WorldWideScience

Sample records for v-1 immunitor therapy

  1. Prominent R wave in ECG lead V1 predicts improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction after cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with or without left bundle branch block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Weeranun D; Bode, Michael F; Gettes, Leonard; Jensen, Brian C; Mounsey, John P; Chung, Eugene H

    2015-10-01

    QRS morphology on postprocedural ECG indicating posterolateral left ventricular pacing may be predictive of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The purpose of this study was to assess whether a positive vector in V1 and/or negative vector in lead I on the first postprocedural ECG, suggesting posterolateral capture from CRT, correlates with improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent CRT implantation at our institution between April 2008 and December 2011. Biventricular (BiV) paced QRS morphology was defined as R/S ≥1 in V1 and/or R/S ≤ 1 in lead I. The primary outcome was improvement of LVEF ≥7.5%. The χ(2) and t tests were used for analysis. Of 68 patients, 49 (72%) met our BiV paced QRS morphology criteria. Thirty-four of these 49 patients (69%) had improvement in LVEF. Of the 19 patients who did not meet our criteria, 17 (89%) did not have an improvement in LVEF (sensitivity 94%, specificity 53%, χ(2) = 19.04, P bundle branch block was not a predictor of echocardiographic response. Our results highlight the importance of periprocedural ECG analysis to optimize response to CRT. Moreover, patients without left bundle branch block still benefited from CRT if they met our BiV paced morphology criteria. This suggests that postprocedural left ventricular activation as reflected on the ECG may supersede the baseline conduction delay. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early, but not late therapy with a vasopressin V1a-antagonist ameliorates the development of renal damage after 5/6 nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Willemijn A K M; Tahara, Atsua; Kluppel, Alex C A; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H; van Dokkum, Richard P E

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vasopressin, mainly through the V1a-receptor, is thought to be a major player in the maintenance of hyperfiltration. Its inhibition could therefore lead to a decrease in progression of chronic renal failure. To this end, the effect of the vasopressin V1a-receptor-selective antagonist,

  3. Early, but not late therapy with a vasopressin V-1a-antagonist ameliorates the development of renal damage after 5/6 nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Willemijn A. K. M.; Tahara, Atsua; Kluppel, Alex C. A.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Henning, Robert H.; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Vasopressin, mainly through the VIA-receptor, is thought to be a major player in the maintenance of hyperfiltration. Its inhibition could therefore lead to a decrease in progression of chronic renal failure. To this end, the effect of the vasopressin V-1a-receptor-selective antagonist,

  4. Current treatment of early breast cancer: adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3l2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Miller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. The latest world cancer statistics calculated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC revealed that 1,677,000 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2012 and 577,000 died. The TNM classification of malignant tumor (TNM is the most commonly used staging system for breast cancer. Breast cancer is a group of very heterogeneous diseases. The molecular subtype of breast cancer carries important predictive and prognostic values, and thus has been incorporated in the basic initial process of breast cancer assessment/diagnosis. Molecular subtypes of breast cancers are divided into human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive (HER2 +, hormone receptor positive (estrogen or progesterone +, both positive, and triple negative breast cancer. By virtue of early detection via mammogram, the majority of breast cancers in developed parts of world are diagnosed in the early stage of the disease. Early stage breast cancers can be completely resected by surgery. Over time however, the disease may come back even after complete resection, which has prompted the development of an adjuvant therapy. Surgery followed by adjuvant treatment has been the gold standard for breast cancer treatment for a long time. More recently, neoadjuvant treatment has been recognized as an important strategy in biomarker and target evaluation. It is clinically indicated for patients with large tumor size, high nodal involvement, an inflammatory component, or for those wish to preserve remnant breast tissue. Here we review the most up to date conventional and developing treatments for different subtypes of early stage breast cancer.

  5. USEEIO v1.1 - Matrices

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides the basic building blocks for the USEEIO v1.1 model and life cycle results per $1 (2013 USD) demand for all goods and services in the model in...

  6. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) V1 dataset contains measurements of brightness temperature taken at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz, as well as MERRA 2 m wind...

  7. Silencing of atp6v1c1 prevents breast cancer growth and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shengmei; Zhu, Guochun; McConnell, Matthew; Deng, Lianfu; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Mengrui; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jinshen; Qi, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Atp6v1c1, a regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex, is up-regulated in metastatic oral tumors. Despite these studies, the function of Atp6v1c1 in tumor growth and metastasis is still unknown. Atp6v1c1's expression in metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma indicates that Atp6v1c1 has an important function in cancer growth and metastasis. We hypothesized that elevated expression of Atp6v1c1 is essential to cancer growth and metastasis and that Atp6v1c1 promotes cancer growth and metastasis through activation of V-ATPase activity. To test this hypothesis, a Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown approach was used to study the function of Atp6v1c1 in mouse 4T1 mammary tumor cell proliferation and migration in vitro and cancer growth and metastasis in vivo. Our data revealed that silencing of Atp6v1c1 in 4T1 cancer cells inhibited lysosomal acidification and severely impaired 4T1 cell growth, migration, and invasion through Matrigel in vitro. We also show that Atp6v1c1 knockdown with Lenti-c1s3, a lentivirus targeting Atp6v1c1 for shRNA mediated knockdown, can significantly inhibit 4T1 xenograft tumor growth, metastasis, and osteolytic lesions in vivo. Our study demonstrates that Atp6v1c1 may promote breast cancer growth and bone metastasis through regulation of lysosomal V-ATPase activity, indicating that Atp6v1c1 may be a viable target for breast cancer therapy and silencing of Atp6v1c1 may be an innovative therapeutic approach for the treatment and prevention of breast cancer growth and metastasis.

  8. Conditional differential cryptanalysis of 105 round Grain v1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banik, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose conditional differential cryptanalysis of 105 round Grain v1. This improves the attack proposed on 97 round Grain v1 by Knellwolf et al at Asiacrypt 2010. We take the help of the tool ΔGrain KSA, to track the differential trails introduced in the internal state of Grain v1...

  9. Targeting voltage gated sodium channels NaV1.7, Na V1.8, and Na V1.9 for treatment of pathological cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1-NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough.

  10. Conformational Flexibility Differentiates Naturally Occurring Bet v 1 Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grutsch, Sarina; Fuchs, Julian E; Ahammer, Linda; Kamenik, Anna S; Liedl, Klaus R; Tollinger, Martin

    2017-06-03

    The protein Bet v 1 represents the main cause for allergic reactions to birch pollen in Europe and North America. Structurally homologous isoforms of Bet v 1 can have different properties regarding allergic sensitization and Th2 polarization, most likely due to differential susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. Using NMR relaxation experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate that the initial proteolytic cleavage sites in two naturally occurring Bet v 1 isoforms, Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a) and Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d), are conformationally flexible. Inaccessible cleavage sites in helices and strands are highly flexible on the microsecond-millisecond time scale, whereas those located in loops display faster nanosecond-microsecond flexibility. The data consistently show that Bet v 1.0102 is more flexible and conformationally heterogeneous than Bet v 1.0101. Moreover, NMR hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements reveal that the backbone amides in Bet v 1.0102 are significantly more solvent exposed, in agreement with this isoform's higher susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. The differential conformational flexibility of Bet v 1 isoforms, along with the transient exposure of inaccessible sites to the protein surface, may be linked to proteolytic susceptibility, representing a potential structure-based rationale for the observed differences in Th2 polarization and allergic sensitization.

  11. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  12. Structural basis for capping protein sequestration by myotrophin (V-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Adam; Fujiwara, Ikuko; Hammer, John A; Tjandra, Nico

    2010-08-13

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric 62-kDa protein that binds the barbed end of the actin filament with high affinity to block further filament elongation. Myotrophin (V-1) is a 13-kDa ankyrin repeat-containing protein that binds CP tightly, sequestering it in a totally inactive complex in vitro. Here, we elucidate the molecular interaction between CP and V-1 by NMR. Specifically, chemical shift mapping and intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments reveal that the ankyrin loops of V-1, which are essential for V-1/CP interaction, bind the basic patch near the joint of the alpha tentacle of CP shown previously to drive most of the association of CP with and affinity for the barbed end. Consistently, site-directed mutagenesis of CP shows that V-1 and the strong electrostatic binding site for CP on the barbed end compete for this basic patch on CP. These results can explain how V-1 inactivates barbed end capping by CP and why V-1 is incapable of uncapping CP-capped actin filaments, the two signature biochemical activities of V-1.

  13. Regridded Harmonized World Soil Database v1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set describes select global soil parameters from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v1.2, including additional calculated parameters such...

  14. Structure and Organization of Computing (Draft v1)

    OpenAIRE

    Denning, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Overview of the CS field's structure including historical evolution, body of knowledge, great principles, and relationships with other fields.An article for CRC Handbook of Computer Science and Engineering DRAFT v1– 5/24/12

  15. Regridded Harmonized World Soil Database v1.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set describes select global soil parameters from the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) v1.2, including additional calculated parameters such as area...

  16. Proyecto Cali Río Pance. v.1

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia Serna, Mauricio; Becerra Cano, María Lourdes; Ortegón Flórez, Ronald; Caicedo Cardona, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Contenido: V.1 Salida de campo marzo 2009. -- V.2 Salida de campo semana santa 2009. -- V.3 Salida de campo a la reserva del Topacio. -- V.4 Recorrido del afluente 4. -- V.5 Salida de campo Grupo introducción a las ciencias ambientales 2009-2.

  17. 12om Methodology: Process v1.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    12om Methodology: Process v1.1 Prepared by: Thales Canada, Defence and Security 1405 boul. du Parc-Technologique Québec...have the approval or endorsement of the Department of National Defence of Canada. Thales Document Control Number (DCN): 2014C.005-REP-03-AT5 Rev. 01

  18. High-resolution eye tracking using V1 neuron activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, James M.; Bondy, Adrian G.; Cumming, Bruce G.; Butts, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of high-acuity visual cortical processing have been limited by the inability to track eye position with sufficient accuracy to precisely reconstruct the visual stimulus on the retina. As a result, studies on primary visual cortex (V1) have been performed almost entirely on neurons outside the high-resolution central portion of the visual field (the fovea). Here we describe a procedure for inferring eye position using multi-electrode array recordings from V1 coupled with nonlinear stimulus processing models. We show that this method can be used to infer eye position with one arc-minute accuracy – significantly better than conventional techniques. This allows for analysis of foveal stimulus processing, and provides a means to correct for eye-movement induced biases present even outside the fovea. This method could thus reveal critical insights into the role of eye movements in cortical coding, as well as their contribution to measures of cortical variability. PMID:25197783

  19. Ongoing Slow Fluctuations in V1 Impact on Visual Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afra Maria Wohlschläger

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human brain’s ongoing activity is characterized by intrinsic networks of coherent fluctuations, measured for example with correlated functional magnetic resonance imaging signals. So far, however, the brain processes underlying this ongoing blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal orchestration and their direct relevance for human behavior are not sufficiently understood. In this study, we address the question of whether and how ongoing BOLD activity within intrinsic occipital networks impacts on conscious visual perception. To this end, backwardly masked targets were presented in participants’ left visual field only, leaving the ipsi-lateral occipital areas entirely free from direct effects of task throughout the experiment. Signal time courses of ipsi-lateral BOLD fluctuations in visual areas V1 and V2 were then used as proxies for the ongoing contra-lateral BOLD activity within the bilateral networks. Magnitude and phase of these fluctuations were compared in trials with and without conscious visual perception, operationalized by means of subjective confidence ratings. Our results show that ipsi-lateral BOLD magnitudes in V1 were significantly higher at times of peak response when the target was perceived consciously. A significant difference between conscious and non-conscious perception with regard to the pre-target phase of an intrinsic-frequency regime suggests that ongoing V1 fluctuations exert a decisive impact on the access to consciousness already before stimulation. Both effects were absent in V2. These results thus support the notion that ongoing slow BOLD activity within intrinsic networks covering V1 represents localized processes that modulate the degree of readiness for the emergence of visual consciousness.

  20. A neurodynamical model of brightness induction in v1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Penacchio

    Full Text Available Brightness induction is the modulation of the perceived intensity of an area by the luminance of surrounding areas. Recent neurophysiological evidence suggests that brightness information might be explicitly represented in V1, in contrast to the more common assumption that the striate cortex is an area mostly responsive to sensory information. Here we investigate possible neural mechanisms that offer a plausible explanation for such phenomenon. To this end, a neurodynamical model which is based on neurophysiological evidence and focuses on the part of V1 responsible for contextual influences is presented. The proposed computational model successfully accounts for well known psychophysical effects for static contexts and also for brightness induction in dynamic contexts defined by modulating the luminance of surrounding areas. This work suggests that intra-cortical interactions in V1 could, at least partially, explain brightness induction effects and reveals how a common general architecture may account for several different fundamental processes, such as visual saliency and brightness induction, which emerge early in the visual processing pathway.

  1. Homoeologous Recombination of the V1r1-V1r2 Gene Cluster of Pheromone Receptors in an Allotetraploid Lineage of Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to other olfactory receptor families that exhibit frequent lineage-specific expansions, the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R family exhibits a canonical six-member repertoire in teleosts. V1r1 and V1r2 are present in no more than one copy in all examined teleosts, including salmons, which are ancient polyploids, implying strict evolutionary constraints. However, recent polyploids have not been examined. Here, we identified a young allotetraploid lineage of weatherfishes and investigated their V1r1-V1r2 cluster. We found a novel pattern that the parental V1r1-V1r2 clusters had recombined in the tetraploid genome and that the recombinant was nearly fixed in the tetraploid population. Subsequent analyses suggested strong selective pressure, for both a new combination of paralogs and homogeneity among gene duplicates, acting on the V1r1-V1r2 pair.

  2. METEOR v1.0 - User's Guide; METEOR v1.0 - Guia de Usuarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script is a User's Guide for the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  3. METEOR v1.0 - A usage example; METEOR v1.0 - Un ejemplo de uso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes a detailed example of the use of the software package METEOR for statistical analysis of meteorological data series. A real spanish meteorological data set is chosen to show the capabilities of METEOR. Output files and resultant plots provided of their interpretations are compiled in three appendixes. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph. D.Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds the graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written is spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v1 .0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  4. Sequence Handling by Sequence Analysis Toolbox v1.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, Christian Ravnsborg; Matthiesen, Rune; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2006-01-01

    The fact that mass spectrometry have become a high-throughput method calls for bioinformatic tools for automated sequence handling and prediction. For efficient use of bioinformatic tools, it is important that these tools are integrated or interfaced with each other. The purpose of sequence...... analysis toolbox v1.0 was to have a general purpose sequence analyzing tool that can import sequences obtained by high-throughput sequencing methods. The program includes algorithms for calculation or prediction of isoelectric point, hydropathicity index, transmembrane segments, and glycosylphosphatidyl...

  5. Targeting Voltage Gated Sodium Channels NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 for Treatment of Pathological Cough

    OpenAIRE

    Muroi, Yukiko; Undem, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1–NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively bloc...

  6. ESMO - Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale V.1.0 questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; Piccart, M J; Bogaerts, J; Tabernero, J; Latino, N J; de Vries, E G E

    2016-01-01

    The ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS) is a standardised, generic, validated tool to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anticancer therapies. The ESMO-MCBS is intended to both assist oncologists in explaining the likely benefits of a particular treatment to their patients as well as to aid public health decision makers' prioritise therapies for reimbursement. From its inception the ESMO-MCBS Working Group has invited questions and critiques to promote understanding and to address misunderstandings regarding the nuanced use of the scale, and to identify shortcomings in the scale to be addressed in future planned revisions and updates. The ESMO-MCBS V.1.0 has attracted many questions regarding its development, structure and potential applications. These questions, together with responses from the ESMO-MCBS Working Group, have been edited and collated, and are herein presented as a supplementary resource.

  7. Practising orientation identification improves orientation coding in V1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoups, A; Vogels, R; Qian, N; Orban, G

    2001-08-02

    The adult brain shows remarkable plasticity, as demonstrated by the improvement in fine sensorial discriminations after intensive practice. The behavioural aspects of such perceptual learning are well documented, especially in the visual system. Specificity for stimulus attributes clearly implicates an early cortical site, where receptive fields retain fine selectivity for these attributes; however, the neuronal correlates of a simple visual discrimination task remained unidentified. Here we report electrophysiological correlates in the primary visual cortex (V1) of monkeys for learning orientation identification. We link the behavioural improvement in this type of learning to an improved neuronal performance of trained compared to naive neurons. Improved long-term neuronal performance resulted from changes in the characteristics of orientation tuning of individual neurons. More particularly, the slope of the orientation tuning curve that was measured at the trained orientation increased only for the subgroup of trained neurons most likely to code the orientation identified by the monkey. No modifications of the tuning curve were observed for orientations for which the monkey had not been trained. Thus training induces a specific and efficient increase in neuronal sensitivity in V1.

  8. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-01-01

    ... sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology.

  9. Targeting Voltage Gated Sodium Channels NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9 for Treatment of Pathological Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) lead to the rational hypothesis that drugs capable of selective blockade of NaV subtypes may be a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of unwanted cough. Among the nine NaV subtypes (NaV1.1–NaV1.9), the afferent nerves involved in initiating cough, in common with nociceptive neurons in the somatosensory system, express mainly NaV1.7, NaV1.8, and NaV1.9. Although knowledge about the effect of selectively blocking these channels on the cough reflex is limited, their biophysical properties indicate that each may contribute to the hypertussive and allotussive state that typifies subacute and chronic nonproductive cough. PMID:24272479

  10. Targeting Atp6v1c1 Prevents Inflammation and Bone Erosion Caused by Periodontitis and Reveals Its Critical Function in Osteoimmunology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects a majority of adult Americans and is associated with other systemic diseases, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this pervasive and destructive disease. In this study, we utilized novel adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown gene therapy to treat bone erosion and inflammatory caused by periodontitis in mouse model. Atp6v1c1 is a subunit of the V-ATPase complex and regulator of the assembly of the V0 and V1 domains of the V-ATPase complex. We demonstrated previously that Atp6v1c1 has an essential function in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. We hypothesized that Atp6v1c1 may be an ideal target to prevent the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis. To test the hypothesis, we employed AAV RNAi knockdown of Atp6v1c1 gene expression to prevent bone erosion and gingival inflammation simultaneously. We found that lesion-specific injection of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 into the periodontal disease lesions protected against bone erosion (>85% and gingival inflammation caused by P. gingivalis W50 infection. AAV-mediated Atp6v1c1 knockdown dramatically reduced osteoclast numbers and inhibited the infiltration of dendritic cells and macrophages in the bacteria-induced inflammatory lesions in periodontitis. Silencing of Atp6v1c1 expression also prevented the expressions of osteoclast-related genes and pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Our data suggests that AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 treatment can significantly attenuate the bone erosion and inflammation caused by periodontitis, indicating the dual function of AAV-shRNA-Atp6v1c1 as an inhibitor of bone erosion mediated by osteoclasts, and as an inhibitor of inflammation through down-regulation of pro

  11. Cellular localization and kinetic properties of Na(V)1.9-, Na(V)1.8-, and Na(V)1.7-like channel subtypes in Helix pomatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; László, Z; Pirger, Z

    2012-02-17

    This article concerns the kinetics, selectivity, and distribution of the Na(V)1.9, Na(V)1.8, and Na(V)1.7 channel subtypes in the CNS of the snail, Helix pomatia. Within the snail brain, Na(V)1.9- and Na(V)1.8-like channel subtypes are widely expressed, with particularly high levels in the pedal, cerebral, and buccal ganglia. The suboesophageal ganglion contains equal amounts of neurons labeled with Na(V)1.9, 1.8, and 1.7 antibodies. Our data show that different types of ion channels are localized to discrete neurons and regions of the neuronal membrane affecting by this way the physiology of synaptic transmission or nerve conduction. Based on the voltage dependence and kinetics, the non- or slowly inactivating currents were observed in identified and nonidentified neurons of the snail CNS attributed to separate Na-channel subtypes. These observations provide the first evidence for the presence of the composite Na-current in snail neurons. The significance of Na(V)1.9 channels in gastropod neurons is assigned to regulating the subthreshold membrane depolarization. First time, we have demonstrated that in addition to the Na(V)1.2-like channels most of the neurons contain Na(V)1.8- or 1.7-like channels carrying the composite inward sodium current. In this way, neurons containing different sets of channels differently are regulated, which allows further dynamic modulation of neuronal activity. The neuronal soma membrane revealed low ion selectivity of the Na-channels with slow kinetics, which is a general property of gastropod molluscs. In addition, the relative similarity of the biophysical properties of voltage-gated currents between vertebrates and invertebrates may reflect a structural similarity existing between Na-channel subtypes pointing to a common evolutionary origin. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 are expressed in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Brendan J; Caldwell, John H; Ehring, George R; Bumsted O'Brien, Keely M; Luo, Songjiang; Levinson, S Rock

    2008-06-20

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are one of the fundamental building blocks of electrically excitable cells in the nervous system. These channels are responsible for the generation of action potentials that are required for the communication of neuronal signals over long distances within a cell. VGSCs are encoded by a family of nine genes whose products have widely varying biophysical properties. In this study, we have detected the expression of two atypical VGSCs (Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9) in the retina. Compared with more common VGSCs, Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 have unusual biophysical and pharmacological properties, including persistent sodium currents and resistance to the canonical sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX). Our molecular biological and immunohistochemical data derived from mouse (Mus musculus) retina demonstrate expression of Na(v)1.8 by retinal amacrine and ganglion cells, whereas Na(v)1.9 is expressed by photoreceptors and Müller glia. The fact that these channels exist in the central nervous system (CNS) and exhibit robust TTX resistance requires a re-evaluation of prior physiological, pharmacological, and developmental data in the visual system, in which the diversity of VGSCs has been previously underestimated. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Isolation of a high affinity Bet v 1-specific IgG-derived ScFv from a subject vaccinated with hypoallergenic Bet v 1 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadermaier, Elisabeth; Marth, Katharina; Lupinek, Christian; Campana, Raffaela; Hofer, Gerhard; Blatt, Katharina; Smiljkovic, Dubravka; Roder, Uwe; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Vrtala, Susanne; Keller, Walter; Valent, Peter; Valenta, Rudolf; Flicker, Sabine

    2018-01-09

    Recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives have been used in clinical immunotherapy studies and clinical efficacy seems to be related to the induction of blocking IgG antibodies recognizing the wild type allergens. However, so far no treatment-induced IgG antibodies have been characterized. To clone, express and characterize IgG antibodies induced by vaccination with two hypoallergenic recombinant fragments of the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1 in a non-allergic subject. A phage-displayed combinatorial single chain fragment (ScFv) library was constructed from blood of the immunized subject and screened for Bet v 1-reactive antibody fragments. ScFvs were tested for specificity and cross-reactivity to native Bet v 1 and related pollen and food allergens and epitope mapping was performed. Germline ancestor genes of the antibody were analyzed with the ImMunoGeneTics (IMGT) database. The affinity to Bet v 1 and cross-reactive allergens was determined by surface plasmon resonance measurements. The ability to inhibit patients' IgE binding to ELISA plate-bound allergens and allergen-induced basophil activation was assessed. A combinatorial ScFv library was obtained from the vaccinated donor after three injections with the Bet v 1 fragments. Despite being almost in germline configuration, ScFv (clone H3-1) reacted with high affinity to native Bet v 1 and homologous allergens, inhibited allergic patients' polyclonal IgE binding to Bet v 1 and partially suppressed allergen-induced basophil activation. Immunization with unfolded hypoallergenic allergen derivatives induces high affinity antibodies even in non-allergic subjects which recognize the folded wild-type allergens and inhibit polyclonal IgE binding of allergic patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. NMR resonance assignments of a hypoallergenic isoform of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahammer, Linda; Grutsch, Sarina; Wallner, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima; Tollinger, Martin

    2017-10-01

    In Northern America and Europe a great number of people are suffering from birch pollen allergy and pollen related food allergies. The trigger for these immunological reactions is the 17.5 kDa major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, which belongs to the family of PR-10 (pathogenesis-related) proteins. In nature, Bet v 1 occurs as a mixture of various isoforms that possess different immunological properties despite their high sequence identities. Bet v 1.0102 (Bet v 1d), which is investigated here, is a hypoallergenic isoform of Bet v 1 and a potential candidate for allergen-specific immunotherapy. We assigned the backbone and side chain 1H, 13C and 15N resonances of this protein and predicted its secondary structure. The NMR-chemical shift data indicate that Bet v 1.0102 is composed of three α-helices and a seven stranded β-sheet, in agreement with the known structure of the hyperallergenic isoform Bet v 1.0101 (Bet v 1a). Our resonance assignments create the foundation for detailed characterization of the dynamic properties of Bet v 1 isoforms by NMR relaxation measurements.

  15. Adaptive gain modulation in V1 explains contextual modifications during bisection learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Schäfer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The neuronal processing of visual stimuli in primary visual cortex (V1 can be modified by perceptual training. Training in bisection discrimination, for instance, changes the contextual interactions in V1 elicited by parallel lines. Before training, two parallel lines inhibit their individual V1-responses. After bisection training, inhibition turns into non-symmetric excitation while performing the bisection task. Yet, the receptive field of the V1 neurons evaluated by a single line does not change during task performance. We present a model of recurrent processing in V1 where the neuronal gain can be modulated by a global attentional signal. Perceptual learning mainly consists in strengthening this attentional signal, leading to a more effective gain modulation. The model reproduces both the psychophysical results on bisection learning and the modified contextual interactions observed in V1 during task performance. It makes several predictions, for instance that imagery training should improve the performance, or that a slight stimulus wiggling can strongly affect the representation in V1 while performing the task. We conclude that strengthening a top-down induced gain increase can explain perceptual learning, and that this top-down signal can modify lateral interactions within V1, without significantly changing the classical receptive field of V1 neurons.

  16. Aberrant Splicing Induced by Dysregulated Rbfox2 Produces Enhanced Function of CaV1.2 Calcium Channel and Vascular Myogenic Tone in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Fan, Jia; Zhu, Huayuan; Ji, Li; Fan, Wenyong; Kapoor, Isha; Wang, Yue; Wang, Yuan; Zhu, Guoqing; Wang, Juejin

    2017-12-01

    Calcium influx from activated voltage-gated calcium channel Ca V 1.2 in vascular smooth muscle cells is indispensable for maintaining myogenic tone and blood pressure. The function of Ca V 1.2 channel can be optimized by alternative splicing, one of post-transcriptional modification mechanisms. The splicing factor Rbfox2 is known to regulate the Ca V 1.2 pre-mRNA alternative splicing events during neuronal development. However, Rbfox2's roles in modulating the key function of vascular Ca V 1.2 channel and in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain elusive. Here, we report that the proportion of Ca V 1.2 channels with alternative exon 9* is increased by 10.3%, whereas that with alternative exon 33 is decreased by 10.5% in hypertensive arteries. Surprisingly, the expression level of Rbfox2 is increased ≈3-folds, presumably because of the upregulation of a dominant-negative isoform of Rbfox2. In vascular smooth muscle cells, we find that knockdown of Rbfox2 dynamically increases alternative exon 9*, whereas decreases exon 33 inclusion of Ca V 1.2 channels. By patch-clamp studies, we show that diminished Rbfox2-induced alternative splicing shifts the steady-state activation and inactivation curves of vascular Ca V 1.2 calcium channel to hyperpolarization, which makes the window current potential to more negative. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rbfox2 increases the pressure-induced vascular myogenic tone of rat mesenteric artery. Taken together, our data indicate that Rbfox2 modulates the functions of vascular Ca V 1.2 calcium channel by dynamically regulating the expressions of alternative exons 9* and 33, which in turn affects the vascular myogenic tone. Therefore, our work suggests a key role for Rbfox2 in hypertension, which provides a rational basis for designing antihypertensive therapies. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Folded or Not? Tracking Bet v 1 Conformation in Recombinant Allergen Preparations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Husslik

    Full Text Available Recombinant Bet v 1a (rBet v 1a has been used in allergy research for more than three decades, including clinical application of so-called hypoallergens. Quantitative IgE binding to rBet v 1a depends on its native protein conformation, which might be compromised upon heterologous expression, purification, or mutational engineering of rBet v 1a.To correlate experimental/theoretical comparisons of IgE binding of defined molar ratios of folded/misfolded recombinant Bet v 1a variants and to determine accuracy and precision of immuno- and physicochemical assays routinely used to assess the quality of recombinant allergen preparations.rBet v 1a and its misfolded variant rBet v 1aS112P/R145P were heterologously expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. Structural integrities and oligomerisation of the recombinant allergens were evaluated by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR, circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS. IgE binding of defined combinations of rBet v 1a and rBet v 1aS112P/R145P was assessed using immunoblotting (IB, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and mediator release (MR of humanized rat basophilic leukemia cells sensitized with serum IgE of subjects allergic to birch pollen. Experimental and theoretically expected results of the analyses were compared.1H-NMR spectra of rBet v 1a and rBet v 1aS112P/R145P demonstrate a native and highly disordered protein conformations, respectively. The CD spectra suggested typical alpha-helical and beta-sheet secondary structure content of rBet v 1a and random coil for rBet v 1aS112P/R145P. The hydrodynamic radii (RH of 2.49 ± 0.39 nm (rBet v 1a and 3.1 ± 0.56 nm (rBet v 1aS112P/R145P showed monomeric dispersion of both allergens in solution. Serum IgE of birch pollen allergic subjects bound to 0.1% rBet v 1a in the presence of 99.9% of non-IgE binding rBet v 1aS112P/R145P. Immunoblot analysis overestimated, whereas ELISA and mediator release assay

  18. Properties of V1 neurons tuned to conjunctions of visual features: application of the V1 saliency hypothesis to visual search behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhaoping

    Full Text Available From a computational theory of V1, we formulate an optimization problem to investigate neural properties in the primary visual cortex (V1 from human reaction times (RTs in visual search. The theory is the V1 saliency hypothesis that the bottom-up saliency of any visual location is represented by the highest V1 response to it relative to the background responses. The neural properties probed are those associated with the less known V1 neurons tuned simultaneously or conjunctively in two feature dimensions. The visual search is to find a target bar unique in color (C, orientation (O, motion direction (M, or redundantly in combinations of these features (e.g., CO, MO, or CM among uniform background bars. A feature singleton target is salient because its evoked V1 response largely escapes the iso-feature suppression on responses to the background bars. The responses of the conjunctively tuned cells are manifested in the shortening of the RT for a redundant feature target (e.g., a CO target from that predicted by a race between the RTs for the two corresponding single feature targets (e.g., C and O targets. Our investigation enables the following testable predictions. Contextual suppression on the response of a CO-tuned or MO-tuned conjunctive cell is weaker when the contextual inputs differ from the direct inputs in both feature dimensions, rather than just one. Additionally, CO-tuned cells and MO-tuned cells are often more active than the single feature tuned cells in response to the redundant feature targets, and this occurs more frequently for the MO-tuned cells such that the MO-tuned cells are no less likely than either the M-tuned or O-tuned neurons to be the most responsive neuron to dictate saliency for an MO target.

  19. 26 CFR 1.414(v)-1 - Catch-up contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...(v)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(v)-1 Catch-up contributions... applicable employer plan to comply with the universal availability requirement of section 414(v)(4). The...

  20. USEEIO v1.1 - Elementary Flows and Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) Characterization Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset is part of the USEEIO v1.1 model release. It provides the elementary flows used in the USEEIO v1.1 Satellite Tables (DOI: 10.23719/1365565) and their...

  1. Vasopressin receptors V1a and V2 are not osmosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kasper Lykke; Assentoft, Mette; Fenton, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    that was, however, independent of hyperosmotic challenges. Similarly, the cAMP production by the V2R was unaffected by hyperosmotic challenges although, in contrast to the V1aR, the V2R displayed an ability to support alternative signaling (IP production) at higher concentration of vasopressin. V1aR and V2...

  2. Subcellular localization and internalization of the vasopressin V1B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwazaki, Aki; Fujiwara, Yoko; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Nobuya; Shibata, Katsushi; Koshimizu, Taka-aki

    2015-10-15

    Only limited information is available on agonist-dependent changes in the subcellular localization of vasopressin V1B receptors. Our radioligand binding study of membrane preparations and intact cells revealed that a large fraction of the V1B receptor is located in the cytoplasm in unstimulated CHO cells, which is in contrast to the plasma membrane localization of the V1A and V2 receptors. Moreover, when the affinity of radiolabeled arginine-vasopressin ([3H]AVP) was compared between membrane preparations and intact cells, the affinity of [3H]AVP to the cell surface V1B receptors, but not the V1A receptors, was significantly reduced. Although the number and affinity of cell surface V1B receptors decreased, they became extensively internalized upon binding with [3H]AVP. Approximately 87% of cell surface-bound [3H]AVP was internalized and became resistant to acid wash during incubation with 1 nM [3H]AVP. By contrast, less ligand (35%) was internalized in the cells expressing the V1A receptor. Extensive internalization of the V1B receptors was partially attenuated by inhibitors of cytoskeletal proteins, siRNA against β-arrestin 2, or the removal of sodium chloride from the extracellular buffer, indicating that this internalization involves clathrin-coated pits. Together, these results indicate that the mechanism that regulates the number and affinity of V1B receptors in the plasma membrane is markedly distinct from the corresponding mechanisms for the V1A and V2 receptors and plays a critical role under stress conditions, when vasopressin release is augmented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Membrane permeable local anesthetics modulate NaV1.5 mechanosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyder, Arthur; Strege, Peter R.; Bernard, Cheryl; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium selective ion channel NaV1.5 is expressed in the heart and the gastrointestinal tract, which are mechanically active organs. NaV1.5 is mechanosensitive at stimuli that gate other mechanosensitive ion channels. Local anesthetic and antiarrhythmic drugs act upon NaV1.5 to modulate activity by multiple mechanisms. This study examined whether NaV1.5 mechanosensitivity is modulated by local anesthetics. NaV1.5 channels wereexpressed in HEK-293 cells, and mechanosensitivity was tested in cell-attached and excised inside-out configurations. Using a novel protocol with paired voltage ladders and short pressure pulses, negative patch pressure (-30 mmHg) in both configurations produced a hyperpolarizing shift in the half-point of the voltage-dependence of activation (V1/2a) and inactivation (V1/2i) by about -10 mV. Lidocaine (50 µM) inhibited the pressure-induced shift of V1/2a but not V1/2i. Lidocaine inhibited the tonic increase in pressure-induced peak current in a use-dependence protocol, but it did not otherwise affect use-dependent block. The local anesthetic benzocaine, which does not show use-dependent block, also effectively blocked a pressure-induced shift in V1/2a. Lidocaine inhibited mechanosensitivity in NaV1.5 at the local anesthetic binding site mutated (F1760A). However, a membrane impermeable lidocaine analog QX-314 did not affect mechanosensitivity of F1760A NaV1.5 when applied from either side of the membrane. These data suggest that the mechanism of lidocaine inhibition of the pressure-induced shift in the half-point of voltage-dependence of activation is separate from the mechanisms of use-dependent block. Modulation of NaV1.5 mechanosensitivity by the membrane permeable local anesthetics may require hydrophobic access and may involve membrane-protein interactions. PMID:22874086

  4. Dynamic evolution of V1R putative pheromone receptors between Mus musculus and Mus spretus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzweil, Vanessa C; Getman, Mike; Green, Eric D; Lane, Robert P

    2009-01-01

    Background The mammalian vomeronasal organ (VNO) expresses two G-protein coupled receptor gene families that mediate pheromone responses, the V1R and V2R receptor genes. In rodents, there are ~150 V1R genes comprising 12 subfamilies organized in gene clusters at multiple chromosomal locations. Previously, we showed that several of these subfamilies had been extensively modulated by gene duplications, deletions, and gene conversions around the time of the evolutionary split of the mouse and rat lineages, consistent with the hypothesis that V1R repertoires might be involved in reinforcing speciation events. Here, we generated genome sequence for one large cluster containing two V1R subfamilies in Mus spretus, a closely related and sympatric species to Mus musculus, and investigated evolutionary change in these repertoires along the two mouse lineages. Results We describe a comparison of spretus and musculus with respect to genome organization and synteny, as well as V1R gene content and phylogeny, with reference to previous observations made between mouse and rat. Unlike the mouse-rat comparisons, synteny seems to be largely conserved between the two mouse species. Disruption of local synteny is generally associated with differences in repeat content, although these differences appear to arise more from deletion than new integrations. Even though unambiguous V1R orthology is evident, we observe dynamic modulation of the functional repertoires, with two of seven V1Rb and one of eleven V1Ra genes lost in spretus, two V1Ra genes becoming pseudogenes in musculus, two additional orthologous pairs apparently subject to strong adaptive selection, and another divergent orthologous pair that apparently was subjected to gene conversion. Conclusion Therefore, eight of the 18 (~44%) presumptive V1Ra/V1Rb genes in the musculus-spretus ancestor appear to have undergone functional modulation since these two species diverged. As compared to the rat-mouse split, where modulation is

  5. Dynamic evolution of V1R putative pheromone receptors between Mus musculus and Mus spretus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getman Mike

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian vomeronasal organ (VNO expresses two G-protein coupled receptor gene families that mediate pheromone responses, the V1R and V2R receptor genes. In rodents, there are ~150 V1R genes comprising 12 subfamilies organized in gene clusters at multiple chromosomal locations. Previously, we showed that several of these subfamilies had been extensively modulated by gene duplications, deletions, and gene conversions around the time of the evolutionary split of the mouse and rat lineages, consistent with the hypothesis that V1R repertoires might be involved in reinforcing speciation events. Here, we generated genome sequence for one large cluster containing two V1R subfamilies in Mus spretus, a closely related and sympatric species to Mus musculus, and investigated evolutionary change in these repertoires along the two mouse lineages. Results We describe a comparison of spretus and musculus with respect to genome organization and synteny, as well as V1R gene content and phylogeny, with reference to previous observations made between mouse and rat. Unlike the mouse-rat comparisons, synteny seems to be largely conserved between the two mouse species. Disruption of local synteny is generally associated with differences in repeat content, although these differences appear to arise more from deletion than new integrations. Even though unambiguous V1R orthology is evident, we observe dynamic modulation of the functional repertoires, with two of seven V1Rb and one of eleven V1Ra genes lost in spretus, two V1Ra genes becoming pseudogenes in musculus, two additional orthologous pairs apparently subject to strong adaptive selection, and another divergent orthologous pair that apparently was subjected to gene conversion. Conclusion Therefore, eight of the 18 (~44% presumptive V1Ra/V1Rb genes in the musculus-spretus ancestor appear to have undergone functional modulation since these two species diverged. As compared to the rat

  6. ST-segment elevation in V1-V4 in acute pulmonary embolism: a case presentation and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R

    2016-12-01

    Electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities are seen in 70%-80% of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). Rarely, APE presents with ST-segment elevation (STE) in leads V1-V4, mimicking ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Herein, we describe a case of APE presenting with STE in V1-V3, along with a comprehensive review of the literature. We reviewed Pubmed/Medline indexed articles from 1950 to 2014 reporting cases of APE presenting with STE in V1-V3 or V4 (V1-V3/V4). Cases were analyzed with specific reference to patient demographics, clinical, laboratory, and radiological data, treatment, and outcome. A total of 12 cases were identified comprising seven males and five females aged between 31 and 64 years. Five cases met the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association criteria for massive APE due to sustained hemodynamic instability or requirement for inotropic support, and seven met criteria for submassive PE due to right ventricular (RV) dysfunction or elevated troponin in absence of systemic hypotension. Among the notable clinical features in this cohort is the high incidence of syncope, in 66.7% of the cases, high incidence of concomitant deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in 90% of cases that reported venous Doppler results (eight proximal and one distal DVT), and the presence of a dilated RV in 90% of the cases that reported echocardiographic results. In all but one case the initial working diagnosis was STEMI and emergent cardiac catheterization was planned. In the 90% of cases who eventually had a coronary angiography, the angiogram was performed prior to diagnosing APE, and the lack of occlusive disease prompted further workup that confirmed the diagnosis of APE. In-hospital mortality rate in the studied population was 16.7%. STE in leads V1-V3/V4 in cases with APE identifies a subset of patients who are an intermediate to high risk category. In cases presenting with right precordial lead STE and clinical features that are more

  7. More Functional V1R Genes Occur in Nest-Living and Nocturnal Terricolous Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Shi, Peng; Zhu, Zhouhai; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2010-01-01

    Size of the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R) gene repertoire may be a good indicator for examining the relationship between animal genomes and their environmental niche specialization, especially the relationship between ecological factors and the molecular evolutionary history of the sensory system. Recently, Young et al. (Young JM, Massa HF, Hsu L, Trask BJ. 2009. Extreme variability among mammalian V1R gene families. Genome Res.) concluded that no single ecological factor could explain the extreme variability of the V1R gene repertoire in mammalian genomes. In contrast, we found a significant positive correlation between the size and percentage of intact V1R genes in 32 species that represent the phylogenetic diversity of terricolous mammals and two ecological factors: spatial activity and rhythm activity. Nest-living species possessed a greater number of intact V1R genes than open-living species, and nocturnal terricolous mammals tended to possess more intact V1R genes than did diurnal species. Moreover, our analysis reveals that the evolutionary mechanisms underlying these observations likely resulted from the rapid gene birth and accelerated amino acid substitutions in nest-living and nocturnal mammals, likely a functional requirement for exploiting narrow, dark environments. Taken together, these results reveal how adaptation to divergent circadian rhythms and spatial activity were manifested at the genomic scale. Size of the V1R gene family might have indicated how this gene family adapts to ecological factors. PMID:20624732

  8. Molecular Evolutionary Characterization of a V1R Subfamily Unique to Strepsirrhine Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Anne D.; Chan, Lauren M.; dos Reis, Mario; Larsen, Peter A.; Campbell, C. Ryan; Rasoloarison, Rodin; Barrett, Meredith; Roos, Christian; Kappeler, Peter; Bielawski, Joseph; Yang, Ziheng

    2014-01-01

    Vomeronasal receptor genes have frequently been invoked as integral to the establishment and maintenance of species boundaries among mammals due to the elaborate one-to-one correspondence between semiochemical signals and neuronal sensory inputs. Here, we report the most extensive sample of vomeronasal receptor class 1 (V1R) sequences ever generated for a diverse yet phylogenetically coherent group of mammals, the tooth-combed primates (suborder Strepsirrhini). Phylogenetic analysis confirms our intensive sampling from a single V1R subfamily, apparently unique to the strepsirrhine primates. We designate this subfamily as V1Rstrep. The subfamily retains extensive repertoires of gene copies that descend from an ancestral gene duplication that appears to have occurred prior to the diversification of all lemuriform primates excluding the basal genus Daubentonia (the aye-aye). We refer to the descendent clades as V1Rstrep-α and V1Rstrep-β. Comparison of the two clades reveals different amino acid compositions corresponding to the predicted ligand-binding site and thus potentially to altered functional profiles between the two. In agreement with previous studies of the mouse lemur (genus, Microcebus), the majority of V1Rstrep gene copies appear to be intact and under strong positive selection, particularly within transmembrane regions. Finally, despite the surprisingly high number of gene copies identified in this study, it is nonetheless probable that V1R diversity remains underestimated in these nonmodel primates and that complete characterization will be limited until high-coverage assembled genomes are available. PMID:24398377

  9. Beneficial effects of bumetanide in a CaV1.1-R528H mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Cannon, Stephen C

    2013-12-01

    Transient attacks of weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis are caused by reduced fibre excitability from paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential in low potassium. Mutations of calcium channel and sodium channel genes have been identified as the underlying molecular defects that cause instability of the resting potential. Despite these scientific advances, therapeutic options remain limited. In a mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis from a sodium channel mutation (NaV1.4-R669H), we recently showed that inhibition of chloride influx with bumetanide reduced the susceptibility to attacks of weakness, in vitro. The R528H mutation in the calcium channel gene (CACNA1S encoding CaV1.1) is the most common cause of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. We developed a CaV1.1-R528H knock-in mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis and show herein that bumetanide protects against both muscle weakness from low K+ challenge in vitro and loss of muscle excitability in vivo from a glucose plus insulin infusion. This work demonstrates the critical role of the chloride gradient in modulating the susceptibility to ictal weakness and establishes bumetanide as a potential therapy for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis arising from either NaV1.4 or CaV1.1 mutations.

  10. The vasopressin V1b receptor modulates plasma corticosterone responses to dehydration-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E M; Pope, G R; Newson, M J F; Lolait, S J; O'Carroll, A-M

    2011-01-01

    Vasopressin V1b receptor knockout (V1b⁻/⁻) mice were used to investigate a putative role for the V1b receptor (V1bR) in fluid regulation and in the hypothalamic-neurohypophysial system (HNS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to osmotic stress induced by water deprivation (WD). Male wild-type and V1b⁻/⁻ mice were housed in metabolic cages to allow determination of water intake and urine volume and osmolality. When provided with food and water ad lib., spontaneous urine volume and urine osmolality did not differ between genotypes. Similarly, WD for 24 h caused comparable decreases in urine volume and increases in urine osmolality irrespective of genotype. WD resulted in an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration in wild-type animals; however, this WD-induced increase in plasma corticosterone was significantly attenuated in V1b⁻/⁻ mice. Comparable increases in neuronal activation, indicated by increased c-fos mRNA expression, and in vasopressin mRNA expression occurred in both the supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of wild-type and V1b⁻/⁻ mice following WD; however, the WD-induced decrease in corticotrophin-releasing hormone mRNA expression seen in the PVN of wild-type mice was not observed in the PVN of V1b⁻/⁻ mice. These data suggest that, although the vasopressin V1bR is not required for normal HNS function, it is necessary for a full HPA-axis response to the osmotic stress of WD. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Touska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatoxins (CTXs are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1 into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX reduce CGRP release by 53–75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC. Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  12. Ciguatoxins Evoke Potent CGRP Release by Activation of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtypes NaV1.9, NaV1.7 and NaV1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touska, Filip; Sattler, Simon; Malsch, Philipp; Lewis, Richard J; Reeh, Peter W; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2017-08-30

    Ciguatoxins (CTXs) are marine toxins that cause ciguatera fish poisoning, a debilitating disease dominated by sensory and neurological disturbances that include cold allodynia and various painful symptoms as well as long-lasting pruritus. Although CTXs are known as the most potent mammalian sodium channel activator toxins, the etiology of many of its neurosensory symptoms remains unresolved. We recently described that local application of 1 nM Pacific Ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) into the skin of human subjects induces a long-lasting, painful axon reflex flare and that CTXs are particularly effective in releasing calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) from nerve terminals. In this study, we used mouse and rat skin preparations and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to study the molecular mechanism by which P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release. We show that P-CTX-1 induces CGRP release more effectively in mouse as compared to rat skin, exhibiting EC50 concentrations in the low nanomolar range. P-CTX-1-induced CGRP release from skin is dependent on extracellular calcium and sodium, but independent from the activation of various thermosensory transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. In contrast, lidocaine and tetrodotoxin (TTX) reduce CGRP release by 53-75%, with the remaining fraction involving L-type and T-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC). Using transgenic mice, we revealed that the TTX-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8 or NaV1.7 alone and the combined activation of the TTX-sensitive VGSC subtypes NaV1.7 and NaV1.1 carry the largest part of the P-CTX-1-caused CGRP release of 42% and 34%, respectively. Given the contribution of CGRP to nociceptive and itch sensing pathways, our findings contribute to a better understanding of sensory symptoms of acute and chronic ciguatera that may help in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  13. NaV1.9: a sodium channel linked to human pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-09-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.9 is preferentially expressed in nociceptors and has been shown in rodent models to have a major role in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. These studies suggest that by selectively targeting Na(V)1.9, it might be possible to ameliorate pain without inducing adverse CNS side effects such as sedation, confusion and addictive potential. Three recent studies in humans--two genetic and functional studies in rare genetic disorders, and a third study showing a role for Na(V)1.9 in painful peripheral neuropathy--have demonstrated that Na(V)1.9 plays an important part both in regulating sensory neuron excitability and in pain signalling. With this human validation, attention is turning to this channel as a potential therapeutic target for pain.

  14. Heterologous expression of NaV1.9 chimeras in various cell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goral, R Oliver; Leipold, Enrico; Nematian-Ardestani, Ehsan; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2015-12-01

    SCN11A encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9, which deviates most strongly from the other eight NaV channels expressed in mammals. It is characterized by resistance to the prototypic NaV channel blocker tetrodotoxin and exhibits slow activation and inactivation gating. Its expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons suggests a role in motor or pain signaling functions as also recently demonstrated by the occurrence of various mutations in human SCN11A leading to altered pain sensation syndromes. The systematic investigation of human NaV1.9, however, is severely hampered because of very poor heterologous expression in host cells. Using patch-clamp and two-electrode voltage-clamp methods, we show that this limitation is caused by the C-terminal structure of NaV1.9. A chimera of NaV1.9 harboring the C terminus of NaV1.4 yields functional expression not only in neuronal cells but also in non-excitable cells, such as HEK 293T or Xenopus oocytes. The major functional difference of the chimeric channel with respect to NaV1.9 is an accelerated activation and inactivation. Since the entire transmembrane domain is preserved, it is suited for studying pharmacological properties of the channel and the functional impact of disease-causing mutations. Moreover, we demonstrate how mutation S360Y makes NaV1.9 channels sensitive to tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin and that the unusual slow open-state inactivation of NaV1.9 is also mediated by the IFM (isoleucine-phenylalanine-methionine) inactivation motif located in the linker connecting domains III and IV.

  15. Einfluss von organischen Umweltpartikeln auf die rBet v 1-induzierte Basophilenaktivierung birkenpollenallergischer Individuen

    OpenAIRE

    Belloni, Benedetta

    2007-01-01

    In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde der Einfluss von organischen Umweltpartikeln auf die allergeninduzierte Basophilenaktivierung untersucht. Als Maß für die Aktivierung wurden basophile Granulozyten mit Hilfe der Durchflußzytometrie auf ihre CD63-Expression analysiert. Es konnte eine Erhöhung der CD63-Expression birkenpollenallergischer Patienten bei Inkubation mit organischem Umweltextrakt und rBet v 1 (Hauptallergen der Birkenpollen) im Vergleich zu alleiniger Inkubation mit rBet v 1 beobacht...

