron and proton beam energies of E_e=27.6 GeV and E_p=920 GeV, respectively. The data are combined with previously published data, taken at E_p=820 GeV. The accuracy of the combined measurement is typically in the range of 1.3-2%. A QCD analysis at next-to-leading order is performed to determine the parton distributions in the proton based on H1 data.

  12. TOMS/EP Total Column Ozone Daily and Monthly Zonal Means V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/EP Total Column Ozone Daily and Monthly Zonal Means Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3 Earth Probe TOMS...

  13. TOMS/EP UV Aerosol Index Daily and Monthly Zonal Means V008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data product contains TOMS/EP UV Aerosol Index Daily and Monthly Zonal Means Version 8 data in ASCII format. (The shortname for this Level-3 Earth Probe TOMS...

  14. Added economic value of limited area multi-EPS weather forecasting applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Deckmyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We compare the GLAMEPS system, a pan-European limited area ensemble prediction system, with ECMWF's EPS over Belgium for an extended period from March 2010 until the end of December 2010. In agreement with a previous study, we find GLAMEPS scores considerably better than ECMWF's EPS. To compute the economic value, we introduce a new relative economic value score for continuous forecasts. The added value of combining the GLAMEPS system with the LAEF system over Belgium is studied. We conclude that adding LAEF to GLAMEPS increases the value, although the increase is small compared to the improvement of GLAMEPS to ECMWF's EPS. As an added benefit we find that the combined GLAMEPS-LAEF multi-EPS system is more robust, that is, it is less vulnerable to the (accidental removal of one of its components.

  15. Reaching Key Populations: PrEP Uptake in an Urban Health Care System in the Bronx, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Cedric H; Patel, Viraj V; Blackstock, Oni J; Felsen, Uriel R

    2017-05-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been established as an effective HIV prevention tool, but real world studies are limited. To inform dissemination efforts, we sought to describe individuals prescribed PrEP in the largest health care system in the Bronx, New York, an urban region with a high burden of HIV. We used a clinical database and chart review to identify individuals prescribed PrEP between 2011 and 2015 (n = 108). A majority were Black and Hispanic, half were men who have sex with men, and nearly a third were cisgender women who have sex with men. Primary care settings were the most common site of PrEP prescription and PrEP prescription rates increased over time. Despite reaching a diverse patient population, PrEP prescribing rates were low, underscoring the urgent need for PrEP scale-up.

  16. A protein-binding domain, EH, identified in the receptor tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 and conserved in evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, W T; Schumacher, C; Salcini, A E

    1995-01-01

    In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several heteroge...... (for Eps15-related). Structural comparison of Eps15 and Eps15r defines a family of signal transducers possessing extensive networking abilities including EH-mediated binding and association with Src homology 3-containing proteins.......In this report we structurally and functionally define a binding domain that is involved in protein association and that we have designated EH (for Eps15 homology domain). This domain was identified in the tyrosine kinase substrate Eps15 on the basis of regional conservation with several...

  17. The design of an ECRH system for JET-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Bongers, W. A.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Graswinckel, M.; Hellingman, P.; Kooijman, W.; Kruijt, O. G.; Maagdenberg, J.; Ronden, D.; Stakenborg, J.; Sterk, A. B.; Tichler, J.; Alberti, S.; Goodman, T.; Henderson, M.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Fernandez, A.; Likin, K.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Novak, S.; Piosczyk, B.; Thumm, M.; Bindslev, H.; Kaye, A.; Fleming, C.; Zohm, H.

    2003-11-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system has been designed for JET in the framework of the JET enhanced performance project (JET-EP) under the European fusion development agreement. Due to financial constraints it has been decided not to implement this project. Nevertheless, the design work conducted from April 2000 to January 2002 shows a number of features that can be relevant in preparation of future ECRH systems, e.g. for ITER. The ECRH system was foreseen to comprise six gyrotrons, 1 MW each, in order to deliver 5 MW into the plasma (Verhoeven A.G.A. et al 2001 The ECRH system for JET 26th Int. Conf. on Infrared and Millimeter Waves (Toulouse, 10 14 September 2001) p 83; Verhoeven A.G.A. et al 2003 The 113 GHz ECRH system for JET Proc. 12th Joint Workshop on ECE and ECRH (13 16 May 2002) ed G. Giruzzi (Aix-en-Provence: World Scientific) pp 511 16). The main aim was to enable the control of neo-classical tearing modes. The paper will concentrate on: the power-supply and modulation system, including series IGBT switches, to enable independent control of each gyrotron and an all-solid-state body power supply to stabilize the gyrotron output power and to enable fast modulations up to 10 kHz and a plug-in launcher that is steerable in both toroidal and poloidal angles and able to handle eight separate mm-wave beams. Four steerable launching mirrors were foreseen to handle two mm-wave beams each. Water cooling of all the mirrors was a particularly ITER-relevant feature.

  18. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Samira; Hojati, Zohreh; Tabatabaeian, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a proto-oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer tissues using reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) followed by analyses of the association between the outcomes. In this study, 122 fresh tissues, including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples, were disrupted by mortar and pestle, and then the RNA was isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by 2 -ΔΔCt method using RT-qPCR. EpCAM protein level was also assessed in 66 cases using Western blot technique. Using RT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign samples. Evaluating EpCAM protein overexpression in a portion of samples depicted the fully concordance rate between Western blot and RT-qPCR techniques. C-myc expression was first evaluated by RT-qPCR method, showing the overexpression rate of 39% and 28% in malignant and benign samples, respectively. These data were also quite concordant with the clinically available immunohistochemistry reports of the same samples studied in this study. Importantly, overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc was significantly associated and showed an agreement of 57.3%. This study demonstrated the cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM and c-myc positive cases were significantly associated with reduced and enhanced risk of ER/PR positivity

  19. [Developments in HPV vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melker, Hester; Kenter, Gemma; van Rossum, Tekla; Conyn-van Spaendonck, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the human papilloma virus (HPV) has been included in the national Vaccination Programme of the Netherlands for 12-year-old girls since 2010. Vaccination coverage for the birth cohort of 1997 was 56.; there is a gradual increase in uptake. Continuous safety monitoring brought no new unknown serious side effects to light; many girls suffered from transient symptoms such as painful arm, fatigue and headache. After the current vaccines that protect against HPV types 2 and 4 types, respectively and induce some cross protection, vaccines are being developed that can induce broader protection. HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls is cost-effective, even for relatively low vaccination coverage. The potential protection of HPV vaccination extends beyond prevention of cervical cancer by preventing other oncological manifestations of HPV infection in women as well as men and genital warts. The preventive HPV vaccines do not appear to be effective in treating existing abnormalities.

  20. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SAMIRA SADEGHI

    and c-myc in breast tumours collected from breast cancer patients of the Iranian population. EpCAM .... Type. Fibroadenoma. 1. 9. 10. 2. 8. 10. Ductal or lobular hyperplasia. 0. 3. 3. 1. 2. 3. Lobular carcinoma in situ. 1. 4. 5. 2. 3. 5. Total. 2. 16. 18. 5. 13. 18. Age. 50<. 2. 12 ..... Distribution of EpCAM/c-myc positive and negative.

  2. PrEP awareness and decision-making for Latino MSM in San Antonio, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    García, Moctezuma; Harris, Allyssa L.

    2017-01-01

    Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has been promoted among high-risk populations as an effective HIV biomedical intervention. However, limited research is available on the significance of culturally informed biomedical interventions for Latino MSM. A total of 159 self-administered Internet surveys were completed by Latino MSM ages 21–30 in San Antonio, Texas. The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument that measured Latino MSM attitudes and beliefs towards PrEP, identify associatio...

  3. Imaging of Ep-CAM Positive Metastatic Cancer in the Lymph System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    IRDye 800CW-NHS Ester from Licor , Inc, (Lincoln, NE). The conjugation ratio was 1.5 to 2.8 IRDye molecules per antibody. The retention of specific...cytometry (FACSAria, BDBiosciences, San Jose, CA), microscopy (Lieca, Bannockburn, IL), or the Odyssey ( Licor , Lincoln, NE). Cell nuclei were stained...conjugates was determined using the Odyssey ( Licor , Lincoln, NE) to scan for IR800. Ep-CAM positive, MT-3 cells, and low Ep-CAM expressing, SKBr-3 cells

  4. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  5. Social, structural, behavioral and clinical factors influencing retention in Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP care in Mississippi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha Arnold

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is a biomedical intervention that can reduce rates of HIV transmission when taken once daily by HIV-negative individuals. Little is understood about PrEP uptake and retention in care among the populations most heavily impacted by the HIV epidemic, particularly among young men who have sex with men (YMSM in the Deep South. Therefore, this study explored the structural, social, behavioral, and clinical factors that affect PrEP use and retention in care among YMSM in Jackson, Mississippi. Thirty MSM who were prescribed PrEP at an outpatient primary care clinic were interviewed and included 23 men who had been retained in PrEP care and seven who had not been retained. The mean age of participants was 26.6 years. Most (23 participants were African American. Major factors affecting PrEP use and retention in PrEP care included 1 structural factors such as cost and access to financial assistance for medications and clinical services; 2 social factors such as stigma and relationship status; 3 behavioral factors including sexual risk behaviors; and 4 clinical factors such as perceived and actual side effects. Many participants also discussed the positive spillover effects of PrEP use and reported that PrEP had a positive impact on their health. Four of the seven individuals who had not been retained re-enrolled in PrEP care after completing their interviews, suggesting that case management and ongoing outreach can enhance retention in PrEP care. Interventions to enhance retention in PrEP care among MSM in the Deep South will be most effective if they address the complex structural, social, clinical, and behavioral factors that influence PrEP uptake and retention in PrEP care.

  6. Social, structural, behavioral and clinical factors influencing retention in Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) care in Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Trisha; Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Chan, Philip A; Perez-Brumer, Amaya; Bologna, Estefany S; Beauchamps, Laura; Johnson, Kendra; Mena, Leandro; Nunn, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a biomedical intervention that can reduce rates of HIV transmission when taken once daily by HIV-negative individuals. Little is understood about PrEP uptake and retention in care among the populations most heavily impacted by the HIV epidemic, particularly among young men who have sex with men (YMSM) in the Deep South. Therefore, this study explored the structural, social, behavioral, and clinical factors that affect PrEP use and retention in care among YMSM in Jackson, Mississippi. Thirty MSM who were prescribed PrEP at an outpatient primary care clinic were interviewed and included 23 men who had been retained in PrEP care and seven who had not been retained. The mean age of participants was 26.6 years. Most (23) participants were African American. Major factors affecting PrEP use and retention in PrEP care included 1) structural factors such as cost and access to financial assistance for medications and clinical services; 2) social factors such as stigma and relationship status; 3) behavioral factors including sexual risk behaviors; and 4) clinical factors such as perceived and actual side effects. Many participants also discussed the positive spillover effects of PrEP use and reported that PrEP had a positive impact on their health. Four of the seven individuals who had not been retained re-enrolled in PrEP care after completing their interviews, suggesting that case management and ongoing outreach can enhance retention in PrEP care. Interventions to enhance retention in PrEP care among MSM in the Deep South will be most effective if they address the complex structural, social, clinical, and behavioral factors that influence PrEP uptake and retention in PrEP care.

  7. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a doctor...

  8. Vaccines against poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented. PMID:25136089

  9. Vaccines against poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  10. A Long Noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS Acts as a Transcriptional Brake to Restrain Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atianand, Maninjay K; Hu, Wenqian; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Shen, Ying; Ricci, Emiliano P; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bhatta, Ankit; Schattgen, Stefan A; McGowan, Jason D; Blin, Juliana; Braun, Joerg E; Gandhi, Pallavi; Moore, Melissa J; Chang, Howard Y; Lodish, Harvey F; Caffrey, Daniel R; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-06-16

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, we identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice, combined with gain-of-function and rescue experiments, revealed a specific role for this lincRNA in restraining IRG expression. Consistently, lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice manifest enhanced inflammation and lethality following endotoxin challenge in vivo. lincRNA-EPS localizes at regulatory regions of IRGs to control nucleosome positioning and repress transcription. Further, lincRNA-EPS mediates these effects by interacting with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L via a CANACA motif located in its 3' end. Together, these findings identify lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of lincRNAs in the immune system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Designing Epidemiology Studies to Determine the Incidence and Prevalence of Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis (EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, Dorothea; Davenport, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    The reported incidence and prevalence of encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) varies markedly between North America, Europe, Japan, and Australia. Although this could reflect differences in clinical practice patterns and access to transplantation as there is no current test for early detection, and some patients may present many years after discontinuation of peritoneal dialysis (PD), there are concerns about under-reporting, particularly for those with milder forms. Currently, only PD vintage has been identified as a significant risk factor for developing EPS, although some patients can develop EPS within months of starting PD. As such, there is a need for epidemiological studies to determine the incidence and prevalence of EPS to allow for patient education and counselling in terms of dialysis modality choice and length of treatment. In addition, carefully designed epidemiological studies could potentially allow for the identification of risk factors and bio-markers that could then be used to identify patients at increased risk of developing EPS in the future. Typically, studies to date have been underpowered with inadequate longitudinal follow-up. We review the different types of epidemiological studies and provide information as to the number of patients to be recruited and the duration of follow-up required to determine the incidence and prevalence of EPS. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  12. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and surface properties of activated sludges: effect of organic carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyik, Ayse Gul; Kılıç, Başak; Çeçen, Ferhan

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to clarify how the type of organic substrate in a wastewater affects the production and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and hydrophobicity and surface charge of activated sludges. For this purpose, three activated sludge reactors were operated in parallel with feeds composed of the organics (i) peptone, glucose, and acetate and (ii) peptone and (iii) glucose. EPS extracted from sludges were fractionated into very loosely bound, loosely bound, and tightly bound fractions and analyzed for protein and polysaccharide. Also, molecular weight distribution of proteins was determined by using high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Regardless of the type of organic substrate, in each sludge, tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) prevailed. The type of organic substrate affected the relative proportion of protein and polysaccharide and had an impact on hydrophobicity and surface charge. The sludge fed with peptone was distinctly more hydrophobic and had a lower negative surface charge than others. HPSEC fingerprints revealed that the variety and size of proteins were dependent on the type of feed. HPSEC also pointed to a shift of high molecular weight (MW) proteins from TB-EPS to others. In addition, results of a parallel study examining the inhibitory effect of Ag(+) on three sludges were interpreted along with feed composition, EPS, and surface measurements. The response of each sludge to toxic Ag(+) ion seemed to change with the type of feed.

  13. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Silver nanoparticles formation by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Zhang, Xing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) excreted from microorganisms were a complex natural biological polymer mixture of proteins and polysaccharides, which played an important roles in the transport of metals, such as Ag(+). Electroactive bacteria, is an important class of environmental microorganisms, which can use iron or manganese mineral as terminal electron acceptors to generate energy for biosynthesis and cell maintenance. In this work, the EPS extracted of three electroactive bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas putida) were used for reducing Ag(+) and forming silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Results showed that all the three microbial EPS could reduce Ag(+) to AgNPs. The formed AgNPs were characterized in depth by the UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The main components in the EPS from the three electroactive bacteria were analyzed. The presence of cytochrome c in these EPS was confirmed, and they were found to contribute to the reduction of Ag(+) to AgNPs. The results indicated that the EPS of electroactive bacteria could act as a reductant for AgNPs synthesis and could provide new information to understand the fate of metals and their metal nanoparticles in the natural environments.

  15. Mechanical and chemical studies on EPS from Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans: from planktonic to biofilm cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Sand, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    Bacteria attach to minerals and form biofilms, which can initiate and enhance bioleaching. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play a crucial role during the whole process. Little is known how the cell surface/EPS mechanically and chemically respond to transformation from planktonic to biofilm cells. In this study the attachment and biofilm formation by Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans were followed during pyrite leaching. Adhesiveness and stiffness of the cell/biofilm and the pyrite surface were checked by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force mapping mode under real living conditions. The EPS components were analysed by colorimetry, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that slimy and soft EPS heterogeneously accumulated in the biofilms and on the surface of pyrite to induce bacterial adhesion and form robust biofilms. After attaching to the pyrite surface, the cells started to change the components of their EPS. Huge amounts of humic substances were detected in the biofilm EPS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiscale BerEp4 Molecular Imaging of Microtumor Phantoms: Toward Theranostics for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Dasgeb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC, the most common cancer in humans, appears macroscopically and microscopically similar to many other skin lesions, which makes differential diagnosis difficult. We are developing an approach for quantitative molecular imaging of BerEP4, a transmembrane biomarker for BCC, with the goal of increasing the precision and accuracy of diagnosis. This pilot study was conducted to assess the affinity and selectivity of BerEp4 antibody and assess its possible use in designing theranostic probes for BCC. We provide evidence that our photon-counting fluorescence macrodetection system can recover specific signal increases from a film/pellet phantom. Additionally, we show that a two-photon excited fluorescence /backscatter confocal microscopy system can image BerEP4 antibody/antigen complex on the surface of BerEP4-expressing cancer cells in three dimensions. Based on the initial results, BerEP4 seems to be a promising biomarker for molecular imaging of BCC. To prepare BerEP4 for eventual theranostic use, we examined the feasibility of a combined macro-/micro-optical approach to imaging BCC with various histologies. These optical methods, endowed with the ability to monitor treatment in real time, may open an opportunity for noninvasive diagnosis, treatments, and follow-up.

  17. Enhancement of nitrifying biofilm formation using selected EPS produced by heterotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneda, S; Park, S; Hayashi, H; Jung, J; Hirata, A

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of enhancing nitrifying biofilm formation rate with the aid of selected EPS produced by heterotrophic bacteria was investigated. When EPS production characteristics were examined for four kinds of heterotrophs isolated from a domestic wastewater treatment reactor, two strains obtained from biofilms (B1, B2) exhibited a higher polysaccharide production rate than those from suspended flocs (A1, A2). Among EPS components, the concentration of uronic acids gave a good correlation with flocculation ability, which suggests that acidic polysaccharides play a major role in bioaggregate formation. Addition of 1 g/L D-glucuronic acid as an EPS substitute enhanced the homocoagulation rate of autotrophic Nitrosomonas europaea and altered its zeta potential from ñ30.4 mV to +4.3 mV, which indicates a possibility that particular EPS components produced by heterotrophs are utilized as neutralising reagents for nitrifying biofilm formation. Moreover, when heterotrophic isolates with Nitrobacter winogradskyi were cultured in batch with fabric supports, biofilm formed on the substratum. These experimental results suggest the application of selected EPS for enhancing nitrifying biofilm formation.

  18. Night eating and obesity in the EP3R-deficient mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Klein, Izabella; Brownell, Sara E; Tabarean, Iustin V; Davis, Christopher N; Conti, Bruno; Bartfai, Tamas

    2007-02-20

    Adult mice carrying a null mutation of the prostanoid receptor EP3R (EP3R(-/-) mice) exhibit increased frequency of feeding during the light cycle of the day and develop an obese phenotype under a normal fat diet fed ad libitum. EP3R(-/-) mice show increased motor activity, which is not sufficient to offset the increased feeding leading to increased body weight. Altered "nocturnal" activity and feeding behavior is present from a very early age and does not seem to require age-dependent factors for the development of obesity. Obesity in EP3R(-/-) mice is characterized by elevated leptin and insulin levels and >20% higher body weight compared with WT littermates. Abdominal and subcutaneous fat and increased liver weight account for the weight increase in EP3R(-/-) mice. These observations expand the roles of prostaglandin E(2) signaling in metabolic regulation beyond the reported stimulation of leptin release from adipose tissue to involve actions mediated by EP3R in the regulation of sleep architecture and feeding behavior. The findings add to the growing literature on links between inflammatory signaling and obesity.

  19. Preparation and microwave-absorbing property of EP/BaFe12O19/PANI composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huixia; Bai, Dezhong; Tan, Lin; Chen, Nali; Wang, Yueyi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we introduced expanded perlite (EP) into the system of ferrite composites for the first time. By sol-gel self-propagating combustion method, expanded perlite/barium ferrite (EP/BaFe12O19) was prepared, and then ternary composites of expanded perlite/barium ferrite/polyaniline (EP/BaFe12O19/PANI) were obtained by in-situ oxidative polymerization of aniline on EP/BaFe12O19 mixture. Although, as is well known, the values of saturation magnetization (Ms), remnant magnetization (Mr) and coercivity (Hc) of composites are all lower than the pure BaFe12O19 particles owing to the existence of the nonmagnetic EP and PANI, the EP/BaFe12O19/PANI composites exhibit absorption characteristics at the range of 2-18 GHz, the effective absorption bandwidth (less than -4 dB) reached 12.12 GHz and the minimum reflection loss of -5.66 dB at 8.48 GHz with only 2 mm thickness of absorbing layer. So the composites could resist urban electromagnetic pollution, such as wireless network, communication and so on, effectively.

  20. Adhesion strength and spreading characteristics of EPS on membrane surfaces during lateral and central growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Tansel, Derya Z

    2013-11-01

    Deposition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on membrane surfaces is a precursor step for bacterial attachment. The purpose of this study was to analyze the morphological changes on a clean polysulfone ultrafilration membrane after exposure to effluent from a membrane bioreactor. The effluent was filtered to remove bacteria before exposing the membrane. The morphological characterization was performed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The lateral (2D) and central growth characteristics (3D) of the EPS deposits were evaluated by section and topographical analyses of the height images. The contact angle of single EPS units was 9.07 ± 0.50° which increased to 24.41 ± 1.00° for large clusters (over 10 units) and decreased to 18.68 ± 1.00° for the multilayered clusters. The surface tension of the single EPS units was 49.34 ± 1.70 mNm(-1). The surface tension of single layered small and large EPS clusters were 51.26 ± 2.05 and 53.48 ± 2.01 mNm(-1), respectively. For the multilayered clusters, the surface tension was 51.43 ± 2.05 mNm(-1). The spreading values were negative for all deposits on the polysulfone membrane indicating that the EPS clusters did not have tendency to spread but preferred to retain their shapes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. How Important are the Longitudinal Virtual Photons in the Semi-Inclusive ep Processes ?

    CERN Document Server

    Jezuita-Dabrowska, U

    2003-01-01

    We study an importance of the longitudinally polarized virtual photons gamma sub sup * L in the semi-inclusive ep processes in the ep center-of-mass and Breit frames, and for various distributions. We used the factorization formulae for the unpolarized inclusive and semi-inclusive ep processes which hold in an arbitrary reference frame. The numerical studies were performed for the ep HERA collider for a process with a large- p sub T (prompt) photons production, i.e., the unpolarized Compton process ep -> e gamma X, in the Born approximation. In the ep center-of-mass frame we found that the differential cross section for the longitudinally polarized intermediate photon, d sigma sub L , and the term due to the interference between the longitudinal- and transverse-polarization states of the photon, d tau sub L sub T , are small, i.e. below 10% of the cross section. Moreover, these two contributions almost cancel one another, leading to a stronger domination of the transversely polarized virtual photon, even for ...

  2. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  3. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immune Interference After Sequential Alphavirus Vaccine Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    containing 50gmL−1 each of neomycin and streptomycin and supplemented with 0.5% human serum albumin , U.S.P. The lyophilized vaccine is the filtered...vaccine was prepared from specific pathogen-free eggs infected with the attenuated CM4884 strain of WEE virus. The supernatant was harvested and filtered...supernatant harvested from primary chicken embryo cell cultures. The vaccine was prepared from spe- cific pathogen-free eggs infected with the

  5. The eps15 homology (EH) domain-based interaction between eps15 and hrb connects the molecular machinery of endocytosis to that of nucleocytosolic transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doria, M; Salcini, A E; Colombo, E

    1999-01-01

    The Eps15 homology (EH) module is a protein-protein interaction domain that establishes a network of connections involved in various aspects of endocytosis and sorting. The finding that EH-containing proteins bind to Hrb (a cellular cofactor of the Rev protein) and to the related protein Hrbl rai...

