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Sample records for va mycorrhizal fungus

  1. Mobilization and utilization of sparingly soluble phosphates by VA mycorrhizal fungus external hyphae I-32P indirectly labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Qing; Zhao Zijuan; Feng Gu; Li Xiaolin; Chen Baodong

    2000-01-01

    Red clover were grown in three-compartment boxes, and were inoculated with VA mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus mosseae. External hyphae were separated from root system by 30 μm pore size membrane. Phosphorus fertilizer indirectly labelled with 32 P and five kind of phosphates were applied in the hyphae compartment, and the ability of external hyphae to mobilize the sparingly soluble phosphates were evaluated. the results showed that external hyphae mobilized and up took Ca 2 -P, Ca 8 -P, Al-P, Fe.P, but not Ca 10 -P. The phosphorus uptake by clover from phosphates and the contribution of phosphates to clover phosphorus nutrition were ranked as Ca 2 -P > Ca 8 -P, Al-P > Fe-P

  2. Does origin of mycorrhizal fungus on mycorrhizal plant influence effectiveness of the mycorrhizal symbiosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2001-01-01

    Mycorrhizal effectiveness depends on the compatibility between fungus and plant. Therefore, genetic variation in plant and fungal species affect the effectiveness of the symbiosis. The importance of mycorrhizal plant and mycorrhizal fungus origin was investigated in two experiments. In the first

  3. A phosphate transporter from the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus versiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M J; van Buuren, M L

    1995-12-07

    Vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of most terrestrial plants, including many agriculturally important crop species. The fungi colonize the cortex of the root to obtain carbon from their plant host, while assisting the plant with the uptake of phosphate and other mineral nutrients from the soil. This association is beneficial to the plant, because phosphate is essential for plant growth and development, especially during growth under nutrient-limiting conditions. Molecular genetic studies of these fungi and their interaction with plants have been limited owing to the obligate symbiotic nature of the VA fungi, so the molecular mechanisms underlying fungal-mediated uptake and translocation of phosphate from the soil to the plant remain unknown. Here we begin to investigate this process by identifying a complementary DNA that encodes a transmembrane phosphate transporter (GvPT) from Glomus versiforme, a VA mycorrhizal fungus. The function of the protein encoded by GvPT was confirmed by complementation of a yeast phosphate transport mutant. Expression of GvPT was localized to the external hyphae of G. versiforme during mycorrhizal associations, these being the initial site of phosphate uptake from the soil.

  4. Interaction of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus ( Glomus intraradices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research, the effect of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) inoculation (Glomus intraradices and Glomus etunicatum) on tomato plants growing in nutrient solution with high concentrations of copper were studied. Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth. In the present study, the effect of copper ...

  5. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices on accumulation of radiocaesium by plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubchak, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices in 134 Cs isotope by different plant species is studied. The impact of radiocaesium on mycorrhizal development and functioning of plant photosynthetic apparatus is considered. The possibility of mycorrhizal symbiosis application in phyto remediation of radioactively contaminated areas is analyzed. It is found that colonization pf plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus resulted in significant decrease of radiocesium concentration in their aboveground parts, while it did not have considerable impact on the radionuclide uptake by plant root system

  6. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intra-radices on accumulation of radiocaesium by plant species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudchak, S.V.

    2012-01-01

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intra-radices in 134 Cs isotope uptake by different plant species is studied. The impact of radiocaesium on mycorrhizal development and functioning of plant photosynthetic apparatus is considered. The possibility of mycorrhizal symbiosis application in phytoremediation of radioactively contaminated areas is analyzed.It is found that colonization of plants with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus resulted in significant decrease of radiocaesium concentration in their aboveground parts, while it did not have considerable impact on the radionuclide uptake by plant root system

  7. Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Naiying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Department of Chemistry, Shangqiu Normal College, Shangqiu 476000 (China); Huang Honglin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen, E-mail: szzhang@rcees.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu Yongguan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Christie, Peter [Agri-Environment Branch, Agriculture Food and Environmental Science Division, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Zhang Yong [State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Environmental Science Research Centre, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. was investigated under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Inoculation of lucerne with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum L. resulted in higher phenanthrene accumulation in the roots and lower accumulation in the shoots compared to non-mycorrhizal controls. Studies on sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by roots and characterization of heterogeneity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots using solid-state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 13}C NMR) demonstrated that increased aromatic components due to mycorrhizal inoculation resulted in enhanced phenanthrene uptake by the roots but lower translocation to the shoots. Direct visualization using two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) revealed higher phenanthrene accumulation in epidermal cells of roots and lower transport into the root interior and stem in mycorrhizal plants than in non-mycorrhizal controls. These results provide some insight into the mechanisms by which arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation may influence the uptake of organic contaminants by plants. - Colonization by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus promoted root uptake and decreased shoot uptake of phenanthrene by Medicago sativa L.

  8. Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Naiying; Huang Honglin; Zhang Shuzhen; Zhu Yongguan; Christie, Peter; Zhang Yong

    2009-01-01

    Phenanthrene uptake by Medicago sativa L. was investigated under the influence of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Inoculation of lucerne with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum L. resulted in higher phenanthrene accumulation in the roots and lower accumulation in the shoots compared to non-mycorrhizal controls. Studies on sorption and desorption of phenanthrene by roots and characterization of heterogeneity of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots using solid-state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13 C NMR) demonstrated that increased aromatic components due to mycorrhizal inoculation resulted in enhanced phenanthrene uptake by the roots but lower translocation to the shoots. Direct visualization using two-photon excitation microscopy (TPEM) revealed higher phenanthrene accumulation in epidermal cells of roots and lower transport into the root interior and stem in mycorrhizal plants than in non-mycorrhizal controls. These results provide some insight into the mechanisms by which arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation may influence the uptake of organic contaminants by plants. - Colonization by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus promoted root uptake and decreased shoot uptake of phenanthrene by Medicago sativa L.

  9. [Proteome analysis on interaction between Anoectochilus roxburghii and Mycorrhizal fungus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chuan; Guo, Shun-Xing; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Li-Chun

    2012-12-01

    To study the mechanism of plant growing promoted by Mycorrhizal fungus through the difference of proteomes. The differential proteomes between uninoculated and inoculated endophytic fungi, Epulorhiza sp. on Anoectochilus roxburghii were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrum. Twenty-seven protein spots were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Twenty-two candidate proteins were identified by database comparisons. The function of these proteins mostly involved in signal transduction, metabolic regulation, as well as photosynthesis and substance metabolism. The results indicate that the regulator control system of plant is influenced by fungi action, and the positive regulation improves substance metabolism and photosynthesis, which results in strong plant and higher resistance. It is also deduced that silent genes may exist in endosymbiosis plants.

  10. Gene expression in mycorrhizal orchid protocorms suggests a friendly plant-fungus relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotto, Silvia; Rodda, Marco; Benetti, Alex; Sillo, Fabiano; Ercole, Enrico; Rodda, Michele; Girlanda, Mariangela; Murat, Claude; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2014-06-01

    Orchids fully depend on symbiotic interactions with specific soil fungi for seed germination and early development. Germinated seeds give rise to a protocorm, a heterotrophic organ that acquires nutrients, including organic carbon, from the mycorrhizal partner. It has long been debated if this interaction is mutualistic or antagonistic. To investigate the molecular bases of the orchid response to mycorrhizal invasion, we developed a symbiotic in vitro system between Serapias vomeracea, a Mediterranean green meadow orchid, and the rhizoctonia-like fungus Tulasnella calospora. 454 pyrosequencing was used to generate an inventory of plant and fungal genes expressed in mycorrhizal protocorms, and plant genes could be reliably identified with a customized bioinformatic pipeline. A small panel of plant genes was selected and expression was assessed by real-time quantitative PCR in mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal protocorm tissues. Among these genes were some markers of mutualistic (e.g. nodulins) as well as antagonistic (e.g. pathogenesis-related and wound/stress-induced) genes. None of the pathogenesis or wound/stress-related genes were significantly up-regulated in mycorrhizal tissues, suggesting that fungal colonization does not trigger strong plant defence responses. In addition, the highest expression fold change in mycorrhizal tissues was found for a nodulin-like gene similar to the plastocyanin domain-containing ENOD55. Another nodulin-like gene significantly more expressed in the symbiotic tissues of mycorrhizal protocorms was similar to a sugar transporter of the SWEET family. Two genes coding for mannose-binding lectins were significantly up-regulated in the presence of the mycorrhizal fungus, but their role in the symbiosis is unclear.

  11. Effect of biochar soil-amendments on Allium porrum growth, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Examine the interaction of biochar addition and arbuscular mycorrhizal [AM] fungus inoculation upon growth and Zn and Cu uptake by Allium porrum L. in heavy metal amended soil mix, and relate these responses to physicochemical properties of the biochars. Methods: The experiment was a complete ...

  12. Carbon availability for the fungus triggers nitrogen uptake and transport in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is characterized by a transfer of nutrients in exchange for carbon. We tested the effect of the carbon availability for the AM fungus Glomus intraradices on nitrogen (N) uptake and transport in the symbiosis. We followed the uptake and transport of 15N and ...

  13. Effect of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... ... association between certain plants and microorganisms plays an important role in soil ..... an Agrostis capillaris population on a copper contaminated soil. Plant ... vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Amazonian Peru.

  14. Enhanced tomato disease resistance primed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuanyuan; Chen, Dongmei; Lu, Kai; Sun, Zhongxiang; Zeng, Rensen

    2015-01-01

    Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza) with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill.) early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins, PR1, PR2, and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC, and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT) plant, a jasmonate (JA) biosynthesis mutant (spr2), and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for mycorrhiza

  15. Identification of a Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus by Using Monoclonal Antibodies in an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay †

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Sara F.; Morton, Joseph B.; Sworobuk, Janis E.

    1987-01-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were no...

  16. Density dependent interactions between VA mycorrhizal fungi and even-aged seedlings of two perennial Fabaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, N; Stock, W D

    1992-08-01

    The interaction of density and mycorrhizal effects on the growth, mineral nutrition and size distribution of seedlings of two perennial members of the Fabaceae was investigated in pot culture. Seedlings of Otholobium hirtum and Aspalathus linearis were grown at densities of 1, 4, 8 and 16 plants per 13-cm pot with or without vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal inoculum for 120 days. Plant mass, relative growth rates, height and leaf number all decreased with increasing plant density. This was ascribed to the decreasing availability of phosphorus per plant as density increased. O. hirtum was highly dependent on mycorrhizas for P uptake but both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal A. linearis seedlings were able to extract soil P with equal ease. Plant size distribution as measured by the coefficient of variation (CV) of shoot mass was greater at higher densities. CVs of mycorrhizal O. hirtum plants were higher than those of non-mycorrhizal plants. CVs of the facultatively mycorrhizal A. linearis were similar for both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. Higher CVs are attributed to resource preemption by larger individuals. Individuals in populations with high CVs will probably survive stress which would result in the extinction of populations with low CVs. Mass of mycorrhizal plants of both species decreased more rapidly with increasing density than did non-mycorrhizal plant mass. It is concluded that the cost of being mycorrhizal increases as plant density increases, while the benefit decreases. The results suggest that mycorrhizas will influence density-dependent population processes of faculative and obligate mycorrhizal species.

  17. Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus to red kidney and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... fungus to red kidney and wheat plants tolerance grown in heavy metal-polluted soil. ... artificially contaminated with high oncentrations of zinc, copper, lead and cadmium. ... strategies of remediation of highly heavy metal contaminated soils.

  18. Reduction of bacterial growth by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus in the rhizosphere of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Jakobsen, I.

    1993-01-01

    Cucumber was grown in a partially sterilized sand-soil mixture with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum or left uninoculated. Fresh soil extract was places in polyvinyl chloride tubes without propagules of mycorrhizal fungi. Root tips and root segments...... and top of tubes, and of cocci with a diameter of 0.55-0.78 mum in the bulk soil in the center of tubes, were significantly reduced by VAM fungi. The extremely high bacterial biomass (1-7 mg C g-1 dry weight soil) was significant reduced by mycorrhizal colonization on root segments and in bulk soil...... biomass, and changed the spatial pattern of bacterial growth compared to non-mycorrhizal cucumbers. The [H-3]-thymidine incorporation was significantly higher on root tips in the top of tubes, and on root segments and bulk soil in the center of tubes on non-mycorrhizal plants compared to mycorrhizal...

  19. Contribution of soil-32P, fertilizer-32P and VA mycorrhizal fungi to phosphorus nutrition of corn plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Gu; Yang Maoqiu; Bai Dengsha; Huang Quansheng

    1997-01-01

    32 P labelled fertilizer and five synthetic phosphates (dicalcium phosphate, octocalcium phosphate, iron phosphate, aluminium phosphate and apatite), which were used to simulate inorganic phosphates such as Ca 2 -P, Ca 8 -P, Fe P , Al-P and Ca 10 -P in calcareous soil, were applied to corn plants inoculating with and without vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi in a calcareous soil. The results showed that VA mycorrhizal fungi and dicalcium phosphate, octocalcium phosphate, iron phosphate, aluminium phosphate promoted growth and increased phosphorus content of corn plant. The four synthetic phosphates except apatite had higher contributions to corn plant growth than VA mycorrhizal fungi. Contributions of fertilizer-P, soil-P and synthetic phosphates to phosphorus nutrition of corn plant were in order of synthetic phosphates (except apatite) > soil- P > fertilizer-P. Inoculating with VA mycorrhizal fungi increased the contribution of soil-P and decreased the contribution of synthetic phosphates, but did not affect the contribution of fertilizer-P

  20. Trace element toxicity in VA mycorrhizal cucumber grown on weathered coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosskey, M.G.; Adriano, D.C. (University of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Ecology Lab.)

    1993-11-01

    Mycorrhizal colonization is widely recognized as enhancing plant growth on severely disturbed sites. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to determine if inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi will enhance vegetation establishment on abandoned coal fly ash basinss, Spores of Glomus intraradices (Schenck and Smith) and Glomus etunicatum (Becker and Gerdemann) were added to weathered precipitator ash (EC-0.91 dSm[sup -1], pH 5.0) and to a pasteurized soils of the same pH (Grossarenic Paleudult, 92% sand, 1% organic matter). Some soil and ash were left unamended as non-mycorrhizal controls. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Poinsette 76) seeds were sown, watered regularly, and fertilized periodically with macronutrient solution. By 8 weeks all ash-grown plants exhibited smaller leaves with leaf margin curl and necrosis, and plant biomass was significantly less (0.75x) than soil-grown plants. Based on analysis of 18 elements in plant tissues, toxicity to B, Mn, or Zn could have caused growth suppression, confirming trace element problems for plant growth on fly ash. For plants grown on fly ash, G. etunicatum was the only fungus that colonized roots (20% of root length reduced from 67% on soil) and it suppressed plant growth to 0.80 x that of uninoculated ash-grown plants. Correspondingly, shoot Zn concentration in G. etunicatum-inoculated plants was 3.5 x higher than in uninoculated plants and at generally toxic levels (273 mg kg[sup -1]). Glomus etunicatum had no other significant effects on elemental concentrations. These results indicate that VAM colonization in acid, weathered fly ash suppressed plant growth by facilitating uptake of Zn to toxic levels, and implies a limitation to successful use of VAM for vegetation establishment on abandoned coal fly ash basins.

  1. pH measurement of tubular vacuoles of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Gigaspora margarita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamoto, Rintaro; Saito, Katsuharu; Oyaizu, Hiroshi; Aono, Toshihiro; Saito, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play an important role in phosphate supply to the host plants. The fungal hyphae contain tubular vacuoles where phosphate compounds such as polyphosphate are accumulated. Despite their importance for the phosphate storage, little is known about the physiological properties of the tubular vacuoles in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. As an indicator of the physiological state in vacuoles, we measured pH of tubular vacuoles in living hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita using ratio image analysis with pH-dependent fluorescent probe, 6-carboxyfluorescein. Fluorescent images of the fine tubular vacuoles were obtained using a laser scanning confocal microscope, which enabled calculation of vacuolar pH with high spatial resolution. The tubular vacuoles showed mean pH of 5.6 and a pH range of 5.1-6.3. These results suggest that the tubular vacuoles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have a mildly acidic pH just like vacuoles of other fungal species including yeast and ectomycorrhizal fungi.

  2. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus caledonium) on the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize (Zea mays L.) and atrazine dissipation in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Honglin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18th Shuangqinglu, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18th Shuangqinglu, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: szzhang@mail.rcees.ac.cn; Shan Xiaoquan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18th Shuangqinglu, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Chen Baodong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18th Shuangqinglu, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu Yongguan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18th Shuangqinglu, Haidian District, Beijing 100085 (China); Bell, J. Nigel B. [Center for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Effects of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus caledonium) on accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize grown in soil contaminated with different concentrations of atrazine were investigated in a series of pot experiments. Roots of mycorrhizal plants accumulated more atrazine than non-mycorrhizal roots. In contrast, atrazine accumulation in shoot decreased in mycorrhizal compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. No atrazine derivatives were detected in the soil, either with or without mycorrhizal colonization. However, atrazine metabolites, deethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA), were detected in plant roots and the AM colonization enhanced the metabolism. After plant harvest atrazine concentrations decreased markedly in the soils compared to the initial concentrations. The decreases were the most in rhizosphere soil and then near-rhizosphere soil and the least in bulk soil. Mycorrhizal treatment enhanced atrazine dissipation in the near-rhizosphere and bulk soils irrespective of atrazine application rates. - Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus increases the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize.

  3. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus caledonium) on the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize (Zea mays L.) and atrazine dissipation in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Honglin; Zhang Shuzhen; Shan Xiaoquan; Chen Baodong; Zhu Yongguan; Bell, J. Nigel B.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (Glomus caledonium) on accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize grown in soil contaminated with different concentrations of atrazine were investigated in a series of pot experiments. Roots of mycorrhizal plants accumulated more atrazine than non-mycorrhizal roots. In contrast, atrazine accumulation in shoot decreased in mycorrhizal compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. No atrazine derivatives were detected in the soil, either with or without mycorrhizal colonization. However, atrazine metabolites, deethylatrazine (DEA) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA), were detected in plant roots and the AM colonization enhanced the metabolism. After plant harvest atrazine concentrations decreased markedly in the soils compared to the initial concentrations. The decreases were the most in rhizosphere soil and then near-rhizosphere soil and the least in bulk soil. Mycorrhizal treatment enhanced atrazine dissipation in the near-rhizosphere and bulk soils irrespective of atrazine application rates. - Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus increases the accumulation and metabolism of atrazine in maize

  4. A mycorrhizal fungus grows on biochar and captures phosphorus from its surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Edith; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Jakobsen, Iver

    2014-01-01

    Biochar application to soils has potential to simultaneously improve soil fertility and store carbon to aid climate change mitigation. While many studies have shown positive effects on plant yields, much less is known about the synergies between biochar and plant growth promoting microbes......, such as mycorrhizal fungi. We present the first evidence that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can use biochar as a physical growth matrix and nutrient source. We used monoxenic cultures of the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis in symbiosis with carrot roots. Using scanning electron microscopy we observed that AM...... fungal hyphae grow on and into two contrasting types of biochar particles, strongly attaching to inner and outer surfaces. Loading a nutrient-poor biochar surface with nutrients stimulated hyphal colonization. We labeled biochar surfaces with 33P radiotracer and found that hyphal contact to the biochar...

  5. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis differentially regulates the copper response of two maize cultivars differing in copper tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlos, Miguel A; Zitka, Ondrej; Vojtech, Adam; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza can increase plant tolerance to heavy metals. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza on plant metal tolerance vary depending on the fungal and plant species involved. Here, we report the effect of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the physiological and biochemical responses to Cu of two maize genotypes differing in Cu tolerance, the Cu-sensitive cv. Orense and the Cu-tolerant cv. Oropesa. Development of the symbiosis confers an increased Cu tolerance to cv. Orense. Root and shoot Cu concentrations were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants of both cultivars. Shoot lipid peroxidation increased with soil Cu content only in non-mycorrhizal plants of the Cu-sensitive cultivar. Root lipid peroxidation increased with soil Cu content, except in mycorrhizal plants grown at 250mg Cu kg -1 soil. In shoots of mycorrhizal plants of both cultivars, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were not affected by soil Cu content. In Cu-supplemented soils, total phytochelatin content increased in shoots of mycorrhizal cv. Orense but decreased in cv. Oropesa. Overall, these data suggest that the increased Cu tolerance of mycorrhizal plants of cv. Orense could be due to an increased induction of shoot phytochelatin biosynthesis by the symbiosis in this cultivar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices on accumulation of radiocaesium by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubchak, S.; Bondar, O.

    2018-01-01

    The impact of radiocaesium on mycorrhizal development and functioning of plant photosynthetic apparatus is considered. The possibility of mycorrhizal symbiosis application in phytoremediation of radioactively contaminated areas is analyzed. It is found that colonization of plants by AM fungus resulted to significant decrease of radiocaesium content in their aboveground parts, while it didn't have considerable impact on the radionuclide uptake by plant root system. AM fungi can restrict or enhance direct root uptake of radiocaesium as well as its root to shoot translocation. Radiocaesium activity concentration was considerably lower in shoots of mycorrhizal plants as compared to nonmycorrhizal ones grown on different soil types. Plant colonization with the G. intraradices resulted in 50 - 100 % decrease of radiocaesium TF from soil to aboveground biomass and 40 - 70% reduction of its translocation from plant roots to shoots. The studied plants could be potentially cultivated within areas with moderate radiocaesium contamination levels and further used in agricultural purposes. The opposite effect was observed in case of H. annuus (sunflower), where AM colonization led to nearly 10-fold increase of 134 Cs activity in roots and shoots. This hyper-accumulating plant could be used in combination with AM fungi for radiocaesium phytoextraction from the soil. (authors)

  7. Jatropha curcas and assisted phytoremediation of a mine tailing with biochar and a mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen A; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; Hernández Godínez, María Isabel; Evangelista Lozano, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    Soil pollution is an important ecological problem worldwide. Phytoremediation is an environmental-friendly option for reducing metal pollution. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the growth and physiological response, metal uptake, and the phytostabilization potential of a nontoxic Jatropha curcas L. genotype when grown in multimetal-polluted conditions. Plants were established on a mine residue (MR) amended or not amended with corn biochar (B) and inoculated or not inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Acaulospora sp. (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, AMF). J. curcas was highly capable of growing in an MR and showed no phytotoxic symptoms. After J. curcas growth (105 days), B produced high desorption of Cd and Pb from the MR; however, no increases in metal shoot concentrations were observed. Therefore, Jatropha may be useful for phytostabilization of metals in mine tailings. The use of B is recommended because improved MR chemical properties conduced to plant growth (cation-exchange capacity, organic matter content, essential nutrients, electrical conductivity, water-holding capacity) and plant growth development (higher biomass, nutritional and physiological performance). Inoculation with an AMF did not improve any plant growth or physiological plant characteristic. Only higher Zn shoot concentration was observed, but it was not phytotoxic. Future studies of B use and its long-term effect on MR remediation should be conducted under field conditions.

  8. Phosphorus uptake of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus is not effected by the biocontrol bacterium ¤Burkholderia cepacia¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskov, S.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2002-01-01

    The biocontrol bacterium Burkholderia cepacia is known to suppress a broad range of root pathogenic fungi, while its impact on other beneficial non-target organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is unknown. Direct interactions between five B. cepacia strains and the AM fungus, Glomus ...

  9. Identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus by using monoclonal antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S F; Morton, J B; Sworobuk, J E

    1987-09-01

    Spore morphology is currently used to identify species of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We report the first use of a highly specific immunological method for identification of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus. Two monoclonal antibodies were produced against Glomus occultum. Monoclonal antibodies reacted strongly with both spores and hyphae in an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All other mycorrhizal (29 species) and nonmycorrhizal (5 species) fungi tested were nonreactive with the monoclonal antibodies. A single spore of G. occultum was detectable in the presence of high numbers of spores of other vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Variation in the reaction of G. occultum isolates from West Virginia, Florida, and Colombia suggests that monoclonal antibodies may differentiate strains.

  10. The symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis drives root water transport in flooded tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Polanco, Monica; Molina, Sonia; Zamarreño, Angel María; García-Mina, Jose María; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    It is known that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the plant roots enhances the tolerance of the host plant to different environmental stresses, although the positive effect of the fungi in plants under waterlogged conditions has not been well studied. Tolerance of plants to flooding can be achieved through different molecular, physiological and anatomical adaptations, which will affect their water uptake capacity and therefore their root hydraulic properties. Here, we investigated the root hydraulic properties under non-flooded and flooded conditions in non-mycorrhizal tomato plants and plants inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Only flooded mycorrhizal plants increased their root hydraulic conductivity, and this effect was correlated with a higher expression of the plant aquaporin SlPIP1;7 and the fungal aquaporin GintAQP1. There was also a higher abundance of the PIP2 protein phoshorylated at Ser280 in mycorrhizal flooded plants. The role of plant hormones (ethylene, ABA and IAA) in root hydraulic properties was also taken into consideration, and it was concluded that, in mycorrhizal flooded plants, ethylene has a secondary role regulating root hydraulic conductivity whereas IAA may be the key hormone that allows the enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity in mycorrhizal plants under low oxygen conditions.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus inoculation reduces the drought-resistance advantage of endophyte-infected versus endophyte-free Leymus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Wei; Wu, Man; Wu, Rihan; Zhou, Yong; Gao, Yubao; Ren, Anzhi

    2017-11-01

    Grasses can be infected simultaneously by endophytic fungi and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that endophyte-associated drought resistance of a native grass was affected by an AM fungus. In a greenhouse experiment, we compared the performance of endophyte-infected (EI) and endophyte-free (EF) Leymus chinensis, a dominant species native to the Inner Mongolia steppe, under altered water and AM fungus availability. The results showed that endophyte infection significantly increased drought resistance of the host grass, but the beneficial effects were reduced by AM fungus inoculation. In the mycorrhizal-non-inoculated (MF) treatment, EI plants accumulated significantly more biomass, had greater proline and total phenolic concentration, and lower malondialdehyde concentration than EF plants. In the mycorrhizal-inoculation (MI) treatment, however, no significant difference occurred in either growth or physiological characters measured between EI and EF plants. AM fungus inoculation enhanced drought resistance of EF plants but had no significant effect on drought resistance of EI plants, thus AM fungus inoculation reduced the difference between EI and EF plants. Our findings highlight the importance of interactions among multiple microorganisms for plant performance under drought stress.

  12. Carbon cost of the fungal symbiont relative to net leaf P accumulation in a split-root VA mycorrhizal symbiosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douds, D.D. Jr.; Johnson, C.R.; Koch, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Translocation of 14 C-photosynthates to mycorrhizal (++), half mycorrhizal (0+), and nonmycorrhizal (00) split-root systems was compared to P accumulation in leaves of the host plant. Carrizo citrange seedlings (Poncirus trifoliata [L.] Raf. x Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) were inoculated with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith. Plants were exposed to 14 CO 2 for 10 minutes and ambient air for 2 hours. Three to 4% of recently labeled photosynthate was allocated to metabolism of the mycorrhiza in each inoculated root half independent of shoot P concentration, growth response, and whether one or both root halves were colonized. Nonmycorrhizal roots respired more of the label translocated to them than did mycorrhizal roots. Label recovered in the potting medium due to exudation or transport into extraradical hyphae was 5 to 6 times greater for (++) versus (00) plants. In low nutrient media, roots of (0+) and (++) plants transported more P to leaves per root weight than roots of (00) plants. However, when C translocated to roots utilized for respiration, exudation, etc., as well as growth is considered, (00) plant roots were at least as efficient at P uptake (benefit) per C utilized (cost) as (0+) and (++) plants. Root systems of (++) plants did not supply more P to leaves than (0+) plants in higher nutrient media, yet they still allocated twice the 14 C-photosynthate to the mycorrhiza as did (0+) root systems

  13. Transport of trace elements through the hyphae of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus into marigold determined by the multitracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, H.; Oohashi, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Inubushi, K.; Enomoto, S.

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of the hyphae of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus to the uptake of traceelements by marigold (Tagetes patula L.) was studied using a multitracer consisting of radionuclides of 7 Be, 22 Na, 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 56 Co, 65 Zn, 75 Se, 83 Rb, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 88 Zr, and 95m Tc. Marigold plants colonized and not colonized with Glomus etunicatum were grown for 40 and 60 d in pots with a hyphal compartment separated from the rooting medium by a fine nylon mesh. The multitracer was applied to the hyphal compartment. We found that the uptake of 22 Na, 65 Zn , 75 Se, 83 Rb, 85 Sr, and 88 Y by the mycorrhizal plants was higher than that by the non-mycorrhizal ones. In the case of 95m Tc, the uptake by the mycorrhizal plants was similar to that by the control ones. The radioactivity of 7 Be, 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 56 Co, and 88 Zr could not be detected in any plants. Our results suggest that the AM fungus can absorb Na, Zn, Se, Rh, Sr, and Y from the soil and transport these elements to the plant through its hyphae. The transport ability of the AM fungal hyphae to plant for Be, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zr, and Tc is likely to be low. (author)

  14. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae can enhance arsenic tolerance in Medicago truncatula by increasing plant phosphorus status and restricting arsenate uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Pengliang; Christie, Peter; Liu Yu; Zhang Junling; Li Xiaolin

    2008-01-01

    A pot experiment examined the biomass and As uptake of Medicago truncatula colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae in low-P soil experimentally contaminated with different levels of arsenate. The biomass of G. mosseae external mycelium was unaffected by the highest addition level of As studied (200 mg kg -1 ) but shoot and root biomass declined in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, indicating that the AM fungus was more tolerant than M. truncatula to arsenate. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased shoot and root dry weights by enhancing host plant P nutrition and lowering shoot and root As concentrations compared with uninoculated plants. The AM fungus may have been highly tolerant to As and conferred enhanced tolerance to arsenate on the host plant by enhancing P nutrition and restricting root As uptake. - G. mosseae was more tolerant than M. truncatula to As and may have conferred enhanced host tolerance by restricting root As uptake and enhancing P nutrition

  15. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae can enhance arsenic tolerance in Medicago truncatula by increasing plant phosphorus status and restricting arsenate uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Pengliang [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Christie, Peter [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Liu Yu [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Zhang Junling [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)], E-mail: junlingz@cau.edu.cn; Li Xiaolin [Key Laboratory of Plant-Soil Interactions, Ministry of Education, College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2008-11-15

    A pot experiment examined the biomass and As uptake of Medicago truncatula colonized by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae in low-P soil experimentally contaminated with different levels of arsenate. The biomass of G. mosseae external mycelium was unaffected by the highest addition level of As studied (200 mg kg{sup -1}) but shoot and root biomass declined in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, indicating that the AM fungus was more tolerant than M. truncatula to arsenate. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased shoot and root dry weights by enhancing host plant P nutrition and lowering shoot and root As concentrations compared with uninoculated plants. The AM fungus may have been highly tolerant to As and conferred enhanced tolerance to arsenate on the host plant by enhancing P nutrition and restricting root As uptake. - G. mosseae was more tolerant than M. truncatula to As and may have conferred enhanced host tolerance by restricting root As uptake and enhancing P nutrition.

  16. Ammonia Assimilation in Zea mays L. Infected with a Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus fasciculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliquet, J. B.; Stewart, G. R.

    1993-03-01

    To investigate nitrogen assimilation and translocation in Zea mays L. colonized by the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum (Thax. sensu Gerd.), we measured key enzyme activities, 15N incorporation into free amino acids, and 15N translocation from roots to shoots. Glutamine synthetase and nitrate reductase activities were increased in both roots and shoots compared with control plants, and glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased in roots only. In the presence of [15N]ammonium, glutamine amide was the most heavily labeled product. More label was incorporated into amino acids in VAM plants. The kinetics of 15N labeling and effects of methionine sulfoximine on distribution of 15N-labeled products were entirely consistent with the operation of the glutamate synthase cycle. No evidence was found for ammonium assimilation via glutamate dehydrogenase. 15N translocation from roots to shoots through the xylem was higher in VAM plants compared with control plants. These results establish that, in maize, VAM fungi increase ammonium assimilation, glutamine production, and xylem nitrogen translocation. Unlike some ectomycorrhizal fungi, VAM fungi do not appear to alter the pathway of ammonium assimilation in roots of their hosts.

  17. Osmotic Adjustment in Leaves of VA Mycorrhizal and Nonmycorrhizal Rose Plants in Response to Drought Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augé, R M; Schekel, K A; Wample, R L

    1986-11-01

    Osmotic adjustment in Rosa hybrida L. cv Samantha was characterized by the pressure-volume approach in drought-acclimated and unacclimated plants brought to the same level of drought strain, as assayed by stomatal closure. Plants were colonized by either of the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus deserticola Trappe, Bloss and Menge or G. intraradices Schenck and Smith, or were nonmycorrhizal. Both the acclimation and the mycorrhizal treatments decreased the osmotic potential (Psi(pi)) of leaves at full turgor and at the turgor loss point, with a corresponding increase in pressure potential at full turgor. Mycorrhizae enabled plants to maintain leaf turgor and conductance at greater tissue water deficits, and lower leaf and soil water potentials, when compared with nonmycorrhizal plants. As indicated by the Psi(pi) at the turgor loss point, the active Psi(pi) depression which attended mycorrhizal colonization alone was 0.4 to 0.6 megapascals, and mycorrhizal colonization and acclimation in concert 0.6 to 0.9 megapascals, relative to unacclimated controls without mycorrhizae. Colonization levels and sporulation were higher in plants subjected to acclimation. In unacclimated hosts, leaf water potential, water saturation deficit, and soil water potential at a particular level of drought strain were affected most by G. intraradices. G. deserticola had the greater effect after drought preconditioning.

  18. Soil mineral concentrations and soil microbial activity in grapevine inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo von Bennewitz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A two year-experiment was carried out to study an effect of root inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungus on soil mineral concentrations and soil microbial activity in grapevine (Vitis vi­ni­fe­ra cv. “Cabernet Sauvignon” cultivated in Chile. Plants were inoculated with a commercial granular inoculant (Mycosym Tri-ton® and cultivated in 20 L plastic pots filled with an unsterilized sandy clay soil from the Vertisols class under climatic conditions of Curicó (34°58´ S; 71°14´ W; 228 m ASL, Chile.Soil analyses were carried out at the beginning of the study and after two years (four samples of rhizospheric soil for each treatment to assess the effects of mycorrhizal infection on soil mineral concentration and physical properties. Soil microbial activity was measured by quantifying the soil production of CO2 in ten replications of 50 g of soil from each treatment. Root mycorrhizal infection was assessed through samples of fresh roots collected during 2005 and 2006. Fifty samples for each treatment were analyzed and the percentage of root length containing arbuscules and vesicles was assessed.During both years (2005 and 2006 all treatments showed mycorrhizal infection, even the Control treatment where no AM was applied. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect the soil concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, Fe, B, organic matter, pH/KCl and ECe. Soil CO2-C in vitro production markedly decreased during the period of the study. No significant differences where detected among treatments in most cases.

  19. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth, photosynthesis and yield of corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohsen jahan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biological fertilizers have received special attention by scientists in sustainable and low input agriculture. In order to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth and photosynthesis characteristics of corn in conventional and ecological cropping systems, a field experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during year 2006. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (1- High input conventional system, 2- Medium input conventional system, 3- Low input conventional system and 4- Ecological system and four inoculations (1- Mycorrhiza fungus, Glomus intraradices, 2- Bacteria, Azotobacter paspali and Azospirillum brasilense, 3- Dual inoculation, Fungus plus bacteria, and 4- No-inoculation, control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. All agronomic practices and inputs application during planting and nursing for each of cropping systems were conducted according to regional traditions. Results showed that the effect of inoculation on photosynthesis rates of corn was significant, as the highest photosynthesis rate obtained in dual inoculation. Single inoculation (fungus or bacteria was ranked second. The effect of all inoculations on corn dry matter production was significant and dual inoculation produced the highest dry matter yield. The cropping systems have significant effect on corn yield and the difference between medium input conventional system and high input conventional system was significant, but the high input, low input and ecological cropping systems showed no differences. Inoculants affected the SPAD readings, and dual inoculation showed the highest SPAD readings. This study showed that utilization of low input conventional and ecological systems in combination with use of dual inoculation of

  20. Hyphal transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus of N applied to the soil as ammonium or nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    Transport of N by hyphae of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus was studied under controlled experimental conditions. The N source was applied to the soil as (NH4+)-N-15 or (NH3-)N-15. Cucumis sativus was grown for 25 days, either alone or in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices, in containers...... with a hyphal compartment separated from the root compartment by a fine nylon mesh. Mineral N was then applied to the hyphal compartment as (NH4+)-N-15 or (NO3-)-N-15 at 5 cm distance from the root compartment. Soil samples were taken from the hyphal compartment at 1, 3 and 5 cm distance from the root...... compartment at 7 and 12 days after labelling, and the concentration of mineral N in the samples was measured from 2 M KCl extracts. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect plant dry weight. The recovery of N-15 in mycorrhizal plants was 38 or 40%, respectively, when (NH4+)-N-15 or (NO3-)-N-15 was applied...

  1. Variation in Ribosomal DNA among Isolates of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Cenococcum Geophilum FR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobuglio, Katherine Frances

    1990-01-01

    Cenococcum geophilum Fr., a cosmopolitan mycorrhizal fungus, is well-known for its extremely wide host and habitat range. The ecological diversity of C. geophilum sharply contrasts its present taxonomic status as a monotypic form -genus. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was used to assess the degree of genetic variation among 72 isolates of C. geophilum. The probe used in this study was the rDNA repeat cloned from C. geophilum isolate A145 (pCG15). Length of the rDNA repeat was approximately 9 kb. The rDNA clone was mapped for 5 restriction endonucleases. Hybridization with cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA (pSR118, and pSR125 containing the 18S, and 5.8-25S rRNA genes respectively), and alignment of restriction endonuclease sites conserved in the rDNA genes of other fungi, were used to position the corresponding rDNAs of C. geophilum. Southern hybridizations with EcoRI, HindIII, XhoI, and PstI digested DNAs indicated extensive variation among the C. geophilum isolates, greater than has been previously reported to occur within a fungal species. Most of the rDNA polymorphisms occurred in the IGS region. Restriction endonuclease site and length polymorphisms were also observed in the 5.8S-26S genic regions. Sixteen size categories of length mutations, 6 restriction endonuclease site additions, and 4 restriction endonuclease site deletions were determined using isolate A145 as a reference. The rDNA repeat length among the isolates varied from approximately 8.5 to 10.2 kb. RFLPs were also observed in the mitochondrial (mt) 24S rRNA gene and flanking regions of HindIII digested DNAs of C. geophilum isolates representing both geographically distinct and similar origins. Among the C. geophilum isolates analyzed there were fewer RFLPs in mt-DNA than in nuclear rDNA. EcoRI rDNA phenotypes between C. geophilum and Elaphomyces anthracinus, its proposed teleomorph or sexual state, did not correspond. In addition, the four

  2. Multi-omics approach identifies molecular mechanisms of plant-fungus mycorrhizal interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Larsen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mycorrhizal symbiosis, plant roots form close, mutually beneficial interactions with soil fungi. Before this mycorrhizal interaction can be established however, plant roots must be capable of detecting potential beneficial fungal partners and initiating the gene expression patterns necessary to begin symbiosis. To predict a plant root – mycorrhizal fungi sensor systems, we analyzed in vitro experiments of Populus tremuloides (aspen tree and Laccaria bicolor (mycorrhizal fungi interaction and leveraged over 200 previously published transcriptomic experimental data sets, 159 experimentally validated plant transcription factor binding motifs, and more than 120-thousand experimentally validated protein-protein interactions to generate models of pre-mycorrhizal sensor systems in aspen root. These sensor mechanisms link extracellular signaling molecules with gene regulation through a network comprised of membrane receptors, signal cascade proteins, transcription factors, and transcription factor biding DNA motifs. Modeling predicted four pre-mycorrhizal sensor complexes in aspen that interact with fifteen transcription factors to regulate the expression of 1184 genes in response to extracellular signals synthesized by Laccaria. Predicted extracellular signaling molecules include common signaling molecules such as phenylpropanoids, salicylate, and, jasmonic acid. This multi-omic computational modeling approach for predicting the complex sensory networks yielded specific, testable biological hypotheses for mycorrhizal interaction signaling compounds, sensor complexes, and mechanisms of gene regulation.

  3. Co-ordinated Changes in the Accumulation of Metal Ions in Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) in Response to Inoculation with the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Funneliformis mosseae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is an ancient interaction between plants and Glomeromycotan fungi. In exchange for photosynthetically fixed carbon, the fungus provides the plant host with greater access to soil nutrients via an extensive network of root-external hyphae. Here, to determine the impac...

  4. Co-ordinated changes in the accumulation of metal ions in maize (Zea mays ssp. mays L.) in response to inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramrez-Flores, M. Rosario; Relln-Lvarez, Rubn; Wozniak, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is an ancient interaction between plants and fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. In exchange for photosynthetically fixed carbon, the fungus provides the plant host with greater access to soil nutrients via an extensive network of root-external hyphae. Here, to det...

  5. Global assessment of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus diversity reveals very low endemism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davison, J.; Moora, M.; Öpik, M.; Adholeya, A.; Ainsaar, L.; Bâ, A.; Burla, S.; Diedhiou, A. G.; Hiiesalu, Inga; Jairus, T.; Johnson, N. C.; Kane, A.; Koorem, K.; Kochar, M.; Ndiaye, C.; Pärtel, M.; Reier, Ü.; Saks, Ü.; Singh, R.; Vasar, M.; Zobel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 349, č. 6251 (2015), 970-973 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * 454 sequencing * diversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 34.661, year: 2015

  6. Gamarada debralockiae gen. nov. sp. nov.-the genome of the most widespread Australian ericoid mycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, David J; Sutcliffe, Brodie; Greenfield, Paul; Tran-Dinh, Nai

    2018-05-01

    This study describes a novel ericoid mycorrhizal fungus (ErMF), Gamarada debralockiae Midgley and Tran-Dinh gen. nov. sp. nov. Additionally, catabolism was explored from a genomic perspective. The nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of G. debralockiae were sequenced. Morphological characteristics were assessed on various media. Catabolic genes of G. debralockiae were explored using SignalP and dbCAN. Phylogenetic comparisons were undertaken using Phylogeny.fr. The 58.5-Mbp draft genome of G. debralockiae contained 17,075 putative genes. The complete mitochondrial genome was 28,168 bp in length. In culture, G. debralockiae produces slow-growing non-sporulating colonies. Gamarada debralockiae has many putative secreted catabolic enzymes. Phylogeny indicated G. debralockiae was distinct from known ascomycetous ErMF: Pezoloma ericae, Meliniomyces spp., Oidiodendron spp., and Cairneyella variabilis. It is closely related to many undescribed plant root-associated fungi and its nearest described relative is Hyphodiscus brevicollaris. Gamarada debralockiae has been recovered from virtually all Australian ericoid mycorrhizal studies and biogeographic data suggests the taxon is widespread in Australia. Gamarada debralockiae has similar catabolic potential to C. variabilis and co-occurs with C. variabilis at Australian sites. Plants that host multiple ErMF may benefit from subtle differences in catabolism that improve access to nitrogen and phosphorus from within recalcitrant organic matter.

  7. Remediation of PAH-contaminated soil by the combination of tall fescue, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and epigeic earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan-Fei; Lu, Mang

    2015-03-21

    A 120-day experiment was performed to investigate the effect of a multi-component bioremediation system consisting of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) (Glomus caledoniun L.), and epigeic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) for cleaning up polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soil. Inoculation with AMF and/or earthworms increased plant yield and PAH accumulation in plants. However, PAH uptake by tall fescue accounted for a negligible portion of soil PAH removal. Mycorrhizal tall fescue significantly enhanced PAH dissipation, PAH degrader density and polyphenol oxidase activity in soil. The highest PAH dissipation (93.4%) was observed in the combination treatment: i.e., AMF+earthworms+tall fescue, in which the soil PAH concentration decreased from an initial value of 620 to 41 mg kg(-1) in 120 days. This concentration is below the threshold level required for Chinese soil PAH quality (45 mg kg(-1) dry weight) for residential use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pre-inoculation by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus enhances male reproductive output of Cucurbita foetidissima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary L. Pendleton

    2000-01-01

    Male and female reproductive output of Cucurbita foetidissima, a gynodioecious native perennial, was examined in a 2-yr greenhouse/outplanting study. Plants were divided into three treatment groups: (1) a lowphosphorus (P) soil mix control; (2) a low-P soil mix with the addition of mycorrhizal inoculum (Glomus intraradices); and (3) a high-P soil mix. Plants were...

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation of peanut in low-fertile tropical soil : I. Host-fungus compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quilambo, OA; Weissenhorn, I.; Kuiper, P.J C; Stulen, I.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of inoculation with an indigenous Mozambican and a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) inoculant on two peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars, a traditional, low-yielding Mozambican landrace (Local) and a modern, high-yielding cultivar (Falcon), were tested in a non-sterile and

  10. Cd-induced production of glomalin by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis) as estimated by monoclonal antibody assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Elham; Aliasgharzad, Nasser; Majidi, Jafar; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal

    2016-10-01

    Glomalin is a specific fungal glycoprotein produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi belonging to the Glomerales which could efficiently sequestrate heavy metals. The glomalin has been introduced as a heat shock protein and there are evidences that increasing levels of heavy metals could enhance its production. We examined the influence of Cd concentrations on glomalin production by AM fungus, as well as its contribution to the sequestration of Cd in both pot and in vitro culture conditions. Pot experiment was carried out using pure sand with Trifolium repens L. as host plant, mycorrhized by Rhizophagus irregularis and treated with Cd levels of 0, 15, 30, and 45 μM. In vitro experiment was performed in two-compartment plates containing the transformed carrot roots mycorrhized with the same fungus and treated with Cd levels of 0, 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 mM. The immunoreactive and Bradford reactive glomalin contents in both experiments increased as so raising Cd concentration. Total Cd sequestrated by hyphal glomalin in both cultures was significantly increased as the levels of Cd increased. The highest contents of Cd sequestration in pot (75.78 μg Cd/mg glomalin) and in vitro (11.44 μg Cd/mg glomalin) cultures were recorded at the uppermost levels of Cd, which significantly differed with other levels. Our results suggested that under Cd-induced stress, stimulated production of glomalin by AM fungus may be a protective mechanism against the toxic effect of Cd.

  11. Persistence of heavy metal tolerance of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices under different cultivation regimes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Jurkiewicz, A.; Turnau, K.; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 2 (2007), s. 71-82 ISSN 0334-5114 Grant - others:Genomyca(XE) QLK5-CT-2000-01319; FNP(PL) Regle 25/97; FNP(PL) Subin 1996; FNP(PL) Subin 2000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis * lead * manganese Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2007

  12. Symbiotic efficiency of autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae) and Brevibacillus sp. isolated from cadmium polluted soil under increasing cadmium levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivas, A.; Voeroes, I.; Biro, B.; Campos, E.; Barea, J.M.; Azcon, R.

    2003-01-01

    Selected ubiquitous microorganisms are important components of Cd tolerance in plants. - The effect of inoculation with indigenous naturally occurring microorganisms [an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus and rhizosphere bacteria] isolated from a Cd polluted soil was assayed on Trifolium repens growing in soil contaminated with a range of Cd. One of the bacterial isolate showed a marked PGPR effect and was identified as a Brevibacillus sp. Mycorrhizal colonization also enhanced Trifolium growth and N, P, Zn and Ni content and the dually inoculated (AM fungus plus Brevibacillus sp.) plants achieved further growth and nutrition and less Cd concentration, particularly at the highest Cd level. Increasing Cd level in the soil decreased Zn and Pb shoot accumulation. Coinoculation of Brevibacillus sp. and AM fungus increased shoot biomass over single mycorrhizal plants by 18% (at 13.6 mg Cd kg -1 ), 26% (at 33.0 mg Cd kg -1 ) and 35% (at 85.1 mg Cd kg -1 ). In contract, Cd transfer from soil to plants was substantially reduced and at the highest Cd level Brevibacillus sp. lowered this value by 37.5% in AM plants. Increasing Cd level highly reduced plant mycorrhization and nodulation. Strong positive effect of the bacterium on nodule formation was observed in all treatments. Results show that selected ubiquitous microorganisms, applied as enriched inocula, are important in plant Cd tolerance and development in Cd polluted soils

  13. Sugar beet waste and its component ferulic acid inhibits external mycelium of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medina, Almudena; Jakobsen, Iver; Egsgaard, Helge

    2011-01-01

    and absent in ASB. We compared the effects of the water extracts of SB and ASB and ferulic acid upon the growth of Glomus intraradices in in vitro monoxenic cultures. Hyphal growth of the AM fungus G. intraradices was extremely reduced in ferulic acid and SB treatments. Moreover, AM hyphae appeared...

  14. Host- and stage-dependent secretome of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tian; Holmer, Rens; Hontelez, Jan; Te Lintel-Hekkert, Bas; Marufu, Lucky; de Zeeuw, Thijs; Wu, Fangyuan; Schijlen, Elio; Bisseling, Ton; Limpens, Erik

    2018-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi form the most wide-spread endosymbiosis with plants. There is very little host specificity in this interaction, however host preferences as well as varying symbiotic efficiencies have been observed. We hypothesize that secreted proteins (SPs) may act as fungal effectors to control symbiotic efficiency in a host-dependent manner. Therefore, we studied whether arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi adjust their secretome in a host- and stage-dependent manner to contribute to their extremely wide host range. We investigated the expression of SP-encoding genes of Rhizophagus irregularis in three evolutionary distantly related plant species, Medicago truncatula, Nicotiana benthamiana and Allium schoenoprasum. In addition we used laser microdissection in combination with RNA-seq to study SP expression at different stages of the interaction in Medicago. Our data indicate that most expressed SPs show roughly equal expression levels in the interaction with all three host plants. In addition, a subset shows significant differential expression depending on the host plant. Furthermore, SP expression is controlled locally in the hyphal network in response to host-dependent cues. Overall, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the R. irregularis secretome, which now offers a solid basis to direct functional studies on the role of fungal SPs in AM symbiosis. © 2018 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Differential gene expression in Rhododendron fortunei roots colonized by an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus and increased nitrogen absorption and plant growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangying Wei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM fungi are specifically symbiotic with plants in the family Ericaceae. Little is known thus far about their symbiotic establishment and subsequent nitrogen (N uptake at the molecular level. The present study devised a system for establishing a symbiotic relationship between Rhododendron fortunei Lindl. and an ERM fungus (Oidiodendron maius var. maius strain Om19, quantified seedling growth and N uptake, and compared transcriptome profiling between colonized and uncolonized roots using RNA-Seq. The Om19 colonization induced 16,892 genes that were differentially expressed in plant roots, of which 14,364 were upregulated and 2,528 were downregulated. These genes included those homologous to ATP-binding cassette transporters, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, and symbiosis receptor-like kinases. N metabolism was particularly active in Om19-colonized roots, and 51 genes were upregulated, such as nitrate transporters, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, ammonium transporters, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase. Transcriptome analysis also identified a series of genes involving endocytosis, Fc-gamma R-mediated phagocytosis, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and GnRH signal pathway that have not been reported previously. Their roles in the symbiosis require further investigation. The Om19 colonization significantly increased N uptake and seedling growth. Total N content and dry weight of colonized seedlings were 36.6% and 46.6% greater than control seedlings. This is the first transcriptome analysis of a species from the family Ericaceae colonized by an ERM fungus. The findings from this study will shed light on the mechanisms underlying symbiotic relationships of ericaceous species with ERM fungi and the symbiosis-resultant N uptake and plant growth.

  16. Impact of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus versus a mixed microbial inoculum on the transcriptome reprogramming of grapevine roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Salvioli, Alessandra; Dal Molin, Alessandra; Novero, Mara; Gabelli, Giovanni; Paparelli, Eleonora; Marroni, Fabio; Bonfante, Paola

    2017-07-01

    Grapevine, cultivated for both fruit and beverage production, represents one of the most economically important fruit crops worldwide. With the aim of better understanding how grape roots respond to beneficial microbes, a transcriptome sequencing experiment has been performed to evaluate the impact of a single arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal species (Funneliformis mosseae) versus a mixed inoculum containing a bacterial and fungal consortium, including different AM species, on Richter 110 rootstock. Results showed that the impact of a single AM fungus and of a complex microbial inoculum on the grapevine transcriptome differed. After 3 months, roots exclusively were colonized after the F. mosseae treatment and several AM marker genes were found to be upregulated. The mixed inoculum led only to traces of colonization by AM fungi, but elicited an important transcriptional regulation. Additionally, the expression of genes belonging to categories such as nutrient transport, transcription factors, and cell wall-related genes was significantly altered in both treatments, but the exact genes affected differed in the two conditions. These findings advance our understanding about the impact of soil beneficial microbes on the root system of a woody plant, also offering the basis for novel approaches in grapevine cultivation.

  17. Spores of the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae host yeasts that solubilize phosphate and accumulate polyphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabal Alonso, Loreli; Kleiner, Diethelm; Ortega, Eduardo

    2008-04-01

    The present paper reports the presence of bacteria and yeasts tightly associated with spores of an isolate of Glomus mosseae. Healthy spores were surface disinfected by combining chloramine-T 5%, Tween-40, and cephalexin 2.5 g L(-1) (CTCf). Macerates of these spores were incubated on agar media, microorganisms were isolated, and two yeasts were characterized (EndoGm1, EndoGm11). Both yeasts were able to solubilize low-soluble P sources (Ca and Fe phosphates) and accumulate polyphosphates (polyPs). Sequence analysis of 18S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid showed that the yeasts belong to the genera Rhodotorula or Rhodosporidium (EndoGm1) and Cryptococcus (EndoGm11). Results from inoculation experiments showed an effect of the spore-associated yeasts on the root growth of rice, suggesting potential tripartite interactions with mycorrhizal fungi and plants.

  18. Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus (AMF) on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Magdalena; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil contamination in the vicinities of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites is a worldwide known environmental issue. The pollutants, in form of iron-cyanide complexes, originating from the gas purification process, create a risk for human health due to potential release of toxic free cyanide, CN(aq) and HCN(g), (aq).The management and remediation of cyanide contaminated soil can be very challenging due to the complex chemistry and toxicity of CN compounds. The employment of phytoremediation to remove or stabilize contaminants at a former MGP site is an inexpensive process, but can be limited through shallow rotting, decreased biomass, poor growing and the risk of secondary accumulation. However, this adaptation may be enhanced via arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) activity, which may cooperate on the degradation, transformation or uptake of the contaminants. We would like to present our preliminary results from the ongoing project concerning toxic substrate-AMF-plant relation, based on studying the site of a former MGP site. In situ experiments contributed to identifying those fungi that are likely to persist in extremely acidic and toxic conditions. Subsequently, commercially available Rhizophagus irregularis was grown in sterilized, un-spiked soil with the roots of the host plant Calamagrostis epigejos. Extracted roots and AMF hyphae were used in the batch experiment, were the potential of this association on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes, in form of potassium ferrocyanide solution, was assessed.

  19. Production of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus inoculum in aeroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, L L; Sylvia, D M

    1988-02-01

    Bahia grass (Paspalum notatum) and industrial sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) colonized by Glomus deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices were grown in aeroponic cultures. After 12 to 14 weeks, all roots were colonized by the inoculated vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Abundant vesicles and arbuscules formed in the roots, and profuse sporulation was detected intra-and extraradically. Within each fungal species, industrial sweet potato contained significantly more roots and spores per plant than bahia grass did, although the percent root colonization was similar for both hosts. Mean percent root colonization and sporulation per centimeter of colonized root generally increased with time, although with some treatments colonization declined by week 14. Spore production ranged from 4 spores per cm of colonized root for G. etunicatum to 51 spores per cm for G. intraradices. Infectivity trials with root inocula resulted in a mean of 38, 45, and 28% of bahia grass roots colonized by G. deserticola, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices, respectively. The germination rate of G. etunicatum spores produced in soil was significantly higher than that produced in aeroponic cultures (64% versus 46%) after a 2-week incubation at 28 degrees C. However, infectivity studies comparing G. etunicatum spores from soil and aeroponic culture indicated no biological differences between the spore sources. Aeroponically produced G. deserticola and G. etunicatum inocula retained their infectivity after cold storage (4 degrees C) in either sterile water or moist vermiculite for at least 4 and 9 months, respectively.