  16. Modulation of activity in human visual area V1 during memory masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneve, Markus H; Alnæs, Dag; Endestad, Tor; Greenlee, Mark W; Magnussen, Svein

    2011-04-15

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex, V1, are specialized for the processing of elemental features of the visual stimulus, such as orientation and spatial frequency. Recent fMRI evidence suggest that V1 neurons are also recruited in visual perceptual memory; a number of studies using multi-voxel pattern analysis have successfully decoded stimulus-specific information from V1 activity patterns during the delay phase in memory tasks. However, consistent fMRI signal modulations reflecting the memory process have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report evidence, from three subjects, that the low V1 BOLD activity during retention of low-level visual features is caused by competing interactions between neural populations coding for different values along the spectrum of the dimension remembered. We applied a memory masking paradigm in which the memory representation of a masker stimulus interferes with a delayed spatial frequency discrimination task when its frequency differs from the discriminanda with ±1 octave and found that impaired behavioral performance due to masking is reflected in weaker V1 BOLD signals. This cross-channel inhibition in V1 only occurs with retinotopic overlap between the masker and the sample stimulus of the discrimination task. The results suggest that memory for spatial frequency is a local process in the retinotopically organized visual cortex.

  17. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV 1.9 in visceral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, J R F; Winchester, W J; Bulmer, D C

    2016-03-01

    Visceral pain is a common symptom for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) disease. It is unpleasant, debilitating, and represents a large unmet medical need for effective clinical treatments. Recent studies have identified NaV 1.9 as an important regulator of afferent sensitivity in visceral pain pathways to mechanical and inflammatory stimuli, suggesting that NaV 1.9 could represent an important therapeutic target for the treatment of visceral pain. This potential has been highlighted by the identification of patients who have an insensitivity to pain or painful neuropathies associated with mutations in SCN11A, the gene encoding voltage-gated sodium channel subtype 1.9 (NaV 1.9). Here, we address the role of NaV 1.9 in visceral pain and what known human NaV 1.9 mutants can tell us about NaV 1.9 function in gut physiology and pathophysiology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Neutronic calculation of fast reactors by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltashev, D. A.; Stakhanova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    This article considers neutronic calculation of a fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 by the EUCLID/V1 integrated code. The main goal of development and application of integrated codes is a nuclear power plant safety justification. EUCLID/V1 is integrated code designed for coupled neutronics, thermomechanical and thermohydraulic fast reactor calculations under normal and abnormal operating conditions. EUCLID/V1 code is being developed in the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The integrated code has a modular structure and consists of three main modules: thermohydraulic module HYDRA-IBRAE/LM/V1, thermomechanical module BERKUT and neutronic module DN3D. In addition, the integrated code includes databases with fuel, coolant and structural materials properties. Neutronic module DN3D provides full-scale simulation of neutronic processes in fast reactors. Heat sources distribution, control rods movement, reactivity level changes and other processes can be simulated. Neutron transport equation in multigroup diffusion approximation is solved. This paper contains some calculations implemented as a part of EUCLID/V1 code validation. A fast-neutron lead-cooled reactor BREST-OD-300 transient simulation (fuel assembly floating, decompression of passive feedback system channel) and cross-validation with MCU-FR code results are presented in this paper. The calculations demonstrate EUCLID/V1 code application for BREST-OD-300 simulating and safety justification.

  19. Modulation of activity in human visual area V1 during memory masking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus H Sneve

    Full Text Available Neurons in the primary visual cortex, V1, are specialized for the processing of elemental features of the visual stimulus, such as orientation and spatial frequency. Recent fMRI evidence suggest that V1 neurons are also recruited in visual perceptual memory; a number of studies using multi-voxel pattern analysis have successfully decoded stimulus-specific information from V1 activity patterns during the delay phase in memory tasks. However, consistent fMRI signal modulations reflecting the memory process have not yet been demonstrated. Here, we report evidence, from three subjects, that the low V1 BOLD activity during retention of low-level visual features is caused by competing interactions between neural populations coding for different values along the spectrum of the dimension remembered. We applied a memory masking paradigm in which the memory representation of a masker stimulus interferes with a delayed spatial frequency discrimination task when its frequency differs from the discriminanda with ±1 octave and found that impaired behavioral performance due to masking is reflected in weaker V1 BOLD signals. This cross-channel inhibition in V1 only occurs with retinotopic overlap between the masker and the sample stimulus of the discrimination task. The results suggest that memory for spatial frequency is a local process in the retinotopically organized visual cortex.

  20. The Fold Variant BM4 Is Beneficial in a Therapeutic Bet v 1 Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Pichler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Specific immunotherapy using recombinant allergens is clinically effective; still wild-type allergens can provoke treatment-induced side effects and often show poor immunogenicity in vivo. Thus, we tested the low IgE-binding, highly immunogenic fold variant BM4 in a Bet v 1 mouse model. Methods. Recombinant BM4 was used as active vaccine ingredient to treat mice sensitized to Bet v 1. As controls, mice were treated with either Bet v 1 or sham, and the humoral as well as cellular immune response was monitored. Moreover, lung function and lung inflammation were analysed. Results. BM4 was more effective than wild-type Bet v 1 in inducing Bet v 1-specific blocking antibodies as well as IFN-γ and IL-10 producing T cells. Further, birch pollen induced lung inflammation could be ameliorated significantly by BM4 treatment as demonstrated by a reduction of airway hyperresponsiveness and drastically decreased eosinophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Conclusion. The study outlines the high potential of BM4 as vaccine candidate for the treatment of Bet v 1-mediated birch pollen allergies.

  1. A Survey of Architecture and Function of the Primary Visual Cortex (V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoping Li

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The largest visual area, known as the primary visual cortex or V1, has greatly contributed to the current understanding of mammalian and human visual pathways and their role in visual perception. The initial discovery of orientation-sensitive neurons in V1, arranged according to a retinotopic mapping, suggested an analogy to its function as a low-level feature analyzer. Subsequent discoveries of phase, spatial frequency, color, ocular origin, and direction-of-motion-sensitive neurons, arranged into overlapping maps, further lent support to the view that it performs a rich decomposition, similar to signal processing transforms, of the retinal output. Like the other cortical areas, V1 has a laminar organization with specialization for input from the relayed retinal afferents, output to the higher visual areas, and the segregation of the magno (motion and parvo (form pathways. Spatially lateral connections that exist between neurons of similar and varying properties have also been proposed to give rise to a computation of a bottom-up saliency map in V1. We provide a review of the selectivity of neurons in V1, laminar specialization and analogies to signal processing techniques, a model of V1 saliency computation, and higher-area feedback that may mediate perception.

  2. METEOR v1.0 - Design and structure of the software package; METEOR v1.0 - Estructura y modulos informaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, E.

    1994-07-01

    This script describes the structure and the separated modules of the software package METEOR for the statistical analysis of meteorological data series. It contains a systematic description of the subroutines of METEOR and, also, of the required shape for input and output files. The original version of METEOR have been developed by Ph.D. Elena Palomo, CIEMAT-IER, GIMASE. It is built by linking programs and routines written in FORTRAN 77 and it adds thc graphical capabilities of GNUPLOT. The shape of this toolbox was designed following the criteria of modularity, flexibility and agility criteria. All the input, output and analysis options are structured in three main menus: i) the first is aimed to evaluate the quality of the data set; ii) the second is aimed for pre-processing of the data; and iii) the third is aimed towards the statistical analyses and for creating the graphical outputs. Actually the information about METEOR is constituted by three documents written in spanish: 1) METEOR v1.0: User's guide; 2) METEOR v1.0: A usage example; 3) METEOR v 1.0: Design and structure of the software package. (Author)

  3. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Role of Na(v)1.9 in activity-dependent axon growth in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Narayan; Wetzel, Andrea; Dombert, Benjamin; Yadav, Preeti; Havlicek, Steven; Jablonka, Sibylle; Nassar, Mohammed A; Blum, Robert; Sendtner, Michael

    2012-08-15

    Spontaneous neural activity promotes axon growth in many types of developing neurons, including motoneurons. In motoneurons from a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), defects in axonal growth and presynaptic function correlate with a reduced frequency of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients in axons which are mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels. To characterize the mechanisms that initiate spontaneous Ca(2+) transients, we investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs). We found that low concentrations of the VGSC inhibitors tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX) reduce the rate of axon growth in cultured embryonic mouse motoneurons without affecting their survival. STX was 5- to 10-fold more potent than TTX and Ca(2+) imaging confirmed that low concentrations of STX strongly reduce the frequency of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients in somatic and axonal regions. These findings suggest that the Na(V)1.9, a VGSC that opens at low thresholds, could act upstream of spontaneous Ca(2+) transients. qPCR from cultured and laser-microdissected spinal cord motoneurons revealed abundant expression of Na(V)1.9. Na(V)1.9 protein is preferentially localized in axons and growth cones. Suppression of Na(V)1.9 expression reduced axon elongation. Motoneurons from Na(V)1.9(-/-) mice showed the reduced axon growth in combination with reduced spontaneous Ca(2+) transients in the soma and axon terminals. Thus, Na(V)1.9 function appears to be essential for activity-dependent axon growth, acting upstream of spontaneous Ca(2+) elevation through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Na(V)1.9 activation could therefore serve as a target for modulating axonal regeneration in motoneuron diseases such as SMA in which presynaptic activity of VGCCs is reduced.

  5. Expression of ATP6V1C1 during oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Alves, M G; Carta, C F L; Padín-Iruegas, M-E; Pérez-Sayáns, M; Suarez-Peñaranda, J M; Issa, J S; García-García, A; Almeida, J D

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the gene and protein expressions of V-type ATPase protein subunit C1 (ATP6V1C1) in cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and contralateral normal mucosa in smokers, nonsmokers and former smokers. Subjects were separated into five groups of 15: group 1, smokers with OSCC; group 2, normal contralateral mucosa of OSCC patients; group 3, chronic smokers; group 4, former smokers who had stopped smoking 1 year earlier; group 5, individuals who had never smoked. Exfoliative cytology specimens from oral mucosa of smokers, former smokers and nonsmokers showed normal gene and protein expression. We found significantly greater gene expression in the OSCC group than in the nonsmoker groups. No difference in gene expression was observed between normal contralateral mucosa and nonsmoker groups, smoker and nonsmoker groups or former smoker and nonsmoker groups. We observed intense immunostaining for ATP6V1C1 protein in all cases of OSCC and weak or no staining in smoker, former smoker and nonsmoker groups. Significantly greater expression of ATP6V1C1 protein was observed in the OSCC group compared to the other groups, which supports the role of ATP6V1C1 in effecting changes associated with oral cancer. Analysis of the mucosae of chronic smokers, former smokers and the normal contralateral mucosa of patients with OSCC showed unaltered ATP6V1C1 gene and protein expression. Early stages of carcinogenesis, represented by altered epithelium of chronic smokers, had neither gene nor protein alterations as seen in OSCC. Therefore, we infer that the changes in ATP6V1C1 occur during later stages of carcinogenesis. Our preliminary study provides a basis for future studies of using ATP6V1C1 levels for detecting early stage OSCC.

  6. Antisense-mediated knockdown of Na(V)1.8, but not Na(V)1.9, generates inhibitory effects on complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Feng; Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2011-05-10

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in sensory neurons were known as key pain modulators. Comparing with the widely reported Na(V)1.8, roles of Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain are poorly studied by antisense-induced specific gene knockdown. Here, we used molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods to examine the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 on inflammatory pain. Following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammation treatment, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions and increased sodium current densities. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated that Na(V)1.8 mainly localized in medium and small-sized DRG neurons, whereas Na(V)1.9 only expressed in small-sized DRG neurons. Intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of AS ODN was used to down-regulate Na(V)1.8 or Na(V)1.9 expressions confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Unexpectedly, behavioral tests showed that only Na(V)1.8 AS ODN, but not Na(V)1.9 AS ODN could reverse CFA-induced heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that TTX-R sodium channels Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 in primary sensory neurons played distinct roles in CFA-induced inflammatory pain and suggested that antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated blocking of key pain modulator might point toward a potential treatment strategy against certain types of inflammatory pain.

  7. Antisense-Mediated Knockdown of NaV1.8, but Not NaV1.9, Generates Inhibitory Effects on Complete Freund's Adjuvant-Induced Inflammatory Pain in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Su-Min; Chen, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in sensory neurons were known as key pain modulators. Comparing with the widely reported NaV1.8, roles of NaV1.9 on inflammatory pain are poorly studied by antisense-induced specific gene knockdown. Here, we used molecular, electrophysiological and behavioral methods to examine the effects of antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) targeting NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 on inflammatory pain. Following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammation treatment, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) up-regulated mRNA and protein expressions and increased sodium current densities. Immunohistochemical data demonstrated that NaV1.8 mainly localized in medium and small-sized DRG neurons, whereas NaV1.9 only expressed in small-sized DRG neurons. Intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of AS ODN was used to down-regulate NaV1.8 or NaV1.9 expressions confirmed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Unexpectedly, behavioral tests showed that only NaV1.8 AS ODN, but not NaV1.9 AS ODN could reverse CFA-induced heat and mechanical hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that TTX-R sodium channels NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in primary sensory neurons played distinct roles in CFA-induced inflammatory pain and suggested that antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated blocking of key pain modulator might point toward a potential treatment strategy against certain types of inflammatory pain. PMID:21572961

  8. Control of submillisecond synaptic timing in binaural coincidence detectors by K(v)1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul J; Jercog, Pablo E; Rinzel, John; Scott, Luisa L; Golding, Nace L

    2010-05-01

    Neurons in the medial superior olive process sound-localization cues via binaural coincidence detection, in which excitatory synaptic inputs from each ear are segregated onto different branches of a bipolar dendritic structure and summed at the soma and axon with submillisecond time resolution. Although synaptic timing and dynamics critically shape this computation, synaptic interactions with intrinsic ion channels have received less attention. Using paired somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings in gerbil brainstem slices together with compartmental modeling, we found that activation of K(v)1 channels by dendritic excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) accelerated membrane repolarization in a voltage-dependent manner and actively improved the time resolution of synaptic integration. We found that a somatically biased gradient of K(v)1 channels underlies the degree of compensation for passive cable filtering during propagation of EPSPs in dendrites. Thus, both the spatial distribution and properties of K(v)1 channels are important for preserving binaural synaptic timing.

  9. Imaging the inelastic scattering of vibrationally excited NO (v = 1) with Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamasah, Alexander; Li, Hongwei; Onvlee, Jolijn; van der Avoird, Ad; Parker, David H.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2018-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of vibrationally excited NO (v = 1) with Ar at a collision energy of 3.0 kcal mol-1 was investigated in crossed beams. Vibrationally excited NO was generated by flash heating and rotationally cooled by the supersonic expansion. The differential cross sections were compared to those of the vibrational ground state NO (v = 0) with Ar, which were also compared to theoretical calculations for scattering from the ground vibrational level. The differential cross sections show a similar strong j dependence of the rotational rainbow maxima from the inelastic scattering for both NO (v = 0) and (v = 1) but no significant differences between NO (v = 0) and (v = 1) were seen.

  10. Identification of Bet v 1-related allergens in fig and other Moraceae fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, W; Focke, M; Marzban, G; Swoboda, I; Jarisch, R; Laimer, M

    2010-04-01

    Allergy to fig fruit (Ficus carica) has been described in patients allergic to Ficus benjamina or rubber latex but may occur also in pollen-allergic patients. To study the potential cross-reactivity between fig and taxonomically related fruits with the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1. One hundred and eighty-eight patients with or without birch pollen allergy were prick-to-prick tested with fig (F. carica), mulberry (Morus alba), jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus; all family Moraceae) and other pollen-associated foods. Moraceae fruit extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE and tested with patient sera and polyclonal antisera against Mal d 1. Western blot inhibition was performed with Moraceae fruit extracts, birch pollen and recombinant Bet v 1. Putative Bet v 1 homologs in Moraceae fruits were analysed by liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry. Among 85 patients with isolated birch pollen allergy, 78% had a positive skin test to fresh fig, 10% to dried fig, 91% to mulberry, 91% to jackfruit, 77% to Rosaceae fruits and 83% to hazelnut. Sixty-six per cent of birch pollen-allergic patients positive for fig, reported symptoms after consumption of fresh figs, whereas dried figs were mostly well tolerated. In 60 patients with isolated Ficus benjamina sensitization, the reactivity rates to the same foods were 83-40-0-0-0-0%. None of 32 mugwort pollen-allergic patients reacted to Moraceae fruits. Rabbit anti-Mal d 1 and patient sera reacted to a 17 kDa band in all Moraceae extracts. IgE binding to these proteins was completely inhibited by birch pollen and rBet v 1. Mass spectrometry identified several peptides from the 17 kDa fig, mulberry and jackfruit allergen with respectively 60%, 56% and 76% homology to Bet v 1. Fig and other Moraceae fruits contain allergens homologous to Bet v 1 and represent clinically relevant birch pollen-associated foods.

  11. Mechanism of sodium channel NaV1.9 potentiation by G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoye, Carlos G; Kunic, Jennifer D; Ehring, George R; George, Alfred L

    2013-02-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated Na (Na(V)) channels have been implicated in nociception. In particular, Na(V)1.9 contributes to expression of persistent Na current in small diameter, nociceptive sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia and is required for inflammatory pain sensation. Using ND7/23 cells stably expressing human Na(V)1.9, we elucidated the biophysical mechanisms responsible for potentiation of channel activity by G-protein signaling to better understand the response to inflammatory mediators. Heterologous Na(V)1.9 expression evoked TTX-resistant Na current with peak activation at -40 mV with extensive overlap in voltage dependence of activation and inactivation. Inactivation kinetics were slow and incomplete, giving rise to large persistent Na currents. Single-channel recording demonstrated long openings and correspondingly high open probability (P(o)) accounting for the large persistent current amplitude. Channels exposed to intracellular GTPγS, a proxy for G-protein signaling, exhibited twofold greater current density, slowing of inactivation, and a depolarizing shift in voltage dependence of inactivation but no change in activation voltage dependence. At the single-channel level, intracellular GTPγS had no effect on single-channel amplitude but caused an increased mean open time and greater P(o) compared with recordings made in the absence of GTPγS. We conclude that G-protein activation potentiates human Na(V)1.9 activity by increasing channel open probability and mean open time, causing the larger peak and persistent current, respectively. Our results advance our understanding about the mechanism of Na(V)1.9 potentiation by G-protein signaling during inflammation and provide a cellular platform useful for the discovery of Na(V)1.9 modulators with potential utility in treating inflammatory pain.

  12. Characterization of PR-10 genes from eight Betula species and detection of Bet v 1 isoforms in birch pollen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.; Cordewener, J.H.G.; America, A.H.P.; Westende, van 't W.P.C.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Bet v 1 is an important cause of hay fever in northern Europe. Bet v 1 isoforms from the European white birch (Betula pendula) have been investigated extensively, but the allergenic potency of other birch species is unknown. The presence of Bet v 1 and closely related PR-10 genes in the

  13. 76 FR 20835 - Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7, V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7, V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI AGENCY: Federal... delays the effective date for the amendment of four VOR Federal airways in the vicinity of Kona, HI; V-1...), amends VOR Federal Airways V-1, V-7 V-11 and V-20; Kona, HI. These VHF Omnidirectional Range Federal...

  14. Developmental pathway for potent V1V2-directed HIV-neutralizing antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Schramm, Chaim A.; Gorman, Jason; Moore, Penny L.; Bhiman, Jinal N.; Dekosky, Brandon J.; Ernandes, Michael J.; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kim, Helen J.; Pancera, Marie; Staupe, Ryan P.; Altae-Tran, Han R.; Bailer, Robert T.; Crooks, Ema T.; Cupo, Albert; Druz, Aliaksandr; Garrett, Nigel J.; Hoi, Kam H.; Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Longo, Nancy S.; McKee, Krisha; Nonyane, Molati; O'Dell, Sijy; Roark, Ryan S.; Rudicell, Rebecca S.; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Sheward, Daniel J.; Soto, Cinque; Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Zhenhai; Mullikin, James C.; Binley, James M.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Wilson, Ian A.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Georgiou, George; Williamson, Carolyn; Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Morris, Lynn; Kwong, Peter D.; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mascola, John R.; Becker, Jesse; Benjamin, Betty; Blakesley, Robert; Bouffard, Gerry; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Dekhtyar, Mila; Gregory, Michael; Guan, Xiaobin; Gupta, Jyoti; Han, Joel; Hargrove, April; Ho, Shi-ling; Johnson, Taccara; Legaspi, Richelle; Lovett, Sean; Maduro, Quino; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Montemayor, Casandra; Mullikin, James; Park, Morgan; Riebow, Nancy; Schandler, Karen; Schmidt, Brian; Sison, Christina; Stantripop, Mal; Thomas, James; Thomas, Pam; Vemulapalli, Meg; Young, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies capable of neutralizing HIV-1 often target variable regions 1 and 2 (V1V2) of the HIV-1 envelope, but the mechanism of their elicitation has been unclear. Here we define the developmental pathway by which such antibodies are generated and acquire the requisite molecular characteristics

  15. Kinomer v. 1.0: a database of systematically classified eukaryotic protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David M A; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of protein function through reversible phosphorylation by protein kinases and phosphatases is a general mechanism controlling virtually every cellular activity. Eukaryotic protein kinases can be classified into distinct, well-characterized groups based on amino acid sequence similarity and function. We recently reported a highly sensitive and accurate hidden Markov model-based method for the automatic detection and classification of protein kinases into these specific groups. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database presented here contains annotated classifications for the protein kinase complements of 43 eukaryotic genomes. These span the taxonomic range and include fungi (16 species), plants (6), diatoms (1), amoebas (2), protists (1) and animals (17). The kinomes are stored in a relational database and are accessible through a web interface on the basis of species, kinase group or a combination of both. In addition, the Kinomer v. 1.0 HMM library is made available for users to perform classification on arbitrary sequences. The Kinomer v. 1.0 database is a continually updated resource where direct comparison of kinase sequences across kinase groups and across species can give insights into kinase function and evolution. Kinomer v. 1.0 is available at http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/kinomer/.

  16. GEOCLIM reloaded (v 1.0): a new coupled earth system model for past climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.; Regnier, P.; Goddéris, Y.; Donnadieu, Y.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new version of the coupled Earth system model GEOCLIM. The new release, GEOCLIM reloaded (v 1.0), links the existing atmosphere and weathering modules to a novel, temporally and spatially resolved model of the global ocean circulation, which provides a physical framework for a

  17. A new allergen from ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with homology to art v 1 from mugwort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, Renaud; Wopfner, Nicole; Pabst, Martin; Stadlmann, Johannes; Petersen, Bent O; Duus, Jens Ø; Himly, Martin; Radauer, Christian; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Ferreira, Fatima; Altmann, Friedrich

    2010-08-27

    Art v 1, the major pollen allergen of the composite plant mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) has been identified recently as a thionin-like protein with a bulky arabinogalactan-protein moiety. A close relative of mugwort, ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is an important allergen source in North America, and, since 1990, ragweed has become a growing health concern in Europe as well. Weed pollen-sensitized patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to a ragweed pollen protein of apparently 29-31 kDa. This reaction could be inhibited by the mugwort allergen Art v 1. The purified ragweed pollen protein consisted of a 57-amino acid-long defensin-like domain with high homology to Art v 1 and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. This part contained hydroxyproline-linked arabinogalactan chains with one galactose and 5 to 20 and more alpha-arabinofuranosyl residues with some beta-arabinoses in terminal positions as revealed by high field NMR. The ragweed protein contained only small amounts of the single hydroxyproline-linked beta-arabinosyl residues, which form an important IgE binding determinant in Art v 1. cDNA clones for this protein were obtained from ragweed flowers. Immunological characterization revealed that the recombinant ragweed protein reacted with >30% of the weed pollen allergic patients. Therefore, this protein from ragweed pollen constitutes a novel important ragweed allergen and has been designated Amb a 4.

  18. A New Allergen from Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) with Homology to Art v 1 from Mugwort*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, Renaud; Wopfner, Nicole; Pabst, Martin; Stadlmann, Johannes; Petersen, Bent O.; Duus, Jens Ø.; Himly, Martin; Radauer, Christian; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Ferreira, Fatima; Altmann, Friedrich

    2010-01-01

    Art v 1, the major pollen allergen of the composite plant mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) has been identified recently as a thionin-like protein with a bulky arabinogalactan-protein moiety. A close relative of mugwort, ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is an important allergen source in North America, and, since 1990, ragweed has become a growing health concern in Europe as well. Weed pollen-sensitized patients demonstrated IgE reactivity to a ragweed pollen protein of apparently 29–31 kDa. This reaction could be inhibited by the mugwort allergen Art v 1. The purified ragweed pollen protein consisted of a 57-amino acid-long defensin-like domain with high homology to Art v 1 and a C-terminal proline-rich domain. This part contained hydroxyproline-linked arabinogalactan chains with one galactose and 5 to 20 and more α-arabinofuranosyl residues with some β-arabinoses in terminal positions as revealed by high field NMR. The ragweed protein contained only small amounts of the single hydroxyproline-linked β-arabinosyl residues, which form an important IgE binding determinant in Art v 1. cDNA clones for this protein were obtained from ragweed flowers. Immunological characterization revealed that the recombinant ragweed protein reacted with >30% of the weed pollen allergic patients. Therefore, this protein from ragweed pollen constitutes a novel important ragweed allergen and has been designated Amb a 4. PMID:20576600

  19. Role of vasopressin V1a receptor in ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol-induced cataleptic immobilization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Koushi, Emi; Myose, Takayuki; Tanoue, Akito; Mishima, Kenichi; Tsuchihashi, Ryota; Kinjo, Junei; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2017-12-01

    Cannabis is a widely used illicit substance. ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of cannabis, is known to cause catalepsy in rodents. Recent studies have shown that vasopressin V1a and V1b receptors are widely distributed in the central nervous system and are capable of influencing a wide variety of brain functions such as social behavior, emotionality, and learning and memory. The present study was designed to examine the possible involvement of V1a and V1b receptors in THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization. The induction of catalepsy following treatment with THC (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or haloperidol (1 mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated in wild-type (WT), V1a receptor knockout (V1aRKO), and V1b receptor knockout (V1bRKO) mice. The effect of treatment with the selective 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor antagonist WAY100635 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) on THC-induced catalepsy was also evaluated in V1aRKO mice. Moreover, the effects of the V1a receptor antagonist VMAX-357 and the V1b receptor antagonist ORG-52186 on THC-induced catalepsy were evaluated in ddY mice. THC and haloperidol markedly caused catalepsy in V1bRKO mice as well as in WT mice. However, V1aRKO mice exhibited a reduction in catalepsy induced by THC but not by haloperidol. WAY100635 dramatically enhanced THC-induced catalepsy in V1aRKO mice. Although VMAX-357 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) but not ORG-52186 significantly attenuated THC-induced catalepsy, it had no significant effect on the enhancement of THC-induced catalepsy by WAY100635 in ddY mice. These findings suggest that V1a receptor regulates THC-induced catalepsy-like immobilization.

  20. Fine Mapping of Virescent Leaf Gene v-1 in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Miao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf color mutants are common in higher plants that can be used as markers in crop breeding or as an important tool in understanding regulatory mechanisms in chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In virescent leaf mutants, young leaves are yellow in color, which gradually return to normal green when the seedlings grow large. In the present study, we conducted phenotypic characterization and genetic mapping of the cucumber virescent leaf mutant 9110Gt conferred by the v-1 locus. Total chlorophyll and carotenoid content in 9110Gt was reduced by 44% and 21%, respectively, as compared with its wild type parental line 9110G. Electron microscopic investigation revealed fewer chloroplasts per cell and thylakoids per chloroplast in 9110Gt than in 9110G. Fine genetic mapping allowed for the assignment of the v-1 locus to a 50.4 kb genomic DNA region in chromosome 6 with two flanking markers that were 0.14 and 0.16 cM away from v-1, respectively. Multiple lines of evidence supported CsaCNGCs as the only candidate gene for the v-1 locus, which encoded a cyclic-nucleotide-gated ion channel protein. A single nucleotide change in the promoter region of v-1 seemed to be associated with the virescent color change in 9110Gt. Real-time PCR revealed significantly lower expression of CsaCNGCs in the true leaves of 9110Gt than in 9110G. This was the first report that connected the CsaCNGCs gene to virescent leaf color change, which provided a useful tool to establish linkages among virescent leaf color change, chloroplast development, chlorophyll biosynthesis, and the functions of the CsaCNGCs gene.

  1. Expression of the sodium channel transcripts Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 in injured dorsal root ganglion neurons of interferon-gamma or interferon-gamma receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Jonas; Fried, Kaj

    2003-03-06

    Changes in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) expression of the sodium channels Na(v)1.8 and Na(v)1.9 may contribute to injury-induced hyperexcitability and pain. Interferon (IFN)-gamma receptor -/- mice display a reduced pain-related behavior after nerve injury as compared to wild-type mice (NeuroReport 8 (1997) 1311). To elucidate a possible role for IFN-gamma in the regulation of sodium channels, we have studied the DRG mRNA expression of Na(v)1.8/Na(v)1.9 in IFN-gamma- or IFN-gamma receptor-deficient mice. In both types of mice, nerve damage induced a downregulation of Na(v)1.8 as well as Na(v)1.9. The magnitude of this reduction was similar to that observed in wild-type animals. These results indicate that the downregulation of Na(v)1.8/Na(v)1.9 in damaged DRG neurons is not influenced by IFN-gamma. Thus, the reduced pain-related behavior of nerve-injured IFN-gamma receptor null mice is not due to differential changes in the regulation of Na(v)1.8/Na(v)1.9 mRNA.

  2. Explosive Model Tarantula V1/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17: #2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P

    2009-05-01

    Tarantula V1 is a kinetic package for reactive flow codes that seeks to describe initiation, failure, dead zones and detonation simultaneously. The most important parameter is P1, the pressure between the initiation and failure regions. Both dead zone formation and failure can be largely controlled with this knob. However, V1 does failure with low settings and dead zones with higher settings, so that it cannot fulfill its purpose in the current format. To this end, V2 is under test. The derivation of the initiation threshold P0 is discussed. The derivation of the initiation pressure-tau curve as an output of Tarantula shows that the initiation package is sound. A desensitization package is also considered.

  3. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  4. Dependence of V2 illusory contour response on V1 cell properties and topographic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Amelia; Buia, Calin; Tiesinga, Paul

    2014-06-01

    An illusory contour is an image that is perceived as a contour in the absence of typical contour characteristics, such as a change in luminance or chromaticity across the stimulus. In cats and primates, cells that respond to illusory contours are sparse in cortical area V1, but are found in greater numbers in cortical area V2. We propose a model capable of illusory contour detection that is based on a realistic topographic organization of V1 cells, which reproduces the responses of individual cell types measured experimentally. The model allows us to explain several experimentally observed properties of V2 cells including variability in orientation tuning and inducer spacing preference. As a practical application, the model can be used to estimate the relationship between the severity of a cortical injury in the primary visual cortex and the deterioration of V2 cell responses to real and illusory contours.

  5. New Approach to Calculation of Renal Cation Clearance in Rats after V1a Receptor Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosova, D V; Natochin, V V

    2017-10-01

    V1a receptor agonist [Phe(2), Ile(3), Orn(8)]-vasopressin produces maximum diuretic and saluretic effects in a dose of 0.1 nmol/100 g body weight: renal excretion of Na(+) increases by 50 times in comparison with the initial level over 90 min, excretion of K(+), Mg(2+), and Са(2+) increases by 3, 2, and 16 times, respectively. New formulas were proposed for calculation of the clearance considering total cation content in the extracellular fluid and the time of total effect of the injected dose. After injection of V1a receptors agonist, clearance of Na(+) was 7% of its total content in the extracellular fluid, the corresponding values for K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) were 63, 35, and 6%, respectively. The proposed approach differs significantly from the standard cation excretion evaluation and characterizes selective shifts in ion balance induced by physiologically active substances and possible side effects due to unbalanced loss of certain ions.

  6. Differences in V1 and V2 ski skating techniques described by accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myklebust, H; Losnegard, T; Hallén, J

    2014-12-01

    The aims of the study were to describe the differences between the ski skating techniques V1 and V2 and evaluate reproducibility in complex cyclic hip movements measured by accelerometers. Fourteen elite senior male cross-country skiers rollerskied twice for 1 min (V1 and V2) at 4° inclination and 3 m/s. Tests were repeated after 20 min and again 4 months later. Five triaxial accelerometers were attached to the subject's hip (os sacrum), poles, and ski boots. Post-processing included transforming to an approximately global coordinate system, normalization for cycle time, double integration for displacement, and revealing temporal patterns. Different acceleration patterns between techniques and large correlation coefficients (Pearson's r = 0.6-0.9) between repeated trials were seen for most parameters. In V2, the hip was lowered [-10.9 (1.2) cm], whereas in V1, the hip was elevated [4.8 (1.5) cm] during the pole thrust. In conclusion, V2 but not V1 showed similarities to double poling in the way that potential energy is gained between poling strokes and transferred to propulsion during the poling action. Elite skiers reproduce their own individual patterns. One triaxial accelerometer on the lower back can distinguish techniques and might be useful in field research as well as in providing individual feedback on daily technique training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cholinergic suppression of visual responses in primate V1 is mediated by GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Anita A; Aoki, Chiye; Hawken, Michael J

    2012-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has been implicated in selective attention. To understand the local circuit action of ACh, we iontophoresed cholinergic agonists into the primate primary visual cortex (V1) while presenting optimal visual stimuli. Consistent with our previous anatomical studies showing that GABAergic neurons in V1 express ACh receptors to a greater extent than do excitatory neurons, we observed suppressed visual responses in 36% of recorded neurons outside V1's primary thalamorecipient layer (4c). This suppression is blocked by the GABA(A) receptor antagonist gabazine. Within layer 4c, ACh release produces a response gain enhancement (Disney AA, Aoki C, Hawken MJ. Neuron 56: 701-713, 2007); elsewhere, ACh suppresses response gain by strengthening inhibition. Our finding contrasts with the observation that the dominant mechanism of suppression in the neocortex of rats is reduced glutamate release. We propose that in primates, distinct cholinergic receptor subtypes are recruited on specific cell types and in specific lamina to yield opposing modulatory effects that together increase neurons' responsiveness to optimal stimuli without changing tuning width.

  8. Development and Matching of Binocular Orientation Preference in Mouse V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabi eBhaumik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eye-specific thalamic inputs converge in the primary visual cortex (V1 and form the basis of binocular vision. For normal binocular perceptions, such as depth and stereopsis, binocularly matched orientation preference between the two eyes is required. A critical period of binocular matching of orientation preference in mice during normal development is reported in literature. Using a reaction diffusion model we present the development of RF and orientation selectivity in mouse V1 and investigate the binocular orientation preference matching during the critical period. At the onset of the critical period the preferred orientations of the modeled cells are mostly mismatched in the two eyes and the mismatch decreases and reaches levels reported in juvenile mouse by the end of the critical period. At the end of critical period 39% of cells in binocular zone in our model cortex is orientation selective. In literature around 40% cortical cells are reported as orientation selective in mouse V1. The starting and the closing time for critical period determine the orientation preference alignment between the two eyes and orientation tuning in cortical cells. The absence of near neighbor interaction among cortical cells during the development of thalmo-cortical wiring causes a salt and pepper organization in the orientation preference map in mice. It also results in much lower % of orientation selective cells in mice as compared to ferrets and cats having organized orientation maps with pinwheels.

  9. Response Suppression in V1 Agrees with Psychophysics of Surround Masking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenger-Landolt, Barbara; Heeger, David J.

    2008-01-01

    When a target stimulus is embedded in a high contrast surround, the target appears reduced in contrast and is harder to detect, and neural responses in visual cortex are suppressed. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and psychophysics to quantitatively compare these physiological and perceptual effects. Observers performed a contrast discrimination task on a contrast-reversing sinusoidal target grating. The target was either presented in isolation or embedded in a high-contrast surround. While observers performed the task, we also measured fMRI responses as a function of target contrast, both with and without a surround. We found that the surround substantially increased the psychophysical thresholds while reducing fMRI responses. The two data sets were compared, on the basis of the assumption that a fixed response difference is required for correct discrimination, and we found that the psychophysics accounted for 96.5% of the variance in the measured V1 responses. The suppression in visual areas V2 and V3 was stronger, too strong to agree with psychophysics. The good quantitative agreement between psychophysical thresholds and V1 responses suggests V1 as a plausible candidate for mediating surround masking. PMID:12890783

  10. Phosphate solubilizing ability of Emericella nidulans strain V1 isolated from vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Satya Sunder; Barman, Soma; Ghosh, Ranjan; Duary, Raj Kumar; Goswami, Linee; Mandal, Narayan C

    2013-10-01

    Phosphorus is one of the key factors that regulate soil fertility. Its deficiencies in soil are largely replenished by chemical fertilizers. The present study was aimed to isolate efficient phosphate solubilizing fungal strains from Eisenia fetida vermicompost. Out of total 30 fungal strains the most efficient phosphate solubilizing one was Emericella (Aspergillus) nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), identified by custom sequencing of beta-tubulin gene and BLAST analysis. This strain solubilized 13 to 36% phosphate from four different rock phosphates. After three days of incubation of isolated culture with black Mussorie phosphate rock, the highest percentage of phosphate solubilization was 35.5 +/- 1.01 with a pH drop of 4.2 +/- 0.09. Kinetics of solubilization and acid production showed a linear relationship until day five of incubation. Interestingly, from zero to tenth day of incubation, solubility of soil phosphate increased gradually from 4.31 +/- 1.57 to 13.65 +/- 1.82 (mg kg(-1)) recording a maximum of 21.23 +/- 0.54 on day 45 in respect of the V1 isolate. Further, enhanced phosphorus uptake by Phaseolus plants with significant pod yield due to soil inoculation of Emericella nidulans V1 (MTCC 11044), demonstrated its prospect as an effective biofertilizer for plant growth.

  11. Differences in selectivity to natural images in early visual areas (V1-V3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggan, David D; Allen, Luke A; Farrar, Oliver R H; Gouws, Andre D; Morland, Antony B; Baker, Daniel H; Andrews, Timothy J

    2017-05-26

    High-level regions of the ventral visual pathway respond more to intact objects compared to scrambled objects. The aim of this study was to determine if this selectivity for objects emerges at an earlier stage of processing. Visual areas (V1-V3) were defined for each participant using retinotopic mapping. Participants then viewed intact and scrambled images from different object categories (bottle, chair, face, house, shoe) while neural responses were measured using fMRI. Our rationale for using scrambled images is that they contain the same low-level properties as the intact objects, but lack the higher-order combinations of features that are characteristic of natural images. Neural responses were higher for scrambled than intact images in all regions. However, the difference between intact and scrambled images was smaller in V3 compared to V1 and V2. Next, we measured the spatial patterns of response to intact and scrambled images from different object categories. We found higher within-category compared to between category correlations for both intact and scrambled images demonstrating distinct patterns of response. Spatial patterns of response were more distinct for intact compared to scrambled images in V3, but not in V1 or V2. These findings demonstrate the emergence of selectivity to natural images in V3.

  12. Continuously Tunable Ca2+ Regulation of RNA-Edited CaV1.3 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Bazzazi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available CaV1.3 ion channels are dominant Ca2+ portals into pacemaking neurons, residing at the epicenter of brain rhythmicity and neurodegeneration. Negative Ca2+ feedback regulation of CaV1.3 channels (CDI is therefore critical for Ca2+ homeostasis. Intriguingly, nearly half the CaV1.3 transcripts in the brain are RNA edited to reduce CDI and influence oscillatory activity. It is then mechanistically remarkable that this editing occurs precisely within an IQ domain, whose interaction with Ca2+-bound calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM is believed to induce CDI. Here, we sought the mechanism underlying the altered CDI of edited channels. Unexpectedly, editing failed to attenuate Ca2+/CaM binding. Instead, editing weakened the prebinding of Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM to channels, which proves essential for CDI. Thus, editing might render CDI continuously tunable by fluctuations in ambient CaM, a prominent effect we substantiate in substantia nigral neurons. This adjustability of Ca2+ regulation by CaM now looms as a key element of CNS Ca2+ homeostasis.

  13. The V1a and V1b, but not V2, vasopressin receptor genes are expressed in the supraoptic nucleus of the rat hypothalamus, and the transcripts are essentially colocalized in the vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurbin, A; Boissin-Agasse, L; Orcel, H; Rabié, A; Joux, N; Desarménien, M G; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-11-01

    We have identified and visualized the vasopressin (VP) receptors expressed by hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. To do this, we used RT-PCR on total RNA extracts from supraoptic nuclei or on single freshly dissociated supraoptic neurons, and in situ hybridization on frontal sections of hypothalamus of Wistar rats. The RT-PCR on supraoptic RNA extracts revealed that mainly V1a, but also V1b, subtypes of VP receptors are expressed from birth to adulthood. No V2 receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected. Furthermore, the single-cell RT-nested PCR indicated that the V1a receptor mRNA is present in vasopressinergic magnocellular neurons. In light of these results, in situ hybridization was performed to visualize the V1a and V1b receptor mRNAs in supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Simultaneously, we coupled this approach to: 1) in situ hybridization detection of oxytocin or VP mRNAs; or 2) immunocytochemistry to detect the neuropeptides. This provided a way of identifying the neurons expressing perceptible amounts of V1a or V1b receptor mRNAs as vasopressinergic neurons. Here, we suggest that the autocontrol exerted specifically by VP on vasopressinergic neurons is mediated through, at least, V1a and V1b subtype receptors.

  14. L-type CaV1.2 deletion in the cochlea but not in the brainstem reduces noise vulnerability: implication for CaV1.2 mediated control of cochlear BDNF expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa eZuccotti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs like CaV1.2 are assumed to play a crucial role for controlling release of trophic peptides including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. In the inner ear of the adult mouse, beside the well described L-VGCC CaV1.3, also CaV1.2 is expressed. Due to lethality of constitutive CaV1.2 KO mice, the function of this ion channel as well as its putative relationship to BDNF in the auditory system is entirely elusive. We recently described that BDNF plays a differential role for inner hair cell (IHC vesicles release in normal and traumatized condition. To elucidate a presumptive role of CaV1.2 during this process, two tissue-specific conditional mouse lines were generated. To distinguish the impact of CaV1.2 on the cochlea from that on feedback loops from higher auditory centers CaV1.2 was deleted, in one mouse line, under the Pax2 promoter (CaV1.2Pax2 leading to a deletion in the spiral ganglion neurons (SGN, dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN, and inferior colliculus (IC. In the second mouse line, the Egr2 promoter was used for deleting CaV1.2 (CaV1.2Egr2 in auditory brainstem nuclei. In both mouse lines normal hearing threshold and equal number of IHC release sites were observed. We found a slight reduction of auditory brainstem response (ABR wave I amplitudes in the CaV1.2Pax2 mice but not in the CaV1.2Egr2 mice. After noise exposure, CaV1.2Pax2 mice had less pronounced hearing loss that correlated with maintenance of ribbons in IHCs and less reduced activity in auditory nerve fibers, as well as in higher brain centers at supra-threshold sound stimulation. As reduced cochlear BDNF mRNA levels were found in CaV1.2Pax2 mice, we suggest that a CaV1.2 dependent step may participate in triggering part of the beneficial and deteriorating effects of cochlear BDNF in intact systems and during noise exposure through a pathway that is independent of Cav1.2 function in efferent circuits.

  15. Mapping of dihydropyridine binding residues in a less sensitive invertebrate L-type calcium channel (LCa v 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatore, Adriano; Boone, Adrienne; Lam, Stanley; Dawson, Taylor F; Zhorov, Boris; Spafford, J David

    2011-01-01

    Invertebrate L-type calcium channel, LCa(v) 1, isolated from the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is nearly indistinguishable from mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 (α1C) calcium channel in biophysical characteristics observed in vitro. These L-type channels are likely constrained within a narrow range of biophysical parameters to perform similar functions in the snail and mammalian cardiovascular systems. What distinguishes snail and mammalian L-type channels is a difference in dihydropyridine sensitivity: 100 nM isradipine exhibits a significant block of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2 currents without effect on snail LCa(v)1 currents. The native snail channel serves as a valuable surrogate for validating key residue differences identified from previous experimental and molecular modeling work. As predicted, three residue changes in LCa(v)1 (N_3o18, F_3i10, and I_4i12) replaced with DHP-sensing residues in respective positions of Ca(v) 1.2, (Q_3o18, Y_3i10, and M_4i12) raises the potency of isradipine block of LCa(v)1 channels to that of mammalian Ca(v) 1.2. Interestingly, the single N_3o18_Q mutation in LCa(v) 1 channels lowers DHP sensitivity even further and the triple mutation bearing enhanced isradipine sensitivity, still retains a reduced potency of agonist, (S)-Bay K8644.

  16. Responsiveness of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 scaffold to the gastric environment: Impact on structure and allergenic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sancho, Ana I; Wangorsch, Andrea; Jensen, Bettina M

    2011-01-01

    Four Bet v 1 homologous food allergens from celeriac (rApi g 1), apple (rMal d 1), peach (rPru p 1) and hazelnut (rCor a 1), were used to probe the structural responsiveness of the Bet v 1 scaffold to gastric digestion conditions and its impact on allergenicity.......Four Bet v 1 homologous food allergens from celeriac (rApi g 1), apple (rMal d 1), peach (rPru p 1) and hazelnut (rCor a 1), were used to probe the structural responsiveness of the Bet v 1 scaffold to gastric digestion conditions and its impact on allergenicity....

  17. Changes in the expression of NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in a distinct population of dorsal root ganglia innervating the rat knee joint in a model of chronic inflammatory joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Iain T; Martindale, Jo C; Woodhams, Peter L; Reeve, Alison J; Chessell, Iain P; McQueen, Daniel S

    2008-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels play an essential role in regulating the excitability of nociceptive primary afferent neurones. In particular the tetrodotoxin-sensitive (TTX-S) Na(V)1.7 and the tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 channels have been suggested to play a role in inflammatory pain. Previous work has revealed acute administration of inflammatory mediators, such as Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA) or carrageenan caused an upregulation in the levels of Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8 protein in DRG (dorsal root ganglia) tissue up to 4 days post-insult. In the present study, the expression of Na(V)1.7, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 was examined over a 28 day timecourse during a rat model of FCA-induced chronic inflammatory joint pain. Using the retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) and specific Na(V)1.7, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 sodium channel antibodies, immunohistochemical staining techniques were used to study sodium channel expression in a distinct population of L3-L5 knee joint afferent DRGs. In the ganglia, counts were made of positively labelled cells in the FB population. The results demonstrate that, following FCA injection, Na(V)1.9 expression is upregulated at days 14, 21 and 28 post-FCA, with Na(V)1.7 and Na(V)1.8 showing increased channel expression at days 14 and 28. These observations are accompanied by a unilateral joint hypersensitivity in the FCA-injected knee indicated by a behavioural shift in weight distribution measured using an incapacitance tester. The increased presence of these channels suggests that Na(V)1.7, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9 play a role, at least in part, in the maintenance of chronic inflammatory pain several weeks after the initial insult.

  18. Outbursting comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami): A miniature comet Holmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jewitt, David [Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Hanayama, Hidekazu; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Tomohiko [Department of Teacher Training, Hokkaido University of Education, 9 Hokumon, Asahikawa 070-8621 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    The short-period comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami, hereafter {sup V}1{sup )} was discovered visually by two amateur astronomers. The appearance of the comet was peculiar, consisting of an envelope, a spherical coma near the nucleus and a tail extending in the anti-solar direction. We investigated the brightness and the morphological development of the comet by taking optical images with ground-based telescopes. Our observations show that V1 experienced a large-scale explosion between UT 2010 October 31 and November 3. The color of the comet was consistent with the Sun (g' – R {sub C} = 0.61 ± 0.20, R {sub C} – I {sub C} = 0.20 ± 0.20, and B – R {sub C} = 0.93 ± 0.25), suggesting that dust particles were responsible for the brightening. We used a dynamical model to understand the peculiar morphology, and found that the envelope consisted of small grains (0.3-1 μm) expanding at a maximum speed of 500 ± 40 m s{sup –1}, while the tail and coma were composed of a wider range of dust particle sizes (0.4-570 μm) and expansion speeds 7-390 m s{sup –1}. The total mass of ejecta is ∼5 × 10{sup 8} kg and kinetic energy ∼5 × 10{sup 12} J. These values are much smaller than in the historic outburst of 17P/Holmes in 2007, but the energy per unit mass (1 × 10{sup 4} J kg{sup –1}) is comparable. The energy per unit mass is about 10% of the energy released during the crystallization of amorphous water ice suggesting that crystallization of buried amorphous ice can supply the mass and energy of the outburst ejecta.