  6. Protection of a novel epitope-RNA VLP double-effective VLP vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-Mei; Cai, Jian-Chun; Chen, Hao-Tai; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious viral disease of cloven-hoofed animals. Previously, we found that the epitope peptide EP141-160 displayed on virus-like particles (VLP) for use as a vaccine showed high immunoreactivity and conferred partially effective protection to animals. In this study, we first combined antisense RNA with VLP as a vaccine against the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) by using a prokaryotic co-expression system. The antisense RNA against the 3D genes of FMDV was packaged into VLP with EP141-160 presented on the surface. ELISA and Western blotting proved that the epitope-RNA VLP eliciting an immune response to FMDV in mice. Furthermore, the potency of the vaccine was tested in mice and guinea pigs. The results indicated that the epitope-RNA VLP vaccine protected 40% of suckling mice and 85% (17/20) of guinea pigs from FMDV. Based on the experimental data, the epitope-RNA VLP vaccine should have value in exploring and developing vaccines against FMDV in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterisation of the exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11 and its non-EPS producing derivative strains as potential probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Milica; López, Patricia; Strahinic, Ivana; Suárez, Ana; Kojic, Milan; Fernández-García, María; Topisirovic, Ljubisa; Golic, Natasa; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia

    2012-08-17

    Traditional fermented foods are the best source for the isolation of strains with specific traits to act as functional starters and to keep the biodiversity of the culture collections. Besides, these strains could be used in the formulation of foods claimed to promote health benefits, i.e. those containing probiotic microorganisms. For the rational selection of strains acting as probiotics, several in vitro tests have been proposed. In the current study, we have characterized the probiotic potential of the strain Lactobacillus paraplantarum BGCG11, isolated from a Serbian soft, white, homemade cheese, which is able to produce a "ropy" exopolysaccharide (EPS). Three novobiocin derivative strains, which have lost the ropy phenotype, were characterized as well in order to determine the putative role of the EPS in the probiotic potential. Under chemically gastrointestinal conditions, all strains were able to survive around 1-2% (10(6)-10(7)cfu/ml cultivable bacteria) only when they were included in a food matrix (1% skimmed milk). The strains were more resistant to acid conditions than to bile salts and gastric or pancreatic enzymes, which could be due to a pre-adaptation of the parental strain to acidic conditions in the cheese habitat. The ropy EPS did not improve the survival of the producing strain. On the contrary, the presence of an EPS layer surrounding the strain BGCG11 hindered its adhesion to the three epithelial intestinal cell lines tested, since the adhesion of the three non-ropy derivatives was higher than the parental one and also than that of the reference strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Aiming to propose a potential target application of these strains as probiotics, the cytokine production of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was analyzed. The EPS-producing L. paraplantarum BGCG11 strain showed an anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressor profile whereas the non-ropy derivative strains induced higher pro-inflammatory response. In addition, when

  8. Function of bacterial cells and their exuded extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in virus removal by red soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingzi; Jiang, Yan; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Jiabao

    2014-01-01

    The potential influence of autochthonous microorganisms on virus fate in soil is usually determined through extreme conditions of sterilization vs. nonsterilization; however, the relative importance of microbial cells and their exudates remains unclear. In this study, bacterial cells (cell) were harvested, and their exuded extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were extracted from three strains of bacteria, namely, Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa as well as Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. This study aimed to evaluate virus removal in solutions in the presence of cell, EPS, and their combination (cell/EPS), as well as to investigate how their presence affects virus removal efficiencies by four red soils based on batch experiments. Results showed that virus removal percentage in solutions ranged from 11 to 23 in the presence of cells only and from 12 to 15 in the presence of EPS only. The removal percentage in the combined cell/EPS treatment can be estimated by summing the results achieved by the cell and EPS treatments, separately. Meanwhile, cell presence had a negligible effect on virus removal by red soils. EPS and combined cell/EPS significantly reduced virus removal by 20 to 69% and 16 to 50%, respectively, which indicated that EPS served a dominant function in reducing virus removal. This study clearly demonstrated that the prediction of virus removal by red soils must consider the effect of bacteria, especially those producing large quantities of EPS, which can be responsible for the underestimation of viral load in certain studies.

  9. Prostaglandin receptor EP3 regulates cell proliferation and migration with impact on survival of endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junyan; Trillsch, Fabian; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Rahmeh, Martina; Hofmann, Simone; Vogel, Marianne; Mahner, Sven; Jeschke, Udo; von Schönfeldt, Viktoria

    2018-01-02

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptor 3 (EP3) regulates tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in numerous cancers. The role of EP3 as a prognostic biomarker in endometrial cancer remains unclear. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic significance of EP3 expression in endometrial cancer. We analyzed the EP3 expression of 140 endometrial carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. RL95-2 endometrial cancer cell line was chosen from four endometrial cancer cell lines (RL95-2, Ishikawa, HEC-1-A, and HEC-1-B) according to EP3 expression level. Treated with PGE2 and EP3 antagonist, RL95-2 cells were investigated by MTT, BrdU, and wound healing assay for functional assessment of EP3. EP3 staining differed significantly according to WHO tumor grading in both whole cohort (p = 0.01) and the subgroup of endometrioid carcinoma (p = 0.01). Patients with high EP3 expression in their respective tumors had impaired progression-free survival as well as overall survival in both cohorts above. EP3 expression in the overall cohort was identified as an independent prognostic marker for progression-free survival (HR 1.014, 95%CI 1.003-1.024, p = 0.01) when adjusted for age, stage, grading, and recurrence. Treatment with EP3 antagonists induced upregulation of estrogen receptor β and decreased activity of Ras and led to attenuated proliferation and migration of RL95-2 cells. EP3 seems to play a crucial role in endometrial cancer progression. In the context of limited systemic treatment options for endometrial cancer, this explorative analysis identifies EP3 as a potential target for diagnostic workup and therapy.

  10. PrEP Adherence Patterns Strongly Affect Individual HIV Risk and Observed Efficacy in Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dobromir T; Mâsse, Benoît R; Donnell, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that the efficacy of tenofovir-based preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) strongly depends on the consistency of PrEP use. We explore how the patterns of pill taking and waning of PrEP protection may affect PrEP efficacy for HIV prevention. A 2-arm RCT was simulated by mathematical models assuming that the prescribed daily doses were skipped periodically, randomly, or in large blocks. Risk-driven adherence, in which PrEP was taken when sex was expected, was also investigated. Three temporal PrEP protection profiles were explored: long (5 days), intermediate (3 days), and short (24 hours). Modeling results were compared to the efficacy observed in completed RCTs. The expected PrEP efficacy was 60% with periodic, 50% with random, and 34% with block adherence when PrEP had a long protection profile and pills were taken only 50% of the days. Risk-driven pill taking resulted in 29% and 37% daily pills taken and efficacy of 43% and 51%, respectively, for long protection. High PrEP efficacy comparable with that observed in Partners PrEP and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Botswana trials was simulated under long protection, high overall adherence, and limited block pill taking; the moderate efficacy observed in iPrEx and Bangkok trials was comparable with the 50% adherence scenarios under random pill taking and long protection. Pill-taking patterns may have a substantial impact on the protection provided by PrEP even when the same numbers of pills are taken. When PrEP retains protection for longer than a day, pill-taking patterns can explain a broad range of efficacies observed in PrEP RCTs.

  11. ORAL LIVE TULAREMIA VACCINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously reported data on the pathogenesis and immunogenicity of live vaccine strain LVS have been sufficiently encouraging to warrant an...potential for oral immunization with live tularemia vaccine prepared from strain LVS.

  12. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  13. Vaccine Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thaul, Susan

    2005-01-01

    .... Whether a vaccine's target is naturally occurring or present because of hostile intent, the issues policy makers must deal with include vaccine development, production, availability, safety, effectiveness, and access...

  14. Vaccinating against cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parry, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Since last year, it has become possible to vaccinate against the human papillomavirus (HPV) that causes most cases of cervical cancer, but countries face tough decisions before making the vaccine widely available.

  15. Vaccines and animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D B

    2007-04-01

    Vaccination promotes animal welfare by protecting animal health, but it also has other welfare benefits, e.g. recent investigations have looked at the potential of vaccines in immunoneutering such as immunocastration--a humane alternative to the painful traditional methods. Similarly, vaccination can be used during disease outbreaks as a viable alternative to stamping-out, thus avoiding the welfare problems that on-farm mass slaughter can cause. Protecting animal health through vaccination leads to improved animal welfare, and maintaining good welfare ensures that animals can respond successfully to vaccination (as poor welfare can lead to immunosuppression, which can affect the response to vaccination). It is clear that vaccination has tremendous advantages for animal welfare and although the possible side effects of vaccination can have a negative effect on the welfare of some individual animals, the harm caused by these unwanted effects must be weighed against the undoubted benefits for groups of animals.

  16. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before I knew I was pregnant? Will this harm my baby? Probably not. The chance of the ... pertussis-tdap-vaccine-pregnancy/pdf/ . The need for vaccination for other diseases during pregnancy will vary and ...

  17. Vaccines and Thimerosal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines and vaccines. There is no evidence of harm caused by the low doses of thimerosal in ... and is therefore less likely to cause any harm. Thimerosal prevents the growth of bacteria in vaccines. ...

  18. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  19. Ingredients of Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... No vaccine produced in the United States contains penicillin. Egg protein is found in influenza and yellow ... bacteria. For children with a prior history of allergic reactions to any of these substances in vaccines, parents ...

  20. Vaccinations during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Map Premature Birth Report Cards Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Vaccinations and pregnancy Vaccinations and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ...

  1. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccines. Vaccine-preventable diseases have many social and economic costs: sick children miss school and can cause ... there are only a few cases of disease today, if we take away the protection given by ...

  2. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  3. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Term Complications of Diabetes Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  4. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  5. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Steve; Giubilini, Alberto; Walker, Mary Jean

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases (either for themselves or for their children); second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection (CO) to vaccination be subject. ...

  6. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-01-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both...

  7. Vaccine-associated hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Michael M; DeStefano, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Vaccine-associated hypersensitivity reactions are not infrequent; however, serious acute-onset, presumably IgE-mediated or IgG and complement-mediated anaphylactic or serious delayed-onset T cell-mediated systemic reactions are considered extremely rare. Hypersensitivity can occur because of either the active vaccine component (antigen) or one of the other components. Postvaccination acute-onset hypersensitivity reactions include self-limited localized adverse events and, rarely, systemic reactions ranging from urticaria/angioedema to full-blown anaphylaxis with multisystem involvement. Risk of anaphylaxis after all vaccines is estimated to be 1.31 (95% CI, 0.90-1.84) per million vaccine doses, respectively. Serious hypersensitivity reactions after influenza vaccines are particularly important because of the large number of persons vaccinated annually. Influenza vaccines are unique in requiring annual changes in the vaccines' antigenic composition to match the predicted circulating influenza strains. Recently, novel influenza vaccine types were introduced in the United States (recombinant vaccines, some with higher antigen content and a new adjuvanted vaccine). Providers should be aware of changing recommendations on the basis of recent published evidence for persons with a history of egg allergy to receive annual influenza vaccination. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathophysiology and risk factors for reported vaccine-associated adverse events. Further research is also needed to determine whether repeated annual inactivated influenza vaccination, the number of vaccine antigens administered at the same time, and the current timing of routine infant vaccinations are optimal for overall population well-being. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of EPs 7630 in adults with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthys, Heinrich; Pliskevich, Dina A; Bondarchuk, Oleksandr M; Malek, Fathi A; Tribanek, Michael; Kieser, Meinhard

    2013-05-01

    Preventing and managing exacerbations is one major component in COPD treatment. We investigated whether EPs 7630, a herbal drug preparation from the roots of Pelargonium sidoides, could prolong time to acute exacerbation in patients with COPD stage II/III. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, patients were randomly allocated to oral 24-week add-on therapy with 3 × 30 drops/day EPs 7630 (n = 99) or placebo (n = 101) to a standardised baseline-treatment. Primary endpoint was time to first exacerbation of COPD. Secondary endpoints were number of exacerbations, consumption of antibiotics, quality of life, patient satisfaction, inability to work, and tolerability. Median time to exacerbation was significantly prolonged with EPs 7630 compared to placebo (57 versus 43 days, Kaplan-Maier-estimate; p = 0.005, one-sided centre-stratified log-rank test). The superiority of EPs 7630 was also confirmed in secondary endpoints, e.g., fewer exacerbations, less patients with antibiotic use, improved quality of life, higher patient satisfaction, and less days of inability to work. The incidence of minor gastrointestinal adverse events was higher in the EPs 7630 group. The results demonstrate a statistically significant and clinically relevant superiority of add-on therapy with EPs 7630 over placebo and a good long-term tolerability in the treatment of moderate to severe COPD. EPs 7630 prolonged time to exacerbations and reduced exacerbation frequency and antibiotic use. Trial Registration No.: ISRCTN01681733. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis on the binding of heavy metals onto extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Guo-Ping; Xu, Juan; Luo, Hong-Wei; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Wei-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing; Xie, Zhi; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Hu, Feng-Chun

    2013-02-01

    Metal binding to microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) greatly influences the distribution of heavy metals in microbial aggregates, soil and aquatic systems in nature. In this work, the thermodynamic characteristics of the binding between aqueous metals (with copper ion as an example) and EPS of activated sludge were investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry was employed to estimate the thermodynamic parameters for the binding of Cu²⁺ onto EPS, while three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy with parallel factor analysis was used for quantifying the complexation of Cu²⁺ with the EPS. The binding mechanisms were further explored by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis. The results show that the proteins and humic substances in EPS were both strong ligands for Cu²⁺. The binding capacity N, binding constant K, binding enthalpy ΔH were calculated as 5.74 × 10⁻² mmol/g, 2.18 × 10⁵ L/mol, and -11.30 kJ/mol, respectively, implying that such a binding process was exothermic and thermodynamically favorable. The binding process was found to be driven mainly by the entropy change of the reaction. A further investigation shows that Cu²⁺ bound with the oxygen atom in the carboxyl groups in the EPS molecules of activated sludge. This study facilitates a better understanding about the roles of EPS in protecting microbes against heavy metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Veterinary Replicon Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hikke, Mia C.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination is essential in livestock farming and in companion animal ownership. Nucleic acid vaccines based on DNA or RNA provide an elegant alternative to those classical veterinary vaccines that have performed suboptimally. Recent advances in terms of rational design, safety, and efficacy have

  11. Vaccines against mucosal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari

    2012-06-01

    There remains a great need to develop vaccines against many of the pathogens that infect mucosal tissues or have a mucosal port of entry. Parenteral vaccination may protect in some instances, but usually a mucosal vaccination route is necessary. Mucosal vaccines also have logistic advantages over injectable vaccines by being easier to administer, having less risk of transmitting infections and potentially being easier to manufacture. Still, however, only relatively few vaccines for human use are available: oral vaccines against cholera, typhoid, polio, and rotavirus, and a nasal vaccine against influenza. For polio, typhoid and influenza, in which the pathogens reach the blood stream, there is also an injectable vaccine alternative. A problem with available oral live vaccines is their reduced immunogenicity when used in developing countries; for instance, the efficacy of rotavirus vaccines correlates closely with the national per capita income. Research is needed to define the impact of factors such as malnutrition, aberrant intestinal microflora, concomitant infections, and preexisting immunity as well as of host genetic factors on the immunogenicity of these vaccines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mucosal vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    Among the novel vaccination methods, mucosal vaccination seems to possess all the desired criteria. The chapter reviews the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding this type of vaccination with a focus on their uptake, immune stimulation, and where possible, discusses their potential as future

  13. Vaccination Records for Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can also ask your doctor to record the vaccines your child has received in your state’s immunization registry. Just ... Talk to your child’s doctor to determine what vaccines your child needs for protection against vaccine preventable diseases. Immunization ...

  14. Oral vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Embregts, Carmen W.E.; Forlenza, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The limited number of oral vaccines currently approved for use in humans and veterinary species clearly illustrates that development of efficacious and safe oral vaccines has been a challenge not only for fish immunologists. The insufficient efficacy of oral vaccines is partly due to antigen

  15. Vaccination: problems and perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Kharit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive vaccination had proved its effective morbidity reduction. Today it is necessary to extend vaccination schedule, creation of selective, regional schedules based on epidemiological, clinical, economical substantiation. Development of vaccination needs the profound scientific research, modernization of adverse reaction observing system, betterment training system and awareness of population.

  16. Can EPS development be avoided with early interventions? The potential role of tamoxifen--a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa-Amorim, Erika; Del Peso, Gloria; Bajo, M Auxiliadora; Alvarez, Laura; Ossorio, Marta; Gil, Fernando; Bellon, Teresa; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Identification of patients at high risk for EPS ("EPS-prone") and delivery of appropriate interventions might prevent its development. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of all EPS and EPS-prone patients diagnosed at our PD unit. For a 30-year period representing our entire PD experience, we retrospectively identified all patients with EPS (diagnosed according to International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis criteria) and all patients defined as EPS-prone because they met at least 2 established criteria (severe peritonitis, PD vintage greater than 3 years, severe hemoperitoneum, overexposure to glucose, and acquired ultrafiltration failure). Of 679 PD patients, we identified 20 with EPS, for an overall prevalence of 2.9%. Mean age at diagnosis was 50.2 ± 16.4 years, with a median PD time of 77.96 months (range: 44.36 - 102.7 months) and a median follow-up of 30.91 months (range: 4.6 - 68.75 months). Of patients with EPS, 10 (50%) received tamoxifen, 10 (50%) received parenteral nutrition, and 2 (10%) underwent adhesiolysis, with 25% mortality related to EPS. Another 14 patients were identified as EPS-prone. Median follow-up was 54.05 months (range: 11.9 - 87.04 months). All received tamoxifen, and 5 (36%) received corticosteroids; none progressed to full EPS. We observed no differences in baseline data between the groups, but the group with EPS had been on PD longer (84 ± 53 months vs 39 ± 20 months, p = 0.002) and had a higher cumulative number of days of peritoneal inflammation from peritonitis (17.2 ± 11.1 days vs 9.8 ± 7.9 days, p = 0.015). Overall mortality was similar in the groups. The incidence of EPS declined during our three decades of experience (5.6%, 3.9%, and 0.3%). Being a serious, life-threatening complication of PD, EPS requires high suspicion to allow for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early detection of EPS

  17. Can EPS Development Be Avoided with Early Interventions? The Potential Role of Tamoxifen—A Single-Center Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa-Amorim, Erika; Del Peso, Gloria; Bajo, M. Auxiliadora; Alvarez, Laura; Ossorio, Marta; Gil, Fernando; Bellon, Teresa; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a severe complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Identification of patients at high risk for EPS (“EPS-prone”) and delivery of appropriate interventions might prevent its development. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical characteristics and outcomes of all EPS and EPS-prone patients diagnosed at our PD unit. ♦ Methods: For a 30-year period representing our entire PD experience, we retrospectively identified all patients with EPS (diagnosed according to International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis criteria) and all patients defined as EPS-prone because they met at least 2 established criteria (severe peritonitis, PD vintage greater than 3 years, severe hemoperitoneum, overexposure to glucose, and acquired ultrafiltration failure). ♦ Results: Of 679 PD patients, we identified 20 with EPS, for an overall prevalence of 2.9%. Mean age at diagnosis was 50.2 ± 16.4 years, with a median PD time of 77.96 months (range: 44.36 - 102.7 months) and a median follow-up of 30.91 months (range: 4.6 - 68.75 months). Of patients with EPS, 10 (50%) received tamoxifen, 10 (50%) received parenteral nutrition, and 2 (10%) underwent adhesiolysis, with 25% mortality related to EPS. Another 14 patients were identified as EPS-prone. Median follow-up was 54.05 months (range: 11.9 - 87.04 months). All received tamoxifen, and 5 (36%) received corticosteroids; none progressed to full EPS. We observed no differences in baseline data between the groups, but the group with EPS had been on PD longer (84 ± 53 months vs 39 ± 20 months, p = 0.002) and had a higher cumulative number of days of peritoneal inflammation from peritonitis (17.2 ± 11.1 days vs 9.8 ± 7.9 days, p = 0.015). Overall mortality was similar in the groups. The incidence of EPS declined during our three decades of experience (5.6%, 3.9%, and 0.3%). ♦ Conclusions: Being a serious, life-threatening complication of PD, EPS requires high suspicion to allow for

  18. Tumour suppressor EP300, a modulator of paclitaxel resistance and stemness, is downregulated in metaplastic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Constantinou, Stephanie; Min, Haoxiang; Gallon, John; Lin, Meng-Lay; Singh, Poonam; Raguz, Selina; Ali, Simak; Shousha, Sami; Coombes, R Charles; Lam, Eric W-F; Hu, Yunhui; Yagüe, Ernesto

    2017-06-01

    We have previously described a novel pathway controlling drug resistance, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stemness in breast cancer cells. Upstream in the pathway, three miRs (miR-106b, miR-93 and miR-25) target EP300, a transcriptional activator of E-cadherin. Upregulation of these miRs leads to the downregulation of EP300 and E-cadherin with initiation of an EMT. However, miRs regulate the expression of many genes, and the contribution to EMT by miR targets other than EP300 cannot be ruled out. We used lentiviruses expressing EP300-targeting shRNA to downregulate its expression in MCF-7 cells as well as an EP300-knocked-out colon carcinoma cell line. An EP300-expression plasmid was used to upregulate its expression in basal-like CAL51 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Drug resistance was determined by short-term proliferation and long-term colony formation assays. Stemness was determined by tumour sphere formation in both soft agar and liquid cultures as well as by the expression of CD44/CD24/ALDH markers. Gene expression microarray analysis was performed in MCF-7 cells lacking EP300. EP300 expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry in 17 samples of metaplastic breast cancer. Cells lacking EP300 became more resistant to paclitaxel whereas EP300 overexpression increased their sensitivity to the drug. Expression of cancer stem cell markers, as well as tumour sphere formation, was also increased in EP300-depleted cells, and was diminished in EP300-overexpressing cells. The EP300-regulated gene signature highlighted genes associated with adhesion (CEACAM5), cytoskeletal remodelling (CAPN9), stemness (ABCG2), apoptosis (BCL2) and metastasis (TGFB2). Some genes in this signature were also validated in a previously generated EP300-depleted model of breast cancer using minimally transformed mammary epithelial cells. Importantly, two key genes in apoptosis and stemness, BCL2 and ABCG2, were also upregulated in EP300-knockout colon carcinoma cells and

  19. Optimizing Content for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Counseling for Men who have Sex with Men: Perspectives of PrEP Users and High-risk PrEP Naïve Men

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, S. Wade; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Elsesser, Steven M.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.; O’Cleirigh, Conall; Steven A Safren

    2014-01-01

    Existing trials of antiretroviral (ARV) medication as chemoprophylaxis against HIV reveal that the degree of protection is primarily dependent on product adherence. However, there is a lack of data on targets for behavioral interventions to improve adherence to ARV as prevention. Information from individuals who have used ARV as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can inform behavioral intervention development. Thirty-nine HIV-uninfected MSM at high risk for HIV acquisition participated in one of...

  20. Stigma and Conspiracy Beliefs Related to Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Interest in Using PrEP Among Black and White Men and Transgender Women Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Lisa A; Kalichman, Seth C; Price, Devon; Finneran, Stephanie; Allen, Aerielle; Maksut, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US continues to persist, in particular, among race, sexual orientation, and gender minority populations. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), or using antiretroviral medications for HIV prevention, is an effective option, but uptake of PrEP has been slow. Sociocultural barriers to using PrEP have been largely underemphasized, yet have the potential to stall uptake and, therefore, warrant further understanding. In order to assess the relationships between potential barriers to PrEP (i.e., PrEP stigma and conspiracy beliefs), and interest in PrEP, Black men and transgender women who have sex with men (BMTW, N = 85) and White MTW (WMTW, N = 179) were surveyed at a gay pride event in 2015 in a large southeastern US city. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were completed to examine factors associated with PrEP interest. Among the full sample, moderate levels of PrEP awareness (63%) and low levels of use (9%) were observed. Believing that PrEP is for people who are promiscuous (stigma belief) was strongly associated with lack of interest in using PrEP, and individuals who endorsed this belief were more likely to report sexual risk taking behavior. Conspiracy beliefs related to PrEP were reported among a large minority of the sample (42%) and were more frequently reported among BMTW than WMTW. Given the strong emphasis on the use of biomedical strategies for HIV prevention, addressing sociocultural barriers to PrEP access is urgently needed and failure to do so will weaken the potential benefits of biomedical prevention.