  20. The Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Funneliformis mosseae Alters Bacterial Communities in Subtropical Forest Soils during Litter Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Gui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial communities and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF co-occur in the soil, however, the interaction between these two groups during litter decomposition remains largely unexplored. In order to investigate the effect of AMF on soil bacterial communities, we designed dual compartment microcosms, where AMF (Funneliformis mosseae was allowed access (AM to, or excluded (NM from, a compartment containing forest soil and litterbags. Soil samples from this compartment were analyzed at 0, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days. For each sample, Illumina sequencing was used to assess any changes in the soil bacterial communities. We found that most of the obtained operational taxonomic units (OTUs from both treatments belonged to the phylum of Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria. The community composition of bacteria at phylum and class levels was slightly influenced by both time and AMF. In addition, time and AMF significantly affected bacterial genera (e.g., Candidatus Solibacter, Dyella, Phenylobacterium involved in litter decomposition. Opposite to the bacterial community composition, we found that overall soil bacterial OTU richness and diversity are relatively stable and were not significantly influenced by either time or AMF inoculation. OTU richness at phylum and class levels also showed consistent results with overall bacterial OTU richness. Our study provides new insight into the influence of AMF on soil bacterial communities at the genus level.

  1. Lack of global population genetic differentiation in thearbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae suggestsa recent range expansion which may have coincided withthe spread of agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren; McGee, Peter; Morton, Joseph B

    2009-01-01

    ; second, the distribution is a result of human-mediated dispersal related to agriculture and finally, the morphologically defined species may encompass several local endemic species. To test these hypotheses, three genes were sequenced from 82 isolates of G. mosseae originating from six continents......The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae is commonly found in agricultural fields. The cosmopolitan species is found in Africa, Europe, America, Asia and Australia. Three hypotheses may explain this worldwide distribution: First, speciation occurred before the continents separated 120 Ma...

  2. Phosphorus effects on the mycelium and storage structures of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus as studied in the soil and roots by analysis of fatty acid signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, P.A.; Bååth, E.; Jakobsen, I.

    1997-01-01

    The distribution of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus between soil and roots, and between mycelial and storage structures, was studied by use of the fatty acid signature 16:1 omega 5. Increasing the soil phosphorus level resulted in a decrease in the level of the fatty acid 16:1 omega 5...... in the soil and roots. A similar decrease was detected by microscopic measurements of root colonization and of the length of AM fungal hyphae in the soil. The fatty acid 16:1 omega 5 was estimated from two types of lipids, phospholipids and neutral lipids, which mainly represent membrane lipids and storage...... lipids, respectively. The numbers of spores of the AM fungus formed in the soil correlated most closely, with neutral lipid fatty acid 16:1 omega 5, whereas the hyphal length in the soil correlated most closely with phospholipid fatty acid 16:1 omega 5. The fungal neutral lipid/phospholipid ratio...

  3. Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis in the mycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, B I; Alvarez Crespo, M C; Kemppainen, M J; Pardo, A G

    2017-05-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer (AMT) is extensively employed as a tool in fungal functional genomics and accordingly, in previous studies we used AMT on a dikaryotic strain of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The interest in this fungus derives from its capacity to establish a symbiosis with tree roots, thereby playing a major role in nutrient cycling of forest ecosystems. The ectomycorrhizal symbiosis is a highly complex interaction involving many genes from both partners. To advance in the functional characterization of fungal genes, AMT was used on a monokaryotic L. bicolor. A collection of over 1200 transgenic strains was produced, of which 200 randomly selected strains were analyzed for their genomic T-DNA insertion patterns. By means of insertional mutagenesis, a number of transgenic strains were obtained displaying differential growth features. Moreover, mating with a compatible strain resulted in dikaryons that retained altered phenotypic features of the transgenic monokaryon. The analysis of the T-DNA integration pattern revealed mostly similar results to those reported in earlier studies, confirming the usefulness of AMT on different genetic backgrounds of L. bicolor. Taken together, our studies display the great versatility and potentiality of AMT as a tool for the genetic characterization of L. bicolor.

  4. Plant-fungus competition for nitrogen erases mycorrhizal growth benefits of Andropogon gerardii under limited nitrogen supply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Hujslová, M.; Slavíková, R.; Gryndlerová, H.; Jansa, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 13 (2016), s. 4332-4346 ISSN 2045-7758 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * nutrient uptake response * mycorrhizal benefits and costs Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.440, year: 2016

  5. Interactions between the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices and nontransformed tomato roots of either wild-type or AM-defective phenotypes in monoxenic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bago, Alberto; Cano, Custodia; Toussaint, Jean-Patrick; Smith, Sally; Dickson, Sandy

    2006-09-01

    Monoxenic symbioses between the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices and two nontransformed tomato root organ cultures (ROCs) were established. Wild-type tomato ROC from cultivar "RioGrande 76R" was employed as a control for mycorrhizal colonization and compared with its mutant line (rmc), which exhibits a highly reduced mycorrhizal colonization (rmc) phenotype. Structural features of the two root lines were similar when grown either in soil or under in vitro conditions, indicating that neither monoxenic culturing nor the rmc mutation affected root development or behavior. Colonization by G. intraradices in monoxenic culture of the wild-type line was low (<10%) but supported extensive development of extraradical mycelium, branched absorbing structures, and spores. The reduced colonization of rmc under monoxenic conditions (0.6%) was similar to that observed previously in soil. Extraradical development of runner hyphae was low and proportional to internal colonization. Few spores were produced. These results might suggest that carbon transfer may be modified in the rmc mutant. Our results support the usefulness of monoxenically obtained mycorrhizas for investigation of AM colonization and intraradical symbiotic functioning.

  6. An arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and Epichloë festucae var. lolii reduce Bipolaris sorokiniana disease incidence and improve perennial ryegrass growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Guo, Yan'e; Christensen, Michael J; Gao, Ping; Li, Yanzhong; Duan, Tingyu

    2018-02-01

    Leaf spot of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana is an important disease in temperate regions of the world. We designed this experiment to test for the combined effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Claroideoglomus etunicatum and the grass endophyte fungus Epichloë festucae var. lolii on growth and disease occurrence in perennial ryegrass. The results show that C. etunicatum increased plant P uptake and total dry weight and that this beneficial effect was slightly enhanced when in association with the grass endophyte. The presence in plants of both the endophyte and B. sorokiniana decreased AM fungal colonization. Plants inoculated with B. sorokiniana showed the typical leaf spot symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation and the lowest disease incidence was with plants that were host to both C. etunicatum and E. festucae var. lolii. Plants with these two fungi had much higher activity of peroxidases (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and lower values of malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The AM fungus C. etunicatum and the grass endophyte fungus E. festucae var. lolii have the potential to promote perennial ryegrass growth and resistance to B. sorokiniana leaf spot.

  7. Growth, respiration and nutrient acquisition by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae and its host plant Plantago lanceolata in cooled soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, T; Hodge, A; Fitter, A H

    2012-04-01

    Although plant phosphate uptake is reduced by low soil temperature, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are responsible for P uptake in many plants. We investigated growth and carbon allocation of the AM fungus Glomus mosseae and a host plant (Plantago lanceolata) under reduced soil temperature. Plants were grown in compartmented microcosm units to determine the impact on both fungus and roots of a constant 2.7 °C reduction in soil temperature for 16 d. C allocation was measured using two (13)CO(2) pulse labels. Although root growth was reduced by cooling, AM colonization, growth and respiration of the extraradical mycelium (ERM) and allocation of assimilated (13)C to the ERM were all unaffected; the frequency of arbuscules increased. In contrast, root respiration and (13)C content and plant P and Zn content were all reduced by cooling. Cooling had less effect on N and K, and none on Ca and Mg content. The AM fungus G. mosseae was more able to sustain activity in cooled soil than were the roots of P. lanceolata, and so enhanced plant P content under a realistic degree of soil cooling that reduced plant growth. AM fungi may therefore be an effective means to promote plant nutrition under low soil temperatures. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The In Vitro Mass-Produced Model Mycorrhizal Fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis, Significantly Increases Yields of the Globally Important Food Security Crop Cassava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, Isabel; Ruiz, Michael; Fernández, Cristhian; Peña, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is formed between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plant roots. The fungi provide the plant with inorganic phosphate (P). The symbiosis can result in increased plant growth. Although most global food crops naturally form this symbiosis, very few studies have shown that their practical application can lead to large-scale increases in food production. Application of AMF to crops in the tropics is potentially effective for improving yields. However, a main problem of using AMF on a large-scale is producing cheap inoculum in a clean sterile carrier and sufficiently concentrated to cheaply transport. Recently, mass-produced in vitro inoculum of the model mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis became available, potentially making its use viable in tropical agriculture. One of the most globally important food plants in the tropics is cassava. We evaluated the effect of in vitro mass-produced R. irregularis inoculum on the yield of cassava crops at two locations in Colombia. A significant effect of R. irregularis inoculation on yield occurred at both sites. At one site, yield increases were observed irrespective of P fertilization. At the other site, inoculation with AMF and 50% of the normally applied P gave the highest yield. Despite that AMF inoculation resulted in greater food production, economic analyses revealed that AMF inoculation did not give greater return on investment than with conventional cultivation. However, the amount of AMF inoculum used was double the recommended dose and was calculated with European, not Colombian, inoculum prices. R. irregularis can also be manipulated genetically in vitro, leading to improved plant growth. We conclude that application of in vitro R. irregularis is currently a way of increasing cassava yields, that there is a strong potential for it to be economically profitable and that there is enormous potential to improve this efficiency further in the future. PMID:23950975

  9. The in vitro mass-produced model mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis, significantly increases yields of the globally important food security crop cassava.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ceballos

    Full Text Available The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is formed between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and plant roots. The fungi provide the plant with inorganic phosphate (P. The symbiosis can result in increased plant growth. Although most global food crops naturally form this symbiosis, very few studies have shown that their practical application can lead to large-scale increases in food production. Application of AMF to crops in the tropics is potentially effective for improving yields. However, a main problem of using AMF on a large-scale is producing cheap inoculum in a clean sterile carrier and sufficiently concentrated to cheaply transport. Recently, mass-produced in vitro inoculum of the model mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis became available, potentially making its use viable in tropical agriculture. One of the most globally important food plants in the tropics is cassava. We evaluated the effect of in vitro mass-produced R. irregularis inoculum on the yield of cassava crops at two locations in Colombia. A significant effect of R. irregularis inoculation on yield occurred at both sites. At one site, yield increases were observed irrespective of P fertilization. At the other site, inoculation with AMF and 50% of the normally applied P gave the highest yield. Despite that AMF inoculation resulted in greater food production, economic analyses revealed that AMF inoculation did not give greater return on investment than with conventional cultivation. However, the amount of AMF inoculum used was double the recommended dose and was calculated with European, not Colombian, inoculum prices. R. irregularis can also be manipulated genetically in vitro, leading to improved plant growth. We conclude that application of in vitro R. irregularis is currently a way of increasing cassava yields, that there is a strong potential for it to be economically profitable and that there is enormous potential to improve this efficiency further in the future.

  10. Conserved Proteins of the RNA Interference System in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare Provide New Insight into the Evolutionary History of Glomeromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Jae; Kong, Mengxuan; Harrison, Paul; Hijri, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is an important mechanism in the evolution of many living organisms particularly in Prokaryotes where genes are frequently dispersed between taxa. Although, HGT has been reported in Eukaryotes, its accumulative effect and its frequency has been questioned. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are an early diverged fungal lineage belonging to phylum Glomeromycota, whose phylogenetic position is still under debate. The history of AMF and land plant symbiosis dates back to at least 460 Ma. However, Glomeromycota are estimated to have emerged much earlier than land plants. In this study, we surveyed genomic and transcriptomic data of the model arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare (synonym Rhizophagus irregularis) and its relatives to search for evidence of HGT that occurred during AMF evolution. Surprisingly, we found a signature of putative HGT of class I ribonuclease III protein-coding genes that occurred from autotrophic cyanobacteria genomes to R. irregulare. At least one of two HGTs was conserved among AMF species with high levels of sequence similarity. Previously, an example of intimate symbiosis between AM fungus and cyanobacteria was reported in the literature. Ribonuclease III family enzymes are important in small RNA regulation in Fungi together with two additional core proteins (Argonaute/piwi and RdRP). The eukaryotic RNA interference system found in AMF was conserved and showed homology with high sequence similarity in Mucoromycotina, a group of fungi closely related to Glomeromycota. Prior to this analysis, class I ribonuclease III has not been identified in any eukaryotes. Our results indicate that a unique acquisition of class I ribonuclease III in AMF is due to a HGT event that occurred from cyanobacteria to Glomeromycota, at the latest before the divergence of the two Glomeromycota orders Diversisporales and Glomerales. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society

  11. Effect of Mycorrhizal Fungus (Glomus spp on Wheat (Triticumaestivum Yield and Yield Components with Regard to Irrigation Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Decrease in water quality affected by salinization of the water resources due to the drought is one of the limiting factors of plant production. Using mycorrhizal fungi is an important approach to deal with damaging effects during stress conditions. The symbiosis of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM with the host plant and hence, the production of a very extensive network of hypha, enhances nutrient acquisition and improves water uptake in the host plant. The specialized network of hypha raises the uptake and translocation of nutrients to the plant, whereas it inhibits high uptake of Na and Cl and their transport to plant shoots compared with plant roots. Hence, AM can alleviate the stress of salinity on plant growth and increases their tolerance to the stresses. Materials and Methods In order to evaluate the influence of mycorrhizal fungi on yield and yield components of wheat, a greenhouse experiment was conducted in research farm of Shahid Chamran Ahvaz University. Experimental design was a randomized complete block design arranged in split factorial with three replications. The factors were water salinity (water quality including filtered water (EC ≥ 1 dS m-1, tap water (EC = 1/7-3 ds m-1, tap water plus NaCl and filtered water plus NaCl (EC = 8 ds m-1. Soil sterilization included sterilized and non-sterilized soil and mycorrhizal inoculation were in five levels (non-inoculated, inoculated with ‌Glomusmosseae, G. intraradices, G. geosporum and mixture of them. Yield and yield components were measured at crop maturity and colonization percentage of root was determined at flowering stage. Root colonization by AM was determined through preparing root samples at 1 g in each experimental unit, and roots were stained using the Gridline- Intersect Method. The harvest index and mycorrhizal dependency were also measured. Salinity levels determined approximate the threshold of wheat –tolerate- salinity before the results would rather

  12. Plant-fungus competition for nitrogen erases mycorrhizal growth benefits of Andropogon gerardii under limited nitrogen supply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Hujslová, Martina; Slavíková, Renata; Gryndlerová, Hana; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 13 (2016), s. 4332-4346 ISSN 2045-7758 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * belowground carbon drain * inoculation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.440, year: 2016

  13. Strigolactone-Induced Putative Secreted Protein 1 Is Required for the Establishment of Symbiosis by the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Handa, Yoshihiro; Takeda, Naoya; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2016-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is the most widespread association between plants and fungi. To provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of AM symbiosis, we screened and investigated genes of the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis that contribute to the infection of host plants. R. irregularis genes involved in the infection were explored by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis. One of the identified genes was then characterized by a reverse genetic approach using host-induced gene silencing (HIGS), which causes RNA interference in the fungus via the host plant. The RNA-seq analysis revealed that 19 genes are up-regulated by both treatment with strigolactone (SL) (a plant symbiotic signal) and symbiosis. Eleven of the 19 genes were predicted to encode secreted proteins and, of these, SL-induced putative secreted protein 1 (SIS1) showed the largest induction under both conditions. In hairy roots of Medicago truncatula, SIS1 expression is knocked down by HIGS, resulting in significant suppression of colonization and formation of stunted arbuscules. These results suggest that SIS1 is a putative secreted protein that is induced in a wide spatiotemporal range including both the presymbiotic and symbiotic stages and that SIS1 positively regulates colonization of host plants by R. irregularis.

  14. A Native Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus, Acaulospora scrobiculata Stimulated Growth of Mongolian Crested Wheatgrass ( Agropyron cristatum (L. Gaertn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burenjargal Otgonsuren

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Agr opyron cristatum (L. Gaertn. (crested wheatgrass is an endemic plant species, which dominates most area of the Mongolian steppe and forest steppe. In the present study, spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the rhizosphere soil of crested wheatgrass were isolated with wet- sieving/decanting methods, and the major species was identifi ed as Acaulospora scrobiculata Trappe. For arbuscular-mycorrhizal resynthesis, the spores of A. scrobiculata were propagated with corn pot-culture technique and inoculated onto the roots of crested wheatgrass seedlings. The inoculated crested wheatgrass seedlings exhibited vigor in growth, and examination of the root structure revealed the occurrence of arbuscules and vesicles in the cortical cells. These results demonstrated that A. scrobiculata could effectively form arbuscular mycorrhizas with crested wheatgrass and promote its growth, which can be used to restore Mongolian grassland.

  15. Influence of substrate and mycorrhizal fungus on the root and shoot architecture of coffee-shading walnut (Cordia alliodora [Ruiz et Pav.] Oken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez Pérez Loyla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Cordia alliodora (coffee-shading walnut is a species of economic importance to Colombia because of its multiple uses for farmers and for reforestation as a timber and industrial resources, mainly in the central coffee region of the country. The aim of this research was to study parameters of C. alliodora shoot and root system architecture over the first year of development. Plants were established in Pacho municipality (Cundinamarca at an 2,150 m a.s.l. A split plot design with a randomized complete block and three replicates was applied. Within the main plot, we evaluated the substrates (soil, husk and compost 2:1:1; soil and husk 3:2; soil and husk 3:1, and withing the subplot, the mycorrhizal fungus (without fungus, Kuklospora colombiana, Glomus manihotis and Acaulospora lacunosa. Substrate type affected C. alliodora root and shoot architectural parameters. Plants transplanted into soil, husk and compost 2:1:1 had the best responses in architectural parameters: diameter of the base of the root (7.82 mm, number of secondary roots (48.4, root dry weight (5.38 g, number of leaves (47.33, dry weight of shoots (7.71 g, shoot length (72.64 g and leaf dry weight (6.28 g at 384 days after transplant. Since no fertilizer was applied to coffee-shading walnut plants, we conclude that the mycorrhizal fungi facilitated a better use and development of mineral elements present in the substrates.

  16. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Enhances Lateral Root Formation in Poncirus trifoliata (L.) as Revealed by RNA-Seq Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weili; Li, Juan; Zhu, Honghui; Xu, Pengyang; Chen, Jiezhong; Yao, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) establish symbiosis with most terrestrial plants, and greatly regulate lateral root (LR) formation. Phosphorus (P), sugar, and plant hormones are proposed being involved in this regulation, however, no global evidence regarding these factors is available so far, especially in woody plants. In this study, we inoculated trifoliate orange seedlings ( Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf) with an AMF isolate, Rhizophagus irregularis BGC JX04B. After 4 months of growth, LR formation was characterized, and sugar contents in roots were determined. RNA-Seq analysis was performed to obtain the transcriptomes of LR root tips from non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal seedlings. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) of selected genes was also conducted for validation. The results showed that AMF significantly increased LR number, as well as plant biomass and shoot P concentration. The contents of glucose and fructose in primary root, and sucrose content in LR were also increased. A total of 909 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in response to AMF inoculation, and qRT-PCR validated the transcriptomic data. The numbers of DEGs related to P, sugar, and plant hormones were 31, 32, and 25, respectively. For P metabolism, the most up-regulated DEGs mainly encoded phosphate transporter, and the most down-regulated DEGs encoded acid phosphatase. For sugar metabolism, the most up-regulated DEGs encoded polygalacturonase and chitinase. For plant hormones, the most up-regulated DEGs were related to auxin signaling, and the most down-regulated DEGs were related to ethylene signaling. PLS-SEM analysis indicates that P metabolism was the most important pathway by which AMF regulates LR formation in this study. These data reveal the changes of genome-wide gene expression in responses to AMF inoculation in trifoliate orange and provide a solid basis for the future identification and characterization of key genes involved in LR formation induced by AMF.

  17. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae gives contradictory effects on phosphorus and arsenic acquisition by Medicago sativa Linn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Xiao Xueyi [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Sciences/State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: ygzhu@rcees.ac.en; Smith, F. Andrew [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia); Miao Xie, Z. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Smith, Sally E. [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, South Australia 5005 (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi may play an important role in protecting plants against arsenic (As) contamination. However, little is known about the direct and indirect involvement of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in detoxification mechanisms. A compartmented pot cultivation system ('cross-pots') is used here to investigate the roles of AMF Glomus mosseae in plant phosphorus (P) and As acquisition by Medicago sativa, and P-As interactions. The results indicate that fungal colonization dramatically increased plant dry weight by a factor of around 6, and also substantially increased both plant P and As contents (i.e. total uptake). Irrespective of P and As addition levels, AM plants had shoot and root P concentrations 2 fold higher, but As concentrations significantly lower, than corresponding uninoculated controls. The decreased shoot As concentrations were largely due to 'dilution effects' that resulted from stimulated growth of AM plants and reduced As partitioning to shoots. The study provides further evidence for the protective effects of AMF on host plants against As contamination, and have uncovered key aspects of underlying mechanisms. The possible application of AMF in remediation practices is discussed.

  18. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae gives contradictory effects on phosphorus and arsenic acquisition by Medicago sativa Linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baodong; Xiao Xueyi; Zhu Yongguan; Smith, F. Andrew; Miao Xie, Z.; Smith, Sally E.

    2007-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi may play an important role in protecting plants against arsenic (As) contamination. However, little is known about the direct and indirect involvement of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in detoxification mechanisms. A compartmented pot cultivation system ('cross-pots') is used here to investigate the roles of AMF Glomus mosseae in plant phosphorus (P) and As acquisition by Medicago sativa, and P-As interactions. The results indicate that fungal colonization dramatically increased plant dry weight by a factor of around 6, and also substantially increased both plant P and As contents (i.e. total uptake). Irrespective of P and As addition levels, AM plants had shoot and root P concentrations 2 fold higher, but As concentrations significantly lower, than corresponding uninoculated controls. The decreased shoot As concentrations were largely due to 'dilution effects' that resulted from stimulated growth of AM plants and reduced As partitioning to shoots. The study provides further evidence for the protective effects of AMF on host plants against As contamination, and have uncovered key aspects of underlying mechanisms. The possible application of AMF in remediation practices is discussed

  19. Low concentration of copper inhibits colonization of soil by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices and radically changes the microbial community structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagerberg, David; Manique, Nina; Brandt, Kristian K.

    2011-01-01

    . To avoid indirect effects through the plant, copper was only added to root-free microcosm compartments. [Cu]bio was measured using a Pseudomonas fluorescens biosensor strain. In the range of 0–1.5 μg g−1 [Cu]bio, a log–log linear relationship between added copper and [Cu]bio was found. Microbial...... colonization of the root-free compartment was evaluated by whole-cell fatty acid analysis (WCFA) and amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). The WCFA analysis showed that the AM fungus soil colonization was severely inhibited by Cu with a 50% reduction of mycorrhizal growth at 0.26 μg g−1 [Cu......]bio. The growth of other main microbial groups was not significantly affected by copper. However, ARDRA analysis showed a very strong effect of copper on the bacterial community composition probably caused by an increased proportion of Cu-resistant bacteria. Our results suggest that problems with plant yield may...

  20. Common and metal-specific proteomic responses to cadmium and zinc in the metal tolerant ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius Zn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapello, M; Martino, E; Perotto, S

    2015-05-01

    Although adaptive metal tolerance may arise in fungal populations in polluted soils, the mechanisms underlying metal-specific tolerance are poorly understood. Comparative proteomics is a powerful tool to identify variation in protein profiles caused by changing environmental conditions, and was used to investigate protein accumulation in a metal tolerant isolate of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius exposed to zinc and cadmium. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and shotgun proteomics followed by mass spectrometry lead to the identification of common and metal-specific proteins and pathways. Proteins selectively induced by cadmium exposure were molecular chaperons of the Hsp90 family, cytoskeletal proteins and components of the translation machinery. Zinc significantly up-regulated metabolic pathways related to energy production and carbohydrates metabolism, likely mirroring zinc adaptation of this fungal isolate. Common proteins induced by the two metal ions were the antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and ubiquitin. In mycelia exposed to zinc and cadmium, both proteomic techniques also identified agmatinase, an enzyme involved in polyamine biosynthesis. This novel finding suggests that, like plants, polyamines may have important functions in response to abiotic environmental stress in fungi. Genetic evidence also suggests that the biosynthesis of polyamines via an alternative metabolic pathway may be widespread in fungi.

  1. Evaluating the antimicrobial, apoptotic, and cancer cell gene delivery properties of protein-capped gold nanoparticles synthesized from the edible mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma crassum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arpita; Ray, Sarmishtha; Chowdhury, Supriyo; Sarkar, Arnab; Mandal, Deba Prasad; Bhattacharjee, Shamee; Kundu, Surekha

    2018-05-01

    Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles of distinct geometric shapes with highly functional protein coats without additional capping steps is rarely reported. This study describes green synthesis of protein-coated gold nanoparticles for the first time from the edible, mycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma crassum (Berk.) Sacc . The nanoparticles were of the size range 5-25 nm and of different shapes. Spectroscopic analysis showed red shift of the absorption maxima with longer reaction period during production and blue shift with increase in pH. These were characterized with spectroscopy, SEM, TEM, AFM, XRD, and DLS. The particle size could be altered by changing synthesis parameters. These had potent antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, and multi-drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. These also had inhibitory effect on the growth kinetics of bacteria and germination of fungal spores. These showed apoptotic properties on eukaryotic cells when tested with comet assays. Moreover, the particles are capped with a natural 40 kDa protein which was utilized as attachment sites for genes to be delivered into sarcoma cancer cells. The present work also attempted at optimizing safe dosage of these nanoparticles using hemolysis assays, for application in therapy. Large-scale production of the nanoparticles in fermentors and other possible applications of the particles have been discussed.

  2. Inoculation of Mimosa latispinosa Lam with the Commercial Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198, and Bradyrhizobium spp. Under Nursery Production Conditions in South-East Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarasin, G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Qit Madagascar Minerals (QMM has planned several actions to reduce the environmental footprint of its mining project located near the city of Fort-Dauphin (Madagascar. One of these actions is the reclamation of a portion of its mined sites. Different symbiotic strains were tested as bio-enhancers for the ecological restoration using Mimosa latispinosa Lam, a native and pioneer shrub. The symbiotic strains tested in nursery were the commercial strain of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM197198, and two local strains of Bradyrhizobium spp., STM1415 and STM1447, inoculated alone or dually with the arbuscular mycorrhiza. Treatments did not significantly increase the plant height and dry mass. However, plants grown in tyndallized soil had better growth than those in unsterilized soil. Results obtained twenty weeks after inoculation suggest that soil tyndallization (heating at 100°C and at atmospheric pressure of 700 kPa during three hours is an effective method for nursery production of high quality seedlings of M. latispinosa.

  3. Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

  4. Hyphal N transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus associated with cucumber grown at three nitrogen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    colonization at all three levels of N supply, but this effect was strongest in plants of low N status. The results indicated that this increase was due partly to the improved inflow of N via the external hyphae. Root colonization by G. intraradices was unaffected by the amount of N supplied to the RC, while...... hyphal length increased in HC(A) compared to HC(B). Although a considerable N-15 content was detected in mycorrhizal roots adjacent to HC(B), only insignificant amounts of N-15 were found in the external hyphae in HC(B). The external hyphae depleted the soil of inorganic N in both HC(A) and HC(B), while...

  5. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Species Dependency Governs Better Plant Physiological Characteristics and Leaf Quality of Mulberry (Morus alba L.) Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Song-Mei; Chen, Ke; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Bei; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Xian-Zhi; Liu, Gui-Xi; Zhu, Li-Quan; He, Xin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the synergic interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and its host mulberry (Morus alba L.), an important perennial multipurpose plant, has theoretical and practical significance in mulberry plantation, silkworm cultivation, and relevant textile industry. In a greenhouse study, we compared functional distinctions of three genetically different AMF species (Acaulospora scrobiculata, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices) on physiological and growth characteristics as well as leaf quality of 6-month-old mulberry seedlings. Results showed that mulberry was AMF-species dependent, and AMF colonization significantly increased shoot height and taproot length, stem base and taproot diameter, leaf and fibrous root numbers, and shoot and root biomass production. Meanwhile, leaf chlorophyll a or b and carotenoid concentrations, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate and stomatal conductance were generally significantly greater, while intercellular CO2 concentration was significantly lower in AMF-inoculated seedlings than in non-AMF-inoculated counterparts. These trends were also generally true for leaf moisture, total nitrogen, all essential amino acids, histidine, proline, soluble protein, sugar, and fatty acid as they were significantly increased under mycorrhization. Among these three tested AMFs, significantly greater effects of AMF on above-mentioned mulberry physiological and growth characteristics ranked as F. mosseae > A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices, whilst on mulberry leaf quality (e.g., nutraceutical values) for better silkworm growth as F. mosseae ≈A. scrobiculata > R. intraradices. In conclusion, our results showed that greater mulberry biomass production, and nutritional quality varied with AMF species or was AMF-species dependent. Such improvements were mainly attributed to AMF-induced positive alterations of mulberry leaf photosynthetic pigments, net photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and N

  6. Beneficial contribution of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Rhizophagus irregularis, in the protection of Medicago truncatula roots against benzo[a]pyrene toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Ingrid; Fontaine, Joël; Tisserant, Benoît; Laruelle, Frédéric; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2017-07-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are able to improve plant establishment in polluted soils but little is known about the genes involved in the plant protection against pollutant toxicity by mycorrhization, in particular in the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). The present work aims at studying in both symbiotic partners, Medicago truncatula and Rhizophagus irregularis: (i) expression of genes putatively involved in PAH tolerance (MtSOD, MtPOX, MtAPX, MtGST, MtTFIIS, and MtTdp1α), (ii) activities of antioxidant (SOD, POX) and detoxification (GST) enzymes, and (iii) H 2 O 2 and the heavy PAH, benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) accumulation. In the presence of B[a]P, whereas induction of the enzymatic activities was detected in R. irregularis and non-mycorrhizal roots as well as upregulation of the gene expressions in the non-mycorrhizal roots, downregulation of the gene expressions and decrease of enzyme activities were observed in mycorrhizal roots. Moreover, B[a]P increased H 2 O 2 production in non-mycorrhizal roots and in R. irregularis but not in mycorrhizal roots. In addition, a lower B[a]P bioaccumulation in mycorrhizal roots was measured in comparison with non-mycorrhizal roots. Being less affected by pollutant toxicity, mycorrhizal roots did not activate any defense mechanism either at the gene expression regulation level or at the enzymatic level.

  7. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R.

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  8. Impact of PAHs on the development of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, G. Intraradices, on the colonization of chicory and carrot grown in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdin, A.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, A.; Fontaine, J.; Grandmougin-Ferjani, A.; Durand, R. [Universite du Littoral-Cote d' Opale, Lab. de Mycologie/Phytopathologie/Environnement, 62 - Calais (France)

    2005-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants found in many environments as result of the incomplete combustion of organic matter, and some of them are of great environmental concern due to their highly cytotoxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties for mammals. PAHs are thermodynamically stable and recalcitrant to microbial degradation, due to their aromatic nature and low aqueous solubility. Ecologically and economically speaking, plants have tremendous potential for bio-remediation of PAH-contaminated soils. The effect of plant roots on the dissipation of organic pollutants has mainly been attributed to an increase in microbial population and selection of specialized microbial communities in the rhizosphere, and also by improving physical and chemical soil conditions. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi living in symbiosis with plant roots play an essential role in plant nutrition and stress tolerance. AM plants are known to be involved in the biodegradation of pollutants such as PAHs. The role of AM fungi concerns two aspects: the improvement of the establishment and development of plants on polluted soil and the enhancement of PAHs degradation levels. AM colonization of different plant species is negatively affected when the plants are grown in contaminated soils. Nevertheless the AM colonization was shown to enhance plant survival and growth. Objectives of this work was to study the impact of PAHs on the development of G. intraradices and on the colonization of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) and carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Monoxenous root cultures have obvious advantages over traditional systems. This technique provides unique visualization of extra-radical fungus development and also allows an important production of extra-radical hyphae, spores and colonized roots free of any other microorganisms. These aspects are important to evaluate direct impact of PAHs on AM fungal

  9. Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae on growth and metal uptake by four plant species in copper mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, B.D.; Zhu, Y.-G.; Duan, J.; Xiao, X.Y.; Smith, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the potential role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in encouraging revegetation of copper (Cu) mine tailings. Two native plant species, Coreopsis drummondii and Pteris vittata, together with a turf grass, Lolium perenne and a leguminous plant Trifolium repens associated with and without AMF Glomus mosseae were grown in Cu mine tailings to assess mycorrhizal effects on plant growth, mineral nutrition and metal uptake. Results indicated that symbiotic associations were successfully established between G. mosseae and all plants tested, and mycorrhizal colonization markedly increased plant dry matter yield except for L. perenne. The beneficial impacts of mycorrhizal colonization on plant growth could be largely explained by both improved P nutrition and decreased shoot Cu, As and Cd concentrations. The experiment provided evidence for the potential use of local plant species in combination with AMF for ecological restoration of metalliferous mine tailings. - This study demonstrated that AM associations can encourage plant survival in Cu mine tailings

  10. Nursery inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus viscosum and its effect on the growth and physiology of hybrid artichoke seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Campanelli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Most nurseries operating in Italy adopt high technologies and produce transplants that well suit and satisfy the grower’s need to produce high value crops. Mycorrhizas are discussed as a tool for improving and developing plant production in the nursery. Much research has been carried out on mycorrhizal symbiosis and we now know more about the symbiontic relationship between fungi and host plants. Plants receive numerous benefits from this symbiosis which are more macroscopic the earlier in the ontogenetic cycle this symbiosis is established. Therefore, it appears that the most effective period in which the inoculum should be made corresponds to the in-nursery growing stage. The earlier the plant is inoculated, the more evident the effect will be. In this study, several aspects related to the physiological foundations of arbuscular mycorrhiza in artichoke plants are presented. The main goal was to study the effects of mycorrhiza on the growth and physiological parameters of three hybrids of artichokes growing in the nursery. The experimental 3¥2 design included two treatments (with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and three hybrids of artichokes marketed by Nunhems (Opal F1, Madrigal F1, Concerto F1. Mycorrhizal plants have greater shoot length, leaf area, shoot and root fresh and dry mass, and root density. This also corresponded with increased photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance of mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal colonization improves relative water content and increases proline concentration in vegetal tissue. Inoculation produced the most beneficial effect on hybrid Madrigal F1 and on hybrid Opal F1; the best mycorrhizal affinity was enhanced when compared to hybrid Concerto F1. The results showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis stimulated the growth of inoculated seedlings providing a qualitatively good propagation material.

  11. Nursery inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus viscosum and its effect on the growth and physiology of hybrid artichoke seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Campanelli

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most nurseries operating in Italy adopt high technologies and produce transplants that well suit and satisfy the grower’s need to produce high value crops. Mycorrhizas are discussed as a tool for improving and developing plant production in the nursery. Much research has been carried out on mycorrhizal symbiosis and we now know more about the symbiontic relationship between fungi and host plants. Plants receive numerous benefits from this symbiosis which are more macroscopic the earlier in the ontogenetic cycle this symbiosis is established. Therefore, it appears that the most effective period in which the inoculum should be made corresponds to the in-nursery growing stage. The earlier the plant is inoculated, the more evident the effect will be. In this study, several aspects related to the physiological foundations of arbuscular mycorrhiza in artichoke plants are presented. The main goal was to study the effects of mycorrhiza on the growth and physiological parameters of three hybrids of artichokes growing in the nursery. The experimental 3¥2 design included two treatments (with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and three hybrids of artichokes marketed by Nunhems (Opal F1, Madrigal F1, Concerto F1. Mycorrhizal plants have greater shoot length, leaf area, shoot and root fresh and dry mass, and root density. This also corresponded with increased photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance of mycorrhizal plants. Mycorrhizal colonization improves relative water content and increases proline concentration in vegetal tissue. Inoculation produced the most beneficial effect on hybrid Madrigal F1 and on hybrid Opal F1; the best mycorrhizal affinity was enhanced when compared to hybrid Concerto F1. The results showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis stimulated the growth of inoculated seedlings providing a qualitatively good propagation material.

  12. Colonization of olive trees (Olea europaea L.) with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus sp. modified the glycolipids biosynthesis and resulted in accumulation of unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, Beligh; Attia, Faouzi; Tekaya, Meriem; Cheheb, Hechmi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonization on photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, the amount of phospholipids and glycolipids in the leaves of olive (Olea europaea L.) trees was investigated. After six months of growth, the rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, transpiration and stomatal conductance in mycorrhizal (M) plants was significantly higher than that of non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. The inoculation treatment increased the foliar P and Mg but not N. The amount of glycolipids in the leaves of M plants was significantly higher than that of NM plants. However, the amount of phospholipids in the leaves of M plants was not significantly different to that in the leaves of NM plants. Also, we observed a significant increase in the level of α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) in glycolipids of M plants. This work supports the view that increased glycolipids level in the leaves of M plants could be involved, at least in part, in the beneficial effects of mycorrhizal colonization on photosynthesis performance of olive trees. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the effect of AM fungi on the amount of glycolipids in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of EDDS chelate and inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices on the efficacy of lead phytoextraction by two tobacco clones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Pavlíková, D.; Macek, Tomáš; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2007), s. 163-173 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/02/0293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : fytostabilization * soil contamination * arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.810, year: 2007

  14. Genetic diversity and host plant preferences revealed by simple sequence repeat and mitochondrial markers in a population of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croll, D.; Wille, L.; Gamper, H.A.; Mathimaran, N.; Lammers, P.J.; Corradi, N.; Sanders, I.R.

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are important symbionts of plants that improve plant nutrient acquisition and promote plant diversity. Although within-species genetic differences among AMF have been shown to differentially affect plant growth, very little is actually known about the degree of

  15. Influence of host plants and soil diluents on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus propagation for on-farm inoculum production using leaf litter compost and agrowastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Claroideoglomus etunicatum NNT10, C. etunicatum PBT03 and Funneliformis mosseae RYA08) were propagated using different culture materials (sterile sandy soil by itself or mixed 1:1 (v/v) with clay-brick granules, rice husk charcoal, or vermiculite) and host plants (...

  16. Regulation of Plant Growth, Photosynthesis, Antioxidation and Osmosis by an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus in Watermelon Seedlings under Well-Watered and Drought Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yanling; Wang, Yongqi; Yang, Ruiping; Zheng, Junxian; Liu, Changming; Li, Hao; Ma, Jianxiang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress has become an increasingly serious environmental issue that influences the growth and production of watermelon. Previous studies found that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization improved the fruit yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of watermelon grown under water stress; however, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, the effects of Glomus versiforme symbiosis on the growth, physio-biochemical attributes, and stress-responsive gene expressions of watermelon seedlings grown under well-watered and drought conditions were investigated. The results showed that AM colonization did not significantly influence the shoot growth of watermelon seedlings under well-watered conditions but did promote root development irrespective of water treatment. Drought stress decreased the leaf relative water content and chlorophyll concentration, but to a lesser extent in the AM plants. Compared with the non-mycorrhizal seedlings, mycorrhizal plants had higher non-photochemical quenching values, which reduced the chloroplast ultrastructural damage in the mesophyll cells and thus maintained higher photosynthetic efficiency. Moreover, AM inoculation led to significant enhancements in the enzyme activities and gene expressions of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in watermelon leaves upon drought imposition. Consequently, AM plants exhibited lower accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and O2− compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Under drought stress, the soluble sugar and proline contents were significantly increased, and further enhancements were observed by pre-treating the drought-stressed plants with AM. Taken together, our findings indicate that mycorrhizal colonization enhances watermelon drought tolerance through a stronger root system, greater protection of photosynthetic apparatus, a more efficient antioxidant system and improved osmoregulation. This study contributes to advances

  17. Regulation of Plant Growth, Photosynthesis, Antioxidation and Osmosis by an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus in Watermelon Seedlings under Well-Watered and Drought Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yanling; Wang, Yongqi; Yang, Ruiping; Zheng, Junxian; Liu, Changming; Li, Hao; Ma, Jianxiang; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Chunhua; Zhang, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress has become an increasingly serious environmental issue that influences the growth and production of watermelon. Previous studies found that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization improved the fruit yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of watermelon grown under water stress; however, the exact mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, the effects of Glomus versiforme symbiosis on the growth, physio-biochemical attributes, and stress-responsive gene expressions of watermelon seedlings grown under well-watered and drought conditions were investigated. The results showed that AM colonization did not significantly influence the shoot growth of watermelon seedlings under well-watered conditions but did promote root development irrespective of water treatment. Drought stress decreased the leaf relative water content and chlorophyll concentration, but to a lesser extent in the AM plants. Compared with the non-mycorrhizal seedlings, mycorrhizal plants had higher non-photochemical quenching values, which reduced the chloroplast ultrastructural damage in the mesophyll cells and thus maintained higher photosynthetic efficiency. Moreover, AM inoculation led to significant enhancements in the enzyme activities and gene expressions of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and monodehydroascorbate reductase in watermelon leaves upon drought imposition. Consequently, AM plants exhibited lower accumulation of MDA, H2O2 and [Formula: see text] compared with non-mycorrhizal plants. Under drought stress, the soluble sugar and proline contents were significantly increased, and further enhancements were observed by pre-treating the drought-stressed plants with AM. Taken together, our findings indicate that mycorrhizal colonization enhances watermelon drought tolerance through a stronger root system, greater protection of photosynthetic apparatus, a more efficient antioxidant system and improved osmoregulation. This study contributes

  18. Diversity and classification of mycorrhizal associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundrett, Mark

    2004-08-01

    Most mycorrhizas are 'balanced' mutualistic associations in which the fungus and plant exchange commodities required for their growth and survival. Myco-heterotrophic plants have 'exploitative' mycorrhizas where transfer processes apparently benefit only plants. Exploitative associations are symbiotic (in the broad sense), but are not mutualistic. A new definition of mycorrhizas that encompasses all types of these associations while excluding other plant-fungus interactions is provided. This definition recognises the importance of nutrient transfer at an interface resulting from synchronised plant-fungus development. The diversity of interactions between mycorrhizal fungi and plants is considered. Mycorrhizal fungi also function as endophytes, necrotrophs and antagonists of host or non-host plants, with roles that vary during the lifespan of their associations. It is recommended that mycorrhizal associations are defined and classified primarily by anatomical criteria regulated by the host plant. A revised classification scheme for types and categories of mycorrhizal associations defined by these criteria is proposed. The main categories of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal associations (VAM) are 'linear' or 'coiling', and of ectomycorrhizal associations (ECM) are 'epidermal' or 'cortical'. Subcategories of coiling VAM and epidermal ECM occur in certain host plants. Fungus-controlled features result in 'morphotypes' within categories of VAM and ECM. Arbutoid and monotropoid associations should be considered subcategories of epidermal ECM and ectendomycorrhizas should be relegated to an ECM morphotype. Both arbuscules and vesicles define mycorrhizas formed by glomeromycotan fungi. A new classification scheme for categories, subcategories and morphotypes of mycorrhizal associations is provided.

  19. When the ribosomal DNA does not tell the truth: The case of the taxonomic position of Kurtia argillacea, an ericoid mycorrhizal fungus residing among Hymenochaetales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolařík, Miroslav; Vohník, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 1 (2018), s. 1-18 ISSN 1878-6146 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67985939 Keywords : Corticioid fungi * Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi * Heterotachy Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2016

  20. The mycorrhizal fungus (¤Glomus intraradices¤) affects microbial activity in the rhizosphere of pea plants (¤Pisum sativum¤)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wamberg, C.; Christensen, S.; Jakobsen, I.

    2003-01-01

    Pea plants were grown in gamma-irradiated soil in pots with and without addition of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices at sufficient N and limiting P. Depending on the growth phase of the plant presence of AM had negative or positive effect on rhizosphere activity. Before flowering during nutrient...... in the rhizosphere community during plant growth also supported by changes in the bacteria (DGGE). (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  1. Short-term chromium (VI) exposure increases phosphorus uptake by the extraradical mycelium of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cardeza, María Lourdes; Calonne-Salmon, Maryline; Gómez, Elena; Declerck, Stéphane

    2017-11-01

    Hexavalent chromium is a potent carcinogen, while phosphorus is an essential nutrient. The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the uptake of P is well known and was also reported, at low levels, for Cr. However, it is unclear whether the uptake of Cr can impact the short-term uptake dynamics of P since both elements have a similar chemical structure and may thus potentially compete with each other during the uptake process. This study investigated the impact of Cr(VI) on short-term P uptake by the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 in Medicago truncatula. Bi-compartmented Petri plates were used to spatially separate a root compartment (RC) from a hyphal compartment (HC) using a whole plant in vitro culture system. The HC was supplemented with Cr(VI). Chromium(VI) as well as total Cr and P were monitored during 16 h within the HC and their concentrations determined by the end of the experiment within roots and shoots. Our results indicated that the uptake and translocation of Cr from hyphae to roots was a fast process: roots in which the extraradical mycelium (ERM) was exposed to Cr(VI) accumulated more Cr than roots of which the ERM was not exposed to Cr(VI) or was dead. Our results further confirmed that dead ERM immobilized more Cr than alive ERM. Finally our results demonstrated that the short exposure to Cr(VI) was sufficient to stimulate P uptake by the ERM and that the stimulation process began within the first 4 h of exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Reducing Water Availability Impacts the Development of the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 and Its Ability to Take Up and Transport Phosphorus Under in Vitro Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Le Pioufle

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change scenarios predict a higher variability in rainfall and an increased risk of water deficits during summers for the coming decades. For this reason, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and their mitigating effects on drought stress in plants are increasingly considered in crop management. However, the impact of a decrease in water availability on the development of AMF and their ability to take up and transport inorganic phosphorus (Pi to their hosts remain poorly explored. Here, Medicago truncatula plantlets were grown in association with Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 in bi-compartmented Petri plates. The system consisted in associating the plant and AMF in a root compartment (RC, allowing only the hyphae to extend in a root-free hyphal compartment (HC. Water availability in the HC was then lowered by increasing the concentration of polyethylene glycol-8000 (PEG-8000 from 0 to 10, 25, and 50 g L-1 (corresponding to a slight decrease in water potential of -0.024, -0.025, -0.030, and -0.056 Mpa, respectively. Hyphal growth, spore production and germination were severely impaired at the lowest water availability. The dynamics of Pi uptake by the AMF was also impacted, although total Pi uptake evaluated after 24 h stayed unchanged. The percentage of metabolically active extraradical hyphae remained above 70%. Finally, at the lowest water availability, a higher P concentration was observed in the shoots of M. truncatula. At reduced water availability, the extraradical mycelium (ERM development was impacted, potentially limiting its capacity to explore a higher volume of soil. Pi uptake was slowed down but not prevented. The sensitivity of R. irregularis MUCL 41833 to a, even small, decrease in water availability contrasted with several studies reporting tolerance of AMF to drought. This suggests a species or strain-dependent effect and support the necessity to compare the impact of water availability on morpho-anatomy, nutrient

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reidinger, S.; Eschen, R.; Gange, A.C.; Finch, P.; Bezemer, T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF

  4. Native arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis alters foliar bacterial community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poosakkannu, Anbu; Nissinen, Riitta; Kytöviita, Minna-Maarit

    2017-11-01

    The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant-associated microbes are poorly known. We tested the hypothesis that colonization by an AM fungus affects microbial species richness and microbial community composition of host plant tissues. We grew the grass, Deschampsia flexuosa in a greenhouse with or without the native AM fungus, Claroideoglomus etunicatum. We divided clonally produced tillers into two parts: one inoculated with AM fungus spores and one without AM fungus inoculation (non-mycorrhizal, NM). We characterized bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal communities (internal transcribed spacer region) in surface-sterilized leaf and root plant compartments. AM fungus inoculation did not affect microbial species richness or diversity indices in leaves or roots, but the AM fungus inoculation significantly affected bacterial community composition in leaves. A total of three OTUs in leaves belonging to the phylum Firmicutes positively responded to the presence of the AM fungus in roots. Another six OTUs belonging to the Proteobacteria (Alpha, Beta, and Gamma) and Bacteroidetes were significantly more abundant in NM plants when compared to AM fungus-inoculated plants. Further, there was a significant correlation between plant dry weight and leaf microbial community compositional shift. Also, there was a significant correlation between leaf bacterial community compositional shift and foliar nitrogen content changes due to AM fungus inoculation. The results suggest that AM fungus colonization in roots has a profound effect on plant physiology that is reflected in leaf bacterial community composition.

  5. Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus intraradices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    leaves were maximum in P. Poae + G.I inoculated plants under water deficit condition. In the presence of ... Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are usually in contact ... plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the pathways of its ...

  6. Soil Solution Phosphorus Status and Mycorrhizal Dependency in Leucaena leucocephala†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Mitiku; Manjunath, Aswathanarayan

    1987-01-01

    A phosphorus sorption isotherm was used to establish concentrations of P in a soil solution ranging from 0.002 to 0.807 μg/ml. The influence of P concentration on the symbiotic interaction between the tropical tree legume Leucaena leucocephala and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum was evaluated in pot experiments. The level of mycorrhizal infection in Leucaena roots increased as the concentration of P was raised from 0.002 to 0.153 μg/ml. Higher levels of P depressed mycorrhizal infection, but the level of infection never declined below 50%. Periodic monitoring of P contents of Leucaena subleaflets indicated that significant mycorrhizal activity was detected as early as 17 days after planting, with the activity peaking 12 to 16 days thereafter. The highest level of mycorrhizal activity was associated with a soil solution P level of 0.021 μg/ml. Even though the mycorrhizal inoculation effect diminished as the concentration of P in the soil solution was increased, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased P uptake and dry-matter yield of Leucaena at all levels of soil solution P examined. The concentration of P required by nonmycorrhizal L. leucocephala for maximum yield was 27 to 38 times higher than that required by mycorrhizal L. leucocephala. The results illustrate the very high dependence of L. leucocephala on VAM fungi and the significance of optimizing soil solution phosphorus for enhancing the benefits of the VAM symbiosis. PMID:16347323

  7. Soil Solution Phosphorus Status and Mycorrhizal Dependency in Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, M; Manjunath, A

    1987-04-01

    A phosphorus sorption isotherm was used to establish concentrations of P in a soil solution ranging from 0.002 to 0.807 mug/ml. The influence of P concentration on the symbiotic interaction between the tropical tree legume Leucaena leucocephala and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus fasciculatum was evaluated in pot experiments. The level of mycorrhizal infection in Leucaena roots increased as the concentration of P was raised from 0.002 to 0.153 mug/ml. Higher levels of P depressed mycorrhizal infection, but the level of infection never declined below 50%. Periodic monitoring of P contents of Leucaena subleaflets indicated that significant mycorrhizal activity was detected as early as 17 days after planting, with the activity peaking 12 to 16 days thereafter. The highest level of mycorrhizal activity was associated with a soil solution P level of 0.021 mug/ml. Even though the mycorrhizal inoculation effect diminished as the concentration of P in the soil solution was increased, mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased P uptake and dry-matter yield of Leucaena at all levels of soil solution P examined. The concentration of P required by nonmycorrhizal L. leucocephala for maximum yield was 27 to 38 times higher than that required by mycorrhizal L. leucocephala. The results illustrate the very high dependence of L. leucocephala on VAM fungi and the significance of optimizing soil solution phosphorus for enhancing the benefits of the VAM symbiosis.

  8. Nitrogen isotope fractionation during N uptake via arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungi into grey alder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Peter F

    2016-10-20

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi affect plant nitrogen (N) dynamics. Plant N isotope patterns have been used to characterise the contribution of ECM fungi to plant N uptake. By quantifying and comparing the effects of an AM and an ECM fungus on growth, N uptake and isotopic composition of one host plant grown at different relative N supply levels, the aim of this study was to improve the mechanistic understanding of natural 15 N abundance patterns in mycorrhizal plants and their underlying causes. Grey alders were inoculated with one ECM fungus or one AM fungus or left non-mycorrhizal. Plants were grown under semi-hydroponic conditions and were supplied with three rates of relative N supply ranging from deficient to luxurious. Neither mycorrhizal fungus increased plant growth or N uptake. AM root colonisation had no effect on whole plant δ 15 N and decreased foliar δ 15 N only under N deficiency. The roots of these plants were 15 N-enriched. ECM root colonisation consistently decreased foliar and whole plant δ 15 N. It is concluded, that both mycorrhizal fungi contributed to plant N uptake into the shoot. Nitrogen isotope fractionation during N assimilation and transformations in fungal mycelia is suggested to have resulted in plants receiving 15 N-depleted N via the mycorrhizal uptake pathways. Negative mycorrhizal growth effects are explained by symbiotic resource trade on carbon and N and decreased direct plant N uptake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycorrhizal symbiosis increases growth, reproduction and recruitment of Abutilon theophrasti Medic. in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Margot R; Koide, Roger T; Shumway, Durland L

    1993-05-01

    We examined in the field the effect of the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorhizal symbiosis on the reproductive success of Abutilon theophrasti Medic., an early successional annual member of the Malvaceae. Mycorrhizal infection greatly enhanced vegetative growth, and flower, fruit and seed production, resulting in significantly greater recruitment the following year. In addition, the seeds produced by mycorrhizal plants were significantly larger and contained significantly more phosphorus than seeds from non-mycorrhizal plants, an effect which may improve offspring vigor. Infection by mycorrhizal fungi may thus contribute to the overall fitness of a host plant and strongly influence long-term plant population dynamics.

  10. Mycorrhizal association of some agroforestry tree species in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-05-05

    May 5, 2011 ... Key words: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, agroforestry tree species. INTRODUCTION ... plant growth hormones, protection of host roots from pathogens .... interactions between fungal strains and soil than between the fungus ... phosphorus and drought stress on the growth of Acacic nilotica and. Leucaena ...

  11. EFFECTS OF VARIOUS SOIL ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES ON THE OCCURRENCE, DISTRIBUTION AND EFFECTIVENESS OF VA MYCORRHIZAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. KHAN

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular - arbuscular (VA mycorrhizal fungi are geographically ubiquitous soil inhabitants and form universal symbiotic relationship with plants from every phylum. These fungi link host plants with host soils and their biota in the mycorrhizosphere and play an important role in plant health, productivity and soil structure. Although VA mycorrhizal fungi do not show any host specificity, there is increasing evidence that various climatic and edaphic environmental factors such as land use and management practices, physical, chemical and biological properties of host soils and host plant characteristics influence their occurrence, taxonomic distribution and effectiveness. The interaction of these factors with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (VAM is poorly understood except in a few cases. It is now very clear that VA mycorrhizal associations are ecologically significant factors that require more attention than previously accorded. This paper discusses the occurrence, distribution and significance of VAM in environmentally stressed soil conditions that limit plant growth such as drought, waterlogging and salinity.

  12. Metagenomic Analyses of the Viruses Detected in Mycorrhizal Fungi and Their Host Orchid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Hanako; Masuta, Chikara; Koda, Yasunori

    2018-01-01

    In nature, mycorrhizal association with soilborne fungi is indispensable for orchid families. Fungal structures from compatible endo-mycorrhizal fungi in orchid cells are digested in cells to be supplied to orchids as nutrition. Because orchid seeds lack the reserves for germination, they keep receiving nutrition through mycorrhizal formation from seed germination until shoots develop (leaves) and become photoautotrophic. Seeds of all orchid species surely geminate with the help of their own fungal partners, and this specific partnership has been acquired for a long evolutional history between orchids and fungi.We have studied the interactions between orchids and mycorrhizal fungi and recently conducted transcriptome analyses (RNAseq) by a next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach. It is possible that orchid RNA isolated form naturally grown plants is contaminated with RNAs derived from mycorrhizal fungi in the orchid cells. To avoid such contamination, we here prepared aseptically germinated orchid plants (i.e., fungus-free plants) together with a pure-cultured fungal isolate and field-growing orchid samples. In the cDNA library prepared from orchid and fungal tissues, we found that partitivirus-like sequences were common in an orchid and its mycorrhizal fungus. These partitivirus-like sequences were closely related by a phylogenetic analysis, suggesting that transmission of an ancestor virus between the two organisms occurred through the specific relation of the orchid and its associated fungus.