  19. Mechanism of osthole inhibition of vascular Ca(v)1.2 current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, Fabio; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Ha, Le Minh; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Saponara, Simona

    2012-04-05

    Osthole is a coumarin extracted from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson. The medicinal plant is widely used in Vietnamese as well as Chinese traditional medicine as a vasodilating and antihypertensive agent. Here we have tested the proposition that the block of Ca(v)1.2 channels is mainly responsible for its vascular activity. An in-depth analysis of the effect of osthole on Ca(v)1.2 current (I(Ca1.2)) was performed in rat tail artery myocytes using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Osthole decreased I(Ca1.2) in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. At holding potentials of -50 and -80mV, the pIC(50) values were 4.78±0.07 and 4.36±0.08, respectively; the latter corresponded to the drug apparent dissociation constant for resting channels, K(R), of 47.8μM. Osthole speeded up the inactivation kinetics of I(Ca1.2) and shifted the voltage dependence of the inactivation curve to more negative potentials in a concentration-dependent manner, with an apparent dissociation constant for inactivated channels (K(I)) of 6.88μM. Block of I(Ca1.2) was frequency-dependent and the rate of recovery from inactivation was slowed down. In conclusion, osthole is a vascular Ca(v)1.2 channel antagonist stabilizing the channel in its inactivated state. This mechanism may account for the systolic blood pressure reduction induced by the drug in animal models of hypertension and points to osthole as a lead for the development of novel antihypertensive agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Outbursting Comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami): A Miniature Comet Holmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Jewitt, David; Hanayama, Hidekazu; Usui, Fumihiko; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Ohta, Kouji; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo; Watanabe, Jun-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The short-period comet P/2010 V1 (Ikeya-Murakami, hereafter "V1") was discovered visually by two amateur astronomers. The appearance of the comet was peculiar, consisting of an envelope, a spherical coma near the nucleus and a tail extending in the anti-solar direction. We investigated the brightness and the morphological development of the comet by taking optical images with ground-based telescopes. Our observations show that V1 experienced a large-scale explosion between UT 2010 October 31 and November 3. The color of the comet was consistent with the Sun (g' - R C = 0.61 ± 0.20, R C - I C = 0.20 ± 0.20, and B - R C = 0.93 ± 0.25), suggesting that dust particles were responsible for the brightening. We used a dynamical model to understand the peculiar morphology, and found that the envelope consisted of small grains (0.3-1 μm) expanding at a maximum speed of 500 ± 40 m s-1, while the tail and coma were composed of a wider range of dust particle sizes (0.4-570 μm) and expansion speeds 7-390 m s-1. The total mass of ejecta is ~5 × 108 kg and kinetic energy ~5 × 1012 J. These values are much smaller than in the historic outburst of 17P/Holmes in 2007, but the energy per unit mass (1 × 104 J kg-1) is comparable. The energy per unit mass is about 10% of the energy released during the crystallization of amorphous water ice suggesting that crystallization of buried amorphous ice can supply the mass and energy of the outburst ejecta.

  1. Maps of cone opsin input to mouse V1 and higher visual areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Issac; Coello-Reyes, Gabriela; Ko, Hee-Kyoung; Nauhaus, Ian

    2017-04-01

    Studies in the mouse retina have characterized the spatial distribution of an anisotropic ganglion cell and photoreceptor mosaic, which provides a solid foundation to study how the cortex pools from afferent parallel color channels. In particular, the mouse's retinal mosaic exhibits a gradient of wavelength sensitivity along its dorsoventral axis. Cones at the ventral extreme mainly express S opsin, which is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Then, moving toward the retina's dorsal extreme, there is a transition to M-opsin dominance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the retina's opsin gradient is recapitulated in cortical visual areas as a functional map of wavelength sensitivity. We first identified visual areas in each mouse by mapping retinotopy with intrinsic signal imaging (ISI). Next, we measured ISI responses to stimuli along different directions of the S- and M-color plane to quantify the magnitude of S and M input to each location of the retinotopic maps in five visual cortical areas (V1, AL, LM, PM, and RL). The results illustrate a significant change in the S:M-opsin input ratio along the axis of vertical retinotopy that is consistent with the gradient along the dorsoventral axis of the retina. In particular, V1 populations encoding the upper visual field responded to S-opsin contrast with 6.1-fold greater amplitude than to M-opsin contrast. V1 neurons encoding lower fields responded with 4.6-fold greater amplitude to M- than S-opsin contrast. The maps in V1 and higher visual areas (HVAs) underscore the significance of a wavelength sensitivity gradient for guiding the mouse's behavior.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Two elements of this study are particularly novel. For one, it is the first to quantify cone inputs to mouse visual cortex; we have measured cone input in five visual areas. Next, it is the first study to identify a feature map in the mouse visual cortex that is based on well-characterized anisotropy of cones in the retina; we have identified

  2. 6. 6 kV/1. 5 kA-class superconducting fault current limiter development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, D.; Yoneda, E.S.; Tsurunaga, K.; Tada, T. (Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)); Hara, T.; Ohkuma, T.; Yamamoto, T. (Engineering Research Center, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Nishi-Tsutsujigaoka, Chofu, Tokyo 182 (JP))

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the authors have developed and tested a 6.6 kV/1.5 kA-class fault current limiter wound with a 42-strand AC superconducting wire having ultra-fine MbTi filaments in a high resistivity matrix. In experiments, voltages up to 7.2 kV were applied to the limiter with phase angles of 0, 45, and 90 degrees. The limiter was able to limit the fault current to 1.8 kA successfully from the 55 kA short-circuit current that would flow in a circuit without limiter.

  3. Draft genome sequence of 'Treponema phagedenis' strain V1, isolated from bovine digital dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mamoona; Manzoor, Shahid; Pringle, Märit; Rosander, Anna; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2015-01-01

    'Treponema phagedenis' is considered to be a key agent in the pathogenesis of bovine digital dermatitis, an infectious foot condition of economic and animal welfare importance. We hereby report the draft sequence of 'T. phagedenis' strain V1. The draft genome assembly consists of 51 scaffolds comprising 3,129,551 bp and a GC-content of 39.9 %. Putative pathogenicity related factors have been identified in the genome that can be used in future studies to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms of 'T. phagedenis'.

  4. Plasticity Beyond V1: Reinforcement of Motion Perception upon Binocular Central Retinal Lesions in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnat, Kalina; Hu, Tjing-Tjing; Kossut, Małgorzata; Eysel, Ulf T; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2017-09-13

    Induction of a central retinal lesion in both eyes of adult mammals is a model for macular degeneration and leads to retinotopic map reorganization in the primary visual cortex (V1). Here we characterized the spatiotemporal dynamics of molecular activity levels in the central and peripheral representation of five higher-order visual areas, V2/18, V3/19, V4/21a,V5/PMLS, area 7, and V1/17, in adult cats with central 10° retinal lesions (both sexes), by means of real-time PCR for the neuronal activity reporter gene zif268. The lesions elicited a similar, permanent reduction in activity in the center of the lesion projection zone of area V1/17, V2/18, V3/19, and V4/21a, but not in the motion-driven V5/PMLS, which instead displayed an increase in molecular activity at 3 months postlesion, independent of visual field coordinates. Also area 7 only displayed decreased activity in its LPZ in the first weeks postlesion and increased activities in its periphery from 1 month onward. Therefore we examined the impact of central vision loss on motion perception using random dot kinematograms to test the capacity for form from motion detection based on direction and velocity cues. We revealed that the central retinal lesions either do not impair motion detection or even result in better performance, specifically when motion discrimination was based on velocity discrimination. In conclusion, we propose that central retinal damage leads to enhanced peripheral vision by sensitizing the visual system for motion processing relying on feedback from V5/PMLS and area 7.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Central retinal lesions, a model for macular degeneration, result in functional reorganization of the primary visual cortex. Examining the level of cortical reactivation with the molecular activity marker zif268 revealed reorganization in visual areas outside V1. Retinotopic lesion projection zones typically display an initial depression in zif268 expression, followed by partial recovery with

  5. Evaluation of the Early Access STR Kit v1 on the Ion Torrent PGM™ platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Zhou, Yishu; Liu, Feng; Yu, Jiao; Song, He; Shen, Hongying; Zhao, Bin; Jia, Fei; Hou, Guangwei; Jiang, Xianhua

    2016-07-01

    The Early Access STR Kit v1 is designed to detect 25-plex loci with next generation sequencing (NGS) technology on the Ion Torrent PGM™ platform, including 16 of 20 expanded Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) core loci (CSF1PO, D1S1656, D2S1338, D2S441, D3S1358, D5S818, D7S820, D8S1179, D10S1248, D13S317, D16S539, D19S433, D21S11, TH01, TPOX and vWA), 8 non-CODIS core loci (D1S1677, D2S1776, D4S2408, D5S2500.AC008791, D6S1043, D6S474, D9S2157 and D14S1434) and Amelogenin. In this study, we compared the Early Access STR Kit v1 with the Ion Torrent™ HID STR 10-plex to find out its improvements and explored an appropriate analytical threshold to enhance the performance. In addition, seven experiments were conducted to evaluate the Early Access STR Kit v1 such as studies of repeatability, concordance, sensitivity, mixtures, degraded samples, case-type samples and pedigrees. Other than a little discordance (0.95%) with CE-STR results observed at D21S11, NGS-STR results correctly reflected the sample being tested. Repeatable results were obtained from both initial PCRs and emPCRs aside from a few variations of allele coverage. Full profiles could be obtained from 100pg input DNA and >48.84% profiles from 10pg input DNA. Mixtures were easily detected at 9:1 and 1:9 ratios. This system could be adapted to case-type samples and degraded samples. As a whole, the Early Access STR Kit v1 is a robust, reliable and reproducible assay for NGS-STR typing and a potential tool for human identification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The cardiac sodium current Na(v)1.5 is functionally expressed in rabbit bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E; Webb, T I; Hollywood, M A; Sergeant, G P; McHale, N G; Thornbury, K D

    2013-08-15

    A collagenase-proteinase mixture was used to isolate airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) from rabbit bronchi, and membrane currents were recorded using the whole cell patch-clamp technique. Stepping from -100 mV to a test potential of -40 mV evoked a fast voltage-dependent Na(+) current, sometimes with an amplitude of several nanoamperes. The current disappeared within 15 min of exposure to papain + DTT (n = 6). Comparison of the current in ASMC with current mediated by NaV1.5 α-subunits expressed in human embryonic kidney cells revealed similar voltage dependences of activation (V1/2 = -42 mV for NaV1.5) and sensitivities to TTX (IC50 = 1.1 and 1.2 μM for ASMC and NaV1.5, respectively). The current in ASMC was also blocked by lidocaine (IC50 = 160 μM). Although veratridine, an agonist of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, reduced the peak current by 33%, it slowed inactivation, resulting in a fourfold increase in sustained current (measured at 25 ms after onset). In current-clamp mode, veratridine prolonged evoked action potentials from 37 ± 9 to 1,053 ± 410 ms (n = 8). Primers for NaV1.2-1.9 were used to amplify mRNA from groups of ∼20 isolated ASMC and from whole bronchial tissue by RT-PCR. Transcripts for NaV1.2, NaV1.3, and NaV1.5-1.9 were detected in whole tissue, but only NaV1.2 and NaV1.5 were detected in single cells. We conclude that freshly dispersed rabbit ASMC express a fast voltage-gated Na(+) current that is mediated mainly by the NaV1.5 subtype.

  7. Electrophysiological evidence for biased competition in V1 for fear expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Greg L; Anderson, Adam A K; Ferber, Susanne; Pratt, Jay

    2011-11-01

    When multiple stimuli are concurrently displayed in the visual field, they must compete for neural representation at the processing expense of their contemporaries. This biased competition is thought to begin as early as primary visual cortex, and can be driven by salient low-level stimulus features. Stimuli important for an organism's survival, such as facial expressions signaling environmental threat, might be similarly prioritized at this early stage of visual processing. In the present study, we used ERP recordings from striate cortex to examine whether fear expressions can bias the competition for neural representation at the earliest stage of retinotopic visuo-cortical processing when in direct competition with concurrently presented visual information of neutral valence. We found that within 50 msec after stimulus onset, information processing in primary visual cortex is biased in favor of perceptual representations of fear at the expense of competing visual information (Experiment 1). Additional experiments confirmed that the facial display's emotional content rather than low-level features is responsible for this prioritization in V1 (Experiment 2), and that this competition is reliant on a face's upright canonical orientation (Experiment 3). These results suggest that complex stimuli important for an organism's survival can indeed be prioritized at the earliest stage of cortical processing at the expense of competing information, with competition possibly beginning before encoding in V1.

  8. Probing rotational relaxation in HBr (v=1) using double resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Md Humayun; Antonov, Ivan O; Heaven, Michael C

    2009-02-21

    Rotational energy transfer in HBr(v=1)+HBr collisions has been investigated using an optical pump-probe double resonance technique at ambient temperature. Rotationally state selective excitation of v=1 for rotational levels in the range J=0-9 was achieved by stimulated Raman pumping, and the evolution of population was monitored using (2+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of the g (3) summation (-)-X (1) summation (+)(0-1) band. Collision-induced population transfer events with DeltaJ

  9. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis eHervais-Adelman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fast and automatic behavioral responses are required to avoid collision with an approaching stimulus. Accordingly, looming stimuli have been found to be highly salient and efficient attractors of attention due to the implication of potential collision and potential threat. Here, we address the question of whether looming motion is processed in the absence of any functional primary visual cortex and consequently without awareness. For this, we investigated a patient (TN suffering from complete, bilateral damage to his primary visual cortex. Using an fMRI paradigm, we measured TN’s brain activation during the presentation of looming, receding, rotating and static point lights, of which he was unaware. When contrasted with other conditions, looming was found to produce bilateral activation of the middle temporal areas, as well as the superior temporal sulcus and inferior parietal lobe. The latter are generally thought to be involved in multisensory processing of motion in extrapersonal space, as well as attentional capture and saliency. No activity was found close to the lesioned V1 area.This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1.

  10. Looming sensitive cortical regions without V1 input: evidence from a patient with bilateral cortical blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervais-Adelman, Alexis; Legrand, Lore B; Zhan, Minye; Tamietto, Marco; de Gelder, Beatrice; Pegna, Alan J

    2015-01-01

    Fast and automatic behavioral responses are required to avoid collision with an approaching stimulus. Accordingly, looming stimuli have been found to be highly salient and efficient attractors of attention due to the implication of potential collision and potential threat. Here, we address the question of whether looming motion is processed in the absence of any functional primary visual cortex and consequently without awareness. For this, we investigated a patient (TN) suffering from complete, bilateral damage to his primary visual cortex. Using an fMRI paradigm, we measured TN's brain activation during the presentation of looming, receding, rotating, and static point lights, of which he was unaware. When contrasted with other conditions, looming was found to produce bilateral activation of the middle temporal areas, as well as the superior temporal sulcus and inferior parietal lobe (IPL). The latter are generally thought to be involved in multisensory processing of motion in extrapersonal space, as well as attentional capture and saliency. No activity was found close to the lesioned V1 area. This demonstrates that looming motion is processed in the absence of awareness through direct subcortical projections to areas involved in multisensory processing of motion and saliency that bypass V1.

  11. FahamecV1:A Low Cost Automated Metaphase Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yilmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, FahamecV1 is introduced and investigated as a low cost and high accuracy solution for metaphase detection. Chromosome analysis is performed at the metaphase stage and high accuracy and automated detection of the metaphase stage plays an active role in decreasing analysis time. FahamecV1 includes an optic microscope, a motorized microscope stage, an electronic control unit, a camera, a computer and a software application. Printing components of the motorized microscope stage (using a 3D printer is of the main reasons for cost reduction. Operations such as stepper motor calibration, are detection, focusing, scanning, metaphase detection and saving of coordinates into a database are automatically performed. To detect metaphases, a filter named Metafilter is developed and applied. Average scanning time per preparate is 77 sec/cm2. True positive rate is calculated as 95.1%, true negative rate is calculated as 99.0% and accuracy is calculated as 98.8%.

  12. Experience-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in V1 Occurs without Microglial CX3CR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecter, Rachel W; Maher, Erin E; Welsh, Christina A; Stevens, Beth; Erisir, Alev; Bear, Mark F

    2017-11-01

    Brief monocular deprivation (MD) shifts ocular dominance and reduces the density of thalamic synapses in layer 4 of the mouse primary visual cortex (V1). We found that microglial lysosome content is also increased as a result of MD. Previous studies have shown that the microglial fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 is involved in synaptic development and hippocampal plasticity. We therefore tested the hypothesis that neuron-to-microglial communication via CX3CR1 is an essential component of visual cortical development and plasticity in male mice. Our data show that CX3CR1 is not required for normal development of V1 responses to visual stimulation, multiple forms of experience-dependent plasticity, or the synapse loss that accompanies MD in layer 4. By ruling out an essential role for fractalkine signaling, our study narrows the search for understanding how microglia respond to active synapse modification in the visual cortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglia in the visual cortex respond to monocular deprivation with increased lysosome content, but signaling through the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 is not an essential component in the mechanisms of visual cortical development or experience-dependent synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3710541-13$15.00/0.

  13. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, M.F.; Gilissen, L.J.W.J.; Esselink, G.D.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa) is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a

  14. Understanding and Leveraging a Supplier’s CMMI Efforts: A Guidebook for Acquirers (Revised for V1.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Support Process Management Project Planning (PP) Requirements Development (RD) Configuration Management (CM) Organizational Process Focus ( OPF ...Integrated Project Management IPM 3 Target Profile 3 Organizational Process Definition OPD 3 Organizational Process Focus OPF 3 Organizational...DEV V1.2 process area; replaced by OPM in CMMI-DEV V1.3) OPD Organizational Process Definition (process area) OPF Organizational Process Focus

  15. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez Herrero, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Klein, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    and progressive dysmyelinating neuropathy from birth with compromised myelin compaction, hypomyelination and distal axonal degeneration. A previous study using immunofluorescence showed that motor nerves deficient of myelin protein zero upregulate the Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel isoform, which...... is normally present only in restricted populations of sensory axons. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of motor axons in protein zero-deficient mice with particular emphasis on ectopic Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel. We combined 'threshold tracking' excitability studies...... by pharmacologic block using the subtype-selective Na(V)1.8 blocker A-803467 and chronically in Na(V)1.8 knock-outs. We found that in the context of dysmyelination, abnormal potassium ion currents and membrane depolarization, the ectopic Na(V)1.8 channels further impair the motor axon excitability in protein zero...

  16. Cortical plasticity following stripe rearing in the marsupial Monodelphis domestica: neural response properties of V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, James C; Donaldson, Michaela S; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2017-02-01

    The functional organization of the primary visual area (V1) and the importance of sensory experience in its normal development have been well documented in eutherian mammals. However, very few studies have investigated the response properties of V1 neurons in another large class of mammals, or whether sensory experience plays a role in shaping their response properties. Thus we reared opossums (Monodelphis domestica) in normal and vertically striped cages until they reached adulthood. They were then anesthetized using urethane, and electrophysiological techniques were used to examine neuronal responses to different orientations, spatial and temporal frequencies, and contrast levels. For normal opossums, we observed responses to the temporal and spatial characteristics of the stimulus to be similar to those described in small, nocturnal, eutherian mammals such as rats and mice; neurons in V1 responded maximally to stimuli at 0.09 cycles per degree and 2.12 cycles per second. Unlike other eutherians, but similar to other marsupials investigated, only 40% of the neurons were orientation selective. In stripe-reared animals, neurons were significantly more likely to respond to vertical stimuli at a wider range of spatial frequencies, and were more sensitive to gratings at lower contrast values compared with normal animals. These results are the first to demonstrate experience-dependent plasticity in the visual system of a marsupial species. Thus the ability of cortical neurons to alter their properties based on the dynamics of the visual environment predates the emergence of eutherian mammals and was likely present in our earliest mammalian ancestors. These results are the first description of visual response properties of the most commonly studied marsupial model organism, the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Further, these results are the first to demonstrate experience-dependent plasticity in the visual system of a marsupial species. Thus the ability of

  17. Head-to-head comparison of PI-RADS v2 and PI-RADS v1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanec, Stephan; Helbich, Thomas H; Bickel, Hubert; Pinker-Domenig, Katja; Georg, Dietmar; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Aulitzky, Wolfgang; Susani, Martin; Baltzer, Pascal A

    2016-06-01

    To compare the reproducibility and diagnostic performance of PI-RADS version 2 (v2) and version 1 (v1) for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) on multiparametric MRI. This IRB-approved retrospective study included 65 consecutive biopsy-naïve or biopsy-negative patients suspicious for PCa (mean age: 65 years, mean PSA: 10.8ng/ml) who were undergoing MR-guided biopsy after multiparametric 3T prostate MRI (T2w, DWI, DCE). Two independent readers (R1; R2) scored the prostate lesions according to the v2 score and the v1 sum score. Diagnostic measures (sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC-curve) were compared for all cases and stratified by location (transitional zone, TZ, peripheral zone, PZ). Inter-reader agreement was assessed by kappa statistics. Inter reader agreement for v2 and v1 was substantial to almost perfect (kappa v2: 0.71, v1: 0.81). Overall, sensitivity between both readers and methods did not differ (p>0.05). Overall specificity was higher using v1 compared to v2 (R1: p=0.0078, R2: p=0.0313) In the TZ, v2 showed a higher AUC (0.81-0.84) compared to v1 (AUC 0.77-0.78). Here, the sensitivity of v2 (87.5-100%) was higher than that of v1 (75%) while v2 specificity (50%-56.3%) was lower than that of v1 (68.8-75%). In the PZ, AUCs were higher using v1 (AUC 0.82-0.83) compared to v2 (AUC 0.61-0.63). The specificity for v1 was higher (43.8-62.3%) than that for v2 (12.5-18.8%) while both v2 and v1 achieved 100% sensitivity. PI-RADS v2 and v1 inter-reader agreement is excellent, but their diagnostic performance differs. While v2 appears to be the preferable method for the evaluation of TZ lesions, v1 performs better in the PZ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurotrophin-evoked depolarization requires the sodium channel Na(V)1.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert; Kafitz, Karl W; Konnerth, Arthur

    2002-10-17

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are essential for normal brain function. Many types of neurons in the central nervous system are excited by BDNF or neurotrophin-4/5, an action that has recently been implicated in synaptic plasticity. The mechanisms involved in this transmitter-like action of neurotrophins remains unclear. Here, by screening candidate genes with an antisense messenger RNA expression approach and by co-expressing the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB and various sodium channels, we demonstrate that the tetrodotoxin-insensitive sodium channel Na(V)1.9 underlies the neurotrophin-evoked excitation. These results establish the molecular basis of neurotrophin-evoked depolarization and reveal a mechanism of ligand-mediated sodium channel activation.

  19. Enzyme discovery beyond homology: a unique hydroxynitrile lyase in the Bet v1 superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Elisa; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Koehler, Eva-Maria; Diepold, Matthias; Steiner, Kerstin; Darnhofer, Barbara; Hartler, Jürgen; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Gruber-Khadjawi, Mandana; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Gruber, Karl; Winkler, Margit; Glieder, Anton

    2017-05-01

    Homology and similarity based approaches are most widely used for the identification of new enzymes for biocatalysis. However, they are not suitable to find truly novel scaffolds with a desired function and this averts options and diversity. Hydroxynitrile lyases (HNLs) are an example of non-homologous isofunctional enzymes for the synthesis of chiral cyanohydrins. Due to their convergent evolution, finding new representatives is challenging. Here we show the discovery of unique HNL enzymes from the fern Davallia tyermannii by coalescence of transcriptomics, proteomics and enzymatic screening. It is the first protein with a Bet v1-like protein fold exhibiting HNL activity, and has a new catalytic center, as shown by protein crystallography. Biochemical properties of D. tyermannii HNLs open perspectives for the development of a complementary class of biocatalysts for the stereoselective synthesis of cyanohydrins. This work shows that systematic integration of -omics data facilitates discovery of enzymes with unpredictable sequences and helps to extend our knowledge about enzyme diversity.

  20. Activation of neurokinin 3 receptor increases Na(v)1.9 current in enteric neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copel, Carine; Osorio, Nancy; Crest, Marcel; Gola, Maurice; Delmas, Patrick; Clerc, Nadine

    2009-04-01

    The intrinsic primary afferent neurons (IPANs) of the guinea pig enteric nervous system express Na(v)1.9 sodium channels that produce a persistent TTX-resistant current having a low activation threshold and slow gating kinetics. These neurons receive slow EPSPs induced mainly by the activation of neurokinin 3 receptors (NK3r). Here, we demonstrate that senktide, a specific NK3r agonist, potentiates the Na(v)1.9 current (I(Nav1.9)) in IPANs. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from IPANs in duodenum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparations, we show that short (1-5 s) and long (up to 1 min) applications of senktide, increase the I(Nav1.9) peak current up to 13-fold. The effect, blocked by a NK3r antagonist SB235375 is transient, lasting approximately 2 min and is due to a negative shift of the activation voltage by approximately 20 mV and of fast inactivation by approximately 10 mV. As a consequence, the window current resulting from the product of the activation and fast inactivation curves is shifted and enlarged. The transient effect of senktide is likely to be due to the fast desensitization of NK3r. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation with phorbol or oleoyl acetylglycerol also increases I(Nav1.9), although persistently, by inducing similar voltage-dependent changes. Current-clamp experiments showed that I(Nav1.9) modulation by senktide lowers action potential threshold and increases excitability. The increase in I(Nav1.9) by NK3r activation is also likely to amplify slow EPSPs generated in the IPANs. These changes in excitability potentially have a profound effect on the entire enteric synaptic circuit and ultimately on gut motility and secretion.

  1. Natural image coding in V1: how much use is orientation selectivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Eichhorn

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation selectivity is the most striking feature of simple cell coding in V1 that has been shown to emerge from the reduction of higher-order correlations in natural images in a large variety of statistical image models. The most parsimonious one among these models is linear Independent Component Analysis (ICA, whereas second-order decorrelation transformations such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA do not yield oriented filters. Because of this finding, it has been suggested that the emergence of orientation selectivity may be explained by higher-order redundancy reduction. To assess the tenability of this hypothesis, it is an important empirical question how much more redundancy can be removed with ICA in comparison to PCA or other second-order decorrelation methods. Although some previous studies have concluded that the amount of higher-order correlation in natural images is generally insignificant, other studies reported an extra gain for ICA of more than 100%. A consistent conclusion about the role of higher-order correlations in natural images can be reached only by the development of reliable quantitative evaluation methods. Here, we present a very careful and comprehensive analysis using three evaluation criteria related to redundancy reduction: In addition to the multi-information and the average log-loss, we compute complete rate-distortion curves for ICA in comparison with PCA. Without exception, we find that the advantage of the ICA filters is small. At the same time, we show that a simple spherically symmetric distribution with only two parameters can fit the data significantly better than the probabilistic model underlying ICA. This finding suggests that, although the amount of higher-order correlation in natural images can in fact be significant, the feature of orientation selectivity does not yield a large contribution to redundancy reduction within the linear filter bank models of V1 simple cells.

  2. The voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 is an effector of peripheral inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Fumimasa; Wang, Haibin; Costigan, Michael; Allchorne, Andrew J; Hatcher, Jon P; Egerton, Julie; Stean, Tania; Morisset, Valerie; Grose, David; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Chessell, Iain P; Tate, Simon; Green, Paula J; Woolf, Clifford J

    2006-12-13

    We used a mouse with deletion of exons 4, 5, and 6 of the SCN11A (sodium channel, voltage-gated, type XI, alpha) gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9 to assess its contribution to pain. Na(v)1.9 is present in nociceptor sensory neurons that express TRPV1, bradykinin B2, and purinergic P2X3 receptors. In Na(v)1.9-/- mice, the non-inactivating persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium TTXr-Per current is absent, whereas TTXr-Slow is unchanged. TTXs currents are unaffected by the mutation of Na(v)1.9. Pain hypersensitivity elicited by intraplantar administration of prostaglandin E2, bradykinin, interleukin-1beta, capsaicin, and P2X3 and P2Y receptor agonists, but not NGF, is either reduced or absent in Na(v)1.9-/- mice, whereas basal thermal and mechanical pain sensitivity is unchanged. Thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity produced by peripheral inflammation (intraplanatar complete Freund's adjuvant) is substantially diminished in the null allele mutant mice, whereas hypersensitivity in two neuropathic pain models is unchanged in the Na(v)1.9-/- mice. Na(v)1.9 is, we conclude, an effector of the hypersensitivity produced by multiple inflammatory mediators on nociceptor peripheral terminals and therefore plays a key role in mediating peripheral sensitization.

  3. NaV1.8 channels are expressed in large, as well as small, diameter sensory afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Renuka; McGrew, Stephanie Y; Baxter, James C; Howard, Jason R; Elmslie, Keith S

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) express a subset of voltage dependent sodium channels (NaV) including NaV1.1, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8 and 1.9. Previous work supported preferential localization of NaV1.8 channels to small-medium diameter, nociceptive afferent neurons. However, we recently published evidence that NaV1.8 was the dominant NaV channel expressed in the somas of small, medium and large diameter muscle afferent neurons, which is consistent with other reports. Here, we extend those results to show that NaV1.8 expression is not correlated with afferent neuron diameter. Using immunocytochemistry, we found NaV1.8 expression in ~50% of sensory afferent neurons with diameters ranging from 20 to 70 µm. In addition, electrophysiological analysis shows that the kinetic and inactivation properties of NaV1.8 current are invariant with neuron size. These data add further support to the idea that NaV1.8 contributes to the electrical excitability of both nociceptive and non-nociceptive sensory neurons.

  4. Characterization of PR-10 genes from eight Betula species and detection of Bet v 1 isoforms in birch pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van't Westende Wendy PC

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bet v 1 is an important cause of hay fever in northern Europe. Bet v 1 isoforms from the European white birch (Betula pendula have been investigated extensively, but the allergenic potency of other birch species is unknown. The presence of Bet v 1 and closely related PR-10 genes in the genome was established by amplification and sequencing of alleles from eight birch species that represent the four subgenera within the genus Betula. Q-TOF LC-MSE was applied to identify which PR-10/Bet v 1 genes are actually expressed in pollen and to determine the relative abundances of individual isoforms in the pollen proteome. Results All examined birch species contained several PR-10 genes. In total, 134 unique sequences were recovered. Sequences were attributed to different genes or pseudogenes that were, in turn, ordered into seven subfamilies. Five subfamilies were common to all birch species. Genes of two subfamilies were expressed in pollen, while each birch species expressed a mixture of isoforms with at least four different isoforms. Isoforms that were similar to isoforms with a high IgE-reactivity (Bet v 1a = PR-10.01A01 were abundant in all species except B. lenta, while the hypoallergenic isoform Bet v 1d (= PR-10.01B01 was only found in B. pendula and its closest relatives. Conclusion Q-TOF LC-MSE allows efficient screening of Bet v 1 isoforms by determining the presence and relative abundance of these isoforms in pollen. B. pendula contains a Bet v 1-mixture in which isoforms with a high and low IgE-reactivity are both abundant. With the possible exception of B. lenta, isoforms identical or very similar to those with a high IgE-reactivity were found in the pollen proteome of all examined birch species. Consequently, these species are also predicted to be allergenic with regard to Bet v 1 related allergies.

  5. Control of Neurotransmission by NaV1.7 in Human, Guinea Pig, and Mouse Airway Parasympathetic Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocmalova, Michaela; Kollarik, Marian; Canning, Brendan J; Ru, Fei; Adam Herbstsomer, R; Meeker, Sonya; Fonquerna, Silvia; Aparici, Monica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Chi, Xian Xuan; Li, Baolin; Wilenkin, Ben; McDermott, Jeff; Nisenbaum, Eric; Krajewski, Jeffrey L; Undem, Bradley J

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about the neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) that control neurotransmission in the parasympathetic nervous system. We evaluated the expression of the α subunits of each of the nine NaVs in human, guinea pig, and mouse airway parasympathetic ganglia. We combined this information with a pharmacological analysis of selective NaV blockers on parasympathetic contractions of isolated airway smooth muscle. As would be expected from previous studies, tetrodotoxin potently blocked the parasympathetic responses in the airways of each species. Gene expression analysis showed that that NaV 1.7 was virtually the only tetrodotoxin-sensitive NaV1 gene expressed in guinea pig and human airway parasympathetic ganglia, where mouse ganglia expressed NaV1.1, 1.3, and 1.7. Using selective pharmacological blockers supported the gene expression results, showing that blocking NaV1.7 alone can abolish the responses in guinea pig and human bronchi, but not in mouse airways. To block the responses in mouse airways requires that NaV1.7 along with NaV1.1 and/or NaV1.3 is blocked. These results may suggest novel indications for NaV1.7-blocking drugs, in which there is an overactive parasympathetic drive, such as in asthma. The data also raise the potential concern of antiparasympathetic side effects for systemic NaV1.7 blockers. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. Exclusion of alternative exon 33 of CaV1.2 calcium channels in heart is proarrhythmogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Wang, Juejin; Liao, Ping; Bartels, Peter; Zhang, Hengyu; Yu, Dejie; Liang, Mui Cheng; Poh, Kian Keong; Yu, Chye Yun; Jiang, Fengli; Yong, Tan Fong; Wong, Yuk Peng; Hu, Zhenyu; Huang, Hua; Zhang, Guangqin; Galupo, Mary Joyce; Bian, Jin-Song; Ponniah, Sathivel; Trasti, Scott Lee; See, Kelvin; Foo, Roger; Hoppe, Uta C; Herzig, Stefan; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2017-05-23

    Alternative splicing changes the CaV1.2 calcium channel electrophysiological property, but the in vivo significance of such altered channel function is lacking. Structure-function studies of heterologously expressed CaV1.2 channels could not recapitulate channel function in the native milieu of the cardiomyocyte. To address this gap in knowledge, we investigated the role of alternative exon 33 of the CaV1.2 calcium channel in heart function. Exclusion of exon 33 in CaV1.2 channels has been reported to shift the activation potential -10.4 mV to the hyperpolarized direction, and increased expression of CaV1.2Δ33 channels was observed in rat myocardial infarcted hearts. However, how a change in CaV1.2 channel electrophysiological property, due to alternative splicing, might affect cardiac function in vivo is unknown. To address these questions, we generated mCacna1c exon 33(-/-)-null mice. These mice contained CaV1.2Δ33 channels with a gain-of-function that included conduction of larger currents that reflects a shift in voltage dependence and a modest increase in single-channel open probability. This altered channel property underscored the development of ventricular arrhythmia, which is reflected in significantly more deaths of exon 33(-/-) mice from β-adrenergic stimulation. In vivo telemetric recordings also confirmed increased frequencies in premature ventricular contractions, tachycardia, and lengthened QT interval. Taken together, the significant decrease or absence of exon 33-containing CaV1.2 channels is potentially proarrhythmic in the heart. Of clinical relevance, human ischemic and dilated cardiomyopathy hearts showed increased inclusion of exon 33. However, the possible role that inclusion of exon 33 in CaV1.2 channels may play in the pathogenesis of human heart failure remains unclear.

  7. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin....../vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold...

  8. Cold-aggravated pain in humans caused by a hyperactive NaV1.9 channel mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Leipold, Enrico; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Frick, Miya; Gong, Ping; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Voigt, Martin; Katona, Istvan; Oliver Goral, R.; Altm?ller, Janine; N?rnberg, Peter; Weis, Joachim; H?bner, Christian A.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Kurth, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the human SCN11A-encoded voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.9 cause severe pain disorders ranging from neuropathic pain to congenital pain insensitivity. However, the entire spectrum of the NaV1.9 diseases has yet to be defined. Applying whole-exome sequencing we here identify a missense change (p.V1184A) in NaV1.9, which leads to cold-aggravated peripheral pain in humans. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that p.V1184A shifts the voltage dependence of channel op...

  9. Discovery of a biarylamide series of potent, state-dependent NaV1.7 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, Laurie B; DiMauro, Erin F; Nguyen, Hanh N; Chakka, Nagasree; Du, Bingfan; Foti, Robert S; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Jarosh, Michael; La, Daniel S; Ligutti, Joseph; Milgram, Benjamin C; Moyer, Bryan D; Peterson, Emily A; Roberts, John; Yu, Violeta L; Weiss, Matthew M

    2017-08-15

    The NaV1.7 ion channel has garnered considerable attention as a target for the treatment of pain. Herein we detail the discovery and structure-activity relationships of a novel series of biaryl amides. Optimization led to the identification of several state-dependent, potent and metabolically stable inhibitors which demonstrated promising levels of selectivity over NaV1.5 and good rat pharmacokinetics. Compound 18, which demonstrated preferential inhibition of a slow inactivated state of NaV1.7, was advanced into a rat formalin study where upon reaching unbound drug levels several fold over the rat NaV1.7 IC50 it failed to demonstrate a robust reduction in nociceptive behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7 is essential for lowering heat pain threshold after burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Shannon D; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Uçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-08-08

    Marked hypersensitivity to heat and mechanical (pressure) stimuli develop after a burn injury, but the neural mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. In this study, we establish a new mouse model of focal second-degree burn injury to investigate the molecular and cellular basis for burn injury-induced pain. This model features robust injury-induced behavioral effects and tissue-specific altered cytokine profile, but absence of glial activation in spinal dorsal horn. Three voltage-gated sodium channels, Na(v)1.7, Na(v)1.8, and Na(v)1.9, are preferentially expressed in peripheral somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and have been implicated in injury-induced neuronal hyperexcitability. Using knock-out mice, we provide evidence that Na(v)1.7 selectively contributes to burn-induced hypersensitivity to heat, but not mechanical, stimuli. After burn model injury, wild-type mice display increased sensitivity to heat stimuli, and a normally non-noxious warm stimulus induces activity-dependent Fos expression in spinal dorsal horn neurons. Strikingly, both effects are absent in Na(v)1.7 conditional knock-out (cKO) mice. Furthermore, burn injury increases density and shifts activation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive currents in a hyperpolarized direction, both pro-excitatory properties, in DRG neurons from wild-type but not Na(v)1.7 cKO mice. We propose that, in sensory neurons damaged by burn injury to the hindpaw, Na(v)1.7 currents contribute to the hyperexcitability of sensory neurons, their communication with postsynaptic spinal pain pathways, and behavioral thresholds to heat stimuli. Our results offer insights into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of modality-specific pain signaling, and suggest Na(v)1.7-blocking drugs may be effective in burn patients.

  11. Vibroacoustic diagnostic monitoring of selected primary coolant circuit components of the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahna, J.; Jaros, I. (Forschungsinstitut fuer Kernkraftwerke, Jaslovske Bohunice (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-02-01

    An information is given about vibroacoustic monitoring systems installed at the two units of the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant for oscillation monitoring of the reactor coolant pumps and reactor pressure vessel. Signal processing and analysis techniques have been developed for diagnostic measurements. It is reported on some experience gained from oscillation measurements at the reactor coolant pumps of the V-1 nuclear power plant since commissioning of the plant.

  12. Regulation of the cardiac Na+ channel NaV1.5 by post-translational modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marionneau, Céline; Abriel, Hugues

    2015-05-01

    The cardiac voltage-gated Na(+) channel, Na(V)1.5, is responsible for the upstroke of the action potential in cardiomyocytes and for efficient propagation of the electrical impulse in the myocardium. Even subtle alterations of Na(V)1.5 function, as caused by mutations in its gene SCN5A, may lead to many different arrhythmic phenotypes in carrier patients. In addition, acquired malfunctions of Na(V)1.5 that are secondary to cardiac disorders such as heart failure and cardiomyopathies, may also play significant roles in arrhythmogenesis. While it is clear that the regulation of Na(V)1.5 protein expression and function tightly depends on genetic mechanisms, recent studies have demonstrated that Na(V)1.5 is the target of various post-translational modifications that are pivotal not only in physiological conditions, but also in disease. In this review, we examine the recent literature demonstrating glycosylation, phosphorylation by Protein Kinases A and C, Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase II, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase, Serum- and Glucocorticoid-inducible Kinases, Fyn and Adenosine Monophosphate-activated Protein Kinase, methylation, acetylation, redox modifications, and ubiquitylation of Na(V)1.5. Modern and sensitive mass spectrometry approaches, applied directly to channel proteins that were purified from native cardiac tissues, have enabled the determination of the precise location of post-translational modification sites, thus providing essential information for understanding the mechanistic details of these regulations. The current challenge is first, to understand the roles of these modifications on the expression and the function of Na(V)1.5, and second, to further identify other chemical modifications. It is postulated that the diversity of phenotypes observed with Na(V)1.5-dependent disorders may partially arise from the complex post-translational modifications of channel protein components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. IEEE Std 730 Software Quality Assurance: Supporting CMMI-DEV v1.3, Product and Process Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    Architecture and Framework – CMMI ® for Acquisition, ACQ • 22 process areas – include process & product quality assurance, PPQA – CMMI ® for Services, SVC ...2011 Walz IEEE Std 730 Software Quality Assurance: Supporting CMMI -DEV v1.3, Product and Process Quality Assurance 1 John Walz 2012 President...Quality Assurance: Supporting CMMI -DEV v1.3, Product and Process Quality Assurance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  14. GTP up-regulated persistent Na+ current and enhanced nociceptor excitability require NaV1.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostman, Johan A R; Nassar, Mohammed A; Wood, John N; Baker, Mark D

    2008-02-15

    Persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-r) sodium currents up-regulated by intracellular GTP have been invoked as the site of action of peripheral inflammatory mediators that lower pain thresholds, and ascribed to the Na(V)1.9 sodium channel. Here we describe the properties of a global knock-out of Na(V)1.9 produced by replacing exons 4 and 5 in SCN11A with a neomycin resistance cassette, deleting the domain 1 voltage sensor and introducing a frameshift mutation. Recordings from small (channel loss eliminates a TTX-r persistent current. Intracellular dialysis of GTP-gamma-S did not cause an up-regulation of persistent Na(+) current in Na(V)1.9-null neurones and the concomitant negative shift in voltage-threshold seen in wild-type and heterozygous neurones. Heterologous hNa(V)1.9 expression in Na(V)1.9 knock-out sensory neurones confirms that the human clone can restore the persistent Na(+) current. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Na(V)1.9 underlies the G-protein pathway-regulated TTX-r persistent Na(+) current in small diameter sensory neurones that may drive spontaneous discharge in nociceptive nerve fibres during inflammation.

  15. Chemical modification of Art v 1, a major mugwort pollen allergen, by cis-aconitylation and citraconylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGANA STANIĆ

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Art v 1 is the major allergen of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris pollen, a significant cause of hay fever all over Europe. Specific immunotherapy is the only treatment modality for allergic disease. Application of modified allergens makes the treatment safer and more efficient. In this work, two out of three (citraconic anhydride, cis-aconitic anhydride, 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride tested anhydrides were proven to be suitable for chemical modifications of allergens. Art v 1 was modified by cis-aconitylation and citraconylation in order to obtain derivatives of Art v 1 that may be suitable for further immunological testing. Acylation of Art v 1 gave derivatives (caaArt v 1 and citArt v 1 with about 80 % modified amino groups. The derivatives were in the monomeric form and had dramatically reduced pI values. Both derivatives were relatively stable at neutral pH values, while the acyl groups undergo hydrolysis under acidic conditions. Modification of allergens by cis-aconitylation and citraconylation could be a new tool for obtaining allergoids.

  16. QR in V1--an ECG sign associated with right ventricular strain and adverse clinical outcome in pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucher, Nils; Walpoth, Nazan; Wustmann, Kerstin; Noveanu, Markus; Gertsch, Marc

    2003-06-01

    To test the hypothesis that Qr in V(1)is a predictor of pulmonary embolism, right ventricular strain, and adverse clinical outcome. ECG's from 151 patients with suspected pulmonary embolism were blindly interpreted by two observers. Echocardiography, troponin I, and pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels were obtained in 75 patients with pulmonary embolism. Qr in V(1)(14 vs 0 in controls; p or =1 mV (15 vs 1 in controls; p=0.0002) were more frequently present in patients with pulmonary embolism. Sensitivity and specificity of Qr in V(1)and T wave inversion in V(2)for predicting right ventricular dysfunction were 31/97% and 45/94%, respectively. Three of five patients who died in-hospital and 11 of 20 patients with a complicated course, presented with Qr in V(1). After adjustment for right ventricular strain including ECG, echocardiography, pro-brain natriuretic peptide and troponin I levels, Qr in V(1)(OR 8.7, 95%CI 1.4-56.7; p=0.02) remained an independent predictor of adverse outcome. Among the ECG signs seen in patients with acute pulmonary embolism, Qr in V(1)is closely related to the presence of right ventricular dysfunction, and is an independent predictor of adverse clinical outcome.

  17. Gating and modulation of presumptive NaV1.9 channels in enteric and spinal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, Bertrand; Osorio, Nancy; Padilla, Françoise; Crest, Marcel; Delmas, Patrick

    2004-05-01

    The NaV1.9 subunit is expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sensory myenteric neurons in which it generates 'persistent' tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents of yet unknown physiological functions. Here, we have analyzed these currents in details by combining single-channel and whole-cell recordings from cultured rat DRG and myenteric neurons. Comparison of single-channel with whole-cell data indicates that recording using internal CsCl best reflects the basic electrical features of NaV1.9 currents. Inclusion of fluoride in the pipette solution caused a negative shift in the activation and inactivation gates of NaV1.9 but not NaV1.8. Fluoride acts by promoting entry of NaV1.9 channels into a preopen closed state, which causes a strong bias towards opening and enhances the ability of sensory neurons to sustain spiking. Thus, the modulation of the resting-closed states of NaV1.9 channels strongly influences nociceptor excitability and may provide a mechanism by which inflammatory mediators alter pain threshold.

  18. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 V1/V2 domain with broadly neutralizing antibody PG9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Pancera, Marie; Carrico, Chris; Gorman, Jason; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Khayat, Reza; Louder, Robert; Pejchal, Robert; Sastry, Mallika; Dai, Kaifan; O’Dell, Sijy; Patel, Nikita; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Diwanji, Devan; Georgiev, Ivelin; Kwon, Young Do; Lee, Doyung; Louder, Mark K.; Moquin, Stephanie; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Bonsignori, Mattia; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Haynes, Barton F.; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Walker, Laura M.; Phogat, Sanjay; Wyatt, Richard; Orwenyo, Jared; Wang, Lai-Xi; Arthos, James; Bewley, Carole A.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Schief, William R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH); (Scripps); (Duke); (IAVI); (Maryland-MED)

    2012-12-13

    Variable regions 1 and 2 (V1/V2) of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) gp120 envelope glycoprotein are critical for viral evasion of antibody neutralization, and are themselves protected by extraordinary sequence diversity and N-linked glycosylation. Human antibodies such as PG9 nonetheless engage V1/V2 and neutralize 80% of HIV-1 isolates. Here we report the structure of V1/V2 in complex with PG9. V1/V2 forms a four-stranded {beta}-sheet domain, in which sequence diversity and glycosylation are largely segregated to strand-connecting loops. PG9 recognition involves electrostatic, sequence-independent and glycan interactions: the latter account for over half the interactive surface but are of sufficiently weak affinity to avoid autoreactivity. The structures of V1/V2-directed antibodies CH04 and PGT145 indicate that they share a common mode of glycan penetration by extended anionic loops. In addition to structurally defining V1/V2, the results thus identify a paradigm of antibody recognition for highly glycosylated antigens, which - with PG9 - involves a site of vulnerability comprising just two glycans and a strand.

  19. Population representation of visual information in areas V1 and V2 of amblyopic macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooner, Christopher; Hallum, Luke E; Kumbhani, Romesh D; Ziemba, Corey M; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; Kelly, Jenna G; Majaj, Najib J; Movshon, J Anthony; Kiorpes, Lynne

    2015-09-01

    Amblyopia is a developmental disorder resulting in poor vision in one eye. The mechanism by which input to the affected eye is prevented from reaching the level of awareness remains poorly understood. We recorded simultaneously from large populations of neurons in the supragranular layers of areas V1 and V2 in 6 macaques that were made amblyopic by rearing with artificial strabismus or anisometropia, and 1 normally reared control. In agreement with previous reports, we found that cortical neuronal signals driven through the amblyopic eyes were reduced, and that cortical neurons were on average more strongly driven by the non-amblyopic than by the amblyopic eyes. We analyzed multiunit recordings using standard population decoding methods, and found that visual signals from the amblyopic eye, while weakened, were not degraded enough to explain the behavioral deficits. Thus additional losses must arise in downstream processing. We tested the idea that under monocular viewing conditions, only signals from neurons dominated by - rather than driven by - the open eye might be used. This reduces the proportion of neuronal signals available from the amblyopic eye, and amplifies the interocular difference observed at the level of single neurons. We conclude that amblyopia might arise in part from degradation in the neuronal signals from the amblyopic eye, and in part from a reduction in the number of signals processed by downstream areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Crustal moment of inertia of glitching pulsars with the KDE0v1 Skyrme interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhuri, K.; Routray, T.R.; Pattnaik, S.P. [Sambalpur University, School of Physics, Jyotivihar (India); Basu, D.N. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Kolkata (India)

    2017-07-15

    The mass, radius and crustal fraction of moment of inertia in neutron stars are calculated using β-equilibrated nuclear matter obtained from the Skyrme effective interaction. The transition density, pressure and proton fraction at the inner edge separating the liquid core from the solid crust of the neutron stars are determined from the thermodynamic stability conditions using the KDE0v1 set. The neutron star masses obtained by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equations using neutron star matter obtained from this set are able to describe highly massive compact stars ∝ 2M {sub CircleDot}. The crustal fraction of the moment of inertia can be extracted from studying pulsar glitches. This fraction is highly dependent on the core-crust transition pressure and corresponding density. These results for pressure and density at core-crust transition together with the observed minimum crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia provide a limit for the radius of the Vela pulsar, R ≥ 3.69 + 3.44M/M {sub CircleDot}. Present calculations suggest that the crustal fraction of the total moment of inertia can be ∝ 6.3% due to crustal entrainment caused by the Bragg reflection of unbound neutrons by lattice ions. (orig.)

  1. The arginine vasopressin V1b receptor gene and prosociality: Mediation role of emotional empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan; Shang, Siyuan; Su, Yanjie

    2015-09-01

    The vasopressin V1b receptor (AVPR1B) gene has been shown to be closely associated with bipolar disorder and depression. However, whether it relates to positive social outcomes, such as empathy and prosocial behavior, remains unknown. This study explored the possible role of the AVPR1B gene rs28373064 in empathy and prosociality. A total of 256 men, who were genetically unrelated, non-clinical ethnic Han Chinese college students, participated in the study. Prosociality was tested by measuring the prosocial tendencies of cognitive and emotional empathy using the Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI). The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs28373064, was genotyped using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. The results suggest that the AVPR1B gene rs28373064 is linked to emotional empathy and prosociality. The mediation analysis indicated that the effect of the AVPR1B gene on prosociality might be mediated by emotional empathy. This study demonstrated the link between the AVPR1B gene and prosociality and provided evidence that emotional empathy might mediate the relation between the AVPR1B gene and prosociality. © 2015 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Perceptual Decision Making Through the Eyes of a Large-scale Neural Model of V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing eShi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sparse coding has been posited as an efficient information processing strategy employed by sensory systems, particularly visual cortex. Substantial theoretical and experimental work has focused on the issue of sparse encoding, namely how the early visual system maps the scene into a sparse representation. In this paper we investigate the complementary issue of sparse decoding, for example given activity generated by a realistic mapping of the visual scene to neuronal spike trains, how do downstream neurons best utilize this representation to generate a decision. Specifically we consider both sparse (L1 regularized and non-sparse (L2 regularized linear decoding for mapping the neural dynamics of a large-scale spiking neuron model of primary visual cortex (V1 to a two alternative forced choice (2-AFC perceptual decision. We show that while both sparse and non-sparse linear decoding yield discrimination results quantitatively consistent with human psychophysics, sparse linear decoding is more efficient in terms of the number of selected informative dimension.