  1. Production of monoclonal antibody against EP0 protein of pseudorabies virus and determination of its recognized epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Keyu; Cheng, Yi; Zhou, Meizhen; Sun, Leilei; Ji, Yikuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Baoshi; Luo, Yongwen; Ju, Chunmei

    2014-12-01

    Early protein 0 (EP0) is especially important for modulating PRV gene expression and reactivation from the latent state, but the mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against EP0 protein of PRV were generated and their characterizations were investigated. Western blot analysis showed all six MAbs could react with immunizing antigen, but only 2B12 and 2C6 could react with native EP0 protein from PRV-infected cells. ELISA additivity tests revealed that at least three epitopes in EP0 were defined by six MAbs. The epitope recognized by MAb 2B12 was further identified in 287-292 aa of EP0 protein using a series of expressed overlapping peptides. These MAbs may provide valuable tools for further research of the functions of EP0 in PRV infection.

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of epithelial antigen Ber-Ep4 and CD10: new markers for endometriosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, G; Wenger, J M; Marras, V; Cosmi, E; Ambrosini, G; Dessole, M; Cherchi, P L

    2013-01-01

    Early and certain diagnoses of endometriosis are mandatory to begin the correct treatment and to exclude the risk of endometriosis-associated ovarian carcinoma (EOC) and endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). To assess the immunohistochemical expression of Ber-Ep4, an epithelial antigen, and CD10 in endometriosis. Forty-eight women underwent laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis and endometriotic samples were recovered for histology. In all surgical specimens Ber-Ep4 and CD10 were searched by an immnohistochemical method. The authors evaluated the correlations among the immunohistochemical positivity and the location of endometriosis. Most cases (40/48 83.34%) were represented by ovarian endometriotic cyst. Among the eight remaining cases, three (3/48, 6.25%) were pelvic endometriotic lesions, two (2/48, 4.17%) peritoneum of vesico-uterine pouch, one vaginal lesion (2.08%), one salpinx lesion (2.08%), and one inguinal location (2.08%). Ber-Ep4 and CD10 were expressed in 90% and in 100% of the ovarian lesions, respectively. In pelvic lesions Ber-Ep4 and CD10 showed both 66.67% of positivity and had the same pattern in peritoneal, salpinx, vaginal, and inguinal lesions (50%, 100%, 100%, 100%, respectively). Ber-Ep4 was negative in 6/48 (12.5%) cases whereas CDO10 was negative in 2/48 (4.17%) cases of endometriosis. The sensitivity of Ber-Ep4 and CD10 for endometriosis diagnosis were 87.50% and 95.83%, respectively. Immunohistochemistry for Ber-Ep4 showed positivity in all cases of endometriosis with typical cubic epithelium, whereas CD10 was positive in 1/2 (50%) atypical case. Immunohistochemical expression of Ber-Ep4 and CD10 was positive in most cases of endometriosis and was useful in differential diagnosis with mesothelial cysts. Ber-Ep4 was negative in cases of hyperplastic epithelium or cytological atypia; these cases are not well-differentiated and could be optimally treated by surgery and not by hormonal therapy because of the risk of cancer degeneration.

  3. PrEP for key populations in combination HIV prevention in Nairobi: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremin, Ide; McKinnon, Lyle; Kimani, Joshua; Cherutich, Peter; Gakii, Gloria; Muriuki, Festus; Kripke, Katharine; Hecht, Robert; Kiragu, Michael; Smith, Jennifer; Hinsley, Wes; Gelmon, Lawrence; Hallett, Timothy B

    2017-05-01

    The HIV epidemic in the population of Nairobi as a whole is in decline, but a concentrated sub-epidemic persists in key populations. We aimed to identify an optimal portfolio of interventions to reduce HIV incidence for a given budget and to identify the circumstances in which pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be used in Nairobi, Kenya. A mathematical model was developed to represent HIV transmission in specific key populations (female sex workers, male sex workers, and men who have sex with men [MSM]) and among the wider population of Nairobi. The scale-up of existing interventions (condom promotion, antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision) for key populations and the wider population as have occurred in Nairobi is represented. The model includes a detailed representation of a PrEP intervention and is calibrated to prevalence and incidence estimates specific to key populations and the wider population. In the context of a declining epidemic overall but with a large sub-epidemic in MSM and male sex workers, an optimal prevention portfolio for Nairobi should focus on condom promotion for male sex workers and MSM in particular, followed by improved antiretroviral therapy retention, earlier antiretroviral therapy, and male circumcision as the budget allows. PrEP for male sex workers could enter an optimal portfolio at similar levels of spending to when earlier antiretroviral therapy is included; however, PrEP for MSM and female sex workers would be included only at much higher budgets. If PrEP for male sex workers cost as much as US$500, average annual spending on the interventions modelled would need to be less than $3·27 million for PrEP for male sex workers to be excluded from an optimal portfolio. Estimated costs per infection averted when providing PrEP to all female sex workers regardless of their risk of infection, and to high-risk female sex workers only, are $65 160 (95% credible interval [CrI] $43 520-$90 250) and $10 920 (95% CrI $4700

  4. Proneoplastic effects of PGE2 mediated by EP4 receptor in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Glen A

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is the major product of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colorectal cancer (CRC). We aimed to assess PGE2 cell surface receptors (EP 1-4) to examine the mechanisms by which PGE2 regulates tumour progression. METHODS: Gene expression studies were performed by quantitative RT-PCR. Cell cycle was analysed by flow cytometry with cell proliferation quantified by BrdU incorporation measured by enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry was employed for expression studies on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumour tissue. RESULTS: EP4 was the most abundant subtype of PGE2 receptor in HT-29 and HCA7 cells (which show COX-2 dependent PGE2 generation) and was consistently the most abundant transcript in human colorectal tumours (n = 8) by qRT-PCR (ANOVA, p = 0.01). G0\\/G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in HT-29 cells treated with SC-236 5 microM (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for 24 hours (p = 0.02), an effect abrogated by co-incubation with PGE2 (1 microM). G0\\/G1 arrest was also seen with a specific EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4A, L-161982) (p = 0.01). Treatment of HT-29 cells with either SC-236 or EP4A caused reduction in intracellular cAMP (ANOVA, p = 0.01). Early induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression (by qRT-PCR) was seen with EP4A treatment (mean fold increase 4.4, p = 0.04) while other genes remained unchanged. Similar induction in p21WAF1\\/CIP1 was also seen with PD153025 (1 microM), an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, suggesting EGFR transactivation by EP4 as a potential mechanism. Additive inhibition of HCA7 proliferation was observed with the combination of SC-236 and neutralising antibody to amphiregulin (AR), a soluble EGFR ligand. Concordance in COX-2 and AR localisation in human colorectal tumours was noted. CONCLUSION: COX-2 regulates cell cycle transition via EP4 receptor and altered p21WAF1\\/CIP1 expression. EGFR pathways appear important. Specific targeting of the EP4 receptor or downstream targets may offer a safer alternative

  5. Brucellosis vaccines for livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zakia I; Pascual, David W

    2016-11-15

    Brucellosis is a livestock disease responsible for fetal loss due to abortions. Worldwide, this disease has profound economic and social impact by reducing the ability of livestock producers to provide an adequate supply of disease-free meat and dairy products. In addition to its presence in domesticated animals, brucellosis is harbored in a number of wildlife species creating new disease reservoirs, which adds to the difficulty of eradicating this disease. Broad and consistent use of the available vaccines would contribute in reducing the incidence of brucellosis. Unfortunately, this practice is not common. In addition, the current brucellosis vaccines cannot provide sterilizing immunity, and in certain circumstances, vaccinated livestock are not protected against co-mingling Brucella-infected wildlife. Given that these vaccines are inadequate for conferring complete protection for some vaccinated livestock, alternatives are being sought, and these include genetic modifications of current vaccines or their reformulations. Alternatively, many groups have sought to develop new vaccines. Subunit vaccines, delivered as a combination of soluble vaccine plus adjuvant or the heterologous expression of Brucella epitopes by different vaccine vectors are currently being tested. New live attenuated Brucella vaccines are also being developed and tested in their natural hosts. Yet, what is rarely considered is the route of vaccination which could improve vaccine efficacy. Since Brucella infections are mostly transmitted mucosally, mucosal delivery of a vaccine has the potential of eliciting a more robust protective immune response for improved efficacy. Hence, this review will examine these questions and provide the status of new vaccines for livestock brucellosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. BEHAVIOUR OF UNREINFORCED EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE (EPS-LWC WALL PANEL ENHANCED WITH STEEL FIBRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROHANA MAMAT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study used steel fibre as reinforcement while enhancing the EPS-LWC strength. In line with architectural demand and ventilation requirement, opening within wall panel was also taken into account. Experimental tests were conducted for reinforced and unreinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. Two samples with size of 1500 mm (height x 1000 mm (length x 75 mm (thickness for each group of wall panel were prepared. Samples in each group had opening size of 600 mm (height x 400 mm (length located at 350 mm and 550 mm from upper end respectively. EPS-LWC wall panel had fcu of 20.87 N/mm2 and a density of 1900 kg/m3. The loading capacity, displacement profiles and crack pattern of each sample was analyzed and discussed. Unreinforced EPS-LWC enhanced with steel fibre resist almost similar loading as reinforced EPS-LWC wall panel. The presence of steel fibre as the only reinforcement creates higher lateral displacement. Wall panel experience shear failure at the side of opening. The number of micro cracks reduces significantly due to presence of steel fibre.

  7. 3DEEM spectroscopy analysis to assess the EPS composition in different carriers in HMBR systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiang; Wu, Man; Liu, Wen; Liu, Huiying; Zhang, Yezhong; Dai, Jie

    2016-12-01

    A hybrid membrane bioreactor (HMBR) with biological band carriers (Reactor A) and an HMBR with suspended honeycomb carriers (Reactor B) were conducted in parallel to investigate the effects of different carriers on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Composition and concentration of EPS were examined by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). 3DEEM spectra demonstrated that the main organic substances of the EPS in two reactors were protein-like, humic acid-like and fulvic acid-like substances. The fluorescence intensity (FI) indicated that the protein-like composition was dominant in EPS, and its intensity in reactor B was stronger than that in A (392.94 > 250.25). Results of the FI identified from the 3DEEM by PARAFAC showed that the EPS in two reactors included two humic acid-like compositions C1 (230, 320/406 nm), C2 (250, 360/440 nm) and one protein-like C4 (230, 280/340 nm), while C3 was fulvic acid-like (220/429 nm) and protein-like (230/357 nm) in reactor A and B, respectively. The proportion and FI of protein-like substances in reactor B were higher than that in A. Consequently, it was concluded that reactor A could control the membrane fouling effectively, compared with reactor B.

  8. Role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) production in bioaggregation: application to wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhiji; Bourven, Isabelle; Guibaud, Gilles; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Panico, Antonio; Pirozzi, Francesco; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews the formation, structure, and stability of bioaggregates with an emphasis on the composition and distribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their role in bioaggregation. Bioaggregation is ubiquitous in natural environment and is of great importance in biological wastewater treatment processes. It greatly influences the flocculability, settleability, and dewaterability for flocs and sludge retention and shear resistance for biofilms. The physico-chemical and microbial structures of bioaggregates are dependent on operational conditions as well as microbial diversity and spatial distribution. The formation of bioaggregates is mediated by the physico-chemical interactions as well as the microbial interactions such as EPS production and quorum sensing. EPS are composed of a mixture of macromolecules including proteins, polysaccharides, humic-like substances, and nucleic acids, which entrap the microbial cells in a three-dimensional matrix. The composition and physico-chemical characteristics of EPS have significant influence on the maintenance of the bioaggregate structure and the process performance of the wastewater treatment. However, the mechanisms of bioaggregation are still unclear and the conclusions on the role of EPS were mostly drawn from the established correlations and hypotheses. This paper expects to provide up-to-date knowledge on bioaggregation and insights for further studies and applications.

  9. Utility of expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads in the control of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivagnaname, N; Amalraj, D Dominic; Mariappan, T

    2005-10-01

    The use of chemicals or bio-larvicides for the control of Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles stephensi breeding in pit latrines and overhead tanks (OHT) respectively is discouraged owing to many undesirable impacts in the environment. Due to faecal contamination and poor survival, use of predatory fish in OHTs is not feasible. The use of expanded polystyrene (EPS) beads is a potential alternative in these habitats. EPS beads not only prevent oviposition but also kill the immature by forming a thick blanket on the water surface. A thick layer of 2 cm with beads of 2 mm is sufficient to suppress and prevent mosquito breeding. These are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need frequent application since they remain on the surface for quiet a long time. Successful trials against C. quinquefasciatus breeding in pit latrines, soakage pits, septic tanks, etc., have been carried out in Kenya, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Certain trials with EPS indicated reduction in microfilaria (mf) rate besides decline in biting density. In India, EPS beads have also been used on small scale for the control of A. stephensi and A. culicifacies breeding in OHTs and unused wells respectively. The polystyrene beads have also been reported to be effective in the control of mosquito breeding in biogas plants and other industrial situations. The practical utility of EPS beads in the control of vector-borne diseases has been discussed in the present review.

  10. EpCAM as a novel therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthakumar S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the sixth most common malignant tumor worldwide. Due to the heterogeneity nature, prognosis for patients with HCC remains unsatisfactory. The conventional treatments like chemotherapy and radiotherpay fails to cure the disease most of the time and this may be due to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs. Cancer stem cell is a small population of cancer tissues responsible for chemoresistant, radioresistant, and cancer relapse through various mechanism like ATP binding cassete (ABC effulus and ALDH inhibitor. Numores cancer stem cell markers are idendified for the liver cancer, such as Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM, CD133, CD90, CD13. EpCAM is one of the first tumor-associated antigen and a marker for most epithelial cancers except renal cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Also it is a marker for liver stem cells/progenitor cells. EpCAM plays a major role in cell-cell migration, cell proliferation, tumorogenisity, metastasis. Also, it acts as a potential target for EpCAM positive carcinomas like breast cancer, colon cancer and liver cancer. This entire review deals about how EpCAM can be used in the near future as a potential therapeutic target for HCC.

  11. Cable Crosstalk Suppression in Resistive Sensor Array with 2-Wire S-NSDE-EP Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianFeng Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With long flexible cables connected to the 1-wire setting non-scanned-driving-electrode equipotential (S-NSDE-EP circuit, the resistive sensor array modules got flexibility in robotic operations but suffered from the crosstalk problem caused by wire resistances and contacted resistances of the cables. Firstly, we designed a new S-NSDE-EP circuit using two wires for every driving-electrode and every sampling-electrode to reduce the crosstalk caused by the connected cables in the 2D networked resistive sensor array. Then, an equivalent resistance expression of the element being tested (EBT for this circuit was analytically derived. Then, the 1-wire S-NSDE-EP circuit and the 2-wire S-NSDE-EP circuit were evaluated by simulations. The simulation results show that the 2-wire S-NSDE-EP circuit, though it requires a large number of wires, can greatly reduce the crosstalk error caused by wire resistances and contacted resistances of the cables in the 2D networked resistive sensor array.

  12. Risk, safety and sex among male PrEP users: time for a new understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Kimberly; Amico, Rivet K; Gilmore, Hailey; Liu, Albert; McMahan, Vanessa; Mayer, Kenneth; Hosek, Sybil; Grant, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Recent advances in biomedical HIV prevention have led to optimistic projections of a dramatic worldwide reduction of new infections by 2030. This optimism is counterbalanced by concerns that the protective benefits of one such technology, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), may be negated by increases in other behaviours that offset these benefits (risk compensation). To contribute to a deeper understanding of concepts of safety and risk in the context of HIV PrEP, we draw on the narrative accounts of 61 male PrEP users who participated in the inaugural PrEP demonstration project: the iPrEx open-label extension study. We conducted in-depth interviews with a purposeful sample of iPrEx participants. Overall, participants did not report significant changes to their sexual practices once they had begun taking PrEP. Rather, participants reported experiencing a sense of relief or reprieve from HIV-related stress. This unburdening of fear did not necessarily lead to condomless sex. Instead, men expressed feeling a sense of security and less free-floating fear of HIV. We contend that no longer living under the threat of HIV is a significant benefit that has not been adequately explored in HIV prevention research.

  13. Exogenous arachidonic acid mediates permeability of human brain microvessel endothelial cells through prostaglandin E2 activation of EP3 and EP4 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Siddhartha; Nguyen, Hieu H; On, Ngoc; Mitchell, Ryan W; Aukema, Harold M; Miller, Donald W; Hatch, Grant M

    2015-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is the restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Arachidonic acid (ARA; 5,8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) is a conditionally essential polyunsaturated fatty acid [20:4(n-6)] and is a major constituent of brain lipids. The current study examined the transport processes for ARA in confluent monolayers of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC). Addition of radioactive ARA to the apical compartment of HBMEC cultured on Transwell(®) inserts resulted in rapid incorporation of radioactivity into the basolateral medium. Knock down of fatty acid transport proteins did not alter ARA passage into the basolateral medium as a result of the rapid generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), an eicosanoid known to facilitate opening of the blood-brain barrier. Permeability following ARA or PGE2 exposure was confirmed by an increased movement of fluorescein-labeled dextran from apical to basolateral medium. ARA-mediated permeability was attenuated by specific cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. EP3 and EP4 receptor antagonists attenuated the ARA-mediated permeability of HBMEC. The results indicate that ARA increases permeability of HBMEC monolayers likely via increased production of PGE2 which acts upon EP3 and EP4 receptors to mediate permeability. These observations may explain the rapid influx of ARA into the brain previously observed upon plasma infusion with ARA. The blood-brain barrier, formed by microvessel endothelial cells, is a restrictive barrier between the brain parenchyma and the circulating blood. Radiolabeled arachidonic acid (ARA) movement across, and monolayer permeability in the presence of ARA, was examined in confluent monolayers of primary human brain microvessel endothelial cells (HBMECs) cultured on Transwell(®) plates. Incubation of HBMECs with ARA resulted in a rapid increase in HBMEC monolayer permeability. The mechanism was mediated, in part

  14. Economics of animal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, A; Rushton, J

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the steps that might be used in assessing the economic justification for using vaccination to control animal disease, and the way that vaccination is financed and administered. It describes decisions that have been taken with respect to preserving international trade, and issues related to protection of livelihoods. Regardless of the motivation for vaccination, its costs can usually be shared between the public and private sectors. Cost-effective vaccination requires methods of delivery to be adapted to livestock production systems. The paper concludes by suggesting questions around the use of vaccination that would merit further economic analysis.

  15. Vaccinations in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Megan; Rowe, Theresa

    2018-02-01

    Vaccines are important for preventing infections in adults aged ≥65 years. Older adults are at increased risk for complications from vaccine-preventable illnesses due to age-associated changes in immune function and chronic medical comorbidities. Vaccination rates for older adults remain low despite widely accepted practice guidelines. Recommended vaccinations for older adults include (1) influenza; (2) pneumococcal; (3) herpes zoster; (4) tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis; and (5) hepatitis B. Cost influences vaccination rates in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. One-year immunogenicity kinetics and safety of a purified chick embryo cell rabies vaccine and an inactivated Vero cell-derived Japanese encephalitis vaccine administered concomitantly according to a new, 1-week, accelerated primary series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Jakob P; Jelinek, Tomas; Paulke-Korinek, Maria; Reisinger, Emil C; Dieckmann, Sebastian; Alberer, Martin; Bühler, Silja; Bosse, Dietrich; Meyer, Seetha; Fragapane, Elena; Costantini, Marco; Pellegrini, Michele; Lattanzi, Maria; Dovali, Claudia

    2016-03-01

    Conventional rabies pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and Japanese encephalitis (JE) primary series vaccination regimens each require up to 4 weeks to complete and, thus, may not be feasible for individuals who need these immunizations on short notice. This Phase 3b, randomized, controlled, observer-blind study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a purified chick embryo cell culture rabies vaccine and an inactivated, adsorbed JE vaccine according to an accelerated (1 week) regimen when compared with the conventional regimens (4 weeks). This report describes the kinetics of immune responses up to 1 year after vaccination. A total of 661 healthy adults (18 to ≤65 years) were randomized into the following accelerated or conventional vaccine regimens: Rabies + JE-Conventional, Rabies + JE-Accelerated, Rabies-Conventional and JE-Conventional. Immunogenicity was assessed by virus neutralization tests. Safety and tolerability were also evaluated. Irrespective of rabies vaccination regimen, ≥97% of subjects had adequate levels of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) concentrations (≥0.5 IU/ml) up to Day 57, with percentages of subjects with RVNA concentrations ≥0.5 IU/ml at Day 366 ranging between 68% in the Rabies + JE-Accelerated group and 80% of subjects in the Rabies-Conventional group. The Rabies + JE-Accelerated group revealed high JE neutralizing antibody titers at all-time points. At Day 366, the percentage of subjects with antibody titers indicative of seroprotection (PRNT50 titers ≥1:10) remained high across JE vaccine groups (86-94%). The accelerated PrEP rabies and JE vaccination regimens, once licensed, could represent a valid alternative in the short-term to currently recommended conventional regimens. The concomitant administration of these two vaccines does not compromise immune responses to any of the vaccine antigens particularly when aiming for short-term protection. Further evidence

  17. Subcellular differential expression of Ep-ICD in oral dysplasia and cancer is associated with disease progression and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, Raj Thani; Kaur, Jatinder; Leong, Iona; MacMillan, Christina; Witterick, Ian J; Walfish, Paul G; Ralhan, Ranju

    2016-07-16

    Identification of patients with oral dysplasia at high risk of cancer development and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) at increased risk of disease recurrence will enable rigorous personalized treatment. Regulated intramembranous proteolysis of Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) resulting in release of its intracellular domain Ep-ICD into cytoplasm and nucleus triggers oncogenic signaling. We analyzed the expression of Ep-ICD in oral dysplasia and cancer and determined its clinical significance in disease progression and prognosis. In a retrospective study, immunohistochemical analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and EpEx (extracellular domain of EpCAM), was carried out in 115 OSCC, 97 oral dysplasia and 105 normal oral tissues, correlated with clinicopathological parameters and disease outcome over 60 months for oral dysplasia and OSCC patients. Disease-free survival (DFS) was determined by Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression analysis. In comparison with normal oral tissues, significant increase in nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx was observed in dysplasia, and OSCC (p = 0.013 and Oral dysplasia patients with increased overall Ep-ICD developed cancer in short time period (mean = 47 months; p = 0.044). OSCC patients with increased nuclear Ep-ICD and membrane EpEx had significantly reduced mean DFS of 33.7 months (p = 0.018). Our study provided clinical evidence for Ep-ICD as a predictor of cancer development in patients with oral dysplasia and recurrence in OSCC patients, suggesting its potential utility in enhanced management of those patients detected to have increased risk of progression to cancer and recurrence in OSCC patients.

  18. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun; Rappuoli, Rino; De Groot, Anne S.; Chen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO) has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning. PMID:21772787

  19. Endotoxins in commercial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, M R; Stanbro, H; Merril, C R

    1978-01-01

    Twenty samples of commercial vaccines intended for administration to humans were assayed for the presence of bacterial endotoxins by using the Limulus amebocyte lysate test. Sixteen of the vaccines contained more than 0.1 ng of endotoxin per ml (which corresponds to 103 bacterial cell wall equivalents per ml in the undiluted vaccines). These results suggest that at some stage of preparation, the vaccines have contained varying amounts of gram-negative bacteria and may indicate the presence of other bacterial products as well. It might be useful to list the level of endotoxins, phage, and other contaminants on each vaccine lot to facilitate studies on any side effects of these contaminants. Selection of vaccine lots with the least endotoxin might reduce some of the adverse effects of vaccinations. PMID:727776

  20. Vaccines as Epidemic Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V. Pauly

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between the research for and development of vaccines against global pandemics and insurance. It shows that development in advance of pandemics of a portfolio of effective and government-approved vaccines does have some insurance properties: it requires incurring costs that are certain (the costs of discovering, developing, and testing vaccines in return for protection against large losses (if a pandemic treatable with one of the vaccines occurs but also with the possibility of no benefit (from a vaccine against a disease that never reaches the pandemic stage. It then argues that insurance against the latter event might usefully be offered to organizations developing vaccines, and explores the benefits of insurance payments to or on behalf of countries who suffer from unpredictable pandemics. These ideas are then related to recent government, industry, and philanthropic efforts to develop better policies to make vaccines against pandemics available on a timely basis.