  13. Influence of silver and titanium nanoparticles on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and accumulation of radiocaesium in Helianthus annuus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubchak, S.; Ogar, A.; Mietelski, J. W.; Turnau, K.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus on 1 34Cs uptake by Helianthus annuus was studied in a pilot study under growth chamber conditions. Mycorrhizal plants took up five times more 1 34Cs (up to 250,000 Bq kg - 1 dry weight) than non mycorrhizal plants. Silver and titanium nanoparticles, supplied into the surface soil layer decreased both the mycorrhizal colonization and Cs uptake by mycorrhizal plants. The application of activated carbon attenuated the effect of nanoparticles and increased 1 34Cs uptake in the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (up to 400,000 Bq kg - 1 dry weight). The results underline the possible application of phyto remediation techniques based on mycorrhizas assisted plants in decontamination of both radionuclides and nanoparticles. (Author) 27 refs.

  14. Influence of silver and titanium nanoparticles on arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization and accumulation of radiocaesium in Helianthus annuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubchak, S.; Ogar, A.; Mietelski, J. W.; Turnau, K.

    2010-07-01

    The influence of albacore's mycorrhizal fungus on {sup 1}34Cs uptake by Helianthus annuus was studied in a pilot study under growth chamber conditions. Mycorrhizal plants took up five times more {sup 1}34Cs (up to 250,000 Bq kg{sup -}1 dry weight) than non mycorrhizal plants. Silver and titanium nanoparticles, supplied into the surface soil layer decreased both the mycorrhizal colonization and Cs uptake by mycorrhizal plants. The application of activated carbon attenuated the effect of nanoparticles and increased {sup 1}34Cs uptake in the presence of mycorrhizal fungi (up to 400,000 Bq kg{sup -}1 dry weight). The results underline the possible application of phyto remediation techniques based on mycorrhizas assisted plants in decontamination of both radionuclides and nanoparticles. (Author) 27 refs.

  15. Does co-inoculation of Lactuca serriola with endophytic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve plant growth in a polluted environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ważny, Rafał; Rozpądek, Piotr; Jędrzejczyk, Roman J; Śliwa, Marta; Stojakowska, Anna; Anielska, Teresa; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2018-04-01

    Phytoremediation of polluted sites can be improved by co-inoculation with mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi. In this study, the effects of single- and co-inoculation of Lactuca serriola with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Rhizoglomus intraradices, and endophytic fungi, Mucor sp. or Trichoderma asperellum, on plant growth, vitality, toxic metal accumulation, sesquiterpene lactone production and flavonoid concentration in the presence of toxic metals were evaluated. Inoculation with the AM fungus increased biomass yield of the plants grown on non-polluted and polluted substrate. Co-inoculation with the AM fungus and Mucor sp. resulted in increased biomass yield of plants cultivated on the polluted substrate, whereas co-inoculation with T. asperellum and the AM fungus increased plant biomass on the non-polluted substrate. In the presence of Mucor sp., mycorrhizal colonization and arbuscule richness were increased in the non-polluted substrate. Co-inoculation with the AM fungus and Mucor sp. increased Zn concentration in leaves and roots. The concentration of sesquiterpene lactones in plant leaves was decreased by AM fungus inoculation in both substrates. Despite enhanced host plant costs caused by maintaining symbiosis with numerous microorganisms, interaction of wild lettuce with both mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi was more beneficial than that with a single fungus. The study shows the potential of double inoculation in unfavourable environments, including agricultural areas and toxic metal-polluted areas.

  16. Common mycorrhizal networks and their effect on the bargaining power of the fungal partner in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücking, Heike; Mensah, Jerry A; Fellbaum, Carl R

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form mutualistic interactions with the majority of land plants, including some of the most important crop species. The fungus takes up nutrients from the soil, and transfers these nutrients to the mycorrhizal interface in the root, where these nutrients are exchanged against carbon from the host. AM fungi form extensive hyphal networks in the soil and connect with their network multiple host plants. These common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) play a critical role in the long-distance transport of nutrients through soil ecosystems and allow the exchange of signals between the interconnected plants. CMNs affect the survival, fitness, and competitiveness of the fungal and plant species that interact via these networks, but how the resource transport within these CMNs is controlled is largely unknown. We discuss the significance of CMNs for plant communities and for the bargaining power of the fungal partner in the AM symbiosis.

  17. OneVA Pharmacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The OneVA Pharmacy application design consists of 3 main components: VistA Medication Profile screen, Health Data Record Clinical Data Service (HDR/CDS), and OneVA...

  18. The Role of Mycorrhizal Fungi in Ecosystem Energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    do not pene- trate the stele . They are the main organ of exchange between the plant and the mycorrhizal fungus. Intercellular hyphae are in direct...processes. Energy flow through the grazing and detritus pathways involves bio - chemical transformation of photosynthate to cellular biomass within...seedlings. 3. Measurement of Annual Production of Aboveground Plant Production and Partitioning Between Stems, Needles, and Branches. Volumes of bio - mass

  19. [Effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth, nutrient uptake and synthesis of volatile oil in Schizonepeta tenuifolia briq].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G; Wang, H

    1991-03-01

    Inoculating Schizonepeta tenuifolia with VA mycorrhizal fungi can significantly improve the plant growth and uptake of P and S, and influence the absorption of K, Na, Fe, Mo, Mn, Zn, Co, Ba, Ni and Pb. It is interesting to note that VA mycorrhiza can also increase the synthesis of volatile oil in the shoots of S. tenuifolia. The efficiency of VA mycorrhiza varies with the fungal species.

  20. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Modulates Antioxidant Response and Ion Distribution in Salt-Stressed Elaeagnus angustifolia Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is a drought-resistant species. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is considered to be a bio-ameliorator of saline soils that can improve salinity tolerance in plants. The present study investigated the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the biomass, antioxidant enzyme activities, and root, stem, and leaf ion accumulation of E. angustifolia seedlings grown during salt stress conditions. Salt-stressed mycorrhizal seedlings produced greater root, stem, and leaf biomass than the uninoculated stressed seedlings. In addition, the seedlings colonized by R. irregularis showed notably higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX in the leaves of the mycorrhizal seedlings in response to salinity compared to those of the non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Mycorrhizal seedlings not only significantly increased their ability to acquire K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, but also maintained higher K+:Na+ ratios in the leaves and lower Ca2+:Mg2+ ratios than non-mycorrhizal seedlings during salt stress. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of E. angustifolia seedlings could be enhanced by R. irregularis. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis could be a promising method to restore and utilize salt-alkaline land in northern China.

  1. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Modulates Antioxidant Response and Ion Distribution in Salt-Stressed Elaeagnus angustifolia Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Sui, Xin; Fan, Xiao-Xu; Jia, Ting-Ting; Song, Fu-Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Elaeagnus angustifolia L. is a drought-resistant species. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis is considered to be a bio-ameliorator of saline soils that can improve salinity tolerance in plants. The present study investigated the effects of inoculation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis on the biomass, antioxidant enzyme activities, and root, stem, and leaf ion accumulation of E. angustifolia seedlings grown during salt stress conditions. Salt-stressed mycorrhizal seedlings produced greater root, stem, and leaf biomass than the uninoculated stressed seedlings. In addition, the seedlings colonized by R. irregularis showed notably higher activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in the leaves of the mycorrhizal seedlings in response to salinity compared to those of the non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Mycorrhizal seedlings not only significantly increased their ability to acquire K + , Ca 2+ , and Mg 2+ , but also maintained higher K + :Na + ratios in the leaves and lower Ca 2+ :Mg 2+ ratios than non-mycorrhizal seedlings during salt stress. These results suggest that the salt tolerance of E. angustifolia seedlings could be enhanced by R. irregularis. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis could be a promising method to restore and utilize salt-alkaline land in northern China.

  2. Response of mycorrhizal grapevine to Armillaria mellea inoculation: disease development and polyamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Nogales, A. (Amaia); Aguirreolea, J. (Jone); Santa-Maria, E. (Eva); Camprubi, A. (Amalia); Calvet, C. (Cinta)

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted with the vine rootstock Richter 110 (Vitis berlandieri Planch. x Vitis rupestris L.) in order to assess whether the colonisation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices (BEG 72) can delay the disease development in plants inoculated with the root-rot fungus Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr) Kummer, and to elucidate if the levels of polyamines (PAs) are modified in response to G. intraradices, A. mellea or by the dual infection. Four treatments were consi...

  3. Carbon and nitrogen metabolism in arbuscular mycorrhizal maize plants under low-temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xian-Can; Song, Feng-Bin; Liu, Fulai

    2015-01-01

    Effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus tortuosum on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism of Zea mays L. grown under low-temperature stress was investigated. Maize plants inoculated or not inoculated with AM fungus were grown in a growth chamber at 258C for 4 weeks...... temperature regimes. AM symbiosis modulated C metabolic enzymes, thereby inducing an accumulation of soluble sugars, which may have contributed to an increased tolerance to low temperature, and therefore higher Pn in maize plants....

  4. Dual Inoculation with Mycorrhizal and Saprotrophic Fungi Applicable in Sustainable Cultivation Improves the Yield and Nutritive Value of Onion

    OpenAIRE

    Albrechtova, Jana; Latr, Ales; Nedorost, Ludovit; Pokluda, Robert; Posta, Katalin; Vosatka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the use of dual microbial inoculation with mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi in onion cultivation to enhance yield while maintaining or improving the nutritional quality of onion bulbs. Treatments were two-factorial: (1) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF): the mix corresponding to fungal part of commercial product Symbivit (Glomus etunicatum, G. microaggregatum, G. intraradices, G. claroideum, G. mosseae, and G. geosporum) (M1) or the single-fungus inoculum ...

  5. Taking mycocentrism seriously: mycorrhizal fungal and plant responses to elevated CO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alberton, O.; Kuyper, T.W.; Gorissen, A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim here was to separately assess mycorrhizal fungal and plant responses under elevated atmospheric CO2, and to test a mycocentric model that assumes that increased carbon availability to the fungus will not automatically feed back to enhanced plant growth performance. Meta-analyses were applied

  6. 31P NMR for the study of P metabolism and translocation in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, N.; Lloyd, D.C.; Ratcliffe, R.G.

    2000-01-01

    spectra of excised AM fungi and mycorrhizal roots contained signals from polyphosphate (PolyP), which were absent in the spectra of nonmycorrhizal roots. This demonstrated that the P-i taken up by the fungus was transformed into PolyP with a short chain length. The spectra of excised AM fungi revealed...

  7. Stimulation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by mycotrophic and nonmycotrophic plant root systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, R P; Koide, R T

    1993-08-01

    Transformed root cultures of three nonmycotrophic and one mycotrophic plant species stimulated germination and hyphal growth of the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum (Becker & Gerd.) in a gel medium. However, only roots of the mycotrophic species (carrot) supported continued hyphal exploration after 3 to 4 weeks and promoted appressoria formation by G. etunicatum.

  8. Stimulation of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Mycotrophic and Nonmycotrophic Plant Root Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Schreiner, R. Paul; Koide, Roger T.

    1993-01-01

    Transformed root cultures of three nonmycotrophic and one mycotrophic plant species stimulated germination and hyphal growth of the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus etunicatum (Becker & Gerd.) in a gel medium. However, only roots of the mycotrophic species (carrot) supported continued hyphal exploration after 3 to 4 weeks and promoted appressoria formation by G. etunicatum.

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis induces strigolactone biosynthesis under drought and improves drought tolerance in lettuce and tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Lozano, J.M.; Aroca, R.; Zamarreno, A.M.; Molina, S.; Andreo Jimenez, B.; Porcel, R.; Garcia-Mina, J.M.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Lopez-Raez, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates drought stress in plants. However, the intimate mechanisms involved, as well as its effect on the production of signalling molecules associated with the host plant–AM fungus interaction remains largely unknown. In the present work, the effects of

  10. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    The roots of plants interact with soil mycorrhizal fungi to facilitate soil nutrient acquisition by the plant and carbon transfer to the fungus. Here we use tomato fruit ripening mutations to demonstrate that this root interaction communicates with and supports genetic mechanisms associated with th...

  11. Inoculation of fumigated nursery beds and containers with arbuscular mycorrhizal products for eastern redcedar production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle M. Cram; Stephen W. Fraedrich

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) products were applied at an operational rate to eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana L.) nursery beds and containers to evaluate seedling growth and colonization responses. A field study at the Augusta Forestry Center in Crimora, VA, and a companion container study were initiated in the fall of 2012. MycoApply® Endo...

  12. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta Calvet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72 and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5 media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment.

  13. Interactions of Heterodera glycines, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Mycorrhizal Fungi on Soybean in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H E; Hetrick, B A; Todd, T C

    1994-12-01

    The impact of naturally occurring arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on soybean growth and their interaction with Heterodera glycines were evaluated in nematode-infested and uninfested fields in Kansas. Ten soybean cultivars from Maturity Groups III-V with differential susceptibility to H. glycines were treated with the fungicide benomyl to suppress colonization by naturally occurring mycorrhizal fungi and compared with untreated control plots. In H. glycines-infested soil, susceptible cultivars exhibited 39% lower yields, 28% lower colonization by mycorrhizal fungi, and an eightfold increase in colonization by the charcoal rot fungus, Macrophomina phaseolina, compared with resistant cultivars. In the absence of the nematode, susceptible cultivars exhibited 10% lower yields than resistant cultivars, root colonization of resistant vs. susceptible soybean by mycorrhizal fungi varied with sampling date, and there were no differences in colonization by M. phaseolina between resistant and susceptible cultivars. Benomyl application resulted in 19% greater root growth and 9% higher seed yields in H. glycines-infested soil, but did not affect soybean growth and yield in the absence of the nematode. Colonization of soybean roots by mycorrhizal fungi was negatively correlated with H. glycines population densities due to nematode antagonism to the mycorrhizal fungi rather than suppression of nematode populations. Soybean yields were a function of the pathogenic effects of H. glycines and M. phaseolina, and, to a lesser degree, the stimulatory effects of mycorrhizal fungi.

  14. Role of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in tolerance response against Armillaria mellea in lavender

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, C.; Garcia-Figueres, F.; Lovato, P.; Camprubi, A.

    2015-07-01

    Lavender species form the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and are at the same time highly susceptible to white root rot. In an attempt to evaluate the response of mycorrhizal Lavandula angustifolia L. to Armillaria mellea (Vahl:Fr) P. Kumm in a greenhouse experiment, plants were previously inoculated with an isolate of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis (former Glomus intraradices BEG 72) and the influence of the pH growing medium on the plant-symbiont-pathogen interaction was tested in gnotobiotic autotrophic growth systems in which mycorrhizal inoculum was obtained from root organ cultures. After ten months growth dual-inoculated lavender plants grown in containers with a pasteurized substrate mixture produced a similar number of spikes than healthy plants and achieved equivalent plant diameter coverage. When the growing medium in the autotrophic systems was supplemented with calcium carbonate, the inoculation of lavender plantlets with R. irregularis at higher pH (7.0 and 8.5) media caused a significant decrease of A. mellea presence in plant roots, as detected by qPCR. Moreover, the observation of internal root mycorrhizal infection showed that the extent of mycorrhizal colonization increasedin plant rootsgrown at higher pH, indicating that tolerance to white root rot in lavender plants inoculated with R. irregularis could be associated to mycorrhizal establishment. (Author)

  15. Induction of fungal disease resistance in Vicia faba by dual inoculation with Rhizobium leguminosarum and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, G H

    1998-01-01

    Infection of Vicia faba with Bothytis fabae causes significant decreases in growth vigour, total nitrogen content, number of nodules and nutrient accumulation. Na-uptake and phenolics concentration increased compared to that of noninfected plants. In contrast, dual inoculation of Rhizobium and VA mycorrhizae increased all above parameters suggesting a distinct improvement of the plants. The results also revealed that an inverse correlation may exist between phenolic, calcium, magnesium and zinc concentrations in mycorrhizal plant tissues grown in presence of rhizobial bacteria and the disease severity. From these findings we conclude a possible role of both VA mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobial bacteria in the decrease of susceptibility of plants.

  16. Gr and hp-1 tomato mutants unveil unprecedented interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis and fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialva, Matteo; Zouari, Inès; Salvioli, Alessandra; Novero, Mara; Vrebalov, Julia; Giovannoni, James J; Bonfante, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Systemic responses to an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus reveal opposite phenological patterns in two tomato ripening mutants depending whether ethylene or light reception is involved. The availability of tomato ripening mutants has revealed many aspects of the genetics behind fleshy fruit ripening, plant hormones and light signal reception. Since previous analyses revealed that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences tomato berry ripening, we wanted to test the hypothesis that an interplay might occur between root symbiosis and fruit ripening. With this aim, we screened seven tomato mutants affected in the ripening process for their responsiveness to the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae. Following their phenological responses we selected two mutants for a deeper analysis: Green ripe (Gr), deficient in fruit ethylene perception and high-pigment-1 (hp-1), displaying enhanced light signal perception throughout the plant. We investigated the putative interactions between ripening processes, mycorrhizal establishment and systemic effects using biochemical and gene expression tools. Our experiments showed that both mutants, notwithstanding a normal mycorrhizal phenotype at root level, exhibit altered arbuscule functionality. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, mycorrhization did not lead to a higher phosphate concentration in berries of both mutants. These results suggest that the mutations considered interfere with arbuscular mycorrhiza inducing systemic changes in plant phenology and fruits metabolism. We hypothesize a cross talk mechanism between AM and ripening processes that involves genes related to ethylene and light signaling.

  17. Monitoring CO2 emissions to gain a dynamic view of carbon allocation to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavíková, Renata; Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Hujslová, Martina; Konvalinková, Tereza; Gryndlerová, Hana; Gryndler, Milan; Weiser, Martin; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of carbon (C) fluxes in mycorrhizal plants is one of the important yet little explored tasks of mycorrhizal physiology and ecology. 13 CO 2 pulse-chase labelling experiments are increasingly being used to track the fate of C in these plant-microbial symbioses. Nevertheless, continuous monitoring of both the below- and aboveground CO 2 emissions remains a challenge, although it is necessary to establish the full C budget of mycorrhizal plants. Here, a novel CO 2 collection system is presented which allows assessment of gaseous CO 2 emissions (including isotopic composition of their C) from both belowground and shoot compartments. This system then is used to quantify the allocation of recently fixed C in mycorrhizal versus nonmycorrhizal Medicago truncatula plants with comparable biomass and mineral nutrition. Using this system, we confirmed substantially greater belowground C drain in mycorrhizal versus nonmycorrhizal plants, with the belowground CO 2 emissions showing large variation because of fluctuating environmental conditions in the glasshouse. Based on the assembled 13 C budget, the C allocation to the mycorrhizal fungus was between 2.3% (increased 13 C allocation to mycorrhizal substrate) and 2.9% (reduction of 13 C allocation to mycorrhizal shoots) of the plant gross photosynthetic production. Although the C allocation to shoot respiration (measured during one night only) did not differ between the mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants under our experimental conditions, it presented a substantial part (∼10%) of the plant C budget, comparable to the amount of CO 2 released belowground. These results advocate quantification of both above- and belowground CO 2 emissions in future studies.

  18. Initial vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal development of slender wheatgrass on two amended mine spoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zak, J.C.; Parkinson, D. (University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Biology)

    1982-01-01

    The initial vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal development of slender wheatgrass on extracted oil-sands and subalpine coal-mine spoils, amended with either fertilizer, peat, or liquid sewage sludge, was examined. Plants were sampled at 2,6 and 10 weeks after plant emergence and the level of infection was expressed as length of mycorrhizal root per plant and length of root which contained arbuscules, vesicles, or only hyphae. Mycorrhizal infection of slender wheatgrass on the oil sands was limited to plants on the peat-amended spoil. Infection of plants on the peat-amended oil-sands spoil was detected by 2 weeks. Plants on the subalpine spoil were infected at 2 weeks only on the peat-amended spoil. While slender wheatgrass on the control and fertilizer-amended spoil developed mycorrhizae by 6 weeks, infection was not observed in plants on the sewage-amended spoil until 10 weeks. At 10 weeks, there were no significant differences in lengths of mycorrhizal root per plant among the amendments. Increased P levels in the fertilizer- and sewage-amended subalpine spoil did not suppress VA mycorrhizal development. 43 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. Oak protein profile alterations upon root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastiana, Mónica; Martins, Joana; Figueiredo, Andreia

    2017-01-01

    in the roots. Consistent with the results of the biochemical analysis, the proteome analysis of the mycorrhizal roots suggests a decreasing utilization of sucrose for the metabolic activity of mycorrhizal roots which is consistent with an increased allocation of carbohydrates from the plant to the fungus...... to ectomycorrhizae formation using a proteomics approach complemented by biochemical analysis of carbohydrate levels. Comparative proteome analysis between mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal cork oak plants revealed no differences at the foliar level. However, the protein profile of 34 unique oak proteins was altered...... in order to sustain the symbiosis. In addition, a promotion of protein unfolding mechanisms, attenuation of defense reactions, increased nutrient mobilization from the plant-fungus interface (N and P), as well as cytoskeleton rearrangements and induction of plant cell wall loosening for fungal root...

  20. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on growth and nitrogen uptake of Chrysanthemum morifolium under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhong; Wang, Minqiang; Li, Yan; Wu, Aiping; Huang, Juying

    2018-01-01

    Soil salinity is a common and serious environmental problem worldwide. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are considered as bio-ameliorators of soil salinity tolerance in plants. However, few studies have addressed the possible benefits of AMF inoculation for medicinal plants under saline conditions. In this study, we examined the effects of colonization with two AMF, Funneliformis mosseae and Diversispora versiformis, alone and in combination, on the growth and nutrient uptake of the medicinal plant Chrysanthemum morifolium (Hangbaiju) in a greenhouse salt stress experiment. After 6 weeks of a non-saline pretreatment, Hangbaiju plants with and without AMF were grown for five months under salinity levels that were achieved using 0, 50 and 200 mM NaCl. Root length, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, and root N concentration were higher in the mycorrhizal plants than in the non-mycorrhizal plants under conditions of moderate salinity, especially with D. versiformis colonization. As salinity increased, mycorrhizal colonization and mycorrhizal dependence decreased. The enhancement of root N uptake is probably the main mechanism underlying salt tolerance in mycorrhizal plants. These results suggest that the symbiotic associations between the fungus D. versiformis and C. morifolium plants may be useful in biotechnological practice.

  1. Phenolic composition of basil plants is differentially altered by plant nutrient status and inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four cultivars of basil (Ocimum basilicum ‘Cinnamon’, ‘Siam Queen’, ‘Sweet Dani’, and ‘Red Rubin’) were inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF), Rhizophagus intraradices, and grown with a fertilizer containing either 64 mg/l P (low-P) or 128 mg/l P (high-P) to assess whether (...

  2. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculum produced on-farm and phosphorus on growth and nutrition of native woody plant species from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Claudio Goetten

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal fungus inoculum produced on-farm can be used during production of woody plant seedlings to reduce costs associated with purchase of commercial inoculant and fertilization. This study aimed to test the efficiency of a mycorrhizal inoculant produced on-farm to promote growth and nutrition of woody species in combination with different levels of phosphorus. Plants were submitted to different treatments of phosphorus (0, 40 and 80 mg P/dm3 and mycorrhizal inoculation (uninoculated, and inoculation with Rhizophagus clarus [Rc] or Claroideoglomus etunicatum [Ce]. Species included were Luehea divaricata, Centrolobium robustum, Schinus terebinthifolius, Garcinia gardneriana, Cedrella fissilis, and Lafoensia pacari. The inoculum was produced using the on-farm methodology. Mycorrhizal colonization of plants inoculated with Rc and Ce ranged from 44.8 to 74.8%, except forGarcinia gardneriana. Inoculation treatment increased plant height and stem diameter of Luehea divaricata, Centrolobium robustum and Cedrella fissilis while phosphorus, inoculation and the interaction affected these parameters for G. gardneriana and Lafoensia pacari. Shoot biomass increased significantly with inoculation treatment in four species. For most species, mycorrhizal fungus inoculation and the addition of phosphorus increased the shoot phosphorus content. Mycorrhizal fungus inoculum produced on-farm successfully colonized tree seedlings and improved growth and/or nutrition under nursery conditions, producing seedlings useful for revegetation of degraded lands.

  3. Transfer of 65Zn in maize -mycorrhizal systems: a potential mechanism to alleviate Zn deficiency in maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.S.; Tenshia, Virgin

    2017-01-01

    Mycorrhizas are root associated fungi and obligate symbionts known to improve the nutritional status of the host plant as a direct consequence of transfer of slowly diffusing nutrients such as zinc. The Zn use efficiency by crops hardly exceeds 2-5 per cent and major portion of the Zn gets accumulated in soil in various pools which are not available to plants. Further, mycorrhizal symbiosis alters the chemical and biochemical properties of rhizosphere that affect the isotopic parameters such as A value, E value and L value. These parameters were measured for both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize plants. A pot culture experiment was conducted to determine the availability of Zn using isotopic dilution techniques. Maize plants were grown in pots inoculated with (M+) or without (M-) mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. Tagged 65 ZnSO 4 was applied to soil at the time of sowing

  4. Transcriptome changes induced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangelisti, Alberto; Natali, Lucia; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Sbrana, Cristiana; Turrini, Alessandra; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Hughes, David; Cavallini, Andrea; Giovannetti, Manuela; Giordani, Tommaso

    2018-01-08

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are essential elements of soil fertility, plant nutrition and productivity, facilitating soil mineral nutrient uptake. Helianthus annuus is a non-model, widely cultivated species. Here we used an RNA-seq approach for evaluating gene expression variation at early and late stages of mycorrhizal establishment in sunflower roots colonized by the arbuscular fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare. mRNA was isolated from roots of plantlets at 4 and 16 days after inoculation with the fungus. cDNA libraries were built and sequenced with Illumina technology. Differential expression analysis was performed between control and inoculated plants. Overall 726 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between inoculated and control plants were retrieved. The number of up-regulated DEGs greatly exceeded the number of down-regulated DEGs and this difference increased in later stages of colonization. Several DEGs were specifically involved in known mycorrhizal processes, such as membrane transport, cell wall shaping, and other. We also found previously unidentified mycorrhizal-induced transcripts. The most important DEGs were carefully described in order to hypothesize their roles in AM symbiosis. Our data add a valuable contribution for deciphering biological processes related to beneficial fungi and plant symbiosis, adding an Asteraceae, non-model species for future comparative functional genomics studies.

  5. Cell wall remodeling in mycorrhizal symbiosis: a way towards biotrophism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Cell walls are deeply involved in the molecular talk between partners during plant and microbe interactions, and their role in mycorrhizae, i.e., the widespread symbiotic associations established between plant roots and soil fungi, has been investigated extensively. All mycorrhizal interactions achieve full symbiotic functionality through the development of an extensive contact surface between the plant and fungal cells, where signals and nutrients are exchanged. The exchange of molecules between the fungal and the plant cytoplasm takes place both through their plasma membranes and their cell walls; a functional compartment, known as the symbiotic interface, is thus defined. Among all the symbiotic interfaces, the complex intracellular interface of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has received a great deal of attention since its first description. Here, in fact, the host plasma membrane invaginates and proliferates around all the developing intracellular fungal structures, and cell wall material is laid down between this membrane and the fungal cell surface. By contrast, in ectomycorrhizae (ECM), where the fungus grows outside and between the root cells, plant and fungal cell walls are always in direct contact and form the interface between the two partners. The organization and composition of cell walls within the interface compartment is a topic that has attracted widespread attention, both in ecto- and endomycorrhizae. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the current knowledge on this topic by integrating morphological observations, which have illustrated cell wall features during mycorrhizal interactions, with the current data produced by genomic and transcriptomic approaches.

  6. Interplant communication of tomato plants through underground common mycorrhizal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Zeng, Ren Sen; Xu, Jian Feng; Li, Jun; Shen, Xiang; Yihdego, Woldemariam Gebrehiwot

    2010-10-13

    Plants can defend themselves to pathogen and herbivore attack by responding to chemical signals that are emitted by attacked plants. It is well established that such signals can be transferred through the air. In theory, plants can also communicate with each other through underground common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) that interconnect roots of multiple plants. However, until now research focused on plant-to-plant carbon nutrient movement and there is no evidence that defense signals can be exchanged through such mycorrhizal hyphal networks. Here, we show that CMNs mediate plant-plant communication between healthy plants and pathogen-infected tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). After establishment of CMNs with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae between tomato plants, inoculation of 'donor' plants with the pathogen Alternaria solani led to increases in disease resistance and activities of the putative defensive enzymes, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and lipoxygenase in healthy neighbouring 'receiver' plants. The uninfected 'receiver' plants also activated six defence-related genes when CMNs connected 'donor' plants challenged with A. solani. This finding indicates that CMNs may function as a plant-plant underground communication conduit whereby disease resistance and induced defence signals can be transferred between the healthy and pathogen-infected neighbouring plants, suggesting that plants can 'eavesdrop' on defence signals from the pathogen-challenged neighbours through CMNs to activate defences before being attacked themselves.

  7. Total fatty acid composition in the characterization and identification of orchid mycorrhizal fungi Epulorhiza spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Corrêa Pereira

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia-like fungi are the main mycorrhizal fungi in orchid roots. Morphological characterization and analysis of conserved sequences of genomic DNA are frequently employed in the identification and study of fungi diversity. However, phytopathogenic Rhizoctonia-like fungi have been reliably and accurately characterized and identified through the examination of the fatty acid composition. To evaluate the efficacy of fatty acid composition in characterizing and identifying Rhizoctonia-like mycorrhizal fungi in orchids, three Epulorhiza spp. mycorrhizal fungi from Epidendrum secundum, two unidentified fungi isolated from Epidendrum denticulatum, and a phytopathogenic fungus, Ceratorhiza sp. AGC, were grouped based on the profile of their fatty acids, which was assessed by the Euclidian and Mahalanobis distances and the UPGMA method. Dendrograms distinguished the phytopathogenical isolate of Ceratorhiza sp. AGC from the mycorrhizal fungi studied. The symbionts of E. secundum were grouped into two clades, one containing Epulorhiza sp.1 isolates and the other the Epulorhiza sp.2 isolate. The similarity between the symbionts of E. denticulatum and Epulorhiza spp. fungi suggests that symbionts found in E. denticulatum may be identified as Epulorhiza. These results were corroborated by the analysis of the rDNA ITS region. The dendrogram constructed based on the Mahalanobis distance differentiated the clades most clearly. Fatty acid composition analysis proved to be a useful tool for characterizing and identifying Rhizoctonia-like mycorrhizal fungi.

  8. Uptake of 15 trace elements in arbuscular mycorrhizal marigold measured by the multitracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, H.; Oohashi, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Inubushi, K.; Enomoto, S.; Ambe, F.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization on the uptake of trace elements in marigold (Tagetes patula L.) was studied using a multitracer consisting of radionuclides of 7 Be, 22 Na, 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 56 Co, 65 Zn, 74 As, 75 Se, 83 Rb, 85 Sr, 88 Y, 88 Zr, and 95m Tc. Marigold plants were grown under controlled environmental conditions in sand culture either without mycorrhizas or in association with an AM fungus, Glomus etunicatum. The multitracer was applied to the pot, and plants were harvested at 7 and 21 d after tracer application. We found that the uptake of 7 Be, 22 Na, 51 Cr, 59 Fe, 65 Zn, and 95m Tc was higher in the mycorrhizal marigolds than in the non-mycorrhizal ones, while that of 46 Sc, 56 Co, 83 Rb, and 85 Sr was lower in the mycorrhizal marigolds than in the non-mycorrhizal ones. Thus, the multitracer technique enabled to analyze the uptake of various elements by plant simultaneously. It is suggested that this technique could be used to analyze the effects of AM colonization on the uptake of trace elements by plant. (author)

  9. [Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis influences the biological effects of nano-ZnO on maize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Zhong; Wang, Fa-Yuan; Li, Shuai; Liu, Xue-Qin

    2014-08-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) can be taken up and accumulated in plants, then enter human bodies via food chain, and thus cause potential health risk. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic symbioses with the majority of higher plants in terrestrial ecosystems, and potentially influence the biological effects of ENPs. The present greenhouse pot culture experiment studied the effects of inoculation with or without arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Acaulospora mellea on growth and nutritional status of maize under different nano-ZnO levels (0, 500, 1 000, 2000 and 3 000 mg x kg(-1)) artificially added into soil. Results showed that with the increasing nano-ZnO levels in soil, mycorrhizal colonization rate and biomass of maize plants showed a decreasing trend, total root length, total surface area and total volume reduced, while Zn concentration and uptake in plants gradually increased, and P, N, K, Fe, and Cu uptake in shoots all decreased. Compared with the controls, arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation improved the growth and P, N and K nutrition of maize, enhanced total root length, total surface area and total volume, and increased Zn allocation to roots when nano-ZnO was added. Our results firstly show that nano-ZnO in soil induces toxicity to arbuscular mycorrhizae, while arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation can alleviate its toxicity and play a protective role in plants.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alleviate arsenic toxicity to Medicago sativa by influencing arsenic speciation and partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinglong; Sun, Yuqing; Jiang, Xuelian; Chen, Baodong; Zhang, Xin

    2018-08-15

    In a pot experiment, Medicago sativa inoculated with/without arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis were grown in four levels (0, 10, 25, and 75 mg/kg) of arsenic (As)-polluted soil to investigate the influences of AM symbiosis on plant As tolerance. The results showed that mycorrhizal inoculation significantly increased plant biomass, while As addition decreased mycorrhizal colonization and hyphal length density. Mycorrhizal inoculation dramatically improved plant phosphorus (P) nutrition, restricted As uptake and retained more As in roots by upregulating the expression of the AM-induced P transporter gene MsPT4 and the metallothionein gene MsMT2. High soil As content downregulated MsPT4 expression. Dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) was detected only in the shoots of mycorrhizal plants, indicating that AM fungi likely play an essential role in As detoxification by biological methylation. The present investigation allowed deeper insights into the As detoxification mechanisms of AM associations and demonstrated the important role of AM fungi in plant resistance under As-contaminated conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rhizobial Nodulation Factors Stimulate Mycorrhizal Colonization of Nodulating and Nonnodulating Soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Z. P.; Staehelin, C.; Vierheilig, H.; Wiemken, A.; Jabbouri, S.; Broughton, W. J.; Vogeli-Lange, R.; Boller, T.

    1995-08-01

    Legumes form tripartite symbiotic associations with noduleinducing rhizobia and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Co-inoculation of soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) roots with Bradyrhizobium japonicum 61-A-101 considerably enhanced colonization by the mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae. A similar stimulatory effect on mycorrhizal colonization was also observed in nonnodulating soybean mutants when inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum and in wild-type soybean plants when inoculated with ineffective rhizobial strains, indicating that a functional rhizobial symbiosis is not necessary for enhanced mycorrhiza formation. Inoculation with the mutant Rhizobium sp. NGR[delta]nodABC, unable to produce nodulation (Nod) factors, did not show any effect on mycorrhiza. Highly purified Nod factors also increased the degree of mycorrhizal colonization. Nod factors from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 differed in their potential to promote fungal colonization. The acetylated factor NodNGR-V (MeFuc, Ac), added at concentrations as low as 10-9 M, was active, whereas the sulfated factor, NodNGR-V (MeFuc, S), was inactive. Several soybean flavonoids known to accumulate in response to the acetylated Nod factor showed a similar promoting effect on mycorrhiza. These results suggest that plant flavonoids mediate the Nod factor-induced stimulation of mycorrhizal colonization in soybean roots.

  12. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas in Plant Phosphorus Nutrition: Interactions between Pathways of Phosphorus Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots Have Important Implications for Understanding and Manipulating Plant Phosphorus Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, S.E.; Jakobsen, Iver; Grønlund, Mette

    2011-01-01

    In this Update, we review new findings about the roles of the arbuscular mycorrhizas (mycorrhiza = fungus plus root) in plant growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition. We focus particularly on the function of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses with different outcomes for plant growth (from positive...

  13. The plasma membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots as modified by arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Achref; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Lemaître-Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane

    2018-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) roots, the plasma membrane (PM) of the host plant is involved in all developmental stages of the symbiotic interaction, from initial recognition to intracellular accommodation of intra-radical hyphae and arbuscules. Although the role of the PM as the agent for cellular morphogenesis and nutrient exchange is especially accentuated in endosymbiosis, very little is known regarding the PM protein composition of mycorrhizal roots. To obtain a global overview at the proteome level of the host PM proteins as modified by symbiosis, we performed a comparative protein profiling of PM fractions from Medicago truncatula roots either inoculated or not with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. PM proteins were isolated from root microsomes using an optimized discontinuous sucrose gradient; their subsequent analysis by liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (MS) identified 674 proteins. Cross-species sequence homology searches combined with MS-based quantification clearly confirmed enrichment in PM-associated proteins and depletion of major microsomal contaminants. Changes in protein amounts between the PM proteomes of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots were monitored further by spectral counting. This workflow identified a set of 82 mycorrhiza-responsive proteins that provided insights into the plant PM response to mycorrhizal symbiosis. Among them, the association of one third of the mycorrhiza-responsive proteins with detergent-resistant membranes pointed at partitioning to PM microdomains. The PM-associated proteins responsive to mycorrhization also supported host plant control of sugar uptake to limit fungal colonization, and lipid turnover events in the PM fraction of symbiotic roots. Because of the depletion upon symbiosis of proteins mediating the replacement of phospholipids by phosphorus-free lipids in the plasmalemma, we propose a role of phosphate nutrition in the PM composition of mycorrhizal roots.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can decrease the uptake of uranium by subterranean clover grown at high levels of uranium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rufyikiri, Gervais; Huysmans, Lien; Wannijn, Jean; Hees, May van; Leyval, Corinne; Jakobsen, Iver

    2004-01-01

    Subterranean clover inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices was grown on soil containing six levels of 238 U in the range 0-87 mg kg -1 . Increasing U concentration in soil enhanced the U concentration in roots and shoots of both mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants but had no significant effects on plant dry matter production or root AM colonization. Mycorrhizas increased the shoot dry matter and P concentration in roots and shoots, while in most cases, it decreased the Ca, Mg and K concentrations in plants. The AM fungus influenced U concentration in plants only in the treatment receiving 87 mg U kg -1 soil. In this case, U concentration in shoots of nonmycorrhizal plants was 1.7 times that of shoots of mycorrhizal plants. These results suggested that mycorrhizal fungi can limit U accumulation by plants exposed to high levels of U in soil. - Plant mycorrhization may decrease U concentration in shoots of plants grown at high level of U in soil

  15. Effect of nitrate supply and mycorrhizal inoculation on characteristics of tobacco root plasma membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moche, Martin; Stremlau, Stefanie; Hecht, Lars; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Stöhr, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane (pm) vesicles from mycorrhizal tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun) roots were isolated with negligible fungal contamination by the aqueous two-phase partitioning technique as proven by fatty acid analysis. Palmitvaccenic acid became apparent as an appropriate indicator for fungal membranes in root pm preparations. The pm vesicles had a low specific activity of the vanadate-sensitive ATPase and probably originated from non-infected root cells. In a phosphate-limited tobacco culture system, root colonisation by the vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus mosseae, is inhibited by external nitrate in a dose-dependent way. However, detrimental high concentrations of 25 mM nitrate lead to the highest colonisation rate observed, indicating that the defence system of the plant is impaired. Nitric oxide formation by the pm-bound nitrite:NO reductase increased in parallel with external nitrate supply in mycorrhizal roots in comparison to the control plants, but decreased under excess nitrate. Mycorrhizal pm vesicles had roughly a twofold higher specific activity as the non-infected control plants when supplied with 10-15 mM nitrate.

  16. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the root uptake and translocation of radiocaesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre de Boulois, Herve; Delvaux, Bruno; Declerck, Stephane

    2005-01-01

    Because mycorrhizal fungi are intimately associated with plant roots, their importance in radionuclide (RN) recycling and subsequent dispersion into the biosphere has received an increasing interest. Recently, the capacity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to take up and translocate radiocaesium to their host was demonstrated. However, the relative contribution of these processes in comparison to the ones of roots remains unknown. Here, the respective contributions of the hyphae of a Glomus species and the transformed carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots on radiocaesium uptake and translocation were compared and quantified. We observed that radiocaesium uptake by hyphae was significantly lower as compared to that of the roots, while the opposite was noted for radiocaesium translocation/uptake ratio. We also observed that the intraradical fungal structures might induce a local accumulation of radiocaesium and concurrently reduce its translocation within mycorrhizal roots. We believe that intraradical fungal structures might induce the down-regulation of radiocaesium channels involved in the transport processes of radiocaesium towards the xylem. - Radiocaesium root uptake and translocation is affected by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

  17. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the root uptake and translocation of radiocaesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre de Boulois, Herve [Universite catholique de Louvain, Mycotheque de l' Universite catholique de Louvain (MUCL), Unite de Microbiologie, Place Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Delvaux, Bruno [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite des Sciences du Sol, Place Croix du Sud 2/10, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Declerck, Stephane [Universite catholique de Louvain, Mycotheque de l' Universite catholique de Louvain (MUCL), Unite de Microbiologie, Place Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)]. E-mail: declerck@mbla.ucl.ac.be

    2005-04-01

    Because mycorrhizal fungi are intimately associated with plant roots, their importance in radionuclide (RN) recycling and subsequent dispersion into the biosphere has received an increasing interest. Recently, the capacity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to take up and translocate radiocaesium to their host was demonstrated. However, the relative contribution of these processes in comparison to the ones of roots remains unknown. Here, the respective contributions of the hyphae of a Glomus species and the transformed carrot (Daucus carota L.) roots on radiocaesium uptake and translocation were compared and quantified. We observed that radiocaesium uptake by hyphae was significantly lower as compared to that of the roots, while the opposite was noted for radiocaesium translocation/uptake ratio. We also observed that the intraradical fungal structures might induce a local accumulation of radiocaesium and concurrently reduce its translocation within mycorrhizal roots. We believe that intraradical fungal structures might induce the down-regulation of radiocaesium channels involved in the transport processes of radiocaesium towards the xylem. - Radiocaesium root uptake and translocation is affected by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

  18. Activation of Symbiosis Signaling by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in Legumes and Rice[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jongho; Miller, J. Benjamin; Granqvist, Emma; Wiley-Kalil, Audrey; Gobbato, Enrico; Maillet, Fabienne; Cottaz, Sylvain; Samain, Eric; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Fort, Sébastien; Morris, Richard J.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Dénarié, Jean; Oldroyd, Giles E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions involves plant recognition of diffusible signals from the fungus, including lipochitooligosaccharides (LCOs) and chitooligosaccharides (COs). Nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that associate with leguminous plants also signal to their hosts via LCOs, the so-called Nod factors. Here, we have assessed the induction of symbiotic signaling by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (Myc) fungal-produced LCOs and COs in legumes and rice (Oryza sativa). We show that Myc-LCOs and tetra-acetyl chitotetraose (CO4) activate the common symbiosis signaling pathway, with resultant calcium oscillations in root epidermal cells of Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus. The nature of the calcium oscillations is similar for LCOs produced by rhizobial bacteria and by mycorrhizal fungi; however, Myc-LCOs activate distinct gene expression. Calcium oscillations were activated in rice atrichoblasts by CO4, but not the Myc-LCOs, whereas a mix of CO4 and Myc-LCOs activated calcium oscillations in rice trichoblasts. In contrast, stimulation of lateral root emergence occurred following treatment with Myc-LCOs, but not CO4, in M. truncatula, whereas both Myc-LCOs and CO4 were active in rice. Our work indicates that legumes and non-legumes differ in their perception of Myc-LCO and CO signals, suggesting that different plant species respond to different components in the mix of signals produced by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:25724637

  19. Nutrient Exchange and Regulation in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanxiao; Shi, Jincai; Xie, Qiujin; Jiang, Yina; Yu, Nan; Wang, Ertao

    2017-09-12

    Most land plants form symbiotic associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. These are the most common and widespread terrestrial plant symbioses, which have a global impact on plant mineral nutrition. The establishment of AM symbiosis involves recognition of the two partners and bidirectional transport of different mineral and carbon nutrients through the symbiotic interfaces within the host root cells. Intriguingly, recent discoveries have highlighted that lipids are transferred from the plant host to AM fungus as a major carbon source. In this review, we discuss the transporter-mediated transfer of carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, potassium and sulfate, and present hypotheses pertaining to the potential regulatory mechanisms of nutrient exchange in AM symbiosis. Current challenges and future perspectives on AM symbiosis research are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  1. Respiration of the external mycelium in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis shows strong dependence on recent photosynthates and acclimation to temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemeyer, A; Ineson, P; Ostle, N; Fitter, A H

    2006-01-01

    * Although arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are a major pathway in the global carbon cycle, their basic biology and, in particular, their respiratory response to temperature remain obscure. * A pulse label of the stable isotope (13)C was applied to Plantago lanceolata, either uninoculated or inoculated with the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. The extra-radical mycelium (ERM) of the fungus was allowed to grow into a separate hyphal compartment excluding roots. We determined the carbon costs of the ERM and tested for a direct temperature effect on its respiration by measuring total carbon and the (13)C:(12)C ratio of respired CO(2). With a second pulse we tested for acclimation of ERM respiration after 2 wk of soil warming. * Root colonization remained unchanged between the two pulses but warming the hyphal compartment increased ERM length. delta(13)C signals peaked within the first 10 h and were higher in mycorrhizal treatments. The concentration of CO(2) in the gas samples fluctuated diurnally and was highest in the mycorrhizal treatments but was unaffected by temperature. Heating increased ERM respiration only after the first pulse and reduced specific ERM respiration rates after the second pulse; however, both pulses strongly depended on radiation flux. * The results indicate a fast ERM acclimation to temperature, and that light is the key factor controlling carbon allocation to the fungus.

  2. DELLA proteins regulate arbuscule formation in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Daniela S; Levy, Julien G; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Pumplin, Nathan; Harrison, Maria J

    2013-12-17

    Most flowering plants are able to form endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In this mutualistic association, the fungus colonizes the root cortex and establishes elaborately branched hyphae, called arbuscules, within the cortical cells. Arbuscule development requires the cellular reorganization of both symbionts, and the resulting symbiotic interface functions in nutrient exchange. A plant symbiosis signaling pathway controls the development of the symbiosis. Several components of the pathway have been identified, but transcriptional regulators that control downstream pathways for arbuscule formation are still unknown. Here we show that DELLA proteins, which are repressors of gibberellic acid (GA) signaling and function at the nexus of several signaling pathways, are required for arbuscule formation. Arbuscule formation is severely impaired in a Medicago truncatula Mtdella1/Mtdella2 double mutant; GA treatment of wild-type roots phenocopies the della double mutant, and a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) enables arbuscule formation in the presence of GA. Ectopic expression of della1-Δ18 suggests that DELLA activity in the vascular tissue and endodermis is sufficient to enable arbuscule formation in the inner cortical cells. In addition, expression of della1-Δ18 restores arbuscule formation in the symbiosis signaling pathway mutant cyclops/ipd3, indicating an intersection between DELLA and symbiosis signaling for arbuscule formation. GA signaling also influences arbuscule formation in monocots, and a Green Revolution wheat variety carrying dominant DELLA alleles shows enhanced colonization but a limited growth response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  3. Effect of mycorrhizal infection on root uptake by pine seedlings and redistribution of three contrasting radio-isotopes: 85Sr, 95mTc and 137Cs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plassard, C.; Ladeyn, I.; Staunton, S.

    2004-01-01

    Mycorrhizal infection is known to improve phosphate nutrition and water supply of higher plants. It has been reported to both increase the uptake of potentially toxic pollutant elements and to protect plants against toxic effects. Little is known about the effect of mycorrhizal infection on the dynamics of radioactive pollutants in soil-plant systems. The aim of this study was to compare the root uptake and root-shoot transfer of three radio-isotopes with contrasting chemical properties ( 85 Sr, 95m Tc and 137 Cs) in mycorrhizal and control, non mycorrhizal plants. The plant studied was Pinus pinaster and the associated ecto-mycorrhizal fungus was Rhizopogon roseolus (strain R18-2). Plants were grown under anoxic conditions for 3 months then transferred to thin layers of autoclaved soil and allowed to grow for four months. After this period, the rhizotrons were dismantled, and plant tissue analysed. Biomass, nutrient content (K, P, N, Ca) and activities of each isotope in roots, shoots and stems were measured, and the degree of mycorrhizal infection assessed. The transfer factors decreased in the order Tc>Sr>Cs as expected from the degree of immobilisation by soil. No effect of mycorrhizal infection on root uptake was observed for Sr. Shoot activity concentration of Tc was decreased by mycorrhizal infection but root uptake correlated well with mycelial soil surface area. In contrast, Cs shoot activity was greater in mycorrhizal than control plants. The uptake and root to shoot distribution shall be discussed in relation to nutrient dynamics. (author)

  4. Feasibility of Using Mycorrhizal Fungi for Enhancement of Plant Establishment on Dredged Material Disposal Sites. A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    Alfalfa Lambert et al. (1980c); 0’Bannon et al. (1980); Owusu- Bennoah and Mosse (1979) (Continued) 48 Scientific Name Common Name Source Persea americana...with VA Mycorrhizal Fungi," Annual Meeting of the Pacific Division of the American Phytopathologi- cal Society, Phytopathology, Vol 73, No. 6, pp 956...Mycorrhizae and Plant Disease Research, The American Phytopathological Society, Vol 72, No. 8, pp 1108-1114. Carling, D. E., et al. 1979. "Colonization

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal wheat inoculation promotes alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation: Microcosm experiment on aged-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingrid, Lenoir; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Frédéric, Laruelle; Yolande, Dalpé; Joël, Fontaine

    2016-01-01

    Very few studies reported the potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to dissipate hydrocarbons in aged polluted soils. The present work aims to study the efficiency of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonized wheat plants in the dissipation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our results demonstrated that the inoculation of wheat with Rhizophagus irregularis allowed a better dissipation of PAHs and alkanes after 16 weeks of culture by comparison to non-inoculated condition. These dissipations observed in the inoculated soil resulted from several processes: (i) a light adsorption on roots (0.5% for PAHs), (ii) a bioaccumulation in roots (5.7% for PAHs and 6.6% for alkanes), (iii) a transfer in shoots (0.4 for PAHs and 0.5% for alkanes) and mainly a biodegradation. Whereas PAHs and alkanes degradation rates were respectively estimated to 12 and 47% with non-inoculated wheat, their degradation rates reached 18 and 48% with inoculated wheat. The mycorrhizal inoculation induced an increase of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by 56 and 37% compared to the non-inoculated wheat. Moreover, an increase of peroxidase activity was assessed in mycorrhizal roots. Taken together, our findings suggested that mycorrhization led to a better hydrocarbon biodegradation in the aged-contaminated soil thanks to a stimulation of telluric bacteria and hydrocarbon metabolization in mycorrhizal roots. - Highlights: • Phytoremediation of aged-hydrocarbon polluted soils may be improved using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. • Inoculation of wheat with R. irregularis improved dissipation of PAH and alkanes. • Dissipation resulted from adsorption and bioaccumulation in wheat and mainly from biodegradation in soil. • Biodegradation was due to a stimulation of rhizosphere bacteria and an induction of root peroxidase. - Inoculation of wheat by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus improves biodegradation of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an aged

  6. VA National Bed Control System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VA National Bed Control System records the levels of operating, unavailable and authorized beds at each VAMC, and it tracks requests for changes in these levels....

  7. Influence of Al and the heavy metals Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd on development and efficacy of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza in tropical and subtropical plants. Einfluss von Al und den Schwermetallen Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb und Cd auf die Effizienz der VA-Mykorrhiza bei tropischen und subtropischen Pflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabig, B.

    1982-07-08

    In greenhouse experiments the influence of Al and the heavy metals Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd on the efficacy of VA-mycorrhizal fungi was tested with special regard to several soil pH levels and soil water regimes in different combinations. The most important results were: The inoculation led to a significantly better growth of all test plants in the presence of Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd up to a specific amount of the soil-applied element; beyond this specific limit the efficacy of the mycorrhiza was more or less inhibited depending on the element. In correlation with the growth, the nearly always better P uptake of the inoculated plants was impaired only by the highest toxic amounts of the elements. In comparison with the uninoculated plants, all the inoculated plants showed higher P and Pb concentrations. The mycorrhizal plants generally had significantly higher concentrations of the elements Al, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Cd in the roots than the uninoculated plants. Generally even toxic levels of Fe in the soil did not lead to higher Fe concentrations in the plants. Even the highest amounts of Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cu did not cause microscopically visible injuries to the development of the mycorrhiza and did not impede the infection. Only the toxic levels of Pb led to a decrease of the infection rate of about 50%. Pb and Cd were the reason for morphological changes of the different developmental phases of the fungus. High amounts of Pb induced an increased formation of vesicles. The highest amounts of Cd were accompanied by the crowded occurrence of arbuscules.

  8. The Geometric-VaR Backtesting Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Wei; Pelletier, Denis

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops a new test to evaluate Value af Risk (VaR) forecasts. VaR is a standard risk measure widely utilized by financial institutions and regulators, yet estimating VaR is a challenging problem, and popular VaR forecast relies on unrealistic assumptions. Hence, assessing...

  9. Trichoderma harzianum might impact phosphorus transport by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Nathalie; de la Providencia, Ivan E; de Boulois, Hervé Dupré; Declerck, Stéphane

    2011-09-01

    Trichoderma sp. is a biocontrol agent active against plant pathogens via mechanisms such as mycoparasitism. Recently, it was demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum was able to parasitize the mycelium of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, thus affecting its viability. Here, we question whether this mycoparasitism may reduce the capacity of Glomus sp. to transport phosphorus ((33)P) to its host plant in an in vitro culture system. (33)P was measured in the plant and in the fungal mycelium in the presence/absence of T. harzianum. The viability and metabolic activity of the extraradical mycelium was measured via succinate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase staining. Our study demonstrated an increased uptake of (33)P by the AM fungus in the presence of T. harzianum, possibly related to a stress reaction caused by mycoparasitism. In addition, the disruption of AM extraradical hyphae in the presence of T. harzianum affected the (33)P translocation within the AM fungal mycelium and consequently the transfer of (33)P to the host plant. The effects of T. harzianum on Glomus sp. may thus impact the growth and function of AM fungi and also indirectly plant performance by influencing the source-sink relationship between the two partners of the symbiosis. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Marco; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Franken, Philipp; Schmülling, Thomas; Wurst, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with a root-specific or constitutive expression of CK-degrading CKX genes and the corresponding wild-type to investigate whether a lowered content of CK in roots or in both roots and shoots influences the interaction with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. Our data indicates that shoot CK has a positive impact on AM fungal development in roots and on the root transcript level of an AM-responsive phosphate transporter gene (NtPT4). A reduced CK content in roots caused shoot and root growth depression following AM colonization, while neither the uptake of phosphorus or nitrogen nor the root transcript levels of NtPT4 were significantly affected. This suggests that root CK may restrict the C availability from the roots to the fungus thus averting parasitism by AM fungi. Taken together, our study indicates that shoot- and root-borne CK have distinct roles in AM symbiosis. We propose a model illustrating how plants may employ CK to regulate nutrient exchange with the ubiquitous AM fungi.