  3. V1.42In1.83Mo15Se19

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Potel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title compound, vanadium indium pentadecamolybdenum nonadecaselenide, V1.42In1.83Mo15Se19, is isotypic with In2.9Mo15Se19 [Grüttner et al. (1979. Acta Cryst. B35, 285–292]. It is characterized by two cluster units Mo6Sei8Sea6 and Mo9Sei11Sea6 (where i represents inner and a apical atoms that are present in a 1:1 ratio. The cluster units are centered at Wyckoff positions 2b and 2c and have point-group symmetry overline{3} and overline{6}, respectively. The clusters are interconnected through additional Mo—Se bonds. In the title compound, the V3+ cations replace the trivalent indium atoms present in In2.9Mo15Se19, and a deficiency is observed on the monovalent indium site. One Mo, one Se and the V atom are situated on mirror planes, and two other Se atoms and the In atom are situated on threefold rotation axes.

  4. Slow feature analysis on retinal waves leads to V1 complex cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Dähne

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The developing visual system of many mammalian species is partially structured and organized even before the onset of vision. Spontaneous neural activity, which spreads in waves across the retina, has been suggested to play a major role in these prenatal structuring processes. Recently, it has been shown that when employing an efficient coding strategy, such as sparse coding, these retinal activity patterns lead to basis functions that resemble optimal stimuli of simple cells in primary visual cortex (V1. Here we present the results of applying a coding strategy that optimizes for temporal slowness, namely Slow Feature Analysis (SFA, to a biologically plausible model of retinal waves. Previously, SFA has been successfully applied to model parts of the visual system, most notably in reproducing a rich set of complex-cell features by training SFA with quasi-natural image sequences. In the present work, we obtain SFA units that share a number of properties with cortical complex-cells by training on simulated retinal waves. The emergence of two distinct properties of the SFA units (phase invariance and orientation tuning is thoroughly investigated via control experiments and mathematical analysis of the input-output functions found by SFA. The results support the idea that retinal waves share relevant temporal and spatial properties with natural visual input. Hence, retinal waves seem suitable training stimuli to learn invariances and thereby shape the developing early visual system such that it is best prepared for coding input from the natural world.

  5. Versican V1 Overexpression Induces a Myofibroblast-Like Phenotype in Cultured Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon M Carthy

    Full Text Available Versican, a chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, is one of the key components of the provisional extracellular matrix expressed after injury. The current study evaluated the hypothesis that a versican-rich matrix alters the phenotype of cultured fibroblasts.The full-length cDNA for the V1 isoform of human versican was cloned and the recombinant proteoglycan was expressed in murine fibroblasts. Versican expression induced a marked change in fibroblast phenotype. Functionally, the versican-expressing fibroblasts proliferated faster and displayed enhanced cell adhesion, but migrated slower than control cells. These changes in cell function were associated with greater N-cadherin and integrin β1 expression, along with increased FAK phosphorylation. The versican-expressing fibroblasts also displayed expression of smooth muscle α-actin, a marker of myofibroblast differentiation. Consistent with this observation, the versican fibroblasts displayed increased synthetic activity, as measured by collagen III mRNA expression, as well as a greater capacity to contract a collagen lattice. These changes appear to be mediated, at least in part, by an increase in active TGF-β signaling in the versican expressing fibroblasts, and this was measured by phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of SMAD2.Collectively, these data indicate versican expression induces a myofibroblast-like phenotype in cultured fibroblasts.

  6. Mutations in KCNH1 and ATP6V1B2 cause Zimmermann-Laband syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, Fanny; Caputo, Viviana; Bauer, Christiane K; Stella, Lorenzo; Ciolfi, Andrea; Alawi, Malik; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Flex, Elisabetta; Paolacci, Stefano; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Grammatico, Paola; Korenke, Georg Christoph; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Mowat, David; Nair, Lal D V; Nguyen, Thi Tuyet Mai; Thierry, Patrick; White, Susan M; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Pizzuti, Antonio; Campeau, Philippe M; Tartaglia, Marco; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-06-01

    Zimmermann-Laband syndrome (ZLS) is a developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphism with gingival enlargement, intellectual disability, hypoplasia or aplasia of nails and terminal phalanges, and hypertrichosis. We report that heterozygous missense mutations in KCNH1 account for a considerable proportion of ZLS. KCNH1 encodes the voltage-gated K(+) channel Eag1 (Kv10.1). Patch-clamp recordings showed strong negative shifts in voltage-dependent activation for all but one KCNH1 channel mutant (Gly469Arg). Coexpression of Gly469Arg with wild-type KCNH1 resulted in heterotetrameric channels with reduced conductance at positive potentials but pronounced conductance at negative potentials. These data support a gain-of-function effect for all ZLS-associated KCNH1 mutants. We also identified a recurrent de novo missense change in ATP6V1B2, encoding the B2 subunit of the multimeric vacuolar H(+) ATPase, in two individuals with ZLS. Structural analysis predicts a perturbing effect of the mutation on complex assembly. Our findings demonstrate that KCNH1 mutations cause ZLS and document genetic heterogeneity for this disorder.

  7. Tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN in afferent neurons innervating urinary bladder in control and spinal cord injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joel A; Cummins, Theodore R; Yoshimura, Naoki; de Groat, William C; Waxman, Stephen G

    2003-02-14

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels Na(v)1.8/SNS and Na(v)1.9/NaN are preferentially expressed in small diameter dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated by small afferent neurons from L6/S1 DRG, of which approximately 75% exhibit high-threshold action potentials that are mediated by TTX-R sodium channels. Following transection of the spinal cord at T8, the bladder becomes areflexic and then gradually hyper-reflexic, and there is an attenuation of the TTX-R sodium currents in bladder afferent neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that Na(v)1.8 is expressed in both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons, while Na(v)1.9 is expressed in non-bladder afferent neurons but is rarely observed in bladder afferent neurons. In spinal cord transected rats 28-32 days following transection, there is a decreased expression of Na(v)1.8 sodium channels in bladder afferents, but no change in the expression of Na(v)1.8 in non-bladder afferent neurons. Both bladder and non-bladder afferent neurons exhibit limited increases in Na(v)1.9 expression following spinal cord transection. These results demonstrate that the expression of TTX-R channels in bladder afferent neurons changes after spinal cord transection, and these changes may contribute to the increased excitability of these neurons following spinal cord injury.

  8. Characterization of the T-cell response to Dau c 1, the Bet v 1-homolog in carrot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulehner, N; Nagl, B; Briza, P; Roulias, A; Ballmer-Weber, B; Zlabinger, G J; Ferreira, F; Bohle, B

    2017-02-01

    In contrast to other Bet v 1-related food allergens, the major carrot allergen, Dau c 1, has been suggested to induce food allergy independently from Bet v 1. As T cells are crucial in the sensitization process, we sought to characterize the T-cell response to Dau c 1 and its cross-reactivity with Bet v 1. Dau c 1-specific T-cell lines (TCL) and clones (TCC) established from PBMC of birch pollen-allergic patients with carrot allergy were analyzed for reactivity to Bet v 1, epitope specificity, allergen-induced cytokine secretion, and expression of integrins α4β7 and α4β1, critical for gut and lung homing, respectively. mRNA expression of GATA3 and Tbet was analyzed in sorted CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells proliferating upon stimulation of PBMC with Dau c 1 or Bet v 1. Dau c 1 was incubated with endolysosomal proteases, and the resulting fragments were identified by mass spectrometry. Among 14 distinct T-cell-activating regions, Dau c 1139-153 was recognized by 55% of the patients. Only 6 of 15 (40%) Dau c 1-specific TCL and 9 of 21 (43%) TCC reacted with Bet v 1. Bet v 1-nonreactive TCC were mainly Th1-like and showed a higher expression of the integrin β7 and a significantly lower expression of the integrin β1 than Bet v 1-positive TCC. A Th1-like response was also detected in Dau c 1-reactive CD3+ CD4+ CFSElow cells. Full-length Dau c 1 was still detectable after 48 h of endolysosomal degradation. Proteolytic fragments of Dau c 1 matched its T-cell-activating regions. Dau c 1 displays several characteristics of sensitizing allergens, namely a major T-cell-activating region, low susceptibility to endolysosomal degradation, and induction of a Bet v 1-independent T-cell response. These cellular insights confirm that the major carrot allergen has a special status among Bet v 1-related food allergens. © 2016 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Characterization of CaV1.2 exon 33 heterozygous knockout mice and negative correlation between Rbfox1 and CaV1.2 exon 33 expressions in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juejin; Li, Guang; Yu, Dejie; Wong, Yuk Peng; Yong, Tan Fong; Liang, Mui Cheng; Liao, Ping; Foo, Roger; Hoppe, Uta C; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2017-09-26

    Recently, we reported that homozygous deletion of alternative exon 33 of CaV1.2 calcium channel in the mouse resulted in ventricular arrhythmias arising from increased CaV1.2Δ33 ICaL current density in the cardiomyocytes. We wondered whether heterozygous deletion of exon 33 might produce cardiac phenotype in a dose-dependent manner, and whether the expression levels of RNA splicing factors known to regulate alternative splicing of exon 33 might change in human heart failure. Unexpectedly, we found that exon 33+/- cardiomyocytes showed similar CaV1.2 channel properties as wild-type cardiomyocyte, even though CaV1.2Δ33 channels exhibit a gain-in-function. In human hearts, we found that the mRNA level of splicing factor Rbfox1, but not Rbfox2, was downregulated in dilated cardiomyopathy, and CACNA1C mRNA level was dramatically decreased in the both of dilated and ischemic cardiomyopathy. These data imply Rbfox1 may be involved in the development of cardiomyopathies via regulating the alternative splicing of CaV1.2 exon 33. (149 words).

  10. [Gentamicin on inner hair cells ribbon synapses CaV1.3 calcium ion channel protein expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Ke

    2014-02-01

    To learn the influence the gentamycin on C57BL/6J mice hear and cochlear hair cell ribbon synapses CaV1.3 calcium protein amount. To explore the relationship between hear loss and its dosage correlation change and significance. The fixed amino glucoside to C57BL/6J mice was used to make abdominal cavity injection mold every day. The auditory brain-stem response ABR was used to measure the hear of mice in 7th, 14th, 28th after the injection. Immunofluorescence method was used to observe cochlear basement membrane of hair ribbon synapse CaV1.3 calcium channel proteins in the distribution and expression. Inner hair cells synaptic membrane was immune fluorescent tags with CtbP2 and CaV1. 3. With the growth of the injected drugs, ABR threshold increased,but all the hair cells and shape had no obvious change. However the amount of hair rib bon synapse CaV1.3 calcium ion channel proteins in the expression had significant differences (P < 0.01). CaV1.3 calcium ion channel proteins increased slightly lower than normal at 7th day, significantly decreased at 14th day, had increased, increased quantity compare with 14th day, but at 28th day after intraperitoneal injection of gentamicin. The increasing,decreasing and increasing trend of cochlear hair cells CaV1.3 proteins in the environment of amino glucoside drug toxicity showed that the increase of hair ribbon synapse CaV1.3 proteins may have a compensatory effect on the drug toxicity. With the increase of the drug toxicity effect, this kind of decompensated function could be the listening decline, which may be one of the mechanism of damage to hearing.

  11. Decomposition of BOLD Activity into Tuned and Untuned Components Reveals Cohabitation of Stimulus and Choice Information in V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Whan Choe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on V1 report top-down modulation of input-driven responses of sensory neurons, implying that exogenous sensory drives and endogenous top-down drives jointly determine V1 responses. By measuring fMRI responses in conjunction with a classification task on ambiguous ring stimuli, we sought to understand how V1 carries out its encoding operation on afferent currents while being adaptively modulated by top-down currents associated with perceptual tasks. Population activity of V1, as in its raw eccentricity profiles, failed to resolve the threshold differences between the ring stimuli due to large moment-to-moment fluctuations. The analysis of variance indicated that stimulus-evoked responses explain only one-fifth of the total variance and fMRI responses were highly correlated among eccentricity-bins, implying that a substantial fraction of V1 responses fluctuate as a whole. This led us to decompose the raw fMRI responses into untuned and tuned components: average response across eccentricity-bins and residual responses from the average, respectively, the former varying only in time and the latter varying in both space and time. The tuned responses revealed the veridical encoding operation of V1 by readily distinguishing between the ring stimuli, which was impossible with the raw fMRI responses. In contrast, the untuned were correlated with two major aspects of choice behavior—inter-trial variability in response time and inter-subject variability in response bias. We propose that this cohabitation of stimulus and choice information in V1 indicates the presence of top-down exertion of gain modulation on the early processing stage by the high-tier stage that accumulates evidence for perceptual choices.

  12. Transgenic rice seeds accumulating recombinant hypoallergenic birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 generate giant protein bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuyi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Kawakatsu, Taiji; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2013-06-01

    A versatile hypoallergenic allergen derivative against multiple allergens is an ideal tolerogen for allergen-specific immunotherapy. Such a tolerogen should exhibit high efficacy, without side effects, when administered at high doses and should be applicable to several allergens. Tree pollen chimera 7 (TPC7), a hypoallergenic Bet v 1 tolerogen against birch pollen allergy, was previously selected by DNA shuffling of 14 types of Fagales tree pollen allergens. In this study, transgenic rice seed accumulating TPC7 was generated as an oral vaccine against birch pollen allergy by expressing this protein as a secretory protein using the N-terminal signal peptide and the C-terminal KDEL tag under the control of an endosperm-specific glutelin promoter. The highest level of TPC7 accumulation was approximately 207 µg grain(-1). Recombinant TPC7 is a glycoprotein with high mannose-type N-glycan, but without β1,2-xylose or α1,3-fucose, suggesting that TPC7 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). TPC7 is deposited as a novel, giant spherical ER-derived protein body, >20 µm in diameter, which is referred to as the TPC7 body. Removal of the KDEL retention signal or mutation of a cysteine residue resulted in an alteration of TPC7 body morphology, and deletion of the signal peptide prevented the accumulation of TPC7 in rice seeds. Therefore, the novel TPC7 bodies may have formed aggregates within the ER lumen, primarily due to the intrinsic physicochemical properties of the protein.

  13. Phase Locking of Multiple Single Neurons to the Local Field Potential in Cat V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kevan A C; Schröder, Sylvia

    2016-02-24

    The local field potential (LFP) is thought to reflect a temporal reference for neuronal spiking, which may facilitate information coding and orchestrate the communication between neural populations. To explore this proposed role, we recorded the LFP and simultaneously the spike activity of one to three nearby neurons in V1 of anesthetized cats during the presentation of drifting sinusoidal gratings, binary dense noise stimuli, and natural movies. In all stimulus conditions and during spontaneous activity, the average LFP power at frequencies >20 Hz was higher when neurons were spiking versus not spiking. The spikes were weakly but significantly phase locked to all frequencies of the LFP. The average spike phase of the LFP was stable across high and low levels of LFP power, but the strength of phase locking at low frequencies (≤10 Hz) increased with increasing LFP power. In a next step, we studied how strong stimulus responses of single neurons are reflected in the LFP and the LFP-spike relationship. We found that LFP power was slightly increased and phase locking was slightly stronger during strong compared with weak stimulus-locked responses. In summary, the coupling strength between high frequencies of the LFP and spikes was not strongly modulated by LFP power, which is thought to reflect spiking synchrony, nor was it strongly influenced by how strongly the neuron was driven by the stimulus. Furthermore, a comparison between neighboring neurons showed no clustering of preferred LFP phase. We argue that hypotheses on the relevance of phase locking in their current form are inconsistent with our findings. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362494-09$15.00/0.

  14. Spatial structure of cone inputs to color cells in alert macaque primary visual cortex (V-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B R

    2001-04-15

    The spatial structure of color cell receptive fields is controversial. Here, spots of light that selectively modulate one class of cones (L, M, or S, or loosely red, green, or blue) were flashed in and around the receptive fields of V-1 color cells to map the spatial structure of the cone inputs. The maps generated using these cone-isolating stimuli and an eye-position-corrected reverse correlation technique produced four findings. First, the receptive fields were Double-Opponent, an organization of spatial and chromatic opponency critical for color constancy and color contrast. Optimally stimulating both center and surround subregions with adjacent red and green spots excited the cells more than stimulating a single subregion. Second, red-green cells responded in a luminance-invariant way. For example, red-on-center cells were excited equally by a stimulus that increased L-cone activity (appearing bright red) and by a stimulus that decreased M-cone activity (appearing dark red). This implies that the opponency between L and M is balanced and argues that these cells are encoding a single chromatic axis. Third, most color cells responded to stimuli of all orientations and had circularly symmetric receptive fields. Some cells, however, showed a coarse orientation preference. This was reflected in the receptive fields as oriented Double-Opponent subregions. Fourth, red-green cells often responded to S-cone stimuli. Responses to M- and S-cone stimuli usually aligned, suggesting that these cells might be red-cyan. In summary, red-green (or red-cyan) cells, along with blue-yellow and black-white cells, establish three chromatic axes that are sufficient to describe all of color space.

  15. European validation of ASTEC-V1 through the EVITA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allelein, H.J.; Neu, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH, GRS, Schwertnergasse 1, D - 50667 Koeln (Germany); Dorsselaere, J.P. Van; Tregoures, N. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, B.P. 17, F - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Koch, M.K.; Bendiab, M. [Ruhr-Uni-Bochum/LEE, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Kubisova, L. [UJD SR, Center for Nuclear Safety in Central and Eastern European Countries, Bajkalska 27, 827 21 Bratislava 212 (Slovakia)

    2003-07-01

    The European Validation of the Integral Code ASTEC (EVITA) involves 19 partners from eight European countries plus JRC. It started in February 2000 and ended in July 2003. The main objective is to distribute the severe accident integral code Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC), jointly developed by Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN, France) and Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Germany), to European partners in order to apply the validation strategy issued from the VASA project (4. European Community Framework Programme). Severe accident management (SAM) measures are currently being developed and implemented at Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) worldwide in order to prevent or to mitigate severe accidents. This needs a deep understanding of processes leading to severe accidents and of phenomena related to them. As greater account of severe accident measures is taken in the regulation of plants, there will be the need to show a greater degree of validation of codes and a better understanding of uncertainties and their impact on plant evaluations. The EVITA evaluation of ASTEC code capabilities and the corresponding feedback towards the code development is an important step towards the intention to provide end-users (like utilities, vendors and licensing authorities) with a well validated European integral code for the simulation of severe accidents in NPPs. ASTEC versions V0 and V1 were installed successfully on the partners' platforms. The extensive portability check concluded that the ASTEC user should not fear portability effects. One of the partners' conclusions was that the level of ASTEC models was near the state of the art in most domains. Of course understanding and thus adequate modelling is still missing, like in all other codes, in some domains: reflooding of a degraded core, MCCI, iodine behaviour in RCS, etc. Obviously recommendations were made to continue efforts of validation and plant

  16. The fusion band in V1: a simple ECG guide to optimal resynchronization? An echocardiographic case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbucci Giorgio

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with left bundle branch block have a preserved right bundle branch conduction and the efficacy of left ventricular pacing could be explained with the fusion between artificial pulse delivered in the left lateral wall and the spontaneous right ventricular activation. Moreover, the efficacy of left ventricular pacing could be enhanced with an optimal timing between the spontaneous right ventricular activation and the left ventricular pulse. Case presentation We evaluated a patient (male, 47 yrs with surgically corrected mitral regurgitation, sinus rhythm and left bundle branch block, heart failure (NYHA class III despite medical therapy and low ejection fraction (25%: he was implanted with a biventricular device. We programmed ventricular pacing only through the left ventricular lead. We defined what we called electrocardiographic "fusion band" as follow: programming OFF the stimulator, we recorded the native electrocardiogram and measured, through the device, the intrinsic atrioventricular interval. Then, atrioventricular interval was progressively shortened by steps of 20 ms down to 100 ms. Twelve leads electrocardiogram was recorded at each step. The fusion band is the range of AV intervals at which surface electrocardiogram (mainly in V1 lead presents an intermediate morphology between the native left bundle branch block (upper limit of the band and the fully paced right bundle branch block (lower limit. The patient underwent echocardiographic examination at each atrioventricular interval chosen inside the fusion band. The following parameters were evaluated: ejection fraction, diastolic filling time, E wave deceleration time, aortic velocity time integral and myocardial performance index. All the echocardiographic parameters showed an improvement inside the fusion band, with a "plateau" behaviour. As the fusion band in this patient ranged from an atrioventricular delay of 200 ms to an atrioventricular delay of 120

  17. Regulation of the Spontaneous Augmentation of Na_V1.9 in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons : Effect of PKA and PKC Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Nobukuni Ogata; Noriko Uryu; Taixing Zheng; Jun-ichi Kakimura

    2010-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion express two kinds of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R) isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. These isoforms play key roles in the pathophysiology of chronic pain. Of special interest is NaV1.9: our previous studies revealed a unique property of the NaV1.9 current, i.e., the NaV1.9 current shows a gradual and notable up-regulation of the peak amplitude during recording (“spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9”). However, the mechanis...

  18. Cold-aggravated pain in humans caused by a hyperactive NaV1.9 channel mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, Enrico; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Frick, Miya; Gong, Ping; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Voigt, Martin; Katona, Istvan; Oliver Goral, R; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Hübner, Christian A; Heinemann, Stefan H; Kurth, Ingo

    2015-12-08

    Gain-of-function mutations in the human SCN11A-encoded voltage-gated Na(+) channel NaV1.9 cause severe pain disorders ranging from neuropathic pain to congenital pain insensitivity. However, the entire spectrum of the NaV1.9 diseases has yet to be defined. Applying whole-exome sequencing we here identify a missense change (p.V1184A) in NaV1.9, which leads to cold-aggravated peripheral pain in humans. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that p.V1184A shifts the voltage dependence of channel opening to hyperpolarized potentials thereby conferring gain-of-function characteristics to NaV1.9. Mutated channels diminish the resting membrane potential of mouse primary sensory neurons and cause cold-resistant hyperexcitability of nociceptors, suggesting a mechanistic basis for the temperature dependence of the pain phenotype. On the basis of direct comparison of the mutations linked to either cold-aggravated pain or pain insensitivity, we propose a model in which the physiological consequence of a mutation, that is, augmented versus absent pain, is critically dependent on the type of NaV1.9 hyperactivity.

  19. Astronomical component estimation (ACE v.1) by time-variant sinusoidal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnesael, Matthias; Zivanovic, Miroslav; De Vleeschouwer, David; Claeys, Philippe; Schoukens, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Accurately deciphering periodic variations in paleoclimate proxy signals is essential for cyclostratigraphy. Classical spectral analysis often relies on methods based on (fast) Fourier transformation. This technique has no unique solution separating variations in amplitude and frequency. This characteristic can make it difficult to correctly interpret a proxy's power spectrum or to accurately evaluate simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency in evolutionary analyses. This drawback is circumvented by using a polynomial approach to estimate instantaneous amplitude and frequency in orbital components. This approach was proven useful to characterize audio signals (music and speech), which are non-stationary in nature. Paleoclimate proxy signals and audio signals share similar dynamics; the only difference is the frequency relationship between the different components. A harmonic-frequency relationship exists in audio signals, whereas this relation is non-harmonic in paleoclimate signals. However, this difference is irrelevant for the problem of separating simultaneous changes in amplitude and frequency. Using an approach with overlapping analysis frames, the model (Astronomical Component Estimation, version 1: ACE v.1) captures time variations of an orbital component by modulating a stationary sinusoid centered at its mean frequency, with a single polynomial. Hence, the parameters that determine the model are the mean frequency of the orbital component and the polynomial coefficients. The first parameter depends on geologic interpretations, whereas the latter are estimated by means of linear least-squares. As output, the model provides the orbital component waveform, either in the depth or time domain. Uncertainty analyses of the model estimates are performed using Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, it allows for a unique decomposition of the signal into its instantaneous amplitude and frequency. Frequency modulation patterns reconstruct changes in

  20. Optical properties of V1-xCrxO2 compounds under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, C.; Arcangeletti, E.; di Castro, D.; Baldassare, L.; Perucchi, A.; Lupi, S.; Malavasi, L.; Boeri, L.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Postorino, P.

    2008-06-01

    Raman and infrared transmission and reflectivity measurements were carried out at room temperature and high pressure (0-15 GPa) on V1-xCrxO2 compounds. Raman spectra were collected at ambient conditions on the x=0.007 and 0.025 materials, which are characterized by different insulating monoclinic phases ( M3 and M2 , respectively), while infrared spectra were collected on the x=0.025 sample only. The present data were compared with companion results on undoped VO2 [E. Arcangeletti , Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 196406 (2007)], which is found at ambient conditions in a different, third insulating monoclinic phase, named M1 . This comparison allowed us to investigate the effects of different extents of structural distortions (Peierls distortion) on the lattice dynamics and the electronic properties of this family of compounds. The pressure dependence of the Raman spectrum of VO2 and Cr-doped samples shows that all the systems retain the monoclinic structure up to the highest explored pressure, regardless the specific monoclinic structure ( M1 , M2 , and M3 ) at ambient condition. Moreover, the Raman spectra of the two Cr-doped samples, which exhibit an anomalous behavior over the low-pressure range (P<8GPa) , merge into that of VO2 in the high-pressure regime and are all found into a common monoclinic phase (a possible fourth kind phase). Combining Raman and infrared results on both the VO2 and the present data, we found that a common metallic monoclinic phase appears accessible in the high-pressure regime at room temperature for both undoped and Cr-doped samples independently of the different extents of Peierls distortion at ambient conditions. This finding differs from the behavior observed at ambient pressure, where the metallic phase is found only in conjunction with the rutile structure. The whole of these results suggests a major role of the electron correlations, rather than of the Peierls distortion, in driving the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

  1. Population activity statistics dissect subthreshold and spiking variability in V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, Mihály; Koman, Zsombor; Orbán, Gergő

    2017-07-01

    Response variability, as measured by fluctuating responses upon repeated performance of trials, is a major component of neural responses, and its characterization is key to interpret high dimensional population recordings. Response variability and covariability display predictable changes upon changes in stimulus and cognitive or behavioral state, providing an opportunity to test the predictive power of models of neural variability. Still, there is little agreement on which model to use as a building block for population-level analyses, and models of variability are often treated as a subject of choice. We investigate two competing models, the doubly stochastic Poisson (DSP) model assuming stochasticity at spike generation, and the rectified Gaussian (RG) model tracing variability back to membrane potential variance, to analyze stimulus-dependent modulation of both single-neuron and pairwise response statistics. Using a pair of model neurons, we demonstrate that the two models predict similar single-cell statistics. However, DSP and RG models have contradicting predictions on the joint statistics of spiking responses. To test the models against data, we build a population model to simulate stimulus change-related modulations in pairwise response statistics. We use single-unit data from the primary visual cortex (V1) of monkeys to show that while model predictions for variance are qualitatively similar to experimental data, only the RG model's predictions are compatible with joint statistics. These results suggest that models using Poisson-like variability might fail to capture important properties of response statistics. We argue that membrane potential-level modeling of stochasticity provides an efficient strategy to model correlations.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neural variability and covariability are puzzling aspects of cortical computations. For efficient decoding and prediction, models of information encoding in neural populations hinge on an appropriate model of

  2. Characterization of epitope specificities of reference antibodies used for the quantification of the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, S; Le Mignon, M; Jain, K; Lebrun, C; Peurois, F; Kellenberger, C; Bordas-Le Floch, V; Mascarell, L; Nony, E; Moingeon, P

    2017-11-24

    Accurate allergen quantification is needed to document the consistency of allergen extracts used for immunotherapy. Herein, we characterize the epitope specificities of two monoclonal antibodies used in an ELISA for the quantification of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, established as a reference by the BSP090 European project. The ability of mAbs 5B4 and 6H4 to recognize Bet v 1 isoforms was addressed by immunochromatography. The capacity of each mAb to compete with patients' IgE for binding to Bet v 1 was measured by ELISA inhibition. Epitope mapping was performed by pepscan analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry. The 5B4 epitope corresponds to a peptide sequence (I56-K68) overlapping with the binding sites of patients' serum IgEs. Mutation of residues P59, E60, and K65 abolishes 5B4 binding to Bet v 1 and reduces the level of IgE recognition. In contrast, 6H4 recognizes a conformational epitope lying opposite to the 5B4 binding site, involving residues located in segments I44-K55 and R70-F79. Substitution of E45 reduces the binding capacity of 6H4, confirming that it is critical for the interaction. Both mAbs interact with >90% of Bet v 1 content present in the birch pollen extract, while displaying a weak cross-reactivity with other allergens of the PR-10 family. MAbs 5B4 and 6H4 recognize structurally distinct epitopes present in the vast majority of Bet v 1 isoforms. These results support the relevance as a reference method of the Bet v 1-specific quantitative ELISA adopted by the European Pharmacopoeia. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  3. Cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 distribution in myocytes via interacting proteins: the multiple pool model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, Diana; Gillet, Ludovic; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    The cardiac sodium current (INa) is responsible for the rapid depolarization of cardiac cells, thus allowing for their contraction. It is also involved in regulating the duration of the cardiac action potential (AP) and propagation of the impulse throughout the myocardium. Cardiac INa is generated by the voltage-gated Na(+) channel, NaV1.5, a 2016-residue protein which forms the pore of the channel. Over the past years, hundreds of mutations in SCN5A, the human gene coding for NaV1.5, have been linked to many cardiac electrical disorders, including the congenital and acquired long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, conduction slowing, sick sinus syndrome, atrial fibrillation, and dilated cardiomyopathy. Similar to many membrane proteins, NaV1.5 has been found to be regulated by several interacting proteins. In some cases, these different proteins, which reside in distinct membrane compartments (i.e. lateral membrane vs. intercalated disks), have been shown to interact with the same regulatory domain of NaV1.5, thus suggesting that several pools of NaV1.5 channels may co-exist in cardiac cells. The aim of this review article is to summarize the recent works that demonstrate its interaction with regulatory proteins and illustrate the model that the sodium channel NaV1.5 resides in distinct and different pools in cardiac cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A sodium channel knockin mutant (NaV1.4-R669H) mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is an ion channelopathy of skeletal muscle characterized by attacks of muscle weakness associated with low serum K+. HypoPP results from a transient failure of muscle fiber excitability. Mutations in the genes encoding a calcium channel (CaV1.1) and a sodium channel (NaV1.4) have been identified in HypoPP families. Mutations of NaV1.4 give rise to a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders, with gain-of-function defects causing myotonia or hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. To address the question of specificity for the allele encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant as a cause of HypoPP and to produce a model system in which to characterize functional defects of the mutant channel and susceptibility to paralysis, we generated knockin mice carrying the ortholog of the gene encoding the NaV1.4-R669H variant (referred to herein as R669H mice). Homozygous R669H mice had a robust HypoPP phenotype, with transient loss of muscle excitability and weakness in low-K+ challenge, insensitivity to high-K+ challenge, dominant inheritance, and absence of myotonia. Recovery was sensitive to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor ouabain. Affected fibers had an anomalous inward current at hyperpolarized potentials, consistent with the proposal that a leaky gating pore in R669H channels triggers attacks, whereas a reduction in the amplitude of action potentials implies additional loss-of-function changes for the mutant NaV1.4 channels.

  5. Persistent modification of Na{sub v}1.9 following chronic exposure to insecticides and pyridostigmine bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nutter, Thomas J., E-mail: tnutter@dental.ufl.edu; Cooper, Brian Y., E-mail: bcooper@dental.ufl.edu

    2014-06-15

    Many veterans of the 1991 Gulf War (GW) returned from that conflict with a widespread chronic pain affecting deep tissues. Recently, we have shown that a 60 day exposure to the insecticides permethrin, chlorpyrifos, and pyridostigmine bromide (NTPB) had little influence on nociceptor action potential forming Na{sub v}1.8, but increased K{sub v}7 mediated inhibitory currents 8 weeks after treatment. Using the same exposure regimen, we used whole cell patch methods to examine whether the influences of NTPB could be observed on Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. During a 60 day exposure to NTPB, rats exhibited lowered muscle pain thresholds and increased rest periods, but these measures subsequently returned to normal levels. Eight and 12 weeks after treatments ceased, DRG neurons were excised from the sensory ganglia. Whole cell patch studies revealed little change in voltage dependent activation and deactivation of Na{sub v}1.9, but significant increases in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 were observed 8 weeks after exposure. Cellular studies, at the 8 week delay, revealed that NTPB also significantly prolonged action potential duration and afterhyperpolarization (22 °C). Acute application of permethrin (10 μM) also increased the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 in skin, muscle and vascular nociceptors. In conclusion, chronic exposure to Gulf War agents produced long term changes in the amplitude of Na{sub v}1.9 expressed in muscle and vascular nociceptors. The reported increases in K{sub v}7 amplitude may have been an adaptive response to increased Na{sub v}1.9, and effectively suppressed behavioral pain measures in the post treatment period. Factors that alter the balance between Na{sub v}1.9 and K{sub v}7 could release spontaneous discharge and produce chronic deep tissue pain. - Highlights: • Rats were treated 60 days with permethrin, chlorpyrifos and pyridostigmine bromide. • 8 weeks after treatments, Nav1.9 activation and deactivation were

  6. Expression of calcium channel CaV1.3 in cat spinal cord: light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengliang; Møller, Morten; Broman, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    In spinal neurons, plateau potentials serve to amplify neuronal input signals. To a large extent, the underlying persistent inward current is mediated by a subtype of the L-type calcium channel (Ca(V)1.3). In the present investigation, we have studied its distribution and cellular localization...... enlargements and the phrenic nucleus in cervical, Clarke's nucleus in lower thoracic and upper lumbar, and Onuf's nucleus in upper sacral segments. At the ultrastructural level, Ca(V)1.3-immunoreactive products were found in neuronal somata and dendrites of different sizes. In the soma, they were predominantly...

  7. Prolonged AT1R activation induces CaV1.2 channel internalization in rat cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Hermosilla, Tamara; Encina, Mat?as; Morales, Danna; Moreno, Cristian; Conejeros, Carolina; Alfaro-Vald?s, Hilda M.; Lagos-Meza, Felipe; Simon, Felipe; Altier, Christophe; Varela, Diego

    2017-01-01

    The cardiac L-type calcium channel is a multi-subunit complex that requires co-assembling of the pore-forming subunit CaV1.2 with auxiliary subunits CaV?2? and CaV?. Its traffic has been shown to be controlled by these subunits and by the activation of various G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). Here, we explore the consequences of the prolonged activation of angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R) over CaV1.2 channel trafficking. Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assay between ?-ar...

  8. NaV1.9 Potentiates Oxidized Phospholipid-Induced TRP Responses Only under Inflammatory Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Martin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidized phospholipids (OxPL like oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (OxPAPC were recently identified as novel proalgesic targets in acute and chronic inflammatory pain. These endogenous chemical irritants are generated in inflamed tissue and mediate their pain-inducing function by activating the transient receptor potential channels TRPA1 and TRPV1 expressed in sensory neurons. Notably, prototypical therapeutics interfering with OxPL were shown to inhibit TRP channel activation and pain behavior. Here, we asked how OxPL excite primary sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons from mice of either sex. Acute stimulation of sensory neurons with the prototypical OxPL 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC evoked repetitive calcium spikes in small-diameter neurons. As NaV1.9, a voltage-gated sodium channel involved in nociceptor excitability, was previously shown to be essential for the generation of calcium spikes in motoneurons, we asked if this channel is also important for OxPL mediated calcium spike and action potential generation in nociceptors. In wild-type and NaV1.9-deficient neurons, the action potential firing rate and the calcium spike frequency to an acute PGPC stimulus was similar. When preincubated with inflammatory mediators, both, the action potential firing rate and the calcium spike frequency were markedly increased in response to an acute PGPC stimulus. However, this potentiating effect was completely lost in NaV1.9-deficient small-diameter neurons. After treatment with inflammatory mediators, the resting membrane potential of NaV1.9 KO neurons was slightly more negative than that of wild-type control neurons. This suggests that NaV1.9 channels are active under this condition and therefore increases the ease with which action potentials are elicited after OxPL stimulation. In summary, our data suggest that NaV1.9 has a switch function to potentiate the receptor potentials

  9. [Vibrational and rotational excitation of CO2 in the collisional quenching of H2(v = 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-jun; Feng, Li; Li, Jia-ling; Liu, Jing; Dai, Kang; Shen, Yi-fan

    2014-06-01

    Energy transfer in H2 (1,1) +CO2 collisions was investigated using high resolution transient laser spectroscopy. Rotational state selective excitation of v = 1 for rotational level J = 1 was achieved by stimulated Raman pumping. Energy gain into CO2 resulting from collisions with H2 (1,1) was probed using transient absorption techniques, Distributions of nascent CO2 rotational populations in both the ground (00 degrees 0) state and the vibrationally excited (00 degrees 1) state were determined from overtone absorption measurements. Translational energy distributions of the recoiling CO2 in individual rovibrational states were determined through measurement of Doppler-broadened transient line shapes. A kinetic model was developed to describe rates for appearance of CO2 states resulting from collisions with H2(1,1). From scanned CARS (coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering) the spectral peaks population ratio n0/n1 was obtained, where n0 and n1 represent the number densities of H2 at the levels (0,1) and (1,1), respectively. Using rotational Boltzmann distribution of H2 (v = 0) at 300 K, n1 was yielded. Values for rate coefficients were obtained using data for CO2 (00 degrees 0) J = 48 to 76 and CO2 (00 degrees 1) J = 5 to 33. The rate coefficients derived from appearance of the (00 degrees 0) state have values of K(tr) = (3.9 ± 0.8) x 10(-11) cm3 x molecule(-1) x s(-1) for J = 48 and k(tr) = (1.4 ± 0.3) x 10(-10) cm3 x molecule(-1) x s(-1) for J = 76, with a monotonic increase for the higher J states. For the (00 degrees 1) state, values of k(tr) remain fairly constant at k(tr) = (4.3 ± 0.9) x 10(-12) cm3 x molecule(-1) x s(-1). Rotational populations for the nascent CO2 states were measured at 0. 5 μs following excitation of H2. The transient population for each state was fit using a Boltzmann rotational distribution. The CO2 (00 degrees 0) J = 48-76 rotational states were populated substantially relative to the initial 300 K CO2 distributions, and the

  10. Aberrant Splicing Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of L-type Ca v 1.2 Calcium Channels by Competitive Binding for CaV β Subunits in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Zhenyu; Wang, Jiong Wei; Yu, Dejie; Soon, Jia Lin; De Kleijn, Dominique P V|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30481489X; Foo, Roger; Liao, Ping; Colecraft, Henry M.; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2016-01-01

    Decreased expression and activity of Ca V1.2 calcium channels has been reported in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here we identified in rodents a splice variant of Ca V1.2 channel, named Ca V1.2 e21+22, that

  11. Automated Scoring of Spontaneous Speech Using SpeechRater? v1.0. Research Report. ETS RR-08-62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xiaoming; Higgins, Derrick; Zechner, Klaus; Williamson, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results of a research and development effort for SpeechRater? Version 1.0 (v1.0), an automated scoring system for the spontaneous speech of English language learners used operationally in the Test of English as a Foreign Language™ (TOEFL®) Practice Online assessment (TPO). The report includes a summary of the validity…

  12. Multinational Experiment 7. Outcome 4: Methodology to Understand Inter-Domain Dependencies and Vulnerabilities Guide v. 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    Reproduction of this document and unlimited distribution of copies is authorized for personal and non-commercial use only. The use of this work for...System UFO UHF Follow-On UHF Ultra-high Frequency WGS Wideband Global SATCOM UNCLASSIFIED Outcome 4 Guide V1.0 Page 10 of 87 UNCLASSIFIED

  13. Suppression of Spontaneous Activity before Visual Response in the Primate V1 Neurons during a Visually Guided Saccade Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choongkil Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Visually guided saccadic responses are thought to involve multiple stages of processing in diverse brain structures including the primary visual cortex (V1. The variability of neural activity in each of these structures may present ambiguities for downstream stages in identifying sensory and motor signals among spontaneous discharges. Response time of saccadic eye movements made toward a visual target is correlated with the time of first spike of V1 evoked by the target (Lee et al., 2010 Journal of Neurophysiology 104 2556–2572. This suggests that downstream neurons receiving the output of V1 are faced with a challenging task of discriminating spikes of visual response against spontaneous discharge. Here we report a novel response property of the output activity of the V1 so that, immediately before neurons discharge a burst of activity to a visual target, spontaneous discharges were transiently suppressed. This suppression was ultra-fast and peaked around 20 ms after target onset. The results of a simulation indicated that the suppression enhanced reliability of detecting activity onset. Thus, the initial transient suppression is hypothesized to enhance temporal contrast for identifying the onset of visual response by downstream neurons.

  14. V1 and V2b interneurons secure the alternating flexor-extensor motor activity mice require for limbed locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingming; Lanuza, Guillermo M.; Britz, Olivier; Wang, Zhi; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zhang, Ying; Velasquez, Tomoko; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Frank, Eric; Goulding, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The reciprocal activation of flexor and extensor muscles constitutes the fundamental mechanism that tetrapod vertebrates use for locomotion and limb-driven reflex behaviors. This aspect of motor coordination is controlled by inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord; however, the identity of the spinal interneurons that serve this function is not known. Here we show that the production of an alternating flexor-extensor motor rhythm depends on the composite activities of two classes of ventrally-located inhibitory neurons, V1 and V2b interneurons (INs). Abrogating V1 and V2b IN-derived neurotransmission in the isolated spinal cord results in a synchronous pattern of L2 flexor-related and L5 extensor-related locomotor activity. Mice lacking V1 and V2b inhibition are unable to articulate their limb joints and display marked deficits in limb-driven reflex movements. Taken together, these findings identify V1- and V2b-derived neurons as the core interneuronal components of the limb central pattern generator (CPG) that coordinate flexor-extensor motor activity. PMID:24698273

  15. Using AppleWorks V1.3 To Construct Data Base Files for the Apple IIe Computer. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This step-by-step guide to using AppleWorks V1.3 to construct database files for the Apple IIe computer covers (1) program loading; (2) selecting the add files to the desktop option; (3) naming the file; (4) the blinking block cursor; (5) naming categories or fields; (6) moving to insert data; (7) inserting data; (8) changing database file…

  16. Stability of the Bet v 1 cross-reactive allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 : a biophysical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollen, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The allergen Bet v 1 is known as the primary sensitizer for birch pollen-related food allergy and is responsible for IgE cross-reactivity to pathogenesis-related 10 (PR-10) proteins from, in particular, fruits from the Rosaceae and vegetables from the Apiaceae families. The allergenic potential of

  17. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldberg, Y.P.; Price, N.; Namdari, R.; Cohen, C.J.; Lamers, M.H.; Winters, C.; Price, J.; Young, C.E.; Verschoof, H.; Sherrington, R.; Pimstone, S.N.; Hayden, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia

  19. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Martijn F; Gilissen, Ludovicus Jwj; Esselink, Gerhard D; Smulders, Marinus Jm

    2006-07-04

    Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa) is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10) multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a single tree, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of PR-10 genes was performed on two diploid B. pendula cultivars and one interspecific tetraploid Betula hybrid. Sequences were attributed to putative genes based on sequence identity and intron length. Information on transcription was derived by comparison with homologous cDNA sequences available in GenBank/EMBL/DDJB. PCR-cloning of multigene families is accompanied by a high risk for the occurrence of PCR recombination artifacts. We screened for and excluded these artifacts, and also detected putative artifact sequences among database sequences. Forty-four different PR-10 sequences were recovered from B. pendula and assigned to thirteen putative genes. Sequence homology suggests that three genes were transcribed in somatic tissue and seven genes in pollen. The transcription of three other genes remains unknown. In total, fourteen different Bet v 1-type isoforms were identified in the three cultivars, of which nine isoforms were entirely new. Isoforms with high and low IgE-reactivity are encoded by different genes and one birch pollen grain has the genetic background to produce a mixture of isoforms with varying IgE-reactivity. Allergen diversity is even higher in the interspecific tetraploid hybrid, consistent with the presence of two genomes. Isoforms of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 are encoded by multiple genes, and we propose to name them accordingly. The present characterization of the Bet v 1 genes provides a framework for the screening of specific Bet v 1 genes among other B. pendula cultivars or Betula species, and for future breeding for trees with a reduced allergenicity. Investigations towards sensitization and

  20. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilissen Ludovicus JWJ

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10 multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a single tree, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of PR-10 genes was performed on two diploid B. pendula cultivars and one interspecific tetraploid Betula hybrid. Sequences were attributed to putative genes based on sequence identity and intron length. Information on transcription was derived by comparison with homologous cDNA sequences available in GenBank/EMBL/DDJB. PCR-cloning of multigene families is accompanied by a high risk for the occurrence of PCR recombination artifacts. We screened for and excluded these artifacts, and also detected putative artifact sequences among database sequences. Results Forty-four different PR-10 sequences were recovered from B. pendula and assigned to thirteen putative genes. Sequence homology suggests that three genes were transcribed in somatic tissue and seven genes in pollen. The transcription of three other genes remains unknown. In total, fourteen different Bet v 1-type isoforms were identified in the three cultivars, of which nine isoforms were entirely new. Isoforms with high and low IgE-reactivity are encoded by different genes and one birch pollen grain has the genetic background to produce a mixture of isoforms with varying IgE-reactivity. Allergen diversity is even higher in the interspecific tetraploid hybrid, consistent with the presence of two genomes. Conclusion Isoforms of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 are encoded by multiple genes, and we propose to name them accordingly. The present characterization of the Bet v 1 genes provides a framework for the screening of specific Bet v 1 genes among other B. pendula cultivars or Betula species, and for future breeding for trees with a reduced

  1. Pyramidal cells in V1 of African rodents are bigger more branched and more spiny than those in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eElston

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pyramidal cells are characterised by markedly different sized dendritic trees, branching patterns and spine density across the cortical mantle. Moreover, pyramidal cells have been shown to differ in structure among homologous cortical areas in different species; however, most of these studies have been conducted in primates. Whilst pyramidal cells have been quantified in a few cortical areas in some other species there are, as yet, no uniform comparative data on pyramidal cell structure in a homologous cortical area among species in different Orders. Here we studied layer III pyramidal cells in V1 of three species of rodents, the greater cane rat, highveld gerbil and four-striped mouse, by the same methodology used to sample data from layer III pyramidal cells in primates. The data reveal markedly different trends between rodents and primates: there is an appreciable increase in the size, branching complexity and number of spines in the dendritic trees of pyramidal cells with increasing size of V1 in the brain in rodents, whereas there is relatively little difference in primates. Moreover, pyramidal cells in rodents are larger, more branched and more spinous than those in primates. For example, the dendritic trees of pyramidal cells in V1 of the cane rat are nearly three times larger, and have more than ten times the number of spines in their basal dendritic trees, than those in V1 of the macaque (7900 and 600, respectively, which has a V1 40 times the size that of the cane rat. It remains to be determined to what extent these differences may result from developmental differences or reflect evolutionary and/or processing specializations.

  2. Systematic Study of Binding of μ-Conotoxins to the Sodium Channel NaV1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Mahdavi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV are fundamental components of the nervous system. Their dysfunction is implicated in a number of neurological disorders, such as chronic pain, making them potential targets for the treatment of such disorders. The prominence of the NaV channels in the nervous system has been exploited by venomous animals for preying purposes, which have developed toxins that can block the NaV channels, thereby disabling their function. Because of their potency, such toxins could provide drug leads for the treatment of neurological disorders associated with NaV channels. However, most toxins lack selectivity for a given target NaV channel, and improving their selectivity profile among the NaV1 isoforms is essential for their development as drug leads. Computational methods will be very useful in the solution of such design problems, provided accurate models of the protein-ligand complex can be constructed. Using docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we have recently constructed a model for the NaV1.4-μ-conotoxin-GIIIA complex and validated it with the ample mutational data available for this complex. Here, we use the validated NaV1.4 model in a systematic study of binding other μ-conotoxins (PIIIA, KIIIA and BuIIIB to NaV1.4. The binding mode obtained for each complex is shown to be consistent with the available mutation data and binding constants. We compare the binding modes of PIIIA, KIIIA and BuIIIB to that of GIIIA and point out the similarities and differences among them. The detailed information about NaV1.4-μ-conotoxin interactions provided here will be useful in the design of new NaV channel blocking peptides.

  3. Capping protein regulatory cycle driven by CARMIL and V-1 may promote actin network assembly at protruding edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Ikuko; Remmert, Kirsten; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-13

    Although capping protein (CP) terminates actin filament elongation, it promotes Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly and accelerates actin-based motility both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, capping protein Arp2/3 myosin I linker (CARMIL) antagonizes CP by reducing its affinity for the barbed end and by uncapping CP-capped filaments, whereas the protein V-1/myotrophin sequesters CP in an inactive complex. Previous work showed that CARMIL can readily retrieve CP from the CP:V-1 complex, thereby converting inactive CP into a version with moderate affinity for the barbed end. Here we further clarify the mechanism of this exchange reaction, and we demonstrate that the CP:CARMIL complex created by complex exchange slows the rate of barbed-end elongation by rapidly associating with, and dissociating from, the barbed end. Importantly, the cellular concentrations of V-1 and CP determined here argue that most CP is sequestered by V-1 at steady state in vivo. Finally, we show that CARMIL is recruited to the plasma membrane and only at cell edges undergoing active protrusion. Assuming that CARMIL is active only at this location, our data argue that a large pool of freely diffusing, inactive CP (CP:V-1) feeds, via CARMIL-driven complex exchange, the formation of weak-capping complexes (CP:CARMIL) at the plasma membrane of protruding edges. In vivo, therefore, CARMIL should promote Arp2/3-dependent actin network assembly at the leading edge by promoting barbed-end capping there.