  1. Investigation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) properties of P. aeruginosa and B. subtilis and their role in bacterial adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harimawan, Ardiyan; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) matrix in biofilm poses important functions such as a diffusion barrier to antimicrobial agents so that biofilm cells are more difficult to completely eliminate. Therefore, biofilm cells exhibit enhanced resilience unlike planktonic cells, and are more difficult to completely eliminate. In order to obtain a comprehensive understanding of bacterial adhesion to surfaces, knowledge of the composition and conformational properties of EPS produced during growth and biofilm formation is required, since their adhesive and conformational properties remain poorly understood at molecular level. Present study has provided further insights into identifying compositional and conformational properties of EPS produced by planktonic and biofilm cells of B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa. Various spectroscopy analyses showed that EPS produced by the two different species were chemically dissimilar. More proteinaceous compounds were present in EPS from B. subtilis, while EPS from P. aeruginosa were characterized by greater carbohydrate components. However, relative proportions of polysaccharides and/or proteins constituents varied with the growth mode of the bacteria. AFM was then used to probe the adhesive nature of EPS produced by the bacteria by using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS). Comparison of the two bacterial species indicated that the presence of polysaccharides promoted the adhesion strength of the EPS while proteins had lesser adherence effects. Comparison of the two growth modes for the same bacterial strain also indicated that greater EPS production and enhanced cellular adhesion are associated with biofilm growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlates of PrEP Indication in a Multi-Site Cohort of Young HIV-Uninfected Transgender Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Lisa M; Reisner, Sari L; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Gayles, Travis; Shelendich, Michael; Garofalo, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Transgender women are at high risk of HIV infection, with younger transgender women (YTW) particularly vulnerable. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has shown efficacy in reducing HIV acquisition, but little is known about PrEP indication or initiation among YTW. Baseline data from 180 YTW age 18-29 years enrolled in Project LifeSkills, an on-going HIV prevention intervention for YTW, were analyzed to examine factors associated with PrEP indication. The sample (mean age = 23.4, SD = 3.2) was comprised largely of women of color (69 %) and of low socioeconomic status (71 % unemployed). Overall, 62 % met criteria for PrEP indication, but only 5 % reported ever taking PrEP. Factors associated with increased odds of PrEP indication were: PrEP interest (aOR 3.24; 95 % CI 1.44, 7.33), number of recent anal sex partners (aOR 1.23; 95 % CI 1.04, 1.46), and lower collective self-esteem scores (aOR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.47, 0.94). Despite high levels of PrEP indication, there remain low levels of PrEP awareness and uptake among YTW.

  3. Raising Awareness of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) among Women in New York City: Community and Provider Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Kate L; Colarossi, Lisa G; Sanders, Kim

    2017-03-01

    This study explored the knowledge, attitudes, and perceived facilitators and barriers to adoption of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among black women and Latinas in the Bronx, NY. Data were collected in focus group discussions (FGDs) held separately with staff (n = 21) and black and Latina female clients aged 18 to 50 (n = 23) of four organizations providing health and social services. Participants were also asked to give feedback about four action messages regarding PrEP for a social marketing campaign. Transcripts were analyzed by two researchers using grounded theory. We found that the majority of clients (74%) and staff (57%) had not heard about PrEP before participating in the FGDs. Following brief educational messaging about PrEP, participants identified potential facilitators and barriers to PrEP uptake among women, and expressed enthusiasm for more widespread efforts to raise awareness about PrEP as an HIV prevention option. Participants preferred an action message that was brief, referred to PrEP as a pill, and did not mention condoms or STD testing. These findings demonstrate the need to raise awareness about PrEP among women and build the capacity of women-serving organizations to educate, screen, and refer or provide PrEP services.

  4. EPS solubilization treatment by applying the biosurfactant rhamnolipid to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mingpu; Xu, Dong; Trinh, Xuantung; Liu, Shuangyuan; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Junmei; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2016-10-01

    Application of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) solubilization treatment with biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL) to reduce clogging in constructed wetlands was first conducted in this study. The results showed significant improvement in the solubilization and dispersion of clogging matter following the treatment. And RL dosage of 0.09-0.15g/L altered microbial group make-up and had an overall positive effect on the growth of microorganisms. Moreover, RL was found to enhance EPS dissolution and dispersion, which was beneficial for the release of enzymes embedded in the EPS, and resulted in enhanced pollutant removal. The treatment had no apparent detrimental effect on wetland plants. Our results indicate that the optimum dosage of RL is 0.12g/L, and that the approach provides a promising and moderate option to reverse wetland clogging through RL-mediated solubilization treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Competitive adsorption of heavy metal by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Qing; Li, Ming-Ming; Chen, Tian-Hu; Zhou, Yue-Fei; Yue, Zheng-Bo

    2014-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of heavy metals by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was investigated. Chemical analysis showed that different EPS compositions had different capacities for the adsorption of heavy metals which was investigated using Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Batch adsorption tests indicated that EPS had a higher combined ability with Zn(2+) than Cu(2+). This was confirmed and explained by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy analysis. FTIR analysis showed that both polysaccharides and protein combined with Zn(2+) while only protein combined with Cu(2+). EEM spectra further revealed that tryptophan-like substances were the main compositions reacted with the heavy metals. Moreover, Zn(2+) had a higher fluorescence quenching ability than Cu(2+). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Degradation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extracted from activated sludge by low-concentration ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lu; Xi, Jinying; Yeung, Marvin

    2016-03-01

    Reaction mechanisms between ozone and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) can be the key of understanding the improvements in microbial aggregates properties by low-concentration ozonation. In this study, EPS are extracted from activated sludge and treated continuously by ozone gas at 270 ± 41 ppm. The reaction between ozone and EPS was investigated by observation of EPS component concentrations, functional groups and molecular weight distributions using UV-Vis spectrometry, excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEM), high performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In a 12-hour-ozonation experiment, significant ozone consumption was observed in the first 4 h and protein concentration in EPS solution was reduced by 30 ± 12%. However, the polysaccharides concentration only had a slightly decrease at the end of the ozonation process. UV-Vis spectra and EEM spectra results suggest that ozone removed protein and fluorescent matters (SMP and tryptophan-like aromatic protein) rapidly by attacking specific amino acid residues on polypeptide chain. After ozonation, the molecular weight of polysaccharide and protein dropped by 4 orders of magnitude according to HPSEC results. TOC concentration of EPS solution was reduced by 13 ± 2% after ozonation. The loss in TOC could be explained by the observation of volatile organic compounds such as carboxylic acids, aldehydes and ketones in the off-gas detected by GC-MS. The results in this study can provide a better understanding towards the mechanisms of improvements in activated sludge properties by ozonation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS and Shredded Waste Polystyrene (SWAP Beads for Control of Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Soltani

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mosquitoes transmit several diseases to human. There are several measures for control of larvae. As part of Integrated Vector Management (IVM program, the utility of floating layers of polystyrene beads (EPS is a po­ten­tial alternative in habitats of mosquito larva. EPS beads prevent oviposition of mosquito as well as killing the im­ma­ture stages by forming a tick layer on the water surface.  They are cheap, environmentally safe and do not need fre­quent application and remain on the surface of water for long time. The objective of the current study was to asses the effectiveness of two types of polystyrene beads of (EPS and (SWAP for control of mosquito larvae under labo­ra­tory conditions.Methods: Anopheles stephensi and Culex quinquefasciatus were used for experimental purposes. In each tray 250 lar­vae of late 3rd and early 4th instars were introduced. The experiment was conducted on 4 replicates for An. ste­phensi, Cu. quinquefasciatus and combination of both. Emerging of adult mosquitoes were calculated every day until the end of experiments.Results: Mortality rate and Inhibition of Emerge (IE for Cu. quinquefasciatus, An. stephensi and combination of both spe­cies was 97.8%, 100% and 99.07%, respectively using EPS. In average, EPS was able to kill 98.9% of lar­vae. The fig­ures with SWAP were 63%, 91.05% and 72.65%, respectively. The average mortality for mosquitoes was 75.57%Conclusion: EPS and SWAP beads can be very effective and practical for elimination of An. stephensi and Cx. quinquefas­ciatus under the laboratory conditions.

  8. Lubiprostone activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the prostaglandin receptor (EP(4)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R; MacDonald, Kelvin D

    2012-09-28

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP(4) receptor has been described [2-5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode voltage clamp was used to assay Xenopus oocytes expressing ClC-2, with or without co-expression of the EP(4) receptor or β adrenergic receptor (βAR), for changes in conductance elicited by lubiprostone. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and either βAR or the EP(4) receptor were also studied. In oocytes co-expressing ClC-2 and βAR conductance was stimulated by hyperpolarization and acidic pH (pH = 6), but there was no response to the β adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. Oocytes expressing ClC-2 only or co-expressing ClC-2 and EP(4) did not respond to the presence of 0.1, 1, or 10 μM lubiprostone in the superperfusate. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and βAR did not respond to hyperpolarization, acidic pH, or 1 μM lubiprostone. However, conductance was elevated by isoproterenol and inhibited by CFTR(inh)172. Co-expression of CFTR and EP(4) resulted in lubiprostone-stimulated conductance, which was also sensitive to CFTR(inh)172. The EC(50) for lubiprostone mediated CFTR activation was ~10 nM. These results demonstrate no direct action of lubiprostone on either ClC-2 or CFTR channels expressed in oocytes. However, the results confirm that CFTR can be activated by lubiprostone via the EP(4) receptor in oocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lubiprostone Activates CFTR, but not ClC-2, via the Prostaglandin Receptor (EP4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, Yohei; Moran, Aurelia R.; MacDonald, Kelvin D.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the mechanism of lubiprostone activation of epithelial chloride transport. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid approved for the treatment of constipation [1]. There is uncertainty, however, as to how lubiprostone increases epithelial chloride transport. Direct stimulation of ClC-2 and CFTR chloride channels as well as stimulation of these channels via the EP4 receptor has been described [2; 3; 4; 5]. To better define this mechanism, two-electrode voltage clamp was used to assay Xenopus oocytes expressing ClC-2, with or without co-expression of the EP4 receptor or β adrenergic receptor (βAR), for changes in conductance elicited by lubiprostone. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and either βAR or the EP4 receptor were also studied. In oocytes co-expressing ClC-2 and βAR conductance was stimulated by hyperpolarization and acidic pH (pH=6), but there was no response to the β adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. Oocytes expressing ClC-2 only or co-expressing ClC-2 and EP4 did not respond to the presence of 0.1, 1, or 10 µM lubiprostone in the superperfusate. Oocytes co-expressing CFTR and βAR did not respond to hyperpolarization, acidic pH, or 1µM lubiprostone. However, conductance was elevated by isoproterenol and inhibited by CFTRinh172. Co-expression of CFTR and EP4 resulted in lubiprostone-stimulated conductance, which was also sensitive to CFTRinh172. The EC50 for lubiprostone mediated CFTR activation was ~ 10 nM. These results demonstrate no direct action of lubiprostone on either ClC-2 or CFTR channels expressed in oocytes. However, the results confirm that CFTR can be activated by lubiprostone via the EP4 receptor in oocytes. PMID:22960173

  10. Preferences for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) information among men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) at community outreach settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Roland C; Corner, David; Garza, Eduardo; Guan, Wentao; Mayer, Kenneth H; Brown, Larry; Chan, Philip A

    Community outreach efforts to increase HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) utilization by at risk men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM) first need to elucidate preferences for learning about PrEP and linking to PrEP resources. In this pilot study, we observed that among MSM recruited through community outreach, HIV sexual risk-taking was significant, yet self-perceived PrEP knowledge was low and interest in learning more about PrEP was moderate. Most preferred learning about PrEP and being provided local PrEP clinic information through electronic media. However, receipt of PrEP information alone did not appear to motivate these men into presenting to a local clinic for PrEP evaluation.

  11. Characterization of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) fractions produced by Microcystis aeruginosa under the stress of linoleic acid sustained-release microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Rong, Shiyi; Su, Lili; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao; Li, Shiyin; Acharya, Kumud

    2017-07-20

    This paper focuses on the characterization of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which are composed of soluble EPS (SL-EPS), loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS), and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) produced by Microcystis aeruginosa under the stress of linoleic acid (LA) and LA sustained-release microspheres. Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D-EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry were used to characterize three forms of EPS while the content of polysaccharide and protein was tested, respectively. The results showed that the highest inhibitor rate (IR) occurred when M. aeruginosa were exposed to LA sustained-release microspheres of 0.3 g L(-1). The 3D-EEM contour demonstrated that tryptophan and protein-like substances were detected in all three EPS fractions, whereas humic acid-like substance was only distributed in SL-EPS, and aromatic proteins merely existed in LB-EPS and TB-EPS. The infrared spectrum showed that functional groups in three EPS fractions had no obvious change in all experimental groups. Polysaccharide (1120-1270 cm(-1), C-O-C and C-O stretching vibration) and protein (1384-1670 cm(-1), C-N and N-H stretching) were detected in three forms of EPS. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  12. Persistence of Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies after Vaccination of Rural Population following Vampire Bat Rabies Outbreak in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Medeiros

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal control measures in Latin America have decreased the incidence of urban human rabies transmitted by dogs and cats; currently most cases of human rabies are transmitted by bats. In 2004-2005, rabies outbreaks in populations living in rural Brazil prompted widespread vaccination of exposed and at-risk populations. More than 3,500 inhabitants of Augusto Correa (Pará State received either post-exposure (PEP or pre-exposure (PrEP prophylaxis. This study evaluated the persistence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA annually for 4 years post-vaccination. The aim was to evaluate the impact of rabies PrEP and PEP in a population at risk living in a rural setting to help improve management of vampire bat exposure and provide additional data on the need for booster vaccination against rabies.This prospective study was conducted in 2007 through 2009 in a population previously vaccinated in 2005; study participants were followed-up annually. An RVNA titer >0.5 International Units (IU/mL was chosen as the threshold of seroconversion. Participants with titers ≤0.5 IU/mL or Equivalent Units (EU/mL at enrollment or at subsequent annual visits received booster doses of purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV. Adherence of the participants from this Amazonian community to the study protocol was excellent, with 428 of the 509 (84% who attended the first interview in 2007 returning for the final visit in 2009. The long-term RVNA persistence was good, with 85-88.0% of the non-boosted participants evaluated at each yearly follow-up visit remaining seroconverted. Similar RVNA persistence profiles were observed in participants originally given PEP or PrEP in 2005, and the GMT of the study population remained >1 IU/mL 4 years after vaccination. At the end of the study, 51 subjects (11.9% of the interviewed population had received at least one dose of booster since their vaccination in 2005.This study and the events preceding it underscore the need for

  13. A Phase-1 Clinical Trial of a DNA Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Delivered by Intramuscular or Intradermal Electroporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    concerns associated with pWRG/VEE or delivery method identified during the Phase 1 study. 3.4. Tolerability of Vaccine Procedures To assess the...results of the Phase I clinical study of EP-mediated pWRG/VEE delivery demonstrate an acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile for the DNA vaccine...11] Hooper JW, Moon JE, Paolino KM, Newcomer R, McLain DE, Josleyn M, et al. A Phase 1 clinical trial of Hantaan virus and Puumala virus M-segment

  14. Persistence of Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies after Vaccination of Rural Population following Vampire Bat Rabies Outbreak in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Rita; Jusot, Viviane; Houillon, Guy; Rasuli, Anvar; Martorelli, Luzia; Kataoka, Ana Paula; Mechlia, Mohamed Ben; Le Guern, Anne-Sophie; Rodrigues, Liliam; Assef, Rhomero; Maestri, Alvino; Lima, Reynaldo; Rotivel, Yolande; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Tordo, Noël

    2016-09-01

    Animal control measures in Latin America have decreased the incidence of urban human rabies transmitted by dogs and cats; currently most cases of human rabies are transmitted by bats. In 2004-2005, rabies outbreaks in populations living in rural Brazil prompted widespread vaccination of exposed and at-risk populations. More than 3,500 inhabitants of Augusto Correa (Pará State) received either post-exposure (PEP) or pre-exposure (PrEP) prophylaxis. This study evaluated the persistence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) annually for 4 years post-vaccination. The aim was to evaluate the impact of rabies PrEP and PEP in a population at risk living in a rural setting to help improve management of vampire bat exposure and provide additional data on the need for booster vaccination against rabies. This prospective study was conducted in 2007 through 2009 in a population previously vaccinated in 2005; study participants were followed-up annually. An RVNA titer >0.5 International Units (IU)/mL was chosen as the threshold of seroconversion. Participants with titers ≤0.5 IU/mL or Equivalent Units (EU)/mL at enrollment or at subsequent annual visits received booster doses of purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV). Adherence of the participants from this Amazonian community to the study protocol was excellent, with 428 of the 509 (84%) who attended the first interview in 2007 returning for the final visit in 2009. The long-term RVNA persistence was good, with 85-88.0% of the non-boosted participants evaluated at each yearly follow-up visit remaining seroconverted. Similar RVNA persistence profiles were observed in participants originally given PEP or PrEP in 2005, and the GMT of the study population remained >1 IU/mL 4 years after vaccination. At the end of the study, 51 subjects (11.9% of the interviewed population) had received at least one dose of booster since their vaccination in 2005. This study and the events preceding it underscore the need for the

  15. Design and implementation of EP-based PID controller for chaos synchronization of Rikitake circuit systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yi-You

    2017-09-01

    This article addresses an evolutionary programming (EP) algorithm technique-based and proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control methods are established to guarantee synchronization of the master and slave Rikitake chaotic systems. For PID synchronous control, the evolutionary programming (EP) algorithm is used to find the optimal PID controller parameters kp, ki, kd by integrated absolute error (IAE) method for the convergence conditions. In order to verify the system performance, the basic electronic components containing operational amplifiers (OPAs), resistors, and capacitors are used to implement the proposed chaotic Rikitake systems. Finally, the experimental results validate the proposed Rikitake chaotic synchronization approach. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. COX-2 Elevates Oncogenic miR-526b in Breast Cancer by EP4 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Mousumi; Landman, Erin; Liu, Ling; Hess, David; Lala, Peeyush K

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small regulatory molecules emerging as potential biomarkers in cancer. Previously, it was shown that COX-2 expression promotes breast cancer progression via multiple mechanisms, including induction of stem-like cells (SLC), owing to activation of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP4 (PTGER4). COX-2 overexpression also upregulated microRNA-526b (miR-526b), in association with aggressive phenotype. Here, the functional roles of miR-526b in breast cancer and the mechanistic role of EP4 signaling in miR-526b upregulation were examined. A positive correlation was noted between miR-526b and COX-2 mRNA expression in COX-2 disparate breast cancer cell lines. Stable overexpression of miR-526b in poorly metastatic MCF7 and SKBR3 cell lines resulted in increased cellular migration, invasion, EMT phenotype and enhanced tumorsphere formation in vitro, and lung colony formation in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Conversely, knockdown of miR-526b in aggressive MCF7-COX-2 and SKBR3-COX-2 cells reduced oncogenic functions and reversed the EMT phenotype, in vitro. Furthermore, it was determined that miR-526b expression is dependent on EP4 receptor activity and downstream PI3K-AKT and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. PI3K-AKT inhibitors blocked EP4 agonist-mediated miR-526b upregulation and tumorsphere formation in MCF7 and SKBR3 cells. NF-κB inhibitor abrogates EP agonist-stimulated miRNA expression in MCF7 and T47D cells, indicating that the NF-κB pathway is also involved in miR-526b regulation. In addition, inhibition of COX-2, EP4, PI3K, and PKA in COX-2-overexpressing cells downregulated miR-526b and its functions in vitro. Finally, miR-526b expression was significantly higher in cancerous than in noncancerous breast tissues and associated with reduced patient survival. In conclusion, miR-526b promotes breast cancer progression, SLC-phenotype through EP4-mediated signaling, and correlates with breast cancer patient survival. This study presents novel

  17. Measure Guideline. Transitioning From Three-Coat Stucco to One-Coat Stucco With EPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Davis, G. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    This measure guideline has been developed to help builders transition from using a traditional three-coat stucco wall-cladding system to a one-coat stucco wall-cladding system with expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulated sheathing. The one-coat system maintains the look of a traditional stucco system but uses only a base layer and a finish coat over EPS insulation that achieves higher levels of energy efficiency. Potential risks associated with the installation of a one-coat stucco system are addressed in terms of design, installation, and warranty concerns such as cracking and delamination, along with mitigation strategies to reduce these risks.

  18. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using diatoms—silica-gold and EPS-gold bionanocomposite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröfel, Adam; Kratošová, Gabriela; Bohunická, Markéta; Dobročka, Edmund; Vávra, Ivo

    2011-08-01

    Novel synthesis of gold nanoparticles, EPS-gold, and silica-gold bionanocomposites by biologically driven processes employing two diatom strains ( Navicula atomus, Diadesmis gallica) is described. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) revealed a presence of gold nanoparticles in the experimental solutions of the diatom culture mixed with tetrachloroaureate. Nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM showed that the nanoparticles were associated with the diatom frustules and extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) excreted by the diatom cells. Due to its accessibility, simplicity, and effectiveness, this method of nanocomposites preparation has great importance for possible future applications.

  19. Final ep DIS cross sections from H1 and ZEUS and HERAPDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Iris

    2016-07-01

    HERA was the first and only ep collider. It was in operation from 1992 to 2007 and the two collaborations ZEUS and H1 collected about 0.5 fb-1 of integrated luminosity each. Inclusive data from both collaborations were combined and used to determine the set of parton distribution functions called HERAPDF2.0. The history of HERA is presented as well as the long path to the final data combination and HERAPDF2.0. The proton remains full of wonders and parton distribution functions might have nothing to do with them. The legacy of HERA are the precise ep data which can be plotted as legacy plots.