  11. Common arbuscular mycorrhizal networks amplify competition for phosphorus between seedlings and established plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrild, Marie Porret; Ambus, Per; Rosendahl, Søren

    2013-01-01

    ) seedlings grew into established networks of Rhizophagus irregularis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) in two experiments. One experiment studied seedling uptake of 32P in the network in response to cutting of cucumber shoots; the other analysed seedling uptake of P and nitrogen (N) in the presence of intact...... or severed arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus networks and at two soil P concentrations. Pre‐established and intact networks suppressed growth of tomato seedlings. Cutting of cucumber shoots mitigated P deficiency symptoms of seedlings, which obtained access to P in the extraradical mycelium and thereby showed...

  12. Partner selection in the mycorrhizal mutualism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, G.D.A.; Kiers, E.T.

    2015-01-01

    Partner selection in the mycorrhizal symbiosis is thought to be a key factor stabilising the mutualism. Both plant hosts and mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to preferentially allocate resources to higher quality partners. This can help maintain underground cooperation, although it is likely that

  13. Antibiotic Resistance and Fungus

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-02-28

    Dr. David Denning, President of the Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections and an infectious diseases clinician, discusses antimicrobial resistance and fungus.  Created: 2/28/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/28/2017.

  14. Home-field advantage? evidence of local adaptation among plants, soil, and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi through meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rúa, Megan A; Antoninka, Anita; Antunes, Pedro M; Chaudhary, V Bala; Gehring, Catherine; Lamit, Louis J; Piculell, Bridget J; Bever, James D; Zabinski, Cathy; Meadow, James F; Lajeunesse, Marc J; Milligan, Brook G; Karst, Justine; Hoeksema, Jason D

    2016-06-10

    Local adaptation, the differential success of genotypes in their native versus foreign environment, arises from various evolutionary processes, but the importance of concurrent abiotic and biotic factors as drivers of local adaptation has only recently been investigated. Local adaptation to biotic interactions may be particularly important for plants, as they associate with microbial symbionts that can significantly affect their fitness and may enable rapid evolution. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is ideal for investigations of local adaptation because it is globally widespread among most plant taxa and can significantly affect plant growth and fitness. Using meta-analysis on 1170 studies (from 139 papers), we investigated the potential for local adaptation to shape plant growth responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation. The magnitude and direction for mean effect size of mycorrhizal inoculation on host biomass depended on the geographic origin of the soil and symbiotic partners. Sympatric combinations of plants, AM fungi, and soil yielded large increases in host biomass compared to when all three components were allopatric. The origin of either the fungi or the plant relative to the soil was important for explaining the effect of AM inoculation on plant biomass. If plant and soil were sympatric but allopatric to the fungus, the positive effect of AM inoculation was much greater than when all three components were allopatric, suggesting potential local adaptation of the plant to the soil; however, if fungus and soil were sympatric (but allopatric to the plant) the effect of AM inoculation was indistinct from that of any allopatric combinations, indicating maladaptation of the fungus to the soil. This study underscores the potential to detect local adaptation for mycorrhizal relationships across a broad swath of the literature. Geographic origin of plants relative to the origin of AM fungal communities and soil is important for describing the

  15. Plant Signals Disrupt (regulate?) Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Growth Under Enhanced Ozone and CO2 Growing Conditions for Populus tremuloides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. M.; Podila, G. K.

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of the genetic determinants of keystone symbiotic relationships is essential to elucidating adaptive mechanisms influencing higher-order processes, including shifts in community composition following environmental perturbations. The Aspen FACE project offers a unique opportunity to address adaptive processes with an imposed three way interaction experiment composed of the atmospheric pollutant ozone (eO3), elevated CO2 (eCO2) fumigations, five Populus tremuloides (aspen) genotypes, and both arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungal interactions. The 10 year time span of this experiment has allowed for a realistic and mechanistic understanding of above ground responses of the aspen genotypes to eCO2, eO3 and the interaction effects of eCO2 and eO3. Even so, treatment influences to the below ground, including carbon allocation to roots and associated mycorrhizal symbionts, and rhizosphere dynamics are just beginning to be understood. We hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal responses to eCO2, eO3, and the interaction effects of eCO2+eO3 are conditioned by the degree of response of their aspen hosts. We intend to describe the molecular mechanisms of an important critical interaction between host and fungus using microarray analysis of expression profiles, as well as metabolic profiling of aspen roots and their associated mycorrhizal partner, the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices, under eCO2, eO3 and eCO2+eO3. We present evidence that host-derived factors, expressed in response to eCO2+eO3, trigger responses in Glomus leading to the partitioning or metabolic shift in lipid biosynthesis that is associated with reduced extraradical hyphae growth and altered lipid metabolism. We then scale these lower-level responses to give better insight to fungal intraradical and extraradical allocation of biomass and fungal and root lipid and carbohydrate content in association with aspen genotype responses to the imposed treatments. By

  16. Characterization of seed germination and protocorm development of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum (Orchidaceae promoted by mycorrhizal fungi Epulorhiza spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Corrêa Pereira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyrtopodium glutiniferum is an endemic orchid of Brazil with potential medicinal and ornamental applications. As mycorrhizal fungi are essential for the initiation of the orchid life cycle, the aim of this study was to determine the strains of mycorrhizal fungi suitable for seed germination and protocorm development of C. glutiniferum and to characterize the symbiotic development of protocorms. Seeds of C. glutiniferum were inoculated with nine mycorrhizal fungi, Epulorhiza spp., Ceratorhiza spp., Rhizoctonia sp., originally isolated from Brazilian neotropical orchids. Only Epulorhiza isolates promoted seed germination and protocorm development. Three Epulorhiza isolates (M1, M6 = E. epiphytica, M20 = Epulorhiza sp. promoted protocorm development until leaf production at 63 days. The protocorms are comprised of parenchyma cells delimited by a unistratified epidermis; the parenchyma cells of the upper part of the protocorms are smaller than those located more towards the base. Intact and digested pelotons were observed inside of protocorms implying that the seedlings were capable of mycotrophy. Additionally, the development of a bud primordium only occurred after colonization by fungus. This study suggests that C. glutiniferum has a preference for strains of Epulorhiza and that fungus digestion is essential to protocorm development.

  17. Growth and nutrition of eucalyptus clones seedlings inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Sousa Lima

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus is one of the most planted forest species, in Brazil, due to its rapid growth and high economic yield. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the seedlings nutritional and phytosanitary status, besides increasing their resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species on the growth and nutrition of different eucalyptus clones seedlings. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions, in a randomized blocks design and a 5x5 factorial scheme (five fungal species and five eucalyptus clones, with five replications. In general, the mycorrhizal symbiosis significantly increased the growth and nutrition of eucalyptus seedlings, when compared to the non-inoculated seedlings. The most efficient interaction occured between the 2361 clone and the Entrophospora infrequens fungus, with increases of 107.3% and 120.6%, for the shoot and root dry biomass yield, and 107.7%, 94.1% and 103.3%, respectively for the accumulation of N, P and K in the seedlings shoots. All the fungal species studied showed a high absolute compatibility index with eucalyptus clones. The Glomus manihots and E. infrequens fungi presented a higher functional compatibility index with the clones tested. The 5204 clone showed 75% of compatibility with the fungi evaluated.

  18. Germination and growth of purple passion fruit seedlings under pre-germination treatments and mycorrhizal inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Guillermo Ramírez Gil

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of purple passion fruit plants has increased in Colombia, as a direct result of its well-accepted consumption. Therefore, there is a need for technological solutions aimed at the sustainable growth of its fruit, such as improving seed germination and decreasing phosphorus (P deficiencies, given its low availability in tropical soils. This study aimed to evaluate pre-germination treatments (control, apical and basal seed cuts, alternation of temperature, photoperiod, application of gibberellic acid and immersion in 96 % of H2SO4 and mycorrhizal dependency of purple passion fruit plants, using three levels of P in the soil solution (0.002 mg L-1, 0.02 mg L-1 and 0.2 mg L-1, in 35 combinations with or without the inoculation of the Glomus fasciculatum mycorrhizal fungus. A completely randomized design with five replications per treatment was used. The treatment with the most significant effect for reducing the dormancy of the purple passion fruit seeds is the immersion in 96 % of H2SO4 for 20 minutes. This species shows a high mycorrhizal dependency, when coupled with 0.02 mg L-1 of P in the soil solution.

  19. Genomic suppression subtractive hybridization as a tool to identify differences in mycorrhizal fungal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Vallino, Marta; Daghino, Stefania; Perotto, Silvia; Bonfante, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Characterization of genomic variation among different microbial species, or different strains of the same species, is a field of significant interest with a wide range of potential applications. We have investigated the genomic variation in mycorrhizal fungal genomes through genomic suppressive subtractive hybridization. The comparison was between phylogenetically distant and close truffle species (Tuber spp.), and between isolates of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius featuring different degrees of metal tolerance. In the interspecies experiment, almost all the sequences that were identified in the Tuber melanosporum genome and absent in Tuber borchii and Tuber indicum corresponded to transposable elements. In the intraspecies comparison, some specific sequences corresponded to regions coding for enzymes, among them a glutathione synthetase known to be involved in metal tolerance. This approach is a quick and rather inexpensive tool to develop molecular markers for mycorrhizal fungi tracking and barcoding, to identify functional genes and to investigate the genome plasticity, adaptation and evolution. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Alleviatory activities in mycorrhizal tobacco plants subjected to increasing chloride in irrigation water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Safahani Langeroodi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of presence and absence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM+ and AM- fungus (AMF Glomus intraradices on agronomic and chemical characteristics of field-grown tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. Virginia type (cv. K-326 plants exposed to varying concentrations of chloride 10, 40, 70 and 100 mg Cl L–1 (C1-C4 were studied over two growing seasons (2012-2013. Mycorrhizal plants had significantly higher uptake of nutrients in shoots and number of leaves regardless of intensities of chloride stress. The cured leaves yields of AM+ plants under C2-C4 chloride stressed conditions were higher than AM- plants. Leaf chloride content increased in line with the increase of chloride level, while AMF colonised plants maintained low Cl content. AM+ plants produced tobacco leaves that contained significantly higher quantities of nicotine than AM- plants. AM inoculation ameliorated the chloride stress to some extent. Antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as non-enzymatic antioxidants (ascorbic acid and glutathione also exhibited great variation with chloride treatment. Chloride stress caused great alterations in the endogenous levels of growth hormones with abscisic acid showing increment. AMF inoculated plants maintained higher levels of growth hormones and also allayed the negative impact of chloride. The level of 40 mg L–1 in combination with arbuscular mycorrhizal can be considered as the acceptable threshold to avoid adverse effects on Virginia tobacco.

  1. Possible Benefits of Mycorrhizal Symbiosis, in Reducing CO2 from Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azmat, Rafia

    2013-01-01

    It is a fact that the relationship between a fungus and a plant can have a great impact on the environment, especially under drought conditions. Experiments conducted at the laboratory scale suggested that in mycorrhizal symbiosis; plants usually provide their fungal partners with carbohydrates from photosynthesis and receive mineral nutrients. It is observed that mycorrhizal inoculated plants observed large surface area of leaves and outsized root sections which were helpful in increasing the rate of photosynthetic processes. This may be attributed to the rapid production of carbohydrate for their fungal mate. The same phenomena can be observed in environments of high traffic density or waste burning, industrial zones (where there are emissions of CO 2 from chimneys) or the areas that are lack nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. It may be observed that the plants that have this association with mycorrhizal fungi may obligate a better chance in inhabiting this area. These plants can be helpful in reducing the CO 2 from the polluted atmosphere. The large length of the roots were related to the absorption of water molecules for survival as well as formation of first organic complex CHO for providing the energy to the plant in biotic stress and C and nutrient exchange between fungal partner and plants

  2. Suppression of allene oxide synthase 3 in potato increases degree of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo, Rafael Jorge León; Navarrete, María Isabel Tamayo; Bote, Juan Antonio Ocampo; Monguio, Salomé Prat; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2016-01-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) is a mutually beneficial interaction among higher plants and soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Numerous studies have pointed that jasmonic acid plays an important role in the development of the intraradical fungus. This compound belongs to a group of biologically active compounds known as oxylipins which are derived from the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies of the regulatory role played by oxylipins in AM colonization have generally focused on jasmonates, while few studies exist on the 9-LOX pathway of oxylipins during AM formation. Here, the cDNA of Allene oxide synthase 3 (AOS3), a key enzyme in the 9-LOX pathway, was used in the RNA interference (RNAi) system to transform potato plants in order to suppress its expression. Results show increases in AOS3 gene expression and 9-LOX products in roots of wild type potato mycorrhizal plants. The suppression of AOS3 gene expression increases the percentage of root with mycorrhizal colonization at early stages of AM formation. AOS3 RNA interference lead to an induction of LOXA and 13-LOX genes, a reduction in AOS3 derived 9-LOX oxylipin compounds and an increase in jasmonic acid content, suggesting compensation between 9 and 13-LOX pathways. The results in a whole support the hypothesis of a regulatory role for the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway during mycorrhization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Phylogeonomics and Ecogenomics of the Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-05-23

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze 2 dozen mycorrhizal genomes of numerous known mycorrhizal orders and several ecological types (ectomycorrhizal [ECM], ericoid, orchid, and arbuscular). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput pipelines for genomic, transcriptomic, and re-sequencing, and platforms for assembly, annotation, and analysis. In the last 2 years we have sequenced 21 genomes of mycorrhizal fungi, and resequenced 6 additional strains of L. bicolor. Most of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm?s Mycorrhizal Fungi Portal (http://jgi.doe.gov/Mycorrhizal_fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. These data allow us to address long-standing issues in mycorrhizal evolution and ecology. For example, a major observation of mycorrhizal evolution is that each of the major ecological types appears to have evolved independently in multiple fungal clades. Using an ecogenomic approach we provide preliminary evidence that 2 clades (Cantharellales and Sebacinales) of a single symbiotic ecotype (orchid) utilize some common regulatory (protein tyrosine kinase) and metabolic (lipase) paths, the latter of which may be the product of HGT. Using a phylogenomic approach we provide preliminary evidence that a particular ecotype (ericoid) may have evolved more than once within a major clade (Leotiomycetes).

  4. Influence of mycorrhizal fungi on the growth and development of sandy everlasting Helichrysum arenarium (L. Moench.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Sawilska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The significance of root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi for the growth and development of Helichrysum arenarium was investigated in two independent experiments. In the first experiment the association of root colonization level with the pluviothermal conditions within the growing season and the age of a natural plant population was analyzed. In the second one, under controlled conditions, the influence of artificial inoculation with the arbuscular fungus Glomus intraradices on the features of plants raised from achenes was studied. It was shown that hydrothermal conditions during blooming period had a greater influence on reproduction processes of sandy everlasting than both the population age (the secondary succession progress and the level of root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. High amount of precipitation at plant generative development phase positively influences the potential and actual fertility of ramets. The presence of arbuscular fungus in the soil favors the growth and development of sandy everlasting specimens at their early growing stages: they have a better-developed root system and a greater photosynthetic area.

  5. Report of VA Medical Training Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Report of VA Medical Training Programs Database is used to track medical center health services trainees and VA physicians serving as faculty. The database also...

  6. Non-VA Hospital System (NVH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) pays for care provided to VA beneficiaries in non-VA hospitals through its contract hospitalization program as mandated by...

  7. Effect of mycorrhizal infection on root uptake by pine seedlings and redistribution of three contrasting radio-isotopes: {sup 85}Sr, {sup 95m}Tc and {sup 137}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plassard, C.; Ladeyn, I.; Staunton, S. [Institut National de Recherches Agronomiques (INRA), UMR Rhizosphere and Symbiose 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2004-07-01

    Mycorrhizal infection is known to improve phosphate nutrition and water supply of higher plants. It has been reported to both increase the uptake of potentially toxic pollutant elements and to protect plants against toxic effects. Little is known about the effect of mycorrhizal infection on the dynamics of radioactive pollutants in soil-plant systems. The aim of this study was to compare the root uptake and root-shoot transfer of three radio-isotopes with contrasting chemical properties ({sup 85}Sr, {sup 95m}Tc and {sup 137}Cs) in mycorrhizal and control, non mycorrhizal plants. The plant studied was Pinus pinaster and the associated ecto-mycorrhizal fungus was Rhizopogon roseolus (strain R18-2). Plants were grown under anoxic conditions for 3 months then transferred to thin layers of autoclaved soil and allowed to grow for four months. After this period, the rhizotrons were dismantled, and plant tissue analysed. Biomass, nutrient content (K, P, N, Ca) and activities of each isotope in roots, shoots and stems were measured, and the degree of mycorrhizal infection assessed. The transfer factors decreased in the order Tc>Sr>Cs as expected from the degree of immobilisation by soil. No effect of mycorrhizal infection on root uptake was observed for Sr. Shoot activity concentration of Tc was decreased by mycorrhizal infection but root uptake correlated well with mycelial soil surface area. In contrast, Cs shoot activity was greater in mycorrhizal than control plants. The uptake and root to shoot distribution shall be discussed in relation to nutrient dynamics. (author)

  8. [Effect of flooding time length on mycorrhizal colonization of three AM fungi in two wetland plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lei-Meng; Wang, Peng-Teng; Wang, Shu-Guang

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide information for elucidating effect of flooding on the formation and function of AM in wetland plants, three AM fungi (Glomus intraradices, Glomus versiforme, Glomus etunicatum) were used to investigate the effects of flooding time length on their colonization in cattail (Typha orientalis) and rice (Oryza sativa L. ). The results showed that the mycorrhizal colonization rate (MCR) presented downtrend with increasing flooding time length. In cattail, MCR of the fungus F3 was higher than those of fungi F1 and F2, but no significant difference in MCR was found between fungi F1 and F2. In rice, the MCRs of fungi F2 and F3 were higher than that of E1. In both plants, the proportional frequency of hyphae was the highest while the proportional frequency of arbuscules and vesicles was very low in all treatments, indicating that hyphal colonization was the main route for AM formation. The proportional frequency of hyphae in cattail increased with the flooding time length, but no significant trend was observed in rice plant. The proportional frequency of arhuscules decreased with the increase of flooding time, and was the highest in the treatment without flooding (treatment IV). The number of spores produced by AM fungi increased with increasing flooding time, and reached the highest in the treatment of long time flooding (treatment I). In the same treatment, the fungus F3 produced more spores than fungi F1 and F2. Changes in wet weight of the two plants showed that AM could increase cattail growth under flooding, hut little effect on rice growth was found. It is concluded that flooding time length significantly affected the mycorrhizal colonization rate and the proportional frequency of colonization. AM could enhance the growth of wetland plant, but this depends on the mycorrhizal dependence of host plant on AM fungi. Therefore, flooding time length should be considered in the inoculation of wetland plants with AM fungi.

  9. Extensive In Vitro Hyphal Growth of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in the Presence of CO(2) and Flavonols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécard, G; Douds, D D; Pfeffer, P E

    1992-03-01

    Various flavonoids were tested for their ability to stimulate in vitro growth of germinated spores of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Experiments were performed in the presence of 2% CO(2), previously demonstrated to be required for growth of Gigaspora margarita (G. Bécard and Y. Piché, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55:2320-2325, 1989). Only the flavonols stimulated fungal growth. The flavones, flavanones, and isoflavones tested were generally inhibitory. Quercetin (10 muM) prolonged hyphal growth from germinated spores of G. margarita from 10 to 42 days. An average of more than 500 mm of hyphal growth and 13 auxiliary cells per spore were obtained. Quercetin also stimulated the growth of Glomus etunicatum. The glycosides of quercetin, rutin, and quercitrin were not stimulatory. The axenic growth of G. margarita achieved here under rigorously defined conditions is the most ever reported for a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus.

  10. Adaptive response of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to accumulation of elements and translocation in Phragmites australis affected by cadmium stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaochen; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Zhu, Shishu; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jieting; Yang, Jixian; Wang, Li

    2017-07-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been reported to play a central role in improving plant tolerance to cadmium (Cd)-contaminated sites. This is achieved by enhancing both the growth of host plants and the nutritive elements in plants. This study assessed potential regulatory effects of AM symbiosis with regard to nutrient uptake and transport, and revealed different response strategies to various Cd concentrations. Phragmites australis was inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis in the greenhouse cultivation system, where it was treated with 0-20 mg L -1 of Cd for 21days to investigate growth parameters, as well as Cd and nutritive element distribution in response to AM fungus inoculation. Mycorrhizal plants showed a higher tolerance, particularly under high Cd-level stress in the substrate. Moreover, our results determined the roots as dominant Cd reservoirs in plants. The AM fungus improved Cd accumulation and saturated concentration in the roots, thus inhibiting Cd uptake to shoots. The observed distributions of nutritive elements and the interactions among these indicated the highest microelement contribution to roots, Ca contributed maximally in leaves, and K and P contributed similarly under Cd stress. In addition, AM fungus inoculation effectively impacted Mn and P uptake and accumulation while coping with Cd toxicity. This study also demonstrated translocation factor from metal concentration (TF) could be a good parameter to evaluate different transportation strategies induced by various Cd stresses in contrast to the bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor from metal accumulation (TF'). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction of Vesicular-arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Phosphorus with Meloidogyne incognita on Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, K M; Hussey, R S; Roncadori, R W

    1983-07-01

    The influence of two vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus (P) nutrition on penetration, development, and reproduction by Meloidogyne incognita on Walter tomato was studied in the greenhouse. Inoculation with either Gigaspora margarita or Glomus mosseae 2 wk prior to nematode inoculation did not alter infection by M. incognita compared with nonmycorrhizal plants, regardless of soil P level (either 3 mug [low P] or 30 mug [high P] available P/g soil). At a given soil P level, nematode penetration and reproduction did not differ in mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants. However, plants grown in high P soil had greater root weights, increased nematode penetration and egg production per plant, and decreased colonization by mycorrhizal fungi, compared with plants grown in low P soil. The number of eggs per female nematode on mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants was not influenced by P treatment. Tomato plants with split root systems grown in double-compartment containers which had either low P soil in both sides or high P in one side and low P in the other, were inoculated at transplanting with G. margarita and 2 wk later one-half of the split root system of each plant was inoculated with M. incognita larvae. Although the mycoorhizal fungus increased the inorganic P content of the root to a level comparable to that in plants grown in high P soil, nematode penetration and reproduction were not altered. In a third series of experiments, the rate of nematode development was not influenced by either the presence of G. margarita or high soil P, compared with control plants grown in low P soil. These data indicate that supplemental P (30 mu/g soil) alters root-knot nematode infection of tomato more than G. mosseae and G. margarita.

  12. Two putative-aquaporin genes are differentially expressed during arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Lotus japonicus

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    Giovannetti Marco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM are widespread symbioses that provide great advantages to the plant, improving its nutritional status and allowing the fungus to complete its life cycle. Nevertheless, molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of AM symbiosis are not yet fully deciphered. Here, we have focused on two putative aquaporin genes, LjNIP1 and LjXIP1, which resulted to be upregulated in a transcriptomic analysis performed on mycorrhizal roots of Lotus japonicus. Results A phylogenetic analysis has shown that the two putative aquaporins belong to different functional families: NIPs and XIPs. Transcriptomic experiments have shown the independence of their expression from their nutritional status but also a close correlation with mycorrhizal and rhizobial interaction. Further transcript quantification has revealed a good correlation between the expression of one of them, LjNIP1, and LjPT4, the phosphate transporter which is considered a marker gene for mycorrhizal functionality. By using laser microdissection, we have demonstrated that one of the two genes, LjNIP1, is expressed exclusively in arbuscule-containing cells. LjNIP1, in agreement with its putative role as an aquaporin, is capable of transferring water when expressed in yeast protoplasts. Confocal analysis have demonstrated that eGFP-LjNIP1, under its endogenous promoter, accumulates in the inner membrane system of arbusculated cells. Conclusions Overall, the results have shown different functionality and expression specificity of two mycorrhiza-inducible aquaporins in L. japonicus. One of them, LjNIP1 can be considered a novel molecular marker of mycorrhizal status at different developmental stages of the arbuscule. At the same time, LjXIP1 results to be the first XIP family aquaporin to be transcriptionally regulated during symbiosis.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the Populus trichocarpa-Rhizophagus irregularis Mycorrhizal Symbiosis: Regulation of Plant and Fungal Transportomes under Nitrogen Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Silvia; Kohler, Annegret; Niehl, Annette; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Boller, Thomas; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Nutrient transfer is a key feature of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. Valuable mineral nutrients are transferred from the AM fungus to the plant, increasing its fitness and productivity, and, in exchange, the AM fungus receives carbohydrates as an energy source from the plant. Here, we analyzed the transcriptome of the Populus trichocarpa-Rhizophagus irregularis symbiosis using RNA-sequencing of non-mycorrhizal or mycorrhizal fine roots, with a focus on the effect of nitrogen (N) starvation. In R. irregularis, we identified 1,015 differentially expressed genes, whereby N starvation led to a general induction of gene expression. Genes of the functional classes of cell growth, membrane biogenesis and cell structural components were highly abundant. Interestingly, N starvation also led to a general induction of fungal transporters, indicating increased nutrient demand upon N starvation. In non-mycorrhizal P. trichocarpa roots, 1,341 genes were differentially expressed under N starvation. Among the 953 down-regulated genes in N starvation, most were involved in metabolic processes including amino acids, carbohydrate and inorganic ion transport, while the 342 up-regulated genes included many defense-related genes. Mycorrhization led to the up-regulation of 549 genes mainly involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis and transport; only 24 genes were down-regulated. Mycorrhization specifically induced expression of three ammonium transporters and one phosphate transporter, independently of the N conditions, corroborating the hypothesis that these transporters are important for symbiotic nutrient exchange. In conclusion, our data establish a framework of gene expression in the two symbiotic partners under high-N and low-N conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Mycorrhizal dependency of laurel (Ocotea sp.)

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    Sierra-Escobar, Jorge A; Castro Restrepo, Dagoberto; Osorio Vega, Walter

    2009-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out to determine the mycorrhizal dependency of laurel (>Ocotea sp.). In order to do this, a completely randomized experimental design was used, with six treatments in a factorial array of 3 x 2 and five repetitions. The treatments involved a combination of three Phosphorus (P) levels in soil solution (0.002, 0.02 and 0.2 mg L-1) and two levels of mycorrhizal inoculation, either inoculated or non-inoculated with Glomus aggregatum Schenck and Smith. The leaf P content as a function of time was used as an output variable. Shoot dry matter, shoot P content, mycorrhizal colonization of roots, and mycorrhizal dependence were measured at harvest. The results indicated that the leaf P content increased significantly when using the mycorrhizal inoculation in laurel at P level 0.2 mg L -1, but not in the other P levels, on some of the sampling days. Shoot dry weight and total plant P content did not increase at all levels of soil available P. Mycorrhizal dependency of laurel reached 28%, which allows this species to be classified as moderately dependent on mycorrhiza.

  15. Dissection of niche competition between introduced and indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with respect to soybean yield responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Rieko; Koyama, Takuya; Sato, Takumi; Adachi, Katsuki; Tawaraya, Keitaro; Sato, Shusei; Hirakawa, Hideki; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2018-05-09

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi associate with most land plants and deliver phosphorus to the host. Identification of biotic/abiotic factors that determine crop responses to AM fungal inoculation is an essential step for successful application of the fungi in sustainable agriculture. We conducted three field trials on soybean with a commercial inoculum and developed a new molecular tool to dissect interactions between the inoculum and indigenous fungi on the MiSeq sequencing platform. Regression analysis indicated that sequence read abundance of the inoculum fungus was the most significant factor that determined soybean yield responses to the inoculation, suggesting that dominance of the inoculum fungus is a necessary condition for positive yield responses. Agricultural practices (fallow/cropping in the previous year) greatly affected the colonization levels (i.e. read abundances) of the inoculum fungus via altering the propagule density of indigenous AM fungi. Analysis of niche competition revealed that the inoculum fungus competed mainly with the indigenous fungi that are commonly distributed in the trial sites, probably because their life-history strategy is the same as that of the inoculum fungus. In conclusion, we provide a new framework for evaluating the significance of environmental factors towards successful application of AM fungi in agriculture.

  16. Comparison of outcomes for veterans receiving dialysis care from VA and non-VA providers

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    Wang Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demand for dialysis treatment exceeds its supply within the Veterans Health Administration (VA, requiring VA to outsource dialysis care by purchasing private sector dialysis for veterans on a fee-for-service basis. It is unclear whether outcomes are similar for veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus non-VA providers. We assessed the extent of chronic dialysis treatment utilization and differences in all-cause hospitalizations and mortality between veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus VA-outsourced providers. Methods We constructed a retrospective cohort of veterans in 2 VA regions who received chronic dialysis treatment financed by VA between January 2007 and December 2008. From VA administrative data, we identified veterans who received outpatient dialysis in (1 VA, (2 VA-outsourced settings, or (3 both (“dual” settings. In adjusted analyses, we used two-part and logistic regression to examine associations between dialysis setting and all-cause hospitalization and mortality one-year from veterans’ baseline dialysis date. Results Of 1,388 veterans, 27% received dialysis exclusively in VA, 47% in VA-outsourced settings, and 25% in dual settings. Overall, half (48% were hospitalized and 12% died. In adjusted analysis, veterans in VA-outsourced settings incurred fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays than users of VA due to favorable selection. Dual-system dialysis patients had lower one-year mortality than veterans receiving VA dialysis. Conclusions VA expenditures for “buying” outsourced dialysis are high and increasing relative to “making” dialysis treatment within its own system. Outcomes comparisons inform future make-or-buy decisions and suggest the need for VA to consider veterans’ access to care, long-term VA savings, and optimal patient outcomes in its placement decisions for dialysis services.

  17. Comparison of outcomes for veterans receiving dialysis care from VA and non-VA providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Virginia; Maciejewski, Matthew L; Patel, Uptal D; Stechuchak, Karen M; Hynes, Denise M; Weinberger, Morris

    2013-01-18

    Demand for dialysis treatment exceeds its supply within the Veterans Health Administration (VA), requiring VA to outsource dialysis care by purchasing private sector dialysis for veterans on a fee-for-service basis. It is unclear whether outcomes are similar for veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus non-VA providers. We assessed the extent of chronic dialysis treatment utilization and differences in all-cause hospitalizations and mortality between veterans receiving dialysis from VA versus VA-outsourced providers. We constructed a retrospective cohort of veterans in 2 VA regions who received chronic dialysis treatment financed by VA between January 2007 and December 2008. From VA administrative data, we identified veterans who received outpatient dialysis in (1) VA, (2) VA-outsourced settings, or (3) both ("dual") settings. In adjusted analyses, we used two-part and logistic regression to examine associations between dialysis setting and all-cause hospitalization and mortality one-year from veterans' baseline dialysis date. Of 1,388 veterans, 27% received dialysis exclusively in VA, 47% in VA-outsourced settings, and 25% in dual settings. Overall, half (48%) were hospitalized and 12% died. In adjusted analysis, veterans in VA-outsourced settings incurred fewer hospitalizations and shorter hospital stays than users of VA due to favorable selection. Dual-system dialysis patients had lower one-year mortality than veterans receiving VA dialysis. VA expenditures for "buying" outsourced dialysis are high and increasing relative to "making" dialysis treatment within its own system. Outcomes comparisons inform future make-or-buy decisions and suggest the need for VA to consider veterans' access to care, long-term VA savings, and optimal patient outcomes in its placement decisions for dialysis services.

  18. Evaluation of Mycorrhizal Fungi, Vermicompost and Humic Acid on Essence Yield and Root Colonization of Fennel

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    I. Akbari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The main objective of sustainable agriculture is to decrease the off-farm inputs such as chemical fertilizers, increased farm nutrient cycle through reduced tillage and the use of biological and organic fertilizers. Studies on medicinal plants indicates that the use of sustainable farming systems provide the best conditions for the production of these plants. Mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost and humic acid are samples of biological and organic fertilizer that can be used, to eliminate or substantially reduce the use of chemical inputs in order to increase the quantity, quality and stability of the products. Mycorrhizal fungi are one of the most important rhizosphere microorganisms which have symbiotic relation with root of most crops. Mycorrhizal symbiosis improves the soil physical (through expansion of hyphae of fungus, chemical (through increased absorption of nutrients and biological (the soil food web quality. These fungus increased nutrient uptake, such as phosphorus and some micronutrients, water uptake, reducing the negative effects of environmental stress and increase resistance to pathogens and improve the quality of their host plants. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill is one of the most important medicinal plants, as the essential oil from the seeds used in a variety of industries, pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic use. Anethole is important component of the essential oil of fennel seed. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted as a factorial based on randomized complete block design in order to evaluate the effects of vermicompost application, humic acid and mycorrhizal fungi on quantitative and qualitative aspects of fennel yield at experimental farm of Shahrood University during growing season of 1391-92. This experiment includes 12 treatments and 3 applications. Vermicompost levels include: v1 (no application v2 (4 ton ha-1 v3 (8 ton ha-1. Mycorrhizal fungi include: m1 (no inoculation and m2 (inoculation and

  19. The potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to form root symbioses with ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal middle European forest plants.

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    Tereza Lukešová

    Full Text Available The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.--Acephala applanata species complex (PAC. We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation protects Miscanthus × giganteus against trace element toxicity in a highly metal-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Stéphane; Labidi, Sonia; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Tisserant, Benoit; Nsanganwimana, Florian; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dalpé, Yolande; Grandmougin, Anne; Douay, Francis; Shirali, Pirouz; Verdin, Anthony; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2015-09-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF)-assisted phytoremediation could constitute an ecological and economic method in polluted soil rehabilitation programs. The aim of this work was to characterize the trace element (TE) phytoremediation potential of mycorrhizal Miscanthus × giganteus. To understand the mechanisms involved in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis tolerance to TE toxicity, the fatty acid compositions and several stress oxidative biomarkers were compared in the roots and leaves of Miscanthus × giganteus cultivated under field conditions in either TE-contaminated or control soils. TEs were accumulated in greater amounts in roots, but the leaves were the organ most affected by TE contamination and were characterized by a strong decrease in fatty acid contents. TE-induced oxidative stress in leaves was confirmed by an increase in the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde (MDA). TE contamination decreased the GSSG/GSH ratio in the leaves of exposed plants, while peroxidase (PO) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were increased in leaves and in whole plants, respectively. AMF inoculation also increased root colonization in the presence of TE contamination. The mycorrhizal colonization determined a decrease in SOD activity in the whole plant and PO activities in leaves and induced a significant increase in the fatty acid content in leaves and a decrease in MDA formation in whole plants. These results suggested that mycorrhization is able to confer protection against oxidative stress induced by soil pollution. Our findings suggest that mycorrhizal inoculation could be used as a bioaugmentation technique, facilitating Miscanthus cultivation on highly TE-contaminated soil. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Growth and nutritional status of Brazilian wood species Cedrella fissilis and Anadenanthera peregrina in bauxite spoil in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and substrate amendment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tótola Marcos Rogério

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of Cedrella fissilis Vell. (Cedro Rosa and of Anadenanthera peregrina Benth (Angico Vermelho in bauxite spoil was studied to evaluate their response to substrate amendment or to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. The plants were grown in bauxite spoil, topsoil or spoil amended with either topsoil or compost, and inoculated with the AMF Acaulospora scrobiculata, Gigaspora margarita or Glomus etunicatum. Root colonization was highly dependent on the interaction plant-fungus-substrate. In C. fissilis, root colonization by Gigaspora margarita dropped from 75% in bauxite spoil to only 4% in topsoil. Contrarily, root colonization of A. peregrina by the same fungus increased from 48% in spoil to 60% in topsoil. Root colonization of C. fissilis in topsoil was lower than in the three other substrates. The opposite was observed for A. peregrina. Inoculation of the plants with Acaulospora scrobiculata or Glomus etunicatum was very effective in promoting plant growth. Plants of both C. fissilis and A. peregrina did not respond to amendments of bauxite spoil unless they were mycorrhizal. Also, a preferential partitioning of photosynthates to the shoots of A. peregrina inoculated with G. etunicatum or A. scrobiculata, and of C. fissilis inoculated with any of the three species of AMF was observed. C. fissilis showed a greater response to mycorrhizal inoculation than A. peregrina. The mean mycorrhizal efficiency (ME for dry matter production by C. fissilis was 1,847% for A. scrobiculata, 1,922% for G. etunicatum, and 119% for G. margarita. In A. peregrina, the ME was 249% for A. scrobiculata, 540% for G. etunicatum, and 50% for G. margarita. The effect of mycorrhizal inoculation on plant growth seems to be related in part to an enhanced phosphorus absorption by inoculated plants. Moreover, the efficiency with which the absorbed nutrients were used to produce plant biomass was much greater in plants inoculated with A. scrobiculata or

  2. Strigolactones Stimulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Activating Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Kiefer, Patrick; Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Jauneau, Alain; Roy, Sébastien; Portais, Jean-Charles; Roux, Christophe; Bécard, Guillaume

    2006-01-01

    The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF) that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10 −13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants. PMID:16787107

  3. Strigolactones stimulate arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by activating mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Besserer

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10(-13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants.

  4. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine under two fertilization treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2015-07-01

    Survival and functioning of mycorrhizal associations at low temperatures are not known well. In an earlier study, ectomycorrhizas did not affect the frost hardiness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) roots, but here we studied whether differential nutrient availability would change the result and additionally, alter frost hardiness aboveground. The aim in this experiment was to compare the frost hardiness of roots and needles of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine seedlings raised using two fertilization treatments and two cold-hardening regimes. The fertilization treatments were low (LF) and high (HF) application of a complete nutrient solution. Three hundred mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were cultivated in growth chambers in four blocks for 16 weeks. For the first 9 weeks, the seedlings grew in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) with low fertilization and then they were raised for 3 weeks in LDHT with either low or high fertilization. After this, half of the plants in each treatment combination remained in LDHT, and half were transferred to short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimatize. The frost hardiness of the roots and needles was assessed using controlled freezing tests followed by electrolyte leakage tests (REL). Mycorrhizal roots were slightly more frost hardy than non-mycorrhizal roots, but only in the growing-season conditions (LDHT) in low-nutrient treatment. In LDHT and LF, the frost hardiness of the non-mycorrhizal roots was about -9 °C, and that of the non-mycorrhizal HF roots and the mycorrhizal roots in both fertilization levels was about -11 °C. However, no difference was found in the roots within the SDLT regime, and in needles, there was no difference between mycorrhizal and fertilization treatments. The frost hardiness of needles increased by SDLT treatment, being -8.5 and -14.1 °C in LDHT and SDLT, respectively. The dry mass of roots, stems, and needles was lower in LF than in

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increase salt tolerance of apple seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shou-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Lan; Xue, Yuan-Xia; Zhang, Zhi-Fen; Shi, Shu-Yi

    2014-12-01

    Apple trees are often subject to severe salt stress in China as well as in the world that results in significant loss of apple production. Therefore this study was carried out to evaluate the response of apple seedlings inoculated with abuscular mycorrhizal fungi under 0, 2‰, 4‰ and 6‰ salinity stress levels and further to conclude the upper threshold of mycorrhizal salinity tolerance. The results shows that abuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly increased the root length colonization of mycorrhizal apple plants with exposure time period to 0, 2‰ and 4‰ salinity levels as compared to non-mycorrhizal plants, however, percent root colonization reduced as saline stress increased. Salinity levels were found to negatively correlate with leaf relative turgidity, osmotic potential irrespective of non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal apple plants, but the decreased mycorrhizal leaf turgidity maintained relative normal values at 2‰ and 4‰ salt concentrations. Under salt stress condition, Cl - and Na + concentrations clearly increased and K + contents obviously decreased in non-mycorrhizal roots in comparison to mycorrhizal plants, this caused mycorrhizal plants had a relatively higher K + /Na + ratio in root. In contrast to zero salinity level, although ascorbate peroxidase and catalase activities in non-inoculated and inoculated leaf improved under all saline levels, the extent of which these enzymes increased was greater in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants. The numbers of survived tree with non-mycorrhization were 40, 20 and 0 (i.e., 66.7%, 33.3% and 0) on the days of 30, 60 and 90 under 4‰ salinity, similarly in mycorrhization under 6‰ salinity 40, 30 and 0 (i.e., 66.7%, 50% and 0) respectively. These results suggest that 2‰ and 4‰ salt concentrations may be the upper thresholds of salinity tolerance in non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal apple plants, respectively.

  6. Frost hardiness of mycorrhizal (Hebeloma sp.) and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Anna; Lehto, Tarja; Repo, Tapani

    2013-10-01

    The frost hardiness (FH) of mycorrhizal [ectomycorrhizal (ECM)] and non-mycorrhizal (NM) Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings was studied to assess whether mycorrhizal symbiosis affected the roots' tolerance of below-zero temperatures. ECM (Hebeloma sp.) and NM seedlings were cultivated in a growth chamber for 18 weeks. After 13 weeks' growth in long-day and high-temperature (LDHT) conditions, a half of the ECM and NM seedlings were moved into a chamber with short-day and low-temperature (SDLT) conditions to cold acclimate. After exposures to a range of below-zero temperatures, the FH of the roots was assessed by means of the relative electrolyte leakage test. The FH was determined as the inflection point of the temperature-response curve. No significant difference was found between the FH of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots in LDHT (-8.9 and -9.8 °C) or SDLT (-7.5 and -6.8 °C). The mycorrhizal treatment had no significant effect on the total dry mass, the allocation of dry mass among the roots and needles or nutrient accumulation. The mycorrhizal treatment with Hebeloma sp. did not affect the FH of Scots pine in this experimental setup. More information is needed on the extent to which mycorrhizas tolerate low temperatures, especially with different nutrient contents and different mycorrhiza fungi.

  7. OneVA EA Vision and Strategy

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — The outcomes/goals supported by effective use of an EA are: Improved Service Delivery, Functional Integration, Resource Optimization and Authoritative Reference. VA...

  8. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY 2016

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  9. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2010

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  10. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2012

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  11. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2004

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  12. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY1998

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  13. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2009

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  14. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2013

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  15. Geographic Distribution of VA Expenditures FY2002

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    Department of Veterans Affairs — This report details VA expenditures at the state, county, and Congressional District level. It includes categories such as Compensation and Pension, Construction,...

  16. DDT uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizal alfalfa and depletion in soil as influenced by soil application of a non-ionic surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Naiying; Zhang Shuzhen; Huang Honglin; Shan Xiaoquan; Christie, Peter; Wang Youshan

    2008-01-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the colonization of alfalfa roots by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus etunicatum and application of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 on DDT uptake by alfalfa and depletion in soil. Mycorrhizal colonization led to an increase in the accumulation of DDT in roots but a decrease in shoots. The combination of AM inoculation and Triton X-100 application enhanced DDT uptake by both the roots and shoots. Application of Triton X-100 gave much lower residual concentrations of DDT in the bulk soil than in the rhizosphere soil or in the bulk soil without Triton X-100. AM colonization significantly increased bacterial and fungal counts and dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere soil. The combined AM inoculation of plants and soil application of surfactant may have potential as a biotechnological approach for the decontamination of soil polluted with DDT. - Combined colonization of alfalfa roots by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and addition of non-ionic surfactant to the soil promoted root and shoot uptake and soil dissipation of DDT

  17. DDT uptake by arbuscular mycorrhizal alfalfa and depletion in soil as influenced by soil application of a non-ionic surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Naiying [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: szzhang@rcees.ac.cn; Huang Honglin; Shan Xiaoquan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Christie, Peter [Agricultural and Environmental Science Department, Queen' s University Belfast, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Wang Youshan [Municipal Academy of Agriculture and Forestry, Institute of Plant Nutrition and Resources, Beijing 100097 (China)

    2008-02-15

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to investigate the colonization of alfalfa roots by the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus etunicatum and application of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 on DDT uptake by alfalfa and depletion in soil. Mycorrhizal colonization led to an increase in the accumulation of DDT in roots but a decrease in shoots. The combination of AM inoculation and Triton X-100 application enhanced DDT uptake by both the roots and shoots. Application of Triton X-100 gave much lower residual concentrations of DDT in the bulk soil than in the rhizosphere soil or in the bulk soil without Triton X-100. AM colonization significantly increased bacterial and fungal counts and dehydrogenase activity in the rhizosphere soil. The combined AM inoculation of plants and soil application of surfactant may have potential as a biotechnological approach for the decontamination of soil polluted with DDT. - Combined colonization of alfalfa roots by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and addition of non-ionic surfactant to the soil promoted root and shoot uptake and soil dissipation of DDT.

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of night warming on physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yajun; Wu, Songlin; Sun, Yuqing; Li, Tao; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Caiyan; Lin, Ge; Chen, Baodong

    2015-02-01

    Elevated night temperature, one of the main climate warming scenarios, can have profound effects on plant growth and metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to the potential role of mycorrhizal associations in plant responses to night warming, although it is well known that symbiotic fungi can protect host plants against various environmental stresses. In the present study, physiological traits of Medicago truncatula L. in association with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis were investigated under simulated night warming. A constant increase in night temperature of 1.53 °C significantly reduced plant shoot and root biomass, flower and seed number, leaf sugar concentration, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. However, the AM association essentially mitigated these negative effects of night warming by improving plant growth, especially through increased root biomass, root to shoot ratio, and shoot Zn and root P concentrations. A significant interaction was observed between R. irregularis inoculation and night warming in influencing both root sucrose concentration and expression of sucrose synthase (SusS) genes, suggesting that AM symbiosis and increased night temperature jointly regulated plant sugar metabolism. Night warming stimulated AM fungal colonization but did not influence arbuscule abundance, symbiosis-related plant or fungal gene expression, or growth of extraradical mycelium, indicating little effect of night warming on the development or functioning of AM symbiosis. These findings highlight the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis in assisting plant resilience to climate warming.

  19. Has the VA Become a White Elephant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. As I write this Dennis Wagner is publishing a series of articles in the Arizona Republic describing his quest to find out if care at VA hospitals have improved over the last 2 years (1. To begin the article Wagner describes the fable of the King of Siam who presented albino pachyderms to his enemies knowing they would be bankrupted because the cost of food and care outweighed all usefulness. A modern expression derives from this parable: the white elephant. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has prided itself on being a leader in healthcare. It is the largest healthcare system in the US, implemented the first electronic medical record, and more than 70 percent of all US doctors have received training in the VA healthcare system (2. This year the VA is celebrating the 70th anniversary of its partnership with US medical schools. Beginning in 1946, the VA partnered ...

  20. KENO-VA-PVM KENO-VA-SM, KENO5A for Parallel Processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon, Javier; Pena, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: This package contains versions KENO-Va-SM (Shared Memory version) and KENO-Va-PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine version) based on SCALE-4.1. KENO-Va three-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation for neutron multiplying systems. The primary purpose of KENO-Va is to determine k-effective. Other calculated quantities include lifetime and generation time, energy-dependent leakages, energy- and region-dependent absorptions, fissions, fluxes, and fission densities. 2 - Method of solution: KENO-Va employs the Monte Carlo technique

  1. The membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula roots displays qualitative and quantitative changes in response to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Cosette; Valot, Benoit; Guillier, Christelle; Mounier, Arnaud; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; van Tuinen, Diederik; Renaut, Jenny; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Recorbet, Ghislaine

    2014-08-28

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis that associates roots of most land plants with soil-borne fungi (Glomeromycota), is characterized by reciprocal nutritional benefits. Fungal colonization of plant roots induces massive changes in cortical cells where the fungus differentiates an arbuscule, which drives proliferation of the plasma membrane. Despite the recognized importance of membrane proteins in sustaining AM symbiosis, the root microsomal proteome elicited upon mycorrhiza still remains to be explored. In this study, we first examined the qualitative composition of the root membrane proteome of Medicago truncatula after microsome enrichment and subsequent in depth analysis by GeLC-MS/MS. The results obtained highlighted the identification of 1226 root membrane protein candidates whose cellular and functional classifications predispose plastids and protein synthesis as prevalent organelle and function, respectively. Changes at the protein abundance level between the membrane proteomes of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots were further monitored by spectral counting, which retrieved a total of 96 proteins that displayed a differential accumulation upon AM symbiosis. Besides the canonical markers of the periarbuscular membrane, new candidates supporting the importance of membrane trafficking events during mycorrhiza establishment/functioning were identified, including flotillin-like proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000875. During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, one of the most widespread mutualistic associations in nature, the endomembrane system of plant roots is believed to undergo qualitative and quantitative changes in order to sustain both the accommodation process of the AM fungus within cortical cells and the exchange of nutrients between symbionts. Large-scale GeLC-MS/MS proteomic analysis of the membrane fractions from mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots of M. truncatula coupled to spectral counting

  2. Dual inoculation with mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi applicable in sustainable cultivation improves the yield and nutritive value of onion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtova, Jana; Latr, Ales; Nedorost, Ludovit; Pokluda, Robert; Posta, Katalin; Vosatka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the use of dual microbial inoculation with mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi in onion cultivation to enhance yield while maintaining or improving the nutritional quality of onion bulbs. Treatments were two-factorial: (1) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF): the mix corresponding to fungal part of commercial product Symbivit (Glomus etunicatum, G. microaggregatum, G. intraradices, G. claroideum, G. mosseae, and G. geosporum) (M1) or the single-fungus inoculum of G. intraradices BEG140 (M2) and (2) bark chips preinoculated with saprotrophic fungi (mix of Gymnopilus sp., Agrocybe praecox, and Marasmius androsaceus) (S). The growth response of onion was the highest for the M1 mix treatment, reaching nearly 100% increase in bulb fresh weight. The effectiveness of dual inoculation was proved by more than 50% increase. We observed a strong correlation (r = 0.83) between the growth response of onion bulbs and AM colonization. All inoculation treatments but the single-fungus one enhanced significantly the total antioxidant capacity of bulb biomass, was the highest values being found for M1, S + M1, and S + M2. We observed some induced enhancement of the contents of mineral elements in bulb tissue (Mg and K contents for the M2 and M2, S, and S + M2 treatments, resp.).

  3. Dual Inoculation with Mycorrhizal and Saprotrophic Fungi Applicable in Sustainable Cultivation Improves the Yield and Nutritive Value of Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Albrechtova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to test the use of dual microbial inoculation with mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi in onion cultivation to enhance yield while maintaining or improving the nutritional quality of onion bulbs. Treatments were two-factorial: (1 arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF: the mix corresponding to fungal part of commercial product Symbivit (Glomus etunicatum, G. microaggregatum, G. intraradices, G. claroideum, G. mosseae, and G. geosporum (M1 or the single-fungus inoculum of G. intraradices BEG140 (M2 and (2 bark chips preinoculated with saprotrophic fungi (mix of Gymnopilus sp., Agrocybe praecox, and Marasmius androsaceus (S. The growth response of onion was the highest for the M1 mix treatment, reaching nearly 100% increase in bulb fresh weight. The effectiveness of dual inoculation was proved by more than 50% increase. We observed a strong correlation (r=0.83 between the growth response of onion bulbs and AM colonization. All inoculation treatments but the single-fungus one enhanced significantly the total antioxidant capacity of bulb biomass, was the highest values being found for M1, S + M1, and S + M2. We observed some induced enhancement of the contents of mineral elements in bulb tissue (Mg and K contents for the M2 and M2, S, and S+M2 treatments, resp..

  4. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Janos

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  5. 75 FR 78806 - Agency Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); a Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt.... 2900-0474.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); a Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt, VA Form 26-8986. OMB Control Number: 2900...

  6. Transcriptional responses of Medicago truncatula upon sulfur deficiency stress and arbuscular mycorrhizal symbios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eWipf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur plays an essential role in plants’ growth and development and in their response to various abiotic and biotic stresses despite its leachability and its very low abundance in the only form that plant roots can uptake (sulfate. It is part of amino acids, glutathione (GSH, thiols of proteins and peptides, membrane sulfolipids, cell walls and secondary products, so reduced availability can drastically alter plant growth and development. The nutritional benefits of symbiotic interactions can help the plant in case of S deficiency. In particular the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM interaction improves N, P and S plant nutrition, but the mechanisms behind these exchanges are not fully known yet. Although the transcriptional changes in the leguminous model plant Medicago truncatula have been already assessed in several biotic and/or abiotic conditions, S deficiency has not been considered so far. The aim of this work is to get a first overview on S-deficiency responses in the leaf and root tissues of plants interacting with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis.Several hundred genes displayed significantly different transcript accumulation levels. Annotation and GO ID association were used to identify biological processes and molecular functions affected by sulfur starvation. Beside the beneficial effects of AM interaction, plants were greatly affected by the nutritional status, showing various differences in their transcriptomic footprints. Several pathways in which S plays an important role appeared to be differentially affected according to mycorrhizal status, with a generally reduced responsiveness to S deficiency in mycorrhized plants.

  7. Establishment and effectiveness of inoculated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhl, Luise; Lukasiewicz, Catherine E; van der Heijden, Marcel G A

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are promoted as biofertilizers for sustainable agriculture. So far, most researchers have investigated the effects of AMF on plant growth under highly controlled conditions with sterilized soil, soil substrates or soils with low available P or low inoculum potential. However, it is still poorly documented whether inoculated AMF can successfully establish in field soils with native AMF communities and enhance plant growth. We inoculated grassland microcosms planted with a grass-clover mixture (Lolium multiflorum and Trifolium pratense) with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizoglomus irregulare. The microcosms were filled with eight different unsterilized field soils that varied greatly in soil type and chemical characteristics and indigenous AMF communities. We tested whether inoculation with AMF enhanced plant biomass and R. irregulare abundance using a species specific qPCR. Inoculation increased the abundance of R. irregulare in all soils, irrespective of soil P availability, the initial abundance of R. irregulare or the abundance of native AM fungal communities. AMF inoculation had no effect on the grass but significantly enhanced clover yield in five out of eight field soils. The results demonstrate that AMF inoculation can be successful, even when soil P availability is high and native AMF communities are abundant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Partitioning of Intermediary Carbon Metabolism in Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Leek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar-Hill, Y.; Pfeffer, P. E.; Douds, D.; Osman, S. F.; Doner, L. W.; Ratcliffe, R. G.

    1995-05-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are symbionts for a large variety of crop plants; however, the form in which they take up carbon from the host is not established. To trace the course of carbon metabolism, we have used nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with [13C]glucose labeling in vivo and in extracts to examine leek (Allium porrum) roots colonized by Glomus etunicatum (and uncolonized controls) as well as germinating spores. These studies implicate glucose as a likely substrate for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the symbiotic state. Root feeding of 0.6 mM 1-[13C]glucose labeled only the fungal metabolites trehalose and glycogen. The time course of this labeling was dependent on the status of the host. Incubation with 50 mM 1-[13C]glucose caused labeling of sucrose (in addition to fungal metabolites) with twice as much labeling in uncolonized plants. There was no detectable scrambling of the label from C1 glucose to the C6 position of glucose moieties in trehalose or glycogen. Labeling of mannitol C1,6 in the colonized root tissue was much less than in axenically germinating spores. Thus, carbohydrate metabolism of host and fungus are significantly altered in the symbiotic state.