  4. Development of a human vasopressin V1a-receptor antagonist from an evolutionary-related insect neuropeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Giglio, Maria Giulia; Muttenthaler, Markus; Harpsøe, Kasper; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Keov, Peter; Eder, Thomas; Rattei, Thomas; Arrowsmith, Sarah; Wray, Susan; Marek, Ales; Elbert, Tomas; Alewood, Paul F.; Gloriam, David E.; Gruber, Christian W.

    2017-02-01

    Characterisation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) relies on the availability of a toolbox of ligands that selectively modulate different functional states of the receptors. To uncover such molecules, we explored a unique strategy for ligand discovery that takes advantage of the evolutionary conservation of the 600-million-year-old oxytocin/vasopressin signalling system. We isolated the insect oxytocin/vasopressin orthologue inotocin from the black garden ant (Lasius niger), identified and cloned its cognate receptor and determined its pharmacological properties on the insect and human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors. Subsequently, we identified a functional dichotomy: inotocin activated the insect inotocin and the human vasopressin V1b receptors, but inhibited the human V1aR. Replacement of Arg8 of inotocin by D-Arg8 led to a potent, stable and competitive V1aR-antagonist ([D-Arg8]-inotocin) with a 3,000-fold binding selectivity for the human V1aR over the other three subtypes, OTR, V1bR and V2R. The Arg8/D-Arg8 ligand-pair was further investigated to gain novel insights into the oxytocin/vasopressin peptide-receptor interaction, which led to the identification of key residues of the receptors that are important for ligand functionality and selectivity. These observations could play an important role for development of oxytocin/vasopressin receptor modulators that would enable clear distinction of the physiological and pathological responses of the individual receptor subtypes.

  5. Antidepressant and anxiolytic profiles of newly synthesized arginine vasopressin V1B receptor antagonists: TASP0233278 and TASP0390325.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, M; Yoshimizu, T; Shimazaki, T; Tokugawa, K; Fukumoto, K; Kurosu, S; Kuwada, T; Sekiguchi, Y; Chaki, S

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin V1B receptor antagonists may be effective for the treatment of depression and anxiety and the objective of this study was to characterize the pharmacological profiles of two newly synthesized arginine vasopressin receptor 1B (V1B receptor) antagonists, TASP0233278 and TASP0390325. We investigated the in vitro profiles of TASP0233278 and TASP0390325. In addition, the effect of TASP0390325 on the increase in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels induced by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)/desmopressin (dDAVP) was investigated. We also investigated the antidepressant and anxiolytic profiles of TASP0233278 and TASP0390325 in animal models. Both TASP0233278 and TASP0390325 showed a high affinity and potent antagonist activity for V1B receptors. Oral administration of TASP0390325 antagonized the increase in plasma ACTH levels induced by CRF/dDAVP in rats, indicating that TASP0390325 blocks the anterior pituitary V1B receptor in vivo. Oral administration of TASP0233278 or TASP0390325 also exerted antidepressant effects in two models of depression (a forced swimming test and an olfactory bulbectomy model). Moreover, TASP0233278 improved depressive-like behaviour induced by repeated treatment with corticosterone, a model that has been shown to be resistant to treatment with currently prescribed antidepressants. In addition to depression models, TASP0233278 or TASP0390325 exerted anxiolytic effects in several anxiety models (social interaction, elevated plus-maze, stress-induced hyperthermia, separation-induced ultrasonic vocalization and sodium lactate-induced panic-like responses in panic-prone rats). TASP0233278 and TASP0390325 are potent and orally active V1B receptor antagonists with antidepressant and anxiolytic activities in rodents. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Enhanced involvement of brain vasopressin V1 receptors in cardiovascular responses to stress in rats with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobruch, Jakub; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Szczepanska-Sadowska, Ewa

    2005-12-01

    Stress is one of the factors provoking cardiovascular complications. The purpose of the study was to explore the role of vasopressin (VP) in central control of arterial blood pressure and heart rate under resting conditions and during stimulation by an alarming stress (air jet stress) in myocardial infarct-induced cardiac failure. Six groups of male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were subjected either to sham surgery (sham rats) or to ligation of a left coronary artery (infarcted rats). After 5 weeks both infarcted and sham rats were subjected either to intracerebroventricular infusion of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) (sham aCSF and infarcted aCSF), [Arg8]-VP (sham VP and infarcted VP) or VP V1a receptor antagonist (d(CH2)5[Tyr(Me)2Ala-]VP, sham V1ANT and infarcted V1ANT). Air jet stress elicited significantly greater increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate in the infarcted aCSF than in the sham aCSF rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of V1ANT significantly reduced resting MABP and MABP and heart rate increases in response to stress in the infarcted but not in the sham rats. Intracerebroventricular infusion of VP elicited a significant increase in resting MABP in the infarcted VP but not in the sham VP rats. The results provide evidence for enhanced engagement of the brain V1 VP receptors in regulation of resting MABP and in generation of exaggerated cardiovascular responses to air jet stress during the post-infarct state.

  7. Sodium channel NaV1.9 mutations associated with insensitivity to pain dampen neuronal excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianying; Vanoye, Carlos G; Cutts, Alison; Goldberg, Y Paul; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Cohen, Charles J; Waxman, Stephen G; George, Alfred L

    2017-06-30

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV) mutations cause genetic pain disorders that range from severe paroxysmal pain to a congenital inability to sense pain. Previous studies on NaV1.7 and NaV1.8 established clear relationships between perturbations in channel function and divergent clinical phenotypes. By contrast, studies of NaV1.9 mutations have not revealed a clear relationship of channel dysfunction with the associated and contrasting clinical phenotypes. Here, we have elucidated the functional consequences of a NaV1.9 mutation (L1302F) that is associated with insensitivity to pain. We investigated the effects of L1302F and a previously reported mutation (L811P) on neuronal excitability. In transfected heterologous cells, the L1302F mutation caused a large hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of activation, leading to substantially enhanced overlap between activation and steady-state inactivation relationships. In transfected small rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, expression of L1302F and L811P evoked large depolarizations of the resting membrane potential and impaired action potential generation. Therefore, our findings implicate a cellular loss of function as the basis for impaired pain sensation. We further demonstrated that a U-shaped relationship between the resting potential and the neuronal action potential threshold explains why NaV1.9 mutations that evoke small degrees of membrane depolarization cause hyperexcitability and familial episodic pain disorder or painful neuropathy, while mutations evoking larger membrane depolarizations cause hypoexcitability and insensitivity to pain.

  8. Reactive species modify NaV1.8 channels and affect action potentials in murine dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schink, Martin; Leipold, Enrico; Schirmeyer, Jana; Schönherr, Roland; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are important relay stations between the periphery and the central nervous system and are essential for somatosensory signaling. Reactive species are produced in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions and are known to alter electric signaling. Here we studied the influence of reactive species on the electrical properties of DRG neurons from mice with the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Even mild stress induced by either low concentrations of chloramine-T (10 μM) or low-intensity blue light irradiation profoundly diminished action potential frequency but prolonged single action potentials in wild-type neurons. The impact on evoked action potentials was much smaller in neurons deficient of the tetrodotoxin (TTX)-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.8 (NaV1.8(-/-)), the channel most important for the action potential upstroke in DRG neurons. Low concentrations of chloramine-T caused a significant reduction of NaV1.8 peak current and, at higher concentrations, progressively slowed down inactivation. Blue light had a smaller effect on amplitude but slowed down NaV1.8 channel inactivation. The observed effects were less apparent for TTX-sensitive NaV channels. NaV1.8 is an important reactive-species-sensitive component in the electrical signaling of DRG neurons, potentially giving rise to loss-of-function and gain-of-function phenomena depending on the type of reactive species and their effective concentration and time of exposure.

  9. Identification of binding domains in the sodium channel Na(V)1.8 intracellular N-terminal region and annexin II light chain p11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, W-Y Louisa; Malik-Hall, Misbah; Wood, John N; Okuse, Kenji

    2004-01-30

    The interaction of p11 (annexin II light chain) with the N-terminal domain of Na(V)1.8, a tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel, is essential for the functional expression of the channel. Here we show that p11 binds to Na(V)1.8 but not to sodium channel isoforms Na(V)1.2, 1.5, 1.7 or Na(V)1.9. The binding of amino acids 74-103 of Na(V)1.8 to p11 residues 33-78 occurs in a random coiled region flanked by two EF hand motifs whose crystal structure has been established. As Na(V)1.8 channel expression is associated with pain pathways, drugs that disrupt the Na(V)1.8-p11 interaction and down-regulate channel expression may have analgesic activity.

  10. Activation of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel NaV1.9 in rat primary sensory neurons contributes to melittin-induced pain behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yao-Qing; Zhao, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xue-Feng; Xie, Fang; Yang, Yan; Chen, Jun

    2013-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channels NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons play important roles in pathological pain. We recently reported that melittin, the major toxin of whole bee venom, induced action potential firings in DRG neurons even in the presence of a high concentration (500 nM) of TTX, indicating the contribution of TTX-R sodium channels. This hypothesis is fully investigated in the present study. After subcutaneous injection of melittin, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 significantly upregulate mRNA and protein expressions, and related sodium currents also increase. Double immunohistochemical results show that NaV1.8-positive neurons are mainly medium- and small-sized, whereas NaV1.9-positive ones are only small-sized. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS ODNs) targeting NaV1.8 and NaV1.9 are used to evaluate functional significance of the increased expressions of TTX-R sodium channels. Behavioral tests demonstrate that AS ODN targeting NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, reverses melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Neither NaV1.8 AS ODN nor NaV1.9 AS ODN affects melittin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These results provide previously unknown evidence that upregulation of NaV1.9, but not NaV1.8, in small-sized DRG neurons contributes to melittin-induced heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, melittin-induced biological effect indicates a potential strategy to study properties of TTX-R sodium channels.

  11. Mechanism and prognostic role of qR in V1in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waligóra, Marcin; Kopeć, Grzegorz; Jonas, Kamil; Tyrka, Anna; Sarnecka, Agnieszka; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Urbańczyk-Zawadzka, Małgorzata; Podolec, Piotr

    The presence of qR pattern in lead V 1 of the 12-lead surface ECG has been proposed as a risk marker of death in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We aimed to validate these findings in the modern era of PAH treatment and additionally to assess the relation of qR in V 1 to PAH severity. We also investigated the possible mechanisms underlying this ECG sign. Consecutive patients with PAH excluding patients with congenital heart defect were recruited between February 2008 and January 2016. A 12-lead standard ECG was acquired and analyzed for the presence of qR in V 1 and other potential prognostic patterns. Cardiac magnetic resonance and echocardiography were used for structural (masses and volumes) and functional (ejection fraction, eccentricity index) characterization of left (LV) and right (RV) ventricles. Standard markers of PAH severity were also assessed. We enrolled 66 patients (19 males), aged 50.0±15.7years with idiopathic PAH (n=52) and PAH associated with connective tissue disease (n=14). qR in V 1 was present in 26(39.4%) patients and was associated with worse functional capacity, hemodynamics and RV function. The main structural determinants of qR in V 1 were RV to LV volume ratio (OR: 3.99; 95% CI: 1.47-10.8, p=0.007) and diastolic eccentricity index (OR: 15.0; 95% CI: 1.29-175.5, p=0.03). During observation time of 30.5±19.4months, 20 (30.3%) patient died, 13 (50%) patients with qR and 7 (17.5%) patients without qR pattern. Electrocardiographic determinants of survival were qR (HR: 3.06, 95% CI: 1.21-7.4; p=0.02) and QRS duration (HR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.04; p=0.01). Presence of qR in V 1 reflects RV dilation and diastolic interventricular septum flattening. It is a sign of advanced PAH and predicts the risk of death in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Memory-guided drawing training increases Granger causal influences from the perirhinal cortex to V1 in the blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciamani, Laura; Likova, Lora T

    2017-05-01

    The perirhinal cortex (PRC) is a medial temporal lobe structure that has been implicated in not only visual memory in the sighted, but also tactile memory in the blind (Cacciamani & Likova, 2016). It has been proposed that, in the blind, the PRC may contribute to modulation of tactile memory responses that emerge in low-level "visual" area V1 as a result of training-induced cortical reorganization (Likova, 2012, 2015). While some studies in the sighted have indicated that the PRC is indeed structurally and functionally connected to the visual cortex (Clavagnier, Falchier, & Kennedy, 2004; Peterson, Cacciamani, Barense, & Scalf, 2012), the PRC's direct modulation of V1 is unknown-particularly in those who lack the visual input that typically stimulates this region. In the present study, we tested Likova's PRC modulation hypothesis; specifically, we used fMRI to assess the PRC's Granger causal influence on V1 activation in the blind during a tactile memory task. To do so, we trained congenital and acquired blind participants on a unique memory-guided drawing technique previously shown to result in V1 reorganization towards tactile memory representations (Likova, 2012). The tasks (20s each) included: tactile exploration of raised line drawings of faces and objects, tactile memory retrieval via drawing, and a scribble motor/memory control. FMRI before and after a week of the Cognitive-Kinesthetic training on these tasks revealed a significant increase in PRC-to-V1 Granger causality from pre- to post-training during the memory drawing task, but not during the motor/memory control. This increase in causal connectivity indicates that the training strengthened the top-down modulation of visual cortex from the PRC. This is the first study to demonstrate enhanced directed functional connectivity from the PRC to the visual cortex in the blind, implicating the PRC as a potential source of the reorganization towards tactile representations that occurs in V1 in the blind brain

  13. Treatment of Na(v)1.7-mediated pain in inherited erythromelalgia using a novel sodium channel blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Yigal Paul; Price, Nicola; Namdari, Rostam; Cohen, Charles Jay; Lamers, Mieke H; Winters, Conrad; Price, James; Young, Clint E; Verschoof, Henry; Sherrington, Robin; Pimstone, Simon Neil; Hayden, Michael Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the SCN9A gene leading to deficiency of its protein product, Na(v)1.7, cause congenital indifference to pain (CIP). CIP is characterized by the absence of the ability to sense pain associated with noxious stimuli. In contrast, the opposite phenotype to CIP, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), is a disorder of spontaneous pain caused by missense mutations resulting in gain-of-function in Na(v)1.7 that promote neuronal hyperexcitability. The primary aim of this study was to demonstrate that Na(v)1.7 antagonism could alleviate the pain of IEM, thereby demonstrating the utility of this opposite phenotype model as a tool for rapid proof-of-concept for novel analgesics. An exploratory, randomized, double-blind, 2-period crossover study was conducted in 4 SCN9A mutation-proven IEM patients. In each treatment period (2days), separated by a 2-day washout period, patients were orally administered XEN402 (400mg twice daily) or matching placebo. In 3 patients, pain was induced by heat or exercise during each treatment arm. A fourth patient, in constant severe pain, required no induction. Patient-reported outcomes of pain intensity and/or relief were recorded, and the time taken to induce pain was measured. The ability to induce pain in IEM patients was significantly attenuated by XEN402 compared with placebo. XEN402 increased the time to maximal pain induction and significantly reduced the amount of pain (42% less) after induction (P=.014). This pilot study showed that XEN402 blocks Na(v)1.7-mediated pain associated with IEM, thereby demonstrating target engagement in humans and underscoring the use of rare genetic disorders with mutant target channels as a novel approach to rapid proof-of-concept. Copyright © 2011 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbides Evolution and Tensile Property of 4Cr5MoSiV1 Die Steel with Rare Earth Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanghang Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies of 4Cr5MoSiV1 die steel suggest that under appropriate conditions, additions of rare earth (RE can enhance tensile property. This improvement is apparently due to the more uniform distribution of carbides and the enhancement of precipitation strengthening after RE additions. In this present work, the effect of the RE addition on the carbides evolution and tensile property of 4Cr5MoSiV1 steel with various RE contents (0, 0.018, 0.048 and 0.15 wt % were systematically investigated. The two-dimensional detection techniques such as optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used to investigate the carbides evolution of as-cast, annealed and tempered with RE addition. The results indicated that the carbides in 4Cr5MoSiV1 steels were modified by adding the suitable amount of RE. The eutectic structure and coarse eutectic carbides were all refining and the morphology of the annealed carbides initiated change from strip shape to ellipsoidal shape compared with the unmodified test steel (0RE. In addition, the amount of the tempered M8C7 carbides increased initially and then decreased with the alteration of RE addition from 0.018 to 0.15 wt %. Notably, the tensile test indicated that the average value of ultimate tensile strength (UTS and elongation rate of 0.048RE steel increased slightly to 1474 MPa and 15%, higher than the 1452 MPa and 12% for the unmodified test steel (0RE, respectively. Such an addition of RE (0.048 wt % would have a significant effect on the carbides evolution of as-cast, annealed and tempered and resulting in the tensile property of 4Cr5MoSiV1 die steel.

  15. Dynamics of orientation tuning in cat V1 neurons depend on location within layers and orientation maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Schummers

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the timecourse of the orientation tuning of responses in primary visual cortex (V1 can provide insight into the circuitry underlying tuning. Several studies have examined the temporal evolution of orientation selectivity in V1 neurons, but there is no consensus regarding the stability of orientation tuning properties over the timecourse of the response. We have used reverse-correlation analysis of the responses to dynamic grating stimuli to re-examine this issue in cat V1 neurons. We find that the preferred orientation and tuning curve shape are stable in the majority of neurons; however, more than forty percent of cells show a significant change in either preferred orientation or tuning width between early and late portions of the response. To examine the influence of the local cortical circuit connectivity, we analyzed the timecourse of responses as a function of receptive field type, laminar position, and orientation map position. Simple cells are more selective, and reach peak selectivity earlier, than complex cells. There are pronounced laminar differences in the timing of responses: middle layer cells respond faster, deep layer cells have prolonged response decay, and superficial cells are intermediate in timing. The average timing of neurons near and far from pinwheel centers is similar, but there is more variability in the timecourse of responses near pinwheel centers. This result was reproduced in an established network model of V1 operating in a regime of balanced excitatory and inhibitory recurrent connections, confirming previous results. Thus, response dynamics of cortical neurons reflect circuitry based on both vertical and horizontal location within cortical networks.

  16. The impact of nitration on the structure and immunogenicity of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Ackaert

    Full Text Available Allergy prevalence has increased in industrialized countries. One contributing factor could be pollution, which can cause nitration of allergens exogenously (in the air or endogenously (in inflamed lung tissue. We investigated the impact of nitration on both the structural and immunological behavior of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to determine whether nitration might be a factor in the increased incidence of allergy. Bet v 1.0101 was nitrated with tetranitromethane. Immune effects were assessed by measuring the proliferation of specific T-cell lines (TCLs upon stimulation with different concentrations of nitrated and unmodified allergen, and by measurement of cytokine release of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and primary DCs (primDCs stimulated with nitrated versus unmodified allergen. HPLC-MS, crystallography, gel electrophoresis, amino acid analysis, size exclusion chromatography and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to characterize structural changes after nitration of the allergen. The proliferation of specific TCLs was higher upon stimulation with the nitrated allergen in comparison to the unmodified allergen. An important structural consequence of nitration was oligomerization. Moreover, analysis of the crystal structure of nitrated Bet v 1.0101 showed that amino acid residue Y83, located in the hydrophobic cavity, was nitrated to 100%. Both moDCs and primDCs showed decreased production of TH1-priming cytokines, thus favoring a TH2 response. These results implicate that nitration of Bet v 1.0101 might be a contributing factor to the observed increase in birch pollen allergy, and emphasize the importance of protein modifications in understanding the molecular basis of allergenicity.

  17. VSTM-v1, a potential myeloid differentiation antigen that is downregulated in bone marrow cells from myeloid leukemia patients

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Min; Li, Ting; Li, Ning; Li, Jinlan; Yao, Qiumei; Han, Wenling; Ruan, Guorui

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte differentiation antigens often represent important markers for the diagnosis, classification, prognosis, and therapeutic targeting of myeloid leukemia. Herein, we report a potential leukocyte differentiation antigen gene VSTM1 (V-set and transmembrane domain-containing 1) that was downregulated in bone marrow cells from leukemia patients and exhibited a higher degree of promoter methylation. The expression level of its predominant encoded product, VSTM1-v1, was positively correlated...

  18. Characterization of 2 genetic variants of Na(v) 1.5-arginine 689 found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottas, Valentin; Rougier, Jean-Sébastien; Jousset, Florian; Kucera, Jan P; Shestak, Anna; Makarov, Leonid M; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V; Abriel, Hugues

    2013-09-01

    Hundreds of genetic variants in SCN5A, the gene coding for the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac sodium channel, Na(v) 1.5, have been described in patients with cardiac channelopathies as well as in individuals from control cohorts. The aim of this study was to characterize the biophysical properties of 2 naturally occurring Na(v) 1.5 variants, p.R689H and p.R689C, found in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and in control individuals. In addition, this study was motivated by the finding of the variant p.R689H in a family with sudden cardiac death (SCD) in children. When expressed in HEK293 cells, most of the sodium current (I(Na)) biophysical properties of both variants were indistinguishable from the wild-type (WT) channels. In both cases, however, an ∼2-fold increase of the tetrodotoxin-sensitive late I(Na) was observed. Action potential simulations and reconstruction of pseudo-ECGs demonstrated that such a subtle increase in the late I(Na) may prolong the QT interval in a nonlinear fashion. In conclusion, despite the fact that the causality link between p.R689H and the phenotype of the studied family cannot be demonstrated, this study supports the notion that subtle alterations of Na(v) 1.5 variants may increase the risk for cardiac arrhythmias. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin-Badaroudine, Pascal; Chahine, Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    The decline of the western honeybee (Apis mellifera) has been reported to be due to parasitism by Varroa destructor mites and to colony collapse disorder in which these mites may be involved. In-hive chemicals such as τ-fluvalinate are being used to control Vdestructor populations. This approach may lead to the chronic exposure of bees to this liposoluble chemical, which tends to accumulate in hives. We cloned a variant of the V. destructor voltage-dependent sodium (VdNaV1) channel and studied its biophysical characteristics and sensitivity to τ-fluvalinate using the Xenopus oocyte expression system and the 2-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. We compared the affinity of VdNaV1 for τ-fluvalinate with the honeybee voltage-dependent sodium ortholog. Our results showed that the honeybee sodium channel is more sensitive to τ-fluvalinate than the V. destructor channel, suggesting that care must be taken when treating hives with this chemical.-Gosselin-Badaroudine, P., Chahine, M. Biophysical characterization of the Varroa destructor NaV1 sodium channel and its affinity for τ-fluvalinate insecticide. © FASEB.

  20. K(v)1.5 potassium channel gene regulation by Sp1 transcription factor and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Samuel J; Cheong, Alex; Li, Jing; Dondas, Naciye Y; Zeng, Fanning; Wood, Ian C; Beech, David J

    2007-11-01

    K(V)1.5, a voltage-gated potassium channel, has functional importance in regulating blood vessel tone and cardiac action potentials and is a target for numerous therapeutic drug development programs. Despite the importance of K(V)1.5, there is little knowledge of the mechanisms controlling expression of its underlying gene, Kcna5. We identified a 5' flanking region of the murine Kcna5 gene that drives expression of a luciferase reporter gene in primary smooth muscle cells and a smooth muscle cell line. The promoter contained CACCC nucleotide motifs, which we have shown to bind the Sp1 transcription factor in the aorta under physiological conditions in vivo. Inhibition of Sp1-Kcna5 promoter interactions using mithramycin A, a dominant-negative Sp1 mutant, or disruption of the CACCC boxes by mutagenesis inhibited promoter activity. Conversely, expression of exogenous Sp1 augmented promoter activity. Sp1 has known sensitivity to oxidative stress and, consistent with this property, Kcna5 promoter activity was suppressed by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Our results show that Kcna5 promoter activity in vascular smooth muscle is critically dependent on Sp1 regulation via CACCC box motifs and identify mechanisms that potentially influence the expression of K(V)1.5 channel expression in physiological or pathological conditions.

  1. Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-Associated Plant Food Sensitization in Uganda and Germany: Differences and Similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odongo, Leo; Mulyowa, Grace; Goebeler, Matthias; Trautmann, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Birch pollen allergy and concomitant plant food sensitization are well documented in Europe. However, there are currently no data available on pollen-associated plant food sensitization or even pollen allergy in tropical Africa. Our study aimed to investigate Bet v 1- and Bet v 2-associated plant food sensitization in atopic patients from Uganda and compare it with sensitization rates in German patients. Sera from 83 Ugandan and 97 German atopic patients were analysed using UniCAP100™ for allergen-specific IgE against the birch tree pollen allergens Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 as well as the plant foods hazelnut, apple, kiwi, pea, peach, cherry, litchi, peanut, and soy. As expected, sensitization to Bet v 1 and cross-reactive plant food allergens was more common in German atopic patients. In contrast, the prevalence of sensitization against Bet v 2 was remarkably similar in Ugandan and German patients. Interestingly, in Ugandan patients we found IgE-mediated sensitization against plant foods such as hazelnut, pea, peach, cherry, and litchi that are neither cultivated nor consumed in Uganda. For Ugandan atopic patients, sensitization against the Bet v 2 allergen (a plant profilin) may explain cross-reactivity to several plant foods which are not consumed in Uganda. Additionally, it is probable that sensitization of Ugandan atopics to alder pollen (Alnus acuminata, plant family Betulaceae) caused serological cross-reactivity with Betula verrucosa-related allergens. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Relaxation of NH(a1Δ, v = 1) in Collisions with H(2S): An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defazio, P.; Petrongolo, C.; McBane, G. C.; Adam, L.; Hack, W.; Akpinar, S.; Schinke, R.

    2009-07-01

    Collisions of electronically and vibrationally excited NH(a1Δ, v = 1) with H atoms were investigated by experimental, quantum mechanical (QM) wavepacket, and quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) methods. The NH(a1Δ, v = 1) total loss rate constant, corresponding to the sum of the NH vibrational relaxation, N(2D)+H2 formation, and electronic quenching to NH(X3Σ-), was measured at room temperature. Most of the calculations were performed within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, neglecting electronic quenching due to Renner-Teller coupling because QCT calculations showed that for the loss of NH(a1Δ, v = 1) the contribution of quenching is negligible. The QM study included Coriolis couplings, and the QCT study counted only trajectories ending close to a vibrational quantum level of the product diatom. The collisions are dominated by long-lived intermediate complexes, and QM probabilities and cross sections thus exhibit pronounced resonances. QM and QCT cross sections and rate coefficients of the various processes are in very good agreement. The measured rate constant is (9.1 ± 3.3) × 10-11 cm3 s-1, compared with (14.4 ± 0.5) × 10-11 and (15.6 ± 1.6) × 10-11 cm3 s-1, as obtained from QM and QCT calculations, respectively. The reason for the theoretical overestimation is unknown.

  3. Spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation during chronic implantation of a microelectrode array in a behaving macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, T. S.; Parker, R. A.; House, P. A.; Bagley, E.; Wendelken, S.; Normann, R. A.; Greger, B.

    2012-12-01

    Objective. It has been hypothesized that a vision prosthesis capable of evoking useful visual percepts can be based upon electrically stimulating the primary visual cortex (V1) of a blind human subject via penetrating microelectrode arrays. As a continuation of earlier work, we examined several spatial and temporal characteristics of V1 microstimulation. Approach. An array of 100 penetrating microelectrodes was chronically implanted in V1 of a behaving macaque monkey. Microstimulation thresholds were measured using a two-alternative forced choice detection task. Relative locations of electrically-evoked percepts were measured using a memory saccade-to-target task. Main results. The principal finding was that two years after implantation we were able to evoke behavioural responses to electric stimulation across the spatial extent of the array using groups of contiguous electrodes. Consistent responses to stimulation were evoked at an average threshold current per electrode of 204 ± 49 µA (mean ± std) for groups of four electrodes and 91 ± 25 µA for groups of nine electrodes. Saccades to electrically-evoked percepts using groups of nine electrodes showed that the animal could discriminate spatially distinct percepts with groups having an average separation of 1.6 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± std) in cortex and 1.0° ± 0.2° in visual space. Significance. These results demonstrate chronic perceptual functionality and provide evidence for the feasibility of a cortically-based vision prosthesis for the blind using penetrating microelectrodes.

  4. Biophysical characterization data of the artificial protein Octarellin V.1 and binding test with its X-ray helpers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano Figueroa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The artificial protein Octarellin V.1 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsb.2016.05.004 [1] was obtained through a direct evolution process over the de novo designed Octarellin V (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-2836(0201206-8 [2]. The protein has been characterized by circular dichroism and fluorescence techniques, in order to obtain data related to its thermo and chemical stability. Moreover, the data for the secondary structure content studied by circular dichroism and infra red techniques is reported for the Octarellin V and V.1. Two crystallization helpers, nanobodies (http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nprot.2014.039 [3] and αRep (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2010.09.048 [4], have been used to create stable complexes. Here we present the data obtained of the binding characterization of the Octarellin V.1 with the crystallization helpers by isothermal titration calorimetry.

  5. Profiles of Birch Sensitization (Bet v 1, Bet v 2, and Bet v 4) and Oral Allergy Syndrome Across Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprandi, G; Comite, P; Mussap, M; De Amici, M; Quaglini, S; Barocci, F; Marseglia, G L; Scala, E

    2016-01-01

    Birch allergy (BA) is a common pollinosis caused by the allergens Bet v 1, Bet v 2, and Bet v 4. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS) is frequently associated with BA. A gradient of sensitization to birch allergen across Europe has been reported. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the birch sensitization profile, including OAS, across Italy. We performed a retrospective study of 854 patients (391 males, mean age 35.9 years, range 18-93 years): 196 patients were recruited in Genoa, 188 in northern Italy, 359 in central Italy, and 111 in southern Italy. Serum IgE to Bet v 1, Bet v 2, and Bet v 4 was assessed, and OAS was analyzed. With respect to the geographical path Genoa-North-Center-South, the frequency of sensitization to Bet v 1 decreased significantly (PItaly (58.56%). The frequency of sensitization to Bet v 2 increased significantly (PItaly (52.25%). The frequency of Bet v 4 also increased significantly (P=.0002) from Genoa (6.12%) to southern Italy (14.41%). The distribution of patients with OAS differed significantly across the areas (PItaly. The frequency of birch allergens correlated with OAS in central Italy only. The present study demonstrated a significant difference between sensitization to birch and its clinical expression across Italy.

  6. Ca3(P x V1 - x O4)2: Eu3+ nanophosphor synthesis, controlled microstructure, and photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaochun; Wang, Xiaojun

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, Eu3+-doped Ca3(P x V1 - x O4)2 ( x = 0.1, 0.4, 0.7) nanophosphors were synthesized in the presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). The products present interesting and regular morphologies under the mild conditions. For Ca3(P x V1 - x O4)2: Eu3+, they have the similar phase and their morphologies vary with the content ratio of P to V. Furthermore, the luminescence behavior of Eu3+ has been investigated in this one kinds of matrices. In Ca3(P x V1 - x O4)2: Eu3+, the 5 D 0-7 F 2 emissions of Eu3+ were the strongest, indicating that the Eu3+ site is without inversion symmetry, the host compositions with different molar ratio of P to V have; great influence on the luminescent performance. Among those products, The value of I 615/ I 593 for Eu3+ in Ca3(P0.7V0.3O4)2 host lattice is the biggest. The substitution of PO{4/3-} for VO{4/3-} increase the ratio of surface Eu cations as well as the value of I 615/ I 593 of Eu3+.

  7. Regulation of the spontaneous augmentation of Na(V)1.9 in mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons: effect of PKA and PKC pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimura, Jun-ichi; Zheng, Taixing; Uryu, Noriko; Ogata, Nobukuni

    2010-03-19

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion express two kinds of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R) isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels, Na(V)1.8 and Na(V)1.9. These isoforms play key roles in the pathophysiology of chronic pain. Of special interest is Na(V)1.9: our previous studies revealed a unique property of the Na(V)1.9 current, i.e., the Na(V)1.9 current shows a gradual and notable up-regulation of the peak amplitude during recording ("spontaneous augmentation of Na(V)1.9"). However, the mechanism underlying the spontaneous augmentation of Na(V)1.9 is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC), on the spontaneous augmentation of Na(V)1.9. The spontaneous augmentation of the Na(V)1.9 current was significantly suppressed by activation of PKA, whereas activation of PKA did not affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for the Na(V)1.9 current. On the contrary, the finding that activation of PKC can affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for Na(V)1.9 in the perforated patch recordings, where the augmentation does not occur, suggests that the effects of PMA are independent of the augmentation process. These results indicate that the spontaneous augmentation of Na(V)1.9 was regulated directly by PKA, and indirectly by PKC.

  8. Regulation of the Spontaneous Augmentation of NaV1.9 in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons: Effect of PKA and PKC Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimura, Jun-ichi; Zheng, Taixing; Uryu, Noriko; Ogata, Nobukuni

    2010-01-01

    Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion express two kinds of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R) isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. These isoforms play key roles in the pathophysiology of chronic pain. Of special interest is NaV1.9: our previous studies revealed a unique property of the NaV1.9 current, i.e., the NaV1.9 current shows a gradual and notable up-regulation of the peak amplitude during recording (“spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9”). However, the mechanism underlying the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9 is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC), on the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9. The spontaneous augmentation of the NaV1.9 current was significantly suppressed by activation of PKA, whereas activation of PKA did not affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for the NaV1.9 current. On the contrary, the finding that activation of PKC can affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for NaV1.9 in the perforated patch recordings, where the augmentation does not occur, suggests that the effects of PMA are independent of the augmentation process. These results indicate that the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9 was regulated directly by PKA, and indirectly by PKC. PMID:20411123

  9. Regulation of the Spontaneous Augmentation of NaV1.9 in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons: Effect of PKA and PKC Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobukuni Ogata

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion express two kinds of tetrodotoxin resistant (TTX-R isoforms of voltage-gated sodium channels, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. These isoforms play key roles in the pathophysiology of chronic pain. Of special interest is NaV1.9: our previous studies revealed a unique property of the NaV1.9 current, i.e., the NaV1.9 current shows a gradual and notable up-regulation of the peak amplitude during recording (“spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9”. However, the mechanism underlying the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9 is still unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of protein kinases A and C (PKA and PKC, on the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9. The spontaneous augmentation of the NaV1.9 current was significantly suppressed by activation of PKA, whereas activation of PKA did not affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for the NaV1.9 current. On the contrary, the finding that activation of PKC can affect the voltage dependence of inactivation for NaV1.9 in the perforated patch recordings, where the augmentation does not occur, suggests that the effects of PMA are independent of the augmentation process. These results indicate that the spontaneous augmentation of NaV1.9 was regulated directly by PKA, and indirectly by PKC.

  10. Local Circuits of V1 Layer 4B Neurons Projecting to V2 Thick Stripes Define Distinct Cell Classes and Avoid Cytochrome Oxidase Blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarch, Jeff; Federer, Frederick

    2017-01-01

    Decades of anatomical studies on the primate primary visual cortex (V1) have led to a detailed diagram of V1 intrinsic circuitry, but this diagram lacks information about the output targets of V1 cells. Understanding how V1 local processing relates to downstream processing requires identification of neuronal populations defined by their output targets. In primates, V1 layers (L)2/3 and 4B send segregated projections to distinct cytochrome oxidase (CO) stripes in area V2: neurons in CO blob columns project to thin stripes while neurons outside blob columns project to thick and pale stripes, suggesting functional specialization of V1-to-V2 CO streams. However, the conventional diagram of V1 shows all L4B neurons, regardless of their soma location in blob or interblob columns, as projecting selectively to CO blobs in L2/3, suggesting convergence of blob/interblob information in L2/3 blobs and, possibly, some V2 stripes. However, it is unclear whether all L4B projection neurons show similar local circuitries. Using viral-mediated circuit tracing, we have identified the local circuits of L4B neurons projecting to V2 thick stripes in macaque. Consistent with previous studies, we found the somata of this L4B subpopulation to reside predominantly outside blob columns; however, unlike previous descriptions of local L4B circuits, these cells consistently projected outside CO blob columns in all layers. Thus, the local circuits of these L4B output neurons, just like their extrinsic projections to V2, preserve CO streams. Moreover, the intra-V1 laminar patterns of axonal projections identify two distinct neuron classes within this L4B subpopulation, including a rare novel neuron type, suggestive of two functionally specialized output channels. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Conventional diagrams of primate primary visual cortex (V1) depict neuronal connections within and between different V1 layers, but lack information about the cells' downstream targets. This information is critical

  11. IgE and allergen-specific immunotherapy-induced IgG4 recognize similar epitopes of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groh, N; von Loetzen, C S; Subbarayal, B; Möbs, C; Vogel, L; Hoffmann, A; Fötisch, K; Koutsouridou, A; Randow, S; Völker, E; Seutter von Loetzen, A; Rösch, P; Vieths, S; Pfützner, W; Bohle, B; Schiller, D

    2017-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) with birch pollen generates Bet v 1-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G4 which blocks IgE-mediated hypersensitivity mechanisms. Whether IgG4 specific for Bet v 1a competes with IgE for identical epitopes or whether novel epitope specificities of IgG4 antibodies are developed is under debate. We sought to analyze the epitope specificities of IgE and IgG4 antibodies from sera of patients who received AIT. 15 sera of patients (13/15 received AIT) with Bet v 1a-specific IgE and IgG4 were analyzed. The structural arrangements of recombinant (r)Bet v 1a and rBet v 1a_11x , modified in five potential epitopes, were analyzed by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. IgE binding to Bet v 1 was assessed by ELISA and mediator release assays. Competitive binding of monoclonal antibodies specific for Bet v 1a and serum IgE/IgG4 to rBet v 1a and serum antibody binding to a non-allergenic Bet v 1-type model protein presenting an individual epitope for IgE was analyzed in ELISA and western blot. rBet v 1a_11x had a Bet v 1a - similar secondary and tertiary structure. Monomeric dispersion of rBet v 1a_11x was concentration and buffer-dependent. Up to 1500-fold increase in the EC50 for IgE-mediated mediator release induced by rBet v 1a_11x was determined. The reduction of IgE and IgG4 binding to rBet v 1a_11x was comparable in 67% (10/15) of sera. Bet v 1a-specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited binding of serum IgE and IgG4 to 66.1% and 64.9%, respectively. Serum IgE and IgG4 bound specifically to an individual epitope presented by our model protein in 33% (5/15) of sera. Patients receiving AIT develop Bet v 1a-specific IgG4 which competes with IgE for partly identical or largely overlapping epitopes. The similarities of epitopes for IgE and IgG4 might stimulate the development of epitope-specific diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Animation of natural scene by virtual eye-movements evokes high precision and low noise in V1 neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre eBaudot

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic Noise is thought to be a limiting factor for computational efficiency in the Brain. In visual cortex (V1, ongoing activity is present in vivo, and spiking responses to simple stimuli are highly unreliable across trials. Stimulus statistics used to plot receptive fields, however, are quite different from those experienced during natural visuomotor exploration. We recorded V1 neurons intracellularly in the anaesthetized and paralyzed cat and compared their spiking and synaptic responses to full field natural images animated by simulated eye-movements to those evoked by simpler (grating or higher dimensionality statistics (dense noise. In most cells, natural scene animation was the only condition where high temporal precision (in the 10-20 ms range was maintained during sparse and reliable activity. At the subthreshold level, irregular but highly reproducible membrane potential dynamics were observed, even during long (several 100 ms spike-less periods. We showed that both the spatial structure of natural scenes and the temporal dynamics of eye-movements increase the signal-to-noise ratio by a non linear amplification of the signal combined with a reduction of the subthreshold contextual noise. These data support the view that the sparsening and the time precision of the neural code in V1 may depend primarily on three factors: 1 broadband input spectrum: the bandwidth must be rich enough for recruiting optimally the diversity of spatial and time constants during recurrent processing; 2 tight temporal interplay of excitation and inhibition: conductance measurements demonstrate that natural scene statistics narrow selectively the duration of the spiking opportunity window during which the balance between excitation and inhibition changes transiently and reversibly; 3 signal energy in the lower frequency band: a minimal level of power is needed below 10 Hz to reach consistently the spiking threshold, a situation rarely reached with visual

  13. Visual Responses in FEF, Unlike V1, Primarily Reflect When the Visual Context Renders a Receptive Field Salient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Wilsaan M; Cavanaugh, James; Wurtz, Robert H; Cumming, Bruce G

    2017-10-11

    When light falls within a neuronal visual receptive field (RF) the resulting activity is referred to as the visual response. Recent work suggests this activity is in response to both the visual stimulation and the abrupt appearance, or salience, of the presentation. Here we present a novel method for distinguishing the two, based on the timing of random and nonrandom presentations. We examined these contributions in frontal eye field (FEF; N = 51) and as a comparison, an early stage in the primary visual cortex (V1; N = 15) of male monkeys (Macaca mulatta). An array of identical stimuli was presented within and outside the neuronal RF while we manipulated salience by varying the time between stimulus presentations. We hypothesized that the rapid presentation would reduce salience (the sudden appearance within the visual field) of a stimulus at any one location, and thus decrease responses driven by salience in the RF. We found that when the interstimulus interval decreased from 500 to 16 ms there was an approximate 79% reduction in the FEF response compared with an estimated 17% decrease in V1. This reduction in FEF response for rapid presentation was evident even when the random sequence preceding a stimulus did not stimulate the RF for 500 ms. The time course of these response changes in FEF suggest that salience is represented much earlier (visual system.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuronal responses in early visual processing [e.g., primary visual cortex (V1)] reflect primarily the retinal stimulus. Processing in higher visual areas is modulated by a combination of the visual stimulation and contextual factors, such as salience, but identifying these components separately has been difficult. Here we quantified these contributions at a late stage of visual processing [frontal eye field (FEF)] and as a comparison, an early stage in V1. Our results suggest that as visual information continues through higher levels of processing the neural responses are no longer

  14. First measurements on Inner Tracker silicon prototype sensors using the BEETLE v1.1 readout chip

    CERN Document Server

    Glebe, T; Pugatch, V; Schmelling, M; Lehner, F; Sievers, P; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollahrdt, A; Ziegler, M

    2002-01-01

    Inner Tracker silicon prototype sensors were connected to the BEETLE v1.1 readout chip and evaluated in a test beam, performed at the X7 facility in October 2001. The main aim of this test was to integrate for the first time different components (BEETLE chip, ODE prototype board) of the readout chain into a running system. Noise characteristics and pulse shape were investigated in the test beam and in a laboratory test setup in Zuerich. We also present measurements of the S/N-ratio and efficiency.

  15. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    FBG SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors into any kind of structure or application. The software removes the need of an fibre optic expert user, becoming more obvious the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using F...... sensors. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation....

  16. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FBG_SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG sensors solutions in any arbitrary loaded structure or application. The software removes the need for a fibre optic expert user and makes the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using FBG sensors more simple and fast. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation.

  17. The LBB methodology application results performed on the safety related piping of NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute, Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-04-01

    A broad overview of the leak before break (LBB) application to the Slovakian V-1 nuclear power plant is presented in the paper. LBB was applied to the primary cooling circuit and surge lines of both WWER 440 type units, and also used to assess the integrity of safety related piping in the feed water and main steam systems. Experiments and calculations performed included analyses of stresses, material mechanical properties, corrosion, fatigue damage, stability of heavy component supports, water hammer, and leak rates. A list of analysis results and recommendations are included in the paper.

  18. Proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proton beam therapy; Cancer - proton therapy; Radiation therapy - proton therapy; Prostate cancer - proton therapy ... that use x-rays to destroy cancer cells, proton therapy uses a beam of special particles called ...

  19. TCSP AEROSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TCSP Aerosonde dataset consists of measurements of air temperature, pressure, and relative humidity were made on each flight using two Vaisalla RS902 sondes...

  20. TCSP AEROSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Measurements of air temperature, pressure, and relative humidity were made on each flight using two Vaisalla RS902 sondes located under the wings of the aircraft. A...

  1. Retinal correspondence of monocular receptive fields in disparity-sensitive complex cells from area V1 in the awake monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Rogelio; Castro, Adrian F; Justo, Maria S; Bermudez, Maria A; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2005-04-01

    To explore the neural mechanisms underlying disparity sensitivity in complex cells of the macaque visual cortex, the relationship between interocular receptive field (RF) positional shift and disparity sensitivity was studied in area V1. Single-unit recordings were made from area V1 of awake Macaca mulatta. Monocular RFs were mapped by means of a reverse cross-correlation technique, and their centers were determined after performing a bidimensional Gaussian function fitting. Interocular RF shifts were calculated for both bright and dark stimuli. Similarly, Gabor adjustments were obtained from disparity profiles to bright and dark dynamic random-dot stereograms (RDSs). Twenty-five complex cells were studied. The response profiles to disparity were similar for bright and dark RDSs. Interocular RF positional shift correlated significantly with both the peaks of Gabor fittings of disparity-sensitivity profiles and the peaks of the Gaussian envelopes of these Gabor fittings. Correlation between interocular RF positional shift and the peaks of the Gaussian envelopes was stronger than correlation between interocular RF positional shift and peaks of Gabor fittings. Interocular shift of monocular RFs is more related to the center of the range of disparities to which the cell is sensitive, than to the preferred disparity of the cell.

  2. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  3. Orbital electronic occupation effect on metal-insulator transition in Ti x V1-x O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang; Meng, Yifan; Xu, XiaoFeng; Chen, Pingping; Lu, Aijiang; Li, Hui; Wu, Binhe; Wang, Chunrui; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2017-09-01

    A series of Ti x V1-x O2 (0%  ⩽  x  ⩽  4.48%) thin films on c-plane sapphire substrates have been fabricated by co-sputtering oxidation solutions, and the metal-insulator transition temperature (T MIT) of Ti x V1-x O2 films rises monotonically at the rate of 1.64 K/at.% Ti. The x-ray diffraction measurement results show that, after Ti4+ ion doping, the rutile structure expands along the c r axis while shrinking along the a r and b r axis simultaneously. It makes the V-O bond length shorter, which is believed to upshift the π * orbitals. The rising of π * orbitals in Ti-doped VO2 has been illustrated by ultraviolet-infrared spectroscopy and first-principles calculation. With the Ti4+ ion doping concentration increasing, the energy levels of π * orbitals are elevated and the electronic occupation of π * orbitals decreases, which weakens the shielding for the strong electron-electron correlations in the d|| orbital and result in the T MIT rising. The research reveals that the T MIT of VO2 can be effected by the electronic occupancy of π * orbitals in a rutile state, which is helpful for developing VO2-based thermal devices.

  4. The effects of short-term synaptic depression at thalamocortical synapses on orientation tuning in cat V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimenser, Aylin; Miller, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    We examine the effects of short-term synaptic depression on the orientation tuning of the LGN input to simple cells in cat primary visual cortex (V1). The total LGN input has an untuned component as well as a tuned component, both of which grow with stimulus contrast. The untuned component is not visible in the firing rate responses of the simple cells. The suppression of the contribution of the untuned input component to firing rate responses is key to establishing orientation selectivity and its invariance with stimulus contrast. It has been argued that synaptic depression of LGN inputs could contribute to the selective suppression of the untuned component and thus contribute to the tuning observed in simple cells. We examine this using a model fit to the depression observed at thalamocortical synapses in-vivo, and compare this to an earlier model fit based on in-vitro observations. We examine the tuning of both the conductance and the firing rate induced in simple cells by the net LGN input. We find that depression causes minimal suppression of the untuned component. The primary effect of depression is to cause the contrast response curve to saturate at lower contrasts without differentially affecting the tuned vs. untuned components. This effect is slightly weaker for in-vivo vs. in-vitro parameters. Thus, synaptic depression of LGN inputs does not appreciably contribute to the orientation tuning of V1 simple cells.

  5. The effects of short-term synaptic depression at thalamocortical synapses on orientation tuning in cat V1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Cimenser

    Full Text Available We examine the effects of short-term synaptic depression on the orientation tuning of the LGN input to simple cells in cat primary visual cortex (V1. The total LGN input has an untuned component as well as a tuned component, both of which grow with stimulus contrast. The untuned component is not visible in the firing rate responses of the simple cells. The suppression of the contribution of the untuned input component to firing rate responses is key to establishing orientation selectivity and its invariance with stimulus contrast. It has been argued that synaptic depression of LGN inputs could contribute to the selective suppression of the untuned component and thus contribute to the tuning observed in simple cells. We examine this using a model fit to the depression observed at thalamocortical synapses in-vivo, and compare this to an earlier model fit based on in-vitro observations. We examine the tuning of both the conductance and the firing rate induced in simple cells by the net LGN input. We find that depression causes minimal suppression of the untuned component. The primary effect of depression is to cause the contrast response curve to saturate at lower contrasts without differentially affecting the tuned vs. untuned components. This effect is slightly weaker for in-vivo vs. in-vitro parameters. Thus, synaptic depression of LGN inputs does not appreciably contribute to the orientation tuning of V1 simple cells.

  6. Validation of CESAR Thermal-hydraulic Module of ASTEC V1.2 Code on BETHSY Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregoures, Nicolas; Bandini, Giacomino; Foucher, Laurent; Fleurot, Joëlle; Meloni, Paride

    The ASTEC V1 system code is being jointly developed by the French Institut de Radioprotection et Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) and the German Gesellschaft für Anlagen und ReaktorSicherheit (GRS) to address severe accident sequences in a nuclear power plant. Thermal-hydraulics in primary and secondary system is addressed by the CESAR module. The aim of this paper is to present the validation of the CESAR module, from the ASTEC V1.2 version, on the basis of well instrumented and qualified integral experiments carried out in the BETHSY facility (CEA, France), which simulates a French 900 MWe PWR reactor. Three tests have been thoroughly investigated with CESAR: the loss of coolant 9.1b test (OECD ISP N° 27), the loss of feedwater 5.2e test, and the multiple steam generator tube rupture 4.3b test. In the present paper, the results of the code for the three analyzed tests are presented in comparison with the experimental data. The thermal-hydraulic behavior of the BETHSY facility during the transient phase is well reproduced by CESAR: the occurrence of major events and the time evolution of main thermal-hydraulic parameters of both primary and secondary circuits are well predicted.