  20. PrEP implementation: moving from trials to policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F Cáceres

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is increasingly clear that the HIV response will not be sustainable if the number of infections is not significantly reduced. Discussion: For two decades, research has been ongoing to identify new behavioural and biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. In the past few years, the efficacy of several new strategies has been demonstrated, including oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; i.e. daily use of tenofovir/emtricitabine. Because several social, political and logistic barriers remain, however, optimal PrEP implementation will require a better dissemination of new evidence in a number of areas and additional implementation research from various disciplinary perspectives (i.e. social science, policy and ethics; health systems; and economics, including cost-effectiveness studies. Discussion of new evidence on those topics, as well as case studies of potential PrEP implementation in diverse environments, can improve the understanding of the role that PrEP may play in addressing the global HIV/AIDS epidemic.In light of these needs, the Network for Multidisciplinary Studies in ARV-based HIV Prevention (NEMUS and the World Health Organization (WHO were honoured to co-organize a special issue of JIAS aimed at contributing to a scholarly discussion of current conditions surrounding PrEP implementation, potential impact and efficiency, social science concerns and the study of PrEP implementation in specific country cases. The papers included in this monograph identify and cover many of the main aspects of the complex yet promising discussions around PrEP implementation today. Conclusions: This is a collection of timely contributions from global leaders in HIV research and policy that addresses geographic diversity, uses a trans-disciplinary approach and covers a variety of the complex issues raised by PrEP. As this publication will become accessible to all, we hope that it will remain a valuable resource for policy makers

  1. PrEP implementation: moving from trials to policy and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Carlos F; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Baggaley, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is increasingly clear that the HIV response will not be sustainable if the number of infections is not significantly reduced. Discussion For two decades, research has been ongoing to identify new behavioural and biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection. In the past few years, the efficacy of several new strategies has been demonstrated, including oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP; i.e. daily use of tenofovir/emtricitabine). Because several social, political and logistic barriers remain, however, optimal PrEP implementation will require a better dissemination of new evidence in a number of areas and additional implementation research from various disciplinary perspectives (i.e. social science, policy and ethics; health systems; and economics, including cost-effectiveness studies). Discussion of new evidence on those topics, as well as case studies of potential PrEP implementation in diverse environments, can improve the understanding of the role that PrEP may play in addressing the global HIV/AIDS epidemic. In light of these needs, the Network for Multidisciplinary Studies in ARV-based HIV Prevention (NEMUS) and the World Health Organization (WHO) were honoured to co-organize a special issue of JIAS aimed at contributing to a scholarly discussion of current conditions surrounding PrEP implementation, potential impact and efficiency, social science concerns and the study of PrEP implementation in specific country cases. The papers included in this monograph identify and cover many of the main aspects of the complex yet promising discussions around PrEP implementation today. Conclusions This is a collection of timely contributions from global leaders in HIV research and policy that addresses geographic diversity, uses a trans-disciplinary approach and covers a variety of the complex issues raised by PrEP. As this publication will become accessible to all, we hope that it will remain a valuable resource for policy makers, programme managers

  2. [Mercury in vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Luc

    2003-01-01

    Thiomersal, also called thimerosal, is an ethyl mercury derivative used as a preservative to prevent bacterial contamination of multidose vaccine vials after they have been opened. Exposure to low doses of thiomersal has essentially been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Nevertheless there is no evidence that allergy to thiomersal could be induced by thiomersal-containing vaccines. Allergy to thiomersal is usually of delayed-hypersensitivity type, but its detection through cutaneous tests is not very reliable. Hypersensitivity to thiomersal is not considered as a contraindication to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines. In 1999 in the USA, thiomersal was present in approximately 30 different childhood vaccines, whereas there were only 2 in France. Although there were no evidence of neurological toxicity in infants related to the use of thiomersal-containing vaccines, the FDA considered that the cumulative dose of mercury received by young infants following vaccination was high enough (although lower than the FDA threshold for methyl mercury) to request vaccine manufacturers to remove thiomersal from vaccine formulations. Since 2002, all childhood vaccines used in Europe and the USA are thiomersal-free or contain only minute amounts of thiomersal. Recently published studies have shown that the mercury levels in the blood, faeces and urine of children who had received thiomersal-containing vaccines were much lower than those accepted by the American Environmental Protection Agency. It has also been demonstrated that the elimination of mercury in children was much faster than what was expected on the basis of studies conducted with methyl mercury originating from food. Recently, the hypothesis that mercury contained in vaccines could be the cause of autism and other neurological developmental disorders created a new debate in the medical community and the general public. To date, none of the epidemiological studies conducted in Europe and elsewhere

  3. Current Ebola vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ebolaviruses cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, neither a specific treatment nor a vaccine licensed for use in humans is available. However, a number of vaccine candidates have been developed in the last decade that are highly protective in non-human primates, the gold standard animal model for Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Areas covered This review analyzes a number of scenarios for the use of ebolavirus vaccines, discusses the requirements for ebolavirus vaccines in these scenarios, and describes current ebolavirus vaccines. Among these vaccines are recombinant Adenoviruses, recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, recombinant Human Parainfluenza viruses and virus-like particles. Interestingly, one of these vaccine platforms, based on recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, has also demonstrated post-exposure protection in non-human primates. Expert opinion The most pressing remaining challenge is now to move these vaccine candidates forward into human trials and towards licensure. In order to achieve this, it will be necessary to establish the mechanisms and correlates of protection for these vaccines, and to continue to demonstrate their safety, particularly in potentially immunocompromised populations. However, already now there is sufficient evidence that, from a scientific perspective, a vaccine protective against ebolaviruses is possible. PMID:22559078

  4. Building confidence in vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer C; Appleton, Mary; MacDonald, Noni E

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant efforts by governments, organizations and individuals to maintain public trust in vaccines, concerns persist and threaten to undermine the effectiveness of immunization programs. Vaccine advocates have traditionally focused on education based on evidence to address vaccine concerns and hesitancy. However, being informed of the facts about immunization does not always translate into support for immunization. While many are persuaded by scientific evidence, others are more influenced by cognitive shortcuts, beliefs, societal pressure and the media, with the latter group more likely to hesitate over immunization. Understanding evidence from the behaviour sciences opens new doors to better support individual decision-making about immunization. Drawing on heuristics, this overview explores how individuals find, process and utilize vaccine information and the role health care professionals and society can play in vaccine decision-making. Traditional, evidence-based approaches aimed at staunching the erosion of public confidence in vaccines are proving inadequate and expensive. Enhancing public confidence in vaccines will be complex, necessitating a much wider range of strategies than currently used. Success will require a shift in how the public, health care professionals and media are informed and educated about vaccine benefits, risks and safety; considerable introspection and change in current academic and vaccine decision-making practices; development of proactive strategies to broadly address current and potential future concerns, as well as targeted interventions such as programs to address pain with immunization. This overview outlines ten such opportunities for change to improve vaccine confidence.

  5. Interaction of erythromycin ethylsuccinate and acetaminophen with protein fraction of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from various bacterial aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métivier, Romain; Bourven, Isabelle; Labanowski, Jérome; Guibaud, Gilles

    2013-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) are, along with microbial cells, the main components of the biological sludges used in wastewater treatment and natural biofilms. EPS play a major role in removing pollutants from water by means of sorption. The ability of soluble EPS (S-EPS) and bound EPS (B-EPS) derived from various bacterial aggregates (flocs, granules, biofilms) to bind at pH 7.0 ± 0.1 to two pharmaceutical substances, acetaminophen (ACE) and erythromycin ethylsuccinate (ERY), has been investigated using the fluorescence quenching method. Two intense fluorescence peaks, A (Ex/Em range, 200-250/275-380 nm) and B (Ex/Em range, 260-320/275-360 nm), corresponding respectively to the aromatic protein region and soluble microbial by-product-like region, were identified in a three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix of EPS samples. The fluorescence peak, which corresponds to humic-like substances, was also identified though at low intensity. The ability of EPS to bind ACE was found to exceed that for ERY. The aromatic protein fraction of EPS displays a slightly higher affinity for drugs than that shown by the soluble microbial by-product-like fraction. The S-EPS and B-EPS present the same affinity for ACE and ERY. The effective quenching constants (log K) derived from the Stern-Volmer Equation equaled at peak A (with S-EPS): 3.7 ± 0.2 to 4.0 ± 0.1 for ACE and 2.1 ± 0.3 to 2.7 ± 0.1 for ERY. With B-EPS, these values were 3.9 ± 0.1 to 4.0 ± 0.1 for ACE and 2.0 ± 0.2 to 2.6 ± 0.1 for ERY. Our results suggest that the weaker EPS affinity for ERY than for ACE serves to partially explain why only about 50-80 % of ERY is removed from wastewater at the treatment plant. Moreover, this work demonstrates that EPS from natural river biofilms are able to bind drugs, which in turn may limit the mobility of drugs in natural waters.

  6. EpCAM is a putative stem marker in retinoblastoma and an effective target for T-cell-mediated immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Moutushy; Kandalam, Mallikarjuna; Harilal, Anju; Verma, Rama Shenkar; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Swaminathan, Sethuraman; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2012-01-01

    The molecular markers cluster of differentiation (CD)24, CD44, adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) binding cassette protein G2 (ABCG2), and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are widely used, individually or in combination, to characterize some types of cancer stem cells. In this study we characterized the EpCAM+ retinoblastoma (RB) cells for their cancer stem-like properties in vitro. Additionally, we targeted RB tumor cells via redirecting T cells using bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody. Flow cytometry was used to study the co-expression of EpCAM with putative cancer stem cell markers, such as CD44, CD24, and ABCG2, in RB primary tumors. In vitro methyl thiazol tetrazolium (MTT) assay, invasion assay, and neurosphere formation assay were performed to characterize EpCAM+ cells for their cancer stem/progenitor cell-like properties. We assessed the in vitro efficacy of bispecific EpCAM×CD3 antibody on RB tumor cell proliferation and validated the results by evaluating effector cytokine production in the culture medium with the ELISA method. EpCAM was co-expressed with all cancer stem cell markers (CD44, CD24, and ABCG2) in primary RB tumors. EpCAM+ cells showed significantly higher proliferative invasive potential and neurosphere formation in vitro compared to EpCAM⁻ Y79 cells. EpCAM+ cells showed higher β-catenin expression compared to EpCAM- cells. EpCAM×CD3 significantly retarded proliferation of RB primary tumor cells. EpCAM×CD3 effectively induced the secretion of effector cytokines, such as interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and also perforin levels by pre-activated lymphocytes. EpCAM might be a novel cancer stem cell marker in RB. EpCAM×CD3 antibody redirecting T cells to attack RB tumor cells may prove effective in RB management. Further preclinical studies are needed to confirm the initial findings of our study.

  7. An Ep-ICD based index is a marker of aggressiveness and poor prognosis in thyroid carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C-H He

    Full Text Available Nuclear accumulation of the intracellular domain of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-ICD in tumor cells was demonstrated to predict poor prognosis in thyroid carcinoma patients in our earlier study. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of Ep-ICD subcellular localization index (ESLI in distinguishing aggressive papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC from non-aggressive cases.Using domain specific antibodies against the intracellular (Ep-ICD and extracellular (EpEx domains of epithelial cell adhesion molecule, 200 archived tissues from a new cohort of patients with benign thyroid disease as well as malignant aggressive and non aggressive PTC were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC. ESLI was defined as sum of the IHC scores for accumulation of nuclear and cytoplasmic Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx; ESLI = [Ep-ICD(nuc + Ep-ICD(cyt + loss of membranous EpEx].For the benign thyroid tissues, non-aggressive PTC and aggressive PTC, the mean ESLI scores were 4.5, 6.7 and 11 respectively. Immunofluorescence double staining confirmed increased nuclear Ep-ICD accumulation and decreased membrane EpEx expression in aggressive PTC. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC of 0.841, 70.2% sensitivity and 83.9% specificity for nuclear Ep-ICD for differentiating aggressive PTC from non-aggressive PTC. ESLI distinguished aggressive PTC from non-aggressive cases with improved AUC of 0.924, 88.4% sensitivity and 85.5% specificity. Our study confirms nuclear accumulation of Ep-ICD and loss of membranous EpEx occurs in aggressive PTC underscoring the potential of Ep-ICD and ESLI to serve as diagnostic markers for aggressive PTC. Kaplan Meier survival analysis revealed significantly reduced disease free survival (DFS for ESLI positive (cutoff >10 PTC (p<0.05, mean DFS=133 months as compared to 210 months for patients who did not show positive ESLI.ESLI scoring improves the identification of aggressive

  8. Light-induced reduction of silver ions to silver nanoparticles in aquatic environments by microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Yang, Chuan-Wang; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-12-01

    Microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) widely exist in natural environments and affect the migration and transformation of pollutants in aquatic environments. Previous works report that EPS have some reducing functional groups and can reduce heavy metals. However, because of the weak reducing capability of EPS, the reduction of heavy metals by EPS without cells is extremely slow, and its effect on heavy metals species is insignificant. In this work, the accelerated reduction of silver ions (Ag+) by EPS from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under illumination was investigated. UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to confirm the formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via the reduction of Ag+ by EPS under light illumination. The Ag+ reduction by EPS follows pseudo-first-order kinetics under both visible and UV light, and the light irradiation can significantly accelerate AgNPs formation. On the one hand, visible light can excite AgNPs for their surface plasma resonance (SPR) and accelerate the electrons from the EPS to adjacent Ag+. On the other hand, EPS molecules may be excited by UV light to produce strong reducing species, which enhance Ag+ reduction. Moreover, pH, dissolved oxygen were found to affect the formation of AgNPs by EPS. This work proves the reducing capability of EPS on the reduction of Ag+, and this process can be accelerated under light illumination, which may affect the speciation and transformation of heavy metals in natural waters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. When the science fails and the ethics works: 'Fail-safe' ethics in the FEM-PrEP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingori, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    This paper will explore the concept of 'fail safe' ethics in the FEM PrEP trial, and the practice of research and ethics on the ground. FEM-PrEP examined the efficacy of PrEP in African women after promising outcomes in research conducted with MSM. This was a hugely optimistic time and FEM-PrEP was mobilised using rights-based ethical arguments that women should have access to PrEP. This paper will present data collected during an ethnographic study of frontline research workers involved in FEM-PrEP. During our discussions, 'fail-safe' ethics emerged as concept that encapsulated their confidence that their ethics could not fail. However, in 2011, FEM-PrEP was halted and deemed a failure. The women involved in the study were held responsible because contrary to researcher's expectations they were not taking the oral PrEP being researched. This examination of FEM-PrEP will show that ethical arguments are increasingly deployed to mobilise, maintain and in some cases stop trials in ways which, at times, are superseded or co-opted by other interests. While promoting the interests of women, rights-based approaches are argued to indirectly justify the continuation of individualised, biomedical interventions which have been problematic in other women-centred trials. In this examination of FEM-PrEP, the rights-based approach obscured: ethical concerns beyond access to PrEP; the complexities of power relationships between donor and host countries; the operations of the HIV industry in research-saturated areas and the cumulative effect of unfilled expectations in HIV research and how this has shaped ideas of research and ethics.

  10. Willingness to Take PrEP and Potential for Risk Compensation Among Highly Sexually Active Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Whitfield, Thomas H F; Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2015-12-01

    Once-daily Truvada (Emtricitabine/Tenofovir) as a method of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one of the most promising biomedical interventions to eliminate new HIV infections; however, uptake among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men has been slow amidst growing concern in popular/social media that PrEP use will result in reduced condom use (i.e., risk compensation). We investigated demographic, behavioral, and psychosocial differences in willingness to use PrEP as well as the perceived impact of PrEP on participants' condom use in a sample of 206 highly sexually active HIV-negative gay and bisexual men. Nearly half (46.1 %) said they would be willing to take PrEP if it were provided at no cost. Although men willing to take PrEP (vs. others) reported similar numbers of recent casual male partners (PrEP. Neither age, race/ethnicity, nor income were associated with willingness to take PrEP, suggesting equal acceptability among subpopulations that are experiencing disparities in HIV incidence. There was limited evidence to suggest men would risk compensate. Only 10 % of men who had not engaged in recent CAS felt that PrEP would result in them starting to have CAS. Men who had not tested for HIV recently were also significantly more likely than others to indicate willingness to take PrEP. Offering PrEP to men who test infrequently may serve to engage them more in routine HIV/STI testing and create a continued dialogue around sexual health between patient and provider in order to prevent HIV infection.

  11. Development and validation of an expedited 10 g protein counter (EP-10) for dietary protein intake quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Su-Lin; Lye, Jamie; Shen, Liang; Miller, Michelle; Chong, Yap-Seng

    2012-11-01

    Precise protein quantification is essential in clinical dietetics, particularly in the management of renal, burn, and malnourished patients. The expedited 10 g protein counter (EP-10) was developed to expedite the estimation of dietary protein for nutritional assessment and recommendation. The main objective of this study was to compare the validity and efficacy of the EP-10 with the American Dietetic Association's "Exchange List for Meal Planning" (ADA-7 g) in quantifying dietary protein intake, against computerized nutrient analysis (CNA). Protein intake of 197 food records kept by healthy adult subjects in Singapore was determined thrice using 3 different methods: (1) EP-10, (2) ADA-7 g, and (3) CNA using SERVE program (Version 4.0). Assessments using the EP-10 and ADA-7 g were performed by 2 assessors in a blind crossover manner while a third assessor performed the CNA. All assessors were blind to each other's results. Time taken to assess a subsample (n = 165) using the EP-10 and ADA-7 g was also recorded. Mean difference in protein intake quantification when compared with the CNA was statistically nonsignificant for the EP-10 (1.4 ± 16.3 g, P = .239) and statistically significant for the ADA-7 g (-2.2 ± 15.6 g, P = .046). Both the EP-10 and ADA-7 g had clinically acceptable agreement with the CNA, as determined via Bland-Altman plots, although it was found that EP-10 had a tendency to overestimate with protein intakes above 150 g. The EP-10 required significantly less time for protein intake quantification than the ADA-7 g (mean time of 65 ± 36 seconds vs. 111 ± 40 seconds, P valid clinical tools for protein intake quantification in an Asian context, with EP-10 being more time efficient. However, a dietician's discretion is needed when the EP-10 is used on protein intakes above 150 g. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaccination against seasonal flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Service once again recommends you to get your annual flu vaccination for the year.   Vaccination is the most effective way of avoiding the illness and any serious consequences and protecting those around you. The flu can have especially serious consequences for people with chronic conditions (diabetes, cardio-vascular disease, etc.), pregnant women, infants, and people over 65 years of age. Remember, anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor) with their vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement by UNIQA. NB: The Medical Service cannot provide this vaccination service for family members or retired members of the personnel. For more information: • The "Seasonal flu" flyer by the Medical Service • Recommendations of the Swiss Federal Office of Public...

  13. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  14. Vaccine development for syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow, Karen V; Cameron, Caroline E

    2017-01-01

    Syphilis, caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum, continues to be a globally prevalent disease despite remaining susceptible to penicillin treatment. Syphilis vaccine development is a viable preventative approach that will serve to complement public health-oriented syphilis prevention, screening and treatment initiatives to deliver a two-pronged approach to stemming disease spread worldwide. Areas covered: This article provides an overview of the need for development of a syphilis vaccine, summarizes significant information that has been garnered from prior syphilis vaccine studies, discusses the critical aspects of infection that would have to be targeted by a syphilis vaccine, and presents the current understanding within the field of the correlates of protection needed to be achieved through vaccination. Expert commentary: Syphilis vaccine development should be considered a priority by industry, regulatory and funding agencies, and should be appropriately promoted and supported.

  15. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  16. The Latest in Vaccine Policies: Selected Issues in School Vaccinations, Healthcare Worker Vaccinations, and Pharmacist Vaccination Authority Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Leila; Schmit, Cason; Hoss, Aila

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses recent changes to state legal frameworks for mandatory vaccination in the context of school and healthcare worker vaccination. It then discusses state laws that allow pharmacists the authority to vaccinate.

  17. Factors influencing the ability of Pseudomonas putida strains epI and II to degrade the organophosphate ethoprophos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpouzas, D G; Walker, A

    2000-07-01

    Two strains of Pseudomonas putida (epI and epII), isolated previously from ethoprophos-treated soil, were able to degrade ethoprophos (10 mg 1(-1)) in a mineral salts medium plus nitrogen (MSMN) in less than 50 h with a concurrent population growth. Addition of glucose or succinate to MSMN did not influence the degrading ability of Ps. putida epI, but increased the lag phase before rapid degradation commenced with Ps. putida epII. The degrading ability of the two isolates was lost when the pesticide provided the sole source of phosphorus. Degradation of ethoprophos was most rapid when bacterial cultures were incubated at 25 and 37 degrees C. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of completely degrading ethoprophos at a slow rate at 5 degrees C, compared with Ps. putida epII which could not completely degrade ethoprophos at the same time. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of degrading ethoprophos when only 60 cells ml(-1) were used as initial inoculum. In contrast, Ps. putida epII was able to totally degrade ethoprophos when inoculum densities of 600 cells ml(-1) or higher were used. In general, longer lag phases accompanied the lower inoculum levels. Both isolates rapidly degraded ethoprophos in MSMN at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 7.6, but not at pH 5 or below.

  18. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the migration and removal of sulfamethazine in activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Ma, Ying; Wang, Long-Fei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-09-15

    The occurrences, transformation of antibiotics in biological wastewater treatment plants have attracted increasing interests. However, roles of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of activated sludge on the fate of antibiotics are not clear. In this study, the roles of EPS in the migration and removal of one typical antibiotic, sulfamethazine (SMZ), in activated sludge process were investigated. The interaction between EPS and SMZ was explored through a combined use of fluorescence spectral analysis, laser light scattering and microcalorimetry techniques. Results show that SMZ interacted with the proteins in EPS mainly with a binding constant of 1.91 × 10(5) L/mol. The binding process proceeded spontaneously, and the driving force was mainly from the hydrophobic interaction. After binding, the structure of EPS was expanded and became loose, which favored the mass transfer and pollution capture. The removal of SMZ was influenced by interaction with EPS. SMZ could be effectively adsorbed on EPS, which accounted for up to 61.8% of total SMZ adsorbed by sludge at the initial adsorption stage and declined to around 35.3% at the subsequent biodegradation stage. The enrichment of SMZ by EPS was beneficial for SMZ removal and acquisition by microbes at the subsequent biodegradation stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and their subfractions to the sludge aggregation in membrane bioreactor coupled with worm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Yu; Ding, Yi; Wang, Haoyu; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    This study focused on the effect of predated sludge recycle on the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and their subfractions to sludge aggregation in combined MBR system. It was observed that aggregation abilities of sludge samples were decreased by worm predation. Furthermore, worm predation enhanced the energy barriers and weakened the secondary energy minimum in the interaction energy profiles of slime, loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS). Further investigations demonstrated that the content decrease and structural change of different EPS fractions induced by worm predation may be the reason for the decreased aggregation of sludge. Concomitantly, the adsorption tests and atomic force microscopy observation confirmed that the worm predation decreased the adsorption of slime, LB-EPS and TB-EPS on membrane. This would indicate the worm predation could keep an optimum EPS level for which floc structure was maintained and the fouling propensity of mixed liquid was reduced. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhanced anaerobically digested swine wastewater treatment by the composite of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and Bacillus megatherium G106 derived EPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junyuan; Huang, Yang; Chen, Cheng; Xiao, Yu; Chen, Jing; Jian, Biyu

    2017-08-17

    A strain was isolated from biological sludge to produce EPS by using anaerobically digested swine wastewater (ADSW). Potential of the EPS in ADSW treatment were discussed. Results showed that the optimal fermentation medium for EPS production was determined as 4 g K2HPO4, 2 g KH2PO4, and 2 g sucrose dissolved in 1 L ADSW. After fermentation for 60 h, 2.98 g EPS with main backbone of polysaccharides can be extracted from 1 L of fermentation broth. The EPS showed good performances in ADSW treatment, after conditioned by this EPS, removal efficiencies of COD, ammonia, and TP reached 70.2%, 76.5% and 82.8%, respectively, which were higher than that obtained when chemicals were selected as conditioning agents. Removal efficiencies were further improved when the EPS and polyaluminum chloride (PAC) were used simultaneously, and finally reached 91.6%, 90.8%, and 92.5%, respectively, under the optimized conditioning process by the composite of EPS of 16 mg/L, PAC of 12 g/L, pH of 7.5, and agitation speed of 200 r/min.

  1. Effects of Fe(III) on biofilm and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in fixed bed biofilm reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xuewei; Chen, Kai; Lai, Xinke; Ji, Siping; Kaiser, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The effects of Fe(III) on the biofilm mass and activity, the biofilm micromorphology as well as the composition and functional groups characteristics of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilm were investigated in laboratory-scale fixed bed biofilm reactors. The results showed that 2 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted the biofilm mass and improved the biofilm activity, but 16 mg/L of Fe(III) adversely affected biofilm development. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study indicated a high concentration (16 mg/L) of Fe(III) led to significant reduction of the filaments, great promotion of the EPS secretion in biofilm. The result of the EPS composition suggested 2 mg/L of Fe(III) increased soluble EPS and loosely bound EPS which contributed to the microbial aggregation, while 16 mg/L of Fe(III) promoted tightly bound EPS production unfavourable for substrate mass transfer. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that Fe(III) exerted a significant influence on the -CONH- groups of proteins and the C-O groups of polysaccharides in EPS. This study reveals that Fe(III) influences biofilm development and activity not only by directly impacting the microbial physiology but by indirectly affecting the EPS constituents, and it helps to provide theoretical guidance for iron ion containing wastewater treatment.