  9. Common arbuscular mycorrhizal networks amplify competition for phosphorus between seedlings and established plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrild, Marie P; Ambus, Per; Rosendahl, Søren; Jakobsen, Iver

    2013-10-01

    Common mycorrhizal networks (CMNs) influence competition between plants, but reports regarding their precise effect are conflicting. We studied CMN effects on phosphorus (P) uptake and growth of seedlings as influenced by various disruptions of network components. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seedlings grew into established networks of Rhizophagus irregularis and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) in two experiments. One experiment studied seedling uptake of (32)P in the network in response to cutting of cucumber shoots; the other analysed seedling uptake of P and nitrogen (N) in the presence of intact or severed arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus networks and at two soil P concentrations. Pre-established and intact networks suppressed growth of tomato seedlings. Cutting of cucumber shoots mitigated P deficiency symptoms of seedlings, which obtained access to P in the extraradical mycelium and thereby showed improved growth. Solitary seedlings growing in a network patch that had been severed from the CMN also grew much better than seedlings of the corresponding CMN. Interspecific and size-asymmetric competition between plants may be amplified rather than relaxed by CMNs that transfer P to large plants providing most carbon and render small plants P deficient. It is likely that grazing or senescence of the large plants will alleviate the network-induced suppression of seedling growth. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of host NH₄⁺ transporters and GS/GOGAT pathway in arbuscular mycorrhizal rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tienda, Jacob; Corrêa, Ana; Azcón-Aguilar, Concepción; Ferrol, Nuria

    2014-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play a key role in the nutrition of many land plants. AM roots have two pathways for nutrient uptake, directly through the root epidermis and root hairs and via AM fungal hyphae into root cortical cells, where arbuscules or hyphal coils provide symbiotic interfaces. Recent studies demonstrated that the AM symbiosis modifies the expression of plant transporter genes and that NH₄⁺ is the main form of N transported in the symbiosis. The aim of the present work was to get insights into the mycorrhizal N uptake pathway in Oryza sativa by analysing the expression of genes encoding ammonium transporters (AMTs), glutamine synthase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in roots colonized by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis and grown under two N regimes. We found that the AM symbiosis down-regulated OsAMT1;1 and OsAMT1;3 expression at low-N, but not at high-N conditions, and induced, independently of the N status of the plant, a strong up-regulation of OsAMT3;1 expression. The AM-inducible NH₄⁺ transporter OsAMT3;1 belongs to the family 2 of plant AMTs and is phylogenetically related to the AM-inducible AMTs of other plant species. Moreover, for the first time we provide evidence of the specific induction of a GOGAT gene upon colonization with an AM fungus. These data suggest that OsAMT3;1 is likely involved in the mycorrhizal N uptake pathway in rice roots and that OsGOGAT2 plays a role in the assimilation of the NH₄⁺ supplied via the OsAMT3;1 AM-inducible transporter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Carlactone-type strigolactones and their synthetic analogues as inducers of hyphal branching in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Narumi; Nishiuma, Kenta; Sugiyama, Takuya; Hayashi, Hideo; Akiyama, Kohki

    2016-10-01

    Hyphal branching in the vicinity of host roots is a host recognition response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This morphological event is elicited by strigolactones. Strigolactones are carotenoid-derived terpenoids that are synthesized from carlactone and its oxidized derivatives. To test the possibility that carlactone and its oxidized derivatives might act as host-derived precolonization signals in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, carlactone, carlactonoic acid, and methyl carlactonoate as well as monohydroxycarlactones, 4-, 18-, and 19-hydroxycarlactones, were synthesized chemically and evaluated for hyphal branching-inducing activity in germinating spores of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita. Hyphal branching activity was found to correlate with the degree of oxidation at C-19 methyl. Carlactone was only weakly active (100 ng/disc), whereas carlactonoic acid showed comparable activity to the natural canonical strigolactones such as strigol and sorgomol (100 pg/disc). Hydroxylation at either C-4 or C-18 did not significantly affect the activity. A series of carlactone analogues, named AD ester and AA'D diester, was synthesized by reacting formyl Meldrum's acid with benzyl, cyclohexylmethyl, and cyclogeranyl alcohols (the A-ring part), followed by coupling of the potassium enolates of the resulting formylacetic esters with the D-ring butenolide. AD ester analogues exhibited moderate activity (1 ng-100 pg/disc), while AA'D diester analogues having cyclohexylmethyl and cyclogeranyl groups were highly active on the AM fungus (10 pg/disc). These results indicate that the oxidation of methyl to carboxyl at C-19 in carlactone is a prerequisite but BC-ring formation is not essential to show hyphal branching activity comparable to that of canonical strigolactones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Response of Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect ofRhizobium and Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation, both individually and in combination on growth and chlorophyll content of economically important plant Vigna unguiculata L. A significant (p < 0.05) increase over control in root length (45.6 cm), shoot height ...

  13. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: VA Category Mapping Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  14. Technology Reference Model (TRM) Reports: VA Category Framework Count Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The One VA Enterprise Architecture (OneVA EA) is a comprehensive picture of the Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) operations, capabilities and services and the...

  15. Identification and Quantification of Cause and Effects in Symbiosis of Corn with Arbuscular Mycorrehiza Fungus using Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jahan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering to necessity and importance of determining mycorrhizal symbiosis level and its effects on crop agroecological characteristics as well as other related factors affecting this relationship, beside, the lack of an assured method for this purpose, the present study designed based on new perspectives and insights for determining cause and effects relations, latent variables using structural equation modeling (SEM approach. A field experiment was conducted during 2 years. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (high, medium, and low input conventional as well as ecological system and four inoculations (mycorrhizae fungus: Glomus intraradices, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR: (Azospirillum brasilense, Azotobacter paspali, dual inoculation: (fungus plus bacteria, and no-inoculation (control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. At the first step, a confirmatory factor analyzing was conducted resulted to two distinguished factors, and then the variables which had the most loads (weight on one of these two factors were determined. At the second step, considering ecophysiological basis of crops growth and development, in order to continue analyzing, the first factor (including: leaf area index (LAI, root length colonization percent (RLCP, dry matter (DM, stem diameter (D, SPAD readings and the second factor (including: maximum photosynthesis (Amax, specific root length (SRL, canopy temperature (CT, plant height (H, soil respiration rate (SRR, variable chlorophyll fluorescence to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm, plant tissue phosphorus content (%P determined resource capture latent construct and resource utilization latent construct, respectively. Correlation coefficients, squared multiple correlation coefficients, covariance matrices, direct and indirect path coefficients were calculated

  16. Mycorrhizal association of maritime pine, Pinus pinaster, with Rhizopogon roseolus has contrasting effects on the uptake from soil and root-to-shoot transfer of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 85}Sr and {sup 95m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladeyn, Ingrid; Plassard, Claude [INRA, UMR 1222, Biogeochimie du Sol et de la Rhizosphere, place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France); Staunton, Siobhan [INRA, UMR 1222, Biogeochimie du Sol et de la Rhizosphere, place Viala, 34060 Montpellier (France)], E-mail: staunton@montpellier.inra.fr

    2008-05-15

    The beneficial role of mycorrhizal association on plant nutrition and water supply is well-known, however, very little information exists with respect to the availability of radionuclides. We have measured the effect of controlled mycorrhizal association on the root uptake from soil and accumulation in leaves of three radionuclides. The radionuclides have contrasting chemical and biological properties: Cs is strongly adsorbed on soil, has no biological role and is a close analogue of potassium; Sr is less strongly adsorbed on soil and behaves very similarly to calcium; and Tc is very mobile in soil as pertechnetate, but immobilised when reduced to Tc(IV), it is also considered to be easily assimilated by biological systems. We found that mycorrhizal association had no effect on root-to-needle transfer of Cs, but increased root uptake and that this increase could not be explained by improved potassium nutrition. In contrast, the symbiotic relation decreased Tc soil-to-needle transfer, but this resulted from complex dynamics of root uptake and rapid immobilisation of Tc in soil. No effect of mycorrhizal association on Sr, like its stable analogue Ca, was observed. The addition of a phytotoxic metal, Cu, inhibited mycorrhizal association, thus eliminating the effects observed for non-contaminated plant-fungus couples, but had no additional effect on radionuclide dynamics.

  17. Mycorrhizal association of maritime pine, Pinus pinaster, with Rhizopogon roseolus has contrasting effects on the uptake from soil and root-to-shoot transfer of 137Cs, 85Sr and 95mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeyn, Ingrid; Plassard, Claude; Staunton, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    The beneficial role of mycorrhizal association on plant nutrition and water supply is well-known, however, very little information exists with respect to the availability of radionuclides. We have measured the effect of controlled mycorrhizal association on the root uptake from soil and accumulation in leaves of three radionuclides. The radionuclides have contrasting chemical and biological properties: Cs is strongly adsorbed on soil, has no biological role and is a close analogue of potassium; Sr is less strongly adsorbed on soil and behaves very similarly to calcium; and Tc is very mobile in soil as pertechnetate, but immobilised when reduced to Tc(IV), it is also considered to be easily assimilated by biological systems. We found that mycorrhizal association had no effect on root-to-needle transfer of Cs, but increased root uptake and that this increase could not be explained by improved potassium nutrition. In contrast, the symbiotic relation decreased Tc soil-to-needle transfer, but this resulted from complex dynamics of root uptake and rapid immobilisation of Tc in soil. No effect of mycorrhizal association on Sr, like its stable analogue Ca, was observed. The addition of a phytotoxic metal, Cu, inhibited mycorrhizal association, thus eliminating the effects observed for non-contaminated plant-fungus couples, but had no additional effect on radionuclide dynamics

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are an alternative to the application of chemical fertilizer in the production of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui S; Ma, Ying; Rocha, Inês; Carvalho, Maria F; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of agrochemicals is detrimental to the environment and may exert harmful effects on human health. The consumer demand for organic food plants has been increasing. There is thus a rising need for alternatives to agrochemicals that can foster sustainable plant production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus as an alternative to application of chemical fertilizer for improving growth performance of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum. Plants were inoculated with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis BEG163 and/or supplemented with a commercial chemical fertilizer (Plant Marvel, Nutriculture Bent Special) in agricultural soil. Plant growth, nutrition, and development of AM fungus were assessed. Plants inoculated with R. irregularis and those supplemented with chemical fertilizer displayed significantly improved growth performances when compared with controls. There were no significant differences in total fresh weight between plants inoculated with R. irregularis or those supplemented with chemical fertilizer. Leaf chlorophyll a + b (82%), shoot nitrogen (44%), phosphorus (254%), and potassium (27%) concentrations increased in plants inoculated with R. irregularis compared to controls. Application of chemical fertilizer inhibited root mycorrhizal colonization and the length of the extraradical mycelium of R. irregularis. Inoculation with R. irregularis was equally or more efficient than application of chemical fertilizer in promoting growth and nutrition of C. sativum. AM fungi may thus contribute to improve biologically based production of food plants and reduce the dependence on agrochemicals in agriculture.

  19. Community assembly and coexistence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vályi, Kriszta; Mardhiah, Ulfah; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are asexual, obligately symbiotic fungi with unique morphology and genomic structure, which occupy a dual niche, that is, the soil and the host root. Consequently, the direct adoption of models for community assembly developed for other organism groups is not evident. In this paper we adapted modern coexistence and assembly theory to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We review research on the elements of community assembly and coexistence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, highlighting recent studies using molecular methods. By addressing several points from the individual to the community level where the application of modern community ecology terms runs into problems when arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are concerned, we aim to account for these special circumstances from a mycocentric point of view. We suggest that hierarchical spatial structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities should be explicitly taken into account in future studies. The conceptual framework we develop here for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is also adaptable for other host-associated microbial communities.

  20. A novel gene whose expression in Medicago truncatula roots is suppressed in response to colonization by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and to phosphate nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burleigh, S H; Harrison, M J

    1997-05-01

    A cDNA clone (Mt4) was isolated as a result of a differential screen to identify genes showing altered expression during the interaction between Medicago truncatula and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus versiforme. Mt4 represents a M. truncatula mRNA that contains numerous short open reading frames, the two longest of which are predicted to encode polypeptides of 51 amino acids each. One of these open reading frames shares a short region of identity with a phosphate starvation-inducible gene from tomato. Mt4 gene expression is regulated in response to colonization by mycorrhizal fungi: transcripts were detected in non-colonized roots and levels decreased in both M. truncatula and M. sativa (alfalfa) roots after colonization by G. versiforme. Transcript levels also decreased during the incomplete interaction between G. versiforme and a M. sativa mycorrhizal minus (myc-) line, indicating that the down-regulation of this gene occurs early during the interaction between the fungus and its host plant. Phosphate levels in the nutrient media also affected the expression of the Mt4 gene: transcripts were present in the roots of plants grown under phosphate-deficient conditions, but were undetectable in the roots of plants grown under phosphate sufficient conditions. Furthermore, expression was only observed when plants were grown under nitrogen-sufficient conditions. Northern blot analyses indicate that Mt4 transcripts are present primarily in roots and barely detectable in stems or leaves. Thus, Mt4 represents a M. truncatula gene whose expression is regulated in response to both colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and to the phosphate status of the plant.

  1. Importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for local adaptations of Aster amellus

    OpenAIRE

    Plachá, Hana

    2006-01-01

    3 Abstract The importance of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis for survival and growth of many plant species is generally recognized. It has been repeatedly shown that symbiosis with mycorrhizal fungi can increase the fitness of many plant species. This increasing fitness is caused by increased uptake of phosphorus and other nutrients or pathogen protection. Most studies on mycorrhizal associations explore these types of relationship using single plant population and single fungal species...

  2. VA Veterans Health Administration Access Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — At the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), our most important mission is to provide the high quality health care and benefits Veterans have earned and deserve —...

  3. VA Personal Health Record Sample Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — My HealtheVet (www.myhealth.va.gov) is a Personal Health Record portal designed to improve the delivery of health care services to Veterans, to promote health and...

  4. Plant Functional Traits Associated with Mycorrhizal Root Foraging in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Ectomycorrhizal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenstat, D. M.; Chen, W.; Cheng, L.; Liu, B.; Koide, R. T.; Guo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Root foraging for nutrient "hot spots" is a key strategy by which some plants maximize nutrient gain from their carbon investment in root and mycorrhizal hyphae. Foraging strategies may depend on costs of root construction, with thick roots generally costing more per unit length than thin roots. Investment in mycorrhizal hyphae, which are considerably thinner than roots, may represent an alternative strategy for cost-effective nutrient foraging, especially for thick-root species. Type of mycorrhiza may matter, as ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are more associated with longer hyphae and ability to mineralize organic matter than arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Among AM trees in both subtropical forests in SE China and in temperate forests in central Pennsylvania, USA, we found that tree species with thin roots proliferated their roots in soil patches enriched with mineral nutrients to a greater extent than species with thick roots. In addition, thick-root species were consistently colonized more heavily with mycorrhizal fungi than thin root species, although nutrient addition tended to diminish colonization. In a common garden in central Pennsylvania of both AM and EM tree species, we found that nutrient patches enriched with organic materials resulted in greater root and mycorrhizal fungal proliferation compared to those enriched with inorganic nutrients and that thick-root species proliferated more with their mycorrhizal fungi whereas thin-root species proliferated more with their roots. We further examined with many more species, patterns of root and mycorrhizal fungal proliferation in organic-nutrient-enriched patches. Foraging precision, or the extent that roots or mycorrhizal hyphae grew in the enriched patch relative to the unenriched patch, was related to both root thickness and type of mycorrhiza. In both AM and EM trees, thick-root species were not selective foragers of either their roots or hyphae. In thin-root species, there was strong selectivity in

  5. Disrupting mycorrhizal mutualisms: a potential mechanism by which exotic tamarisk outcompetes native cottonwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kelley A; Gehring, Catherine A

    2012-03-01

    The disruption of mutualisms between plants and mycorrhizal fungi is a potentially powerful mechanism by which invasives can negatively impact native species, yet our understanding of this mechanism's role in exotic species invasion is still in its infancy. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that invasive tamarisk (Tamarix sp.) negatively affects native cottonwoods (Populus fremontii) by disrupting their associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. At a field site in the early stages of tamarisk invasion, cottonwoods with tamarisk neighbors had reduced EM colonization and altered EM fungal community composition relative to cottonwoods with native neighbors, leading to reductions in EM propagule abundance in the soil beneath tamarisk. Similarly, AM colonization of cottonwoods was reduced with a tamarisk neighbor, but there were no significant changes in AM fungal spore communities or propagule abundance. Root colonization by nonmycorrhizal fungi, including potential pathogens, was higher in cottonwoods with tamarisk neighbors. A greenhouse experiment in which AM and EM inoculation and plant neighbor were manipulated in a fully factorial design showed that cottonwoods benefited from mycorrhizas, especially EM, in terms of shoot biomass when grown with a conspecific, but shoot biomass was similar to that of nonmycorrhizal controls when cottonwoods were grown with a tamarisk neighbor. These results are partially explained by a reduction in EM but not AM colonization of cottonwoods by a tamarisk neighbor. Tamarisk neighbors negatively affected cottonwood specific leaf area, but not chlorophyll content, in the field. To pinpoint a mechanism for these changes, we measured soil chemistry in the field and the growth response of an EM fungus (Hebeloma crustuliniforme) to salt-amended media in the laboratory. Tamarisk increased both NO3- concentrations and electrical conductivity 2.5-fold beneath neighboring cottonwoods in

  6. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Requires a Phosphate Transceptor in the Gigaspora margarita Fungal Symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianan; Lin, Hui; Peng, Xiaowei; Xu, Congrui; Sun, Zhongfeng; Jiang, Kexin; Huang, Antian; Wu, Xiaohui; Tang, Nianwu; Salvioli, Alessandra; Bonfante, Paola; Zhao, Bin

    2016-12-05

    The majority of terrestrial vascular plants are capable of forming mutualistic associations with obligate biotrophic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota. This mutualistic symbiosis provides carbohydrates to the fungus, and reciprocally improves plant phosphate uptake. AM fungal transporters can acquire phosphate from the soil through the hyphal networks. Nevertheless, the precise functions of AM fungal phosphate transporters, and whether they act as sensors or as nutrient transporters, in fungal signal transduction remain unclear. Here, we report a high-affinity phosphate transporter GigmPT from Gigaspora margarita that is required for AM symbiosis. Host-induced gene silencing of GigmPT hampers the development of G. margarita during AM symbiosis. Most importantly, GigmPT functions as a phosphate transceptor in G. margarita regarding the activation of the phosphate signaling pathway as well as the protein kinase A signaling cascade. Using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method, we identified residues A 146 (in transmembrane domain [TMD] IV) and Val 357 (in TMD VIII) of GigmPT, both of which are critical for phosphate signaling and transport in yeast during growth induction. Collectively, our results provide significant insights into the molecular functions of a phosphate transceptor from the AM fungus G. margarita. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acaulospora papillosa, a new mycorrhizal fungus from NE Brazil, and Acaulospora rugosa from Norway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pereira, C. M. R.; Maia, L. C.; Sánchez-Castro, I.; Palenzuela, J.; Silva, D. K. A.; Sudová, Radka; Kolaříková, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana; Čtvrtlíková, Martina; Goto, B. T.; Silva, G.A.; Oehl, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 260, č. 1 (2016), s. 14-24 ISSN 1179-3155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0781 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : Acaulosporaceae * rainforest * arbuscular mycorrhiza Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (BC-A) Impact factor: 1.240, year: 2016

  8. Hyphal Growth from Spores of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus Caledonius: Effect of Amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hepper, C.M.; Jakobsen, Iver

    1983-01-01

    Hyphal growth from spores of Glomus caledonius (Nicol. and Gerd.) Trappe and Gerdemann was stimulated by cystine, glycine and lysine at optimum concentrations of 4.6, 556 and 825 mg l−1 respectively. When all three amino acids were supplied together in water agar, five times more growth...

  9. Amelioration of Pb and Mn toxicity to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices by maize root exudates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malcová, Radka; Gryndler, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2003), s. 297-299 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114; GA MŠk OC 838.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : heavy metals * hyphal growth * Zea mays Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.919, year: 2003

  10. Polyphosphates in Intraradical and Extraradical Hyphae of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus, Gigaspora margarita

    OpenAIRE

    Solaiman, M. Zakaria; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro; Kojima, Tomoko; Saito, Masanori

    1999-01-01

    The amount of polyphosphate in the intraradical and extraradical hyphae of Gigaspora margarita was estimated from successive extractions with trichloroacetic acid (TCA), EDTA, and phenol-chloroform (PC). In the intraradical hyphae, most of the polyphosphate was present in TCA- and EDTA-soluble (short-chain and long-chain) fractions, whereas most of the polyphosphate in the extraradical hyphae was present in EDTA- and PC-soluble (long-chain and granular) fractions.

  11. Dynamics of Short-Term Phosphorus Uptake by Intact Mycorrhizal and Non-mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Circulatory Semi-Hydroponic Cultivation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcés-Ruiz, Mónica; Calonne-Salmon, Maryline; Plouznikoff, Katia; Misson, Coralie; Navarrete-Mier, Micaela; Cranenbrouck, Sylvie; Declerck, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    A non-destructive cultivation system was developed to study the dynamics of phosphorus (Pi) uptake by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize plantlets. The system consisted of a plant container connected via silicon tubes to a glass bottle containing a nutrient solution supplemented with Pi. The nutrient solution is pumped with a peristaltic pump to the upper part of the container via the silicon tubes and the solution percolate through the plantlet container back into the glass bottle. Pi is sampled from the glass bottle at regular intervals and concentration evaluated. Maize plantlets were colonized by the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 and Pi uptake quantified at fixed intervals (9, 21, and 42 h) from the depletion of the Pi in the nutrient solution flowing through the plantlets containers. Plants and fungus grew well in the perlite substrate. The concentration of Pi in the bottles followed an almost linear decrease over time, demonstrating a depletion of Pi in the circulating solution and a concomitant uptake/immobilization by the plantlet-AMF associates in the containers. The Pi uptake rate was significantly increased in the AMF-colonized plantlets (at 9 and 21 h) as compared to non-colonized plantlets, although no correlation was noticed with plant growth or P accumulation in shoots. The circulatory semi-hydroponic cultivation system developed was adequate for measuring Pi depletion in a nutrient solution and by corollary Pi uptake/immobilization by the plant-AMF associates. The measurements were non-destructive so that the time course of Pi uptake could be monitored without disturbing the growth of the plant and its fungal associate. The system further opens the door to study the dynamics of other micro and macro-nutrients as well as their uptake under stressed growth conditions such as salinity, pollution by hydrocarbon contaminants or potential toxic elements.

  12. Dynamics of Short-Term Phosphorus Uptake by Intact Mycorrhizal and Non-mycorrhizal Maize Plants Grown in a Circulatory Semi-Hydroponic Cultivation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Garcés-Ruiz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A non-destructive cultivation system was developed to study the dynamics of phosphorus (Pi uptake by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize plantlets. The system consisted of a plant container connected via silicon tubes to a glass bottle containing a nutrient solution supplemented with Pi. The nutrient solution is pumped with a peristaltic pump to the upper part of the container via the silicon tubes and the solution percolate through the plantlet container back into the glass bottle. Pi is sampled from the glass bottle at regular intervals and concentration evaluated. Maize plantlets were colonized by the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis MUCL 41833 and Pi uptake quantified at fixed intervals (9, 21, and 42 h from the depletion of the Pi in the nutrient solution flowing through the plantlets containers. Plants and fungus grew well in the perlite substrate. The concentration of Pi in the bottles followed an almost linear decrease over time, demonstrating a depletion of Pi in the circulating solution and a concomitant uptake/immobilization by the plantlet-AMF associates in the containers. The Pi uptake rate was significantly increased in the AMF-colonized plantlets (at 9 and 21 h as compared to non-colonized plantlets, although no correlation was noticed with plant growth or P accumulation in shoots. The circulatory semi-hydroponic cultivation system developed was adequate for measuring Pi depletion in a nutrient solution and by corollary Pi uptake/immobilization by the plant-AMF associates. The measurements were non-destructive so that the time course of Pi uptake could be monitored without disturbing the growth of the plant and its fungal associate. The system further opens the door to study the dynamics of other micro and macro-nutrients as well as their uptake under stressed growth conditions such as salinity, pollution by hydrocarbon contaminants or potential toxic elements.

  13. Phosphatase activity in sandy soil influenced by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alceu Kunze

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cover crops may difffer in the way they affect rhizosphere microbiota nutrient dynamics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cover crops on soil phosphatase activity and its persistence in subsequent crops. A three-year experiment was carried out with a Typic Quartzipsamment. Treatments were winter species, either mycorrhizal black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb or the non-mycorrhizal species oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiferus Metzg and corn spurry (Spergula arvensis L.. The control treatment consisted of resident vegetation (fallow in the winter season. In the summer, a mixture of pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. with sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea L. or with soybean (Glycine max L. was sown in all plots. Soil cores (0-10 cm and root samples were collected in six growing seasons (winter and summer of each year. Microbial biomass P was determined by the fumigation-extraction method and phosphatase activity using p-nitrophenyl-phosphate as enzyme substrate. During the flowering stage of the winter cover crops, acid phosphatase activity was 30-35 % higher in soils with the non-mycorrhizal species oilseed radish, than in the control plots, regardless of the amount of P immobilized in microbial biomass. The values of enzyme activity were intermediate in the plots with corn spurry and black oat. Alkaline phosphatase activity was 10-fold lower and less sensitive to the treatments, despite the significant relationship between the two phosphatase activities. The effect of plant species on the soil enzyme profile continued in the subsequent periods, during the growth of mycorrhizal summer crops, after completion of the life cycle of the cover crops.

  14. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL ASSOCIATION IN Coccothrinax readii Quero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Emmanuel Polanco Hernández

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Coccothrinax readii, is a palm endemic to the Yucatan coast, its successful establishment in stressful environments suggests that factors such as mycorrhizal association may determine its success, the question arose in this work, assess environmental conditions which states and to describe their particular characteristics related to the anatomy of their roots and mycorrhizal colonization in three different seasons over a year. The study site was the coastal dune scrub of San Benito, Yucatan, where he placed a data logger that measurements performed ambient temperature (T, relative humidity (HR and photosynthethic photon flux (PPF for five days in dry, rainy and windy, also determined  the total phosphorus and extractable of the soil. The results indicate significant fluctuations of environmental variables throughout the year, on the other hand, the presence of the velamen on the roots of C. readii not restrict arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. This association is affected by microenvironmental conditions, as during the dry season, when environmental conditions are unfavorable, the colonization percentage is higher than in the windy season, when microenvironmental conditions are more favorable.

  15. Influence of mycorrhizal developmental stages and plant age on rhizosphere mycoflora of Pinus kesiya (Royle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Quantitatively the population was recorded to be high around thc mycorrhizal roots. Some fungi were specific to different stages of mycorrhizal development. Rhizopus nigricans and Cunninghamella elegans were recorded at 5% mycorrhizal association stage. Fusarium sp. was found at 20% mycorrhizal association, while Mucor spp. were obtained at 60% stage. Verticillium sp. had the highest frequency of occurrence in the beginning of mycorrhizal association but later on Penicilium spp. were found to be the most common. Sugar content of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal roots were determined to assess their effect on the mycorrhizospheric micropopulation. The mannitol and trehalose were present only in mycorrhizal roots.

  16. Do Older Rural and Urban Veterans Experience Different Rates of Unplanned Readmission to VA and Non-VA Hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, William B.; Lee, Richard E.; Wallace, Amy E.; West, Alan N.; Bagian, James P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Unplanned readmission within 30 days of discharge is an indicator of hospital quality. Purpose: We wanted to determine whether older rural veterans who were enrolled in the VA had different rates of unplanned readmission to VA or non-VA hospitals than their urban counterparts. Methods: We used the combined VA/Medicare dataset to examine…

  17. 75 FR 61252 - Proposed Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); A Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); A Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt... information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.Regulations.gov or to Nancy J...

  18. 78 FR 59771 - Proposed Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); a Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt.... Title: Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); A Computer Generated... through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at www.Regulations.gov or to Nancy J. Kessinger...

  19. 75 FR 61859 - Proposed Information Collection (Create Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); A Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt... Payment Request for the VA Funding Fee Payment System (VA FFPS); A Computer Generated Funding Fee Receipt... information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at http://www.Regulations.gov or to Nancy J...

  20. VaST: A variability search toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.; Lebedev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    Variability Search Toolkit (VaST) is a software package designed to find variable objects in a series of sky images. It can be run from a script or interactively using its graphical interface. VaST relies on source list matching as opposed to image subtraction. SExtractor is used to generate source lists and perform aperture or PSF-fitting photometry (with PSFEx). Variability indices that characterize scatter and smoothness of a lightcurve are computed for all objects. Candidate variables are identified as objects having high variability index values compared to other objects of similar brightness. The two distinguishing features of VaST are its ability to perform accurate aperture photometry of images obtained with non-linear detectors and handle complex image distortions. The software has been successfully applied to images obtained with telescopes ranging from 0.08 to 2.5 m in diameter equipped with a variety of detectors including CCD, CMOS, MIC and photographic plates. About 1800 variable stars have been discovered with VaST. It is used as a transient detection engine in the New Milky Way (NMW) nova patrol. The code is written in C and can be easily compiled on the majority of UNIX-like systems. VaST is free software available at http://scan.sai.msu.ru/vast/.

  1. Colonization of new land by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Knud Nor; Kjøller, Rasmus; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the primary assembly of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities on a newly constructed island Peberholm between Denmark and Sweden. The AM fungal community on Peberholm was compared with the neighboring natural island Saltholm. The structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal communities wa...

  2. Molecular characterisation of a mycorrhizal inoculant that enhances ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-04

    Jul 4, 2007 ... lum used as biological models originated from the same desert area. In order to identify this mycorrhizal fungal inoculum, a molecular approach developed by Helgason et al. (1999) was adapted. The small subunit 18S from the roots of mycorrhizal T. alexandrium was amplified using primers NS31 and ...

  3. Mycorrhizal association of some agroforestry tree species in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycorrhizal colonization of different agroforestry tree species in two social forestry nurseries was investigated. Percentage of Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) infection, number of resting spores and AM fungi species varies both in tree species as well as in two different nurseries. This variation is attributed to various factors such ...

  4. Specific interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth-promoting bacteria--as revealed by different combinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaderlund, Lotta; Arthurson, Veronica; Granhall, Ulf; Jansson, Janet K.

    2008-05-15

    The interactions between two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and Paenibacillus brasilensis PB177, two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices) and one pathogenic fungus (Microdochium nivale) were investigated on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum cultivar Tarso) in a greenhouse trial. PB177, but not SBW25, had strong inhibitory effects on M. nivale in dual culture plate assays. The results from the greenhouse experiment show very specific interactions; e.g. the two AM fungi react differently when interacting with the same bacteria on plants. G. intraradices (single inoculation or together with SBW25) increased plant dry weight on M. nivale infested plants, suggesting that the pathogenic fungus is counteracted by G. intraradices, but PB177 inhibited this positive effect. This is an example of two completely different reactions between the same AM fungus and two species of bacteria, previously known to enhance plant growth and inhibit pathogens. When searching for plant growth promoting microorganisms it is therefore important to test for the most suitable combination of plant, bacteria and fungi in order to get satisfactory plant growth benefits.

  5. Impact of fertilizer, corn residue, and cover crops on mycorrhizal inoculum potential and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) increase nutrient and water acquisition for mycorrhizal-susceptible plants, which may lead to higher yields. However, intensive agricultural practices such as tilling, fallow treatments, and inorganic nutrient application reduce soil AMF. The purpose of the three e...

  6. Differential access to phosphorus pools of an Oxisol by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, I.M.; Boddington, C.L.; Janssen, B.H.; Oenema, O.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated whether arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) could take up phosphorus (P) from pools that are normally considered unavailable to plants. An aluminum (Al) resistant maize variety, inoculated with three species of Glomus or uninoculated, supplied with nutrient solution without P,

  7. Proteome analysis of an ectomycorrhizal fungus Boletus edulis under salt shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Chen, Hui; Tang, Mingjuan; Shen, Shihua

    2007-08-01

    Soil salinization has become a severe global problem and salinity is one of the most severe abiotic stresses inhibiting growth and survival of mycorrhizal fungi and their host plants. Salinity tolerance of ectomycorrhizal fungi and survival of ectomycorrhizal inocula is essential to reforestation and ecosystem restoration in saline areas. Proteomic changes of an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Boletus edulis, when exposed to salt stress conditions (4% NaCl, w/v) were determined using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. Twenty-two protein spots, 14 upregulated and 8 downregulated, were found changed under salt stress conditions. Sixteen changed protein spots were identified by nanospray ESI Q-TOF MS/MS and liquid chromatography MS/MS. These proteins were involved in biosynthesis of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine, glycolysis, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and general stress tolerance, and their possible functions in salinity adaptation of Boletus edulis were discussed.

  8. Spore communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and mycorrhizal associations in different ecosystems, south Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. I. Antoniolli

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF were surveyed in different South Australian ecosystems. The soil was wet-sieved for spore extraction, followed by the determination of presence and abundance of AMF species as well as the percentage of root colonization. Mycorrhizal associations were common and there was substantial fungal diversity in different ecosystems. Spores were most abundant in the permanent pasture system and less abundant under continuous wheat. The incidence of mycorrhizal associations in different plant species and the occurrence of Arum and Paris type colonization generally conformed with previous information. Spores of seventeen AMF were verified throughout seasonal changes in 1996 and 1997 in the permanent pasture and on four host species (Lolium perenne, Plantago lanceolata, Sorghum sp. and Trifolium subterraneum , set up with the same soils under greenhouse conditions. Glomus mosseae was the dominant spore type at all sampling times and in all trap cultures. Mycorrhizal diversity was significantly affected by different sampling times in trap cultures but not in field-collected soil. P. lanceolata, Sorghum sp. and T. subterraneum as hosts for trap cultures showed no differences in richness and diversity of AMF spores that developed in association with their roots. Abundance and diversity were lowest, however, in association with L. perenne , particularly in December 1996. Results show that the combination of spore identification from field-collected soil and trap cultures is essential to study population and diversity of AMF. The study provides baseline data for ongoing monitoring of mycorrhizal populations using conventional methods and material for the determination of the symbiotic effectiveness of AMF key members.

  9. The VA mission act: Funding to fail?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Yesterday on D-Day, the 74th anniversary of the invasion of Normandy, President Trump signed the VA Mission Act. The law directs the VA to combine a number of existing private-care programs, including the so-called Choice program, which was created in 2014 after veterans died waiting for appointments at the Phoenix VA (1. During the signing Trump touted the new law saying “there has never been anything like this in the history of the VA” and saying that veterans “can go right outside [the VA] to a private doctor”-but can they? Although the bill authorizes private care, it appropriates no money to pay for it. Although a bipartisan plan to fund the expansion is proposed in the House, the White House has been lobbying Republicans to vote the plan down (2. Instead Trump has been asking Congress to pay for veteran’s programs by cutting spending elsewhere (2. We in Arizona are …

  10. Effects of water stress, organic amendment and mycorrhizal inoculation on soil microbial community structure and activity during the establishment of two heavy metal-tolerant native plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, D A; Roldán, A; Azcón, R; Caravaca, F; Bååth, E

    2012-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the effect of water stress on plant growth and development of two native plant species (Tetraclinis articulata and Crithmum maritimum) and on microbial community composition and activity in the rhizosphere soil, following the addition of an organic amendment, namely sugar beet residue (SBR), and/or the inoculation with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, namely Glomus mosseae, in a non-sterile heavy metal-polluted soil. The AM inoculation did not have any significant effect on plant growth of both species. In T. articulata, SBR increased shoot growth, foliar P, total phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), fungi-related PLFA, AM fungi-related neutral lipid fatty acid, bacterial gram-positive/gram-negative PLFA ratio and the β-glucosidase and dehydrogenase activities. SBR and AM inoculation increased phosphatase activity in T. articulata plants grown under drought conditions. In both plants, there was a synergistic effect between AM inoculation and SBR on mycorrhizal colonisation under drought conditions. In C. maritimum, the increase produced by the SBR on total amounts of PLFA, bacterial gram-positive-related PLFA and bacterial gram-negative-related PLFA was considerably higher under drought conditions. Our results suggest that the effectiveness of the amendment with regard to stimulating microbial communities and plant growth was largely limited by drought, particularly for plant species with a low degree of mycorrhizal colonisation.

  11. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrzik, Karel, E-mail: petrzik@umbr.cas.cz [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Sarkisova, Tatiana [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Starý, Josef [Institute of Soil Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Sádkách 7, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); Koloniuk, Igor [Department of Plant Virology, Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branišovská 31, 370 05 České Budějovice (Czech Republic); and others

    2016-02-15

    A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites. - Highlights: • A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris. • A new virus genus Phlegivirus is proposed. • The mycovirus was firstly detected in oribatid mites.

  12. Molecular characterization of a new monopartite dsRNA mycovirus from mycorrhizal Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and its detection in soil oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrzik, Karel; Sarkisova, Tatiana; Starý, Josef; Koloniuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris (Ehrh.) and sequenced. This virus, named Thelephora terrestris virus 1 (TtV1), contains two reading frames in different frames but with the possibility that ORF2 could be translated as a fusion polyprotein after ribosomal -1 frameshifting. Picornavirus 2A-like motif, nudix hydrolase, phytoreovirus S7, and RdRp domains were found in a unique arrangement on the polyprotein. A new genus named Phlegivirus and containing TtV1, PgLV1, RfV1 and LeV is therefore proposed. Twenty species of oribatid mites were identified in soil material in the vicinity of T. terrestris. TtV1 was detected in large amounts in Steganacarus (Tropacarus) carinatus (C.L. Koch, 1841) and in much smaller amounts in Nothrus silvestris (Nicolet). This is the first description of mycovirus presence in oribatid mites. - Highlights: • A novel dsRNA virus was identified in the mycorrhizal fungus Thelephora terrestris. • A new virus genus Phlegivirus is proposed. • The mycovirus was firstly detected in oribatid mites.

  13. Protocorms of an epiphytic orchid (Epidendrum amphistomum A. Richard recovered in situ, and subsequent identification of associated mycorrhizal fungi using molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence W. Zettler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic orchids have received considerable study, yet little has been published on their germination requirements in situ involving mycorrhizal fungi. Such research has been hampered by the small, dust-like size of seeds and leafless seedlings (protocorms which are difficult to pinpoint on natural substrates, especially those on arboreal substrates (tree limbs. We report a novel seed sowing and retrieval method, modified from one applied to terrestrial orchids, used in the acquisition of epiphytic orchid protocorms from the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. Seeds from two epiphytic orchid species (Epidendrum amphistomum A. Richard, E. nocturnum Jacquin were placed in separate nylon mesh packets secured within 35 mm plastic slide mounts, and affixed to tree bark using gutter mesh and a staple gun. To confirm that the embryos were viable, some seeds were also sown on asymbiotic media in the laboratory which subsequently germinated after 52 days incubation. Of 60 packets distributed among 18 tree limb sites, one packet – harboring seeds of E. amphistomum affixed to pop ash (Fraxinus caroliniana Mill. on a moss substrate – harbored protocorms after 267 days. Using molecular markers, a fungus assignable to the Ceratobasidiaceae, appears to be the mycorrhizal associate of these protocorms suggesting that this fungus may be associated with the germination process in situ.

  14. Beyond the rhizosphere: growth and function of arbuscular mycorrhizal external hyphae in sands of varying pore sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drew, E.A.; Murray, R.S.; Smith, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Research on nutrient acquisition by symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi has mainly focused on the root fungus interface and less attention has been given to the growth and functioning of external hyphae in the bulk soil. The growth and function of external hyphae may be affected....... intraradices obtained a greater proportion of P at a distance from the host roots. Differences in P acquisition were not correlated with production of external hyphae in the four media zones and changes in sand pore size did not affect the ability of the fungi studied to acquire P at a distance from the host...... roots. Production of external hyphae in HC2 was influenced by fungal species and media treatment. Both fungi produced maximum amounts of external hyphae in the soil medium. Sand pore size affected growth of G. intraradices (but not G. mosseae) and hyphal diameter distributions of both fungi. The results...

  15. Assessing the quality of VA Human Research Protection Programs: VA vs. affiliated University Institutional Review Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Nguyen, Yen; Brooks, Robert

    2013-04-01

    We compared the Human Research Protection Program (HRPP) quality indicator data of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities using their own VA institutional review boards (IRBs) with those using affiliated university IRBs. From a total of 25 performance metrics, 13 did not demonstrate statistically significant differences, while 12 reached statistically significance differences. Among the 12 with statistically significant differences, facilities using their own VA IRBs performed better on four of the metrics, while facilities using affiliate IRBs performed better on eight. However, the absolute difference was small (0.2-2.7%) in all instances, suggesting that they were of no practical significance. We conclude that it is acceptable for facilities to use their own VA IRBs or affiliated university IRBs as their IRBs of record.

  16. Symbiosis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Robinia pseudoacacia L. Improves Root Tensile Strength and Soil Aggregate Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haoqiang; Liu, Zhenkun; Chen, Hui; Tang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (black locust) is a widely planted tree species on Loess Plateau for revegetation. Due to its symbiosis forming capability with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, we explored the influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant biomass, root morphology, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability in a pot experiment. We inoculated R. pseudoacacia with/without AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis or Glomus versiforme), and measured root colonization, plant growth, root morphological characters, root tensile force and tensile strength, and parameters for soil aggregate stability at twelve weeks after inoculation. AM fungi colonized more than 70% plant root, significantly improved plant growth. Meanwhile, AM fungi elevated root morphological parameters, root tensile force, root tensile strength, Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) content in soil, and parameters for soil aggregate stability such as water stable aggregate (WSA), mean weight diameter (MWD) and geometric mean diameter (GMD). Root length was highly correlated with WSA, MWD and GMD, while hyphae length was highly correlated with GRSP content. The improved R. pseudoacacia growth, root tensile strength and soil aggregate stability indicated that AM fungi could accelerate soil fixation and stabilization with R. pseudoacacia, and its function in revegetation on Loess Plateau deserves more attention.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation-Scavenging and Signaling during Plant-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Piriformospora indica Interaction under Stress Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Manoj; Bhatt, Deepesh; Prasad, Ram; Gill, Sarvajeet S; Anjum, Naser A; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    A defined balance between the generation and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential to utilize ROS as an adaptive defense response of plants under biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Moreover, ROS are not only a major determinant of stress response but also act as signaling molecule that regulates various cellular processes including plant-microbe interaction. In particular, rhizosphere constitutes the biologically dynamic zone for plant-microbe interactions which forms a mutual link leading to reciprocal signaling in both the partners. Among plant-microbe interactions, symbiotic associations of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and arbuscular mycorrhizal-like fungus especially Piriformospora indica with plants are well known to improve plant growth by alleviating the stress-impacts and consequently enhance the plant fitness. AMF and P. indica colonization mainly enhances ROS-metabolism, maintains ROS-homeostasis, and thereby averts higher ROS-level accrued inhibition in plant cellular processes and plant growth and survival under stressful environments. This article summarizes the major outcomes of the recent reports on the ROS-generation, scavenging and signaling in biotic-abiotic stressed plants with AMF and P. indica colonization. Overall, a detailed exploration of ROS-signature kinetics during plant-AMF/ P. indica interaction can help in designing innovative strategies for improving plant health and productivity under stress conditions.

  18. An improved method for Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of tomato suitable for the study of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho-Plágaro, Tania; Huertas, Raúl; Tamayo-Navarrete, María I; Ocampo, Juan A; García-Garrido, José M

    2018-01-01

    Solanum lycopersicum , an economically important crop grown worldwide, has been used as a model for the study of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in non-legume plants for several years and several cDNA array hybridization studies have revealed specific transcriptomic profiles of mycorrhizal tomato roots. However, a method to easily screen candidate genes which could play an important role during tomato mycorrhization is required. We have developed an optimized procedure for composite tomato plant obtaining achieved through Agrobacterium rhizogenes -mediated transformation. This protocol involves the unusual in vitro culture of composite plants between two filter papers placed on the culture media. In addition, we show that DsRed is an appropriate molecular marker for the precise selection of cotransformed tomato hairy roots . S. lycopersicum composite plant hairy roots appear to be colonized by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis in a manner similar to that of normal roots, and a modified construct useful for localizing the expression of promoters putatively associated with mycorrhization was developed and tested. In this study, we present an easy, fast and low-cost procedure to study AM symbiosis in tomato roots.

  19. Utilization of organic nitrogen by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-is there a specific role for protists and ammonia oxidizers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Petra; Bonkowski, Michael; Konvalinková, Tereza; Beskid, Olena; Hujslová, Martina; Püschel, David; Řezáčová, Veronika; Gutiérrez-Núñez, María Semiramis; Gryndler, Milan; Jansa, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi can significantly contribute to plant nitrogen (N) uptake from complex organic sources, most likely in concert with activity of soil saprotrophs and other microbes releasing and transforming the N bound in organic forms. Here, we tested whether AM fungus (Rhizophagus irregularis) extraradical hyphal networks showed any preferences towards certain forms of organic N (chitin of fungal or crustacean origin, DNA, clover biomass, or albumin) administered in spatially discrete patches, and how the presence of AM fungal hyphae affected other microbes. By direct 15 N labeling, we also quantified the flux of N to the plants (Andropogon gerardii) through the AM fungal hyphae from fungal chitin and from clover biomass. The AM fungal hyphae colonized patches supplemented with organic N sources significantly more than those receiving only mineral nutrients, organic carbon in form of cellulose, or nothing. Mycorrhizal plants grew 6.4-fold larger and accumulated, on average, 20.3-fold more 15 N originating from the labeled organic sources than their nonmycorrhizal counterparts. Whereas the abundance of microbes (bacteria, fungi, or Acanthamoeba sp.) in the different patches was primarily driven by patch quality, we noted a consistent suppression of the microbial abundances by the presence of AM fungal hyphae. This suppression was particularly strong for ammonia oxidizing bacteria. Our results indicate that AM fungi successfully competed with the other microbes for free ammonium ions and suggest an important role for the notoriously understudied soil protists to play in recycling organic N from soil to plants via AM fungal hyphae.

  20. 38 CFR 74.27 - How will VA store information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VETERANS SMALL BUSINESS REGULATIONS Records Management § 74.27 How will VA store information? VA... examination visits will be scanned onto portable media and fully secured in the Center for Veterans Enterprise...

  1. 77 FR 67063 - VA Directive 0005 on Scientific Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... in multiple areas, including data integrity, ethics, privacy, and human research protections, as well... replace the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Programs (AAHRPP) with Alion... human research protection programs. VA Response: VA is currently reviewing its accreditation...

  2. Accessing VA Healthcare During Large-Scale Natural Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Pinnock, Laura; Dobalian, Aram

    2017-01-01

    Natural disasters can lead to the closure of medical facilities including the Veterans Affairs (VA), thus impacting access to healthcare for U.S. military veteran VA users. We examined the characteristics of VA patients who reported having difficulty accessing care if their usual source of VA care was closed because of natural disasters. A total of 2,264 veteran VA users living in the U.S. northeast region participated in a 2015 cross-sectional representative survey. The study used VA administrative data in a complex stratified survey design with a multimode approach. A total of 36% of veteran VA users reported having difficulty accessing care elsewhere, negatively impacting the functionally impaired and lower income VA patients.

  3. Resistance Responses of Potato to Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi under Varying Abiotic Phosphorus Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, D A; Knowles, N R

    1992-09-01

    In mycorrhizal symbioses, susceptibility of a host plant to infection by fungi is influenced by environmental factors, especially the availability of soil phosphorus. This study describes morphological and biochemical details of interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus and potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Russet Burbank) plants, with a particular focus on the physiological basis for P-induced resistance of roots to infection. Root infection by the VAM fungus Glomus fasciculatum ([Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) was extensive for plants grown with low abiotic P supply, and plant biomass accumulation was enhanced by the symbiosis. The capacity of excised roots from P-deficient plants to produce ethylene in the presence or absence of exogenous 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) was markedly reduced by VAM infection. This apparent inhibition of ACC oxidase (ACC(ox)) activity was localized to areas containing infected roots, as demonstrated in split-root studies. Furthermore, leachate from VAM roots contained a potent water-soluble inhibitor of ethylene generation from exogenous ACC by nonmycorrhizal (NM) roots. The leachate from VAM-infected roots had a higher concentration of phenolics, relative to that from NM roots. Moreover, the rates of ethylene formation and phenolic concentration in leachates from VAM roots were inversely correlated, suggesting that this inhibitor may be of a phenolic nature. The specific activity of extracellular peroxidase recovered in root leachates was not stimulated by VAM infection, although activity on a fresh weight basis was significantly enhanced, reflecting the fact that VAM roots had higher protein content than NM roots. Polyphenol oxidase activity of roots did not differ between NM and VAM roots. These results characterize the low resistance response of P-deficient plants to VAM infection. When plants were grown with higher abiotic P supply, the relative benefit of the VAM symbiosis

  4. Continuous measurement of stem-diameter growth response of Pinus pinea seedlings mycorrhizal with Rhizopogon roseolus and submitted to two water regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parladé, Javier; Cohen, Moshe; Doltra, Jordi; Luque, Jordi; Pera, Joan

    2001-08-01

    Linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensors were used to detect continuous diameter growth responses of Pinus pinea (stone pine) seedlings inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon roseolus. Colonised and non-colonised seedlings provided with sensors were submitted to different water regimes in two consecutive experiments established in a controlled-temperature greenhouse module (cycle 1), and in an adjacent module without temperature control (cycle 2). Under regular irrigation, colonised seedlings showed significantly higher growth than non-colonised seedlings. Water-stressed seedlings showed no benefit from inoculation in terms of growth. Also, seedlings with a high colonisation level recovered more slowly from water stress than control seedlings. A significant positive relationship between maximum daily shrinkage (amplitude of the daily stem contraction) and global radiation was observed only in the first water-stress period in cycle 1 and in regularly irrigated seedlings in both cycles. However, no differential responses due to inoculation were observed. The mycorrhizal colonisation of the seedlings at the end of the experiment was related with the initial colonisation level. Mycorrhizal colonisation by R. roseolus in old roots was maintained at significantly higher levels in seedlings which had an initial colonisation level >50% than in seedlings with 50% than in seedlings with an initial colonisation sensors can be used to detect a differential response of plants according to water supply, mycorrhizal status and, in some cases, to their colonisation level. The results are discussed in relation to the predictive possibilities of the method for the selection of efficient mycorrhizal fungi for the promotion of plant growth.

  5. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on growth, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FAMA

    2015-09-30

    Sep 30, 2015 ... AMF on root colonization, biomass production, mycorrhizal dependency (MD) and shoot mineral ... four months of growth in a sterilized soil and greenhouse conditions, grasses inoculated with AMF ..... Quetta, Pakistan.

  6. Role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation of heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sadia

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... Sciences, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan. Received 19 ... weeks of pot experiment, roots colonization, shoot and root biomass, growth, heavy metals contents ... using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in soil.

  7. Composition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with cassava

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2016-02-29

    Feb 29, 2016 ... Objectives: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form root symbiotic relationships with higher plants, but .... including growth habit of stem, stem colour, outer and inner root ..... of AM fungi to colonize roots, breaking down their.

  8. Mycorrhizal responses to biochar in soil-concepts and mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warnock, D.D.; Lehmann, J.; Kuyper, T.W.; Rillig, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments suggest that biomass-derived black carbon (biochar) affects microbial populations and soil biogeochemistry. Both biochar and mycorrhizal associations, ubiquitous symbioses in terrestrial ecosystems, are potentially important in various ecosystem services provided by soils, contributing

  9. Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi mixture improves seedling establishment under greenhouse conditions. Ouahmane Lahcen, Ndoye Ibrahima, Morino Abdessadek, Ferradous Abderrahim, Sfairi Youssef, Al Faddy Mohamed Najib, Abourouh Mohamed ...

  10. Host plant quality mediates competition between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegt, B.; Jansa, J.; Franken, O.; Engelmoer, D.J.P.; Werner, G.D.A.; Bücking, H.; Kiers, E.T.

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi exchange soil nutrients for carbon from plant hosts. Empirical works suggests that hosts may selectively provide resources to different fungal species, ultimately affecting fungal competition. However, fungal competition may also be mediated by colonization strategies of

  11. Molecular trait indicators: Moving beyond phylogeny in arbuscular mycorrhizal ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, H.A.; van der Heijden, M.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form symbiotic associations with the roots of most plants, thereby mediating nutrient and carbon fluxes, plant performance, and ecosystem dynamics. Although considerable effort has been expended to understand the keystone ecological position of AM symbioses, most

  12. Diversity and biogeography of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agricultural soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oehl, F.; Laczko, E.; Oberholzer, H.-R.; Jansa, Jan; Egli, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 7 (2017), s. 777-797 ISSN 0178-2762 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Arbuscular mycorrhizal * Agriculture * Biodiversity Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 3.683, year: 2016

  13. Plant hormones as signals in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miransari, Mohammad; Abrishamchi, A; Khoshbakht, K; Niknam, V

    2014-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are non-specific symbionts developing mutual and beneficial symbiosis with most terrestrial plants. Because of the obligatory nature of the symbiosis, the presence of the host plant during the onset and proceeding of symbiosis is necessary. However, AM fungal spores are able to germinate in the absence of the host plant. The fungi detect the presence of the host plant through some signal communications. Among the signal molecules, which can affect mycorrhizal symbiosis are plant hormones, which may positively or adversely affect the symbiosis. In this review article, some of the most recent findings regarding the signaling effects of plant hormones, on mycorrhizal fungal symbiosis are reviewed. This may be useful for the production of plants, which are more responsive to mycorrhizal symbiosis under stress.

  14. Mycorrhizal symbiosis: ancient signalling mechanisms co-opted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, R.; Vleeshouwers, V.G.A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal root endosymbiosis is an ancient property of land plants. Two parallel studies now provide novel insight into the mechanism driving this interaction and how it is used by other filamentous microbes like pathogenic oomycetes.

  15. Troubles continue for the Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. According to the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (Joint Commission, JCAHO, an independent organization that reviews hospitals, the Phoenix VA does not comply with U.S. standards for safety, patient care and management (1. The hospital was at the epicenter of the national scandal over the quality of care being afforded to the nation's veterans where the now notorious practice of double-booking patient appointments was first exposed. The hospital's indifferent management provoked congressional investigations that uncovered still more system-wide abuses leading to the removal of the hospital director and the resignation of then VA secretary, Eric Shinseki. The hospital maintains its accreditation but with a follow-up survey in 1-6 months where it must show that it has successfully addressed the 13 identified problems (1. Inspectors who conducted the review in July found that VA employees were unable to report concerns "without retaliatory action from the hospital." Other alarming ...

  16. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz

    2012-01-01

    chemistry similar to that of brown-rot fungi. The set of enzymes expressed by Pa. involutus during the degradation of the organic matter was similar to the set of enzymes involved in the oxidative degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi. However, Pa. involutus lacked transcripts encoding extracellular...... the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matterprotein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism...... by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton...