  7. Repeated functional convergent effects of NaV1.7 on acid insensitivity in hibernating mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Tong-Zuo; Li, Gong-Hua; He, Kai; Huang, Jing-Fei; Jiang, Xue-Long; Murphy, Robert W; Shi, Peng

    2014-02-07

    Hibernating mammals need to be insensitive to acid in order to cope with conditions of high CO2; however, the molecular basis of acid tolerance remains largely unknown. The African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) and hibernating mammals share similar environments and physiological features. In the naked mole-rat, acid insensitivity has been shown to be conferred by the functional motif of the sodium ion channel NaV1.7. There is now an opportunity to evaluate acid insensitivity in other taxa. In this study, we tested for functional convergence of NaV1.7 in 71 species of mammals, including 22 species that hibernate. Our analyses revealed a functional convergence of amino acid sequences, which occurred at least six times independently in mammals that hibernate. Evolutionary analyses determined that the convergence results from both parallel and divergent evolution of residues in the functional motif. Our findings not only identify the functional molecules responsible for acid insensitivity in hibernating mammals, but also open new avenues to elucidate the molecular underpinnings of acid insensitivity in mammals.

  8. Distal C terminus of CaV1.2 channels plays a crucial role in the neural differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Ge

    Full Text Available L-type voltage-dependent CaV1.2 channels play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. C-terminal cleavage of CaV1.2 channels was reported in several types of excitable cells, but its expression and possible roles in non-excitable cells is still not clear. The aim of this study was to determine whether distal C-terminal fragment of CaV1.2 channels is present in rat dental pulp stem cells and its possible role in the neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells. We generated stable CaV1.2 knockdown cells via short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Rat dental pulp stem cells with deleted distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 channels lost the potential of differentiation to neural cells. Re-expression of distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 rescued the effect of knocking down the endogenous CaV1.2 on the neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells, indicating that the distal C-terminal of CaV1.2 is required for neural differentiation of rat dental pulp stem cells. These results provide new insights into the role of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in stem cells during differentiation.

  9. Mice with an NaV1.4 sodium channel null allele have latent myasthenia, without susceptibility to periodic paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Fu, Yu; Struyk, Arie; Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in NaV1.4 are most often associated with myotonia or periodic paralysis. Loss of function changes are rare, and are seen in congenital myasthenia, congenital myopathy, and hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Using an NaV1.4 knock-out mouse, Wu et al. show that haploinsufficiency gives rise to latent myasthenia, but not periodic paralysis.

  10. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca [subscript V] 1.2 Mediates Fear Extinction and Modulates Synaptic Tone in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in both the formation and the reduction of fear through Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. Despite the implication of LVGCCs in fear learning and extinction, studies of the individual LVGCC subtypes, Ca[subscript V]1.2 and Ca[subscript V] 1.3, using transgenic mice have…

  11. Increased peripheral nerve excitability and local NaV1.8 mRNA up-regulation in painful neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuka Yoshizo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain caused by peripheral nerve injury is a chronic disorder that represents a significant clinical challenge because the pathological mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Several studies have suggested the involvement of various sodium channels, including tetrodotoxin-resistant NaV1.8, in affected dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. We have hypothesized that altered local expression of NaV1.8 in the peripheral axons of DRG neurons could facilitate nociceptive signal generation and propagation after neuropathic injury. Results After unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment injury in rats, compound action potential amplitudes were increased in both myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of the ipsilateral sciatic nerve. Tetrodotoxin resistance of both fiber populations and sciatic nerve NaV1.8 immunoreactivity were also increased. Further analysis of NaV1.8 distribution revealed that immunoreactivity and mRNA levels were decreased and unaffected, respectively, in the ipsilateral L4 and L5 DRG; however sciatic nerve NaV1.8 mRNA showed nearly an 11-fold ipsilateral increase. Nav1.8 mRNA observed in the sciatic nerve was likely of axonal origin since it was not detected in non-neuronal cells cultured from nerve tissue. Absence of changes in NaV1.8 mRNA polyadenylation suggests that increased mRNA stability was not responsible for the selective peripheral mRNA increase. Furthermore, mRNA levels of NaV1.3, NaV1.5, NaV1.6, NaV1.7, and NaV1.9 were not significantly different between ipsilateral and contralateral nerves. We therefore propose that selective NaV1.8 mRNA axonal transport and local up-regulation could contribute to the hyperexcitability of peripheral nerves in some neuropathic pain states. Conclusion Cuff entrapment injury resulted in significantly elevated axonal excitability and increased NaV1.8 immunoreactivity in rat sciatic nerves. The concomitant axonal accumulation of NaV1.8 mRNA may play a role in the

  12. Voltage-gated potassium channel (K(v) 1) autoantibodies in patients with chagasic gut dysmotility and distribution of K(v) 1 channels in human enteric neuromusculature (autoantibodies in GI dysmotility).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubball, A W; Lang, B; Souza, M A N; Curran, O D; Martin, J E; Knowles, C H

    2012-08-01

    Autoantibodies directed against specific neuronal antigens are found in a significant number of patients with gastrointestinal neuromuscular diseases (GINMDs) secondary to neoplasia. This study examined the presence of antineuronal antibodies in idiopathic GINMD and GINMD secondary to South American Trypanosomiasis. The GI distribution of voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) was also investigated. Seventy-three patients were included in the study with diagnoses of primary achalasia, enteric dysmotility, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, esophageal or colonic dysmotility secondary to Chagas' disease. Sera were screened for specific antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs; P/Q subtype), nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; α3 subtype), and voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs, K(V) 1 subtype) using validated immunoprecipitation assays. The distribution of six VGKC subunits (K(V) 1.1-1.6), including those known to be antigenic targets of anti-VGKC antibodies was immunohistochemically investigated in all main human GI tract regions. Three patients (14%) with chagasic GI dysmotility were found to have positive anti-VGKC antibody titers. No antibodies were detected in patients with idiopathic GINMD. The VGKCs were found in enteric neurons at every level of the gut in unique yet overlapping distributions. The VGKC expression in GI smooth muscle was found to be limited to the esophagus. A small proportion of patients with GI dysfunction secondary to Chagas' disease have antibodies against VGKCs. The presence of these channels in the human enteric nervous system may have pathological relevance to the growing number of GINMDs with which anti-VGKC antibodies have been associated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Fine mapping and candidate gene analysis of the virescent gene v1in Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guangzhi; Ma, Qiang; Wei, Hengling; Su, Junji; Wang, Hantao; Ma, Qifeng; Fan, Shuli; Song, Meizhen; Zhang, Xianlong; Yu, Shuxun

    2018-02-01

    The young leaves of virescent mutants are yellowish and gradually turn green as the plants reach maturity. Understanding the genetic basis of virescent mutants can aid research of the regulatory mechanisms underlying chloroplast development and chlorophyll biosynthesis, as well as contribute to the application of virescent traits in crop breeding. In this study, fine mapping was employed, and a recessive gene (v 1 ) from a virescent mutant of Upland cotton was narrowed to an 84.1-Kb region containing ten candidate genes. The GhChlI gene encodes the cotton Mg-chelatase I subunit (CHLI) and was identified as the candidate gene for the virescent mutation using gene annotation. BLAST analysis showed that the GhChlI gene has two copies, Gh_A10G0282 and Gh_D10G0283. Sequence analysis indicated that the coding region (CDS) of GhChlI is 1269 bp in length, with three predicted exons and one non-synonymous nucleotide mutation (G1082A) in the third exon of Gh_D10G0283, with an amino acid (AA) substitution of arginine (R) to lysine (K). GhChlI-silenced TM-1 plants exhibited a lower GhChlI expression level, a lower chlorophyll content, and the virescent phenotype. Analysis of upstream regulatory elements and expression levels of GhChlI showed that the expression quantity of GhChlI may be normal, and with the development of the true leaf, the increase in the Gh_A10G0282 dosage may partially make up for the deficiency of Gh_D10G0283 in the v 1 mutant. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence alignment revealed that the protein sequence encoded by the third exon of GhChlI is highly conserved across diverse plant species, in which AA substitutions among the completely conserved residues frequently result in changes in leaf color in various species. These results suggest that the mutation (G1082A) within the GhChlI gene may cause a functional defect of the GhCHLI subunit and thus the virescent phenotype in the v 1 mutant. The GhChlI mutation not only provides a tool for understanding the

  14. Facile synthesis and characterization of FeP x V1 - x O4 nanobelts with enhanced photocatalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhendong; Lu, Qifang; Guo, Enyan; Wei, Mingzhi; Wang, Qinyu; Yao, Linbing

    2017-09-01

    With doping a bit of phosphorus (P) into the lattice of FeVO4 nanobelts, FeP x V1 - x O4 solid solution nanobelts have been successfully synthesized for the first time via a simple electrospinning process. The as-prepared products were characterized by thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The results demonstrated that the lattice constants of FeVO4 were changed and transport of charge carriers was improved after doping P element. Furthermore, the FeP0.005V0.995O4 nanobelts presented an admirable one-dimensional morphology and the excellent photocatalytic properties for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) solution under the visible light irradiation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. A Fracture Analysis of Ti-10Mo-8V-1Fe-3.5Al Alloy Screws during Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifang Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Titanium screws have properties that make them ideal for applications that require both a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance, such as fastener applications for aviation and aerospace. The fracture behavior of Ti-10Mo-8V-1Fe-3.5Al (TB3 alloy screws during assembly was explored. Besides visual examination, other experimental techniques used for the investigation are as follows: (1 fracture characteristics and damage morphology via scanning electron microscopy (SEM; (2 chemical constituents via energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and hydrogen concentration testing; (3 metallographic observation; (4 stress durability embrittlement testing; and (5 torsion simulation testing. Results show that the fracture mode of the screws is brittle. There is no obvious relation to hydrogen-induced brittle. The main reason for the fracture of titanium alloy screws is internal defects, around which oxygen content is high, increasing brittleness. The internal defects of screws result from grain boundary cracking caused by hot forging.

  16. Multi-scale lines and edges in V1 and beyond: brightness, object categorization and recognition, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João; du Buf, J M Hans

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved model for line and edge detection in cortical area V1. This model is based on responses of simple and complex cells, and it is multi-scale with no free parameters. We illustrate the use of the multi-scale line/edge representation in different processes: visual reconstruction or brightness perception, automatic scale selection and object segregation. A two-level object categorization scenario is tested in which pre-categorization is based on coarse scales only and final categorization on coarse plus fine scales. We also present a multi-scale object and face recognition model. Processing schemes are discussed in the framework of a complete cortical architecture. The fact that brightness perception and object recognition may be based on the same symbolic image representation is an indication that the entire (visual) cortex is involved in consciousness.

  17. ViralEpi v1.0: a high-throughput spectrum of viral epigenomic methylation profiles from diverse diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Shoaib; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    To develop a computational resource for viral epigenomic methylation profiles from diverse diseases. Methylation patterns of Epstein-Barr virus and hepatitis B virus genomic regions are provided as web platform developed using open source Linux-Apache-MySQL-PHP (LAMP) bundle: programming and scripting languages, that is, HTML, JavaScript and PERL. A comprehensive and integrated web resource ViralEpi v1.0 is developed providing well-organized compendium of methylation events and statistical analysis associated with several diseases. Additionally, it also facilitates 'Viral EpiGenome Browser' for user-affable browsing experience using JavaScript-based JBrowse. This web resource would be helpful for research community engaged in studying epigenetic biomarkers for appropriate prognosis and diagnosis of diseases and its various stages.

  18. A User's Manual for MASH V1.5 - A Monte Carlo Adjoint Shielding Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. O. Slater; J. M. Barnes; J. O. Johnson; J.D. Drischler

    1998-10-01

    The Monte Carlo ~djoint ~ielding Code System, MASH, calculates neutron and gamma- ray environments and radiation protection factors for armored military vehicles, structures, trenches, and other shielding configurations by coupling a forward discrete ordinates air- over-ground transport calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo treatment of the shielding geometry. Efficiency and optimum use of computer time are emphasized. The code system includes the GRTUNCL and DORT codes for air-over-ground transport calculations, the MORSE code with the GIFT5 combinatorial geometry package for adjoint shielding calculations, and several peripheral codes that perform the required data preparations, transformations, and coupling functions. The current version, MASH v 1.5, is the successor to the original MASH v 1.0 code system initially developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The discrete ordinates calculation determines the fluence on a coupling surface surrounding the shielding geometry due to an external neutron/gamma-ray source. The Monte Carlo calculation determines the effectiveness of the fluence at that surface in causing a response in a detector within the shielding geometry, i.e., the "dose importance" of the coupling surface fluence. A coupling code folds the fluence together with the dose importance, giving the desired dose response. The coupling code can determine the dose response as a function of the shielding geometry orientation relative to the source, distance from the source, and energy response of the detector. This user's manual includes a short description of each code, the input required to execute the code along with some helpful input data notes, and a representative sample problem.

  19. Detection of Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1) in exported frozen tails of subadult-adult Caribbean spiny lobsters Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huchin-Mian, Juan Pablo; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia; Simá-Alvarez, Raúl; Cruz-Quintana, Yanis; Pérez-Vega, Juan Antonio; Lozano-Alvarez, Enrique; Pascual-Jiménez, Cristina; Rodríguez-Canul, Rossanna

    2009-09-23

    The Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus is a valuable fishing resource and the trade in frozen lobster tails is an important industry. However, the presence of the pathogenic virus Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1), which causes systemic infection in P. argus and is particularly lethal to juvenile individuals, has not been previously examined in imported/exported lobster products. We used PCR assays to determine the presence of PaV1 in abdominal muscle tissue of 22 frozen P. argus tails exported from Belize to Mexico. Based on their size, the tails belonged to subadult-adult lobsters. Using specific primers targeted for PaV1 resulted in 11 tails showing a specific 499 bp band. The sequence of positive amplified fragments showed a high similarity to PaV1 (95% identity with GenBank accession no. EF206313.1). Although the pathogenicity of PaV1 was not evaluated in the present study, our results provide the first evidence of PaV1 in frozen lobster tails exported in the seafood industry as well as the first molecular evidence of PaV1 in adult lobsters.

  20. The presence and role of the tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.9 (NaN) in nociceptive primary afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Djouhri, Laiche; Black, Joel A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G; Lawson, Sally N

    2002-09-01

    This is the first examination of sensory receptive properties and associated electrophysiological properties in vivo of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that express the TTX-resistant sodium channel Na(v)1.9 (NaN). Intracellular recordings in lumbar DRGs in Wistar rats enabled units with dorsal root C-, Adelta-, or Aalpha/beta-fibers to be classified as nociceptive, low-threshold mechanoreceptive (LTM), or unresponsive. Intracellular dye injection enabled subsequent immunocytochemistry for Na(v)1.9-like immunoreactivity (Na(v)1.9-LI). Na(v)1.9-LI was expressed selectively in nociceptive-type (C- and A-fiber nociceptive and C-unresponsive) units. Of the nociceptive units, 64, 54, and 31% of C-, Adelta-, and Aalpha/beta-fiber units, respectively, were positive for Na(v)1.9-LI. C-unresponsive units were included in the nociceptive-type group on the basis of their nociceptor-like membrane properties; 91% were positive. Na(v)1.9-LI was undetectable in Adelta- or Aalpha/beta-fiber LTM units and in one C-LTM unit. Na(v)1.9-LI intensity was correlated negatively with soma size and conduction velocity in nociceptive units and with conduction velocity in C-fiber units. There was a positive correlation with action potential rise time in nociceptive-type units with membrane potentials equal to or more negative than -50 mV. The data provide direct evidence that Na(v)1.9 is expressed selectively in (but not in all) C- and A-fiber nociceptive-type units and suggest that Na(v)1.9 contributes to membrane properties that are typical of nociceptive neurons.

  1. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease–derived stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R.F.; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K.; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Winchester, Wendy J.; Knowles, Charles H.; Bulmer, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulus–response function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9−/− afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9−/− mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. PMID:24972070

  2. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease-derived stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockley, James R F; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Yip, Ping K; Chan, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N; Nassar, Mohammed A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J; Baker, Mark D; Winchester, Wendy J; Knowles, Charles H; Bulmer, David C

    2014-10-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and for sensitization of mouse colonic afferents by mediators from inflammatory bowel disease tissues, and by noxious inflammatory mediators individually. Excitatory responses to ATP or PGE2 were substantially reduced in NaV1.9(-/-) mice. Deletion of NaV1.9 substantially attenuates excitation and subsequent mechanical hypersensitivity after application of inflammatory soup (IS) (bradykinin, ATP, histamine, PGE2, and 5HT) to visceral nociceptors located in the serosa and mesentery. Responses to mechanical stimulation of mesenteric afferents were also reduced by loss of NaV1.9, and there was a rightward shift in stimulus-response function to ramp colonic distension. By contrast, responses to rapid, high-intensity phasic distension of the colon are initially unaffected; however, run-down of responses to repeat phasic distension were exacerbated in NaV1.9(-/-) afferents. Finally colonic afferent activation by supernatants derived from inflamed human tissue was greatly reduced in NaV1.9(-/-) mice. These results demonstrate that NaV1.9 is required for persistence of responses to intense mechanical stimulation, contributes to inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity, and is essential for activation by noxious inflammatory mediators, including those from diseased human bowel. These observations indicate that NaV1.9 represents a high-value target for development of visceral analgesics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of thrombocythemia [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4ez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisstina Gowin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential thrombocythemia is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by an elevated platelet count, the potential for both microvascular and macrovascular sequelae, and a risk for transformation to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia. A systematic and detailed initial analysis is essential for accurate diagnosis of essential thrombocythemia, as many etiologies are reactive and benign. Once a diagnosis has been made, risk stratification and symptom assessment are vital to guide the subsequent therapy. Treatment may be required in high-risk disease, such as in cases of advanced age or prior thrombotic events. Systemic therapy is aimed at reducing the thrombotic risk and includes daily low dose aspirin and in some patients, cytoreductive therapy.  Currently, the first line cytoreductive therapy includes hydroxyurea or pegylated interferon, with a phase III clinical trial underway comparing these two important agents. Anagrelide and clinical trials are reserved for refractory or intolerant patients. Looking to the future, new therapies including Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 and telomerase inhibitors are promising and may become valuable to the treatment armamentarium for those afflicted with essential thrombocythemia.

  4. NaV1.5 Na⁺ channels allosterically regulate the NHE-1 exchanger and promote the activity of breast cancer cell invadopodia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brisson, Lucie; Driffort, Virginie; Benoist, Lauriane; Poet, Mallorie; Counillon, Laurent; Antelmi, Ester; Rubino, Rosa; Besson, Pierre; Labbal, Fabien; Chevalier, Stéphan; Reshkin, Stephan J; Gore, Jacques; Roger, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of the extracellular matrix by cancer cells represents an essential step in metastatic progression and this is performed by cancer cell structures called invadopodia. NaV1.5 (also known as SCN5A) Na...

  5. Mechanisms of a human skeletal myotonia produced by mutation in the C-terminus of NaV1.4: is Ca2+ regulation defective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Biswas

    Full Text Available Mutations in the cytoplasmic tail (CT of voltage gated sodium channels cause a spectrum of inherited diseases of cellular excitability, yet to date only one mutation in the CT of the human skeletal muscle voltage gated sodium channel (hNaV1.4F1705I has been linked to cold aggravated myotonia. The functional effects of altered regulation of hNaV1.4F1705I are incompletely understood. The location of the hNaV1.4F1705I in the CT prompted us to examine the role of Ca(2+ and calmodulin (CaM regulation in the manifestations of myotonia. To study Na channel related mechanisms of myotonia we exploited the differences in rat and human NaV1.4 channel regulation by Ca(2+ and CaM. hNaV1.4F1705I inactivation gating is Ca(2+-sensitive compared to wild type hNaV1.4 which is Ca(2+ insensitive and the mutant channel exhibits a depolarizing shift of the V1/2 of inactivation with CaM over expression. In contrast the same mutation in the rNaV1.4 channel background (rNaV1.4F1698I eliminates Ca(2+ sensitivity of gating without affecting the CaM over expression induced hyperpolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation. The differences in the Ca(2+ sensitivity of gating between wild type and mutant human and rat NaV1.4 channels are in part mediated by a divergence in the amino acid sequence in the EF hand like (EFL region of the CT. Thus the composition of the EFL region contributes to the species differences in Ca(2+/CaM regulation of the mutant channels that produce myotonia. The myotonia mutation F1705I slows INa decay in a Ca(2+-sensitive fashion. The combination of the altered voltage dependence and kinetics of INa decay contribute to the myotonic phenotype and may involve the Ca(2+-sensing apparatus in the CT of NaV1.4.

  6. ProTx-II, a selective inhibitor of NaV1.7 sodium channels, blocks action potential propagation in nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalhofer, William A; Calhoun, Jeffrey; Burrows, Rachel; Bailey, Timothy; Kohler, Martin G; Weinglass, Adam B; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L; Koltzenburg, Martin; Priest, Birgit T

    2008-11-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na(V)1) channels play a critical role in modulating the excitability of sensory neurons, and human genetic evidence points to Na(V)1.7 as an essential contributor to pain signaling. Human loss-of-function mutations in SCN9A, the gene encoding Na(V)1.7, cause channelopathy-associated indifference to pain (CIP), whereas gain-of-function mutations are associated with two inherited painful neuropathies. Although the human genetic data make Na(V)1.7 an attractive target for the development of analgesics, pharmacological proof-of-concept in experimental pain models requires Na(V)1.7-selective channel blockers. Here, we show that the tarantula venom peptide ProTx-II selectively interacts with Na(V)1.7 channels, inhibiting Na(V)1.7 with an IC(50) value of 0.3 nM, compared with IC(50) values of 30 to 150 nM for other heterologously expressed Na(V)1 subtypes. This subtype selectivity was abolished by a point mutation in DIIS3. It is interesting that application of ProTx-II to desheathed cutaneous nerves completely blocked the C-fiber compound action potential at concentrations that had little effect on Abeta-fiber conduction. ProTx-II application had little effect on action potential propagation of the intact nerve, which may explain why ProTx-II was not efficacious in rodent models of acute and inflammatory pain. Mono-iodo-ProTx-II ((125)I-ProTx-II) binds with high affinity (K(d) = 0.3 nM) to recombinant hNa(V)1.7 channels. Binding of (125)I-ProTx-II is insensitive to the presence of other well characterized Na(V)1 channel modulators, suggesting that ProTx-II binds to a novel site, which may be more conducive to conferring subtype selectivity than the site occupied by traditional local anesthetics and anticonvulsants. Thus, the (125)I-ProTx-II binding assay, described here, offers a new tool in the search for novel Na(V)1.7-selective blockers.

  7. The primary circuit materials properties results analysis performed on archive material used in NPP V-1 and Kola NPP Units 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P. [Nuclear Power Plants Research Institute Inc., Trnava (Slovakia)

    1997-04-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a primary circuit piping material properties analysis. The analysis was performed for the Bohunice V-1 reactor and the Kola-1 and -2 reactors. Assessment was performed on Bohunice V-1 archive materials and primary piping material cut from the Kola units after 100,000 hours of operation. Main research program tasks included analysis of mechanical properties, corrosion stability, and microstructural properties. Analysis results are not provided.

  8. Fusion proteins of flagellin and the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 show enhanced immunogenicity, reduced allergenicity, and intrinsic adjuvanticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmüller, Claudia; Kalser, Julia; Mutschlechner, Sonja; Hauser, Michael; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Ferreira, Fatima; Bohle, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Recombinant fusion proteins of flagellin and antigens have been demonstrated to induce strong innate and adaptive immune responses. Such fusion proteins can enhance the efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy. We sought to characterize different fusion proteins of flagellin and the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 for suitability as allergy vaccines. A truncated version of flagellin (NtCFlg) was genetically fused to the N- or C-terminus of Bet v 1. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 binding was assessed with HEK293 cells expressing TLR5. Upregulation of CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86 on monocyte-derived dendritic cells from allergic patients was analyzed by using flow cytometry. The T cell-stimulatory capacity of the fusion proteins was assessed with naive and Bet v 1-specific T cells. IgE binding was tested in inhibition ELISAs and basophil activation tests. Mice were immunized with the fusion proteins in the absence and presence of aluminum hydroxide. Cellular and antibody responses were monitored. Murine antibodies were tested for blocking capacity in basophil activation tests. Both fusion proteins matured monocyte-derived dendritic cells through TLR5. Compared with Bet v 1, the fusion proteins showed stronger T cell-stimulatory and reduced IgE-binding capacity and induced murine Bet v 1-specific antibodies in the absence of aluminum hydroxide. However, only antibodies induced by means of immunization with NtCFlg fused to the C-terminus of Bet v 1 inhibited binding of patients' IgE antibodies to Bet v 1. Bet v 1-flagellin fusion proteins show enhanced immunogenicity, reduced allergenicity, and intrinsic adjuvanticity and thus represent promising vaccines for birch pollen allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, the sequential order of allergen and adjuvant within a fusion protein determines its immunologic characteristics. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Priest, Birgit T.; Murphy, Beth A.; Lindia, Jill A.; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M.; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M.; Kash, Shera F.; Kohler, Martin G.; Kaczorowski, Gregory J.; MacIntyre, D. Euan; Martin, William J.

    2005-01-01

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which en...

  10. Multiple roles for NaV1.9 in the activation of visceral afferents by noxious inflammatory, mechanical, and human disease–derived stimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Hockley, James R.F.; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; McGuire, Cian; Ping K Yip; CHAN, Christopher; Tranter, Michael; Wood, John N.; Nassar, Mohammed A; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Aziz, Qasim; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D; Winchester, Wendy J.; Knowles, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain affects millions of individuals worldwide and remains poorly understood, with current therapeutic options constrained by gastrointestinal adverse effects. Visceral pain is strongly associated with inflammation and distension of the gut. Here we report that the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype NaV1.9 is expressed in half of gut-projecting rodent dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons. We show that NaV1.9 is required for normal mechanosensation, for direct excitation and ...

  11. Age-dependent regulation of renal vasopressin V(1A) and V₂ receptors in rats with genetic hypertension: implications for the treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, Louise M; Risvanis, John; Dean, Rachael G; Patel, Sheila K; Velkoska, Elena; Johnston, Colin I

    2013-01-01

    The role of arginine vasopressin (AVP) as a hypertensive hormone remains controversial. We have previously reported that intervention with a V(1A) receptor antagonist in 6-week-old prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) for 4 weeks attenuated the subsequent development of hypertension in adult SHR. This study assessed the age-dependent regulation of plasma AVP levels and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression during the development of hypertension in SHR and in normotensive Sprague Dawley rats. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), plasma AVP, and plasma renin activity (PRA) and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression were assessed. SHR were studied at three ages: prehypertensive (6 weeks), developed hypertension (10 weeks), and established hypertension (16 weeks). SBP increased with age in SHR (P P P V(1A) receptor gene expression decreased in 10-week and 16-week-old SHR (P V(1A) receptor protein in the inner medulla of 16-week-old SHR (P young SHR. There was no change in V₂ receptor expression during the development of hypertension. In normotensive rats, plasma AVP, PRA, and kidney V(1A) and V₂ receptor expression were unchanged over time. These data suggest that in SHR, activation of plasma AVP and the renal V(1A) receptor occurs during developing hypertension, with downregulation when hypertension is established. The use of V(1A) receptor antagonists in prehypertension may provide a unique opportunity for the prevention of hypertension in high-risk individuals. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Direct interaction with contactin targets voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN to the cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C J; Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Greenwood, J; Lian, Z; Waxman, S G

    2001-12-07

    The mechanisms that target various sodium channels within different regions of the neuronal membrane, which they endow with different physiological properties, are not yet understood. To examine this issue we studied the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN, which is preferentially expressed in small sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia and the nonmyelinated axons that arise from them. Our results show that the cell adhesion molecule contactin binds directly to Na(v)1.9/NaN and recruits tenascin to the protein complex in vitro. Na(v)1.9/NaN and contactin co-immunoprecipitate from dorsal root ganglia and transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and co-localize in the C-type neuron soma and along nonmyelinated C-fibers and at nerve endings in the skin. Co-transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with Na(v)1.9/NaN and contactin enhances the surface expression of the sodium channel over that of Na(v)1.9/NaN alone. Thus contactin binds directly to Na(v)1.9/NaN and participates in the surface localization of this channel along nonmyelinated axons.

  13. Presynaptic CaV1.3 channels regulate synaptic ribbon size and are required for synaptic maintenance in sensory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Lavinia; Kindt, Katie S; Nicolson, Teresa

    2012-11-28

    L-type calcium channels (Ca(V)1) are involved in diverse processes, such as neurotransmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction, and gene expression. In this study, we uncover a role for Ca(V)1.3a in regulating the architecture of a cellular structure, the ribbon synapse, in developing zebrafish sensory hair cells. By combining in vivo calcium imaging with confocal and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that genetic disruption or acute block of Ca(V)1.3a channels led to enlargement of synaptic ribbons in hair cells. Conversely, activating channels reduced both synaptic-ribbon size and the number of intact synapses. Along with enlarged presynaptic ribbons in ca(V)1.3a mutants, we observed a profound loss of juxtaposition between presynaptic and postsynaptic components. These synaptic defects are not attributable to loss of neurotransmission, because vglut3 mutants lacking neurotransmitter release develop relatively normal hair-cell synapses. Moreover, regulation of synaptic-ribbon size by Ca(2+) influx may be used by other cell types, because we observed similar pharmacological effects on pinealocyte synaptic ribbons. Our results indicate that Ca(2+) influx through Ca(V)1.3 fine tunes synaptic ribbon size during hair-cell maturation and that Ca(V)1.3 is required for synaptic maintenance.

  14. Contribution of the tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.9 to sensory transmission and nociceptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Birgit T; Murphy, Beth A; Lindia, Jill A; Diaz, Carmen; Abbadie, Catherine; Ritter, Amy M; Liberator, Paul; Iyer, Leslie M; Kash, Shera F; Kohler, Martin G; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; MacIntyre, D Euan; Martin, William J

    2005-06-28

    The transmission of pain signals after injury or inflammation depends in part on increased excitability of primary sensory neurons. Nociceptive neurons express multiple subtypes of voltage-gated sodium channels (NaV1s), each of which possesses unique features that may influence primary afferent excitability. Here, we examined the contribution of NaV1.9 to nociceptive signaling by studying the electrophysiological and behavioral phenotypes of mice with a disruption of the SCN11A gene, which encodes NaV1.9. Our results confirm that NaV1.9 underlies the persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant current in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons but suggest that this current contributes little to mechanical thermal responsiveness in the absence of injury or to mechanical hypersensitivity after nerve injury or inflammation. However, the expression of NaV1.9 contributes to the persistent thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain behavior after peripheral inflammation. These results suggest that inflammatory mediators modify the function of NaV1.9 to maintain inflammation-induced hyperalgesia.

  15. [Inhibitory effect of NaV1.9 gene silencing on proliferation, phagocytosis and migration in RAW264.7 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuechen; Zhou, Xin; Ji, Wenjie; Sun, Haiying; Lu, Ruiyi; Jiang, Tiemin; Li, Yuming

    2013-03-01

    To establish the cell line with stable voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs/NaVs) α subunit NaV1.9 gene silencing through RNA interference (RNAi) in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, and to investigate proliferation, phagocytosis and migration in this cell line. The stable NaV1.9-deficient cell line was generated by selection in G418 after the transfection of short hairpin (shRNA) plasmid with Lipofectamine TM2000. RNAi efficiency was qualified by RT-PCR; proliferation ability was measured by CCK-8 assay; cell cycle and phagocytic ability were analyzed by flow cytometry; and migrating ability was detected by Transwell migration assay. Stable NaV1.9-deficient cell line was established and the expression of NaV1.9 was reduced by 80%. CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry showed that the proliferation of the NaV1.9-deficient cell line was inhibited (PNaV1.9-deficient cells we successfully constructed, proliferation, phagocytosis and migration were obviously inhibited.

  16. Local Overexpression of V1a-Vasopressin Receptor Enhances Regeneration in Tumor Necrosis Factor-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Costa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs during disuse and aging, or as a consequence of chronic diseases such as cancer and diabetes. It is characterized by progressive loss of muscle tissue due to hypotrophic changes, degeneration, and an inability of the regeneration machinery to replace damaged myofibers. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF is a proinflammatory cytokine known to mediate muscle atrophy in many chronic diseases and to inhibit skeletal muscle regeneration. In this study, we investigated the role of Arg-vasopressin-(AVP-dependent pathways in muscles in which atrophy was induced by local overexpression of TNF. AVP is a potent myogenesis-promoting factor and is able to enhance skeletal muscle regeneration by stimulating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase and calcineurin signaling. We performed morphological and molecular analyses and demonstrated that local over-expression of the AVP receptor V1a enhances regeneration of atrophic muscle. By upregulating the regeneration/differentiation markers, modulating the inflammatory response, and attenuating fibrogenesis, the stimulation of AVP-dependent pathways creates a favourable environment for efficient and sustained muscle regeneration and repair even in the presence of elevated levels of TNF. This study highlights a novel in vivo role for AVP-dependent pathways, which may represent an interesting strategy to counteract muscle decline in aging or in muscular pathologies.

  17. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P; Muddiman, David C

    2018-01-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Acupuncture Alleviates Colorectal Hypersensitivity and Correlates with the Regulatory Mechanism of TrpV1 and p-ERK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we used a mouse model of zymosan-induced colorectal hypersensitivity, a similar model of IBS in our previous work, to evaluate the effectiveness of the different number of times of acupuncture and elucidate its potential mechanism of EA treatment. Colorectal distension (CRD tests show that intracolonic zymosan injection does, while saline injection does not, induce a typical colorectal hypersensitivity. EA treatment at classical acupoints Zusanli (ST36 and Shangjuxu (ST37 in both hind limbs for 15 min slightly attenuated and significantly blunted the hypersensitive responses after first and fifth acupunctures, respectively, to colorectal distention in zymosan treatment mice, but not in saline treatment mice. Western blot results indicated that ion channel and TrpV1 expression in colorectum as well as ERK1/2 MAPK pathway activation in peripheral and central nerve system might be involved in this process. Hence, we conclude that EA is a potential therapeutic tool in the treatment and alleviation of chronic abdominal pain, and the effectiveness of acupuncture analgesia is accumulative with increased number of times of acupuncture when compared to that of a single time of acupuncture.

  19. Personality in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Exploring the Hierarchical Structure and Associations with the Vasopressin V1A Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D.; Hopkins, William D.; Keebaugh, Alaine C.; Young, Larry J.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major contributions of recent personality psychology is the finding that traits are related to each other in an organized hierarchy. To date, however, researchers have yet to investigate this hierarchy in nonhuman primates. Such investigations are critical in confirming the cross-species nature of trait personality helping to illuminate personality as neurobiologically-based and evolutionarily-derived dimensions of primate disposition. Investigations of potential genetic polymorphisms associated with hierarchical models of personality among nonhuman primates represent a critical first step. The current study examined the hierarchical structure of chimpanzee personality as well as sex-specific associations with a polymorphism in the promoter region of the vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A), a gene associated with dispositional traits, among 174 chimpanzees. Results confirmed a hierarchical structure of personality across species and, despite differences in early rearing experiences, suggest a sexually dimorphic role of AVPR1A polymorphisms on hierarchical personality profiles at a higher-order level. PMID:24752497

  20. The topographical arrangement of cutoff spatial frequencies across lower and upper visual fields in mouse V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian; An, Xu; Liu, Hanxiao; Peng, Jing; Cai, Shanshan; Wang, Wei; Lin, Da-Ting; Yang, Yupeng

    2015-01-13

    The visual response to spatial frequency (SF), a characteristic of spatial structure across position in space, is of particular importance for animal survival. A natural challenge for rodents is to detect predators as early as possible while foraging. Whether neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1) are functionally organized to meet this challenge remains unclear. Combining intrinsic signal optical imaging and single-unit recording, we found that the cutoff SF was much greater for neurons whose receptive fields were located above the mouse. Specifically, we discovered that the cutoff SF increased in a gradient that was positively correlated with the elevation in the visual field. This organization was present at eye opening and persisted through adulthood. Dark rearing delayed the maturation of the cutoff SF globally, but had little impact on the topographical organization of the cutoff SF, suggesting that this regional distribution is innately determined. This form of cortical organization of different SFs may benefit the mouse for detection of airborne threats in the natural environment.

  1. Alternative Splicing at C Terminus of CaV1.4 Calcium Channel Modulates Calcium-dependent Inactivation, Activation Potential, and Current Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gregory Ming Yeong; Yu, Dejie; Wang, Juejin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The CaV1.4 voltage-gated calcium channel is predominantly expressed in the retina, and mutations to this channel have been associated with human congenital stationary night blindness type-2. The L-type CaV1.4 channel displays distinct properties such as absence of calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and slow voltage-dependent inactivation (VDI) due to the presence of an autoinhibitory domain (inhibitor of CDI) in the distal C terminus. We hypothesized that native CaV1.4 is subjected to extensive alternative splicing, much like the other voltage-gated calcium channels, and employed the transcript scanning method to identify alternatively spliced exons within the CaV1.4 transcripts isolated from the human retina. In total, we identified 19 alternative splice variations, of which 16 variations have not been previously reported. Characterization of the C terminus alternatively spliced exons using whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology revealed a splice variant that exhibits robust CDI. This splice variant arose from the splicing of a novel alternate exon (43*) that can be found in 13.6% of the full-length transcripts screened. Inclusion of exon 43* inserts a stop codon that truncates half the C terminus. The CaV1.4 43* channel exhibited robust CDI, a larger current density, a hyperpolarized shift in activation potential by ∼10 mV, and a slower VDI. Through deletional experiments, we showed that the inhibitor of CDI was responsible for modulating channel activation and VDI, in addition to CDI. Calcium currents in the photoreceptors were observed to exhibit CDI and are more negatively activated as compared with currents elicited from heterologously expressed full-length CaV1.4. Naturally occurring alternative splice variants may in part contribute to the properties of the native CaV1.4 channels. PMID:22069316

  2. Predictive Value of Exercise Stress Test-Induced ST-Segment Changes in Leads V1 and avR in Determining Angiographic Coronary Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Samad; Asadzadeh, Reza; Tajlil, Arezou; Mohammadalian, Amirhossein; Pourafkari, Leili

    2017-01-01

    The significance of electrocardiographic changes during exercise tolerance testing for distinguishing occluded artery is not well known. We tried to determine the role of ST elevation in leads aVR and V1 during exercise in detecting stenosis of left main coronary artery and proximal left anterior descending artery. ST segment changes during exercise in 230 patients, who underwent diagnostic angiography, were documented. The association of ST elevation in lead aVR, V1 , leads aVR + V1 , and STE in leads aVR + V1 with ST depression in other leads with pattern of coronary stenosis were investigated. Left main and proximal left anterior artery stenosis were more common in patients with ST elevation in lead aVR (P lead V1 . The presence of ST elevation ≥1 mm in lead aVR had a sensitivity of 100% and 94.3% for detecting left main and left anterior descending artery stenosis, respectively. The specificity was 33.5% and 26.6%, respectively. ST elevation in leads aVR + V1 had a sensitivity of 74.4% and 65.9% and a specificity of 68.5% and 64.4% for detecting left main and left anterior descending arteries stenosis, respectively. ST elevation in lead aVR is highly sensitive for left main and proximal left anterior descending artery lesions. Using ST elevation in lead V1 in addition to lead aVR as a positive finding increases the specificity with a further decrease in sensitivity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Electrophysiological and autoradiographical evidence of V1 vasopressin receptors in the lateral septum of the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raggenbass, M.; Tribollet, E.; Dreifuss, J.J.

    1987-11-01

    Extracellular recordings were obtained from single neurons located in the lateral septum, an area known to receive a vasopressinergic innervation in the rat brain. Approximately half of the neurons tested responded to 8-L-arginine vasopressin (AVP) by a marked increase in firing rate at concentrations greater than 1 nM. The effect of vasopressin was blocked by synthetic structural analogues possessing antagonistic properties on peripheral vasopressin and oxytocin receptors. Oxytocin was much less potent than vasopressin in firing septal neurons, and a selective oxytocic agonist was totally ineffective. The action of vasopressin on neuronal firing was mimicked by the vasopressor agonist (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin but not by the selective antidiuretic agonist 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin. In a parallel study, sites that bind (/sup 3/H)AVP at low concentration (1.5 nM) were found by in vitro autoradiography in the lateral septum. Adjacent sections were also incubated with 1.5 mM (/sup 3/H)AVP and, in addition, with 100 nM (2-phenylalanine,8-ornithine)vasotocin or 1-deamino(8-D-arginine)vasopressin--i.e., the same compounds as those used for the electrophysiological study. Results showed that the vasopressor agonist, but not the antidiuretic agonist, displaced (/sup 3/H)AVP, thus indicating that the vasopressin binding sites detected by autoradiography in the septum were V1 (vasopressor type) rather than V2 (antidiuretic type) receptors. Based on the electrophysiological evidence, we conclude that these receptors, when occupied, lead to increased firing of lateral septal neurons.

  4. Tripal v1.1: a standards-based toolkit for construction of online genetic and genomic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Ficklin, Stephen P; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Jung, Sook; Feltus, Frank A; Bett, Kirstin E; Main, Dorrie

    2013-01-01

    Tripal is an open-source freely available toolkit for construction of online genomic and genetic databases. It aims to facilitate development of community-driven biological websites by integrating the GMOD Chado database schema with Drupal, a popular website creation and content management software. Tripal provides a suite of tools for interaction with a Chado database and display of content therein. The tools are designed to be generic to support the various ways in which data may be stored in Chado. Previous releases of Tripal have supported organisms, genomic libraries, biological stocks, stock collections and genomic features, their alignments and annotations. Also, Tripal and its extension modules provided loaders for commonly used file formats such as FASTA, GFF, OBO, GAF, BLAST XML, KEGG heir files and InterProScan XML. Default generic templates were provided for common views of biological data, which could be customized using an open Application Programming Interface to change the way data are displayed. Here, we report additional tools and functionality that are part of release v1.1 of Tripal. These include (i) a new bulk loader that allows a site curator to import data stored in a custom tab delimited format; (ii) full support of every Chado table for Drupal Views (a powerful tool allowing site developers to construct novel displays and search pages); (iii) new modules including 'Feature Map', 'Genetic', 'Publication', 'Project', 'Contact' and the 'Natural Diversity' modules. Tutorials, mailing lists, download and set-up instructions, extension modules and other documentation can be found at the Tripal website located at http://tripal.info. DATABASE URL: http://tripal.info/.

  5. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Muddiman, David C.

    2017-09-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. MSiReader v1.0: Evolving Open-Source Mass Spectrometry Imaging Software for Targeted and Untargeted Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhart, Mark T.; Nazari, Milad; Garrard, Kenneth P.; Muddiman, David C.

    2018-01-01

    A major update to the mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) software MSiReader is presented, offering a multitude of newly added features critical to MSI analyses. MSiReader is a free, open-source, and vendor-neutral software written in the MATLAB platform and is capable of analyzing most common MSI data formats. A standalone version of the software, which does not require a MATLAB license, is also distributed. The newly incorporated data analysis features expand the utility of MSiReader beyond simple visualization of molecular distributions. The MSiQuantification tool allows researchers to calculate absolute concentrations from quantification MSI experiments exclusively through MSiReader software, significantly reducing data analysis time. An image overlay feature allows the incorporation of complementary imaging modalities to be displayed with the MSI data. A polarity filter has also been incorporated into the data loading step, allowing the facile analysis of polarity switching experiments without the need for data parsing prior to loading the data file into MSiReader. A quality assurance feature to generate a mass measurement accuracy (MMA) heatmap for an analyte of interest has also been added to allow for the investigation of MMA across the imaging experiment. Most importantly, as new features have been added performance has not degraded, in fact it has been dramatically improved. These new tools and the improvements to the performance in MSiReader v1.0 enable the MSI community to evaluate their data in greater depth and in less time. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. MISTRAL V1.1.1: assessing doses from atmospheric releases in normal and off-normal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Kerouanton [AREVA/SGN/DMI/ECR (France); Patrick Devin [AREVA/COGEMA/D3S/IG (France); Malvina Rennesson [AREVA/COGEMA/BUT/DQSSE (France)

    2006-07-01

    Protecting the environment and the public from radioactive and chemical hazards has always been a top priority for all companies operating in the nuclear domain. In this scope, SGN provides all the services the nuclear industry needs in environmental studies especially in relation to the impact assessment in normal operating conditions and risk assessment in off-normal conditions. In order to quantify dose impact on members of the public due to atmospheric releases, COGEMA and SGN developed MISTRAL V1.1.1 code. Dose impact depends strongly on dispersion of radionuclides in atmosphere. The main parameters involved in dispersion characterization are wind velocity and direction, rain, diffusion conditions, coordinates of the point of observation and stack elevation. MISTRAL code implements DOURY and PASQUILL Gaussian plume models which are widely used in the scientific community. These models, applicable for distances of transfer ranging from 100 m up to 30 km, are used to calculate atmospheric concentration and deposit at different distances from the point of release. MISTRAL allows the use of different dose regulations or dose coefficient databases such as: - ICRP30 and ICPR71 for internal doses (inhalation, ingestion) - Despres/Kocher database or US-EPA Federal Guidance no.12 (ICPR72 for noble gases) for external exposure (from plume or ground). The initial instant of the release can be considered as the origin of time or a date format can be specified (could be useful in a crisis context). While the context is specified, the user define the meteorological conditions of the release. In normal operating mode (routine releases), the user gives the annual meteorological scheme. The data can be recorded in the MISTRAL meteorological database. In off-normal conditions mode, MISTRAL V1.1 allows the use of successive release stages for which the user gives the duration, the meteorological conditions, that is to say stability class, wind speed and direction and rainfall

  8. A CACNA1C variant associated with reduced voltage-dependent inactivation, increased CaV1.2 channel window current, and arrhythmogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hennessey

    Full Text Available Mutations in CACNA1C that increase current through the CaV1.2 L-type Ca2+ channel underlie rare forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS, and Timothy syndrome (TS. We identified a variant in CACNA1C in a male child of Filipino descent with arrhythmias and extracardiac features by candidate gene sequencing and performed functional expression studies to electrophysiologically characterize the effects of the variant on CaV1.2 channels. As a baby, the subject developed seizures and displayed developmental delays at 30 months of age. At age 5 years, he displayed a QTc of 520 ms and experienced recurrent VT. Physical exam at 17 years of age was notable for microcephaly, short stature, lower extremity weakness and atrophy with hyperreflexia, spastic diplegia, multiple dental caries and episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Candidate gene sequencing identified a G>C transversion at position 5731 of CACNA1C (rs374528680 predicting a glycine>arginine substitution at residue 1911 (p.G1911R of CaV1.2. The allele frequency of this variant is 0.01 in Malays, but absent in 984 Caucasian alleles and in the 1000 genomes project. In electrophysiological analyses, the variant decreased voltage-dependent inactivation, thus causing a gain of function of CaV1.2. We also observed a negative shift of V1/2 of activation and positive shift of V1/2 of channel inactivation, resulting in an increase of the window current. Together, these suggest a gain-of-function effect on CaV1.2 and suggest increased susceptibility for arrhythmias in certain clinical settings. The p.G1911R variant was also identified in a case of sudden unexplained infant death (SUID, for which an increasing number of clinical observations have demonstrated can be associated with arrhythmogenic mutations in cardiac ion channels. In summary, the combined effects of the CACNA1C variant to diminish voltage-dependent inactivation of CaV1.2 and increase window current expand our appreciation of mechanisms by which a gain of

  9. Validity and reliability of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder self-report scale (ASRS-v1.1) in a clinical sample with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Samantha; Ivanova, Iryna; Bissada, Hany; Tasca, Giorgio A

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with eating disorders (EDs) commonly experience comorbid attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The shared features of EDs and ADHD, such as inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, may exacerbate ED symptomatology and pose challenges to treatment. It is important to screen patients with EDs for symptoms of ADHD to optimize their treatment outcomes. However, the psychometrics of common measures of ADHD have not yet been examined within an ED population. An example of such a measure is the ADHD self-report scale (ASRS-v1.1) symptom checklist, which identifies the presence of ADHD symptoms. This study reports a psychometric study of the ASRS-v1.1 in a clinical sample of 500 adults with an ED. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated the ASRS-v1.1 maintained its two-factor structure of inattention and impulsivity/hyperactivity. The item loadings demonstrated path invariance across ED diagnostic groups indicating construct validity. Further, the subscales exhibited good internal consistency and they were significantly correlated with other measures of impulsivity indicating convergent validity. The ED sample had significantly higher mean scores than published nonclinical norms indicating predictive validity, but the ASRS-v1.1 scores were not significantly different among ED diagnostic groups. Results suggest the ASRS-v1.1 is a valid and reliable screening tool for identifying symptoms of ADHD among adults seeking treatment for ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional Antibody Response Against V1V2 and V3 of HIV gp120 in the VAX003 and VAX004 Vaccine Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Preetha; Williams, Constance; Shapiro, Mariya B; Sinangil, Faruk; Higgins, Keith; Nádas, Arthur; Totrov, Maxim; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Fiore-Gartland, Andrew J; Haigwood, Nancy L; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Hioe, Catarina E

    2018-01-11

    Immunization with HIV AIDSVAX gp120 vaccines in the phase III VAX003 and VAX004 trials did not confer protection. To understand the shortcomings in antibody (Ab) responses induced by these vaccines, we evaluated the kinetics of Ab responses to the V1V2 and V3 regions of gp120 and the induction of Ab-mediated antiviral functions during the course of 7 vaccinations over a 30.5-month period. Plasma samples from VAX003 and VAX004 vaccinees and placebo recipients were measured for ELISA-binding Abs and for virus neutralization, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Ab responses to V1V2 and V3 peaked after 3 to 4 immunizations and declined after 5 to 7 immunizations. The deteriorating responses were most evident against epitopes in the underside of the V1V2 β-barrel and in the V3 crown. Correspondingly, vaccinees demonstrated higher neutralization against SF162 pseudovirus sensitive to anti-V1V2 and anti-V3 Abs after 3 or 4 immunizations than after 7 immunizations. Higher levels of ADCP and ADCC were also observed at early or mid-time points as compared with the final time point. Hence, VAX003 and VAX004 vaccinees generated V1V2- and V3-binding Abs and functional Abs after 3 to 4 immunizations, but subsequent boosts did not maintain these responses.