  2. The influence of recycled expanded polystyrene (EPS) on concrete properties: Influence on flexural strength, water absorption and shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsalah, Jamaleddin; Al-Sahli, Yosra; Akish, Ahmed; Saad, Omar; Hakemi, Abdurrahman

    2013-12-01

    Expanded polystyrene waste in a granular form was used as a lightweight aggregate in order to produce lightweight concretë Lightweight EPS concrete composites were produced by replacing the coarse aggregate, either partially or fully with equal volume of EPS aggregates. The coarse aggregate replacements levels used were 25, 50, 75, and 100%, which corresponded to (9.20, 18.40, 27.60, and 36.8%) from total volume. The investigation is directed towards the development and performance evaluation of the concrete composites containing EPS aggregates, without addition of either bonding additives, or super-plasticizers on some concrete properties such as flexure strength, water absorption and change in length (or shrinkage). Experimental results showed that a density reduction of 12% caused flexure strength to decrease by 25.3% at a replacement level of 25% EPS. However, the reduction percentage strongly depends upon the replacement level of EPS granules. Moreover, the lower strength concretes showed a higher water absorption values compared to higher strength concrete, i.e., increasing the volume percentage of EPS increases the water absorption as well as the negative strain (shrinkage). The negative strain was higher at concretes of lower density (containing a high amount of EPS aggregate). The water to cement ratio of EPS aggregate concrete is found to be slightly lower than that of conventional concrete.

  3. Optimization of Cultural Conditions for Production of Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS by Serpentine Rhizobacterium Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Pal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS are complex biopolymers produced by a wide array of microorganisms for protection against dessication, aggregation, adhesion, and expression of virulence. Growth associated production of EPS by Ni-resistant Cupriavidus pauculus KPS 201 was determined in batch culture using sodium gluconate as the sole carbon source. The optimum pH and temperature for EPS production were 6.5 and 25°C, respectively. Optimal EPS yield (118 μg/mL was attained at 0.35% Na-gluconate after 72 h of growth. Cupriavidus KPS 201 cells also utilized glutamate, acetate, pyruvate, fumarate, malate, malonate, formate, citrate, and succinate for EPS production. Although EPS production was positively influenced by the increase of nitrogen and phosphate in the growth medium, it was negatively influenced by nickel ions. Compositional analysis of the purified EPS showed that it is a homopolymer of rhamnose containing uronic acid, protein, and nucleic acid. Presence of lipids was also detected with spectroscopy. Non-destructive EPS mediated biofilm formation of KPS 201 was also visualized by epifluorescence microscopy.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Dudas, Robert A; Karron, Ruth A.

    1998-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of viral lower respiratory tract illness (LRI) in infants and children worldwide and causes significant LRI in the elderly and in immunocompromised patients. The goal of RSV vaccination is to prevent serious RSV-associated LRI. There are several obstacles to the development of successful RSV vaccines, including the need to immunize very young infants, who may respond inadequately to vaccination; the existence of two antigenically d...

  5. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    OpenAIRE

    Nicol, A.F.; Andrade, C.V.; Russomano, F.B.; Rodrigues, L.L.S.; Oliveira, N.S.; D.W. Provance Jr

    2016-01-01

    Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment o...

  6. Combined measurement and QCD analysis of the inclusive e(+/-)p scattering cross sections at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Al-daya Martin, M.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Antunovic, B.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borodin, M.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Boudry, V.; Boutle, S. K.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bussey, P. J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Deak, M.; de Favereau, J.; Delcourt, B.; del Peso, J.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Falkiewicz, A.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D. -J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Fourletov, S.; Gabathuler, E.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grell, B. R.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Helebrant, C.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Holm, U.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Horton, K.; Hreus, T.; Huettmann, A.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Jonsson, L.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kamaluddin, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Katzy, J.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knutsson, A.; Kogler, R.; Kollar, D.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krueger, K.; Kulinski, P.; Kuprash, O.; Kutak, K.; Kuze, M.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Loizides, J. H.; Loktionova, N.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukasik, J.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Luzniak, P.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makankine, A.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Marage, P.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Marti, Ll.; Martyn, H. -U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Mozer, M. U.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, K.; Murin, P.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, Th.; Nicholass, D.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Osman, S.; Ota, O.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pejchal, O.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Plucinski, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Raspiareza, A.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roloff, P.; Ron, E.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salek, D.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoening, A.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Sloan, T.; Slominski, W.; Smiljanic, I.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sorokin, Iu.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Sunar, D.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Tchoulakov, V.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Urban, K.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Trevino, A. Vargas; Vazdik, Y.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, V.; Vinokurova, S.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volchinski, V.; Volynets, O.; von den Driesch, M.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Whyte, J.; Wing, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wuensch, E.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zeniaev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolko, M.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    A combination is presented of the inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e(+/-)p scattering at HERA during the period 1994-2000. The data span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared,

  7. Role of Catechin Quinones in the Induction of EpRE-Mediated Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muzolf-Panek, M.; Gliszczynska-Swiglo, A.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Szymusiak, H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Tyrakowska, B.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the ability of green tea catechins to induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression and the role of their quinones in the mechanism of this induction were investigated. To this end, Hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells were used, stably transfected with a

  8. Search for single-top production in ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    A search for single-top production, ep -> et X, has been performed with the ZEUS detector at HERA using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.37 fb(-1). No evidence for top production was found, consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model. Limits were computed for

  9. The Promise and Peril of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP): Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our review highlights the importance of involving social scientists in clinical and community-based research on PrEP. We advocate for a shift away from a singular “re-medicalization” of the HIV epidemic to that of a “reintegration” of interdisciplinary approaches to prevention that could benefit female sex workers and other ...

  10. Hybrid modeling of microbial exopolysaccharide (EPS) production: The case of Enterobacter A47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rodolfo; von Stosch, Moritz; Portela, Rui M C; Torres, Cristiana A V; Antunes, Sílvia; Freitas, Filomena; Reis, Maria A M; Oliveira, Rui

    2017-03-20

    Enterobacter A47 is a bacterium that produces high amounts of a fucose-rich exopolysaccharide (EPS) from glycerol residue of the biodiesel industry. The fed-batch process is characterized by complex non-linear dynamics with highly viscous pseudo-plastic rheology due to the accumulation of EPS in the culture medium. In this paper, we study hybrid modeling as a methodology to increase the predictive power of models for EPS production optimization. We compare six hybrid structures that explore different levels of knowledge-based and machine-learning model components. Knowledge-based components consist of macroscopic material balances, Monod type kinetics, cardinal temperature and pH (CTP) dependency and power-law viscosity models. Unknown dependencies are set to be identified by a feedforward artificial neural network (ANN). A semiparametric identification schema is applied resorting to a data set of 13 independent fed-batch experiments. A parsimonious hybrid model was identified that describes the dynamics of the 13 experiments with the same parameterization. The final model is specific to Enterobacter A47 but can be easily extended to other microbial EPS processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Measurement of isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering ZEUS Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Nicholass, D.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cindolo, F.; Corradi, M.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Nania, R.; Polini, A.; Antonelli, S.; Basile, M.; Bindi, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Contin, A.; De Pasquale, S.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H. -P.; Juengst, M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Samson, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Shehzadi, R.; Wlasenko, M.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Capua, M.; Fazio, S.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Tassi, E.; Kim, J. Y.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Kamaluddin, B.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Ning, Y.; Ren, Z.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Pawlik, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Lukasik, J.; Przybycien, M.; Suszycki, L.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Bachynska, O.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Blohm, C.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Coppola, N.; Geiser, A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Huettmann, A.; Januschek, F.; Kahle, B.; Katkov, I. I.; Klein, U.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Libov, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Miglioranzi, S.; Montanari, A.; Namsoo, T.; Notz, D.; Parenti, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Spiridonov, A.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Theedt, T.; Tomaszewska, J.; Wolf, G.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Drugakov, V.; Lohmann, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Dobur, D.; Karstens, F.; Vlasov, N. N.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Forrest, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Papageorgiu, K.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Lohrmann, E.; Perrey, H.; Schleper, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sztuk, J.; Stadie, H.; Turcato, M.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Aushev, V.; Borodin, M.; Kadenko, I.; Korol, Ie.; Kuprash, O.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Salii, A.; Sorokin, Iu.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, V.; Volynets, O.; Zenaiev, O.; Zolko, M.; Son, D.; de Favereau, J.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; Jimenez, M.; del Peso, J.; Ron, E.; Terron, J.; Uribe-Estrada, C.; Corriveau, F.; Schwartz, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Stifutkin, A.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Zotkin, D. S.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Kollar, D.; Reisert, B.; Schmidke, W. B.; Grigorescu, G.; Keramidas, A.; Kooijman, P.; Pellegrino, A.; Tiecke, H.; Vazquez, M.; Bruemmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Lee, A.; Ling, T. Y.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Ferrando, J.; Foster, B.; Gwenlan, C.; Horton, K.; Oliver, K.; Robertson, A.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Oh, B. Y.; Raval, A.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Hart, J. C.; Abramowicz, H.; Ingbir, R.; Kananov, S.; Stern, A.; Ishitsuka, M.; Kanno, T.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Hori, R.; Okazaki, N.; Hamatsu, R.; Kitamura, S.; Ota, O.; Ri, Y. D.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Fourletov, S.; Stewart, T. P.; Boutle, S. K.; Butterworth, J. M.; Jones, T. W.; Loizides, J. H.; Wing, M.; Brzozowska, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kulinski, P.; Luzniak, P.; Malka, J.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Perlanski, W.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Tymieniecka, T.; Eisenberg, Y.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Brownson, E.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Wolfe, H.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Hartner, G.; Noor, U.; Whyte, J.

    2010-01-01

    Isolated photon production in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 320 pb(-1). Measurements were made in the isolated-photon transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4

  12. Production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by benthic diatoms: the effect of irradiance and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfstein, K.; Stal, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    An axenic culture of Cylindrotheca closterium and a natural community of benthic diatoms were used to study the effect of temperature and irradiance on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). In the culture, results depended on the growth stage of the algae and on whether

  13. EPS (Electric Particulate Suspension) Microgravity Technology Provides NASA with New Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Greene, Nate; Xu, Hua

    2004-01-01

    The Electric Particulate Suspension is a fire safety ignition test system being developed at Iowa State University with NASA support for evaluating combustion properties of powders, powder-gas mixtures, and pure gases in microgravity and gravitational atmospheres (quenching distance, ignition energy, flammability limits). A separate application is the use of EPS technology to control heat transfer in vacuum and space environment enclosures. In combustion testing, ignitable powders (aluminum, magnesium) are introduced in the EPS test cell and ignited by spark, while the addition of inert particles act as quenching media. As a combustion research tool, the EPS method has potential as a benchmark design for quenching powder flames that would provide NASA with a new fire safety standard for powder ignition testing. The EPS method also supports combustion modeling by providing accurate measurement of flame-quenching distance as an important parameter in laminar flame theory since it is closely related to characteristic flame thickness and flame structure. In heat transfer applications, inert powder suspensions (copper, steel) driven by electric fields regulate heat flow between adjacent surfaces enclosures both in vacuum (or gas) and microgravity. This simple E-field control can be particularly useful in space environments where physical separation is a requirement between heat exchange surfaces.

  14. Quenching Combustible Dust Mixtures Using Electric Particulate Suspensions (EPS): A New Testing Method For Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Greene, Nathanael; Shoemaker, David; Xu, Hua

    2003-01-01

    The Electric Particulate Suspension (EPS) is a combustion ignition system being developed at Iowa State University for evaluating quenching effects of powders in microgravity (quenching distance, ignition energy, flammability limits). Because of the high cloud uniformity possible and its simplicity, the EPS method has potential for "benchmark" design of quenching flames that would provide NASA and the scientific community with a new fire standard. Microgravity is expected to increase suspension uniformity even further and extend combustion testing to higher concentrations (rich fuel limit) than is possible at normal gravity. Two new combustion parameters are being investigated with this new method: (1) the particle velocity distribution and (2) particle-oxidant slip velocity. Both walls and (inert) particles can be tested as quenching media. The EPS method supports combustion modeling by providing accurate measurement of flame-quenching distance as a parameter in laminar flame theory as it closely relates to characteristic flame thickness and flame structure. Because of its design simplicity, EPS is suitable for testing on the International Space Station (ISS). Laser scans showing stratification effects at 1-g have been studied for different materials, aluminum, glass, and copper. PTV/PIV and a leak hole sampling rig give particle velocity distribution with particle slip velocity evaluated using LDA. Sample quenching and ignition energy curves are given for aluminum powder. Testing is planned for the KC-135 and NASA s two second drop tower. Only 1-g ground-based data have been reported to date.

  15. Laboratory Investigation of Buried Pipes Using Geogrid and EPS Geofoam Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj, O.; Azizian, M.; Moghaddas Tafreshi, S. N.; Mašek, B.

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory tests conducted on flexible PVC pipes with diameter of 160 mm, buried in unreinforced and reinforced trench with geogrid layer and expanded polystyrene (EPS) geofoam block. The repeated load with amplitude of 450 kPa and frequency of 0.33 Hz was applied on the trench surface, using plate loading at a diameter of 150 mm to simulate the vehicle loads. Vertical diameter strain (VDS), strain at pipe’s crown and transferred pressure on the pipe’s crown were recorded throughout the test for up to 500 cycles of loading. The variables examined in the testing program include thickness of EPS block (30, 60 and 100 mm) and its density (10, 20 and 30 kg/cm3). The pipes were embedded at depths 1.5 times their diameter and the width of EPS block was kept constant at 2.0 times the pipe diameter in all tests. The results show that the values of VDS and pipe strain increased rapidly during the initial loading cycles, thereafter the rate of deformation and strain reduced significantly as the number of load cycles increased. According to the results, the minimum VDS and pipe’s crown strain were provided by 100 mm thickness and 30 kg/cm3 of EPS block placed over the pipe with a geogrid layer giving values of, respectively, 0.15 and 0.10 times those obtained in the reinforced trench with a geogrid layer.

  16. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and three...

  17. 30 CFR 250.227 - What environmental impact analysis (EIA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What environmental impact analysis (EIA... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.227 What environmental impact analysis (EIA... requirements. Your EIA must: (1) Assess the potential environmental impacts of your proposed exploration...

  18. Ber-EP4 enhances the differential diagnostic accuracy of cytokeratin 7 in pagetoid cutaneous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellheyer, Klaus; Krahl, Dieter

    2008-04-01

    While cytokeratin 7 is a reliable marker for most cases of Paget's disease, it is not 100% sensitive. Moreover, cases of cytokeratin 7-positive pagetoid squamous cell carcinoma in situ are reported in the literature. The monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4 is diagnostically highly reliable in the differentiation between basal cell carcinoma and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. Here we report its application in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous pagetoid neoplasms. Biopsy samples from 21 cases of extramammary Paget's disease, 12 pagetoid squamous cell carcinomas in situ and 10 pagetoid melanomas in situ of the superficial spreading type were examined immunohistochemically with Ber-EP4, 34betaE12 and HMB-45. Ber-EP4 selectively labeled all cases of extramammary Paget's disease but none of the other pagetoid neoplasms. The majority of cases (18 = 85.7%) displayed strong and three (14.3%) showed moderate immunoreactivity. Ber-EP4 reliably differentiates extramammary Paget's disease from pagetoid squamous cell carcinoma in situ and pagetoid melanoma in situ. The antibody should be included along with a panel of other markers when evaluating for pagetoid cutaneous neoplasms in order to avoid a possible misdiagnosis of pagetoid squamous cell carcinoma in situ.

  19. PrEP-dossier : Pre-Expositie Profylaxe voor hiv-negatieven in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus AT; Blom C; Zantkuijl P; David S; P&B; I&V

    2017-01-01

    In October 2016, the Minister for Health, Welfare and Sport requested advice from the Health Council of the Netherlands on the use of medication to prevent HIV infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP) in people with an increased risk of HIV. The National Institute for Public Health and the

  20. A thermo-electro-mechanical simulation model for hot wire cutting of EPS foam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petkov, Kiril; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermo-electro-mechanical mathematical model describing the effects taking place within a Ni-Cr20% wire used in a hot-wire cutting process for free forming and rapid prototyping of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is investigated and simulated. The model implements and solves three se...

  1. Project work on wellbeing in multidisciplinary student teams : A triple testimonial on eps at artesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rohaert, S.; Baelus, C.; Lacko, D.

    2012-01-01

    The European Project Semester (EPS) programme offers an educational framework to support students to practice problem-and project-based cross-disciplinary product innovation and research, in small multidisciplinary and international teams. To explore the potential and the restrictions of this

  2. New Reactor Physics Benchmark Data in the March 2012 Edition of the IRPhEP Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Jim Gulliford

    2012-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was established to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications. Numerous experiments that have been performed worldwide, represent a large investment of infrastructure, expertise, and cost, and are valuable resources of data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, development, and validation of methods. If the experimental data are lost, the high cost to repeat many of these measurements may be prohibitive. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer-reviewed set of reactor physics-related integral data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next-generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. Contributors from around the world collaborate in the evaluation and review of selected benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook) [1]. Several new evaluations have been prepared for inclusion in the March 2012 edition of the IRPhEP Handbook.

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Co-overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Methods: To this purpose, 122 fresh tissues including 104 malignant and 18 benign samples were disrupted by mortar and pestle and RNA was then isolated from the samples and converted to cDNA. The relative expression levels of EpCAM and c-myc genes were measured by2−ΔΔCt method using RT-. qPCR method.

  4. Loss of the actin remodeler Eps8 causes intestinal defects and improved metabolic status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Tocchetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a variety of organisms, including mammals, caloric restriction improves metabolic status and lowers the incidence of chronic-degenerative diseases, ultimately leading to increased lifespan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that knockout mice for Eps8, a regulator of actin dynamics, display reduced body weight, partial resistance to age- or diet-induced obesity, and overall improved metabolic status. Alteration in the liver gene expression profile, in behavior and metabolism point to a calorie restriction-like phenotype in Eps8 knockout mice. Additionally, and consistent with a calorie restricted metabolism, Eps8 knockout mice show increased lifespan. The metabolic alterations in Eps8 knockout mice correlated with a significant reduction in intestinal fat absorption presumably caused by a 25% reduction in intestinal microvilli length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings implicate actin dynamics as a novel variable in the determination of longevity. Additionally, our observations suggest that subtle differences in energy balance can, over time, significantly affect bodyweight and metabolic status in mice.

  5. Angular correlations in three-jet events in ep collisions at HERA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruemmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Goettlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Horton, K.; Huettmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H. -P.; Januschek, F.; Jimenez, M.; Jones, T. W.; Juengst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Loehr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Noor, U.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Oliver, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Salii, A.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoenberg, V.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terron, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomalak, O.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vazquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Volynets, O.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yaguees-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zolko, M.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-01-01

    Three-jet production in deep inelastic ep scattering and photoproduction was investigated with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of up to 127 pb(-1). Measurements of differential cross sections are presented as functions of angular correlations between the three jets in the

  6. Handwriting Movement Kinematics for Quantifying EPS in Patients Treated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Michael P.; Teulings, Hans-Leo; Dean, Charles E.; Niculescu, Alexander B.; Lohr, James B.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing monitoring of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) is important to maximize treatment outcome, improve medication adherence and reduce re-hospitalization. Traditional approaches for assessing EPS such as parkinsonism, tardive akathisia, or dyskinesia rely upon clinical ratings. However, these observer-based EPS severity ratings can be unreliable and are subject to examiner bias. In contrast, quantitative instrumental methods are less subject to bias. Most instrumental methods have only limited clinical utility because of their complexity and costs. This paper describes an easy-to-use instrumental approach based on handwriting movements for quantifying EPS. Here, we present findings from psychiatric patients treated with atypical (second generation) antipsychotics. The handwriting task consisted of a sentence written several times within a 2 cm vertical boundary at a comfortable speed using an inkless pen and digitizing tablet. Kinematic variables including movement duration, peak vertical velocity and the number of acceleration peaks, and average normalized jerk (a measure of smoothness) for each up or down stroke and their submovements were analyzed. Results from 59 psychosis patients and 46 healthy comparison subjects revealed significant slowing and dysfluency in patients compared to controls. We observed differences across medications and daily dose. These findings support the ecological validity of handwriting movement analysis as an objective behavioral biomarker for quantifying the effects of antipsychotic medication and dose on the motor system. PMID:20381875

  7. EP-DNN: A Deep Neural Network-Based Global Enhancer Prediction Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Gon; Harwani, Mrudul; Grama, Ananth; Chaterji, Somali

    2016-12-08

    We present EP-DNN, a protocol for predicting enhancers based on chromatin features, in different cell types. Specifically, we use a deep neural network (DNN)-based architecture to extract enhancer signatures in a representative human embryonic stem cell type (H1) and a differentiated lung cell type (IMR90). We train EP-DNN using p300 binding sites, as enhancers, and TSS and random non-DHS sites, as non-enhancers. We perform same-cell and cross-cell predictions to quantify the validation rate and compare against two state-of-the-art methods, DEEP-ENCODE and RFECS. We find that EP-DNN has superior accuracy with a validation rate of 91.6%, relative to 85.3% for DEEP-ENCODE and 85.5% for RFECS, for a given number of enhancer predictions and also scales better for a larger number of enhancer predictions. Moreover, our H1 → IMR90 predictions turn out to be more accurate than IMR90 → IMR90, potentially because H1 exhibits a richer signature set and our EP-DNN model is expressive enough to extract these subtleties. Our work shows how to leverage the full expressivity of deep learning models, using multiple hidden layers, while avoiding overfitting on the training data. We also lay the foundation for exploration of cross-cell enhancer predictions, potentially reducing the need for expensive experimentation.

  8. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fergelot, Patricia; Van Belzen, Martine; Van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M.; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B A; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka L.; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304815861; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J M; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs

  9. Vaccines: Shaping global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Ting, Ching-Chia; Lobos, Fernando

    2017-03-14

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) gathered leaders in immunization programs, vaccine manufacturing, representatives of the Argentinean Health Authorities and Pan American Health Organization, among other global health stakeholders, for its 17th Annual General Meeting in Buenos Aires, to reflect on how vaccines are shaping global health. Polio eradication and elimination of measles and rubella from the Americas is a result of successful collaboration, made possible by timely supply of affordable vaccines. After decades of intense competition for high-value markets, collaboration with developing countries has become critical, and involvement of multiple manufacturers as well as public- and private-sector investments are essential, for developing new vaccines against emerging infectious diseases. The recent Zika virus outbreak and the accelerated Ebola vaccine development exemplify the need for international partnerships to combat infectious diseases. A new player, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) has made its entrance in the global health community, aiming to stimulate research preparedness against emerging infections. Face-to-face panel discussions facilitated the dialogue around challenges, such as risks of viability to vaccine development and regulatory convergence, to improve access to sustainable vaccine supply. It was discussed that joint efforts to optimizing regulatory pathways in developing countries, reducing registration time by up to 50%, are required. Outbreaks of emerging infections and the global Polio eradication and containment challenges are reminders of the importance of vaccines' access, and of the importance of new public-private partnerships. Copyright © 2017.

  10. Rotavirus vaccines: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Penelope H

    2005-02-01

    Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide and has a major global impact on childhood morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is the only control measure likely to have a significant impact on the incidence of severe dehydrating rotavirus disease. Rotavirus disease prevention efforts suffered a great setback in 1999 with the withdrawal of the RRV-TV vaccine less than a year after its introduction. Several new rotavirus vaccine candidates have now been developed and are undergoing clinical trials. New safe and effective rotavirus vaccines offer the best hope of reducing the toll of acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in both developed and developing countries.

  11. Rotavirus vaccines: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midthun, K; Kapikian, A Z

    1996-07-01

    Rotavirus vaccine development has focused on the delivery of live attenuated rotavirus strains by the oral route. The initial "Jennerian" approach involving bovine (RIT4237, WC3) or rhesus (RRV) rotavirus vaccine candidates showed that these vaccines were safe, well tolerated, and immunogenic but induced highly variable rates of protection against rotavirus diarrhea. The goal of a rotavirus vaccine is to prevent severe illness that can lead to dehydration in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. These studies led to the concept that a multivalent vaccine that represented each of the four epidemiologically important VP7 serotypes might be necessary to induce protection in young infants, the target population for vaccination. Human-animal rotavirus reassortants whose gene encoding VP7 was derived from their human rotavirus parent but whose remaining genes were derived from the animal rotavirus parent were developed as vaccine candidates. The greatest experience with a multivalent vaccine to date has been gained with the quadrivalent preparation containing RRV (VP7 serotype 3) and human-RRV reassortants of VP7 serotype 1, 2, and 4 specificity. Preliminary efficacy trial results in the United States have been promising, whereas a study in Peru has shown only limited protection. Human-bovine reassortant vaccines, including a candidate that contains the VP4 gene of a human rotavirus (VP4 serotype 1A), are also being studied.