  17. A nutrient-regulated, dual localization phospholipase A2 in the symbiotic fungus Tuber borchii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Bolchi, Angelo; Balestrini, Raffaella; Gambaretto, Claudio; Percudani, Riccardo; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2001-01-01

    Important morphogenetic transitions in fungi are triggered by starvation-induced changes in the expression of structural surface proteins. Here, we report that nutrient deprivation causes a strong and reversible up-regulation of TbSP1, a surface-associated, Ca2+-dependent phospholipase from the mycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii. TbSP1 is the first phospholipase A2 to be described in fungi and identifies a novel class of phospholipid-hydrolyzing enzymes. The TbSP1 phospholipase, which is synthesized initially as a pre-protein, is processed efficiently and secreted during the mycelial phase. The mature protein, however, also localizes to the inner cell wall layer, close to the plasma membrane, in both free-living and symbiosis-engaged hyphae. It thus appears that a dual localization phospholipase A2 is involved in the adaptation of a symbiotic fungus to conditions of persistent nutritional limitation. Moreover, the fact that TbSP1-related sequences are present in Streptomyces and Neurospora, and not in wholly sequenced non-filamentous microorganisms, points to a general role for TbSP1 phospholipases A2 in the organization of multicellular filamentous structures in bacteria and fungi. PMID:11566873

  18. VA announces aggressive new approach to produce rapid improvements in VA medical centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA announced steps that it is taking as part of an aggressive new approach to produce rapid improvements at VA’s low-performing medical facilities nationwide (1. VA defines its low-performing facilities as those medical centers that receive the lowest score in its Strategic Analytics for Improvement and Learning (SAIL star rating system, or a one-star rating out of five. The SAIL star rating was initiated in 2016 and uses a variety of measures including mortality, length of hospital stay, readmission rates, hospital complications, physician productivity and efficiency. A complete listing of the VA facilities, their star ratings and the metrics used to determine the ratings is available through the end of fiscal year 2017 (2. Based on the latest ratings, the VA currently has 15 one-star facilities including Denver, Loma Linda, and Phoenix in the Southwest (Table 1. Table 1. VA facilities with one-star ratings …

  19. Optical properties of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Adverdi; V-Hernandez, Alejandra; Rudamas, Carlos; Dreyer, Beatriz

    2008-01-01

    It was already reported by B. Dreyer at al. [1] that all fungal structures, both intra- and extra-radical fluoresced under blue light excitation regardless of their state (dead or alive). The source of the so called autofluorescence appears to be localized in the fungal cell wall. This supports the use of photoluminescence for the evaluation of AM colonization. However, the interpretation of these results is still in discussion [1-4]. In this work, arbuscular mycorrhizal spores were isolated from the rhizosphere of mango (Mangifera indica L.) plants by the method of wet sieving and decanting of Gerdemann and Nicolson [5] and studied by photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our experimental setup consists of an epifluorescence microscope (EM) coupled to a CCD-spectrometer through an arrangement of a home-made-telescope + fiber optic. This experimental setup allows the capture of images of the mycorrhizal structures (as usual in a standard epifluorescence microscope) combined with measurements of their corresponding emission bands. The preliminary results based on images obtained by standard EM do not clearly show that the emission is originated in the fungal cell walls as reported in Ref. 1. On the other hand, a very broad emission band in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum was observed in these spores by exciting at 450-490 nm and 300- 380 nm. We obtain a Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of around 200 nm for this emission band whichis centered at 515 nm. This broad band seems to be composed of two narrower bands peaked around 494 and 547 nm and with FWHM of 50 nm and 150 nm, respectively. The profile of the observed emission band is in good agreement with the bands reported in Ref. 1 for vesicles, arbuscules and spores measured using the λ-Scan of a confocal laser scanning microscope. However, our results for spores show that the maxima of the narrower bands are shifted to higher energies in comparison to the corresponding bands observed in Ref. 1

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots during Development of the Prepenetration Apparatus1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Valeria; Genre, Andrea; Balestrini, Raffaella; Cappellazzo, Gilda; deWit, Pierre J.G.M.; Bonfante, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Information on changes in the plant transcriptome during early interaction with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is still limited since infections are usually not synchronized and plant markers for early stages of colonization are not yet available. A prepenetration apparatus (PPA), organized in epidermal cells during appressorium development, has been reported to be responsible for assembling a trans-cellular tunnel to accommodate the invading fungus. Here, we used PPAs as markers for cell responsiveness to fungal contact to investigate gene expression at this early stage of infection with minimal transcript dilution. PPAs were identified by confocal microscopy in transformed roots of Medicago truncatula expressing green fluorescent protein-HDEL, colonized by the AM fungus Gigaspora margarita. A PPA-targeted suppressive-subtractive cDNA library was built, the cDNAs were cloned and sequenced, and, consequently, 107 putative interaction-specific genes were identified. The expression of a subset of 15 genes, selected by reverse northern dot blot screening, and five additional genes, potentially involved in PPA formation, was analyzed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and compared with an infection stage, 48 h after the onset of the PPA. Comparison of the expression profile of G. margarita-inoculated wild type and the mycorrhiza-defective dmi3-1 mutant of M. truncatula revealed that an expansin-like gene, expressed in wild-type epidermis during PPA development, can be regarded as an early host marker for successful mycorrhization. A putative Avr9/Cf-9 rapidly elicited gene, found to be up-regulated in the mutant, suggests novel regulatory roles for the DMI3 protein in the early mycorrhization process. PMID:17468219

  1. Biodiversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots and soils of two salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Petra; Manal, Astrid; Stodden, Marc; Sieverding, Ewald; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Bothe, Hermann

    2009-06-01

    The occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was assessed by both morphological and molecular criteria in two salt marshes: (i) a NaCl site of the island Terschelling, Atlantic Coast, the Netherlands and (ii) a K(2)CO(3) marsh at Schreyahn, Northern Germany. The overall biodiversity of AMF, based on sequence analysis, was comparably low in roots at both sites. However, the morphological spore analyses from soil samples of both sites exhibited a higher AMF biodiversity. Glomus geosporum was the only fungus of the Glomerales that was detected both as spores in soil samples and in roots of the AMF-colonized salt plants Aster tripolium and Puccinellia sp. at both saline sites and on all sampling dates (one exception). In roots, sequences of Glomus intraradices prevailed, but this fungus could not be identified unambiguously from DNA of soil spores. Likewise, Glomus sp. uncultured, only deposited as sequence in the database, was widely detected by DNA sequencing in root samples. All attempts to obtain the corresponding sequences from spores isolated from soil samples failed consistently. A small sized Archaeospora sp. was detected, either/or by morphological and molecular analyses, in roots or soil spores, in dead AMF spores or orobatid mites. The study noted inconsistencies between morphological characterization and identification by DNA sequencing of the 5.8S rDNA-ITS2 region or part of the 18S rDNA gene. The distribution of AMF unlikely followed the salt gradient at both sites, in contrast to the zone formation of plant species. Zygotes of the alga Vaucheria erythrospora (Xanthophyceae) were retrieved and should not be misidentified with AMF spores.

  2. Plant litter chemistry and mycorrhizal roots promote a nitrogen feedback in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina Wurzburger; Ronald L. Hendrick

    2009-01-01

    1. Relationships between mycorrhizal plants and soil nitrogen (N) have led to the speculation that the chemistry of plant litter and the saprotrophy of mycorrhizal symbionts can function together to...

  3. A endophytic fungus, Ramichloridium cerophilum, promotes growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... A fungal endophyte, Ramichloridium cerophilum, was identified as a Class 2 endophytes species ... The mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and fungi is common and .... growing fungal colony and placed into a sterile plastic pot and .... bacteria associated with the roots of Chinese cabbage (Brassica.

  4. Variability in colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and its effect on mycorrhizal dependency of improved and unimproved soybean cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, M S; Guzzo, M C; Velazquez, M S; Sagadin, M B; Luna, C M

    2016-12-01

    Breeding selection of germplasm under fertilized conditions may reduce the frequency of genes that promote mycorrhizal associations. This study was developed to compare variability in mycorrhizal colonization and its effect on mycorrhizal dependency (MD) in improved soybean genotypes (I-1 and I-2) with differential tolerance to drought stress, and in unimproved soybean genotypes (UI-3 and UI-4). As inoculum, a mixed native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was isolated from soybean roots, showing spores mostly of the species Funneliformis mosseae. At 20 days, unimproved genotypes followed by I-2, showed an increase in arbuscule formation, but not in I-1. At 40 days, mycorrhizal plants showed an increase in nodulation, this effect being more evident in unimproved genotypes. Mycorrhizal dependency, evaluated as growth and biochemical parameters from oxidative stress was increased in unimproved and I-2 since 20 days, whereas in I-1, MD increased at 40 days. We cannot distinguish significant differences in AMF colonization and MD between unimproved and I-2. However, variability among improved genotypes was observed. Our results suggest that selection for improved soybean genotypes with good and rapid AMF colonization, particularly high arbuscule/hyphae ratio could be a useful strategy for the development of genotypes that optimize AMF contribution to cropping systems.

  5. Sequestration of Carbon in Mycorrhizal Fungi Under Nitrogen Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Turner, K. M.

    2005-12-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are root symbionts that facilitate plant uptake of soil nutrients in exchange for plant carbohydrates. They grow in almost every terrestrial ecosystem on earth, form relationships with about 80% of plant species, and receive 10 to 20% of the carbon fixed by their host plants. As such, they could potentially sequester a significant amount of carbon in ecosystems. We hypothesized that nitrogen fertilization would decrease carbon storage in mycorrhizal fungi, because plants should reduce investment of carbon in mycorrhizal fungi when nitrogen availability is high. We measured the abundance of two major groups of mycorrhizal fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, in control and nitrogen-fertilized plots within three boreal ecosystems of inland Alaska. The ecosystems represented different recovery stages following severe fire, and comprised a young site dominated by AM fungi, an old site dominated by ECM fungi, and an intermediate site co-dominated by both groups. Pools of mycorrhizal carbon included root-associated AM and ECM structures, soil-associated AM hyphae, and soil-associated glomalin. Glomalin is a glycoprotein produced only by AM fungi. It is present in the cell walls of AM hyphae, and then is deposited in the soil as the hyphae senesce. Nitrogen significantly altered total mycorrhizal carbon pools, but its effect varied by site (site * N interaction, P = 0.05). Under nitrogen fertilization, mycorrhizal carbon was reduced from 99 to 50 g C m2 in the youngest site, was increased from 124 to 203 g C m2 in the intermediate-aged site, and remained at 35 g C m2 in the oldest site. The changes in total mycorrhizal carbon stocks were driven mostly by changes in glomalin (site * N interaction, P = 0.05), and glomalin stocks were strongly correlated with AM hyphal abundance (P stocks within root-associated AM structures increased significantly with nitrogen fertilization across all sites (P = 0.001), as did root

  6. Cooperation through Competition—Dynamics and Microeconomics of a Minimal Nutrient Trade System in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Stephan; Valdebenito, Braulio; Bustos, Daniel; Gomez-Porras, Judith L.; Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, fungi and plants exchange nutrients (sugars and phosphate, for instance) for reciprocal benefit. Until now it is not clear how this nutrient exchange system works. Here, we used computational cell biology to simulate the dynamics of a network of proton pumps and proton-coupled transporters that are upregulated during AM formation. We show that this minimal network is sufficient to describe accurately and realistically the nutrient trade system. By applying basic principles of microeconomics, we link the biophysics of transmembrane nutrient transport with the ecology of organismic interactions and straightforwardly explain macroscopic scenarios of the relations between plant and AM fungus. This computational cell biology study allows drawing far reaching hypotheses about the mechanism and the regulation of nutrient exchange and proposes that the “cooperation” between plant and fungus can be in fact the result of a competition between both for the same resources in the tiny periarbuscular space. The minimal model presented here may serve as benchmark to evaluate in future the performance of more complex models of AM nutrient exchange. As a first step toward this goal, we included SWEET sugar transporters in the model and show that their co-occurrence with proton-coupled sugar transporters results in a futile carbon cycle at the plant plasma membrane proposing that two different pathways for the same substrate should not be active at the same time. PMID:27446142

  7. Cooperation through Competition-Dynamics and Microeconomics of a Minimal Nutrient Trade System in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Stephan; Valdebenito, Braulio; Bustos, Daniel; Gomez-Porras, Judith L; Sharma, Tripti; Dreyer, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    In arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, fungi and plants exchange nutrients (sugars and phosphate, for instance) for reciprocal benefit. Until now it is not clear how this nutrient exchange system works. Here, we used computational cell biology to simulate the dynamics of a network of proton pumps and proton-coupled transporters that are upregulated during AM formation. We show that this minimal network is sufficient to describe accurately and realistically the nutrient trade system. By applying basic principles of microeconomics, we link the biophysics of transmembrane nutrient transport with the ecology of organismic interactions and straightforwardly explain macroscopic scenarios of the relations between plant and AM fungus. This computational cell biology study allows drawing far reaching hypotheses about the mechanism and the regulation of nutrient exchange and proposes that the "cooperation" between plant and fungus can be in fact the result of a competition between both for the same resources in the tiny periarbuscular space. The minimal model presented here may serve as benchmark to evaluate in future the performance of more complex models of AM nutrient exchange. As a first step toward this goal, we included SWEET sugar transporters in the model and show that their co-occurrence with proton-coupled sugar transporters results in a futile carbon cycle at the plant plasma membrane proposing that two different pathways for the same substrate should not be active at the same time.

  8. Behavior of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in soil: Effects of rhizosphere and mycorrhizal colonization of ryegrass roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Sen [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Shuzhen, E-mail: szzhang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Honglin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Christie, Peter [Agri-Environment Branch, Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Newforge Lane, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    A rhizobox experiment was conducted to investigate degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) in the rhizosphere of ryegrass and the influence of root colonization with an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus. BDE-209 dissipation in soil varied with its proximity to the roots and was enhanced by AM inoculation. A negative correlation (P < 0.001, R{sup 2} = 0.66) was found between the residual BDE-209 concentration in soil and soil microbial biomass estimated as the total phospholipid fatty acids, suggesting a contribution of microbial degradation to BDE-209 dissipation. Twelve and twenty-four lower brominated PBDEs were detected in soil and plant samples, respectively, with a higher proportion of di- through hepta-BDE congeners in the plant tissues than in the soils, indicating the occurrence of BDE-209 debromination in the soil-plant system. AM inoculation increased the levels of lower brominated PBDEs in ryegrass. These results provide important information about the behavior of BDE-209 in the soil-plant system. - Research highlights: > BDE-209 dissipation in soil was affected by the proximity to the roots. > Microbial degradation contributes greatly to BDE-209 dissipation in the soil. > Twelve and twenty-four lower brominated PBDEs were detected in soil and plant samples. > AM inoculation increased root uptake and accumulation of BDE-209. - BDE-209 dissipation and degradation in soil were affected by both its proximity to ryegrass roots and inoculation with an AM fungus.

  9. VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD extremity injury outcomes collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shireman, Paula K; Rasmussen, Todd E; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Pugh, Mary Jo

    2015-02-03

    Limb injuries comprise 50-60% of U.S. Service member's casualties of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Combat-related vascular injuries are present in 12% of this cohort, a rate 5 times higher than in prior wars. Improvements in medical and surgical trauma care, including initial in-theatre limb salvage approaches (IILS) have resulted in improved survival and fewer amputations, however, the long-term outcomes such as morbidity, functional decline, and risk for late amputation of salvaged limbs using current process of care have not been studied. The long-term care of these injured warfighters poses a significant challenge to the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA Vascular Injury Study (VAVIS): VA-DoD Extremity Injury Outcomes Collaborative, funded by the VA, Health Services Research and Development Service, is a longitudinal cohort study of Veterans with vascular extremity injuries. Enrollment will begin April, 2015 and continue for 3 years. Individuals with a validated extremity vascular injury in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry will be contacted and will complete a set of validated demographic, social, behavioral, and functional status measures during interview and online/ mailed survey. Primary outcome measures will: 1) Compare injury, demographic and geospatial characteristics of patients with IILS and identify late vascular surgery related limb complications and health care utilization in Veterans receiving VA vs. non-VA care, 2) Characterize the preventive services received by individuals with vascular repair and related outcomes, and 3) Describe patient-reported functional outcomes in Veterans with traumatic vascular limb injuries. This study will provide key information about the current process of care for Active Duty Service members and Veterans with polytrauma/vascular injuries at risk for persistent morbidity and late amputation. The results of this study will be the first step for clinicians in VA and

  10. 48 CFR 853.215-70 - VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. 853.215-70 Section 853.215-70 Federal... 853.215-70 VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA. VA Form 10-1170, Application for Furnishing Nursing Home Care to Beneficiaries of VA, will be used for...

  11. Effects of Nano Chelated Zinc and Mycorrhizal Fungi Inoculation on Some Agronomic and Physiological Characteristics of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. under Drought Stress Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rezaei Chiyaneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Zinc is an essential element for plants and animals and plays an important role in plants metabolic system. This element activates enzymes and involved in protein, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acid metabolism. Zinc has a major role in cell defenses against ROS and as a protective factor against several chemical compositions of oxidation such as membrane lipids, protein, chlorophyll, and enzyme having sulfhydryl and DNA. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that plays many important roles in various physiological and metabolic processes in all living organisms. It functions as a cofactor for over 300 enzymes and proteins involved in cell division, nucleic acid metabolism and protein synthesis. Nanoparticles have received considerable attention due to their increased uptake and high rate of penetration in plants. Nanomaterials are classified as materials with at least one dimension less than 100 nm. Nonmaterial could to be applied in designing more soluble and diffusible sources of Zn fertilizer for increased plant productivity. Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. an oilseed crop is a member of the family Compositae or Asteraceae. Safflower, a multipurpose crop that has been grown for centuries in India for the orange-red dye (carthamin extracted from its brilliantly colored flowers and for its quality oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, 78%. Safflower flowers are known to have many medicinal properties for curing several chronic diseases, and they are widely used in Chinese herbal preparations. The mycorrhizal symbiosis is arguably the most important symbiosis on earth. The majority of these mycorrhizal interactions is mutually beneficial for both partners and is characterized by a bidirectional exchange of resources across the mycorrhizal interface. The mycorrhizal fungus provides the host plant with nutrients, such as phosphate and nitrogen, and increases the abiotic (drought, salinity and heavy metals and

  12. Mycorrhizal symbiosis produces changes in specific flavonoids in leaves of pepper plant (Capsicum annum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate if mycorrhizal plants grown under optimal growth conditions would improve crop quality compared to the non-mycorrhizal control. The results clearly showed that while mycorrhizal plants grown under an optimal nutrient supply did not increase t...

  13. Differences in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi among three coffee cultivars in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligia Lebrón; Jean D. Lodge; Paul. Bayman

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is important for growth of coffee (Coffea arabica), but differences among coffee cultivars in response to mycorrhizal interactions have not been studied. We compared arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) extraradical hyphae in the soil and diversity of AM fungi among three coffee cultivars, Caturra, Pacas, and Borbon, at three farms in...

  14. Niche differentiation and expansion of plant species are associated with mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerz, Maret; Guillermo Bueno, C.; Ozinga, Wim A.; Zobel, Martin; Moora, Mari

    2018-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is a widespread association between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, which is thought to contribute to plant niche differentiation and expansion. However, this has so far not been explicitly tested. To address the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis on plants’ realized niches, we

  15. SlaVaComp Fonts Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Skilevic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fonts converter that was developed as a part of the Freiburg project on historical corpus linguistics. The tool named SlaVaComp-Konvertierer converts Church Slavonic texts digitized with non-Unicode fonts into the Unicode format without any loss of information contained in the original file and without damage to the original formatting. It is suitable for the conversion of all idiosyncratic fonts—not only Church Slavonic—and therefore can be used not only in Palaeoslavistic, but also in all historical and philological studies.

  16. How do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi handle phosphate? New insight into fine-tuning of phosphate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, Tatsuhiro; Saito, Katsuharu

    2018-04-27

    Contents Summary I. Introduction II. Foraging for phosphate III. Fine-tuning of phosphate homeostasis IV. The frontiers: phosphate translocation and export V. Conclusions and outlook Acknowledgements References SUMMARY: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi form symbiotic associations with most land plants and deliver mineral nutrients, in particular phosphate, to the host. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of phosphate acquisition and delivery in the fungi is critical for full appreciation of the mutualism in this association. Here, we provide updates on physical, chemical, and biological strategies of the fungi for phosphate acquisition, including interactions with phosphate-solubilizing bacteria, and those on the regulatory mechanisms of phosphate homeostasis based on resurveys of published genome sequences and a transcriptome with reference to the latest findings in a model fungus. For the mechanisms underlying phosphate translocation and export to the host, which are major research frontiers in this field, not only recent advances but also testable hypotheses are proposed. Lastly, we briefly discuss applicability of the latest tools to gene silencing in the fungi, which will be breakthrough techniques for comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of fungal phosphate metabolism. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Transport properties and regulatory roles of nitrogen in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqun; Gu, Mian; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Jiadong; Xu, Guohua

    2018-02-01

    Many terrestrial plants can form root symbiosis with beneficial microorganisms for enhancing uptake of mineral nutrients or increasing fitness to adverse environmental challenges. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis that is formed by AM fungi and the roots of vascular flowering plants is the most widespread mutualistic associations in nature. As a typical endosymbiosis, AM interactions involves the differentiation of both symbionts to create novel symbiotic interfaces within the root cells, and requires a continuous nutrient exchange between the two partners. AM plants have two pathways for nutrient uptake, either direct uptake via the root hairs and root epidermis at the plant-soil interface, or indirectly through the AM fungal hyphae at the plant-fungus interface. Over the last few years, great progress has been made in deciphering the mechanisms underlying the AM-mediated modulation of nutrient uptake processes, and an increasing number of plant and fungal genes responsible for transporting nutrients from the soil or across the intraradical symbiotic interfaces have been identified and functionally characterized. Here, we summarize the recent advances in the nitrogen uptake, assimilation and translocation in the AM symbiosis, and also explore the current understanding of how the N status and interplay with C and P in modulating the development of AM associations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Lipid droplets of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi emerge in concert with arbuscule collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobae, Yoshihiro; Gutjahr, Caroline; Paszkowski, Uta; Kojima, Tomoko; Fujiwara, Toru; Hata, Shingo

    2014-11-01

    Plants share photosynthetically fixed carbon with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to maintain their growth and nutrition. AM fungi are oleogenic fungi that contain numerous lipid droplets in their syncytial mycelia during most of their life cycle. These lipid droplets are probably used for supporting growth of extraradical mycelia and propagation; however, when and where the lipid droplets are produced remains unclear. To address these issues, we investigated the correlation between intracellular colonization stages and the appearance of fungal lipid droplets in roots by a combination of vital staining of fungal structures, selective staining of lipids and live imaging. We discovered that a surge of lipid droplets coincided with the collapse of arbuscular branches, indicating that arbuscule collapse and the emergence of lipid droplets may be associated processes. This phenomenon was observed in the model AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis and the ancestral member of AM fungi Paraglomus occultum. Because the collapsing arbuscules were metabolically inactive, the emerged lipid droplets are probably derived from preformed lipids but not de novo synthesized. Our observations highlight a novel mode of lipid release by AM fungi. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Positive Gene Regulation by a Natural Protective miRNA Enables Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couzigou, Jean-Malo; Lauressergues, Dominique; André, Olivier; Gutjahr, Caroline; Guillotin, Bruno; Bécard, Guillaume; Combier, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-11

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis associates most plants with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. The fungus penetrates into roots and forms within cortical cell branched structures called arbuscules for nutrient exchange. We discovered that miR171b has a mismatched cleavage site and is unable to downregulate the miR171 family target gene, LOM1 (LOST MERISTEMS 1). This mismatched cleavage site is conserved among plants that establish AM symbiosis, but not in non-mycotrophic plants. Unlike other members of the miR171 family, miR171b stimulates AM symbiosis and is expressed specifically in root cells that contain arbuscules. MiR171b protects LOM1 from negative regulation by other miR171 family members. These findings uncover a unique mechanism of positive post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by miRNAs and demonstrate its relevance for the establishment of AM symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis induces strigolactone biosynthesis under drought and improves drought tolerance in lettuce and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Aroca, Ricardo; Zamarreño, Ángel María; Molina, Sonia; Andreo-Jiménez, Beatriz; Porcel, Rosa; García-Mina, José María; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien; López-Ráez, Juan Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis alleviates drought stress in plants. However, the intimate mechanisms involved, as well as its effect on the production of signalling molecules associated with the host plant-AM fungus interaction remains largely unknown. In the present work, the effects of drought on lettuce and tomato plant performance and hormone levels were investigated in non-AM and AM plants. Three different water regimes were applied, and their effects were analysed over time. AM plants showed an improved growth rate and efficiency of photosystem II than non-AM plants under drought from very early stages of plant colonization. The levels of the phytohormone abscisic acid, as well as the expression of the corresponding marker genes, were influenced by drought stress in non-AM and AM plants. The levels of strigolactones and the expression of corresponding marker genes were affected by both AM symbiosis and drought. The results suggest that AM symbiosis alleviates drought stress by altering the hormonal profiles and affecting plant physiology in the host plant. In addition, a correlation between AM root colonization, strigolactone levels and drought severity is shown, suggesting that under these unfavourable conditions, plants might increase strigolactone production in order to promote symbiosis establishment to cope with the stress. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Optimization of the production of mycorrhizal inoculum on substrate with organic fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieda R Coelho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The system for production of inoculum of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF using sand and vermiculite irrigated with nutrient solution is promising. However, organic amendments added to the substrate can stimulate sporulation of AMF and replace the nutrient solution. The aim of this study was to maximize the production of AMF (Acaulospora longula, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Dentiscutata heterogama and Gigaspora albida using selected organic substrates (vermicompost, coir dust and Tropstrato together with sand and vermiculite. The production of spores varied among the tested AMF and according to the organic source added to the substrate. The vermicompost promoted higher sporulation of A. longula in relation to the other AMF and substrates. The Tropstrato® inhibited the sporulation of D. heterogama while the reproduction of C. etunicatum was not affected by the organic compounds. The inoculum of A. longula also showed a high number of infective propagules and promoted biomass accumulation in maize plants. The system of inoculum production using sand and vermiculite + 10% vermicompost favors the production of infective inoculum of A. longula with the fungus benefiting growth of corn plants.

  2. Microsatellite Primers for Fungus-Growing Ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen Fredsted, Palle; Gertsch, Pia J.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan (Koos)

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  3. Microsatellite primers for fungus-growing ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villesen, Palle; Gertsch, P J; Boomsma, JJ

    2002-01-01

    We isolated five polymorphic microsatellite loci from a library of two thousand recombinant clones of two fungus-growing ant species, Cyphomyrmex longiscapus and Trachymyrmex cf. zeteki. Amplification and heterozygosity were tested in five species of higher attine ants using both the newly...... developed primers and earlier published primers that were developed for fungus-growing ants. A total of 20 variable microsatellite loci, developed for six different species of fungus-growing ants, are now available for studying the population genetics and colony kin-structure of these ants....

  4. Medical Student Psychiatry Examination Performance at VA and Non-VA Clerkship Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Phebe; von Schlageter, Margo Shultes; Park, EunMi; Rosenberg, Emily; Benjamin, Ashley B.; Nawar, Ola

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the effects of medical student assignment to U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center inpatient and outpatient psychiatry clerkship sites versus other university and community sites on the performance outcome measure of National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject examination scores. Methods:…

  5. Influence of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on the Response of Potato to Phosphorus Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, DAJ.; Knowles, N. R.

    1993-01-01

    Morphological and biochemical interactions between a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus (Glomus fasciculatum [Thaxt. sensu Gerdemann] Gerdemann and Trappe) and potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants during the development of P deficiency were characterized. Nonmycorrhizal (NM) plants grown for 63 d with low abiotic P supply (0.5 mM) produced 34, 52, and 73% less root, shoot, and tuber dry matter, respectively, than plants grown with high P (2.5 mM). The total leaf area and the leaf area:plant dry weight ratio of low-P plants were substantially lower than those of high-P plants. Moreover, a lower shoot:root dry weight ratio and tuber:plant dry weight ratio in low-P plants than in high-P plants characterized a major effect of P deficiency stress on dry matter partitioning. In addition to a slower rate of growth, low-P plants accumulated nonreducing sugars and nitrate. Furthermore, root respiration and leaf nitrate reductase activity were lower in low-P plants than in high-P plants. Low abiotic P supply also induced physiological changes that contributed to the greater efficiency of P acquisition by low-P plants than by high-P plants. For example, allocation of dry matter and P to root growth was less restricted by P deficiency stress than to shoot and tuber growth. Also, the specific activities of root acid phosphatases and vanadate-sensitive microsomal ATPases were enhanced in P-deficient plants. The establishment of a VAM symbiosis by low-P plants was essential for efficient P acquisition, and a greater root infection level for P-stressed plants indicated increased compatibility to the VAM fungus. By 63 d after planting, low-P VAM plants had recovered 42% more of the available soil P than low-P NM plants. However, the VAM fungus only partially alleviated P deficiency stress and did not completely compensate for inadequate abiotic P supply. Although the specific activities of acid phosphatases and microsomal ATPases were only marginally influenced by VAM

  6. Visionary leadership and the future of VA health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezold, C; Mayer, E; Dighe, A

    1997-01-01

    As the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) makes the change over to Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISNs) the need for new and better leadership is warranted if VA wants to not only survive, but thrive in the emerging twenty-first century healthcare system. VA can prepare for the future and meet the challenges facing them by adopting a system of visionary leadership. The use of scenarios and vision techniques are explained as they relate to VA's efforts to move toward their new system of VISNs. The four scenarios provide snapshots of possible futures for the U.S. healthcare system as well as the possible future role and mission of VA--from VA disappearing to its becoming a premier virtual organization.

  7. Mycorrhizal inoculation affects the phytochemical content in strawberry fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cecatto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the inoculation date of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the fruit quality and the content of phytochemicals in a strawberry soilless growing system. The experiment was performed in Huelva (Spain and was conducted in a greenhouse on the La Rábida Campus of Huelva University under natural light and temperature from October 2013 to June 2014. Three short-day strawberry cultivars (‘Splendor’, ‘Sabrina’ and ‘Fortuna’ were grown in polyethylene bags filled with coconut fibres. Randomized block design, with 3 repetitions and factorial arrangement (3 cultivars x 3 treatments, was established. Each replicate consisted of one bag with 12 plants supporting structures at 40 cm height. The treatments were: T1 = mycorrhizal inoculation in the transplantation; T2 = mycorrhizal inoculation 30 days after transplantation (DAT; and T0 = control treatment, without inoculation. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation significantly affected the contents of anthocyanin and phenolics. When the inoculation is performed in the transplantation, the fruits showed a high content of anthocyanin and total phenolics. The mycorrhizal inoculation influences decreasing the acidity in fruit throughout the growing season and increase firmness only during the early stage of production.

  8. Assembly, Annotation, and Analysis of Multiple Mycorrhizal Fungal Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Initiative Consortium, Mycorrhizal Genomics; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2013-03-08

    Mycorrhizal fungi play critical roles in host plant health, soil community structure and chemistry, and carbon and nutrient cycling, all areas of intense interest to the US Dept. of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To this end we are building on our earlier sequencing of the Laccaria bicolor genome by partnering with INRA-Nancy and the mycorrhizal research community in the MGI to sequence and analyze dozens of mycorrhizal genomes of all Basidiomycota and Ascomycota orders and multiple ecological types (ericoid, orchid, and ectomycorrhizal). JGI has developed and deployed high-throughput sequencing techniques, and Assembly, RNASeq, and Annotation Pipelines. In 2012 alone we sequenced, assembled, and annotated 12 draft or improved genomes of mycorrhizae, and predicted ~;;232831 genes and ~;;15011 multigene families, All of this data is publicly available on JGI MycoCosm (http://jgi.doe.gov/fungi/), which provides access to both the genome data and tools with which to analyze the data. Preliminary comparisons of the current total of 14 public mycorrhizal genomes suggest that 1) short secreted proteins potentially involved in symbiosis are more enriched in some orders than in others amongst the mycorrhizal Agaricomycetes, 2) there are wide ranges of numbers of genes involved in certain functional categories, such as signal transduction and post-translational modification, and 3) novel gene families are specific to some ecological types.

  9. Mycorrhizal-like interaction between gametophytes and young sporophytes of the fern Dryopteris muenchii (Filicales and its fungal endophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Reyes-Jaramillo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of a Glomus-like fungus-host interaction in chlorophyllous gametophytes and young apogamic sporophytes of Dryopteris muenchii A.R. Sm. was studied from ferns cultivated in laboratory, using soil as substrate. An aseptate fungus colonized the gametophytes’ tissue through the rhizoids, developing vesicles. The fungus penetrated the young sporophytes primary roots by developing appressoria. It spread forming inter- and intra-cellular hyphae through the epidermis and the outermost cortical cell layers, where it formed vesicles, hyphal coils-like and arbuscules. The fungus hyphae never colonized the gametophyte-sporophyte cellular junction. The fungal structures observed on D. muenchii during this study, are rather similar to those reported for the plant host-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF interaction, where the AMF described belonged to Phylum Glomeromycota. Therefore, this study is a contribution to the scarce knowledgement of the association between AMF and chlorophyllous gametophytes and young apogamic sporophytes of ferns. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (3: 1101-1107. Epub 2008 September 30.Se describe la morfología de un hongo endófito afín al género Glomus, como colonizador de gametofitos clorofílicos y de esporofitos apogámicos jóvenes del helecho Dryopteris muenchii A.R. Sm.; el estudio se llevó a cabo con helechos cultivados en el laboratorio y utilizando tierra como substrato. El tejido del gametofito fue colonizado, a través de los rizoides, por un hongo miceliar aseptado, el cual formó vesículas. El hongo logró penetrar las raíces primarias de los esporofitos jóvenes desarrollando apresorios. El hongo se dispersó formando hifas inter- e intra-celulares a través de la epidermis y de la capa de células corticales más externas, donde produjo vesículas, estructuras similares a ovillos y arbúsculos. Las hifas del hongo nunca colonizaron las células de la unión entre el gametofito y el esporofito. Las

  10. Dynamic of arbuscular mycorrhizal population on Amazon forest from the south Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Vanegas, Clara P

    2001-01-01

    This work compared changes occurred on the number of arbuscular mycorrhizal spores at three mature forests and three regenerative forests, before and after clear-cutting. Results suggest that it is possible to predict the quantity of arbuscular mycorrhizal inocule after clear-cutting if initial number and type of forests is known before. A model to explain these changes shows that arbuscular mycorrhizal depletion on mature forests is about 70% after clear-cutting. Survival mycorrhizal populations colonize regenerative forests. Then, if a clear-cutting occurs on regenerative forests, arbuscular mycorrhizal populations will decrease on 35%, being less drastic that it occurred on mature forests

  11. Mycorrhizal associations as Salix repens L. communities in succession of dune ecosystems II Mycorrhizal dynamics and interactions of ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Vosatka, M.

    2000-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EcM) and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations of Salix repens were studied at 16 sites in different successional stages of dune ecosystems (calcareous-acidic, dry-wet) in the Netherlands. High EcM colonization, low AM colonization, and lack of differences between habitats

  12. Metabolites from marine fungus Aspergillus sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; Rajmanickam, R.; DeSouza, L.

    Chemical examination of a methanolic extract of the marine fungus, Aspergillus sp., isolated from marine grass environment, yielded a steroid, ergosterol peroxide (1), and a mixture of known glyceride esters (2,3) of unsaturated fatty acids...

  13. U.S. National Fungus Collections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — The U.S. National Fungus Collections (BPI) are the “Smithsonian for fungi” and are the repository for over one million fungal specimens worldwide - the largest such...

  14. Geosmithia-Ophiostoma: a New Fungus-Fungus Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepori, Alessia L; Bettini, Priscilla P; Comparini, Cecilia; Sarrocco, Sabrina; Bonini, Anna; Frascella, Arcangela; Ghelardini, Luisa; Scala, Aniello; Vannacci, Giovanni; Santini, Alberto

    2018-04-01

    In Europe as in North America, elms are devastated by Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by the alien ascomycete Ophiostoma novo-ulmi. Pathogen dispersal and transmission are ensured by local species of bark beetles, which established a novel association with the fungus. Elm bark beetles also transport the Geosmithia fungi genus that is found in scolytids' galleries colonized by O. novo-ulmi. Widespread horizontal gene transfer between O. novo-ulmi and Geosmithia was recently observed. In order to define the relation between these two fungi in the DED pathosystem, O. novo-ulmi and Geosmithia species from elm, including a GFP-tagged strain, were grown in dual culture and mycelial interactions were observed by light and fluorescence microscopy. Growth and sporulation of O. novo-ulmi in the absence or presence of Geosmithia were compared. The impact of Geosmithia on DED severity was tested in vivo by co-inoculating Geosmithia and O. novo-ulmi in elms. A close and stable relation was observed between the two fungi, which may be classified as mycoparasitism by Geosmithia on O. novo-ulmi. These results prove the existence of a new component in the complex of organisms involved in DED, which might be capable of reducing the disease impact.

  15. The Efficiency of Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth Characteristics and some Nutrients Uptake of Plane tree Seedling (Platanus orientalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Alipour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drought stress is one of the most important abiotic stresses which significantly reduce yield and growth of most of plants. Plane tree is one of the important trees planted in the urban landscapes of Iran. One of the major limiting factors of landscapes development is providing water for plants. Deficit irrigation is a desirable method for saving water use in water deficit conditions and ultimately reducing necessary cost of water securement to landscape plants. Moreover, inoculation of plant root with mycorrhizal fungi can be considered as a method to reduce water demand of plants. In addition, mycorrhiza can increase plant resistance against environmental stress, such as salinity, temperature stress, drought stress and etc. Mycorrhiza can improve drought stress through enhancing water uptake as result of extra radical hyphae and stomatal regulation or transpiration. Increasing P concentration by mycorrhiza inoculation can be another mechansim for drought resistance in plants. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two Glomus species in combination together on plane tree under water deficit for growth characteristics and nutrients uptake such as P, Fe and Zn concentration. Materials and Methods: This outdoor experiment was conducted at - Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran, with average temperature 14.2 ºC and 27.9 ºC night/day, respectively and relative humidity 35-70% between Mar and Aug 2012 and repeated under the same condition in 2013. This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of inoculation with mycorrhizal fungus on plane saplings response to different applicable water levels (50 and 100% of water needs based on a completely randomized design with 3 replications. The treatments were control (without fertilizer, Germans peat + fertilizer, Germans peat + fertilizer + mycorrhiza in 50% of field capacity and Germans peat + fertilizer + mycorrhizain 100% of field capacity. The Mycorrhiza

  16. Development of a parallelization method for KENO V.a

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basoglu, B.; Bentley, C.; Dunn, M.

    1995-01-01

    The KENO V.a codes is a widely used Monte carlo codes that is part of the SCALE modular codes system for performing standardized computer analysis of nuclear systems for licensing evaluation. In the past few years, attempts have been made to speed up KENO V.a using new generation computers. In this paper we report on the initial development of a parallel version of KENO V.a for the Kendall Square Research supercomputer (KSRI) at ORNL. Investigations thus far have shown that the parallel code provides accurate results with significantly reduced computation times relative to the conventional KENO V.a code

  17. The potential of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi application on aggregrate stability in alfisol soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamsiyah, J.; Herawati, A.; Mujiyo

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the soil aggregate stability and its relationship with another variable in alfisol. The research used completely randomized design with four treatments: two sterilization levels (no sterilization and with sterilization) and two levels of mycorrhizal inoculation (no mycorrhizal and with mycorrhizal). Mycorrhizal (5 grams/pot) was inoculated before planting rice seeds. The soil aggregate stability was measured by wet-sieving and turbidimetric measurements. The results showed that soil aggregate stability was higher in mycorrhizal inoculated than non-mycorrhizal inoculated treatment, by 5% in sterilization soil and 3.2% in non-sterilization soil. The correlation analysis indicated that soil aggregate stability has a tight relationship with spore population, total glomalin, available glomalin, dry weight, tiller number of plant, and soil organic C. Inoculation of mycorrhizal contributed to stabilize soil aggregates in alfisol

  18. P depletion and activity of phosphatases in the rhizosphere of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cucumber (Cucumis Sativus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joner, E.J.; Magid, J.; Gahoonia, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was set up to test the ability of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) roots and hyphae to produce extracellular phosphatases and to study the relationship between phosphatase activity and soil organic P (P-o). Non-mycorrhizal cucumber and cucumber in symbiosis with either of two mycorrhizal...... fungi were grown in a sandy loam-sand mixture in three-compartment pots. Plant roots were separated from two consecutively adjoining compartments, first by a 37 m mesh excluding roots and subsequently by a 0.45 m membrane excluding mycorrhizal hyphae. Soil from the two root-free compartments...... was sectioned in a freezing microtome and analyzed for extracellular acid (pH 5.2) and alkaline (pH 8.5) phosphatase activity as well as depletion of NaHCO-3-extractable inorganic P (P-i) and P-o. Roots and mycorrhizal hyphae depleted the soil of P-i but did not influence the concentration of P-o in spite...

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and mycorrhizal stimulant affect dry matter and nutrient accumulation in bean and soybean plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Henrique Moreira Salgado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of biological resources in agriculture may allow less dependence and better use of finite resources. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi native to the Brazilian Savannah associated with the application of mycorrhizal stimulant (7-hydroxy, 4'-methoxy-isoflavone, in the early growth of common bean and soybean. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, in a completely randomized design, with a 7 x 2 factorial arrangement, consisting of five arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species, joint inoculation (junction of all species in equal proportions and native fungi (without inoculation, in the presence and absence of stimulant. The following traits were evaluated: shoot dry matter, root dry matter, mycorrhizal colonization, nodules dry matter and accumulation of calcium, zinc and phosphorus in the shoot dry matter. The increase provided by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and the use of stimulant reached over 200 % in bean and over 80 % in soybean plants. The fungi Acaulospora scrobiculata, Dentiscutata heterogama, Gigaspora margarita and Rhizophagus clarus, for bean, and Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Dentiscutata heterogama, Rhizophagus clarus and the joint inoculation, for soybean, increased the dry matter and nutrients accumulation.

  20. Non-targeted Colonization by the Endomycorrhizal Fungus, Serendipita vermifera, in Three Weeds Typically Co-occurring with Switchgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasun Ray

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serendipita vermifera (=Sebacina vermifera; isolate MAFF305830 is a mycorrhizal fungus originally isolated from the roots of an Australian orchid that we have previously shown to be beneficial in enhancing biomass yield and drought tolerance in switchgrass, an important bioenergy crop for cellulosic ethanol production in the United States. However, almost nothing is known about how this root-associated fungus proliferates and grows through the soil matrix. Such information is critical to evaluate the possibility of non-target effects, such as unintended spread to weedy plants growing near a colonized switchgrass plant in a field environment. A microcosm experiment was conducted to study movement of vegetative mycelia of S. vermifera between intentionally inoculated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. and nearby weeds. We constructed size-exclusion microcosms to test three different common weeds, large crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L., Texas panicum (Panicum texanum L., and Broadleaf signalgrass (Brachiaria platyphylla L., all species that typically co-occur in Southern Oklahoma and potentially compete with switchgrass. We report that such colonization of non-target plants by S. vermifera can indeed occur, seemingly via co-mingled root systems. As a consequence of colonization, significant enhancement of growth was noted in signalgrass, while a mild increase (albeit not significant was evident in crabgrass. Migration of the fungus seems unlikely in root-free bulk soil, as we failed to see transmission when the roots were kept separate. This research is the first documentation of non-targeted colonization of this unique root symbiotic fungus and highlights the need for such assessments prior to deployment of biological organisms in the field.

  1. Comparing Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention Programs Between VA and Non-VA Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M. Todd; Saint, Sanjay; Meddings, Jennifer; Trautner, Barbara W.; Wald, Heidi L.; Crnich, Christopher; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; McNamara, Sara E.; King, Beth J.; Hogikyan, Robert; Edson, Barbara; Krein, Sarah L.

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The impact of healthcare system integration on infection prevention programs is unknown. Using catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention as an example, we hypothesize that U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) nursing homes have a more robust infection prevention infrastructure due to integration and centralization compared with non-VA nursing homes. SETTING VA and non-VA nursing homes participating in the “AHRQ Safety Program for Long-term Care” collaborative. METHODS Nursing homes provided baseline information about their infection prevention programs to assess strengths and gaps related to CAUTI prevention. RESULTS A total of 353 (71%; 47 VA, 306 non-VA) of 494 nursing homes from 41 states responded. VA nursing homes reported more hours/week devoted to infection prevention-related activities (31 vs. 12 hours, P<.001), and were more likely to have committees that reviewed healthcare-associated infections. Compared with non-VA facilities, a higher percentage of VA nursing homes reported tracking CAUTI rates (94% vs. 66%, P<.001), sharing CAUTI data with leadership (94% vs. 70%, P=.014) and nursing personnel (85% vs. 56%, P=.003). However, fewer VA nursing homes reported having policies for appropriate catheter use (64% vs. 81%, P=.004) and catheter insertion (83% vs. 94%, P=.004). CONCLUSIONS Among nursing homes participating in an AHRQ-funded collaborative, VA and non-VA nursing homes differed in their approach to CAUTI prevention. Best practices from both settings should be applied universally to create an optimal infection prevention program within emerging integrated healthcare systems. PMID:27917728

  2. Genetics of mycorrhizal symbiosis in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Heike; Serfling, Albrecht; Enders, Matthias; Friedt, Wolfgang; Ordon, Frank

    2017-07-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) is a major staple food and therefore of prime importance for feeding the Earth's growing population. Mycorrhiza is known to improve plant growth, but although extensive knowledge concerning the interaction between mycorrhizal fungi and plants is available, genotypic differences concerning the ability of wheat to form mycorrhizal symbiosis and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) involved in mycorrhization are largely unknown. Therefore, a diverse set of 94 bread wheat genotypes was evaluated with regard to root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In order to identify genomic regions involved in mycorrhization, these genotypes were analyzed using the wheat 90k iSelect chip, resulting in 17 823 polymorphic mapped markers, which were used in a genome-wide association study. Significant genotypic differences (P wheat. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. DNA extraction method for PCR in mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manian, S; Sreenivasaprasad, S; Mills, P R

    2001-10-01

    To develop a simple and rapid DNA extraction protocol for PCR in mycorrhizal fungi. The protocol combines the application of rapid freezing and boiling cycles and passage of the extracts through DNA purification columns. PCR amplifiable DNA was obtained from a number of endo- and ecto-mycorrhizal fungi using minute quantities of spores and mycelium, respectively. DNA extracted following the method, was used to successfully amplify regions of interest from high as well as low copy number genes. The amplicons were suitable for further downstream applications such as sequencing and PCR-RFLPs. The protocol described is simple, short and facilitates rapid isolation of PCR amplifiable genomic DNA from a large number of fungal isolates in a single day. The method requires only minute quantities of starting material and is suitable for mycorrhizal fungi as well as a range of other fungi.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi decrease radiocesium accumulation in Medicago truncatula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Declerck, Stephane; Dupre de Boulois, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant radiocesium uptake and accumulation remains ambiguous. This is probably due to the presence of other soil microorganisms, the variability of soil characteristics and plant nutritional status or the availability of its chemical analogue, potassium (K). Here, we used an in vitro culture system to study the impact of increased concentration of K on radiocesium accumulation in non K-starved mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Medicago truncatula plants. In the presence of AMF radiocesium uptake decreased regardless of the concentration of K, and its translocation from root to shoot was also significantly lower. Potassium also reduced the accumulation of radiocesium in plants but to a lesser extent than mycorrhization, and without any effect on translocation. These results suggest that AMF in combination with K can play a key role in reducing radiocesium uptake and its subsequent translocation to plant shoots, thereby representing good potential for improved phytomanagement of contaminated areas.

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal responses to abiotic stresses: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Ingrid; Fontaine, Joël; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa

    2016-03-01

    The majority of plants live in close collaboration with a diversity of soil organisms among which arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an essential role. Mycorrhizal symbioses contribute to plant growth and plant protection against various environmental stresses. Whereas the resistance mechanisms induced in mycorrhizal plants after exposure to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and pollution, are well documented, the knowledge about the stress tolerance mechanisms implemented by the AMF themselves is limited. This review provides an overview of the impacts of various abiotic stresses (pollution, salinity, drought, extreme temperatures, CO2, calcareous, acidity) on biodiversity, abundance and development of AMF and examines the morphological, biochemical and molecular mechanisms implemented by AMF to survive in the presence of these stresses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi decrease radiocesium accumulation in Medicago truncatula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyuricza, Veronika; Declerck, Stephane [Universite catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute (ELI), Laboratoire de Mycologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Dupre de Boulois, Herve, E-mail: herve.dupre@uclouvain.b [Universite catholique de Louvain, Earth and Life Institute (ELI), Laboratoire de Mycologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in plant radiocesium uptake and accumulation remains ambiguous. This is probably due to the presence of other soil microorganisms, the variability of soil characteristics and plant nutritional status or the availability of its chemical analogue, potassium (K). Here, we used an in vitro culture system to study the impact of increased concentration of K on radiocesium accumulation in non K-starved mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Medicago truncatula plants. In the presence of AMF radiocesium uptake decreased regardless of the concentration of K, and its translocation from root to shoot was also significantly lower. Potassium also reduced the accumulation of radiocesium in plants but to a lesser extent than mycorrhization, and without any effect on translocation. These results suggest that AMF in combination with K can play a key role in reducing radiocesium uptake and its subsequent translocation to plant shoots, thereby representing good potential for improved phytomanagement of contaminated areas.

  7. Communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the phylum Glomeromycota are found globally in most vegetation types, where they form a mutualistic symbiosis with plant roots. Despite their wide distribution, only relatively few species are described. The taxonomy is based on morphological characters...... of the asexual resting spores, but molecular approaches to community ecology have revealed a considerable unknown diversity from colonized roots. Although the lack of genetic recombination is not unique in the fungal kingdom, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are probably ancient asexuals. The long asexual evolution...... of the fungi has resulted in considerable genetic diversity within morphologically recognizable species, and challenges our concepts of individuals and populations. This review critically examines the concepts of species, communities, populations and individuals of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi....

  8. Interactions between aboveground herbivores and the mycorrhizal mutualists of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, C A; Whitham, T G

    1994-07-01

    Plant growth, reproduction and survival can be affected both by mycorrhizal fungi and aboveground herbivores, but few studies have examined the interactive effects of these factors on plants. Most of the available data suggest that severe herbivory reduces root colonization by vesicular-arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal fungi. However, the reverse interaction has also been documented - mycorrhizal fungi deter herbivores and interact with fungal endophytes to influence herbivory. Although consistent patterns and mechanistic explanations are yet to emerge, it is likely that aboveground herbivore-mycorrhiza interactions have important implications for plant populations and communities. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Can Microbial Ecology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Inform Climate Change Models?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmockel, Kirsten; Hobbie, Erik

    2017-07-31

    Our funded research focused on soil organic matter dynamics and plant-microbe interactions by examining the role of belowground processes and mechanisms across scales, including decomposition of organic molecules, microbial interactions, and plant-microbe interactions associated with a changing climate. Research foci included mycorrhizal mediated priming of soil carbon turnover, organic N use and depolymerization by free-living microbes and mycorrhizal fungi, and the use of isotopes as additional constraints for improved modeling of belowground processes. This work complemented the DOE’s mandate to understand both the consequences of atmospheric and climatic change for key ecosystems and the feedbacks on C cycling.

  10. Survival and growth of Alfalfa (Medicago sativa l.) inoculated with an am fungus (Glomus intraradices) in contaminated soils treated with two different remediation technologies (bio-pile and thermal desorption)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norini, M.P.; Beguiristain, Th.; Leyval, C.

    2005-01-01

    sativa L.), inoculated or not with an AM fungus (Glomus intraradices) and fertilized with Hewitt solution. Control non-inoculated and non-fertilized plants were included. There was four replicates per treatment. After 2 months, plant survival and growth was measured, as well as mycorrhizal colonization of roots. PAH in rhizosphere soils was analyzed using ASE and GC-FID. Major and trace elements in plants were analyzed after acid digestion using ICP. AM fungal and bacterial communities present in roots and rhizosphere were also analysed after DNA extraction with a PCR-TGGE technique. Plant survival rate was significantly lower in the soil treated with bio-pile than in untreated soil. Non-inoculated and non fertilized alfalfa biomass was lower with soil treated with bio-pile and thermal desorption than with untreated soil. Mycorrhizal inoculation as well as fertilization significantly improved alfalfa growth in the soil treated with bio-pile. In the soil treated with thermal desorption, shoot and root biomass were significantly higher with mycorrhizal inoculation and fertilization. Estimation of root colonization showed that the roots of un-inoculated plants growing on the untreated contaminated soil contained indigenous mycorrhizal fungi. With the soil treated with bio-pile, mycorrhizal colonization of un-inoculated plants was significantly lower, while no colonization was observed in the roots in the soil treated with thermal desorption. Inoculation with a mycorrhizal fungus increased root colonization rate in both treated soils. It also significantly increased the number of rhizobia nodules. Phosphorus concentration in plant roots and shoots was significantly improved by mycorrhizal inoculation in soil treated with thermal desorption. Data on PAH concentration in soils and fungal and bacterial communities will be also presented and discussed

  11. VA office of inspector general releases scathing report of Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The long-awaited Office of Inspector General’s (OIG report on the Phoenix VA Health Care System (PVAHCS was released on August 27, 2014 (1. The report was scathing in its evaluation of VA practices and leadership. Five questions were investigated: 1.Were there clinically significant delays in care? 2. Did PVAHCS omit the names of veterans waiting for care from its Electronic Wait List (EWL? 3. Were PVAHCS personnel not following established scheduling procedures? 4. Did the PVAHCS culture emphasize goals at the expense of patient care? 5. Are scheduling deficiencies systemic throughout the VA? In each case, the OIG found that the allegations were true. Despite initial denials, the OIG report showed that former PVAHCS director Sharon Helman, associate director Lance Robinson, hospital administration director Brad Curry, chief of staff Darren Deering and other senior executives were aware of delays in care and unofficial wait lists. Perhaps most disturbing is ...

  12. VA Dental Insurance Program--federalism. Direct final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is taking direct final action to amend its regulations related to the VA Dental Insurance Program (VADIP), a pilot program to offer premium-based dental insurance to enrolled veterans and certain survivors and dependents of veterans. Specifically, this rule will add language to clarify the limited preemptive effect of certain criteria in the VADIP regulations.

  13. 76 FR 52230 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Forest, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ...-0378; Airspace Docket No. 11-AEA-11] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Forest, VA AGENCY: Federal... at Forest, VA, to accommodate the new Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard... published in the Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to establish Class E airspace at Forest...

  14. ESTIMASI NILAI VaR PORTOFOLIO MENGGUNAKAN FUNGSI ARCHIMEDEAN COPULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AULIA ATIKA PRAWIBTA SUHARTO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Value at Risk explains the magnitude of the worst losses occurred in financial products investments with a certain level of confidence and time interval. The purpose of this study is to estimate the VaR of portfolio using Archimedean Copula family. The methods for calculating the VaR are as follows: (1 calculating the stock return; (2 calculating descriptive statistics of return; (3 checking for the nature of autocorrelation and heteroscedasticity effects on stock return data; (4 checking for the presence of extreme value by using Pareto tail; (5 estimating the parameters of Achimedean Copula family; (6 conducting simulations of Archimedean Copula; (7 estimating the value of the stock portfolio VaR. This study uses the closing price of TLKM and GGRM. At 90% the VaR obtained using Clayton, Gumbel, Frank copulas are 0.9562%, 1.0189%, 0.9827% respectively. At 95% the VaR obtained using Clayton, Gumbel, Frank copulas are 1.2930%, 1.2522%, 1.3152% respectively. At 99% the VaR obtained using Clayton, Gumbel, Frank copulas are 2.0327%, 1.9164%, is 1.8678% respectively. In conclusion estimation of VaR using Clayton copula yields the highest VaR.

  15. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  16. 38 CFR 1.203 - Information to be reported to VA Police.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reported to VA Police. 1.203 Section 1.203 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... be reported to VA Police. Information about actual or possible violations of criminal laws related to... occurs on VA premises, will be reported by VA management officials to the VA police component with...

  17. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  18. VaR Methodology Application for Banking Currency Portfolios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Armeanu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available VaR has become the standard measure that financial analysts use to quantify market risk. VaR measures can have many applications, such as in risk management, to evaluate the performance of risk takers and for regulatory requirements, and hence it is very important to develop methodologies that provide accurate estimates. In particular, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision at the Bank for International Settlements imposes to financial institutions such as banks and investment firms to meet capital requirements based on VaR estimates. In this paper we determine VaR for a banking currency portfolio and respect rules of National Bank of Romania regarding VaR report.

  19. Flavonoids released by carrot (Daucus carota) seedlings stimulate hyphal development of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the presence of optimal CO2 enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, M J; Bel-Rhlid, R; Piché, Y; Chênevert, R

    1993-10-01

    Carbon dioxide has been previously identified as a critical volatile factor that stimulates hyphal growth ofGigaspora margarita, a vesiculararbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, and we determined the optimal concentration at 2.0%. The beneficial effect of CO2 on fungal development is also visible in the presence of stimulatory (quercetin, myricetin) or inhibitory (naringenin) flavonoids. Sterile root exudates from carrot seedlings stimulate the hyphal development ofG. margarita in the presence of optimal CO2 enrichment. Three flavonols (quercetin, kaempferol, rutin or quercetin 3-rutinoside) and two flavones (apigenin, luteolin) were identified in carrot root exudates by means of HPLC retention time. Flavonols like quercetin and kaempferol are known to have stimulatory effects on hyphal growth ofG. margarita.