  11. A null mutation of the neuronal sodium channel NaV1.6 disrupts action potential propagation and excitation-contraction coupling in the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Sami F; Kaur, Kuljeet; Milstein, Michelle; Jones, Julie M; Furspan, Philip; Jiang, Daniel; Auerbach, David S; Herron, Todd; Meisler, Miriam H; Jalife, José

    2012-01-01

    Evidence supports the expression of brain-type sodium channels in the heart. Their functional role, however, remains controversial. We used global Na(V)1.6-null mice to test the hypothesis that Na(V)1.6 contributes to the maintenance of propagation in the myocardium and to excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We demonstrated expression of transcripts encoding full-length Na(V)1.6 in isolated ventricular myocytes and confirmed the striated pattern of Na(V)1.6 fluorescence in myocytes. On the ECG, the PR and QRS intervals were prolonged in the null mice, and the Ca(2+) transients were longer in the null cells. Under patch clamping, at holding potential (HP) = -120 mV, the peak I(Na) was similar in both phenotypes. However, at HP = -70 mV, the peak I(Na) was smaller in the nulls. In optical mapping, at 4 mM [K(+)](o), 17 null hearts showed slight (7%) reduction of ventricular conduction velocity (CV) compared to 16 wild-type hearts. At 12 mM [K(+)](o), CV was 25% slower in a subset of 9 null vs. 9 wild-type hearts. These results highlight the importance of neuronal sodium channels in the heart, whereby Na(V)1.6 participates in EC coupling, and represents an intrinsic depolarizing reserve that contributes to excitation.

  12. Sulfonamides as Selective NaV1.7 Inhibitors: Optimizing Potency, Pharmacokinetics, and Metabolic Properties to Obtain Atropisomeric Quinolinone (AM-0466) that Affords Robust in Vivo Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graceffa, Russell F; Boezio, Alessandro A; Able, Jessica; Altmann, Steven; Berry, Loren M; Boezio, Christiane; Butler, John R; Chu-Moyer, Margaret; Cooke, Melanie; DiMauro, Erin F; Dineen, Thomas A; Feric Bojic, Elma; Foti, Robert S; Fremeau, Robert T; Guzman-Perez, Angel; Gao, Hua; Gunaydin, Hakan; Huang, Hongbing; Huang, Liyue; Ilch, Christopher; Jarosh, Michael; Kornecook, Thomas; Kreiman, Charles R; La, Daniel S; Ligutti, Joseph; Milgram, Benjamin C; Lin, Min-Hwa Jasmine; Marx, Isaac E; Nguyen, Hanh N; Peterson, Emily A; Rescourio, Gwen; Roberts, John; Schenkel, Laurie; Shimanovich, Roman; Sparling, Brian A; Stellwagen, John; Taborn, Kristin; Vaida, Karina R; Wang, Jean; Yeoman, John; Yu, Violeta; Zhu, Dawn; Moyer, Bryan D; Weiss, Matthew M

    2017-07-27

    Because of its strong genetic validation, NaV1.7 has attracted significant interest as a target for the treatment of pain. We have previously reported on a number of structurally distinct bicyclic heteroarylsulfonamides as NaV1.7 inhibitors that demonstrate high levels of selectivity over other NaV isoforms. Herein, we report the discovery and optimization of a series of atropisomeric quinolinone sulfonamide inhibitors [ Bicyclic sulfonamide compounds as sodium channel inhibitors and their preparation . WO 2014201206, 2014 ] of NaV1.7, which demonstrate nanomolar inhibition of NaV1.7 and exhibit high levels of selectivity over other sodium channel isoforms. After optimization of metabolic and pharmacokinetic properties, including PXR activation, CYP2C9 inhibition, and CYP3A4 TDI, several compounds were advanced into in vivo target engagement and efficacy models. When tested in mice, compound 39 (AM-0466) demonstrated robust pharmacodynamic activity in a NaV1.7-dependent model of histamine-induced pruritus (itch) and additionally in a capsaicin-induced nociception model of pain without any confounding effect in open-field activity.

  13. The method ADAMONT v1.0 for statistical adjustment of climate projections applicable to energy balance land surface models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Verfaillie

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the method ADAMONT v1.0 to adjust and disaggregate daily climate projections from a regional climate model (RCM using an observational dataset at hourly time resolution. The method uses a refined quantile mapping approach for statistical adjustment and an analogous method for sub-daily disaggregation. The method ultimately produces adjusted hourly time series of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, humidity, and short- and longwave radiation, which can in turn be used to force any energy balance land surface model. While the method is generic and can be employed for any appropriate observation time series, here we focus on the description and evaluation of the method in the French mountainous regions. The observational dataset used here is the SAFRAN meteorological reanalysis, which covers the entire French Alps split into 23 massifs, within which meteorological conditions are provided for several 300 m elevation bands. In order to evaluate the skills of the method itself, it is applied to the ALADIN-Climate v5 RCM using the ERA-Interim reanalysis as boundary conditions, for the time period from 1980 to 2010. Results of the ADAMONT method are compared to the SAFRAN reanalysis itself. Various evaluation criteria are used for temperature and precipitation but also snow depth, which is computed by the SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus model using the meteorological driving data from either the adjusted RCM data or the SAFRAN reanalysis itself. The evaluation addresses in particular the time transferability of the method (using various learning/application time periods, the impact of the RCM grid point selection procedure for each massif/altitude band configuration, and the intervariable consistency of the adjusted meteorological data generated by the method. Results show that the performance of the method is satisfactory, with similar or even better evaluation metrics than alternative methods. However, results for air temperature are generally

  14. The method ADAMONT v1.0 for statistical adjustment of climate projections applicable to energy balance land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verfaillie, Deborah; Déqué, Michel; Morin, Samuel; Lafaysse, Matthieu

    2017-11-01

    We introduce the method ADAMONT v1.0 to adjust and disaggregate daily climate projections from a regional climate model (RCM) using an observational dataset at hourly time resolution. The method uses a refined quantile mapping approach for statistical adjustment and an analogous method for sub-daily disaggregation. The method ultimately produces adjusted hourly time series of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, humidity, and short- and longwave radiation, which can in turn be used to force any energy balance land surface model. While the method is generic and can be employed for any appropriate observation time series, here we focus on the description and evaluation of the method in the French mountainous regions. The observational dataset used here is the SAFRAN meteorological reanalysis, which covers the entire French Alps split into 23 massifs, within which meteorological conditions are provided for several 300 m elevation bands. In order to evaluate the skills of the method itself, it is applied to the ALADIN-Climate v5 RCM using the ERA-Interim reanalysis as boundary conditions, for the time period from 1980 to 2010. Results of the ADAMONT method are compared to the SAFRAN reanalysis itself. Various evaluation criteria are used for temperature and precipitation but also snow depth, which is computed by the SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus model using the meteorological driving data from either the adjusted RCM data or the SAFRAN reanalysis itself. The evaluation addresses in particular the time transferability of the method (using various learning/application time periods), the impact of the RCM grid point selection procedure for each massif/altitude band configuration, and the intervariable consistency of the adjusted meteorological data generated by the method. Results show that the performance of the method is satisfactory, with similar or even better evaluation metrics than alternative methods. However, results for air temperature are generally better than for

  15. IgE, IgG4 and IgA specific to Bet v 1-related food allergens do not predict oral allergy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guhsl, E E; Hofstetter, G; Lengger, N; Hemmer, W; Ebner, C; Fröschl, R; Bublin, M; Lupinek, C; Breiteneder, H; Radauer, C

    2015-01-01

    Birch pollen-associated plant food allergy is caused by Bet v 1-specific IgE, but presence of cross-reactive IgE to related allergens does not predict food allergy. The role of other immunoglobulin isotypes in the birch pollen-plant food syndrome has not been investigated in detail. Bet v 1-sensitized birch pollen-allergic patients (n = 35) were diagnosed for food allergy by standardized interviews, skin prick tests, prick-to-prick tests and ImmunoCAP. Concentrations of allergen-specific IgE, IgG1, IgG4 and IgA to seven Bet v 1-related food allergens were determined by ELISA. Bet v 1, Cor a 1, Mal d 1 and Pru p 1 bound IgE from all and IgG4 and IgA from the majority of sera. Immunoglobulins to Gly m 4, Vig r 1 and Api g 1.01 were detected in allergy and increased or reduced levels of IgE, IgG1, IgG4 or IgA specific to most Bet v 1-related allergens. Api g 1-specific IgE was significantly (P = 0.01) elevated in celeriac-allergic compared with celeriac-tolerant patients. Likewise, frequencies of IgE (71% vs 15%; P = 0.01) and IgA (86% vs 38%; P = 0.04) binding to Api g 1.01 were increased. Measurements of allergen-specific immunoglobulins are not suitable for diagnosing Bet v 1-mediated plant food allergy to hazelnut and Rosaceae fruits. In contrast, IgE and IgA to the distantly related allergen Api g 1 correlate with allergy to celeriac. © 2014 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular modeling of interactions of the non-peptide antagonist YM087 with the human vasopressin V1a, V2 receptors and with oxytocin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giełdoń, Artur; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Ślusarz, Rafał; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2001-12-01

    The nonapeptide hormones arginine vasopressin (CYFQNCPRG-NH2, AVP) and oxytocin (CYIQNCPLG-NH2, OT), control many essential functions in mammals. Their main activities include the urine concentration (via stimulation of AVP V2 receptors, V2R, in the kidneys), blood pressure regulation (via stimulation of vascular V1a AVP receptors, V1aR), ACTH control (via stimulation of V1b receptors, V1bR, in the pituitary) and labor and lactation control (via stimulation of OT receptors, OTR, in the uterus and nipples, respectively). All four receptor subtypes belong to the GTP-binding (G) protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. This work consists of docking of YM087, a potent non-peptide V1aR and V2R - but not OTR - antagonist, into the receptor models based on relatively new theoretical templates of rhodopsin (RD) and opiate receptors, proposed by Mosberg et al. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA). It is simultaneously demonstrated that this RD template satisfactorily compares with the first historical GPCR structure of bovine rhodopsin (Palczewski et al., 2000) and that homology-modeling of V2R, V1aR and OTR using opiate receptors as templates is rational, based on relatively high (20-60%) sequence homology among the set of 4 neurophyseal and 4 opiate receptors. YM087 was computer-docked to V1aR, V2R and OTR using the AutoDock (Olson et al., Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA) and subsequently relaxed using restrained simulated annealing and molecular dynamics, as implemented in AMBER program (Kollman et al., University of California, San Francisco, USA). From about 80 diverse configurations, sampled for each of the three ligand/receptor systems, 3 best energy-relaxed complexes were selected for mutual comparisons. Similar docking modes were found for the YM087/V1aR and YM087/V2R complexes, diverse from those of the YM087/OTR complexes, in agreement with the molecular affinity data.

  17. An IgE epitope of Bet v 1 and fagales PR10 proteins as defined by a human monoclonal IgE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Schulz, D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analyses of the molecular basis underlying allergenicity and allergen cross-reactivity, as well as improvement of allergy diagnostics and therapeutics, are hampered by the lack of human monoclonal IgE antibodies and knowledge about their epitopes. Here, we addressed the consecutive...... formats including IgE. Using variants of Bet v 1, the epitope of the antibody was mapped and extrapolated to other PR10 proteins. RESULTS: The obtained antibodies exhibited pronounced reactivity with Bet v 1, but were not reactive with the homologous PR10 protein Mal d 1. The epitope as defined by the Ig...

  18. Ultrasonic calibration and certification of V1 and V2 type reference standard blocks for use in Non-Destructive Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Maggi, Luís Eduardo; Silva, Cristiane Evelise Ribeiro da; Alvarenga, André Victor; Costa-Félix, Rodrigo Pereira Barretto da

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Testing (US-NDT) has many industrial applications,such as flaws detection, welding integrity evaluation and solid material thickness measurement.To evaluate the instrumentation conditions, before a measurement begins, a “calibration” should be carried out with the aid of a reference standard block (RSB). Types V1 (ISO 2400) and V2 (ISO 7963) are the most widely used in US-NDT. Due their characteristics, V1 and V2 RSB can be classified as Reference Material, so that ...

  19. Sistema Automatizado GRiesgo v.1 para la Gestión de Riesgo por impacto de rayos en estructuras y servicios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Susana Suárez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available La descarga eléctrica atmosférica es uno de los fenómenos naturales que causa más daños en la Isla de Cuba ya sea en los sistemas eléctricos y de comunicaciones así como en las instalaciones industriales. En el trabajo sereporta un sistema automatizado para la gestión de riesgos por rayos en estructuras y/o servicios denominado GRiesgo v.1. El Sistema Automatizado GRiesgo v.1, diseñado y programado para plataforma de 32 bits en lenguaje Visual Basic sobre un libro Microsoft Excel 2003, se basa en la parte 2 de la norma internacional IEC 62305, Gestiónde Riesgo, propuesta para su adopción junto a las partes 1, 3 y 4, como norma cubana. Teniendo en cuenta aspectos técnicos y económicos, el GRiesgo v.1 permite la correcta selección de las medidas de protecciónnecesarias para minimizar los riesgos a valores inferiores a los tolerables. Se presentan resultados prácticos de la aplicación del Sistema Automatizado GRiesgo v.1. The atmospheric electric discharge is the natural events that more damage causes in the island cuban either in those in the electrics and communications systems like industrial facilities. In this work, an Automated System, called GRiesgo v.1, to assess the risks of lightning for structures and/or services, is presented. The automatedsystem GRiesgo v.1, designed and programmed in Visual Basic upon Microsoft Excel 2003 for a 32 bits platform, is based on the IEC 62305 International Standard part 2, Risk Management, which is proposed to be adopted along with part 1, 3 and 4 as the Cuban Standard. Keeping in mind technical and economic aspects, GRiesgo v.1 allowsdetermining the necessary measures to be taken to minimize risks below what is today considered acceptable values. Results of the implementation of Automated System GRiesgo v.1 are also presented.

  20. High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy of the v1 + v4 Band of 14NF3:Reductions of the Rovibrational Hamiltonian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Najib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high-resolution Fourier transform infrared spectrum of nitrogen trifluoride NF3 has been studied in the v1 + v4 perpendicular band region around 1523 cm−1. All experimental data have been refined applying various reduction forms of the effective rovibrational Hamiltonian developed for an isolated degenerate state of a symmetric top molecule. The v1 = v4 = 1 excited state of the 14NF3 oblate molecule was treated with models taking into account ℓ- and k-type intravibrational resonances. Parameters up to sixth order have been accurately determined and the unitary equivalence of the derived parameter sets in different reductions was demonstrated.

  1. Individual Variation in Social Behaviours of Male Lab-reared Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) is Non-heritable and Weakly Associated with V1aR Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andrea R; Patisaul, Heather B; Arambula, Sheryl E; Tiezzi, Francesco; McGraw, Lisa A

    2018-01-23

    The genetic and environmental factors that contribute to pair bonding behaviour remain poorly understood. Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) often, but not always, form stable pair bonds and present an ideal model species for investigating the genetic and environmental factors that influence monogamy. Here, we assessed variation in partner preference, a measure of pair bonding, and related social behaviours in a population of laboratory-reared prairie voles under controlled environmental conditions. We evaluated to what extent variation in these behaviours correlate with vasopressin 1a receptor (V1aR) expression in the ventral pallidum (VP) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC), and estimated the heritability of these behaviours and V1aR expression. We found substantial variation in partner preference and measures of aggression, paternal care, and anxiety-like behaviours, but no correlation between these traits. We also found variation in V1aR density in the VP and RSC can account for behavioural components of paternal care and aggression, but not in partner preference. Heritability estimates of variation in partner preference were low, yet heritability estimates for V1aR expression were high, indicating that the extensive variation in partner preference observed within this population is due largely to environmental plasticity.

  2. Direct interaction with contactin targets voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN to the cell membrane

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, C J; Dib-Hajj, S D; Black, J A; Greenwood, J; Lian, Z; Waxman, S G

    2001-01-01

    .... To examine this issue we studied the voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.9/NaN, which is preferentially expressed in small sensory neurons of dorsal root ganglia and trigeminal ganglia and the nonmyelinated axons that arise...

  3. Epitope grafting, re-creating a conformational Bet v 1 antibody epitope on the surface of the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens; Ferreras, Mercedes; Ipsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    allergen Malus domestica group 1 (Mal d 1). Engineering of the epitope was accomplished by genetic engineering substituting amino acid residues in Mal d 1 differing between Bet v 1 and Mal d 1 within the epitope defined by the mAb BV16. The kinetic parameters characterizing the antibody binding interaction...

  4. Actin Filaments Are Involved in the Coupling of V0-V1 Domains of Vacuolar H+-ATPase at the Golgi Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Peinado, Carla; Sicart, Adrià; Llopis, Juan; Egea, Gustavo

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that actin-depolymerizing agents promote the alkalization of the Golgi stack and thetrans-Golgi network. The main determinant of acidic pH at the Golgi is the vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase), whose V1domain subunitsBandCbind actin. We have generated a GFP-tagged subunitB2construct (GFP-B2) that is incorporated into the V1domain, which in turn is coupled to the V0sector. GFP-B2 subunit is enriched at distal Golgi compartments in HeLa cells. Subcellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation, and inversal FRAP experiments show that the actin depolymerization promotes the dissociation of V1-V0domains, which entails subunitB2translocation from Golgi membranes to the cytosol. Moreover, molecular interaction between subunitsB2andC1and actin were detected. In addition, Golgi membrane lipid order disruption byd-ceramide-C6 causes Golgi pH alkalization. We conclude that actin regulates the Golgi pH homeostasis maintaining the coupling of V1-V0domains of V-ATPase through the binding of microfilaments to subunitsBandCand preserving the integrity of detergent-resistant membrane organization. These results establish the Golgi-associated V-ATPase activity as the molecular link between actin and the Golgi pH. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. 75 FR 54627 - ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ..., ``Land-Use Scenarios: National-Scale Housing- Density Scenarios Consistent with Climate Change Storylines... AGENCY ICLUS v1.3 User's Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth... Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth'' (EPA/600/R-09/ 143F). The tool and its documentation were prepared...

  6. Immunogenicity of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV1) and equine rhinovirus type 1 (ERhV1) following inactivation by betapropiolactone (BPL) and ultraviolet (UV) light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, T.M.; Studdert, M.J.; Blackney, M.H. (Melbourne Univ., Parkville (Australia). School of Veterinary Science)

    1982-12-01

    Some kinetic data on the inactivation of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV1) and equine rhinovirus type 1 (ERhV1) by betapropiolactone (BPL) and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are reported. 0.25% BPL at 37/sup 0/C for 1 h reduced the titre of EHV1 by > 10sup(3.4) and of ERhV1 by > 10sup(4.1) TCID/sub 50//ml. UV irradiation (334 ..mu..W/cm/sup 2/) produced similar reductions in titre after 2 min. These data were used as a basis for inactivating EHV1 and ERhV1 by the combined action of BPL and UV irradiation. Viruses were exposed to 0.1% BPL for 1 h at 4/sup 0/C with constant stirring, followed by UV irradiation for 2 min, followed by incubation for 3 h at 37/sup 0/C. Inactivated EHV1 elicted secondary immune responses only in horses whereas ERhV1 produced primary immune responses in mice (including athymic nu/nu mice), rabbits and probably in horses.

  7. The cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A and its gene product NaV1.5: Role in physiology and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Lodder, Elisabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    The gene SCN5A encodes the main cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5. This channel predominates the cardiac sodium current, INa, which underlies the fast upstroke of the cardiac action potential. As such, it plays a crucial role in cardiac electrophysiology. Over the last 60years a tremendous amount of

  8. Isolation of high-affinity human IgE and IgG antibodies recognising Bet v 1 and Humicola lanuginosa lipase from combinatorial phage libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Charlotte G; Bødtger, Uffe; Kristensen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    . Human IgE and IgG libraries have been created from patients allergic to birch pollen or lipase. These libraries have been used to select binders recognising the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and Humicola lanuginosa lipase. A panel of allergen-specific IgE and IgG antibodies were identified...

  9. Dominating IgE-binding epitope of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen, characterized by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangfort, Michael D; Mirza, Osman; Ipsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    approach to the engineering of allergen molecules with reduced IgE binding. In this study, we describe the identification and modification of a human IgE-binding epitope based on the crystal structure of Bet v 1 in complex with the BV16 Fab' fragment. The epitope occupies approximately 10% of the molecular...... surface area of Bet v 1 and is clearly conformational. A synthetic peptide representing a sequential motif in the epitope (11 of 16 residues) did not inhibit the binding of mAb BV16 to Bet v 1, illustrating limitations in the use of peptides for B cell epitope characterization. The single amino acid...... substitution, Glu(45)-Ser, was introduced in the epitope and completely abolished the binding of mAb BV16 to the Bet v 1 mutant within a concentration range 1000-fold higher than wild type. The mutant also showed up to 50% reduction in the binding of human polyclonal IgE, demonstrating that glutamic acid 45...

  10. The major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 induces different responses in dendritic cells of birch pollen allergic and healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Smole

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells play a fundamental role in shaping the immune response to allergens. The events that lead to allergic sensitization or tolerance induction during the interaction of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and dendritic cells are not very well studied. Here, we analyzed the uptake of Bet v 1 and the cross-reactive celery allergen Api g 1 by immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMoDCs of allergic and normal donors. In addition, we characterized the allergen-triggered intracellular signaling and transcriptional events. Uptake kinetics, competitive binding, and internalization pathways of labeled allergens by iMoDCs were visualized by live-cell imaging. Surface-bound IgE was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Allergen- and IgE-induced gene expression of early growth response genes and Th1 and Th2 related cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Phosporylation of signaling kinases was analyzed by Western blot. Internalization of Bet v 1 by iMoDCs of both donor groups, likely by receptor-mediated caveolar endocytosis, followed similar kinetics. Bet v 1 outcompeted Api g 1 in cell surface binding and uptake. MoDCs of allergic and healthy donors displayed surface-bound IgE and showed a pronounced upregulation of Th2 cytokine- and NFκB-dependent genes upon non-specific Fcε receptor cross-linking. In contrast to these IgE-mediated responses, Bet v 1-stimulation increased transcript levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 but not of NFκB-related genes in MoDCs of BP allergic donors. Cells of healthy donors were either unresponsive or showed elevated mRNA levels of Th1-promoting chemokines. Moreover, Bet v 1 was able to induce Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation in BP allergics but only a slight p38 activation in normal donors. In conclusion, our data indicate that Bet v 1 favors the activation of a Th2 program only in DCs of BP allergic individuals.

  11. Lack of colonic-inflammation-induced acute visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in Na(v)1.9 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, V; Melgar, S

    2008-10-01

    Tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-gated sodium channels subtype 9 (Na(v)1.9) are expressed in small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and have been involved in persistent somatic hyperalgesic responses associated with inflammation. We assessed the role of Na(v)1.9 channels on acute colonic inflammation-induced visceral hypersensitivity in conscious mice, using Na(v)1.9 knockout (KO) mice. Colorectal distension (CRD)-induced visceral pain was assessed in conscious wild-type and Na(v)1.9 KO mice (C57Bl/6 background). The mechanical activity of the abdominal muscles during isobaric colorectal distension was used as a measure of visceral pain. Acute colonic inflammation was induced by intracolonic administration of the toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 activator, R-848 (40mug/animal). CRD was performed 5h later, thereafter animals were euthanized and the colonic content of inflammatory mediators assessed. Normal pain responses were similar in Na(v)1.9 KO and wild-type mice. In wild-type mice, R-848 administration increased the response to phasic CRD by 62% compared with vehicle-treated animals (vehicle: 0.16+/-0.04, R-848: 0.26+/-0.03, n=6-7, P1.9 KO mice, intracolonic R-848 did not affect the response to CRD (0.11+/-0.02, n=7) compared to animals treated with vehicle (0.17+/-0.03, n=5; P>0.05). After R-848 administration, the colonic content of pro-inflammatory cytokines was increased in similar proportion in wild type and Na(v)1.9 KO mice, suggesting the presence of a similar acute inflammatory reaction in both groups of animals. These results suggest that Na(v)1.9 channels do not significantly contribute to normal visceral pain responses to acute colonic mechanical stimulation but may be important for the development of inflammation-related acute visceral hyperalgesic responses.

  12. Chimeras of Bet v 1 and Api g 1 reveal heterogeneous IgE responses in patients with birch pollen allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gepp, Barbara; Lengger, Nina; Bublin, Merima; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Breiteneder, Heimo; Radauer, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Characterization of IgE-binding epitopes of allergens and determination of their patient-specific relevance is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of allergy. We sought to assess the contribution of specific surface areas of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1.0101 to binding IgE of individual patients. Four distinct areas of Bet v 1 representing in total 81% of its surface were grafted onto the scaffold of its homolog, Api g 1.0101, to yield the chimeras Api-Bet-1 to Api-Bet-4. The chimeras were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. IgE binding of 64 sera from Bet v 1-sensitized subjects with birch pollen allergy was determined by using direct ELISA. Specificity was assessed by means of inhibition ELISA. rApi g 1.0101, Api-Bet-1, Api-Bet-2, Api-Bet-3, and Api-Bet-4 bound IgE from 44%, 89%, 80%, 78%, and 48% of the patients, respectively. By comparing the amount of IgE binding to the chimeras and to rApi g 1.0101, 81%, 70%, 75%, and 45% of the patients showed significantly enhanced IgE binding to Api-Bet-1, Api-Bet-2, Api-Bet-3, and Api-Bet-4, respectively. The minority (8%) of the sera revealed enhanced IgE binding exclusively to a single chimera, whereas 31% showed increased IgE binding to all 4 chimeras compared with rApi g 1.0101. The chimeras inhibited up to 70% of IgE binding to rBet v 1.0101, confirming the specific IgE recognition of the grafted regions. The Bet v 1-specific IgE response is polyclonal, and epitopes are spread across the entire Bet v 1 surface. Furthermore, the IgE recognition profile of Bet v 1 is highly patient specific. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided ...

  14. Role of PKC and CaV1.2 in detrusor overactivity in a model of obesity associated with insulin resistance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz O Leiria

    Full Text Available Obesity/metabolic syndrome are common risk factors for overactive bladder. This study aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM in high-fat insulin resistant obese mice, focusing on the role of protein kinase C (PKC and Ca(v1.2 in causing bladder dysfunction. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet for 10 weeks. In vitro functional responses and cystometry, as well as PKC and Ca(v1.2 expression in bladder were evaluated. Obese mice exhibited higher body weight, epididymal fat mass, fasting glucose and insulin resistance. Carbachol (0.001-100 µM, α,β-methylene ATP (1-10 µM, KCl (1-300 mM, extracellular Ca(2+ (0.01-100 mM and phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu; 0.001-3 µM all produced greater DSM contractions in obese mice, which were fully reversed by the Ca(v1.2 blocker amlodipine. Cystometry evidenced augmented frequency, non-void contractions and post-void pressure in obese mice that were also prevented by amlodipine. Metformin treatment improved the insulin sensitivity, and normalized the in vitro bladder hypercontractility and cystometric dysfunction in obese mice. The PKC inhibitor GF109203X (1 µM also reduced the carbachol induced contractions. PKC protein expression was markedly higher in bladder tissues from obese mice, which was normalized by metformin treatment. The Ca(v1.2 channel protein expression was not modified in any experimental group. Our findings show that Ca(v1.2 blockade and improvement of insulin sensitization restores the enhanced PKC protein expression in bladder tissues and normalizes the overactive detrusor. It is likely that insulin resistance importantly contributes for the pathophysiology of this urological disorder in obese mice.

  15. New electrocardiographic criteria to differentiate the Type-2 Brugada pattern from electrocardiogram of healthy athletes with r'-wave in leads V1/V2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Guillem; Baranchuk, Adrián; Bayés-De-Luna, Antoni; Brugada, Josep; Goldwasser, Diego; Capulzini, Lucio; Arazo, David; Boraita, Araceli; Heras, Maria-Eugenia; Garcia-Niebla, Javier; Elosua, Roberto; Brugada, Ramón; Brugada, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    Diagnosis of Type-2 Brugada pattern remains challenging and it could be confused with other electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns presenting an r'-wave in leads V1-V2 like in healthy athletes. This could impact their ability to perform competitive sports. The aim of the study was to evaluate, as a proof of concept, the new ECG criteria to differentiate the Type-2 Brugada pattern from the ECG pattern of healthy athletes depicting an r'-wave in leads V1-V2. Surface ECGs from 50 patients with Brugada syndrome and type-2 Brugada pattern and 58 healthy athletes with an r'-wave in leads V1-V2 were analysed. Different criteria based on the characteristics of the triangle formed by the ascendant and descendant arms of the r'-wave in leads V1-V2 were compared. The duration of the base of the triangle at 0.5 mV (5 mm) from high take-off ≥160 ms (4 mm) has a specificity (SP) of 95.6%, sensitivity (SE) 85%, positive predictive value (PPV) 94.4%, and negative predictive value (NPV) 87.9%. The duration of the base of the triangle at the isoelectric line ≥60 ms (1.5 mm) in leads V1-V2 has an SP of 78%, SE 94.8%, PPV 79.3%, and NPV 93.5%. The ratio of the base at isoelectric line/height from the baseline to peak of r'-wave in leads V1-V2 has an SP of 92.1%, SE 82%, PPV 90.1%, and NPV 83.3%. The three new ECG criteria were accurate to distinguish the Type-2 Brugada pattern from the ECG pattern with an r'-wave in healthy athletes. The duration of the base of the triangle at 0.5 mV from the high take-off is the easiest to measure and may be used in clinical practice. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. A vectorization of the Jameson-Caughey NYU transonic swept-wing computer program FLO-22-V1 for the STAR-100 computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. E.; Pitts, J. I.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The computer program FLO-22 for analyzing inviscid transonic flow past 3-D swept-wing configurations was modified to use vector operations and run on the STAR-100 computer. The vectorized version described herein was called FLO-22-V1. Vector operations were incorporated into Successive Line Over-Relaxation in the transformed horizontal direction. Vector relational operations and control vectors were used to implement upwind differencing at supersonic points. A high speed of computation and extended grid domain were characteristics of FLO-22-V1. The new program was not the optimal vectorization of Successive Line Over-Relaxation applied to transonic flow; however, it proved that vector operations can readily be implemented to increase the computation rate of the algorithm.

  17. Selepressin, a novel selective vasopressin V1A agonist, is an effective substitute for norepinephrine in a phase IIa randomized, placebo-controlled trial in septic shock patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, James A; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Kjølbye, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasopressin is widely used for vasopressor support in septic shock patients, but experimental evidence suggests that selective V1A agonists are superior. The initial pharmacodynamic effects, pharmacokinetics, and safety of selepressin, a novel V1A-selective vasopressin analogue......, was examined in a phase IIa trial in septic shock patients. METHODS: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial in 53 patients in early septic shock (aged ≥18 years, fluid resuscitation, requiring vasopressor support) who received selepressin 1.25 ng/kg/minute (n = 10), 2.5 ng...... for selepressin 2.5 ng/kg/minute and placebo. Two patients were infused at 3.75 ng/kg/minute, one of whom had the study drug infusion discontinued for possible safety reasons, with subsequent discontinuation of this dose group. CONCLUSIONS: In septic shock patients, selepressin 2.5 ng/kg/minute was able...

  18. Anion-sensitive regions of L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels expressed in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Babai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available L-type calcium currents (I(Ca are influenced by changes in extracellular chloride, but sites of anion effects have not been identified. Our experiments showed that CaV1.2 currents expressed in HEK293 cells are strongly inhibited by replacing extracellular chloride with gluconate or perchlorate. Variance-mean analysis of I(Ca and cell-attached patch single channel recordings indicate that gluconate-induced inhibition is due to intracellular anion effects on Ca(2+ channel open probability, not conductance. Inhibition of CaV1.2 currents produced by replacing chloride with gluconate was reduced from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% by omitting beta subunits but unaffected by omitting alpha(2delta subunits. Similarly, gluconate inhibition was reduced to approximately 50% by deleting an alpha1 subunit N-terminal region of 15 residues critical for beta subunit interactions regulating open probability. Omitting beta subunits with this mutant alpha1 subunit did not further diminish inhibition. Gluconate inhibition was unchanged with expression of different beta subunits. Truncating the C terminus at AA1665 reduced gluconate inhibition from approximately 75%-80% to approximately 50% whereas truncating it at AA1700 had no effect. Neutralizing arginines at AA1696 and 1697 by replacement with glutamines reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 60% indicating these residues are particularly important for anion effects. Expressing CaV1.2 channels that lacked both N and C termini reduced gluconate inhibition to approximately 25% consistent with additive interactions between the two tail regions. Our results suggest that modest changes in intracellular anion concentration can produce significant effects on CaV1.2 currents mediated by changes in channel open probability involving beta subunit interactions with the N terminus and a short C terminal region.

  19. Oxytocin inhibits the activity of acid-sensing ion channels through the vasopressin, V1A receptor in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Fang; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Cai, Huilan; Liu, Ting-Ting; Qu, Zu-Wei; Yang, Zhifan; Li, Jia-Da; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2014-06-01

    A growing number of studies have demonstrated that oxytocin (OT) plays an analgesic role in modulation of nociception and pain. Most work to date has focused on the central mechanisms of OT analgesia, but little is known about whether peripheral mechanisms are also involved. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are distributed in peripheral sensory neurons and participate in nociception. Here, we investigated the effects of OT on the activity of ASICs in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Electrophysiological experiments were performed on neurons from rat DRG. Nociceptive behaviour was induced by acetic acid in rats and mice lacking vasopressin, V1A receptors. OT inhibited the functional activity of native ASICs. Firstly, OT dose-dependently decreased the amplitude of ASIC currents in DRG neurons. Secondly, OT inhibition of ASIC currents was mimicked by arginine vasopressin (AVP) and completely blocked by the V1A receptor antagonist SR49059, but not by the OT receptor antagonist L-368899. Thirdly, OT altered acidosis-evoked membrane excitability of DRG neurons and significantly decreased the amplitude of the depolarization and number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administered OT or AVP inhibited nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Both OT and AVP also induced an analgesic effect on acidosis-evoked pain in wild-type mice, but not in V1A receptor knockout mice. These results reveal a novel peripheral mechanism for the analgesic effect of OT involving the modulation of native ASICs in primary sensory neurons mediated by V1A receptors. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. The effect of coffee consumption on food group intake, nutrient intake, and metabolic syndrome of Korean adults—2010 KNHANES (V-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Fangfang; Oh, JiEun; Lee, KyungWon; Cho, Mi Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coffee is a popular beverage in Korea recent years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coffee consumption and the risk of metabolic syndrome in Korean adults based on the 2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V-1). Methods: Dietary intake status and the factors of metabolic syndrome were assessed. Three groups (no coffee consumption, moderate intake, and high intake) were divided into tertile according to black ...

  1. Design, implementation, and testing of a software interface between the AN/SPS-65(V)1 radar and the SRC-6E reconfigurable computer

    OpenAIRE

    Guthrie, Thomas G.

    2005-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited This thesis outlines the development, programming, and testing a logical interface between a radar system, the AN/SPS-65(V)1, and a general-purpose reconfigurable computing platform, the SRC Computer, Inc. model, the SRC-6E. To confirm the proper operation of the interface and associated subcomponents, software was developed to perform basic radar signal processing. The interface, as proven by the signal processing results, accurately ...

  2. Insights into the extremotolerance of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, a gram-negative bacterium isolated from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, K B; Derecho, I; Wong, T; Tran, H M; Huynh, T D; La Duc, M T; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2012-09-01

    The microbiology of the spacecraft assembly process is of paramount importance to planetary exploration, as the biological contamination that can result from remote-enabled spacecraft carries the potential to impact both life-detection experiments and extraterrestrial evolution. Accordingly, insights into the mechanisms and range of extremotolerance of Acinetobacter radioresistens 50v1, a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the surface of the preflight Mars Odyssey orbiter, were gained by using a combination of microbiological, enzymatic, and proteomic methods. In summary, A. radioresistens 50v1 displayed a remarkable range of survival against hydrogen peroxide and the sequential exposures of desiccation, vapor and plasma phase hydrogen peroxide, and ultraviolet irradiation. The survival is among the highest reported for non-spore-forming and Gram-negative bacteria and is based upon contributions from the enzyme-based degradation of H(2)O(2) (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy management (ATP synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase), and modulation of the membrane composition. Together, the biochemical and survival features of A. radioresistens 50v1 support a potential persistence on Mars (given an unintended or planned surface landing of the Mars Odyssey orbiter), which in turn may compromise the scientific integrity of future life-detection missions.

  3. Potential Roles of the Interaction Between Model V1 Neurons with Orientation-Selective and Non-selective Surround Inhibition in Contour Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Fu eYang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Both the neurons with orientation-selective and with non-selective surround inhibition have been observed in the primary visual cortex (V1 of primates and cats. Though the inhibition coming from the surround region (named as non-classical receptive field, nCRF has been considered playing critical role in visual perception, the specific role of orientation-selective and non-selective inhibition in the task of contour detection is less known. To clarify above question, we first carried out computational analysis of the contour detection performance of V1 neurons with different types of surround inhibition, on the basis of which we then proposed two integrated models to evaluate their role in this specific perceptual task by combining the two types of surround inhibition with two different ways. The two models were evaluated with synthetic images and a set of challenging natural images, and the results show that both of the integrated models outperform the typical models with orientation-selective or non-selective inhibition alone. The findings of this study suggest that V1 neurons with different types of center-surround interaction work in cooperative and adaptive ways at least when extracting organized structures from cluttered natural scenes. This work is expected to inspire efficient phenomenological models for engineering applications in field of computational machine-vision.

  4. Facile synthesis of nanoporous Li1+xV1-xO2@C composites as promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Peng; Pramanik, Malay; Lee, Jaewoo; Takei, Toshiaki; Ide, Yusuke; Hossain, Md Shahriar A; Kim, Jung Ho; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2017-03-29

    Recently, a layered material with composition Li1+xV1-xO2 has been discovered as a promising alternative anode material to graphite due to its high volumetric capacity and low operation potential. Herein, we demonstrate a mild and cost-effective synthetic methodology to construct a novel nanoporous anode material (P-LVO@C), comprising Li1+xV1-xO2 nanocrystals embedded in a porous carbon matrix. The thermal decomposition of organic materials, including a triblock copolymer (P123) and citric acid, in a N2 atmosphere is the source of the nanoporous carbon in the porous composite material, while citric acid also plays a crucial role in maintaining the reductive environment of the synthetic medium. Due to the novel composition of Li1+xV1-xO2 (x ≥ 0.03), as well as its porous structure and well-integrated conductive framework, our P-LVO@C has great applicability as a high performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Our P-LVO@C composite electrode shows high reversible capacity with an excellent cycling performance (100 cycles) and good capacity retention (82%) at a higher rate (0.48C).

  5. Swift heavy ion irradiation damage in Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-4V-1B: Study of the microstructure and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amroussia, Aida; Avilov, Mikhail; Boehlert, Carl J.; Durantel, Florent; Grygiel, Clara; Mittig, Wolfgang; Monnet, Isabelle; Pellemoine, Frederique

    2015-12-01

    The α + β alloy Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) and the boron-modified Ti-6Al-4V-1B (wt.%), due to their low activation, corrosion resistance, good mechanical properties, and their commercial availability, were chosen as candidate materials for the beam dump for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIBs) at Michigan State University: a new generation accelerator with high power heavy ion beams. Through this study our goal is to establish the first irradiation data of the recently developed Ti-6Al-4V-1B (wt.%) alloy and investigate the changes in microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V due to swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation damage. The results of hardness measurements showed that the studied Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) and Ti-6Al-4V-1B (wt.%) alloy, under the specified irradiation conditions, exhibited a high irradiation resistance. In fact, only a slight hardening was observed (∼13%) in the tested samples and no changes in the microstructure were observed. Temperature, dose and electronic excitation effects were also discussed.

  6. Ultrasonic calibration and certification of V1 and V2 type reference standard blocks for use in Non-Destructive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, L. E.; Silva, C. E. R.; Alvarenga, A. V.; Costa-Felix, R. P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasonic Non-Destructive Testing (US-NDT) has many industrial applications, such as flaws detection, welding integrity evaluation and solid material thickness measurement. To evaluate the instrumentation conditions, before a measurement begins, a "calibration" should be carried out with the aid of a reference standard block (RSB). Types V1 (ISO 2400) and V2 (ISO 7963) are the most widely used in US-NDT. Due their characteristics, V1 and V2 RSB can be classified as Reference Material, so that they can be certified, resulting in a Certified Reference Material (CRM). This paper describes technical aspects of a V1 and V2 RSB certification, based on ISO 2400, ISO 7963, EN 12223 and EN 27963. According the certification protocol established at Inmetro's Laboratory of Ultrasound, RSB relevant dimensions were determined through calibration. Ultrasound velocity was assessed by using a scope and a signal generator at 5 MHz. Uncertainties were determined including measurement accuracy under repeatability conditions. A complete uncertainty budget was determined for both parameters. Within the specimens used, velocities were in accordance with specifications 5920 ± 30 m/s.

  7. Pain thresholds, supra-threshold pain and lidocaine sensitivity in patients with erythromelalgia, including the I848Tmutation in NaV 1.7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helås, T; Sagafos, D; Kleggetveit, I P; Quiding, H; Jönsson, B; Segerdahl, M; Zhang, Z; Salter, H; Schmelz, M; Jørum, E

    2017-09-01

    Nociceptive thresholds and supra-threshold pain ratings as well as their reduction upon local injection with lidocaine were compared between healthy subjects and patients with erythromelalgia (EM). Lidocaine (0.25, 0.50, 1.0 or 10 mg/mL) or placebo (saline) was injected intradermally in non-painful areas of the lower arm, in a randomized, double-blind manner, to test the effect on dynamic and static mechanical sensitivity, mechanical pain sensitivity, thermal thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain sensitivity. Heat pain thresholds and pain ratings to supra-threshold heat stimulation did not differ between EM-patients (n = 27) and controls (n = 25), neither did the dose-response curves for lidocaine. Only the subgroup of EM-patients with mutations in sodium channel subunits NaV 1.7, 1.8 or 1.9 (n = 8) had increased lidocaine sensitivity for supra-threshold heat stimuli, contrasting lower sensitivity to strong mechanical stimuli. This pattern was particularly clear in the two patients carrying the NaV 1.7 I848T mutations in whom lidocaine's hyperalgesic effect on mechanical pain sensitivity contrasted more effective heat analgesia. Heat pain thresholds are not sensitized in EM patients, even in those with gain-of-function mutations in NaV 1.7. Differential lidocaine sensitivity was overt only for noxious stimuli in the supra-threshold range suggesting that sensitized supra-threshold encoding is important for the clinical pain phenotype in EM in addition to lower activation threshold. Intracutaneous lidocaine dose-dependently blocked nociceptive sensations, but we did not identify EM patients with particular high lidocaine sensitivity that could have provided valuable therapeutic guidance. Acute pain thresholds and supra-threshold heat pain in controls and patients with erythromelalgia do not differ and have the same lidocaine sensitivity. Acute heat pain thresholds even in EM patients with the NaV 1.7 I848T mutation are normal and only nociceptor sensitivity

  8. Changes in Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression precede the occurrence of substantial fibrosis in calcineurin-induced murine cardiac hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda S C Fontes

    Full Text Available In mice, the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin A (CnA induces a transcriptional pathway leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Interestingly, induction of CnA has been frequently noticed in human hypertrophic and failing hearts. Independently, the arrhythmia vulnerability of such hearts has been regularly associated with remodeling of parameters determining electrical conduction (expression level of connexin43 (Cx43 and NaV1.5, connective tissue architecture, for which the precise molecular basis and sequence of events is still unknown. Recently, we observed reduced Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression in 4-week old mouse hearts, overexpressing a constitutively active form of CnA (MHC-CnA model, but the order of events is still unknown. Therefore, three key parameters of conduction (Cx43, NaV1.5 and connective tissue expression were characterized in MHC-CnA ventricles versus wild-type (WT during postnatal development on a weekly basis. At postnatal week 1, CnA overexpression induced cardiac hypertrophy in MHC-CnA. Moreover, protein and RNA levels of both Cx43 and NaV1.5 were reduced by at least 50% as compared to WT. Cx43 immunoreactive signal was reduced at week 2 in MHC-CnA. At postnatal week 3, Cx43 was less phosphorylated and RNA level of Cx43 normalized to WT values, although the protein level was still reduced. Additionally, MHC-CnA hearts displayed substantial fibrosis relative to WT, which was accompanied by increased RNA levels for genes previously associated with fibrosis such as Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Tgfb1, Ctgf, Timp1 and microRNA miR-21. In MHC-CnA, reduction in Cx43 and NaV1.5 expression thus coincided with overexpression of CnA and hypertrophy development and preceded significant presence of fibrosis. At postnatal week 4 the alterations in conductional parameters observed in the MHC-CnA model lead to abnormal conduction and arrhythmias, similar to those observed in cardiac remodeling in heart failure patients. The MHC

  9. Molecular Surface of JZTX-V (β-Theraphotoxin-Cj2a Interacting with Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Subtype NaV1.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Luo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs; NaV1.1–NaV1.9 have been proven to be critical in controlling the function of excitable cells, and human genetic evidence shows that aberrant function of these channels causes channelopathies, including epilepsy, arrhythmia, paralytic myotonia, and pain. The effects of peptide toxins, especially those isolated from spider venom, have shed light on the structure–function relationship of these channels. However, most of these toxins have not been analyzed in detail. In particular, the bioactive faces of these toxins have not been determined. Jingzhaotoxin (JZTX-V (also known as β-theraphotoxin-Cj2a is a 29-amino acid peptide toxin isolated from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao. JZTX-V adopts an inhibitory cysteine knot (ICK motif and has an inhibitory effect on voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels. Previous experiments have shown that JZTX-V has an inhibitory effect on TTX-S and TTX-R sodium currents on rat DRG cells with IC50 values of 27.6 and 30.2 nM, respectively, and is able to shift the activation and inactivation curves to the depolarizing and the hyperpolarizing direction, respectively. Here, we show that JZTX-V has a much stronger inhibitory effect on NaV1.4, the isoform of voltage-gated sodium channels predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle cells, with an IC50 value of 5.12 nM, compared with IC50 values of 61.7–2700 nM for other heterologously expressed NaV1 subtypes. Furthermore, we investigated the bioactive surface of JZTX-V by alanine-scanning the effect of toxin on NaV1.4 and demonstrate that the bioactive face of JZTX-V is composed of three hydrophobic (W5, M6, and W7 and two cationic (R20 and K22 residues. Our results establish that, consistent with previous assumptions, JZTX-V is a Janus-faced toxin which may be a useful tool for the further investigation of the structure and function of sodium channels.

  10. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaginal lining gets thinner, dryer, and less elas- tic. Vaginal dryness may cause pain during sexual intercourse . ... when a woman starts taking hormone therapy. Some research suggests that for women who start combined therapy ...

  11. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  12. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  13. Electronic structure, magnetic properties and electrical resistivity of the Fe(2)V(1-x)Ti(x)Al Heusler alloys: experiment and calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebarski, A; Goraus, J; Deniszczyk, J; Skoczeń, L

    2006-11-22

    The aim of this work is to investigate electronic structure, magnetic properties and electrical resistivity of Fe(2)V(1-x)Ti(x)Al Heusler alloys. Numerical calculations give a pseudogap at the Fermi level for the majority-spin band of Fe(2)TiAl and a magnetic moment larger than 0.9 μ(B), whereas the ground state of Fe(2)VAl is calculated as a nonmagnetic semimetal with a very low total density of states at the Fermi level. In our calculations the remaining alloys of the Fe(2)V(1-x)Ti(x)Al series are nonmagnetic for xmagnetic for 0.1magnetic moment μ of the series of Fe(2)V(1-x)Ti(x)Al compounds scales with the number of valence electrons and fits well to the Slater-Pauling curve. We also present a study of the electronic transport properties and magnetic susceptibility. The resistivities ρ(T) of Fe(2)VAl and Fe(2)V(0.9)Ti(0.1)Al are large and exhibit a negative temperature coefficient dρ/dT of the resistivity between 2 and 300 K. Below 20 K, ρ(T) also shows an activated character. The magnetic susceptibility of Fe(2)VAl and Fe(2)V(0.9)Ti(0.1)Al shows a maximum at ∼2 K which could reflect either the disorder effect or the hybridization gap, characteristic of Kondo insulators.