  12. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-05

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccines and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian; Salisbury, David; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines have made a major contribution to global health in recent decades but they could do much more. In November 2011, a Royal Society discussion meeting, ‘New vaccines for global health’, was held in London to discuss the past contribution of vaccines to global health and to consider what more could be expected in the future. Papers presented at the meeting reviewed recent successes in the deployment of vaccines against major infections of childhood and the challenges faced in developing vaccines against some of the world's remaining major infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malaria and tuberculosis. The important contribution that development of more effective veterinary vaccines could make to global health was also addressed. Some of the social and financial challenges to the development and deployment of new vaccines were reviewed. The latter issues were also discussed at a subsequent satellite meeting, ‘Accelerating vaccine development’, held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre. Delegates at this meeting considered challenges to the more rapid development and deployment of both human and veterinary vaccines and how these might be addressed. Papers based on presentations at the discussion meeting and a summary of the main conclusions of the satellite meeting are included in this issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. PMID:21893534

  14. Vaccination against Weight Gain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eric P. Zorrilla; Shinichi Iwasaki; Jason A. Moss; Jason Chang; Jonathan Otsuji; Koki Inoue; Michael M. Meijler; Kim D. Janda

    2006-01-01

    .... Here we show that active vaccination of mature rats with ghrelin immunoconjugates decreases feed efficiency, relative adiposity, and body weight gain in relation to the immune response elicited...

  15. PGE2 promotes breast cancer-associated lymphangiogenesis by activation of EP4 receptor on lymphatic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Pinki; Girish, Gannareddy V; Majumder, Mousumi; Xin, Xiping; Tutunea-Fatan, Elena; Lala, Peeyush K

    2017-01-05

    Lymphatic metastasis, facilitated by lymphangiogenesis is a common occurrence in breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms remaining incompletely understood. We had earlier shown that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression by human or murine breast cancer cells promoted lymphangiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis by upregulating VEGF-C/D production by tumor cells or tumor-associated macrophages primarily due to activation of the prostaglandin receptor EP4 by endogenous PGE2. It is not clear whether tumor or host-derived PGE2 has any direct effect on lymphangiogenesis, and if so, whether EP4 receptors on lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) play any role. Here, we address these questions employing in vitro studies with a COX-2-expressing and VEGF-C/D-producing murine breast cancer cell line C3L5 and a rat mesenteric (RM) LEC line and in vivo studies in nude mice. RMLEC responded to PGE2, an EP4 agonist PGE1OH, or C3L5 cell-conditioned media (C3L5-CM) by increased proliferation, migration and accelerated tube formation on growth factor reduced Matrigel. Native tube formation by RMLEC on Matrigel was abrogated in the presence of a selective COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist. Addition of PGE2 or EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM individually in the presence of COX-2 inhibitor, or EP4 antagonist, restored tube formation, reinforcing the role of EP4 on RMLEC in tubulogenesis. These results were partially duplicated with a human dermal LEC (HMVEC-dLyAd) and a COX-2 expressing human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Knocking down EP4 with shRNA in RMLEC abrogated their tube forming capacity on Matrigel in the absence or presence of PGE2, EP4 agonist, or C3L5-CM. RMLEC tubulogenesis following EP4 activation by agonist treatment was dependent on PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling pathways and VEGFR-3 stimulation. Finally in a directed in vivo lymphangiogenesis assay (DIVLA) we demonstrated the lymphangiogenic as well as angiogenic capacity of PGE2 and EP4 agonist in vivo. These results demonstrate

  16. Interest in Long-Acting Injectable PrEP in a Cohort of Men Who have Sex with Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kathrine; Wu, Yumeng; Qian, Haoyu; Sandfort, Theodorus; Huang, Xiaojie; Xu, Junjie; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Wei; Glidden, David; Wu, Hao; Shang, Hong

    2017-07-13

    Long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations of antiretrovirals (ARVs) as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) could be an attractive alternative for men who have sex with men (MSM) who are interested in ARV-based biomedical prevention but will not use a daily pill. This study investigated interest in LAI-PrEP in a cohort of MSM in China and characterized how MSM willing to use only injectable PrEP differed from MSM who would use PrEP regardless of modality or not at all. Demographic, behavioral, and risk perception measures were collected and associations investigated. A licensed LAI-PrEP agent would increase the proportion interested in PrEP by 24.5% over oral PrEP alone. Combining interest in oral and injectable PrEP, 78.5% of the sample could be covered if reported interest in PrEP translated into actual uptake. Partnership factors differentiated those who would be willing to use only LAI-PrEP versus any PrEP modality, while higher self-perception of risk was associated with interest in LAI-PrEP versus no PrEP. The addition of a second PrEP modality could yield increased population coverage of PrEP. Social and behavioral research should be undertaken in parallel with clinical development of injectable PrEP agents to identify characteristics of those who are not interested in oral PrEP but would take advantage of ARV-based prevention with the introduction of an injectable product.

  17. From Efficacy to Effectiveness: Facilitators and Barriers to PrEP Acceptability and Motivations for Adherence Among MSM and Transgender Women in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarel, Kristi E.; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Surace, Anthony; Lelutiu-Weinberger, Corina L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study examined potential facilitators and barriers to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use and their association with PrEP acceptability and motivations for adherence among 184 MSM and transgender women living in New York City. Participants were presented with educational information about PrEP and completed a computerized survey. Overall, 55.4% of participants reported willingness to take PrEP. The most highly endorsed barriers to PrEP use were health concerns, including both long-term impacts and short-term side effects, questions about PrEP's impact on future drug resistance, and concerns that PrEP does not provide complete protection against HIV. The most highly endorsed facilitator was free access to PrEP, followed by access to support services such as regular HIV testing, sexual health care/monitoring, and access to one-on-one counseling. Participants of color rated both barriers and facilitators as more important than their White counterparts. In multivariate models, barrier and facilitator scores significantly predicted not only PrEP acceptability, but also motivation for PrEP adherence among those who were likely to use PrEP. PrEP implementation programs should consider addressing these barriers and facilitators in protocol and policy development. Findings underscore the importance of support services, such as sexual health counseling, to the success of PrEP as a prevention strategy. PMID:23565928

  18. Biosorption of lead, copper and cadmium using the extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) of Bacillus sp., from solar salterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameer, Syed

    2016-12-01

    Extracellular Polysaccharides (EPS) from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes have a great deal of research interest as they protect the producer from different stresses including antibiotics, ionic stress, desiccation and assist in bio-film formation, pathogenesis, adhesion, etc. In this study haloalkaliphilic Bacillus sp., known to cope with osmophilic stress, was selected and screened for EPS production. The EPS were isolated, partially purified and chemical characteristics were documented using liquid FT-IR followed by assessment of heavy metal biosorption (lead, copper and cadmium) using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The EPS extracted from three isolates B. licheniformis NSPA5, B. cereus NSPA8 and B. subtilis NSPA13 showed maximum biosorption of Lead followed by Copper and Cadmium. Of the tested isolates, the EPS from isolate B. cereus NSPA8 showed maximum (90 %) biosorption of the lead.

  19. Characteristic Ber-EP4 and EMA expression in sebaceoma is immunohistochemically distinct from basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y S; Carr, R A; Sanders, D S A; Smith, A P; Lazar, A J F; Calonje, E

    2007-07-01

    There is considerable overlap between the histological features of sebaceoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The distinction between these two tumours is important due to the often more locally aggressive nature of BCC and the association of sebaceoma with the Muir-Torre syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe the immunohistochemical reactivity of the cells in sebaceoma to Ber-EP4 and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and investigate the utility of this panel to differentiate sebaceoma from basal cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry of 25 sebaceomas for Ber-EP4 and EMA revealed unequivocal negative expression of Ber-EP4 in 24 of 25 sebaceomas. A single case exhibited focal weak Ber-EP4 staining, predominantly in mature sebocytes and in Ber-EP4 in combination with EMA, both widely used immunomarkers in histopathology, is a helpful aid in distinguishing sebaceoma from nodular BCC.

  20. Biofilm formation and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by Cronobacter sakazakii depending on environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jin-Ho; Choi, Na-Young; Lee, Sun-Young

    2013-05-01

    Biofilm matrices are formed largely of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). This study was conducted to investigate biofilm formation and EPS production by Cronobacter sakazakii under various conditions (media, nutrition, and relative humidity (RH)) by quantification of EPS and cell populations, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FE-SEM), and colony observation. Various agar media conditions (TSA without dextrose (W/D), M9 minimum salt medium (MSM) agar, and M9 MSM agar with 3% glucose, 3% NaCl, 3% Tween 80, 3% sucrose, and adjusted to pH 5 with HCl) were prepared. C. sakazakii biofilm formed on the surface of stainless steel coupons (SSCs) immersed in TSB W/D and M9 MSM with or without 0, 1, 3, and 5% sucrose and subsequently exposed to various RH levels (23, 43, 68, 85, and 100%). EPS production by C. sakazakii on TSA W/D was significantly higher than that on other media after 1 and 2 days. However, C. sakazakii ATCC 12868 produced the highest levels of EPS (209.18 ± 16.13 and 207.22 ± 4.14 μg/mL after 1 and 2 days, respectively) on M9 MSM agar with 3% sucrose. Regarding C. sakazakii ATCC 12868 biofilm formed on the surface of SSCs immersed in M9 MSM with 0, 1, 3, and 5% sucrose and subsequently exposed to various RHs, populations were significantly different among the various RHs and sucrose concentrations, and EPS production was significantly higher (4.69 mg/L) compared to other sucrose concentrations (0%:0.71 mg/L and 1%:0.98 mg/L), except for M9 MSM with 3% sucrose (2.97 mg/L) (P ≤ 0.05). From these results, biofilm formation and EPS production by C. sakazakii differed depending on the nutrient or environmental conditions provided to the cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccine acceptance: the UK perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, John A; Mahgoub, Hamid; Shankar, Ananda Giri

    2013-12-01

    The United Kingdom has had a long history with vaccine acceptability dating back to Edward Jenner's theory of small pox vaccination. More recently, the discredited, Wakefield study published in 1998 continues to cause MMR skepticism. In pregnant women pertussis vaccination has been considerably more successful than influenza vaccination. Influenza vaccine uptake in healthcare workers remains poor. The media, politicians, and health reforms have contributed to the mixed coverage for these vaccines. In this article we examine vaccine acceptability from a UK perspective, and consider the future impact this is likely to have on the introduction of rotavirus and shingles vaccine in the UK in 2013.

  2. Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adacel® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine) ... Boostrix® (as a combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis Vaccine)

  3. Recommended Vaccines for Healthcare Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). Increasing Flu Vaccination Rates among Healthcare Workers Position statements from professional organizations, mandatory influenza vaccination policies, and many helpful ...

  4. Views of policymakers, healthcare workers and NGOs on HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP): a multinational qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Ana; Eisingerich, Andreas B; Gomez, Gabriela B; Gray, Emily; Dybul, Mark R; Piot, Peter

    2012-01-01

    To examine policymakers and providers' views on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and their willingness to support its introduction, to inform policy and practice in this emerging field. Semistructured qualitative interview study. Peru, Ukraine, India, Kenya, Uganda, Botswana and South Africa. 35 policymakers, 35 healthcare workers and 21 non-governmental organisation representatives involved in HIV prevention. Six themes emerged from the data: (1) perceived HIV prevention landscape: prevention initiatives needed to be improved and expanded; (2) PrEP awareness: 50 of 91 participants had heard of PrEP; (3) benefits of PrEP: one component of the combination prevention arsenal that could help prioritise HIV prevention, empower key populations and result in economic gains; (4) challenges of PrEP: regimen complexity, cost and cost-effectiveness, risk compensation, efficacy and effectiveness, stigmatisation and criminalisation, information and training and healthcare system capacity; (5) programmatic considerations: user eligibility, communication strategy, cost, distribution, medication and HIV testing compliance and (6) early versus late implementation: participants were divided as to whether they would support an early introduction of PrEP in their country or would prefer to wait until it has been successfully implemented in other countries, with around half of those we spoke to supporting each option. Very few said they would not support PrEP at all. Despite the multiple challenges identified, there was general willingness to support the introduction of PrEP. Yet, strengthening existing HIV prevention efforts was also deemed necessary. Our results suggest that an effective PrEP programme would be delivered in healthcare facilities and involve non-governmental organisations and the community and consider the needs of mobile populations. Comprehensive information packages and training for users and providers would be critical. The cost of PrEP would be affordable and

  5. The Pelargonium sidoides Extract EPs 7630 Drives the Innate Immune Defense by Activating Selected MAP Kinase Pathways in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Katrin; Koch, Egon; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Wolk, Kerstin; Sabat, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelargonium sidoides is a medical herb and respective extracts are used very frequently for the treatment of respiratory tract infections. However, the effects of Pelargonium sidoides and a special extract prepared from its roots (EPs 7630) on human immune cells are not fully understood. Here we demonstrate that EPs 7630 induced a rapid and dose-dependent production of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 by human blood immune cells. This EPs 7630-induced cytokine profile was more pro-inflammatory in comparison with the profile induced by viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. The search for EPs 7630 target cells revealed that T-cells did not respond to EPs 7630 stimulation by production of TNF-α, IL-6, or IL-10. Furthermore, pretreatment of T-cells with EPs 7630 did not modulate their TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10 secretion during subsequent activation. In contrast to lymphocytes, monocytes showed clear intracellular TNF-α staining after EPs 7630 treatment. Accordingly, EPs 7630 predominantly provoked activation of MAP kinases and inhibition of p38 strongly reduced the monocyte TNF-α production. The pretreatment of blood immune cells with EPs 7630 lowered their secretion of TNF-α and IL-10 and caused an IL-6 dominant response during second stimulation with viral or bacterial infection-mimicking agents. In summary, we demonstrate that EPs 7630 activates human monocytes, induces MAP kinase-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokines in these cells, and specifically modulates their production capacity of mediators known to lead to an increase of acute phase protein production in the liver, neutrophil generation in the bone marrow, and the generation of adaptive Th17 and Th22 cells.

  6. An educational initiative in response to identified PrEP prescribing needs among PCPs in the Southern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Meredith E; Seidelman, Jessica; Wu, Jiewei; Alexis, Kareem; McGee, Kara; Okeke, N Lance; Samsa, Gregory; McKellar, Mehri

    2017-10-03

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective HIV prevention method, but many primary care physicians (PCPs) have not incorporated PrEP into practice. While PrEP may be a key strategy to reducing high HIV transmission rates in the southern US, knowledge about PrEP prescribing patterns among PCPs in this region is lacking. An online survey was sent to a large network of PCPs at an academic medical center in North Carolina in October 2015. The survey was repeated in September 2016, after an educational intervention that included on-site trainings at 14 PCP offices. Chi-square tests were used to compare PrEP prescribing patterns among providers. The initial survey was sent to 389 PCPs, with 115 (30%) responding. Of these, 78% reported seeing men who have sex with men (MSM). Only 17% had prescribed PrEP. The most frequently identified barrier was lack of knowledge (60%). When the survey was repeated after the educational initiative, 79 PCPs (20%) responded. Of these, 90% reported seeing MSM, and 35% had prescribed PrEP. PCPs who had attended a training were more likely to have prescribed PrEP (OR 4.84, CI 1.77-13.21). In conclusion, PrEP prescribing among PCPs in the southern US is low. A survey among PCPs identified lack of knowledge as a barrier to prescribing, motivating an institutional-wide educational campaign in response. Further efforts are needed to continue to raise awareness and educate PCPs in the South about PrEP.

  7. Attitudes Towards PrEP and Anticipated Condom Use Among Concordant HIV-Negative and HIV-Discordant Male Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Deepalika; Bircher, Anja E.; Campbell, Chadwick K.; Grisham, Kirk; Neilands, Torsten B.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Dworkin, Shari

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Since the July 2012 approval by the FDA of emtricitabine/ tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada) for use as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) against HIV, its feasibility and acceptability has been under study. HIV-discordant couples are likely targets for PrEP but little is known about how this new prevention tool impacts relationships. We examined, among gay male couples, the acceptability of individual and partner use of PrEP and intentions to use condoms with primary and outside partners in the context of PrEP use. Data are from two independent samples of couples recruited in the San Francisco bay area and New York City—a qualitative one (N=48 couples) between March and November, 2011, and a quantitative one (N=171 couples) between June, 2012 and May, 2013. Data were categorized by couple HIV status and general linear models; chi-square tests of independence were used to examine condom-use intentions with primary and outside partners, by sexual risk profile, and race. Almost half of the HIV-negative couples felt PrEP was a good HIV prevention strategy for themselves and their partner. Over half reported that they would not change their current condom use if they or their partner were taking PrEP. However, approximately 30% of HIV-negative couples reported that they would stop using condoms or use them less with primary and outside partners if they were on PrEP or if their partner was on PrEP. A large percentage of couples view PrEP positively. However, to ensure safety for both partners, future programing must consider those who intend not to use condoms while on PrEP. PMID:26057304

  8. The future of PrEP among transgender women: the critical role of gender affirmation in research and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevelius, Jae M; Deutsch, Madeline B; Grant, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Globally, transgender ("trans") women are one of the key populations most disproportionately impacted by HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the newest and most promising biomedical HIV prevention intervention to date. This paper reviews relevant literature to describe the current state of the science and describes the potential role of PrEP among trans women, including a discussion of unique considerations for maximizing the impact of PrEP for this vulnerable population. Available information, including but not limited to existing scientific literature, about trans women and PrEP was reviewed and critiqued based on author expertise, including PrEP clinical trials and rollout. To date, PrEP demonstration projects and clinical trials have largely excluded trans women, or have not included them in a meaningful way. Data collection strategies that fail to identify trans women in clinical trials and research further limit the ability to draw conclusions about trans women's unique needs and devise strategies to meet them. Gender-affirming providers and clinic environments are essential components of any sexual health programme that aims to serve trans women, as they will largely avoid settings that may result in stigmatizing encounters and threats to their identities. While there is currently no evidence to suggest drug-drug interactions between PrEP and commonly used feminizing hormone regimens, community concerns about potential interactions may limit interest in and uptake of PrEP among trans women. In scaling up PrEP for trans women, it is essential to engage trans communities, utilize trans-inclusive research and marketing strategies and identify and/or train healthcare providers to provide gender-affirming healthcare to trans women, including transition-related care such as hormone provision. PrEP implementation guidelines must consider and address trans women's unique barriers and facilitators to uptake and adherence.

  9. The future of PrEP among transgender women: the critical role of gender affirmation in research and clinical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae M Sevelius

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Globally, transgender (“trans” women are one of the key populations most disproportionately impacted by HIV. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is the newest and most promising biomedical HIV prevention intervention to date. This paper reviews relevant literature to describe the current state of the science and describes the potential role of PrEP among trans women, including a discussion of unique considerations for maximizing the impact of PrEP for this vulnerable population. Methods: Available information, including but not limited to existing scientific literature, about trans women and PrEP was reviewed and critiqued based on author expertise, including PrEP clinical trials and rollout. Results: To date, PrEP demonstration projects and clinical trials have largely excluded trans women, or have not included them in a meaningful way. Data collection strategies that fail to identify trans women in clinical trials and research further limit the ability to draw conclusions about trans women's unique needs and devise strategies to meet them. Gender-affirming providers and clinic environments are essential components of any sexual health programme that aims to serve trans women, as they will largely avoid settings that may result in stigmatizing encounters and threats to their identities. While there is currently no evidence to suggest drug-drug interactions between PrEP and commonly used feminizing hormone regimens, community concerns about potential interactions may limit interest in and uptake of PrEP among trans women. Conclusions: In scaling up PrEP for trans women, it is essential to engage trans communities, utilize trans-inclusive research and marketing strategies and identify and/or train healthcare providers to provide gender-affirming healthcare to trans women, including transition-related care such as hormone provision. PrEP implementation guidelines must consider and address trans women's unique barriers and facilitators

  10. BrEPS 2.0: Optimization of sequence pattern prediction for enzyme annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian-Alexander Dudek

    Full Text Available The prediction of gene functions is crucial for a large number of different life science areas. Faster high throughput sequencing techniques generate more and larger datasets. The manual annotation by classical wet-lab experiments is not suitable for these large amounts of data. We showed earlier that the automatic sequence pattern-based BrEPS protocol, based on manually curated sequences, can be used for the prediction of enzymatic functions of genes. The growing sequence databases provide the opportunity for more reliable patterns, but are also a challenge for the implementation of automatic protocols. We reimplemented and optimized the BrEPS pattern generation to be applicable for larger datasets in an acceptable timescale. Primary improvement of the new BrEPS protocol is the enhanced data selection step. Manually curated annotations from Swiss-Prot are used as reliable source for function prediction of enzymes observed on protein level. The pool of sequences is extended by highly similar sequences from TrEMBL and SwissProt. This allows us to restrict the selection of Swiss-Prot entries, without losing the diversity of sequences needed to generate significant patterns. Additionally, a supporting pattern type was introduced by extending the patterns at semi-conserved positions with highly similar amino acids. Extended patterns have an increased complexity, increasing the chance to match more sequences, without losing the essential structural information of the pattern. To enhance the usability of the database, we introduced enzyme function prediction based on consensus EC numbers and IUBMB enzyme nomenclature. BrEPS is part of the Braunschweig Enzyme Database (BRENDA and is available on a completely redesigned website and as download. The database can be downloaded and used with the BrEPScmd command line tool for large scale sequence analysis. The BrEPS website and downloads for the database creation tool, command line tool and database are

  11. Test tools and test data for the future EUMETSAT EPS-SG platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystova, Iryna; Sunda, Michela

    2017-04-01

    The EUMETSAT Polar System - Second Generation (EPS-SG) represents Europe's contribution to the future Joint Polar System (JPS), which is planned to be established together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States, following on from the Initial Joint Polar System (IJPS). Due to its global coverage and the variety of passive and active sensors on the EPS-SG platform, a significant positive impact on Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) can be expected for all forecasts based on NWP in the 2020-2040 time frame. It will increase direct socio-economic benefits to Member States and leverage additional benefits through its integration into the JPS and cooperation in the context of CGMS and WMO. For the EUMETSAT will develop the EPS-SG overall system of satellites and the Overall Ground Segment (OGS) and be responsible for the Payload Data Acquisition and Processing (PDAP) system. This will include all the functionality dedicated to the L0, L1 and L2 Operational Processor, for generation of the near-real time L1 and L2 mission central products. Also the European Space Agency will develop the EPS-SG satellites and a number of instruments, with CNES and DLR playing a key role. The general processing chain should be in place and be extensively tested before the first data set is sent from the space platform to the ground. For this, numerous test tools, such as satellite data simulators (IDS) and processors prototypes (GPPs and IPPs) need to be developed and operated before the launch of the satellites. EUMETSAT cooperated with several European agencies in order to provide all the testing items in time. Here, we present the insight into the EPS-SG the logic of the test tools for the generation of the test data and provide insights into the modern space-based mission planning and preparation activities.