  20. Plant mycorrhizal traits in Europe in relation to climatic and edaphic gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo Bueno, C.; Gerz, Maret; Zobel, Martin; Moora, Mari

    2017-04-01

    Around 90% of plant species associate with mycorrhizal fungi. The symbiosis is known to provide plants with soil N, P and water, and fungi with plant photosynthesized carbohydrates. However, not all mycorrhizal symbioses are identical. The identity of associated plant and fungal species differs, as does the effect of the symbiosis on nutrient cycling and ecosystems more generally. In this study, we analysed the European distribution of two plant mycorrhizal traits in relation to climatic and edaphic drivers. We used the European distribution of the frequency of mycorrhizal colonization (plant mycorrhizal status); whether mycorrhizal fungi either always (obligately mycorrhizal, OM), or sometimes (facultatively mycorrhizal, FM) colonize plant roots, and the four main plant mycorrhizal types; arbuscular (AM), ecto-(ECM), ericoid (ERM), and non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. We expected AM species to predominate in ecosystems where most soil nutrients occur in inorganic forms (lower latitudes) and those with higher soil pH. By contrast, due to the saprophytic abilities of ECM and ERM fungi, we expected ECM and ERM plants to predominate in ecosystems where nutrients are bound to organic compounds (higher latitudes) and those with lower soil pH. NM plant species are known to be common in disturbed habitats or in extremely phosphorus poor ecosystems, such as the Arctic tundra. Our results showed that the distribution of mycorrhizal types was driven by temperature and soil pH, with increases of NM, ECM and ERM, and decreases of AM, with latitude. FM predominated over OM species and this difference increased with latitude and was dependent on temperature drivers only. These results represent the first evidence at a European scale of plant mycorrhizal distribution patterns linked with climatic and edaphic gradients, supporting the idea of a tight relationship between the mycorrhizal symbiosis and nutrient cycling.

  1. Fungus-insect gall of Phlebopus portentosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Xia; He, Ming-Xia; Cao, Yang; Liu, Jing; Gao, Feng; Wang, Wen-Bing; Ji, Kai-Ping; Shao, Shi-Cheng; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Phlebopus portentosus is a popular edible wild mushroom found in the tropical Yunnan, China, and northern Thailand. In its natural habitats, a gall often has been found on some plant roots, around which fungal fruiting bodies are produced. The galls are different from common insect galls in that their cavity walls are not made from plant tissue but rather from the hyphae of P. portentosus. Therefore we have termed this phenomenon "fungus-insect gall". Thus far six root mealy bug species in the family Pseudococcidae that form fungus-insect galls with P. portentosus have been identified: Formicococcus polysperes, Geococcus satellitum, Planococcus minor, Pseudococcus cryptus, Paraputo banzigeri and Rastrococcus invadens. Fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of more than 21 plant species, including Delonix regia, Citrus maxima, Coffea arabica and Artocarpus heterophyllus. Greenhouse inoculation trials showed that fungus-insect galls were found on the roots of A. heterophyllus 1 mo after inoculation. The galls were subglobose to globose, fulvous when young and became dark brown at maturation. Each gall harbored one or more mealy bugs and had a chimney-like vent for ventilation and access to the gall. The cavity wall had three layers. Various shaped mealy bug wax deposits were found inside the wall. Fungal hyphae invaded the epidermis of plant roots and sometimes even the cortical cells during the late stage of gall development. The identity of the fungus inside the cavity was confirmed by molecular methods. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  2. Native plant growth promoting bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis and mixed or individual mycorrhizal species improved drought tolerance and oxidative metabolism in Lavandula dentata plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armada, E; Probanza, A; Roldán, A; Azcón, R

    2016-03-15

    This study evaluates the responses of Lavandula dentata under drought conditions to the inoculation with single autochthonous arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus (five fungal strains) or with their mixture and the effects of these inocula with a native Bacillus thuringiensis (endophytic bacteria). These microorganisms were drought tolerant and in general, increased plant growth and nutrition. Particularly, the AM fungal mixture and B. thuringiensis maximized plant biomass and compensated drought stress as values of antioxidant activities [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase APX)] shown. The AMF-bacteria interactions highly reduced the plant oxidative damage of lipids [malondialdehyde (MDA)] and increased the mycorrhizal development (mainly arbuscular formation representative of symbiotic functionality). These microbial interactions explain the highest potential of dually inoculated plants to tolerate drought stress. B. thuringiensis "in vitro" under osmotic stress does not reduce its PGPB (plant growth promoting bacteria) abilities as indole acetic acid (IAA) and ACC deaminase production and phosphate solubilization indicating its capacity to improve plant growth under stress conditions. Each one of the autochthonous fungal strains maintained their particular interaction with B. thuringiensis reflecting the diversity, intrinsic abilities and inherent compatibility of these microorganisms. In general, autochthonous AM fungal species and particularly their mixture with B. thuringiensis demonstrated their potential for protecting plants against drought and helping plants to thrive in semiarid ecosystems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis (Glomus intraradice on Egyptian Broomrape (Orobanche aegyptiaca. Pers in Cultivated Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mojtaba zafarian

    2017-03-01

    the data in the end of experiment collected on the characteristics of tomato and broomrape (after normality test of Kolmogorov - Smirnov was done separately using software SAS V 9.2 and the comparisons were done with Fisher LSD test at the 5% and 1% levels and drawing graphs in Excel. Results and Discussion: The results showed that among arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi treatments, two levels of 50 and 100 kg ha-1 in most cases, orobanche and tomato traits had no significant effect within the orobanche infested control treatment. With the possible existence of uniform density of orobanche seeds ready to germinate in the surroundings of tomato root and absence of adequate colonization by the fungies, these treatments will not be able to prevent the germination establishment of weed on tomato roots. Lack of adequate root colonization can firstly be due to the lack of sufficient numbers of fungi and secondly because of the unsuitable growth environment conditions for fungal propagation. But the treatments of 150 and 200 kg ha-1 decreased the number of nodules on the roots of tomato, orobanche dry weight, and time of emergence of orobanche flower on the soil surface, ratio of orobanche dry weight to tomato shoot dry weight. The difference may be due to the high fungal mycorrhiza colonization on the tomato roots that has led to a significant level of tomato root covered with the fungus, thereby was prohibited the haustorium penetration of orobanche into the root host. The host plant roots do this effect with the release of molecular signals called branching factors (BFs that induced a wide branching of fungal hyphae. Whereas the treatments of 150 and 200 kg ha-1 increased tomato shoot dry weight and the percentage of tomato root dry weight to shoot dry weight. Even in these two measured traits, the treatments of 150 and 200 kg ha-1 were also transcended on weed-free treatment. Generally, because of no of significant differences between the two treatments of 150 and 200 kg ha-1

  4. In vitro culture of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: advances and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ecologically important for most vascular plants for their growth and survival. AM fungi are obligate symbionts. In recent years, there have been many attempts to cultivate in vitro. Some relevant results indicate efforts are not far from successful growth of AM fungi independent of a plant ...

  5. Mycorrhizal fungi of aspen forests: Natural occurrence and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathy L. Cripps

    2001-01-01

    Native mycorrhizal fungi associated with aspen were surveyed on three soil types in the north-central Rocky Mountains. Selected isolates were tested for the ability to enhance aspen seedling growth in vitro. Over 50 species of ectomycorrhizal fungi occur with Populus tremuloides in this region, primarily basidiomycete fungi in the Agaricales. Almost one-third (30%)...

  6. Cropping enhances mycorrhizal benefits to maize in a tropical soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jemo, M.; Souleymanou, A.; Frossard, E.; Jansa, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 2014 (2014), s. 117-124 ISSN 0038-0717 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224; GA ČR GAP504/12/1665 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : tropical soil * mycorrhizal benefits * southern Cameroon Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.932, year: 2014

  7. Inoculation of Ceratonia siliqua L. with native arbuscular mycorrhizal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ouhmane

    tree Ceratonia siliqua, a Mediterranean legume in Morocco. ... After 6 months of culturing in nursery conditions, height, shoot and root ... distributed around the world and the Mediterranean ... more resistant to water stress compared to other ... individual trees. ... mycorrhizal maize roots were used for the control treatment.

  8. Mycorrhizal specificity in the fully mycoheterotrophic Hexalectris Raf. (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron H. Kennedy; D. Lee Taylor; Linda E. Watson

    2011-01-01

    Mycoheterotrophic species have abandoned an autotrophic lifestyle and obtain carbon exclusively from mycorrhizal fungi. Although these species have evolved independently in many plant families, such events have occurred most often in the Orchidaceae, resulting in the highest concentration of these species in the tracheophytes. Studies of mycoheterotrophic species...

  9. Arsenic uptake and phytoremediation potential by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinhua He; Erik Lilleskov

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of soils and water is a global problem because of its impacts on ecosystems and human health. Various approaches have been attempted for As remediation, with limited success. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play vital roles in the uptake of water and essential nutrients, especially phosphorus (P), and hence enhance plant performance and...

  10. Effect of mycorrhizal inoculum and urea fertilizer on diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-18

    Aug 18, 2008 ... Ambang Zachée*, Ndongo Bekolo, Bime, Ngoh Dooh, Maho Yalen and .... and 29°C. The soil is classified as the ferruginous tropical soil. According to the description of the physical properties of the soil by ... mycorrhizal inoculation, showed different variations of .... Cahiers ORSTOM, Paris, France.

  11. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi (Glomales) in Egypt. III: Distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roots and rhizospheric soils of 26 plant species belonging to 18 families representing five different habitats at El-Omayed Biosphere Reserve were collected and examined for arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) associations. Plant species recorded in the habitat of coastal sand dunes had the highest percentage of ...

  12. Mycorrhizal inoculation of pecan seedlings with some marketable truffles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian M. Benucci

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pecan is the common name of Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh. K. Koch, an ectomycorrhizal tree native to North America, also frequently known as hickory. Mycorrhizal inoculations of pecan seedlings with: Tuber aestivum Vittad., T. borchii Vittad., T. indicum Cooke & Massee, and T. lyonii Butters are described and discussed.

  13. Solanum cultivar responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out in a sandy soil with a low available phosphorus to evaluate responsiveness of four Solanum aethiopicum cultivars to indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Results showed clear interaction between genetic variability of cultivars and fungal isolates on shoot biomass and on ...

  14. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal inoculation on growth, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of our work was to assess the effect of inoculation with three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Rhizoglomus aggregatum (N.C. Schenck and G.S. Sm.) Sieverd., G.A. Silva and Oeh., Funneliformis mosseae (T.H. Nicolson and Gerd.) C. Walker and A. Schüssler. and Rhizoglomus intraradices (N.C. Schenck and ...

  15. Studying genome heterogeneity within the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal cytoplasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, E.; Halary, S.; Bapteste, E.; Hijri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Although heterokaryons have been reported in nature, multicellular organisms are generally assumed genetically homogeneous. Here, we investigate the case of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) that form symbiosis with plant roots. The growth advantages they confer to their hosts are of great

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species associated with rhizosphere of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) diversity and date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) tree root colonization in arid areas was undertaken in ten palm groves located along the Ziz valley (Tafilalet, south-west Morocco). The frequency and the mean intensity of root colonization reached 72 and 43% respectively and ...

  17. Cover cropping impacts on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and soil aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover crops are a management tool which can extend the period of time that a living plant is growing and conducting photosynthesis. This is critical for soil health, because most of the soil organisms, particularly the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, are limited by carbon. Research, on-farm, and demon...

  18. Phosphorus and Nitrogen Regulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis in Petunia hybrida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:24608923

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the growth of olive trees and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two native Algerian mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices) were tested for their effect on the growth of micropropagated olive tree (Olea europaea L.). The effect of inoculation of plantlets with G. mosseae was also compared with chemical fertilization using osmocote. Specific molecular techniques ...

  20. Influence of mycorrhizal inoculation on alley cropped farms in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi under farmers' conditions was tried at Ajibode Village, a humid tropical environment on maize/cassava intercropped farms in an alley cropping system. Four species of AM fungi (Glomus clarum, Glomus mosseae Glomus etunicatum and Acaulospora dilatata) were used in ...

  1. Mycorrhizal association in soybean and weeds in competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Maria Teixeira Fialho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mycorrhizal association on the interference of Bidens pilosa, Urochloa decumbens and Eleusine indica on soybean culture in two conditions: a plants competing without contact with roots of another species; b with contact between roots. At 60 days after planting, growth, nutrient accumulation and mycorrhizal colonization of soybean and weeds were evaluated. The contact between roots of soybean plant and weed species increased the negative interference effects for both species, with less growth and nutrient accumulation. With the individualization of roots, higher competition occurred for soil resources up to 60 days of coexistence between species. In competition with soybean, Bidens pilosa and Urochloa decumbens stood out in accumulation of most nutrients without differing from when cultivated in monocultivation. The increase of the soybean mycorrhizal colonization was 53, 40 and 33% when in competition with Urochloa decumbens, Eleusine indica and Bidens pilosa species, respectively. A positive interaction occurred for soybean mycorrhizal colonization and competing plants irrespective of weed species or root contact.

  2. The distribution of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, R; Mukerji, K G

    1990-01-01

    Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are widely distributed throughout the area studied including different altitudes ranging from sea level to 2500 ft above sea level. VAM fungi were recorded from 88% of the sites examined with Glomus fasciculatum and Glomus macrocarpum being the most commonly recorded. Mean species diversity was found to be maximum in the areas thickly vegetated and undisturbed.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi improve the growth of olive trees and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    quality olive plants. To study the potential of the mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices to stimulate the growth of micropropagated olive plants and to compare their ... phosphate, 15% potassium oxide, 2% magnesium oxide, 4.5% sulphur, 0.02% ..... Our results indicate the feasibility of G. mosseae and.

  4. Phosphorus and nitrogen regulate arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Eva; Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Feller, Urs; Reinhardt, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen are essential nutrient elements that are needed by plants in large amounts. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis between plants and soil fungi improves phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition under limiting conditions. On the other hand, these nutrients influence root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic functioning. This represents a feedback mechanism that allows plants to control the fungal symbiont depending on nutrient requirements and supply. Elevated phosphorus supply has previously been shown to exert strong inhibition of arbuscular mycorrhizal development. Here, we address to what extent inhibition by phosphorus is influenced by other nutritional pathways in the interaction between Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis. We show that phosphorus and nitrogen are the major nutritional determinants of the interaction. Interestingly, the symbiosis-promoting effect of nitrogen starvation dominantly overruled the suppressive effect of high phosphorus nutrition onto arbuscular mycorrhiza, suggesting that plants promote the symbiosis as long as they are limited by one of the two major nutrients. Our results also show that in a given pair of symbiotic partners (Petunia hybrida and R. irregularis), the entire range from mutually symbiotic to parasitic can be observed depending on the nutritional conditions. Taken together, these results reveal complex nutritional feedback mechanisms in the control of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

  5. Mycorrhizal symbioses of Salix repens : diversity and functional significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis investigates the significance of different mycorrhizal fungi, belonging to different functional types (arbuscular mycorrhiza-AM and ectomycorrhiza-EcM), in Salix repens . A comparison between above-ground and below-ground observations on ectomycorrhizal

  6. Siderophore production by mycorrhizal sorghum roots under micronutrient deficient condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Aliasgharzad

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available It has widely been accepted that mycorrhizal symbiosis improves micronutrients uptake by most of the plants. In this study, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. plants were grown in sterile perlite and were inoculated with either Glomus etunicatum (GE or G.intraradices (GI, while the control set was left un-inoculated. Rorison's nutrient solution with three levels of 0, half and full strength (C0, C0.5 and C1, respectively of Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn was applied to the pots during 85 days of growth period. Chrome azurol-S assay was used for determination of siderophores in root leachates on 45, 65 and 85 days after sowing (DAS. Siderophore production per unit volume of root was higher in mycorrhizal than non-mycorrhizal plants. Both GE and GI were efficient fungi in this respect. Siderophore production was significantly induced at C0 level of the micronutrients. Amount of siderophores produced on 45 and 85 DAS was more than 65 DAS. Mycorrhizal root colonization by GE or GI was not significantly affected by micronutrient levels.

  7. Shoot- and root-borne cytokinin influences arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebeca Cosme, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is functionally important for the nutrition and growth of most terrestrial plants. Nearly all phytohormones are employed by plants to regulate the symbiosis with AM fungi, but the regulatory role of cytokinin (CK) is not well understood. Here, we used

  8. Reciprocal rewards stabilize cooperation in the mycorrhizal symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, E.T.; Duhamel, M.; Beesetty, Y.; Mensah, J.A.; Franken, O.; Verbruggen, E.; Fellbaum, C.R.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Hart, M.M.; Bago, A.; Palmer, T.M.; West, S.A.; Vandenkoornhuyse, P.; Jansa, J.; Bücking, H.

    2011-01-01

    Plants and their arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal symbionts interact in complex underground networks involving multiple partners. This increases the potential for exploitation and defection by individuals, raising the question of how partners maintain a fair, two-way transfer of resources. We

  9. 1000-kVA arc power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.E.; Barber, G.C.; Ponte, N.S.

    1979-01-01

    Because of ever-increasing power demands for the development of the Oak Ridge duoPIGatron ion source, a continuous-duty arc power supply was constructed for the Medium Energy Test Facility (METF) to furnish power for the plasma generator of experimental ion sources. The power supply utilizes 12-pulse rectification with half-wave switching in a delta and wye full-wave bridge that may be connected in series or parallel. It will deliver 340 V dc, 2500 A to an ion source when series connected and 170 V dc, 5000 A when paralleled connected. Silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCR) in each rectifier bridge can be switched for pulses as short as 10 ms through continuous duty. The filter section that reduces the ripple in the output consists of an inductor-to-capacitor (L-C) filter to smooth the 720-Hz pulses. The power transformer serves as an isolation transformer allowing the secondary to be elevated to the accelerating potential of the ion source. The dc output level is controlled with a 1000-kVA auto transformer connected to the primary of the power transformer. All elevated voltages and currents are monitored at ground potential with an optical telemetry system. This paper describes the power supply in detail, including block diagrams, component specifications, and waveforms when supplying power to an ion source

  10. COPD, COOP and BREATH at the VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The February 2011 Pulmonary Journal Club reviews a study by Rice and colleagues (1 of high-risk COPD patients (click here for Pulmonary Journal Club. This review was authored by Kevin Park who also authored an ACP Journal Club review (2. In Rice’s study a single educational session, an individualized care plan, and monthly case-manager telephone calls, resulted in a 41% decrease in hospitalizations and emergency room visits and a nonsignficant trend toward decreased mortality.Rice’s study was supported and conducted in the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN 23 (Minnesota, Iowa, Nebraska and the Dakotas. The COPD patients in this study were recruited and followed primarily using the VA computer system. The study represents a potential model of data-based management leading to improved patient outcomes. The authors; Robert Petzel MD, then VISN 23 Director (now Veterans Healthcare Administration Undersecretary; and Janet Murphy, then VISN Primary Care Service Line CEO (now VISN …

  11. 76 FR 40453 - Agency Information Collection (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration... Education Benefits, VA Form 22-1990. b. Application for Family Member to Use Transferred Benefits, VA Form 22-1990E. [[Page 40454

  12. VA INFORMATION SYSTEMS: Computer Security Weaknesses Persist at the Veterans Health Administration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    .... To determine the status of computer security within VHA, we (1) evaluated information system general controls at the VA Maryland Health Cafe System, the New Mexico VA Health Care System, and the VA North Texas Health Care System and (2...

  13. Revegetation of oil sands tailings. Growth improvement of silver-berry and buffalo-berry by inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and N/sub 2/-fixing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, S.; Danielson, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of actinorhizal shrubs to tolerate inhospitable conditions while improving soil fertility and organic matter status has led to increased usage of these plants for land reclamation and amenity planting purposes. Silver-berry and buffalo-berry are two such shrubs being tested as potential candidates for the revegetation of the oil sands tailings in northeastern Alberta. Associated with the roots of silver-berry and buffalo-berry are two symbiants, the N/sub 2/-fixing actimomycete Frankia and the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi. Numerous studies have demonstrated that, particularly in nutrient-limited conditions, mycorrhization and nodulation can result in significantly better plant performance as a consequence of improved N and P nutrition. It was found in this study that in Alberta, silver-berry and buffalo-berry are strictly VA mycorrhizal; that they are highly dependent on their symbiants for optimum growth; and that the VAM inoculum potential of both stockpiled and undisturbed muskeg peak is negligible, due to the absence of VAM hosts. Means to increase the inoculum potential of peat have been studied. The efficacy of inoculating seedlings grown in greenhouses with VAM and Frankia has been demonstrated. Overwinter mortality was higher for inoculated shrubs, but after one growing season, shoot-weights of silver-berry were 3 to 7 times greater than for uninoculated shrubs, and shoot weights of buffalo-berry were 3 to 5 times greater. 122 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. The application of isotopic (32P and 15N) dilution techniques to evaluate the interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria, mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium to improve the agronomic efficiency of rock phosphate for legume crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barea, J.M.; Toro, M.; Azcon, R.; Orozco, M.O.; Campos, E.; Azcon, R.

    2002-01-01

    A pot experiment was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of multifunctional microbial inoculation treatments and rock phosphate (RP) application on N and P uptake by alfalfa through the use of 15 N and 32 P isotopic dilution approaches. The microbial inocula consisted of a wild type (WT) Rhizobium meliloti strain, the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and a phosphate solubilizing rhizobacterium (Enterobacter sp.). Inoculated microorganisms were established in the root tissues and/or in the rhizosphere soil of alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L.). Improvements in N and P accumulation in alfalfa corroborate beneficial effects of Rhizobium and AM interactions. Inoculation with selected rhizobacteria improved the AM effect on N or P accumulation in both the RP-added soil and in the non RP-amended controls. Measurements of the 15 N/ 14 N ratio in plant shoots indicate an enhancement of the N 2 fixation rates in Rhizobium-inoculated AM-plants, over that achieved by Rhizobium in non-mycorrhizal plants. Whether or not RP was added, AM-inoculated plants showed a lower specific activity ( 32 P/ 31 P) than did their comparable non-mycorrhizal controls, suggesting that the plant was using otherwise unavailable P sources. The phosphate-solubilizing, AM-associated, microbiota could in fact release phosphate ions, either from the added RP or from the indigenous 'less-available' soil phosphate. A low Ca concentrations in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. Under field conditions, the inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased plant biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria improved mycorrhizal responses in soil dually receiving RP and organic matter amendments. Organic matter addition favoured RP solubilization. This, together with a tailored microbial inoculation, increased the agronomic efficiency of RP in the test soil that was Ca deficient at neutral

  15. The application of isotopic ({sup 32}P and {sup 15}N) dilution techniques to evaluate the interactive effect of phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria, mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium to improve the agronomic efficiency of rock phosphate for legume crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barea, J.M. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain)]. E-mail: jmbarea@eez.csic.es; Toro, M.; Azcon, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain); Orozco, M.O. [Instituto de Sistematica y Ecologia, Academia Cubana de Ciencias, Habana (Cuba); Campos, E. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra y Quimica Ambiental Estacion Experimental del Zaidin (CSIC), Granada (Spain); Azcon, R. [Departamento de Microbiologia del Suelo y Sistemas Simbioticos (Spain)

    2002-05-15

    A pot experiment was designed to evaluate the interactive effects of multifunctional microbial inoculation treatments and rock phosphate (RP) application on N and P uptake by alfalfa through the use of {sup 15}N and {sup 32}P isotopic dilution approaches. The microbial inocula consisted of a wild type (WT) Rhizobium meliloti strain, the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, and a phosphate solubilizing rhizobacterium (Enterobacter sp.). Inoculated microorganisms were established in the root tissues and/or in the rhizosphere soil of alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa L.). Improvements in N and P accumulation in alfalfa corroborate beneficial effects of Rhizobium and AM interactions. Inoculation with selected rhizobacteria improved the AM effect on N or P accumulation in both the RP-added soil and in the non RP-amended controls. Measurements of the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N ratio in plant shoots indicate an enhancement of the N{sub 2} fixation rates in Rhizobium-inoculated AM-plants, over that achieved by Rhizobium in non-mycorrhizal plants. Whether or not RP was added, AM-inoculated plants showed a lower specific activity ({sup 32}P/{sup 31}P) than did their comparable non-mycorrhizal controls, suggesting that the plant was using otherwise unavailable P sources. The phosphate-solubilizing, AM-associated, microbiota could in fact release phosphate ions, either from the added RP or from the indigenous 'less-available' soil phosphate. A low Ca concentrations in the test soil may have benefited P solubilization. Under field conditions, the inoculation with AM fungi significantly increased plant biomass and N and P accumulation in plant tissues. Phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacteria improved mycorrhizal responses in soil dually receiving RP and organic matter amendments. Organic matter addition favoured RP solubilization. This, together with a tailored microbial inoculation, increased the agronomic efficiency of RP in the

  16. Differences in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi among Three Coffee Cultivars in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Lebrón, Ligia; Lodge, D. Jean; Bayman, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is important for growth of coffee (Coffea arabica), but differences among coffee cultivars in response to mycorrhizal interactions have not been studied. We compared arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) extraradical hyphae in the soil and diversity of AM fungi among three coffee cultivars, Caturra, Pacas, and Borbón, at three farms in Puerto Rico. Caturra had significantly lower total extraradical AM hyphal length than Pacas and Borbón at all locations. P content did not differ a...

  17. White-Nose Syndrome Fungus (Geomyces destructans) in Bat, France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puechmaille, Sébastien J.; Verdeyroux, Pascal; Fuller, Hubert; Gouilh, Meriadeg Ar; Bekaert, Michaël

    2010-01-01

    White-nose syndrome is caused by the fungus Geomyces destructans and is responsible for the deaths of >1,000,000 bats since 2006. This disease and fungus had been restricted to the northeastern United States. We detected this fungus in a bat in France and assessed the implications of this finding. PMID:20113562

  18. Dentigerumycin: a bacterial mediator of an ant-fungus symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, Dong-Chan; Poulsen, Michael; Currie, Cameron R

    2009-01-01

    Fungus-growing ants engage in mutualistic associations with both the fungus they cultivate for food and actinobacteria (Pseudonocardia spp.) that produce selective antibiotics to defend that fungus from specialized fungal parasites. We have analyzed one such system at the molecular level and found...

  19. Impact of two arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on Arundo donax L. response to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastri, Susanna; Savvides, Andreas; Pesando, Massimo; Lumini, Erica; Volpe, Maria Grazia; Ozudogru, Elif Aylin; Faccio, Antonella; De Cunzo, Fausta; Michelozzi, Marco; Lambardi, Maurizio; Fotopoulos, Vasileios; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2018-03-01

    AM symbiosis did not strongly affect Arundo donax performances under salt stress, although differences in the plants inoculated with two different fungi were recorded. The mechanisms at the basis of the improved tolerance to abiotic stresses by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been investigated mainly focusing on food crops. In this work, the potential impact of AM symbiosis on the performance of a bioenergy crop, Arundo donax, under saline conditions was considered. Specifically, we tried to understand whether AM symbiosis helps this fast-growing plant, often widespread in marginal soils, withstand salt. A combined approach, involving eco-physiological, morphometric and biochemical measurements, was used and the effects of two different AM fungal species (Funneliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis) were compared. Results indicate that potted A. donax plants do not suffer permanent damage induced by salt stress, but photosynthesis and growth are considerably reduced. Since A. donax is a high-yield biomass crop, reduction of biomass might be a serious agronomical problem in saline conditions. At least under the presently experienced growth conditions, and plant-AM combinations, the negative effect of salt on plant performance was not rescued by AM fungal colonization. However, some changes in plant metabolisms were observed following AM-inoculation, including a significant increase in proline accumulation and a trend toward higher isoprene emission and higher H 2 O 2 , especially in plants colonized by R. irregularis. This suggests that AM fungal symbiosis influences plant metabolism, and plant-AM fungus combination is an important factor for improving plant performance and productivity, in presence or absence of stress conditions.

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization, plant chemistry, and aboveground herbivory on Senecio jacobaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidinger, Stefan; Eschen, René; Gange, Alan C.; Finch, Paul; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can affect insect herbivores by changing plant growth and chemistry. However, many factors can influence the symbiotic relationship between plant and fungus, potentially obscuring experimental treatments and ecosystem impacts. In a field experiment, we assessed AMF colonization levels of individual ragwort ( Senecio jacobaea) plants growing in grassland plots that were originally sown with 15 or 4 plant species, or were unsown. We measured the concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), and assessed the presence of aboveground insect herbivores on the sampled plants. Total AMF colonization and colonization by arbuscules was lower in plots sown with 15 species than in plots sown with 4 species and unsown plots. AMF colonization was positively related to the cover of oxeye daisy ( Leucanthemum vulgare) and a positive relationship between colonization by arbuscules and the occurrence of a specialist seed-feeding fly ( Pegohylemyia seneciella) was found. The occurrence of stem-boring, leaf-mining and sap-sucking insects was not affected by AMF colonization. Total PA concentrations were negatively related to colonization levels by vesicles, but did not differ among the sowing treatments. No single factor explained the observed differences in AMF colonization among the sowing treatments or insect herbivore occurrence on S. jacobaea. However, correlations across the treatments suggest that some of the variation was due to the abundance of one plant species, which is known to stimulate AMF colonization of neighbouring plants, while AMF colonization was related to the occurrence of a specialist insect herbivore. Our results thus illustrate that in natural systems, the ecosystem impact of AMF through their influence on the occurrence of specialist insects can be recognised, but they also highlight the confounding effect of neighbouring plant species identity. Hence, our results emphasise the importance of field

  1. On the perils of mycorrhizal status lists: the case of Buddleja davidii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, I A; Thomas, M M; Bellingham, P J

    2007-11-01

    One observation in a mycorrhizal check-list that Buddleja davidii is nonmycorrhizal has been perpetuated in subsequent citations and used in a number of analyses of mycorrhizal ecology and evolution. Direct observation of B. davidii from New Zealand and the UK shows extensive arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal structures inside B. davidii roots. The suggestion that B. davidii is nonmycorrhizal is therefore not supported. The use of mycorrhizal checklists for analysis of plant traits and evolution needs to be undertaken with care to ensure the validity of underlying data.

  2. SlaVaComp: Konvertierungstool (= SlaVaComp Fonts Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Skilevic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Der vorliegende Beitrag informiert über ein Tool, das im Rahmen eines Freiburger Projekts zur historischen Korpuslinguistik entwickelt wurde und dazu dient, kirchenslavische Texte, die ohne Einsatz von Unicode digitalisiert wurden, ohne Verlust von Information bzw. Formatierung ins Unicode-Format zu überführen. Das Tool heißt SlaVaComp-Konvertierer. Es eignet sich für die Konvertierung aller idiosynkratischen Fonts und kann somit nicht nur in der Paläoslavistik, sondern in allen historisch arbeitenden Philologien eingesetzt werden. ____________________ This paper presents a fonts converter that was developed as a part of the Freiburg project on historical corpus linguistics. The tool named SlaVaComp-Konvertierer converts Church Slavonic texts digitized with non-Unicode fonts into the Unicode format without any loss of information contained in the original file and without damage to the original formatting. It is suitable for the conversion of all idiosyncratic fonts—not only Church Slavonic—and therefore can be used not only in Palaeoslavistic, but also in all historical and philological studies.

  3. An academic-VA partnership: Student interprofessional teams integrated with VA PACT teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenty, Constance L; Schaar, Gina L; Butler, Ryan M

    2016-12-01

    Veterans are challenged with multiple unique healthcare issues related to their military service environment. Likewise, health care providers must understand the special concerns associated with military conflict and recognize how the veteran's care can be optimized by interprofessional care delivery. Little is taught didactically or clinically that supports nursing students in addressing the unique issues of the veteran or the student's need to work collaboratively with allied health team members to enhance the veteran's care. Because of limited exposure to the veteran's special conditions, nursing students who may seek a career with the veteran population often face challenges in rendering appropriate care. The VA offers an invaluable opportunity for health profession students to collaborate with VA interprofessional Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) ultimately optimizing veteran health outcomes. This academic partnership, that implements an interprofessional model, will prepare students to better embrace the veteran population. This article describes the immersion of health profession students in interprofessional collaborative practice (IPCP) using PACT team principles which ultimately promotes the students' ability to link theory content to patient care delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maximum power per VA control of vector controlled interior ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thakur Sumeet Singh

    2018-04-11

    Apr 11, 2018 ... Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New ... The MPVA operation allows maximum-utilization of the drive-system. ... Permanent magnet motor; unity power factor; maximum VA utilization; ...

  5. VA Enterprise Design Patterns - 5.1 (Mobility) Mobile

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — First of a set of guidance documents that establish the architectural foundation for mobile computing in the VA. This document outlines the enterprise capabilities...

  6. VA Enterprise Design Patters - 2.5 (Enterprise Architecture)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Enterprise architectural guidelines and constraints that provide references to the use of enterprise capabilities that will enable the VA to access and exchange data...

  7. Spread of Rare Fungus from Vancouver Island

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2006-12-20

    Cryptococcus gattii, a rare fungus normally found in the tropics, has infected people and animals on Vancouver Island, Canada. Dr. David Warnock, Director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC, discusses public health concerns about further spread of this organism.  Created: 12/20/2006 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 12/29/2006.

  8. Entomology: A Bee Farming a Fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Benjamin P; Aanen, Duur K

    2015-11-16

    Farming is done not only by humans, but also by some ant, beetle and termite species. With the discovery of a stingless bee farming a fungus that provides benefits to its larvae, bees can be added to this list. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Death from Fungus in the Soil

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-12-17

    Dr. Shira Shafir, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, discusses her study about fungus found in soil.  Created: 12/17/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/18/2012.

  10. Spread of Rare Fungus from Vancouver Island

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Cryptococcus gattii, a rare fungus normally found in the tropics, has infected people and animals on Vancouver Island, Canada. Dr. David Warnock, Director, Division of Foodborne, Bacterial, and Mycotic Diseases, CDC, discusses public health concerns about further spread of this organism

  11. Botrallin from the endophytic fungus Hyalodendriella sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Bioassay-guided fractionation of the crude methanol extract of the mycelia from the endophytic fungus. Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12, associated with the hybrid 'Neva' of Populus deltoides Marsh × P. nigra L., led to the isolation of one compound coded as P12-1 which was identified as botrallin (1,7-.

  12. Expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDef4.2 confers resistance to leaf rust pathogen Puccinia triticina but does not affect mycorrhizal symbiosis in transgenic wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jagdeep; Fellers, John; Adholeya, Alok; Velivelli, Siva L S; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Nersesian, Natalya; Clemente, Thomas; Shah, Dilip

    2017-02-01

    Rust fungi of the order Pucciniales are destructive pathogens of wheat worldwide. Leaf rust caused by the obligate, biotrophic basidiomycete fungus Puccinia triticina (Pt) is an economically important disease capable of causing up to 50 % yield losses. Historically, resistant wheat cultivars have been used to control leaf rust, but genetic resistance is ephemeral and breaks down with the emergence of new virulent Pt races. There is a need to develop alternative measures for control of leaf rust in wheat. Development of transgenic wheat expressing an antifungal defensin offers a promising approach to complement the endogenous resistance genes within the wheat germplasm for durable resistance to Pt. To that end, two different wheat genotypes, Bobwhite and Xin Chun 9 were transformed with a chimeric gene encoding an apoplast-targeted antifungal plant defensin MtDEF4.2 from Medicago truncatula. Transgenic lines from four independent events were further characterized. Homozygous transgenic wheat lines expressing MtDEF4.2 displayed resistance to Pt race MCPSS relative to the non-transgenic controls in growth chamber bioassays. Histopathological analysis suggested the presence of both pre- and posthaustorial resistance to leaf rust in these transgenic lines. MtDEF4.2 did not, however, affect the root colonization of a beneficial arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. This study demonstrates that the expression of apoplast-targeted plant defensin MtDEF4.2 can provide substantial resistance to an economically important leaf rust disease in transgenic wheat without negatively impacting its symbiotic relationship with the beneficial mycorrhizal fungus.

  13. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Alters Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms of Cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and Resists Cadmium Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25–60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg·kg−1 Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mg·kg−1 Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2–80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation. PMID:23139811

  14. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus, Glomus irregulare, controls the mycotoxin production of Fusarium sambucinum in the pathogenesis of potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecenes are an important family of mycotoxins produced by several species of the genus Fusarium. These fungi cause serious disease on infected plants and postharvest storage of crops and the toxins can cause health problems for humans and animals. Unfortunately, there are few methods for cont...

  15. Transfer of N and P from intact or decomposing roots of pea to barley interconnected by an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    of growth. In half of the containers, the donor-plant shoot was removed 42 d after the start of labelling and the roots were left in the soil to decompose. The reverse transfer of N and P, from barley donor to pea receiver plants was also measured to allow calculation of the net transfer through hyphae...... by G, intraradices. The results for P transfer followed the same patterns as was observed for N, although in smaller proportions. The results indicate that arbuscular mycorrhizas may play a significant role in the flow of N and P between two plants interconnected by hyphae, when the root system of one...

  16. Hyphal growt and mycorrhiza formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus claroideum BEG 23 is stimulated by humic substances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Sudová, Radka; Gryndlerová, Hana; Řezáčová, Veronika; Merhautová, Věra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2005), s. 483-488 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188; GA ČR GA526/00/1276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : fulvic acid * humic acid * iron Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2005

  17. Whistle-blower accuses VA inspector general of a "whitewash"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Yesterday, Dr. Sam Foote, the initial whistle-blower at the Phoenix VA, criticized the Department of Veterans Affairs inspector general's (VAOIG report on delays in healthcare at the Phoenix VA at a hearing before the House Committee of Veterans Affairs (1,2. Foote accused the VAOIG of minimizing bad patient outcomes and deliberately confusing readers, downplaying the impact of delayed health care at Phoenix VA facilities. "At its best, this report is a whitewash. At its worst, it is a feeble attempt at a cover-up," said Foote. Foote earlier this year revealed that as many as 40 Phoenix patients died while awaiting care and that the Phoenix VA maintained secret waiting lists while under-reporting patient wait times for appointments. His disclosures triggered the national VA scandal. Richard Griffin, the acting VAOIG, said that nearly 300 patients died while on backlogged wait lists in the Phoenix VA Health Care System, a much higher ...

  18. Leaf elemental analysis in mycorrhizal post oak seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boling, B.C. [Department of Biology, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 305220, Denton, TX 76203-5220 (United States); Naab, F.U. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, TX 76203-1427 (United States)]. E-mail: fun001@unt.edu; Smith, D. [Department of Biology, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 305220, Denton, TX 76203-5220 (United States); Duggan, J.L. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, TX 76203-1427 (United States); McDaniel, F.D. [Ion Beam Modification and Analysis Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of North Texas, P.O. Box 311427, Denton, TX 76203-1427 (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Growth and element assimilation was investigated in the leaves of post oak seedlings exposed to four different treatment combinations of fertilization and ectomycorrhizal inoculation. Element concentration was analyzed via particle-induced X-ray emission spectrometry (PIXE). PIXE detected 10 of the 13 essential macro and micronutrients: P, S, Mg, Ca, K, Cu, Zn, Mn, Fe and Cl. Mean growth and dry weight was significantly different across the treatment groups as well as the mean concentration of Mg, Al, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn. The data suggest that fertilization rather than mycorrhizal inoculation had a stronger influence on nutrient uptake. This study is the first to analyze element concentration in post oak and to investigate the potential benefits of mycorrhizal symbiosis in post oak seedlings in terms of nutrient uptake.

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Elicit a Novel Intracellular Apparatus in Medicago truncatula Root Epidermal Cells before InfectionW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genre, Andrea; Chabaud, Mireille; Timmers, Ton; Bonfante, Paola; Barker, David G.

    2005-01-01

    The penetration of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi through the outermost root tissues of the host plant is a critical step in root colonization, ultimately leading to the establishment of this ecologically important endosymbiotic association. To evaluate the role played by the host plant during AM infection, we have studied in vivo cellular dynamics within Medicago truncatula root epidermal cells using green fluorescent protein labeling of both the plant cytoskeleton and the endoplasmic reticulum. Targeting roots with Gigaspora hyphae has revealed that, before infection, the epidermal cell assembles a transient intracellular structure with a novel cytoskeletal organization. Real-time monitoring suggests that this structure, designated the prepenetration apparatus (PPA), plays a central role in the elaboration of the apoplastic interface compartment through which the fungus grows when it penetrates the cell lumen. The importance of the PPA is underlined by the fact that M. truncatula dmi (for doesn't make infections) mutants fail to assemble this structure. Furthermore, PPA formation in the epidermis can be correlated with DMI-dependent transcriptional activation of the Medicago early nodulin gene ENOD11. These findings demonstrate how the host plant prepares and organizes AM infection of the root, and both the plant–fungal signaling mechanisms involved and the mechanistic parallels with Rhizobium infection in legume root hairs are discussed. PMID:16284314

  20. Effect of vegetation types on soil arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacterial communities in a karst region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yueming; Pan, Fujing; He, Xunyang; Chen, Xiangbi; Su, Yirong

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria play important roles in plant growth and recovery in degraded ecosystems. The desertification in karst regions has become more severe in recent decades. Evaluation of the fungal and bacterial diversity of such regions during vegetation restoration is required for effective protection and restoration in these regions. Therefore, we analyzed relationships among AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria abundances, plant species diversity, and soil properties in four typical ecosystems of vegetation restoration (tussock (TK), shrub (SB), secondary forest (SF), and primary forest (PF)) in a karst region of southwest China. Abundance of AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, plant species diversity, and soil nutrient levels increased from the tussock to the primary forest. The AM fungus, nitrogen-fixing bacterium, and plant community composition differed significantly between vegetation types (p fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria, respectively. Available phosphorus, total nitrogen, and soil organic carbon levels and plant richness were positively correlated with the abundance of AM fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria (p fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria increased from the tussock to the primary forest and highlight the essentiality of these communities for vegetation restoration.

  1. Respiratory ATP cost and benefit of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with Nicotiana tabacum at different growth stages and under salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Saz, Néstor Fernández; Romero-Munar, Antonia; Alonso, David; Aroca, Ricardo; Baraza, Elena; Flexas, Jaume; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2017-11-01

    Growth and maintenance partly depend on both respiration and ATP production during oxidative phosphorylation in leaves. Under stress, ATP is needed to maintain the accumulated biomass. ATP production mostly proceeds from the cytochrome oxidase pathway (COP), while respiration via the alternative oxidase pathway (AOP) may decrease the production of ATP per oxygen consumed, especially under phosphorus (P) limitation and salinity conditions. Symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is reputed by their positive effect on plant growth under stress at mature stages of colonization; however, fungal colonization may decrease plant growth at early stages. Thus, the present research is based on the hypothesis that AM fungus colonization will increase both foliar respiration and ATP production at mature stages of plant growth while decreasing them both at early stages. We used the oxygen-isotope-fractionation technique to study the in vivo respiratory activities and ATP production of the COP and AOP in AM and non-AM (NM) tobacco plants grown under P-limiting and saline conditions in sand at different growth stages (14, 28 and 49days). Our results suggest that AM symbiosis represents an ATP cost detrimental for shoot growth at early stages, whilst it represents a benefit on ATP allowing for faster rates of growth at mature stages, even under salinity conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities in the rhizosphere of a continuous cropping soybean system at the seedling stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaqi; Bai, Li; Liu, Xiaorui; Jie, Weiguang; Cai, Baiyan

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) fungi play a crucial role in the growth of soybean; however, the planting system employed is thought to have an effect on AM fungal communities in the rhizosphere. This study was performed to explore the influence of continuous soybean cropping on the diversity of Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, and to identify the dominant AM fungus during the seedling stage. Three soybean cultivars were planted under two and three years continuous cropping, respectively. The diversity of AM fungi in the rhizosphere soil at the seedling stage was subsequently analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The results showed that an increase in cropping years improved the colonization rate of AM in all three soybean cultivars. Moreover, the dominant species were found to be Funneliformis mosseae and Glomus species. The results of cluster analysis further confirmed that the number of years of continuous cropping significantly affected the composition of rhizospheric AM fungal communities in different soybean cultivars. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Underground friends or enemies: model plants help to unravel direct and indirect effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on plant competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facelli, Evelina; Smith, Sally E; Facelli, José M; Christophersen, Helle M; Andrew Smith, F

    2010-03-01

    *We studied the effects of two arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, singly or together, on the outcome of competition between a host (tomato cultivar, wild-type (WT)) and a surrogate nonhost (rmc, a mycorrhiza-defective mutant of WT) as influenced by the contributions of the direct and AM phosphorus (P) uptake pathways to plant P. *We grew plants singly or in pairs of the same or different genotypes (inoculated or not) in pots containing a small compartment with (32)P-labelled soil accessible to AM fungal hyphae and determined expression of orthophosphate (P(i)) transporter genes involved in both AM and direct P uptake. *Gigaspora margarita increased WT competitive effects on rmc. WT and rmc inoculated with Glomus intraradices both showed growth depressions, which were mitigated when G. margarita was present. Orthophosphate transporter gene expression and (32)P transfer showed that the AM pathway operated in single inoculated WT, but not in rmc. *Effects of AM fungi on plant competition depended on the relative contributions of AM and direct pathways of P uptake. Glomus intraradices reduced the efficiency of direct uptake in both WT and rmc. The two-fungus combination showed that interactions between fungi are important in determining outcomes of plant competition.

  4. Elevated CO{sub 2} and ozone reduce nitrogen acquisition by Pinus halepensis from its mycorrhizal symbiont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kytoeviita, M.M. [Oulu Univ., Dept. of Biology, Oulu (Finland); Thiec, D. Le [Univ. Henri Poincare-Nancy, Lab. de Biologie Forestiere, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Dizengremel, P. [Unite Ecophysiologie Forestiere-Lab. de Pollution Atmospherique, INRA-Centre de Recherches Forestieres, Champenoux (France)

    2001-07-01

    The effects of 700 {mu}mol mol{sup -1} CO{sub 2} and 200 nmol mol{sup -1} ozone on photosynthesis in Pinus halepensis seedlings and on N translocation from its mycorrhizal symbiont, Paxillus involutus, were studied under nutrient-poor conditions. After 79 days of exposure, ozone reduced and elevated CO{sub 2} increased net assimilation rate. However, the effect was dependent on daily accumulated exposure. No statistically significant differences in total plant mass accumulation were observed, although ozone-treated plants tended to be smaller. Changes in atmospheric gas concentrations induced changes in allocation of resources: under elevated ozone, shoots showed high priority over roots and had significantly elevated N concentrations. As a result of different shoot N concentration and net carbon assimilation rates, photosynthetic N use efficiency was significantly increased under elevated CO{sub 2} and decreased under ozone. The differences in photosynthesis were mirrored in the growth of the fungus in symbiosis with the pine seedlings. However, exposure to CO{sub 2} and ozone both reduced the symbiosis-mediated N uptake. The results suggest an increased carbon cost of symbiosis-mediated N uptake under elevated CO{sub 2} while under ozone, plant N acquisition is preferentially shifted towards increased root uptake. (au)

  5. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  6. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis Alleviates Diesel Toxicity on Melilotus albus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Ortega, H. A.; Alarcon, A.; Ferrera-Cerrato, R.; Zavaleta-Mancera, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (PH) affect plant growth and development by limiting water absorption and nutrient availability. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been demonstrated to increase plant tolerance of grass species to PH, but the performance of AMF on legume species during phytorremediation of PH-contaminated soils has been scarcely understood. Thus, this research evaluated the effects of AMF on tolerance and growth of Melilotus albus in a diesel-contaminated soil. (Author)

  7. 75 FR 9277 - Proposed Information Collection (VA National Rehabilitation Special Events, Event Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Sports Clinic Application, VA Form 0924--233 hours. b. National Veterans Wheelchair Games Application, VA.... National Veterans TEE Tournament Application, VA Form 0927--133 hours. e. National Veterans Summer Sports... Form 0929--67 hours. OMB Control Number: 2900-New (VA Form 0924). Type of Review: Existing collection...

  8. Biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by arbuscular mycorrhizal leek plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, A.; Dalpe, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) on the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), nutrient uptake, and leek growth under greenhouse conditions. This experiment included 3 mycorrhizal treatments, 2 microorganism treatments, 2 PAH chemicals, and 4 concentrations of PAHs. Plant growth was greatly reduced by the addition of anthracene or phenanthrene in soil, whereas mycorrhizal inoculation not only increased plant growth, but also enhanced uptake of nitrogen and phosphorus. PAH concentrations in soil was lowered through the inoculation of two different strains of the species G. intraradices and G. versiforme. In 12 weeks of pot cultures, anthracene and phenanthrene concentrations decreased for all 3 PAH levels tested. However, the reduced amount of phenanthrene in soil was greater than that of anthracene. The addition of a soil microorganism extract into pot cultures accelerated the PAH degradation. The inoculation of AMF in a hydrocarbon contaminated soil was shown to enhance PAHs soil decontamination. It was concluded that a soil colonized with AMF can not only improve plant growth but can also stimulate soil microflora abundance and diversity. AMF may therefore directly influence PAH soil decontamination through plant growth enhancement

  9. POTENCIAL SIMBIOTICO Y EFECTIVIDAD DE HONGOS MICORRIZO ARBUSCULARES DE TRES SUELOS SOMETIDOS A DIFERENTES USOS MYCORRHIZAL SYMBIOTIC POTENTIAL AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE SOILS UNDER DIFFERENT USES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Patricia Jaramillo Padilla

    2004-06-01

    consisting of a soil-quartz (1:1 ratio mixture. The substrate was inoculated with a crude inoculum of Glomus aggregatum, a mycorrhizal fungus of known effectiveness. Mycorrhizal effectiveness was evaluated by monitoring P pinnule content of the leucaena seedlings at regular intervals of time during the growth period of 49 days. At harvest, shoot dry mass, shoot P content, and mycorrhizal colonization were determined. Plant growth and P uptake were significantly higher in plants growing in the substrate inoculated with G. aggregatum than those plants grown in either non-inoculated substrate or substrate inoculated with aliquots of tested soils. Mycorrhizal colonization was very high in the G. aggregtaum inoculated-substrate and virtually absent in the other treatments. Results suggest that in the tested soils there were a low mycorrhizal effectiveness and/or low content of mycorrizal infective propagules, which was confirmed by the most-probable-number method and mycorrhizal spore counting.

  10. arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi status of some crops in the cross river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    The incidence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization and rhizospheric spore prevalence of ten crops was studied in relation to their foliar concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the Calabar area of the Cross. River Basin of Nigeria in order to determine their mycorrhizal status. All crops studied ...

  11. Role of mycorrhizal fungi and salicylic acid in salinity tolerance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most researchers showed that inoculation of plants with mycorrhizal fungi and using salicylic acid increase tolerance of plants due to salinity. In this study, the effect of mycorrhizal fungi, including Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices, and salicylic acid (0.2 mM) on tolerance of green basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) to salinity ...

  12. Mycorrhizal diversity of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) rhizosphere in Tawangmangu, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, D. Y.; Parjanto; Cahyani, V. R.

    2018-03-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi is a group of soil fungi with mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and plant roots. The diversity on mycorrhiza contributes the maintenance of plant biodiversity, ecosystem function, and plant productivity. Climate change may affects the distribution and diversity of mycorrhizal fungi, and thus the study on mycorrhizal diversity is important to develop the information about mycorrhizal function and utilization. The present study investigated mycorrhizal diversity in the rhizosphere of stevia at four locations in different altitudes and soil types. The samples taken from Tlogodlingo (Andisols 1), Kalisoro (Andisols 2), Nglurah (Alfisols 1) and Ledoksari (Alfisols 2) in Tawangmangu, Karanganyar, Central Java, Indonesia. The result showed that Glomus sp. and Acaulospora sp. were the common genus found at all locations, whereas Gigaspora sp. was the only species found in the acidic Alfisol soil. Statistical analysis indicated that altitude, soil pH, and P availability significantly positively correlated with mycorrhizal spore density. The increase of altitude, soil pH and P availability, also increase the mycorrhizal spore density. Mycorrhizal infectivity negatively correlated with C/N ratio.

  13. Root-Associated Fungi Shared Between Arbuscular Mycorrhizal and Ectomycorrhizal Conifers in a Temperate Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toju, Hirokazu; Sato, Hirotoshi

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal symbioses are among the most important drivers of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics. Historically, the two types of symbioses have been investigated separately because arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal plant species are considered to host discrete sets of fungal symbionts (i.e., arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungi, respectively). Nonetheless, recent studies based on high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have suggested that diverse non-mycorrhizal fungi (e.g., endophytic fungi) with broad host ranges play roles in relationships between arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal plant species in forest ecosystems. By analyzing an Illumina sequencing dataset of root-associated fungi in a temperate forest in Japan, we statistically examined whether co-occurring arbuscular mycorrhizal ( Chamaecyparis obtusa ) and ectomycorrhizal ( Pinus densiflora ) plant species could share non-mycorrhizal fungal communities. Among the 919 fungal operational taxonomic units (OTUs) detected, OTUs in various taxonomic lineages were statistically designated as "generalists," which associated commonly with both coniferous species. The list of the generalists included fungi in the genera Meliniomyces, Oidiodendron, Cladophialophora, Rhizodermea, Penicillium , and Mortierella . Meanwhile, our statistical analysis also detected fungi preferentially associated with Chamaecyparis (e.g., Pezicula ) or Pinus (e.g., Neolecta ). Overall, this study provides a basis for future studies on how arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal plant species interactively drive community- or ecosystem-scale processes. The physiological functions of the fungi highlighted in our host-preference analysis deserve intensive investigations for understanding their roles in plant endosphere and rhizosphere.

  14. Increasing diveristy of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agroecosystems using specific cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-planted cover crops provide a plant host for obligate symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) during otherwise fallow periods and thus may increase AMF numbers in agroecosystems. Increased AMF numbers should increase mycorrhizal colonization of the subsequent cash crops, which has been li...

  15. Meta-analysis of crop and weed growth responses to arbuscular-mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have long been regarded as beneficial soil microorganisms, but have been reported to have detrimental effects on several non-mycorrhizal agricultural weed species. If AMF have negative effects on weeds but neutral or positive effects on crops under certain cropping...

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi status of some crops in the cross river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) colonization and rhizospheric spore prevalence of ten crops was studied in relation to their foliar concentration of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in the Calabar area of the Cross River Basin of Nigeria in order to determine their mycorrhizal status. All crops studied ...

  17. Resilience of arctic mycorrhizal fungal communities after wildfire facilitated by resprouting shrubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Hewitt; Elizabeth Bent; Teresa N. Hollingsworth; F. Stuart Chapin; D. Lee Taylor

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced changes in the tundra fire regime are expected to alter shrub abundance and distribution across the Arctic. However, little is known about how fire may indirectly impact shrub performance by altering mycorrhizal symbionts. We used molecular tools, including ARISA and ITS sequencing, to characterize the mycorrhizal communities on resprouting ...

  18. Differences in mycorrhizal communities between Epipactis palustris, E. helleborine and its presumed sister species E. neerlandica

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquemyn, Hans; Waud, Michael; Lievens, Bart; Brys, Rein

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In orchid species that have populations occurring in strongly contrasting habitats, mycorrhizal divergence and other habitat-specific adaptations may lead to the formation of reproductively isolated taxa and ultimately to species formation. However, little is known about the mycorrhizal communities associated with recently diverged sister taxa that occupy different habitats.

  19. Phosphate uptake from phytate due to hyphae-mediated phytase activity by arbuscular mycorrhizal maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xinxin; Hoffland, Ellis; Feng, Gu; Kuijper, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Phytate is the most abundant form of soil organic phosphorus (P). Increased P nutrition of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants derived from phytate has been repeatedly reported. Earlier studies assessed acid phosphatase rather than phytase as an indication of mycorrhizal fungi-mediated phytate use. We

  20. 65Zn transfer in maize – Mycorrhizal system: mechanism to alleviate Zn deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, K.S.; Tenshia, J.S. Virgine; Meena, S.