  12. Universal influenza vaccines: Shifting to better vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Donnelly, John J

    2016-06-03

    Influenza virus causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections and is the most likely, among known pathogens, to cause a large epidemic in humans. Influenza virus mutates rapidly, enabling it to evade natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, influenza viruses can cross from animals to humans, generating novel, potentially pandemic strains. Currently available influenza vaccines induce a strain specific response and may be ineffective against new influenza viruses. The difficulty in predicting circulating strains has frequently resulted in mismatch between the annual vaccine and circulating viruses. Low-resource countries remain mostly unprotected against seasonal influenza and are particularly vulnerable to future pandemics, in part, because investments in vaccine manufacturing and stockpiling are concentrated in high-resource countries. Antibodies that target conserved sites in the hemagglutinin stalk have been isolated from humans and shown to confer protection in animal models, suggesting that broadly protective immunity may be possible. Several innovative influenza vaccine candidates are currently in preclinical or early clinical development. New technologies include adjuvants, synthetic peptides, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vectors, messenger RNA, viral vectors, and attenuated or inactivated influenza viruses. Other approaches target the conserved exposed epitope of the surface exposed membrane matrix protein M2e. Well-conserved influenza proteins, such as nucleoprotein and matrix protein, are mainly targeted for developing strong cross-protective T cell responses. With multiple vaccine candidates moving along the testing and development pipeline, the field is steadily moving toward a product that is more potent, durable, and broadly protective than previously licensed vaccines. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) as an Additional Tool for HIV Prevention Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Belgium: The Be-PrEP-ared Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baetselier, Irith; Reyniers, Thijs; Nöstlinger, Christiana; Wouters, Kristien; Fransen, Katrien; Crucitti, Tania; Kenyon, Chris; Buyze, Jozefien; Schurmans, Céline; Laga, Marie; Vuylsteke, Bea

    2017-01-30

    Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a promising and effective tool to prevent HIV. With the approval of Truvada as daily PrEP by the European Commission in August 2016, individual European Member states prepare themselves for PrEP implementation following the examples of France and Norway. However, context-specific data to guide optimal implementation is currently lacking. With this demonstration project we evaluate whether daily and event-driven PrEP, provided within a comprehensive prevention package, is a feasible and acceptable additional prevention tool for men who have sex with men (MSM) at high risk of acquiring HIV in Belgium. The study's primary objective is to document the uptake, acceptability, and adherence to both daily and event-driven PrEP, while several secondary objectives have been formulated including impact of PrEP use on sexual behavior. The Be-PrEP-ared study is a phase 3, single-site, open-label prospective cohort study with a large social science component embedded in the trial. A total of 200 participants choose between daily or event-driven PrEP use and may switch, discontinue, or restart their regimen at the 3-monthly visits for a duration of 18 months. Data are collected on several platforms: an electronic case report form, a Web-based tool where participants register their sexual behavior and pill use, a more detailed electronic self-administered questionnaire completed during study visits on a tablet computer, and in-depth interviews among a selected sample of participants. To answer the primary objective, the recruitment rate, (un)safe sex behavior during the last 6 months, percentage of reported intention to use PrEP in the future, retention rates in different regimens, and attitudes towards PrEP use will be analyzed. Adherence will be monitored using self-reported adherence, pill count, tenofovir drug levels in blood samples, and the perceived skills to adhere. All participants are currently enrolled, and the last study visit is

  14. Who Will Use Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Why?: Understanding PrEP Awareness and Acceptability amongst Men Who Have Sex with Men in the UK--A Mixed Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankis, Jamie; Young, Ingrid; Flowers, Paul; McDaid, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical trials suggest that pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) may reduce HIV transmission by up to 86% for men who have sex with men (MSM), whilst relatively high levels of PrEP acceptability have been reported to date. This study examines PrEP awareness amongst sub-groups of MSM communities and acceptability amongst MSM in a low prevalence region (Scotland, UK), using a mixed methods design. Quantitative surveys of n = 690 MSM recruited online via social and sociosexual media were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. In addition, n = 10 in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM were analysed thematically. Under one third (29.7%) of MSM had heard of PrEP, with awareness related to living in large cities, degree level education, commercial gay scene use and reporting an HIV test in the last year. Just under half of participants (47.8%) were likely to use PrEP if it were available but there was no relationship between PrEP acceptability and previous PrEP awareness. Younger men (18-25 years) and those who report higher risk UAI were significantly more likely to say they would use PrEP. Qualitative data described specific PrEP scenarios, illustrating how risk, patterns of sexual practice and social relationships could affect motivation for and nature of PrEP use. These findings suggest substantial interest PrEP amongst MSM reporting HIV risk behaviours in Scotland. Given the Proud results, there is a strong case to investigate PrEP implementation within the UK. However, it appears that disparities in awareness have already emerged along traditional indicators of inequality. Our research identifies the need for comprehensive support when PrEP is introduced, including a key online component, to ensure equity of awareness across diverse MSM communities (e.g. by geography, education, gay scene use and HIV proximity), as well as to responding to the diverse informational and sexual health needs of all MSM communities.

  15. Implementing good participatory practice guidelines in the FEM-PrEP Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial for HIV Prevention among African Women: a focus on local stakeholder involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mack N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Natasha Mack,1 Stella Kirkendale,1 Paul Omullo,2 Jacob Odhiambo,2 Malebo Ratlhagana,3 Martha Masaki,4 Phumzile Siguntu,5 Kawango Agot,2 Khatija Ahmed,3 Saidi Kapiga,4 Johan Lombaard,5 Lut Van Damme,1 Amy Corneli1 1FHI 360, Durham, NC, USA; 2Impact Research and Development Organization, Bondo, Kenya; 3Setshaba Research Centre, Soshanguve, South Africa; 4Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Moshi, Tanzania; 5Josha Research, Bloemfontein, South Africa Abstract: Biomedical HIV-prevention research is most likely to succeed when researchers actively engage with community stakeholders. To this effect, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and the AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition developed good participatory practice guidelines for biomedical HIV-prevention trials in 2007 and updated them in 2011. The Preexposure Prophylaxis Trial for HIV Prevention among African Women (FEM-PrEP clinical trial, testing once-daily Truvada as preexposure prophylaxis among women at higher risk of HIV in Kenya, South Africa, and Tanzania, included a community program to engage with local stakeholders. Following the trial, we revisited the community program to situate activities in the context of the 2011 guidelines. In the paper, we describe implementation of the six guidelines relevant to local stakeholder engagement – stakeholder advisory mechanisms, stakeholder engagement plan, stakeholder education plan, communications plan, issues management plan, trial closure, and results dissemination – in light of on-the-ground realities of the trial. We then identify two cross-cutting themes from our considerations: (1 stakeholder education beyond the good participatory practice recommendation to increase research literacy about the specific trial is needed; education efforts should also communicate a base of information on HIV transmission and prevention; and (2 anticipatory preparation is useful in communications planning, issues management, and trial closure and

  16. The PGE(2)-EP4 receptor is necessary for stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in response to low dietary salt intake in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pöschke, Antje; Kern, Niklas; Maruyama, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and PGE(2) synthesis have been shown to be prerequisites for renal renin release after Na(+) deprivation. To answer the question of whether EP4 receptor type of PGE(2) mediates renin regulation under a low-salt diet, we examined renin regulation in EP4......(+/+), EP4(-/-), and in wild-type mice treated with EP4 receptor antagonist. After 2 wk of a low-salt diet (0.02% wt/wt NaCl), EP4(+/+) mice showed diminished Na(+) excretion, unchanged K(+) excretion, and reduced Ca(2+) excretion. Diuresis and plasma electrolytes remained unchanged. EP4(-/-) exhibited...... groups, the low-salt diet caused a significantly greater rise in PGE(2) excretion. Furthermore, mRNA expression for COX-2 and PGE(2) synthetic activity was significantly greater in EP4(-/-) than in EP4(+/+) mice. We conclude that low dietary salt intake induces expression of COX-2 followed by enhanced...

  17. Optimization of EPS Production and Characterization by a Halophilic Bacterium, Kocuria rosea ZJUQH from Chaka Salt Lake with Response Surface Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Di Gu; Yingchun Jiao; Jianan Wu; Zhengjie Liu; Qihe Chen

    2017-01-01

    .... The optimal combination of fermentation medium compositions on EPS production was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was adopted to investigate the significant factors that affected EPS production...

  18. Vaccine adjuvants: Why and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dennis

    2016-10-02

    Novel vaccine strategies include the so-called subunit vaccines, which encompass only the part of the pathogen to which immune recognition results in protection. The high purity of these vaccines make adverse events less likely, but it also makes the vaccines less immunogenic and therefore potentially less effective. Vaccine adjuvants that increase and modulate the immunogenicity of the vaccine are therefore added to solve this problem. Besides aluminum salts, which have been used in vaccines for 90 years, a number of novel vaccine adjuvants have been included in licensed vaccines over the last 30 years. Increasing insight into immunological mechanisms and how to manipulate them has replaced empirical with rational design of adjuvants, leading to vaccine adjuvants with increased and customized immunogenicity profiles without compromising vaccine safety.

  19. Development of an Electrophysiology (EP)-Enabled Intracardiac Ultrasound Catheter Integrated With NavX 3-Dimensional Electrofield Mapping for Guiding Cardiac EP Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao Kui; Pemberton, James; Thomenius, Kai; Dentinger, Aaron; Lowe, Robert I.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Shung, K. Kirk; Chia, Raymond; Stephens, Douglas N.; O'Donnell, Matthew; Mahajan, Aman; Balaji, Seshadri; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Sahn, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have developed an integrated high-resolution intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheter for electrophysiology (EP) testing, which can be coregistered in 3-dimensional space with EP testing and ablation catheters using electrofield sensing. Methods Twelve open-chest pigs (34–55 kg) and 3 closed-chest pigs were studied. After introduction from the jugular or femoral venous locations, the 9F side-looking, highly steerable (0°–180°), 64-element array catheters could be manipulated easily throughout the right side of the heart. Multisite cardiac pacing was performed for assessing left ventricular (LV) synchrony using tissue Doppler methods. Also, in the open-chest pigs, right atrial (RA) and right ventricular (RV) ablations were performed with a separate radio frequency catheter under fluoroscopic guidance and visualized with ICE to characterize the changes. In the 3 closed-chest pigs, electrofield NavX 3-dimensional coregistration (St Jude Medical Corp, Minneapolis, MN) allowed us to test whether this additional feature could shorten the time necessary to perform 4 targeted ablations in each animal while imaging the ablation catheter and the adjacent region by ICE. Results Intracardiac anatomy, tricuspid, aortic, pulmonary, and mitral valve function, and pulmonary vein flow were all imaged reproducibly from scanning locations in the RA or RV in all animals, along with assessment of cardiac motion and the effects of multisite pacing. Three-dimensional electrofield displays detailed the spatial relationship between the ICE catheter and ablation catheters such that the time to visualize and ablate 4 sites in each of the 3 closed-chest animals was reduced. Conclusions This new technology is a first step in the integration of ICE with EP procedures. PMID:17957051

  20. Parental vaccine concerns in Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J; Woods, Charles R; Marshall, Gary S

    2009-09-01

    An increasing number of parents are questioning the safety and necessity of routine childhood immunizations. Locally produced vaccine risk communication materials may be effective in reassuring these parents. However, little is known about specific vaccine safety concerns in the state of Kentucky. An Internet-based survey focusing on parental vaccine safety concerns and potential vaccine risk communication strategies was sent to all members of the Kentucky Chapter of the Amerian Academy of Pediatrics. There were 121 respondents who routinely administered childhood vaccines. Of these, 85% reported parental concern about the combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Concerns about the influenza and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines were also frequent. Of the respondents, 46% noted parental skepticism about all vaccines in general. However, refusal of all vaccines was uncommon in most practices (median 1%, interquartile range 1%-3%). The belief that vaccines cause autism was the most prevalent parental concern, reported by 70% of pediatricians. Physicians also reported that a list of reliable vaccine information Websites and pamphlets addressing common vaccine safety concerns would be the most helpful materials to use during their discussions with concerned parents. These findings suggest that specific information about the MMR, influenza, and HPV vaccines, as well as data refuting the putative link between vaccines and autism would be useful to physicians who administer vaccinations. Respondents were especially interested in reliable vaccine information on the Internet. The Websites listed below offer accurate scientific information about vaccines and the diseases they prevent.

  1. Preferences for Long-Acting Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), Daily Oral PrEP, or Condoms for HIV Prevention Among U.S. Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George J; Swann, Greg; Fought, Angela J; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Hope, Thomas J; Kiser, Patrick F; Mustanski, Brian; D'Aquila, Richard T

    2017-05-01

    HIV prevention method preferences were evaluated among 512 U.S. men who have sex with men (MSM; median age: 22 years). Approximately 90 % consistently preferred one option across pairwise comparisons of condoms, daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and long-acting PrEP delivered via either an injectable or one of two types of PrEP implants differing in visibility. Condoms were most frequently preferred (33.8 %), followed by non-visible implants (21.5 %), and oral PrEP (17.0 %); HIV risk was reported by more choosing implants. In a follow-up question comparing the four PrEP options only, daily oral pills and non-visible implants were most frequently preferred (35.5 and 34.3 %, respectively), followed by injections (25.2 %) and visible implants (4.3 %). An inductive, open-coding approach determined that convenience, duration of protection, and privacy were the most commonly cited reasons for a PrEP method choice, and associated with self-report of HIV risk. Tailoring PrEP product development to privacy and other concerns important to those at highest HIV risk may improve HIV prevention.

  2. Female and younger subjects have lower adherence in PrEP trials: a meta-analysis with implications for the uptake of PrEP service to prevent HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ke; Xu, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Jing; Li, Jia-Ming; Hu, Qing-Hai; Chu, Zhen-Xing; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Shang, Hong; Wang, Ning

    2017-07-29

    To estimate the medicine-taking compliance (MTC) level, explore its facilitators and barriers, and quantify the association between MTC level and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) protective efficacy in individuals at risk of acquiring HIV being administered oral PrEP. Meta-analysis. We searched PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases for published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) pertaining to MTC of oral PrEP for HIV prevention up to 16 January 2017. The pooled proportion of MTC and risk ratio (RR) of HIV incidences between intervention group and control group were estimated. We identified 10 eligible studies with 24 193 participants. The overall pooled MTC for oral HIV PrEP was 59.9% (95% CI 43.1% to 74.6%). Subgroup analyses revealed that the MTC level of participants aged PrEP is almost moderate, and its proportion in women and younger participants was relatively low. The protective efficacy of oral PrEP for HIV prevention increased with MTC level. These findings indicated that it is necessary to identify measures to enhance MTC of oral PrEP in future clinical usage, especially in women and younger participants with high HIV infection risk. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steve; Giubilini, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases (either for themselves or for their children); second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection (CO) to vaccination be subject. To address these questions, we consider an analogy between CO to vaccination and CO to military service. We argue that conscientious objectors to vaccination should make an appropriate contribution to society in lieu of being vaccinated. The contribution to be made will depend on the severity of the relevant disease(s), its morbidity, and also the likelihood that vaccine refusal will lead to harm. In particular, the contribution required will depend on whether the rate of CO in a given population threatens herd immunity to the disease in question: for severe or highly contagious diseases, if the population rate of CO becomes high enough to threaten herd immunity, the requirements for CO could become so onerous that CO, though in principle permissible, would be de facto impermissible. PMID:28008636

  4. Pricing of new vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Y; McGlone, Sarah M

    2010-08-01

    New vaccine pricing is a complicated process that could have substantial long-standing scientific, medical, and public health ramifications. Pricing can have a considerable impact on new vaccine adoption and, thereby, either culminate or thwart years of research and development and public health efforts. Typically, pricing strategy consists of the following ten components: 1. Conduct a target population analysis; 2. Map potential competitors and alternatives; 3. Construct a vaccine target product profile (TPP) and compare it to projected or actual TPPs of competing vaccines; 4. Quantify the incremental value of the new vaccine's characteristics; 5. Determine vaccine positioning in the marketplace; 6. Estimate the vaccine price-demand curve; 7. Calculate vaccine costs (including those of manufacturing, distribution, and research and development); 8. Account for various legal, regulatory, third party payer, and competitor factors; 9. Consider the overall product portfolio; 10. Set pricing objectives; 11. Select pricing and pricing structure. While the biomedical literature contains some studies that have addressed these components, there is still considerable room for more extensive evaluation of this important area.

  5. ADULT PNEUMOCOCCAL VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaccine description. A highly purified vaccine containing 2~. Ilg of each of 23 capsular polysaccharides representing;;, 85% of the serotypes causing pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease in the community. Polysaccharide a.rltigens induce type-specific antibodies that enhance opsonisation, phagocytosis and ...

  6. Towards universal influenza vaccines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce the considerable disease burden of seasonal influenza. Although seasonal influenza vaccines are effective, their performance in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals would benefit from improvement. Major problems related to the

  7. Vaccines against malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Laurens, Matthew B

    2015-03-15

    Despite global efforts to control malaria, the illness remains a significant public health threat. Currently, there is no licensed vaccine against malaria, but an efficacious vaccine would represent an important public health tool for successful malaria elimination. Malaria vaccine development continues to be hindered by a poor understanding of antimalarial immunity, a lack of an immune correlate of protection, and the genetic diversity of malaria parasites. Current vaccine development efforts largely target Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the pre-erythrocytic and erythrocytic stages, with some research on transmission-blocking vaccines against asexual stages and vaccines against pregnancy-associated malaria. The leading pre-erythrocytic vaccine candidate is RTS,S, and early results of ongoing Phase 3 testing show overall efficacy of 46% against clinical malaria. The next steps for malaria vaccine development will focus on the design of a product that is efficacious against the highly diverse strains of malaria and the identification of a correlate of protection against disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Therapeutic vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are used to treat leishmaniasis. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is solely depends on antimonate derivatives with safety issues and questionable efficacy and there is no fully effective modality to treat CL caused by Leishmania tropica and Leishmania braziliensis. There is no prophylactic vaccine available against any form of leishmaniasis. Immunotherapy for CL has a long history; immunotherapy trials of first and second generation vaccines showed promising results. The current article briefly covers the prophylactic vaccines and explains different immunotherapy strategies that have been used to treat leishmaniasis. This paper does not include experimental vaccines and only lays emphasis on human trials and those vaccines which reached human trials. Immunotherapy is currently used to successfully treat several disorders; Low cost, limited side effects and no possibility to develop resistance make immunotherapy a valuable choice especially for infectious disease with chemotherapy problems. Efforts are needed to explore the immunological surrogate marker(s) of cure and protection in leishmaniasis and overcome the difficulties in standardization of crude Leishmania vaccines. One of the reasons for anti-leishmaniasis vaccine failure is lack of an appropriate adjuvant. So far, not enough attention has been paid to develop vaccines for immunotherapy of leishmaniasis.

  9. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  10. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steve; Giubilini, Alberto; Walker, Mary Jean

    2017-03-01

    Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases (either for themselves or for their children); second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection (CO) to vaccination be subject. To address these questions, we consider an analogy between CO to vaccination and CO to military service. We argue that conscientious objectors to vaccination should make an appropriate contribution to society in lieu of being vaccinated. The contribution to be made will depend on the severity of the relevant disease(s), its morbidity, and also the likelihood that vaccine refusal will lead to harm. In particular, the contribution required will depend on whether the rate of CO in a given population threatens herd immunity to the disease in question: for severe or highly contagious diseases, if the population rate of CO becomes high enough to threaten herd immunity, the requirements for CO could become so onerous that CO, though in principle permissible, would be de facto impermissible. © 2016 The Authors Bioethics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Trends in vaccine adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Lavelle, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a

  12. The Human Hookworm Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J; Diemert, David; Bacon, Kristina M; Beaumier, Coreen; Bethony, Jeffrey M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Brooker, Simon; Couto, Artur Roberto; Freire, Marcos da Silva; Homma, Akira; Lee, Bruce Y; Loukas, Alex; Loblack, Marva; Morel, Carlos Medicis; Oliveira, Rodrigo Correa; Russell, Philip K

    2013-04-18

    Hookworm infection is one of the world's most common neglected tropical diseases and a leading cause of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries. A Human Hookworm Vaccine is currently being developed by the Sabin Vaccine Institute and is in phase 1 clinical testing. The candidate vaccine is comprised of two recombinant antigens known as Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1, each of which is an important parasite enzyme required for hookworms to successfully utilize host blood as a source of energy. The recombinant proteins are formulated on Alhydrogel(®) and are being tested in combination with a synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 agonist. The aim of the vaccine is to induce anti-enzyme antibodies that will reduce both host blood loss and the number of hookworms attached to the gut. Transfer of the manufacturing technology to the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ)/Bio-Manguinhos (a Brazilian public sector developing country vaccine manufacturer) is planned, with a clinical development plan that could lead to registration of the vaccine in Brazil. The vaccine would also need to be introduced in the poorest regions of Africa and Asia, where hookworm infection is highly endemic. Ultimately, the vaccine could become an essential tool for achieving hookworm control and elimination, a key target in the 2012 London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ADULT INFLUENZA VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meeting to consider the draft guideline. Financial sponsor. Development supported by an ... respiratory vaccinations consensus meeting was held in. Gauteng (see below). Participants were invited ..... Boorman D. Influenza vaccine and its relationship to absenteeism in the workplace. Occupational Health SA 1997; 3: 29-30.

  14. HPV Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breastfeeding. The father of the baby received the HPV vaccine around the time that I got pregnant. Is there a risk to the baby? No. There is no evidence that vaccines given to men will affect the sperm. In general, exposures that fathers have are unlikely ...

  15. Acceptance of vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, B.; Eilers, R.; Donken, R.; Barug, D.; Swillens, J.; Vriend, C. de; Weerdenburg, S.; Pot, M.; Keulen, H. van; Paulussen, T.; Vermey, K.; Alberts, N.; Marra, E.; Melker, H.E. de; Mollema, L.

    2016-01-01

    Both in 2013 and 2015 the mean intention of parents to vaccinate their child was high. Only 21% of parents reported making an informed decision about childhood vaccinations included in the NIP. Mass media attention on the use of allegedly inferior needles, which was later refuted, appeared to have a

  16. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  17. 75 FR 48712 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... representative in the case of a child) receiving vaccines covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation... influenza vaccine each year. But some children younger than 9 years of age need 2 doses to be protected. Ask... months should not get either influenza vaccine.) Children younger than 5 with asthma or one or more...

  18. 75 FR 48706 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... representative in the case of a child) receiving vaccines covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Rotavirus Vaccine AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Department of Health and Human...

  19. Towards preparedness for PrEP: PrEP awareness and acceptability among MSM at high risk of HIV transmission who use sociosexual media in four Celtic nations: Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and The Republic of Ireland: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankis, Jamie S; Young, Ingrid; Lorimer, Karen; Davis, Mark; Flowers, Paul

    2016-06-01

    To assess the awareness and acceptability of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and use sociosexual media at high risk of HIV infection in four Celtic nations. Cross-sectional study. Online self-complete survey of 386 HIV-negative/status unknown MSM who reported condomless anal intercourse (CAI) with ≥2 men in the last year, recruited from gay sociosexual media. One-third (34.5%, 132/386) of the participants were aware of PrEP but over half (58.5%, 226/356) reported that they would be willing to use PrEP if it were available to them. Only men who regularly tested for HIV every 6 months (adjusted OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.42) were more likely to be aware of PrEP. PrEP acceptability was only associated with reporting ≥5 CAI partners (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.46) in the last year. Low levels of PrEP awareness were reported across these Celtic nations. Only one-third of high-risk MSM had heard of PrEP but over one-half would be willing to take a daily pill to prevent HIV infection. Sociodemographic factors, commercial gay scene proximity and social network use were unrelated to considering PrEP use. However, those reporting most CAI partners were more likely to consider PrEP use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. [Adverse reactions to vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito Tsuchiya, F M; Rosas Vargas, M A; Zepeda Ortega, B; Río del Navarro, Blanca Estela; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis

    2007-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the medicine's achievements to control and/or eradicate certain infectious diseases. Vaccines contain antigenic doses derived from microorganisms and/or its toxins, besides they are composed of other substances such as aluminum, gelatin, egg proteins, mercury components (as thimerosal), and antibiotics; therefore, these substances can produce hypersensitivity reactions. The above-mentioned reactions can be evidenced with itch, edema, hives, asthmatic crisis, hypotension and even anaphylactic shock. Due to the importance of vaccination, especially in childhood, it is essential to know the benefits of vaccines, their impact in morbidity and mortality decrease of certain infected-contagious diseases, as well as the adverse effects and the allergic reactions to their application. As immunizations prevent natural infections, they might contribute to a free infectious environment that would allow atopic response. This paper reviews the allergic reactions to vaccines and their influence on the development of atopic disease.