    2017-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis improves the host plant Zn nutrition as a consequence of hyphal transport, enhanced availability in soil as measured using isotopic dilution techniques besides preferential mobilization and transport of Zn. Overall, the data suggest that mycorrhizal symbiosis can improve the host plant nutrition and quality of grains through the mobilization and transport of slowly diffusing ions such as Zn

  1. A Role for Myosin Va in Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Adrian R; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Ericsson, Maria; Fernandez, Rosio; Coen, Donald M

    2018-03-15

    Herpesviruses replicate and package their genomes into capsids in replication compartments within the nuclear interior. Capsids then move to the inner nuclear membrane for envelopment and release into the cytoplasm in a process called nuclear egress. We previously found that nuclear F-actin is induced upon infection with the betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and is important for nuclear egress and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Despite these and related findings, it has not been shown that any specific motor protein is involved in herpesvirus nuclear egress. In this study, we have investigated whether the host motor protein, myosin Va, could be fulfilling this role. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation, we observed associations between a nuclear population of myosin Va and the viral major capsid protein, with both concentrating at the periphery of replication compartments. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that nearly 40% of assembled nuclear capsids associate with myosin Va. We also found that myosin Va and major capsid protein colocalize with nuclear F-actin. Importantly, antagonism of myosin Va with RNA interference or a dominant negative mutant revealed that myosin Va is important for the efficient production of infectious virus, capsid accumulation in the cytoplasm, and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Our results lead us to suggest a working model whereby human cytomegalovirus capsids associate with myosin Va for movement from replication compartments to the nuclear periphery during nuclear egress. IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding how newly assembled and packaged herpesvirus capsids move from the nuclear interior to the periphery during nuclear egress. While it has been proposed that an actomyosin-based mechanism facilitates intranuclear movement of alphaherpesvirus capsids, a functional role for

  2. Mycorrhizal symbionts of Pisonia grandis and P. sechellarum in Seychelles: identification of mycorrhizal fungi and description of new Tomentella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvi, Triin; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Beaver, Katy; Gerlach, Justin; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2010-01-01

    Nyctaginaceae includes species that are predominantly non-mycorrhizal or form arbuscular or ectomycorrhiza. Root-associated fungi were studied from P. grandis and P. sechellarum roots collected respectively on the islands of Cousin and Silhouette in Seychelles. In addition fungal sporocarps were collected from the sampling area. Fungal symbionts were identified from the roots by anatomotyping and rDNA sequencing; sporocarps collected were examined microscopically and sequenced. Three distantly related ectomycorrhizal fungal species belonging to Thelephoraceae were identified from the roots of P. grandis. Sporocarps also were found for two symbionts and described as new Tomentella species. In addition Tomentella species collected from other Seychelles islands were studied and described as new species if there was no close resemblance to previously established species. P. sechellarum was determined to be an arbuscular mycorrhizal plant; three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species were detected from the roots. P. grandis is probably associated only with species of Thelephoraceae throughout its area. Only five Tomentella species are known to form ectomycorrhiza with P. grandis and they never have been found to be associated with another host, suggesting adaptation of these fungi to extreme environmental conditions in host's habitat.

  3. Patient deaths blamed on long waits at the Phoenix VA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. This morning the lead article in the Arizona Republic was a report blaming as many as 40 deaths at the Phoenix VA on long waits (1. Yesterday, Rep. Jeff Miller, the chairman of the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, held a hearing titled “A Continued Assessment of Delays in VA Medical Care and Preventable Veteran Deaths.” “It appears as though there could be as many as 40 veterans whose deaths could be related to delays in care,” Miller announced to a stunned audience. The committee has spent months investigating patient-care scandals and allegations at VA facilities in Pittsburgh, Atlanta, Miami and other cities. said that dozens of VA hospital patients in Phoenix may have died while awaiting medical care. He went on to say that staff investigators have evidence that the Phoenix VA Health Care System keeps two sets of records to conceal prolonged waits that patients must endure for ...

  4. Responses of mycorrhizal fungi and other rootassociated fungi to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrild, Marie Porret

    Climate change is expected to affect many terrestrial ecosystem processes. Mycorrhizal fungi are important to soil carbon (C) and nutrient cycling thus changes in abundance of mycorrhizal fungi could alter ecosystem functioning. The aim of the present thesis was therefore to investigate responses...... of mycorrhizal fungi to climate change in a seasonal and long-term perspective. Effects of elevated CO2 (510 ppm), night-time warming and extended summer drought were investigated in the long-term field experiment CLIMAITE located in a Danish semi-natural heathland. Mycorrhizal colonization was investigated...... levels. Colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi increased under elevated CO2 and warming in spring while ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) colonisation decreased in response to drought and warming. Increased AM colonization correlated with higher phosphorus and nitrogen root pools. Dark septate...

  5. Role and influence of mycorrhizal fungi on radiocesium accumulation by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupre de Boulois, H.; Joner, E.J.; Leyval, C.; Jakobsen, I.; Chen, B.D.; Roos, P.; Thiry, Y.; Rufyikiri, G.; Delvaux, B.; Declerck, S.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge on the contribution of mycorrhizal fungi to radiocesium immobilization and plant accumulation. These root symbionts develop extended hyphae in soils and readily contribute to the soil-to-plant transfer of some nutrients. Available data show that ecto-mycorrhizal (ECM) fungi can accumulate high concentration of radiocesium in their extraradical phase while radiocesium uptake and accumulation by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is limited. Yet, both ECM and AM fungi can transport radiocesium to their host plants, but this transport is low. In addition, mycorrhizal fungi could thus either store radiocesium in their intraradical phase or limit its root-to-shoot translocation. The review discusses the impact of soil characteristics, and fungal and plant transporters on radiocesium uptake and accumulation in plants, as well as the potential role of mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation strategies

  6. [Discussion on appraisal methods and key technologies of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plant symbiosis system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Guo, Lanping; Yang, Guang; Chen, Min; Yang, Li; Huang, Luqi

    2011-11-01

    Applications of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in research of medicinal plant cultivation are increased in recent years. Medicinal plants habitat is complicated and many inclusions are in root, however crop habitat is simple and few inclusions in root. So appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of crop and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can't completely suitable for the symbiotic system of medicinal plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This article discuss the appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of medicinal plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the isolation and identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza, and the appraisal of colonization intensity. This article provides guidance for application research of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in cultivation of medicinal plants.

  7. Role and influence of mycorrhizal fungi on radiocesium accumulation by plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupre de Boulois, H. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de Microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Joner, E.J. [Bioforsk Soil and Environment, FredrikA Dahls vei 20, N-1432 As (Norway); Leyval, C. [LIMOS, Nancy University, CNRS, Faculte des Sciences, BP239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, Cedex (France); Jakobsen, I. [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Chen, B.D. [Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Roos, P. [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Thiry, Y.; Rufyikiri, G. [Biosphere Impact Assessment, SCK.CEN, Foundation of Public Utility, 200 Boeretang, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Delvaux, B. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite des Sciences du Sol, Croix du Sud 2/10, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Declerck, S. [Universite catholique de Louvain, Unite de Microbiologie, Croix du Sud 3, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)], E-mail: declerck@mbla.ucl.ac.be

    2008-05-15

    This review summarizes current knowledge on the contribution of mycorrhizal fungi to radiocesium immobilization and plant accumulation. These root symbionts develop extended hyphae in soils and readily contribute to the soil-to-plant transfer of some nutrients. Available data show that ecto-mycorrhizal (ECM) fungi can accumulate high concentration of radiocesium in their extraradical phase while radiocesium uptake and accumulation by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is limited. Yet, both ECM and AM fungi can transport radiocesium to their host plants, but this transport is low. In addition, mycorrhizal fungi could thus either store radiocesium in their intraradical phase or limit its root-to-shoot translocation. The review discusses the impact of soil characteristics, and fungal and plant transporters on radiocesium uptake and accumulation in plants, as well as the potential role of mycorrhizal fungi in phytoremediation strategies.

  8. Host Plant Physiology and Mycorrhizal Functioning Shift across a Glacial through Future [CO2] Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becklin, Katie M; Mullinix, George W R; Ward, Joy K

    2016-10-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO 2 ]) may modulate the functioning of mycorrhizal associations by altering the relative degree of nutrient and carbohydrate limitations in plants. To test this, we grew Taraxacum ceratophorum and Taraxacum officinale (native and exotic dandelions) with and without mycorrhizal fungi across a broad [CO 2 ] gradient (180-1,000 µL L -1 ). Differential plant growth rates and vegetative plasticity were hypothesized to drive species-specific responses to [CO 2 ] and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. To evaluate [CO 2 ] effects on mycorrhizal functioning, we calculated response ratios based on the relative biomass of mycorrhizal (M Bio ) and nonmycorrhizal (NM Bio ) plants (R Bio = [M Bio - NM Bio ]/NM Bio ). We then assessed linkages between R Bio and host physiology, fungal growth, and biomass allocation using structural equation modeling. For T. officinale, R Bio increased with rising [CO 2 ], shifting from negative to positive values at 700 µL L -1 [CO 2 ] and mycorrhizal effects on photosynthesis and leaf growth rates drove shifts in R Bio in this species. For T. ceratophorum, R Bio increased from 180 to 390 µL L -1 and further increases in [CO 2 ] caused R Bio to shift from positive to negative values. [CO 2 ] and fungal effects on plant growth and carbon sink strength were correlated with shifts in R Bio in this species. Overall, we show that rising [CO 2 ] significantly altered the functioning of mycorrhizal associations. These symbioses became more beneficial with rising [CO 2 ], but nonlinear effects may limit plant responses to mycorrhizal fungi under future [CO 2 ]. The magnitude and mechanisms driving mycorrhizal-CO 2 responses reflected species-specific differences in growth rate and vegetative plasticity, indicating that these traits may provide a framework for predicting mycorrhizal responses to global change. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. VA's National PTSD Brain Bank: a National Resource for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matthew J; Huber, Bertrand R; Brady, Christopher B; Ursano, Robert J; Benedek, David M; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2017-08-25

    The National PTSD Brain Bank (NPBB) is a brain tissue biorepository established to support research on the causes, progression, and treatment of PTSD. It is a six-part consortium led by VA's National Center for PTSD with participating sites at VA medical centers in Boston, MA; Durham, NC; Miami, FL; West Haven, CT; and White River Junction, VT along with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. It is also well integrated with VA's Boston-based brain banks that focus on Alzheimer's disease, ALS, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and other neurological disorders. This article describes the organization and operations of NPBB with specific attention to: tissue acquisition, tissue processing, diagnostic assessment, maintenance of a confidential data biorepository, adherence to ethical standards, governance, accomplishments to date, and future challenges. Established in 2014, NPBB has already acquired and distributed brain tissue to support research on how PTSD affects brain structure and function.

  10. Poststroke Rehabilitation and Restorative Care Utilization: A Comparison Between VA Community Living Centers and VA-contracted Community Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huanguang; Pei, Qinglin; Sullivan, Charles T; Cowper Ripley, Diane C; Wu, Samuel S; Bates, Barbara E; Vogel, W Bruce; Bidelspach, Douglas E; Wang, Xinping; Hoffman, Nannette

    2016-03-01

    Effective poststroke rehabilitation care can speed patient recovery and minimize patient functional disabilities. Veterans affairs (VA) community living centers (CLCs) and VA-contracted community nursing homes (CNHs) are the 2 major sources of institutional long-term care for Veterans with stroke receiving care under VA auspices. This study compares rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care among Veterans residing in VA CLCs versus those Veterans in VA-contracted CNHs. Retrospective observational. All Veterans diagnosed with stroke, newly admitted to the CLCs or CNHs during the study period who completed at least 2 Minimum Data Set assessments postadmission. The outcomes were numbers of days for rehabilitation therapy and restorative nursing care received by the Veterans during their stays in CLCs or CNHs as documented in the Minimum Data Set databases. For rehabilitation therapy, the CLC Veterans had lower user rates (75.2% vs. 76.4%, P=0.078) and fewer observed therapy days (4.9 vs. 6.4, Pcare, CLC Veterans had higher user rates (33.5% vs. 30.6%, Pcare days (9.4 vs. 5.9, Pcare (coefficient=5.48±0.37, Pcare both before and after risk adjustment.

  11. VA Telemedicine: An Analysis of Cost and Time Savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jack E; McCool, Ryan R; Davies, Louise

    2016-03-01

    The Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare system provides beneficiary travel reimbursement ("travel pay") to qualifying patients for traveling to appointments. Travel pay is a large expense for the VA and hence the U.S. Government, projected to cost nearly $1 billion in 2015. Telemedicine in the VA system has the potential to save money by reducing patient travel and thus the amount of travel pay disbursed. In this study, we quantify this savings and also report trends in VA telemedicine volumes over time. All telemedicine visits based at the VA Hospital in White River Junction, VT between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed (5,695 visits). Travel distance and time saved as a result of telemedicine were calculated. Clinical volume in the mental health department, which has had the longest participation in telemedicine, was analyzed. Telemedicine resulted in an average travel savings of 145 miles and 142 min per visit. This led to an average travel payment savings of $18,555 per year. Telemedicine volume grew significantly over the study period such that by the final year the travel pay savings had increased to $63,804, or about 3.5% of the total travel pay disbursement for that year. The number of mental health telemedicine visits rose over the study period but remained small relative to the number of face-to-face visits. A higher proportion of telemedicine visits involved new patients. Telemedicine at the VA saves travel distance and time, although the reduction in travel payments remains modest at current telemedicine volumes.

  12. Reaction of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal Scots pine fine roots along a deposition gradient of air pollutants in eastern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzenberger, B.; Schminke, B.; Strubelt, F.; Huettl, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    Based on an ecosystematic approach within the comprehensive SANA (regeneration of the atmosphere above the new federal states) project the influence of industrial air pollutants (SO 2 , NO x ) (alkaline fly ashes) on the vitality of mycorrhizal, mycorrhizal frequency, and on parameters of root growth such as root biomass and necromass and distribution of different root classes in the soil horizons was investigated. The studies were conducted in three comparable Scots pine ecosystems in eastern Germany which were exposed to different deposition loads of air pollutants during the time of the former German Democratic Republic. Site specific differences were obtained for all parameters investigated. The reference plot Neuglobsow (background deposition) revealed the highest number of vital mycorrhizal, highest mycorrhizal frequency, and largest biomass of finest roots in the humus layer. At the impact-site Roesa and Taura (heavy and moderate deposition) located near Halle/Bitterfeld and Leipzig, the number of vital mycorrhizae was reduced and the life-span of mycorrhizae of reduced vitality was elongated. Finest root biomass and necromass of the humus layer were also lower at these plots as compared to Neuglobsow. At Neuglobsow a higher turnover of mycorrhizae and finest roots of the humus layer is assumed. The reduced growth of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal finest roots at the two pollution impacted sites Roesa and Taura is seen as an adaptation mechanism of the root system to high nutrient inputs. 14 refs., 4 figs

  13. Weed control and cover crop management affect mycorrhizal colonization of grapevine roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal spore populations in a California vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Kendra; Smith, Richard F; Bettiga, Larry

    2005-03-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi naturally colonize grapevines in California vineyards. Weed control and cover cropping may affect AM fungi directly, through destruction of extraradical hyphae by soil disruption, or indirectly, through effects on populations of mycorrhizal weeds and cover crops. We examined the effects of weed control (cultivation, post-emergence herbicides, pre-emergence herbicides) and cover crops (Secale cereale cv. Merced rye, x Triticosecale cv.Trios 102) on AM fungi in a Central Coast vineyard. Seasonal changes in grapevine mycorrhizal colonization differed among weed control treatments, but did not correspond with seasonal changes in total weed frequency. Differences in grapevine colonization among weed control treatments may be due to differences in mycorrhizal status and/or AM fungal species composition among dominant weed species. Cover crops had no effect on grapevine mycorrhizal colonization, despite higher spring spore populations in cover cropped middles compared to bare middles. Cover crops were mycorrhizal and shared four AM fungal species (Glomus aggregatum, G. etunicatum, G. mosseae, G. scintillans) in common with grapevines. Lack of contact between grapevine roots and cover crop roots may have prevented grapevines from accessing higher spore populations in the middles.

  14. The WHO 2016 verbal autopsy instrument: An international standard suitable for automated analysis by InterVA, InSilicoVA, and Tariff 2.0.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Nichols

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Verbal autopsy (VA is a practical method for determining probable causes of death at the population level in places where systems for medical certification of cause of death are weak. VA methods suitable for use in routine settings, such as civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS systems, have developed rapidly in the last decade. These developments have been part of a growing global momentum to strengthen CRVS systems in low-income countries. With this momentum have come pressure for continued research and development of VA methods and the need for a single standard VA instrument on which multiple automated diagnostic methods can be developed.In 2016, partners harmonized a WHO VA standard instrument that fully incorporates the indicators necessary to run currently available automated diagnostic algorithms. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality. This VA instrument offers the opportunity to harmonize the automated diagnostic algorithms in the future.Despite all improvements in design and technology, VA is only recommended where medical certification of cause of death is not possible. The method can nevertheless provide sufficient information to guide public health priorities in communities in which physician certification of deaths is largely unavailable. The WHO 2016 VA instrument, together with validated approaches to analyzing VA data, offers countries solutions to improving information about patterns of cause-specific mortality.

  15. [Physiological responses of mycorrhizal Pinus massoniana seedlings to drought stress and drought resistance evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Ding, Gui-jie

    2013-03-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of inoculating Pisolithus tinctorius, Cenococcum geophilum, Cantharellus cibarius, and Suillus luteus on the physiological characteristics of Pinus massoniana seedlings under the conditions of drought stress and re-watering, with the drought resistance of the mycorrhizal seedlings evaluated. Under drought stress, the MDA content and membrane' s relative permeability of P. massoniana seedlings increased, but these two indices in the inoculated (mycorrhizal) seedlings were significantly lower than these in the un-inoculated (control) seedlings. After re-watering, the MDA content and membrane's relative permeability of mycorrhizal seedlings had a rapid decrease, as compared with the control. In the first 21 days of drought stress, the production rate of superoxide radical of the seedlings increased, and the SOD, POD and NR activities of mycorrhizal seedlings increased significantly. With the extending of drought stress, the seedlings after re-watering had different recovery ability. Under the re-watering after 14 days drought stress, the SOD, POD and NR activities recovered. The drought resistance of the mycorrhizal seedlings was in the order of Suillus luteus 1 > Suillus luteus 7 > Cantharellus cibarius > Cenococcum geophilum > Pisolithus tinctorius. The SOD and MDA activities had a greater correlation with the mycorrhizal seedlings drought resistance, being able to be used as the indicators to evaluate the drought resistance of mycorrhizal seedlings.

  16. Enrichment of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a contaminated soil after rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Leal, Patrícia; Varón-López, Maryeimy; Gonçalves de Oliveira Prado, Isabelle; Valentim Dos Santos, Jessé; Fonsêca Sousa Soares, Cláudio Roberto; Siqueira, José Oswaldo; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    Spore counts, species composition and richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and soil glomalin contents were evaluated in a soil contaminated with Zn, Cu, Cd and Pb after rehabilitation by partial replacement of the contaminated soil with non-contaminated soil, and by Eucalyptus camaldulensis planting with and without Brachiaria decumbens sowing. These rehabilitation procedures were compared with soils from contaminated non-rehabilitated area and non-contaminated adjacent soils. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi communities attributes were assessed by direct field sampling, trap culture technique, and by glomalin contents estimate. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was markedly favored by rehabilitation, and a total of 15 arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi morphotypes were detected in the studied area. Species from the Glomus and Acaulospora genera were the most common mycorrhizal fungi. Number of spores was increased by as much as 300-fold, and species richness almost doubled in areas rehabilitated by planting Eucalyptus in rows and sowing B. decumbens in inter-rows. Contents of heavy metals in the soil were negatively correlated with both species richness and glomalin contents. Introduction of B. decumbens together with Eucalyptus causes enrichment of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species and a more balanced community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi spores in contaminated soil. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. [Effect of five fungicides on growth of Glycyrrhiza uralensis and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng-ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Xiu-teng; Zhou, Liane-yun; Shao, Ai-juan; Chen, Mei-lan

    2015-12-01

    In order to obtain the fungicides with minimal impact on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, the effect of five fungicides including polyoxins, jinggangmycins, thiophanate methylate, chlorothalonil and carbendazim on the growth of medicinal plant and efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis were studied. Pot cultured Glycyrrhiza uralensis was treated with different fungicides with the concentration that commonly used in the field. 60 d after treated with fungicides, infection rate, infection density, biomass indexes, photosyn- thetic index and the content of active component were measured. Experimental results showed that carbendazim had the strongest inhibition on mycorrhizal symbiosis effect. Carbendazim significantly inhibited the mycorrhizal infection rate, significantly suppressed the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. Polyoxins showed the lowest inhibiting affection. Polyoxins had no significant effect on mycorrhizal infection rate, the actual photosynthetic efficiency of G. uralensis and the most indicators of biomass. The other three fungicides also had an inhibitory effect on efficiency of mycorrhizal symbiosis, and the inhibition degrees were all between polyoxins's and carbendazim's. The author considered that fungicide's inhibition degree on mycorrhizal effect might be related with the species of fungicides, so the author suggested that the farmer should try to choose bio-fungicides like polyoxins.

  18. Some Root Traits of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. as Affected by Mycorrhizal Symbiosis under Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bayani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of drought stress and mycorrhizal symbiosis on the colonization, root and leaf phosphorous content, root and leaf phosphatase activity, root volume and area as well as shoot dry weight of a variety of hulless barley were evaluated using a completely randomized experimental design (CRD with 3 replications. Treatments were three levels of drought stress of 30, 60 and 90% field capacity and two levels of mycorrhizal with and without inoculation. According to the results, the highest value of leaf phosphorous (1.54 mg/g was observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis against severe drought treatment. Root phosphatase activity was highest (297.9 OD min -1 FW-1 at severe drought stress with mycorrhizal symbiosis which in comparison with mild stress in the presence of mycorrhiza showed 16.6 fold increasing. The control and non-mycorrhizal symbiosis treatments had highest root dry weight (0.091 g. The lowest root volume (0.016 cm2 observed at mycorrhizal symbiosis × severe drought treatment. Generally, Inoculation of barley seed with mycorrhiza at severe water stress could transport more phosphorous to shoot, especially leaf via inducing of leaf and root phosphatase activity. Also, in addition to supply of nutrient sources especially phosphorous for plant, mycorrhizal symbiosis could play an important role in withstanding water stress in plant via increasing of root dry weight and area.

  19. Can Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Reduce the Growth of Agricultural Weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Rita S. L.; Jansa, Jan; Frossard, Emmanuel; van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known for their beneficial effects on plants. However, there is increasing evidence that some ruderal plants, including several agricultural weeds, respond negatively to AMF colonization. Here, we investigated the effect of AMF on the growth of individual weed species and on weed-crop interactions. Methodology/Principal Findings First, under controlled glasshouse conditions, we screened growth responses of nine weed species and three crops to a widespread AMF, Glomus intraradices. None of the weeds screened showed a significant positive mycorrhizal growth response and four weed species were significantly reduced by the AMF (growth responses between −22 and −35%). In a subsequent experiment, we selected three of the negatively responding weed species – Echinochloa crus-galli, Setaria viridis and Solanum nigrum – and analyzed their responses to a combination of three AMF (Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae and Glomus claroideum). Finally, we tested whether the presence of a crop (maize) enhanced the suppressive effect of AMF on weeds. We found that the growth of the three selected weed species was also reduced by a combination of AMF and that the presence of maize amplified the negative effect of AMF on the growth of E. crus-galli. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that AMF can negatively influence the growth of some weed species indicating that AMF have the potential to act as determinants of weed community structure. Furthermore, mycorrhizal weed growth reductions can be amplified in the presence of a crop. Previous studies have shown that AMF provide a number of beneficial ecosystem services. Taken together with our current results, the maintenance and promotion of AMF activity may thereby contribute to sustainable management of agroecosystems. However, in order to further the practical and ecological relevance of our findings, additional experiments should be performed under field conditions. PMID

  20. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi make a complex contribution to soil aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Peter; Daynes, Cathal; Damien, Field

    2013-04-01

    Soil aggregates contain solid and fluid components. Aggregates develop as a consequence of the organic materials, plants and hyphae of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi acting on the solid phase. Various correlative studies indicate hyphae of AM fungi enmesh soil particles, but their impact on the pore space is poorly understood. Hyphae may penetrate between particles, remove water from interstitial spaces, and otherwise re-arrange the solid phase. Thus we might predict that AM fungi also change the pore architecture of aggregates. Direct observations of pore architecture of soil, such as by computer-aided tomography (CT), is difficult. The refractive natures of solid and biological material are similar. The plant-available water in various treatments allows us to infer changes in pore architecture. Our experimental studies indicate AM fungi have a complex role in the formation and development of aggregates. Soils formed from compost and coarse subsoil materials were planted with mycorrhizal or non-mycorrhizal seedlings and the resultant soils compared after 6 or 14 months in separate experiments. As well as enmeshing particles, AM fungi were associated with the development of a complex pore space and greater pore volume. Even though AM fungi add organic matter to soil, the modification of pore space is not correlated with organic carbon. In a separate study, we visualised hyphae of AM fungi in a coarse material using CT. In this study, hyphae appeared to grow close to the surfaces of particles with limited ramification across the pore spaces. Hyphae of AM fungi appear to utilise soil moisture for their growth and development of mycelium. The strong correlation between moisture and hyphae has profound implications for soil aggregation, plant utilisation of soil water, and the distribution of water as water availability declines.

  1. 78 FR 62441 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ...--Federalism AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of... that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO85-VA Dental Insurance Program-- Federalism... add preemption language in accordance with the discussion above. Executive Order 13132, Federalism...

  2. 78 FR 63143 - VA Dental Insurance Program-Federalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...--Federalism AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Veterans... that they are submitted in response to ``RIN 2900-AO86-VA Dental Insurance Program-- Federalism... Order 13132, Federalism Section 6(c) of Executive Order 13132 (entitled ``Federalism'') requires an...

  3. VA Library Service--Today's look at Tomorrow's Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veterans Administration, Washington, DC.

    The Conference Poceedings are divided into three broad topics: systems planning, audiovisuals in biomedical communication, and automation and networking. Speakers from within the Veterans Administration (VA), from the National Medical Audiovisual Center, and the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of…

  4. What does Shulkin's firing mean for the VA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. David Shulkin MD, Secretary for Veterans Affairs (VA was finally fired by President Donald Trump ending long speculation (1. Trump nominated his personal physician, Ronny Jackson MD, to fill Shulkin’s post. The day after his firing, Shulkin criticized his firing in a NY Times op-ed claiming pro-privatization factions within the Trump administration led to his ouster (2. “They saw me as an obstacle to privatization who had to be removed,” Dr. Shulkin wrote. “That is because I am convinced that privatization is a political issue aimed at rewarding select people and companies with profits, even if it undermines care for veterans.” Former Secretary Shulkin’s tenure at the VA has had several controversies. First, as undersecretary of Veterans Healthcare and later as secretary money appropriated to the VA to obtain private care under the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Acts of 2014 and the VA Choice and Quality Employment Act of …

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter phosphorus relations of broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus L.) plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, J.C.; Cumming, J.R.

    2001-07-01

    Broomsedge (Andropogon virginicus L.) is a dominant grass revegetating many abandoned coal-mined lands in West Virginia, USA. Residual soils on such sites are often characterized by low pH, low nutrients, and high aluminium. Experiments were conducted to assess the resistance of broomsedge to limited phosphorus (Pi) availability and to investigate the role that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play in aiding plant growth under low Pi conditions. Pregerminated mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal seedlings were grown in a sand-culture system with nutrient solutions containing Pi concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M for 8 weeks. Non-mycorrhizal plants exhibited severe inhibition of growth under Pi limitation ({lt}60 {mu}M). Colonization by AM fungi greatly enhanced host plant growth at low Pi concentrations, but did not benefit growth when Pi was readily available (100 {mu}M). In comparison to non-mycorrhizal plants, mycorrhizal plants had higher phosphorus use efficiency at low Pi concentrations and maintained nearly constant tissue nutrient concentrations across the gradient of Pi concentrations investigated. Manganese (Mn) and sodium (Na) accumulated in shoots of nonmycorrhizal plants under Pi limitation. Mycorrhizal plants exhibited lower instantaneous Pi uptake rates and significantly lower C-min values compared to non-mycorrhizal plants. These patterns suggest that the symbiotic association between broomsedge roots and AM fungi effectively maintains nutrient homeostasis through changes in physiological properties, including nutrient uptake, allocation and use. The mycorrhizal association is thus a major adaptation that allows broomsedge to become established on infertile mined lands.

  6. The abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are linked to the soil chemistry of screes and to slope in the Alpic paleo-endemic Berardia subacaulis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Casazza

    Full Text Available Berardia subacaulis Vill. is a monospecific genus that is endemic to the South-western Alps, where it grows on alpine screes, which are extreme habitats characterized by soil disturbance and limiting growth conditions. Root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF is presumably of great importance in these environments, because of its positive effect on plant nutrition and stress tolerance, as well as on structuring the soil. However, there is currently a lack of information on this topic. In this paper, we tested which soil characteristics and biotic factors could contribute to determining the abundance and community composition of AMF in the roots of B. subacaulis, which had previously been found to be mycorrhizal. For such a reason, the influence of soil properties and environmental factors on AMF abundance and community composition in the roots of B. subacaulis, sampled on three different scree slopes, were analysed through microscopic and molecular analysis. The results have shown that the AMF community of Berardia roots was dominated by Glomeraceae, and included a core of AMF taxa, common to all three scree slopes. The vegetation coverage and dark septate endophytes were not related to the AMF colonization percentage and plant community did not influence the root AMF composition. The abundance of AMF in the roots was related to some chemical (available extractable calcium and potassium and physical (cation exchange capacity, electrical conductivity and field capacity properties of the soil, thus suggesting an effect of AMF on improving the soil quality. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS ordination of the AMF community composition showed that the diversity of AMF in the various sites was influenced not only by the soil quality, but also by the slope. Therefore, the slope-induced physical disturbance of alpine screes may contribute to the selection of disturbance-tolerant AMF taxa, which in turn may lead to different

  7. The abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are linked to the soil chemistry of screes and to slope in the Alpic paleo-endemic Berardia subacaulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Gabriele; Lumini, Erica; Ercole, Enrico; Dovana, Francesco; Guerrina, Maria; Arnulfo, Annamaria; Minuto, Luigi; Fusconi, Anna; Mucciarelli, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Berardia subacaulis Vill. is a monospecific genus that is endemic to the South-western Alps, where it grows on alpine screes, which are extreme habitats characterized by soil disturbance and limiting growth conditions. Root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) is presumably of great importance in these environments, because of its positive effect on plant nutrition and stress tolerance, as well as on structuring the soil. However, there is currently a lack of information on this topic. In this paper, we tested which soil characteristics and biotic factors could contribute to determining the abundance and community composition of AMF in the roots of B. subacaulis, which had previously been found to be mycorrhizal. For such a reason, the influence of soil properties and environmental factors on AMF abundance and community composition in the roots of B. subacaulis, sampled on three different scree slopes, were analysed through microscopic and molecular analysis. The results have shown that the AMF community of Berardia roots was dominated by Glomeraceae, and included a core of AMF taxa, common to all three scree slopes. The vegetation coverage and dark septate endophytes were not related to the AMF colonization percentage and plant community did not influence the root AMF composition. The abundance of AMF in the roots was related to some chemical (available extractable calcium and potassium) and physical (cation exchange capacity, electrical conductivity and field capacity) properties of the soil, thus suggesting an effect of AMF on improving the soil quality. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination of the AMF community composition showed that the diversity of AMF in the various sites was influenced not only by the soil quality, but also by the slope. Therefore, the slope-induced physical disturbance of alpine screes may contribute to the selection of disturbance-tolerant AMF taxa, which in turn may lead to different plant-fungus

  8. Characterization and purification of a bacterial chlorogenic acid esterase detected during the extraction of chlorogenic acid from arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrel, Jonathan; Javelle, Francine; Morandi, Dominique; Lucchi, Géraldine

    2016-12-01

    A Gram-negative bacterium able to grow using chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid) as sole carbon source has been isolated from the roots of tomato plants inoculated with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Rhizophagus irregularis. An intracellular esterase exhibiting very high affinity (K m  = 2 μM) for chlorogenic acid has been extracted and purified by FPLC from the chlorogenate-grown cultures of this bacterium. The molecular mass of the purified esterase determined by SDS-PAGE was 61 kDa and its isoelectric point determined by chromatofocusing was 7.75. The esterase hydrolysed chlorogenic acid analogues (caffeoylshikimate, and the 4- and 3-caffeoylquinic acid isomers), feruloyl esterases substrates (methyl caffeate and methyl ferulate), and even caffeoyl-CoA in vitro but all of them were less active than chlorogenic acid, demonstrating that the esterase is a genuine chlorogenic acid esterase. It was also induced when the bacterial strain was cultured in the presence of hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic, p-coumaric or ferulic acid) as sole carbon source, but not in the presence of simple phenolics such as catechol or protocatechuic acid, nor in the presence of organic acids such as succinic or quinic acids. The purified esterase was remarkably stable in the presence of methanol, rapid formation of methyl caffeate occurring when its activity was measured in aqueous solutions containing 10-60% methanol. Our results therefore show that this bacterial chlorogenase can catalyse the transesterification reaction previously detected during the methanolic extraction of chlorogenic acid from arbuscular mycorrhizal tomato roots. Data are presented suggesting that colonisation by Rhizophagus irregularis could increase chlorogenic acid exudation from tomato roots, especially in nutrient-deprived plants, and thus favour the growth of chlorogenate-metabolizing bacteria on the root surface or in the mycorhizosphere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  9. Phosphate concentration and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation influence the growth, yield and expression of twelve PHT1 family phosphate transporters in foxtail millet (Setaria italica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Antony Ceasar

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P is an essential element which plays several key roles in all living organisms. Setaria italica (foxtail millet is a model species for panacoid grasses including several millet species widely grown in arid regions of Asia and Africa, and for the bioenergy crop switchgrass. The growth responses of S. italica to different levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi and to colonisation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae were studied. Phosphate is taken up from the environment by the PHT1 family of plant phosphate transporters, which have been well characterized in several plant species. Bioinformatic analysis identified 12 members of the PHT1 gene family (SiPHT1;1-1;12 in S. italica, and RT and qPCR analysis showed that most of these transporters displayed specific expression patterns with respect to tissue, phosphate status and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation. SiPHT1;2 was found to be expressed in all tissues and in all growth conditions tested. In contrast, expression of SiPHT1;4 was induced in roots after 15 days growth in hydroponic medium of low Pi concentration. Expression of SiPHT1;8 and SiPHT1;9 in roots was selectively induced by colonisation with F. mosseae. SiPHT1;3 and SiPHT1;4 were found to be predominantly expressed in leaf and root tissues respectively. Several other transporters were expressed in shoots and leaves during growth in low Pi concentrations. This study will form the basis for the further characterization of these transporters, with the long term goal of improving the phosphate use efficiency of foxtail millet.

  10. Phosphate concentration and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation influence the growth, yield and expression of twelve PHT1 family phosphate transporters in foxtail millet (Setaria italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceasar, S Antony; Hodge, Angela; Baker, Alison; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential element which plays several key roles in all living organisms. Setaria italica (foxtail millet) is a model species for panacoid grasses including several millet species widely grown in arid regions of Asia and Africa, and for the bioenergy crop switchgrass. The growth responses of S. italica to different levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and to colonisation with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae) were studied. Phosphate is taken up from the environment by the PHT1 family of plant phosphate transporters, which have been well characterized in several plant species. Bioinformatic analysis identified 12 members of the PHT1 gene family (SiPHT1;1-1;12) in S. italica, and RT and qPCR analysis showed that most of these transporters displayed specific expression patterns with respect to tissue, phosphate status and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonisation. SiPHT1;2 was found to be expressed in all tissues and in all growth conditions tested. In contrast, expression of SiPHT1;4 was induced in roots after 15 days growth in hydroponic medium of low Pi concentration. Expression of SiPHT1;8 and SiPHT1;9 in roots was selectively induced by colonisation with F. mosseae. SiPHT1;3 and SiPHT1;4 were found to be predominantly expressed in leaf and root tissues respectively. Several other transporters were expressed in shoots and leaves during growth in low Pi concentrations. This study will form the basis for the further characterization of these transporters, with the long term goal of improving the phosphate use efficiency of foxtail millet.

  11. Effects of Vermicompost and Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth Characteristics, Essential Oil and Yield of Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeemeh Bitarafan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. is one of the most important essential oil plants that its essential oil constituent be used in different medicinal and food industries. Vermicompost is organic manure that significant amounts of macro and micronutrients make available to the plants. Although some of this material is minerals but most of them gradually and slowly released through the mineralization of organic matter. Mycorrhizal fungi are one of the biological factors in the rhizosphere, which include a relatively important part of soil organisms. Under water deficit conditions, mycorrhiza enhances photosynthesis and carbon fixation during the growing season by increasing the leaf area. This condition does not directly contribute to increased photosynthesis in the host plant, but keeps the photosynthesis level higher than control by improving water relations and changing the hormonal relations. Materials and methods The treatments included vermicompost in four levels (0, 2, 4, and 6 ton.ha-1 and mycorrhiza in three levels (without inoculation, inoculation with Glomus mosseae and Glomus intraradices was arranged based on randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and 3 replications. Fresh leaf tissue was used to measure chlorophyll content. Dimethyl sulfoxide (7 ml was added to 0.1 g leaf tissue and the samples were incubated at 70°Cfor 4h. The light absorptance was measured at 663, 645 and 470 nm with spectrophotometer (Jenway, 6305 to obtain chlorophyll content. To measure Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis, plant roots were collected one week before harvesting, cleaned by 10% KOH at 80˚C for 2h, and acidified in 1% HCL for 60 min. Then the cleaned up roots were stained in a solution of trypan blue. The roots were destained in a mixture of 500 ml glycerol, 450 ml water and 5 ml HCL for 24 h, allowing the fungus to be revealed under microscopic examination (Taylor et al. 2008. Statistical analysis: Analysis of variance (ANOVA

  12. Changes of mycorrhizal colonization along moist gradient in a vineyard of Eger (Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donkó Ádám

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of mycorrhizal fungi has special importance in the case of low soil moisture because the colonization of vine roots by mycorrhiza increases water and nutrient uptake and thus aids the avoidance of biotic and abiotic stresses of grape. Our aim was to investigate in the Eger wine region the changes of mycorrhizal colonization, water potential, and yield quality and quantity of grape roots at three altitudes, along a changing soil moist gradient. Our results show that the degree of mycorrhizal colonization is higher in drier areas, which supports the water and nutrient uptake of the host plant.

  13. Phosphorus supply, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, and plant genotype impact on the protective efficacy of mycorrhizal inoculation against wheat powdery mildew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, G; Randoux, B; Tisserant, B; Fontaine, J; Magnin-Robert, M; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, A; Reignault, Ph

    2016-10-01

    A potential alternative strategy to chemical control of plant diseases could be the stimulation of plant defense by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). In the present study, the influence of three parameters (phosphorus supply, mycorrhizal inoculation, and wheat cultivar) on AMF protective efficiency against Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, responsible for powdery mildew, was investigated under controlled conditions. A 5-fold reduction (P/5) in the level of phosphorus supply commonly recommended for wheat in France improved Funneliformis mosseae colonization and promoted protection against B. graminis f. sp. tritici in a more susceptible wheat cultivar. However, a further decrease in P affected plant growth, even under mycorrhizal conditions. Two commercially available AMF inocula (F. mosseae, Solrize®) and one laboratory inoculum (Rhizophagus irregularis) were tested for mycorrhizal development and protection against B. graminis f. sp. tritici of two moderately susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars at P/5. Mycorrhizal levels were the highest with F. mosseae (38 %), followed by R. irregularis (19 %) and Solrize® (SZE, 8 %). On the other hand, the highest protection level against B. graminis f. sp. tritici was obtained with F. mosseae (74 %), followed by SZE (58 %) and R. irregularis (34 %), suggesting that inoculum type rather than mycorrhizal levels determines the protection level of wheat against B. graminis f. sp. tritici. The mycorrhizal protective effect was associated with a reduction in the number of conidia with haustorium and with an accumulation of polyphenolic compounds at B. graminis f. sp. tritici infection sites. Both the moderately susceptible and the most resistant wheat cultivar were protected against B. graminis f. sp. tritici infection by F. mosseae inoculation at P/5, although the underlying mechanisms appear rather different between the two cultivars. This study emphasizes the importance of taking into account the considered

  14. A Mycorrhizal-Specific Ammonium Transporter from Lotus japonicus Acquires Nitrogen Released by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guether, Mike; Neuhäuser, Benjamin; Balestrini, Raffaella; Dynowski, Marek; Ludewig, Uwe; Bonfante, Paola

    2009-01-01

    In mycorrhizal associations, the fungal partner assists its plant host by providing nitrogen (N) in addition to phosphate. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have access to inorganic or organic forms of N and translocate them via arginine from the extra- to the intraradical mycelium, where the N is transferred to the plant without any carbon skeleton. However, the molecular form in which N is transferred, as well as the involved mechanisms, is still under debate. NH4+ seems to be the preferential transferred molecule, but no plant ammonium transporter (AMT) has been identified so far. Here, we offer evidence of a plant AMT that is involved in N uptake during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The gene LjAMT2;2, which has been shown to be the highest up-regulated gene in a transcriptomic analysis of Lotus japonicus roots upon colonization with Gigaspora margarita, has been characterized as a high-affinity AMT belonging to the AMT2 subfamily. It is exclusively expressed in the mycorrhizal roots, but not in the nodules, and transcripts have preferentially been located in the arbusculated cells. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant complementation has confirmed its functionality and revealed its dependency on acidic pH. The transport experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes indicated that, unlike other plant AMTs, LjAMT2;2 transports NH3 instead of NH4+. Our results suggest that the transporter binds charged ammonium in the apoplastic interfacial compartment and releases the uncharged NH3 into the plant cytoplasm. The implications of such a finding are discussed in the context of AM functioning and plant phosphorus uptake. PMID:19329566

  15. 76 FR 79067 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AN49 Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency..., authorize the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to reimburse eligible veterans for costs related to non-VA.... Specifically, section 1725 authorizes reimbursement for emergency treatment for eligible veterans with...

  16. 75 FR 33216 - Payment or Reimbursement for Emergency Treatment Furnished by Non-VA Providers in Non-VA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... health care services for veterans).'' Proposed Sec. 17.121(a) would establish the clinical decision maker... practice to utilize the services of health care professionals, such as nurses, for purposes of clinical review. For this reason, establishing the clinical decision maker as a ``designated VA clinician'' would...

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ANAEROBIC FUNGUS FROM LLAMA FECES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; LAHPOR, GA; KRAAK, MN; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    1992-01-01

    An anaerobic fungus was isolated from Hama faeces. Based on its morphological characteristics, polyflagellated zoospores, extensive rhizoid system and the formation of monocentric colonies, the fungus is assigned to the genus Neocallimastix. Neocallimastix sp. L2 is able to grow on several poly-,

  18. Phomalactone from a phytopathogenic fungus infecting Zinnia elegans (Asteraceae) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnia elegans plants are infected by a fungus that causes necrosis with dark red spots particularly in late spring to the middle of summer in the Mid-South part of the United States. This fungal disease when untreated causes the leaves to wilt and eventually kills the plant. The fungus was isolated...

  19. ( Azadirachta Indica ) Leaf Extracts on the Rot Fungus ( Fusarium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The storage lifespan of kola nuts is challenged by the problem of decay of nuts in storage as a result of the attack by the rot fungus (Fusarium spp). The effect of the neem leaf (Azadirachta indica) extracts on the rot fungus was investigated in order to aid extended kola nuts storage. The aqueous and ethanolic leaf extracts of ...

  20. Microbial transformation of (-)-isolongifolol by plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Sakata, Kazuki; Ueda, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    The biotransformation of terpenoids using the plant pathogenic fungus as a biocatalyst to produce useful novel organic compounds was investigated. The biotransformation of sesquiterpen alcohol, (-)-isolongifolol (1) was investigated using plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata as a biocatalyst. Compound 1 was converted to (-)-(3R)-3-hydroxy-isolongifolol and (-)-(9R)-9-hydroxy-isolongifolol by G. cingulata.

  1. Metacridamides A and B from the biocontrol fungus metarhizium acridum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metarhizium acridum, an entomopathogenic fungus, has been commercialized and used successfully for biocontrol of grasshopper pests in Africa and Australia. As part of an effort to catalog the secondary metabolites of this fungus we discovered that its conidia produce two novel 17-membered macrocycl...

  2. Reciprocal genomic evolution in the ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Sanne; Hu, Haofu; Li, Cai

    2016-01-01

    The attine ant-fungus agricultural symbiosis evolved over tens of millions of years, producing complex societies with industrial-scale farming analogous to that of humans. Here we document reciprocal shifts in the genomes and transcriptomes of seven fungus-farming ant species and their fungal...

  3. Medical image of the week: fungus ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 69 year-old Asian woman living in Arizona with a past medical history of nephrotic syndrome on high-dose steroids had worsening pulmonary symptoms. A computed tomography (CT of the chest (Figure 1 showed a 4.7 cm thin walled cavitary lesion in the right middle lobe compatible with mycetoma. She underwent thoracotomy for mycetoma resection. Surgical pathology confirmed an epithelial-lined cavity containing dense mycelia (Figure 2. Given the patient lived in an endemic area; the cavity was thought to be likely due to coccidioidomycosis. However, the mycetoma was of unclear etiology. No spherules were noted on GMS stain and tissue culture was negative. While of unclear clinical significance which fungus colonizes a pre-existing cavity, a Coccidioides PCR was performed and no Coccidioides genes were amplified making a Coccidioides mycetoma very unlikely. Pulmonary mycetoma or “fungus ball” consists of dense fungal elements and amorphous cellular material within a pre-existing pulmonary cavity. Classically ...

  4. The Blast Fungus Decoded: Genomes in Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Langner

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant disease outbreaks caused by fungi are a chronic threat to global food security. A prime case is blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae, which is infamous as the most destructive disease of the staple crop rice. However, despite its Linnaean binomial name, M. oryzae is a multihost pathogen that infects more than 50 species of grasses. A timely study by P. Gladieux and colleagues (mBio 9:e01219-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01219-17 reports the most extensive population genomic analysis of the blast fungus thus far. M. oryzae consists of an assemblage of differentiated lineages that tend to be associated with particular host genera. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence of gene flow between lineages consistent with maintaining M. oryzae as a single species. Here, we discuss these findings with an emphasis on the ecologic and genetic mechanisms underpinning gene flow. This work also bears practical implications for diagnostics, surveillance, and management of blast diseases.

  5. Antimicrobial chemical constituents from endophytic fungus Phomasp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidayat Hussain; Siegfried Draeger; Barbara Schulz; Karsten Krohn; Ines Kock; Ahmed Al-Harrasi; Ahmed Al-Rawahi; Ghulam Abbas; Ivan R Green; Afzal Shah; Amin Badshah; Muhammad Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the antimicrobial potential of different extracts of the endophytic fungus Phomasp. and the tentative identification of their active constituents.Methods:The extract and compounds were screened for antimicrobial activity using theAgarWellDiffusionMethod. Four compounds were purified using column chromatography and their structures were assigned using1H and13CNMR spectra,DEPT,2DCOSY,HMQC andHMBC experiments.Results:The ethyl acetate fraction ofPhomasp. showed good antifungal, antibacterial, and algicidal properties.One new dihydrofuran derivative, named phomafuranol(1), together with three known compounds, phomalacton(2),(3R)-5-hydroxymellein(3) and emodin(4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction ofPhomasp.Preliminary studies indicated that phomalacton(2) displayed strong antibacterial, good antifungal and antialgal activities.Similarly(3R)-5-hydroxymellein (3) and emodin(4) showed good antifungal, antibacterial and algicidal properties.Conclusions:Antimicrobial activities of the ethyl acetate fraction of the endophytic fungusPhomasp. and isolated compounds clearly demonstrate thatPhomasp. and its active compounds represent a great potential for the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  6. Ribonucleic acids in different tea fungus beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malbaša Radomir V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In human nutrition, nucleic acids have to be balanced and limited up to 2 g/day because purines are degraded to urate, and excessive production of urate is a cause of gout which primarily affects adult males. Tea fungus beverage is a well known drink with high nutritional value and certain curative effects. Its benefits have been proved in a number of studies but it is still necessary to examine some potential harmful effects of this beverage. The aim of this paper was to investigate content of ribonucleic acids (RNA produced during tea fungus fermentation on a usual substrate sweetened black tea, and on Jerusalem artichoke tubers (J.A.T extract using method by Munro and Fleck (1966. pH, ribonucleic acids and also the production of proteins that affect purity of nucleic acids preparations were monitored. A higher value of RNA has been noticed in J.A.T. beverage (0.57 mg/ml and with observation of usual daily dose of the beverage it is completely safe and useful one.

  7. The Blast Fungus Decoded: Genomes in Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Thorsten; Białas, Aleksandra; Kamoun, Sophien

    2018-04-17

    Plant disease outbreaks caused by fungi are a chronic threat to global food security. A prime case is blast disease, which is caused by the ascomycete fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (syn. Pyricularia oryzae ), which is infamous as the most destructive disease of the staple crop rice. However, despite its Linnaean binomial name, M. oryzae is a multihost pathogen that infects more than 50 species of grasses. A timely study by P. Gladieux and colleagues (mBio 9:e01219-17, 2018, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01219-17) reports the most extensive population genomic analysis of the blast fungus thus far. M. oryzae consists of an assemblage of differentiated lineages that tend to be associated with particular host genera. Nonetheless, there is clear evidence of gene flow between lineages consistent with maintaining M. oryzae as a single species. Here, we discuss these findings with an emphasis on the ecologic and genetic mechanisms underpinning gene flow. This work also bears practical implications for diagnostics, surveillance, and management of blast diseases. Copyright © 2018 Langner et al.

  8. 78 FR 77204 - Proposed Information Collection (VA National Veterans Sports Programs and Special Event Surveys...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... AGENCY: Office of Public & Intergovernmental Affairs, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Office of Public Affairs (OPA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-NEW] Proposed Information Collection (VA...

  9. Mycorrhizal synthesis between Lactarius deliciosus and Arbutus unedo L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Filomena; Suárez, Diego; Santos, Rita; Silva, Márcia; Gaspar, Daniel; Machado, Helena

    2016-04-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizae were synthesized in vitro between Arbutus unedo L. and two isolates of Lactarius deliciosus. The fungal isolates were obtained from sporocarps collected under Pinus sylvestris and in a mixed forest stand of Quercus suber and Pinus pinea. Synthesis tubes filled with a mixture of sterilized peat, vermiculite, and perlite imbibed with nutrient solution were used. Two inoculation methods using solid and liquid media were tested. Shoots from an adult selected clone of A. unedo were used after in vitro rooting by auxin dipping. After 3 months of shoots transfer to the substrate, the root systems were examined for arbutoid mycorrhizae formation and later on ex vitro conditions, 9 months after acclimatization. The inoculum treatment with liquid medium improved the mycorrhizal development for both isolates, in vitro. Sterilized substrate for plant acclimatization increased the mycorrhizal development. The arbutoid mycorrhizae were observed in vitro as well as 9 months after acclimatization. Standard arbutoid mycorrhiza features were observed: pale yellow mantle, typical cruciform appearance, Hartig net (HN), and intracellular hyphal complexes, both confined to the epidermis. L. deliciosus mycorrhizae synthetized in vitro persisted 9 months after plant acclimatization. Morphological observations were confirmed by molecular techniques.

  10. Metal accumulation and detoxification mechanisms in mycorrhizal Betula pubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Fuego, D; Bertrand, A; González, A

    2017-12-01

    Metal detoxification in plants is a complex process that involves different mechanisms, such as the retention of metals to the cell wall and their chelation and subsequent compartmentalization in plant vacuoles. In order to identify the mechanisms involved in metal accumulation and tolerance in Betula pubescens, as well as the role of mycorrhization in these processes, mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants were grown in two industrial soils with contrasting concentrations of heavy metals. Mycorrhization increased metal uptake at low metal concentrations in the soil and reduced it at high metal concentrations, which led to an enhanced growth and biomass production of the host when growing in the most polluted soil. Our results suggest that the sequestration on the cell wall is the main detoxification mechanism in white birch exposed to acute chronic metal-stress, while phytochelatins play a role mitigating metal toxicity inside the cells. Given its high Mn and Zn root-to-shoot translocation rate, Betula pubescens is a very promising species for the phytoremediation of soils polluted with these metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Phylogenetic constrains on mycorrhizal specificity in eight Dendrobium (Orchidaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiaoke; Ma, Xueting; Men, Jinxin; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Shunxing

    2017-05-01

    Plant phylogeny constrains orchid mycorrhizal (OrM) fungal community composition in some orchids. Here, we investigated the structures of the OrM fungal communities of eight Dendrobium species in one niche to determine whether similarities in the OrM fungal communities correlated with the phylogeny of the host plants and whether the Dendrobium-OrM fungal interactions are phylogenetically conserved. A phylogeny based on DNA data was constructed for the eight coexisting Dendrobium species, and the OrM fungal communities were characterized by their roots. There were 31 different fungal lineages associated with the eight Dendrobium species. In total, 82.98% of the identified associations belonging to Tulasnellaceae, and a smaller proportion involved members of the unknown Basidiomycota (9.67%). Community analyses revealed that phylogenetically related Dendrobium tended to interact with a similar set of Tulasnellaceae fungi. The interactions between Dendrobium and Tulasnellaceae fungi were significantly influenced by the phylogenetic relationships among the Dendrobium species. Our results provide evidence that the mycorrhizal specificity in the eight coexisting Dendrobium species was phylogenetically conserved.

  12. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false VA mentor-protégÃ....219-71 VA mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in 819.7115(a), insert the following clause: VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA Mentor-Protégé...

  13. Mycorrhizal fungi associated with Taiwanese Pyrola morrisonensis (Ericaceae in a naturally regenerated forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke MATSUDA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrola morrisonensis, an evergreen herb in the family Ericaceae, is endemic to Taiwan. We examined mycorrhizal development and the associated fungi in this species. Nine plants were collected in a naturally regenerated forest in central Taiwan. The plants were genetically identical in their internal transcribed spacer (ITS region, and their sequences matched the known sequence for P. morrisonensis. Fine roots of each plant were colonized by mycorrhizal fungi that formed mycorrhizas either with or without fungal mantles. DNA sequences of the ITS region of these fungi suggested that they belonged to mycorrhizal taxa that are common tree symbionts. Among them, members of Thelephoraceae were the dominant taxon in the host plants. These results indicate that P. morrisonensis is intimately associated with mycorrhizal fungi that might also connect with neighboring trees.

  14. Duration and intensity of shade differentially affects mycorrhizal growth- and phosphorus uptake responses of Medicago truncatula

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinková, T.; Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Gryndler, M.; Jansa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, FEB 13 (2015), s. 1-11 ISSN 1664-462X Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis * light intensity * shading duration Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.495, year: 2015

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi counteract the Janzen-Connell effect of soil pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Etienne, Rampal S; Huang, Fengmin; Wang, Yongfan; Yu, Shixiao

    Soilborne pathogens can contribute to diversity maintenance in tree communities through the Janzen-Connell effect, whereby the pathogenic reduction of seedling performance attenuates with distance from conspecifics. By contrast, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been reported to promote

  16. A phenotypic plasticity framework for assessing intraspecific variation in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behm, J.E.; Kiers, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical models of ecosystem functioning based on species traits are valuable tools for predicting how nutrient cycling will respond to global change. However, species such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have evolved high intraspecific trait variation, making trait characterization and

  17. Effects of Microbiotic Soil Crust Organisms and Mycorrhizal Fungi on Seedling Growth of Blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pendleton, Rosemary

    1999-01-01

    .... A series of experiments conducted from 1993 to 1997 tested the effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of young blackbrush seedlings under a variety of soil nutrient conditions...

  18. 38 CFR 26.7 - VA environmental decision making and documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false VA environmental decision making and documents. 26.7 Section 26.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (VA) ACTIONS § 26.7 VA environmental decision making and document...

  19. 76 FR 24570 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... (Application for VA Education Benefits) Activity; Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA... Under the Montgomery GI Bill, VA Form 22-1990E. c. Application for VA Education Benefits Under the...

  20. 78 FR 18425 - Proposed Information Collection VA Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VA Police Officer Pre-Employment... Police Officer Pre-Employment Screening Checklist); Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Operations... approved collection. Abstract: VA personnel complete VA Form 0120 to document pre- employment history and...