  14. IgE to recombinant allergens Api m 1, Ves v 1, and Ves v 5 distinguish double sensitization from crossreaction in venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, U; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Hausmann, O; Helbling, A

    2012-08-01

    Diagnostic tests in patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy are frequently positive to venoms of both honey bee and wasp (Vespula). Component-resolved analysis with recombinant species-specific major allergens (rSSMA) may help to distinguish true double sensitization from crossreactivity. Included were 121 patients with systemic allergic reactions to Hymenoptera stings, 76 with double positivity of serum-specific IgE (sIgE) to both venoms, 45 with single positivity to bee or wasp venom, and 32 controls without history of systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings and no sIgE to whole venoms. In venom-allergic patients and controls, sIgE to rSSMA Api m 1 of bee venom and to Ves v 1 and Ves v 5 of wasp venom were tested by ImmunoCAP. Only 47% of 76 patients with double positivity to whole venoms reacted also to rSSMA of both species. Specificity of sIgE to the 3 rSSMA was very high, with no sIgE to rSSMA of the other species in single-positive venom-allergic patients and only one control with low sIgE to Ves v 1. All wasp-allergic single-positive patients had sIgE to Ves v 5 and/or Ves v 1, and 78.3% of single-positive bee venom-allergic patients had sIgE to Api m 1. Specificity of sIgE to rSSMA of both species is excellent. Sensitivity of sIgE to rSSMA was optimal for wasp venom. Sensitivity of bee venom Api m 1 could be increased by adding rSSMA of other important bee venom allergens. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Effect of Glycosylation on an Immunodominant Region in the V1V2 Variable Domain of the HIV-1 Envelope gp120 Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy glycosylation of the envelope (Env surface subunit, gp120, is a key adaptation of HIV-1; however, the precise effects of glycosylation on the folding, conformation and dynamics of this protein are poorly understood. Here we explore the patterns of HIV-1 Env gp120 glycosylation, and particularly the enrichment in glycosylation sites proximal to the disulfide linkages at the base of the surface-exposed variable domains. To dissect the influence of glycans on the conformation these regions, we focused on an antigenic peptide fragment from a disulfide bridge-bounded region spanning the V1 and V2 hyper-variable domains of HIV-1 gp120. We used replica exchange molecular dynamics (MD simulations to investigate how glycosylation influences its conformation and stability. Simulations were performed with and without N-linked glycosylation at two sites that are highly conserved across HIV-1 isolates (N156 and N160; both are contacts for recognition by V1V2-targeted broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. Glycosylation stabilized the pre-existing conformations of this peptide construct, reduced its propensity to adopt other secondary structures, and provided resistance against thermal unfolding. Simulations performed in the context of the Env trimer also indicated that glycosylation reduces flexibility of the V1V2 region, and provided insight into glycan-glycan interactions in this region. These stabilizing effects were influenced by a combination of factors, including the presence of a disulfide bond between the Cysteines at 131 and 157, which increased the formation of beta-strands. Together, these results provide a mechanism for conservation of disulfide linkage proximal glycosylation adjacent to the variable domains of gp120 and begin to explain how this could be exploited to enhance the immunogenicity of those regions. These studies suggest that glycopeptide immunogens can be designed to stabilize the most relevant Env conformations to

  16. Energy and information flows in biological systems: Bioenergy transduction of V1-ATPase rotary motor and dynamics of thermodynamic entropy in information flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamato, Ichiro; Murata, Takeshi; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2017-11-01

    We classify research fields in biology with respect to flows of materials, energy, and information. We investigate energy transducing mechanisms in biology, using as a representative the typical molecular rotary motor V1-ATPase from a bacterium Enterococcus hirae. The structures of several intermediates of the rotary motor are described and the molecular mechanism of the motor converting chemical energy into mechanical energy is discussed. Comments and considerations on the information flows in biology, especially on the thermodynamic entropy in quantum physical and biological systems, are presented in section 3 in a biologist friendly manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cathare2 V1.3E post-test computations of SPE-1 and SPE-2 experiments at PMK-NVH facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belliard, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Laugier, E. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches en Securite

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the first CATHARE2 V1.3E simulations of the SPE-2 transients at PMK-NVH loop. Concerning the SPE-1 and the SPE-2 experimentations at PMK-NVH, it contains a description of the facilities and the transient, as well as different conditions of use. The paper includes also a presentation of the CATHARE2 model and different type of computation, such as the steady state computation or SPE-1 and SPE-2 transient (TEC). 4 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Selective expression of a persistent tetrodotoxin-resistant Na+ current and NaV1.9 subunit in myenteric sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugiero, François; Mistry, Mohini; Sage, Dominique; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G; Crest, Marcel; Clerc, Nadine; Delmas, Patrick; Gola, Maurice

    2003-04-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) currents play critical roles in shaping electrogenesis in neurons. Here, we have identified a TTX-resistant Na(+) current (TTX-R I(Na)) in duodenum myenteric neurons of guinea pig and rat and have sought evidence regarding the molecular identity of the channel producing this current from the expression of Na(+) channel alpha subunits and the biophysical and pharmacological properties of TTX-R I(Na). Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from in situ neurons revealed the presence of a voltage-gated Na(+) current that was highly resistant to TTX (IC(50), approximately 200 microm) and selectively distributed in myenteric sensory neurons but not in interneurons and motor neurons. TTX-R I(Na) activated slowly in response to depolarization and exhibited a threshold for activation at -50 mV. V(1/2) values of activation and steady-state inactivation were -32 and -31 mV in the absence of fluoride, respectively, which, as predicted from the window current, generated persistent currents. TTX-R I(Na) also had prominent ultraslow inactivation, which turns off 50% of the conductance at rest (-60 mV). Substituting CsF for CsCl in the intracellular solution shifted the voltage-dependent parameters of TTX-R I(Na) leftward by approximately 20 mV. Under these conditions, TTX-R I(Na) had voltage-dependent properties similar to those reported previously for NaN/Na(V)1.9 in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Consistent with this, reverse transcription-PCR, single-cell profiling, and immunostaining experiments indicated that Na(V)1.9 transcripts and subunits, but not Na(V)1.8, were expressed in the enteric nervous system and restricted to myenteric sensory neurons. TTX-R I(Na) may play an important role in regulating subthreshold electrogenesis and boosting synaptic stimuli, thereby conferring distinct integrative properties to myenteric sensory neurons.

  19. Geologic Map of the Snegurochka Planitia Quadrangle (V-1): Implications for the Volcanic History of the North Polar Region of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, D. M.; Head, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    Geologic mapping of Snegurochka Planitia (V-1) reveals a complex stratigraphy of tectonic and volcanic features that can provide insight into the geologic history of Venus and Archean Earth [1,2], including 1) episodes of both localized crustal uplift and mantle downwelling, 2) shifts from local to regional volcanic activity, and 3) a shift back to local volcanic activity. We present our interpretations of the volcanic history of the region surrounding the north pole of Venus and explore how analysis of new data support our interpretations

  20. Evidence of Gate Voltage Oscillations during Short Circuit of Commercial 1.7 kV/ 1 kA IGBT Power Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigosa, Paula Diaz; Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evidence of critical gate voltage oscillations in 1.7 kV/1 kA Insulated-Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) power modules under short circuit conditions. A 6 kA/1.1 kV Non-Destructive Test (NDT) set up for repeatable short circuit tests has been built with a 40 nH stray...... inductance. A large amount of measurements have been acquired on commercial IGBT modules evidencing gate voltage oscillations under short circuit conditions. To tackle this problem, similar tests have been performed on a modified version of the same modules with two parallel sections and one single section...

  1. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  2. Phisherman v 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-10-15

    Phisherman is an online software tool that was created to help experimenters study phishing. It can potentially be re-purposed to run other human studies. Phisherman enables studies to be run online, so that users can participate from their own computers. This means that experimenters can get data from subjects in their natural settings. Alternatively, an experimenter can also run the app online in a lab-based setting, if that is desired. The software enables the online deployment of a study that is comprised of three main parts: (1) a consent page, (2) a survey, and (3) an identification task, with instruction/transition screens between each part, allowing the experimenter to provide the user with instructions and messages. Upon logging in, the subject is taken to the permission page, where they agree to or do not agree to take part in the study. If the subject agrees to participate, then the software randomly chooses between doing the survey first (and identification task second) or the identification task first (and survey second). This is to balance possible order effects in the data. Procedurally, in the identification task, the software shows the stimuli to the subject, and asks if she thinks it is a phish (yes/no) and how confident she is about her answer. The subject is given 5 levels of certainty to select from, labeled "low" (1), to "medium" (3), to "high" (5), with the option of picking a level between low and medium (2), and between medium and high (4). After selecting his/her confidence level, then the "Next" button activates, allowing a user to move to the next email. The software saves a given subject's progress in the identification task, so that she may log in and out of the site. The consent page is a space for the experimenter to provide the subject with human studies board /internal review board information, and to formally consent to participate in the study. The survey is a space for the experimenter to provide questions and spaces for the users to input answers (allowing both multiple-choice and free-answer options). Phisherman includes administrative pages for managing the stimuli and users. This includes a tool for the experimenter to create, preview, edit, delete (if desired), and manage stimuli (emails). The stimuli may include pictures (uploaded to an appropriate folder) and links, for realism. The software includes a safety feature that prevents the user from going to any link location or opening a file/image. Instead of re-directing the subject's browser, the software provides a pop-up box with the URL location of where the user would have gone. Another administrative page may be used to create fake subject accounts for testing the software prior to deployment, as well as to delete subject accounts when necessary. Data from the experiment can be downloaded from another administrative page.

  3. crm_v1.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC's 3 arc-second U.S. Coastal Relief Model (CRM) provides the first comprehensive view of the U.S. coastal zone, integrating offshore bathymetry with land...

  4. ACES CONTINUOUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. During August, 2002, ACES researchers conducted overflights of...

  5. ACES TRIGGERED DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was Based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. ACES researchers in August 2002 conducted overflights of...

  6. ACES TRIGGERED DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. During August 2002, ACES researchers conducted overflights of...

  7. ACES TIMING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was Based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. ACES researchers in August 2002 conducted overflights of...

  8. ACES LOG DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was Based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. ACES researchers in August 2002 conducted overflights of...

  9. ACES CONTINUOUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was Based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. ACES researchers in August 2002 conducted overflights of...

  10. ROSSTEP v1.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-07-21

    ROSSTEP is a system for sequentially running roslaunch, rosnode, and bash scripts automatically, for use in Robot Operating System (ROS) applications. The system consists of YAML files which define actions and conditions. A python file parses the code and runs actions sequentially using the sys and subprocess python modules. Between actions, it uses various ROS-based code to check conditions required to proceed, and only moves on to the next action when all the necessary conditions have been met. Included is rosstep-creator, a QT application designed to create the YAML files required for ROSSTEP. It has a nearly one-to-one mapping from interface elements to YAML output, and serves as a convenient GUI for working with the ROSSTEP system.

  11. GRIP CLOUD MICROPHYSICS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Cloud Microphysics dataset was collected during the GRIP campaign from three probes: the Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS), the...

  12. ATF2 Proposal v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, H; Logatchev, P V; Podgorny, Fedor; Telnov, Valery I; Angal-Kalinin, Deepa; Appleby, Robert; Jones, James; Kalinin, Alexander; Napoly, Olivier; Payet, Jacques; Braun, Hans Heinrich; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank; Barlow, Roger J; Bailey, Ian Richard; Jenner, Leo; Jones, Roger; Kourevlev, German Yu; Walker, Nick; Takahasi, Tohru; Gao, Jie; Liu Wei Bin; Pei Guo Xi; Wang Jiu Qing; Delerue, Nicolas; Dixit, Sudhir; Howell, David Francis; Reichold, Armin; Agapov, Ilya V; Blair, Grahame A; Boorman, Gary; Carter, John; Driouichi, Chafik; Price, Michael T; Araki, Sakae; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Kanazawa, Ken Ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kume, Tatsuya; Kuriki, Masao; Kuroda, Shigeru; Masuzawa, Mika; Naito, Takashi; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Toge, Nobu; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Yamaoka, Hiroshi; Yokoya, Kaoru; Yoshihisa, Iwashita; Mihara, Takanori; Bambade, Philip; Wolski, Andrzej; Gronberg, Jeff; Takashi Boogert, Stewart; Lyapin, A; Malton, Stephen; Miller, David J; Kumada, Masayuki; Danagulyan, S; Torrence, Eric; Choi Jinh Yuk; Huang Jung Yun; Sik Kang Heung; Kim, E S; Kim Seungh Wan; Soo Ko In; Burrows, P N; Christian, Glenn B; Clarke, Christine; Hartin, Anthony F; Dabiri-Khah, Hamid; Molloy, Stephen; Bane, Karl Leopold Freitag; Brachmann, Axel; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas W; Nelson, Janice; Nosochkov, Yuri; Phinney, Nan; Torino, Mauro; Pivi, Francesco; Raubenheimer, T O; Ross, Marc; Ruland, R E; Seryi, Andrei; Spencer, Cherrill M; Tenenbaum, P G; Woodley, Mark; Komamiya, Sachio; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Suehara, T

    2005-01-01

    Since the ICFA decision on the choice of technology, a world-wide collaboration on the design of the ILC has rapidly progressed. The formation of the GDE will accelerate the work towards a final design. An important technical challenge is obviously the high gradient acceleration but what is similarly challenging is the collision of extremely small beams of a few nanometer size. The latter challenge has three distinct issues: creating small emittance beams, preserving the emittance during acceleration and transport, and focusing the beams to nanometers. Most studies have been done using computer simulations but many issues still remain that require experimental verification. KEK-ATF was built to create small emittance beams, and succeeded in obtaining an emittance that almost satisfies the ILC requirements. In this proposal we present a project, ATF2, which addresses the third issue, namely the focusing of the beam into nanometer spot.ybr> In the longer term, the ATF2 project would also provide invaluable inpu...

  13. ACES LOG DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. During August 2002, ACES researchers conducted overflights of...

  14. GRIP CAMPAIGN REPORTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Campaign Reports dataset consists of various reports filed by scientists during the GRIP campaign which took place 8/15/2010 - 9/30/2010; however, several...

  15. GRIP CAMPAIGN REPORTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Campaign Reports dataset consists of various reports filed by the scientists during the GRIP campaign which took place 8/15/2010 - 9/30/2010; however...

  16. Henson v1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Modern scientific and engineering simulations track the time evolution of billions of elements. For such large runs, storing most time steps for later analysis is not a viable strategy. It is far more efficient to analyze the simulation data while it is still in memory. The developers present a novel design for running multiple codes in situ: using coroutines and position-independent executables they enable cooperative multitasking between simulation and analysis, allowing the same executables to post-process simulation output, as well as to process it on the fly, both in situ and in transit. They present Henson, an implementation of our design, and illustrate its versatility by tackling analysis tasks with different computational requirements. Our design differs significantly from the existing frameworks and offers an efficient and robust approach to integrating multiple codes on modern supercomputers. The presented techniques can also be integrated into other in situ frameworks.

  17. Poblano v 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-12-11

    Poblano is a Matlab toolbox of large-scale algorithms for nonlinear optimization. The algorithms in Poblano require only first-order derivative information (e.g., gradients for scalar-valued objective functions), and therefore can scale to very large problems [6].Poblano is a set of general purpose methods for solving unconstrained nonlinear optimization methods. It has been applied to standard test problems covering a range of application areas. The driving application for Poblano development has been tensor decompositions in data analysis applications (bibliometric analysis, social network analysis, chemometrics, etc.) [1].

  18. ACES TIMING DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. During August or 2002, ACES researchers overflights of...

  19. CAMEX-4 AEROSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 Aerosonde dataset contains temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure measurements collected to study the boundary layer below levels where...

  20. GRIP CLOUD MICROPHYSICS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of data collected during the GRIP campaign from three probes: the Cloud, Aerosol, and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS), the Precipitation...

  1. CAMEX-4 AEROSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Aerosonde is an unmanned aerial vehicle with a wingspan of a 2.9 meters (~9 feet) weighing approximately 14 Kg (~31 lbs). Carrying a payload of air pressure,...

  2. Specialization of pyramidal cell structure in the visual areas V1, V2 and V3 of the South American rodent, Dasyprocta primnolopha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Elston, Alejandra; Freire, Marco Aurelio M; Gomes Leal, Wallace; Dias, Ivanira Amaral; Pereira, Antonio; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam W

    2006-08-23

    Marked phenotypic variation has been reported in pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. These extent and systematic nature of these specializations suggest that they are important for specialized aspects of cortical processing. However, it remains unknown as to whether regional variations in the pyramidal cell phenotype are unique to primates or if they are widespread amongst mammalian species. In the present study we determined the receptive fields of neurons in striate and extrastriate visual cortex, and quantified pyramidal cell structure in these cortical regions, in the diurnal, large-brained, South American rodent Dasyprocta primnolopha. We found evidence for a first, second and third visual area (V1, V2 and V3, respectively) forming a lateral progression from the occipital pole to the temporal pole. Pyramidal cell structure became increasingly more complex through these areas, suggesting that regional specialization in pyramidal cell phenotype is not restricted to primates. However, cells in V1, V2 and V3 of the agouti were considerably more spinous than their counterparts in primates, suggesting different evolutionary and developmental influences may act on cortical microcircuitry in rodents and primates.

  3. Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Immunogens Derived from an Elite Neutralizer Elicit Cross-Reactive V1V2 Antibodies and Low Potency Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jolene; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D. Noah

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated four gp140 Envelope protein vaccine immunogens that were derived from an elite neutralizer, subject VC10042, whose plasma was able to potently neutralize a wide array of genetically distinct HIV-1 isolates. We sought to determine whether soluble Envelope proteins derived from the viruses circulating in VC10042 could be used as immunogens to elicit similar neutralizing antibody responses by vaccination. Each gp140 was tested in its trimeric and monomeric forms, and we evaluated two gp140 trimer vaccine regimens in which adjuvant was supplied at all four immunizations or at only the first two immunizations. Interestingly, all four Envelope immunogens elicited high titers of cross-reactive antibodies that recognize the variable regions V1V2 and are potentially similar to antibodies linked with a reduced risk of HIV-1 acquisition in the RV144 vaccine trial. Two of the four immunogens elicited neutralizing antibody responses that neutralized a wide array of HIV-1 isolates from across genetic clades, but those responses were of very low potency. There were no significant differences in the responses elicited by trimers or monomers, nor was there a significant difference between the two adjuvant regimens. Our study identified two promising Envelope immunogens that elicited anti-V1V2 antibodies and broad, but low potency, neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:24466285

  4. Mature seeds for in vitro sanitation of the Grapevine leafroll associated virus (GLRaV-1andGLRaV-3 from grape (Vitis vinifera L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Peiró

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of old grapevine varieties is important since they are adapted to specific climate conditions and may carry genes interesting to breeders. As virus infection is common in grapevine varieties, the use of virus free materials is of great importance. In this work, we used somatic embryogenesis for the sanitation of GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 viruses that were found after analyzing the putative presence of the five most common, economically important grape viruses by real-time multiplex RT-PCR in the old cultivar “Grumet Negre”. Unopened and opened inflorescences, fecundated ovaries, and, also, mature seeds were used as starting explants. Explants were cultured on plates with two embryogenesis induction media (Nitsch & McCown Woody plant medium that contained the growth regulator thidiazuron and differed in their salt and vitamin compositions. One half of each kind of explant was cut prior to being cultured. After five months of culture, embryos had only developed from seeds that were cut previous to sowing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that mature seeds have been used for inducing embryogenesis in grape. A total of 42% of the embryos transferred to tubes for germination regenerated into normal plantlets. The absence of both the GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 viruses in all regenerated plants was confirmed by real-time uniplex RT-PCR. So, this protocol can be used for sanitation and also for micropropagation.

  5. Identificando Hallazgos de Mejora en Pymes de TI Utilizando un Modelo Ontológico para CMMI-DEV v1.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guadalupe Uribe Dévora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uno de los principales requisitos que deben cumplir las pymes de desarrollo de software es adoptar un estándar o modelo para garantizar la calidad de sus productos. Sin embargo, este tipo de organización, carece o no tienen procesos bien definidos. En este contexto implementar un modelo o estándar de calidad para estas organizaciones enfrenta algunos obstáculos como: gran desconocimiento sobre éstos, su adopción representa una curva de aprendizaje prolongado, las certificaciones de estos modelos o estándares para las pymes y su personal representan costos muy elevados. Por lo tanto, en este artículo se presenta una herramienta ontológica basada en el Modelo CMMI-DEV v1.3. El objetivo principal es proveer a las pymes de una herramienta que contraste sus procesos actuales obtenidos a través de un método para la extracción del conocimiento tácito versus los procesos de CMMI-DEV v1.3 para detectar posibles hallazgos de mejora e implementar mejoras en sus procesos organizacionales.

  6. Vitual screening and binding mode elucidation of curcumin analogues on Cyclooxygenase-2 using AYO_COX2_V1.1 protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulatsari, E.; Mumpuni, E.; Herfian, A.

    2017-05-01

    Curcumin is yellow colored phenolic compounds contained in Curcuma longa. Curcumin is known to have biological activities as anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, and anti-infective agent [1]. Synthesis of curcumin analogue compounds has been done and some of them had biological activity like curcumin. In this research, the virtual screening of curcumin analogue compounds has been conducted. The purpose of this research was to determine the activity of these compounds as selective Cyclooxygenase-2inhibitors in in-silico. Binding mode elucidation was made by active and inactive representative compounds to see the interaction of the amino acids in the binding site of the compounds. This research used AYO_COX2_V.1.1, a structure-based virtual screening protocol (SBVS) that has been validated by Mumpuni E et al, 2014 [2]. AYO_COX2_V.1.1 protocol using a variety of integrated applications such as SPORES, PLANTS, BKchem, OpenBabel and PyMOL. The results of virtual screening conducted on 49 curcumin analogue compounds obtained 8 compounds with 4 active amino acid residues (GLY340, ILE503, PHE343, and PHE367) that were considered active as COX-2 inhibitor.

  7. Enhanced Thermochromic Properties and Solar-Heat Shielding Ability of W(x)V(1-x)O2 Thin Films with Ag Nanowires Capping Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Li; Miao, Lei; Liu, Cheng Yan; Wang, Hai Long; Tanemura, Sakae; Sun, Li Xian; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Jian Hua

    2015-11-01

    Considerable efforts have been made to shift the phase transition temperature of metal-doped vanadium dioxide (VO2) films nearer the ambient temperature while maintain the excellent thermochromic properties simultaneously. Here, we describe a facile and economic solution-based method to fabricate W-doped VO2 (V(1-x)W(x)O2) thin films with excellent thermochromic properties for the application of smart windows. The substitutional doping of tungsten atoms notably reduces the phase transition temperature to the ambient temperature and retains the excellent thermochromic property. Furthermore, Ag nanowires (NWs) are employed as capping layers to effectively decrease the thermal emissivity from 0.833 to 0.603, while the original near infrared region (NIR) modulation ability is not severely affected. Besides, the Ag NWs layers further depress the phase transition temperature as well as the hysteresis loop width, which is important to the fenestration application. These solution-grown Ag NWs/V(1-x)W(x)O2 thin films exhibit excellent solar modulation ability, narrowed hysteresis loop width as well as low thermal emissivity, which provide a promising perspective into the practical application of VO2-based smart windows.

  8. Effects of grain size on high temperature creep of fine grained, solution and dispersion hardened V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuno, T. [Ehime Univerisity, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kurishita, H., E-mail: kurishi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nagasaka, T.; Nishimura, A.; Muroga, T. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Oroshi-cho 322-6, Tok, Gifu 292 (Japan); Sakamoto, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Nakai, K. [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime Univerisity, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Matsuo, S.; Arakawa, H. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Creep resistance is the major concern of vanadium and its alloys for fusion reactor structural applications. In order to elucidate the effects of grain size on the creep behavior of solution and dispersion strengthened vanadium alloys, V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC specimens with fine grain sizes from 0.58 to 1.45 {mu}m were prepared by mechanical alloying and HIP without any plastic working and tested at 1073 K and 250 MPa in vacuum. It is shown that the creep resistance of V-1.6Y-8W-0.8TiC depends strongly on grain size and increases with increasing grain size: The creep life for the grain size of 1.45 {mu}m is almost one order longer than that of 0.58 {mu}m, and about two orders longer than that of V-4Cr-4Ti (NIFS-Heat 2) although the grain size of V-4Cr-4Ti is as large as 17.8 {mu}m. The observed creep behavior is discussed in terms of grain size effects on dislocation glide and grain boundary sliding.

  9. Physiological Response of Field Grown Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Marzemino to Grapevine Leafroll-Associated Virus (GLRaV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bertamini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The physiological response of field grown grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Marzemino plants to grapevine leafroll-associated virus (GLRaV-1 was studied. Changes in photosynthetic pigments and in photosynthetic activity were investigated. GLRaV-1 considerably decreased the leaf net photosynthetic rate (Pn, stomatal conductance (gs and the transpiration rate (E in grapevine leaves, and also strongly reduced pigments, soluble proteins, ribulose-1,5- bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC and nitrate reductase activity. In isolated thylakoids, the virus strongly inhibited whole-chain and photosystem (PS II activity, while PSI activity was only marginally inhibited. The artificial exogenous electron donors diphenyl carbazide, manganese chloride (MnCl2 and hydroxylamine (NH2OH did not restore lost PSII activity to virus-infected leaves. Chlorophyll fluorescence suggested that the inhibition of primary light reactions was a major effect of virus infection. Immunological studies showed that D1 protein levels of the PSII reaction centre were significantly lower in virus-infected leaves. It is concluded that the decreases in photosynthetic pigments and photosynthetic activities caused by the virus strongly impair photosynthesis in Marzemino grapevine plants.

  10. Mature seeds for in vitro sanitation of the Grapevine leafroll associated virus (GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peiró, R.; Gammoudi, N.; Yuste, A.; Olmos, A.; Gisbert, C.

    2015-07-01

    The conservation of old grapevine varieties is important since they are adapted to specific climate conditions and may carry genes interesting to breeders. As virus infection is common in grapevine varieties, the use of virus free materials is of great importance. In this work, we used somatic embryogenesis for the sanitation of GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 viruses that were found after analyzing the putative presence of the five most common, economically important grape viruses by real-time multiplex RT-PCR in the old cultivar “Grumet Negre”. Unopened and opened inflorescences, fecundated ovaries, and, also, mature seeds were used as starting explants. Explants were cultured on plates with two embryogenesis induction media (Nitsch & McCown Woody plant medium) that contained the growth regulator thidiazuron and differed in their salt and vitamin compositions. One half of each kind of explant was cut prior to being cultured. After five months of culture, embryos had only developed from seeds that were cut previous to sowing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that mature seeds have been used for inducing embryogenesis in grape. A total of 42% of the embryos transferred to tubes for germination regenerated into normal plantlets. The absence of both the GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3 viruses in all regenerated plants was confirmed by real-time uniplex RT-PCR. So, this protocol can be used for sanitation and also for micropropagation. (Author)

  11. Effect of verapamil and lidocaine on TRPM and NaV1.9 gene expressions in renal ischemia-reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusmez, D; Cengiz, B; Yumrutas, O; Demir, T; Oztuzcu, S; Demiryurek, S; Tutar, E; Bayraktar, R; Bulut, A; Simsek, H; Daglı, S Nur; Kılıc, T; Bagcı, C

    2014-01-01

    To determine effects on calcium and sodium channels of Ca(2+) and Na(+) channel blockers in the present study, expression levels of TRPM1, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM6, TRPM7, TRPM8, and NaV1.9 genes were evaluated in kidney tissues after induced ischemia-reperfusion. Forty albino Wistar male rats were equally divided into 4 groups as follows: group I: control group (n = 10), group II: ischemia group (60 minutes of ischemia + 48 hours of reperfusion; n = 10), group III: ischemia (60 minutes of ischemia + 48 hours of reperfusion) + calcium channel blocker (n = 8), group IV: ischemia (60 minutes of ischemia + 48 hours of reperfusion) + sodium channel blocker (n = 8). When compared to ischemia group expression levels of TRPM2, TRPM4, TRPM6, and NaV1.9 in Ca(2+) and Na(+) channel blocker groups were increased, whereas that of TRPM7 was decreased. However, expression levels of TRPM1, TRPM3, TRPM5, and TRPM8 were not determined in kidney tissue. Histologically, the Ca(2+) channel blocker verapamil and the Na(+) channel blocker lidocaine inhibited the cell death in kidney tissue compared to control. Our study suggested that verapamil and lidocaine significantly reduce the degree of ischemia-reperfusion injury due to effects to TRPM and Nav1.9 genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. First high-resolution FTIR study of the v1 = v4 = 1 rovibrational state of 14NF3 near 1523 cm-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmimou, Siham; Msahal, Hicham; Najib, Hamid

    2010-03-01

    The v 1 + v 4 (E, ν0 = 1523.0407 cm-1) perpendicular band of the oblate symmetric top 14NF3 has been studied by FTIR spectroscopy with a resolution of 2.5 × 10-3 cm-1. In total, 1885 rovibrational transitions up to K max = 70 = J max have been assigned. Due to the k(Δℓ = 0, Δk = ±6) interaction (h 3 = 2.22 × 10-13 cm-1) within the kℓ = +4 sublevel, large A+/A- doublets were identified from J = 24 to J = 33 and large A +/A - doublets due to ℓ(Δℓ = ±2, Δk = ±2) rotational resonance (q 4 = 1.730 × 10-3 cm-1) within the kℓ = +1 level were also observed, while the effect of the expected ℓ(Δℓ = ±2, Δk = ∓ 4) interaction was not detected on the ΔK = -1 transitions owing to their vanishing intensity. The same D-reduction Hamiltonian model taking into account intravibrational resonances, recently performed for the v4 = 1 (E, ν0 = 493.4227 cm-1) state of 14NF3, was employed. Assuming the v1 = v4 = 1 vibrational state as isolated, the nonzero weighted experimental data were fitted to 26 free parameters with a standard deviation better than the spectral resolution. The experimental anharmonicity constant x 14 = -2.383 249 (49) cm-1 was determined.

  13. Stress release and defect occurrence in V1-xFe x films upon hydrogen loading: H-induced superabundant vacancies, movement and creation of dislocations

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen-induced elastic/plastic deformation was studied in V 1-xFex (x = 0.02-0.08) films with thicknesses between 10 and 400 nm and prepared at different temperatures. The combination of several in situ techniques such as X-ray diffraction, acoustic emission, electromotive force and substrate curvature techniques allows sensitive studies of defects generated in these thin films. As well as conventional out-of-plane linear elastic film expansion and in-plane compressive stress increase during hydrogen absorption, the investigations uncovered new details: as soon as hydrogen predominately solved in interstitial lattice sites, discrete stress relaxation (DSR) events were detected, after which the film continued to behave in a linear elastic manner. DSRs were interpreted by uncorrelated movement of pre-existing dislocations. Particularly in the case of films deposited at higher temperatures, in-plane tensile stress was found at very small H concentrations of less than 0.005 H/V. Upon further H uptake, this turned into compressive stress. However, this stress increase differed from theoretical predictions. This behavior is explained by the generation of superabundant vacancies. Dislocation emission and plastic deformation are linked to the formation of the hydride phase in the V1-xFex films. © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Uniaxial creep behavior of nanostructured, solution and dispersion hardened V-1.4Y-7W-9Mo-0.7TiC with different grain sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, T. [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kurishita, H., E-mail: kurishi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Furuno, T. [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Nagasaka, T. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 292 (Japan); Kobayashi, S.; Nakai, K. [Department of Materials Science and Biotechnology, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Matsuo, S.; Arakawa, H. [International Research Center for Nuclear Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishimura, A.; Muroga, T. [Fusion Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki, Gifu 292 (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The major concern for nanostructured V is poor creep resistance due to grain boundary sliding. {yields} Significant enhancement of creep resistance in nanostructured V has been achieved using V-1.4Y-7W-9Mo-0.7TiC. {yields} The enhancement owes to solute W and Mo, dispersoids of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiC and grain size (GS) adjustment. {yields} The creep life of V-1.4Y-7W-9Mo-0.7TiC increases by a factor 30 by increasing GS from 0.6 to 2.2 {mu}m. {yields} The creep life for 2.2 {mu}m GS is two orders longer than that of primary candidate V-4Cr-4Ti (GS: {approx}18 {mu}m). - Abstract: Nanostructured vanadium (V) alloys are expected to exhibit high performance under neutron irradiation environments. However, their ultra-fine or refined grains cause significant decrease in flow stress at high temperatures due to grain boundary sliding (GBS), which is the major concern for their high-temperature structural applications such as future fusion reactors. The contribution of GBS to plastic deformation is known to depend strongly on grain size (GS) and may give more significant influence on long-time creep test results than on short-time tensile test results. In order to improve the creep resistance through elucidation of the effect of GS on the uniaxial creep behavior of nanostructured V alloys, a solution and dispersion hardened V alloy, V-1.4Y-7W-9Mo-0.7TiC (in wt%), with GSs from 0.58 to 2.16 {mu}m was developed by mechanical alloying and HIP processes, followed by annealing at 1473-1773 K, and creep tested at 1073 K and 250 MPa in vacuum. It is shown that the creep resistance of V-1.4Y-7W-9Mo-0.7TiC increases monotonically with GS: The creep life for the alloy with 2.16 {mu}m in GS is as long as 114 h, which is longer by factors of 2-30 than those for the other finer grained alloys and by two orders than that for coarse-grained V-4Cr-4Ti (Nifs heat2, GS: 17.8 {mu}m) that is a primary candidate material for fusion reactor structural applications. The

  15. Singular vector-based targeted observations of chemical constituents: description and first application of the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, N.; Elbern, H.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the large-dimensional chemical state of the atmosphere provide only sparse snapshots of the state of the system due to their typically insufficient temporal and spatial density. In order to optimize the measurement configurations despite those limitations, the present work describes the identification of sensitive states of the chemical system as optimal target areas for adaptive observations. For this purpose, the technique of singular vector analysis (SVA), which has proven effective for targeted observations in numerical weather prediction, is implemented in the EURAD-IM (EURopean Air pollution and Dispersion - Inverse Model) chemical transport model, yielding the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0. Besides initial values, emissions are investigated as critical simulation controlling targeting variables. For both variants, singular vectors are applied to determine the optimal placement for observations and moreover to quantify which chemical compounds have to be observed with preference. Based on measurements of the airship based ZEPTER-2 campaign, the EURAD-IM-SVA v1.0 has been evaluated by conducting a comprehensive set of model runs involving different initial states and simulation lengths. For the sake of brevity, we concentrate our attention on the following chemical compounds, O3, NO, NO2, HCHO, CO, HONO, and OH, and focus on their influence on selected O3 profiles. Our analysis shows that the optimal placement for observations of chemical species is not entirely determined by mere transport and mixing processes. Rather, a combination of initial chemical concentrations, chemical conversions, and meteorological processes determines the influence of chemical compounds and regions. We furthermore demonstrate that the optimal placement of observations of emission strengths is highly dependent on the location of emission sources and that the benefit of including emissions as target variables outperforms the value of initial value optimization with growing

  16. User manual of Visual Balan V. 1.0 Interactive code for water balances and refueling estimation; Manual del usuario del programa Visual Balan V. 1.0. Codigo interactivo para la realizacion de balances hidrologicos y la estimacion de la recarga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samper, J.; Huguer, L.; Ares, J.; Garcia, M. A. [Universidad de La Coruna (Spain)

    1999-07-01

    This document contains the Users Manual of Visual Balan V1.0, an updated version of Visual Balan V0.0 (Samper et al., 1997). Visual Balan V1.0 performs daily water balances in the soil, the unsaturated zone and the aquifer in a user-friendly environment which facilitates both the input data process and the postprocessing of results. The main inputs of the balance are rainfall and irrigation while the outputs are surface runoff, evapotranspiration, interception, inter flow and groundwater flow. The code evaluates all these components in a sequential manner by starting with rainfall and irrigation, which must be provided by the user, and continuing with interception, surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and potential recharge (water flux crossing the bottom of the soil). This potential recharge is the input to the unsaturated zone where water can flow horizontally as subsurface flow (inter flow) or vertically as percolation into the aquifer. (Author)

  17. Evaluation of the NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 assay in comparison with the Roche Amplicor v1.5 and the Roche CAP/CTM HIV-1 Test v2.0 in quantification of C-clade HIV-1 in plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Muenchhoff

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genetic diversity poses a challenge to reliable viral load monitoring. Discrepancies between different testing platforms have been observed, especially for non-clade-B virus. Therefore we compare, in antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve South African subjects predominantly infected with HIV-1 clade-C, three commercially available assays: the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test version 2.0 by Roche (CAP/CTM v2.0, the BioMérieux NucliSens Version 2.0 Easy Q/Easy Mag (NucliSens v2.0 and the Roche COBAS Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test Version 1.5 (Amplicor v1.5. Strong linear correlation was observed and Bland-Altman analyses showed overall good agreement between the assays with mean viral load differences of 0.078 log cp/ml (NucliSens v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5, 0.260 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5 and 0.164 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - NucliSens v2.0, indicating lower mean viral load results for the Amplicor v1.5 and higher mean readings for the CAP/CTM v2.0. Consistent with observations following previous comparisons of CAP/CTM v2.0 versus Amplicor v1.5, the CAP/CTM v2.0 assay detected low-level viremia (median 65 cp/ml in more than one-third of those in whom viremia had been undetectable (<20 cp/ml in assays using the NucliSens platform. These levels of viremia are of uncertain clinical significance but may be of importance in early detection of ART resistance in those on treatment. Overall the three assays showed good comparability of results but with consistent, albeit relatively small, discrepancies for HIV-1 clade-C samples, especially in the low-viremic range that should be taken into account when interpreting viral load data.

  18. The vacuolar V1/V0-ATPase is involved in the release of the HOPS subunit Vps41 from vacuoles, vacuole fragmentation and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kozue; Cabrera, Margarita; Rohde, Jan; Bausch, Dirk; Jensen, Ole N; Ungermann, Christian

    2008-04-30

    At yeast vacuoles, phosphorylation of the HOPS subunit Vps41 depends on the Yck3 kinase. In a screen for mutants that mimic the yck3Delta phenotype, in which Vps41 accumulates in vacuolar dots, we observed that mutants in the V0-part of the V0/V1-ATPase, in particular in vma16Delta, also accumulate Vps41. This accumulation is not due to a phosphorylation defect, but to reduced release of Vps41 from vma16Delta vacuoles. One reason could be a connection to vacuole fission, which is blocked in V-ATPase mutants. Vacuole fusion is not impaired between vacuoles lacking the V0-subunits Vma16 or Vma6 and wild-type vacuoles, whereas fusion between mutant vacuoles is reduced. Our data suggest a connection between vacuole biogenesis and membrane fusion.

  19. The vacuolar V1/V0-ATPase is involved in the release of the HOPS subunit Vps41 from vacuoles, vacuole fragmentation and fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeda, Kozue; Cabrera, Margarita; Rohde, Jan

    2008-01-01

    At yeast vacuoles, phosphorylation of the HOPS subunit Vps41 depends on the Yck3 kinase. In a screen for mutants that mimic the yck3Delta phenotype, in which Vps41 accumulates in vacuolar dots, we observed that mutants in the V0-part of the V0/V1-ATPase, in particular in vma16Delta, also accumulate...... Vps41. This accumulation is not due to a phosphorylation defect, but to reduced release of Vps41 from vma16Delta vacuoles. One reason could be a connection to vacuole fission, which is blocked in V-ATPase mutants. Vacuole fusion is not impaired between vacuoles lacking the V0-subunits Vma16 or Vma6...

  20. Calculations for a BWR Lattice with Adjacent Gadolinium Pins Using the Monte Carlo Cell Code Serpent v.1.1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ferraro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo neutron transport codes are usually used to perform criticality calculations and to solve shielding problems due to their capability to model complex systems without major approximations. However, these codes demand high computational resources. The improvement in computer capabilities leads to several new applications of Monte Carlo neutron transport codes. An interesting one is to use this method to perform cell-level fuel assembly calculations in order to obtain few group constants to be used on core calculations. In the present work the VTT recently developed Serpent v.1.1.7 cell-oriented neutronic calculation code is used to perform cell calculations of a theoretical BWR lattice benchmark with burnable poisons, and the main results are compared to reported ones and with calculations performed with Condor v.2.61, the INVAP's neutronic collision probability cell code.

  1. Successful Delivery of Twin Pregnancy in Class U3b/C2/V1 Uterus by Bilateral Caesarean Section after Spontaneous Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmine El-Masry

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of a 19-year-old female with class U3b/C2/V1 uterus conceived a twin pregnancy with a fetus in each horn after spontaneous conception. She referred to our department with presentation of premature rupture of membranes, with a history of cesarean delivery of a single full term living fetus a year and a half before this delivery. Examination revealed two completely separate uterine horns with a fetus in each horn, two distinct externally rounded cervices, and a single vagina with a short nonobstructing vaginal septum in the upper part of the vagina. And as the appropriate mode of delivery is still unclear, each case should be managed as the condition requires, and in our case urgent bilateral caesarean sections were performed.

  2. Διοhικετα Διολευθερι̣[-] IG V.1 700

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcorac Alonso Déniz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available t is almost universally admitted that in the Laconian inscription IG V.1 700, Διοhικετα and Διολευθερι [-] stand for the phonetic evolution of Διὸζ Ἱκέτα and Διὸζ Ἐλευθερίō. In both sequences final /s/ before an initial vowel allegedly underwent lenition, similarly to intervocalic /s/ in inner word position. The paper shows that this interpretation must be rejected for various reasons. On the contrary, both forms can be accounted for as compounds with first element Διοo.

  3. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 User's Manual: A Code for the Simulation of System Behavior in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kowalsky, Michael B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pruess, Karsten [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 is a code for the simulation of the behavior of hydratebearing geologic systems, and represents the second update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. By solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, TOUGH+HYDRATE can model the non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under conditions typical of common natural CH4-hydrate deposits (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments) in complex geological media at any scale (from laboratory to reservoir) at which Darcy’s law is valid. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.2 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components, i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dissociation or formation, phase changes and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects and inhibitor-induced effects. TOUGH+HYDRATE is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available.

  4. TOUGH+Hydrate v1.0 User's Manual: A Code for the Simulation of System Behavior in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George; Moridis, George J.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-03-01

    TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.0 is a new code for the simulation of the behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic systems. By solving the coupled equations of mass and heat balance, TOUGH+HYDRATE can model the non-isothermal gas release, phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat under conditions typical of common natural CH{sub 4}-hydrate deposits (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments) in complex geological media at any scale (from laboratory to reservoir) at which Darcy's law is valid. TOUGH+HYDRATE v1.0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate formation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components, i.e., water, CH{sub 4}, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dissociation or formation, phase changes and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects and inhibitor-induced effects. TOUGH+HYDRATE is the first member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95, and can be run on any computational platform (workstation, PC, Macintosh) for which such compilers are available.

  5. Dissociation of the Reach and the Grasp in the destriate (V1) monkey Helen: a new anatomy for the dual visuomotor channel theory of reaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, Ian Q; Karl, Jenni M; Humphrey, Nicholas K

    2016-08-01

    Dual visuomotor channel theory proposes that reaching depends on two neural pathways that extend from visual cortex (V1) to motor cortex via the parietal lobe. The Reach pathway directs the hand to the target's location and the Grasp pathway shapes the hand and digits for purchase. Sighted human participants integrate the Reach and the Grasp, but without vision they dissociate the movements to capitalize on tactile cues. They use a Reach with a relatively open hand to locate the target and then they use touch cues to shape the fingers to Grasp. After a V1 lesion, the rhesus monkey, Helen, learned to make near-normal visual discriminations based on size and brightness but displayed visual agnosia. She also learned to reach for food with her mouth and her hands. The present analysis of film of her reaching behavior shows that she dissociated the Reach and the Grasp, as do unsighted human participants reaching for a food target at a fixed location. Her rapid and direct Reach was made with an open hand and extended fingers to contact the food with the palm whereas her Grasp was initiated after she touched the food. She also visually fixated the target during the Reach and visually disengaged after target contact, as do sighted human participants. In contrast, Helen did integrate the Reach and the Grasp to take food from her mouth, demonstrating that she could integrate the movements using online tactile cues. The finding that extrastriate pathways can direct the hand toward extrinsic target properties (location) but not intrinsic target properties (size and shape) is discussed as a novel addition to dual visuomotor channel theory.

  6. Technical note: PaGELL v.1.5: A flexible parametric program for the Bayesian analysis of longevity data within the context of animal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, J; Brito, L C

    2017-10-01

    This technical note presents the program PaGELL v.1.5 (Parametric Genetic Evaluation of Lifespan in Livestock), a flexible software program to analyze (right-censored) longevity data in livestock populations, with a special emphasis on the genetic evaluation of the breeding stock. This software relies on a parametric generalization of the proportional hazard model; more specifically, the baseline hazard function follows a Weibull process and flexibility is gained by including an additional time-dependent effect with the number of change points defined by the user. The program can accommodate 3 different sources of variation (i.e., systematic, permanent environmental, and additive genetic effects) and both fixed and time-dependent patterns (only for systematic and permanent environmental effects). Analyses are performed within a Bayesian context by sampling from the joint posterior distribution of the model, and model fit can be easily determined by the calculation of the deviance information criterion. Although this software has already been used on field data sets, its performance has been double-checked on simulated data set, and results are presented in this technical note. PaGELL v.1.5 was written in Fortran 95 language and, after compiling with the GNU Fortran Compiler v.4.7 and later, it has been tested in Windows, Linux, and MacOS operating systems (both 32- and 64-bit platforms). This program is available at http://www.casellas.info/files/pageII.zip. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. ACTH response to desmopressin in a patient with acromegaly; expression of corticotropin-releasing factor, urocortins and vasopressin V1b receptor in GH-producing pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arihara, Zenei; Sakurai, Kanako; Osaki, Yoshinori; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Shozo; Inoshita, Naoko; Murakami, Osamu; Ohba, Koji; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    GH-producing pituitary adenomas frequently co-produce other certain anterior pituitary hormones, such as prolactin (PRL). In contrast, GH-producing adenomas which express all of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), urocorin1 (Ucn1) and urocortin3 (Ucn3) have not been reported. A 39-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of the pituitary tumor. The diagnosis of acromegaly was confirmed by elevated serum GH and IGF-I levels, and the absence of GH suppression by oral glucose tolerance test. ACTH response to desmopressin (DDAVP) was observed (plasma ACTH levels increased from 13.9 to 50.4 pg/ml at 90 min). Although it is known that ACTH response to DDAVP is considerably useful for the diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome, the diagnosis of Cushing's disease was not supported by the criteria. The patient underwent transsphenoidal resection of the pituitary tumor. Immunohistological examination confirmed a GH- and PRL-producing adenoma, whereas ACTH was negative. ACTH response to DDAVP disappeared after tumor removal. To determine the cause of preoperative ACTH response to DDAVP, we examined expression of CRF family peptides and vasopressin V1b receptor in the pituitary adenoma by immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive immunostaining for CRF, Ucn1, Ucn3 and vasopressin V1b receptor in the adenoma. These observations raised the possibility that DDAVP caused an ACTH response, perhaps via the paracrine effects of tumor-derived CRF and Ucn1. When ACTH response to DDAVP is observed in patients with pituitary tumor, not only the direct effect of DDAVP on ACTH secretion, but also a possible involvement of CRF and/or urocortins expressed in the pituitary adenoma, should be considered.

  8. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Christoffersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ε, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x and stomata (P50,gs, and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As. We embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration, as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD, leaf mass per area (LMA, and photosynthetic capacity (Amax, and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait–trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model

  9. Safety and efficacy trial of adipose-tissue derived oral preparation V-6 Immunitor (V-6: results of open-label, two-month, follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirathitikal Vichai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic inflammations, atherosclerosis and obesity, are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Immune modulation of the inflammatory response has shown promise in animal models of atherogenesis and metabolic disease. Tableted dietary supplement, V-6, containing pooled antigens derived from pig adipose tissue has been administered daily to 12 volunteers for 2 months. Results No significant changes were observed in liver ALT and AST enzymes, i.e., 28 vs 23.8 IU and 22.6 vs 24.8 IU, with p = 0.07 and p = 0.49, respectively. Creatinine decreased; 0.88 vs 0.84 mg/dL (p = 0.05 while BUN moved upward; 14.5 vs 17.5 mg/dL (p = 0.01, but both values remained within normal range. Blood glucose remained within normal range; 96.1 vs 101.1 mg/dL (p = 0.04. Complete blood cell analysis has not revealed any change except slight increase in hemoglobin; 13.13 to 13.96 g/dL (p = 0.0002; hematocrit and red blood cells count 40.3 to 42.3% (p = 0.02 and 5.15 to 5.35 × 106 cells/mm3 (p = 0.03 respectively. Blood pressure systolic and diastolic values were not affected, i.e., 116.1 vs 116.3 (p = 0.12 and 76.8 vs 76.6 (p = 0.99. Body weight and body mass index (BMI remained same; 66.4 vs 66.3 kg (p = 0.47 and 25.7 vs 25.6 kg/m2 (p = 0.2. Body fat deposit indices, such as abdomen; mid-arm; and thigh circumferences declined by 3.5 cm (p = 0.008; 1.2 cm (p = 0.004; and 3.0 cm (p = 0.0007 respectively. The total cholesterol and LDL levels did not change; 195.5 vs 195.1 (-0.2%; p = 0.8 and 113.4 vs 120.3 (6.1%; p = 0.08 respectively. Triglycerides have been reduced but not statistically significant; 168.1 vs 118 mg/dL (-29.8%; p = 0.2. In contrast, HDL content had risen by 29.7% from 39.4 to 51.1 mg/dL in all 12 patients (p = 0.000003. TG/HDL ratio - a marker of insulin resistance - was reduced from 4.78 to 2.56 (-46.5%; p = 0.04. Conclusions These results demonstrate that V-6 is safe and has a potential as an anti-atherogenic and overweight/obesity immune intervention.

  10. Sweat Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmant, Stephen A.; Merta, Rod J.

    2000-01-01

    A study combined group sweating and group counseling. Four adolescent boys with disruptive behavior disorders participated in 12 sweat therapy sessions. They reported the sessions useful for sharing personal concerns and receiving assistance with problem solving. Three boys showed improvement in self-esteem. Advantages of sweat therapy over other…

  11. Intravenous Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliart, Barbara

    Intended for teaching licensed practical nurses, this curriculum guide provides information related to the equipment and skills required for nursing care of patients needing intravenous (IV) therapy. It also explains the roles and responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse with regard to intravenous therapy. Each of the 15 instructional…

  12. Poetry Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald V.

    Poetry therapy is the method of therapy based on the principle that a poem is a special medium for expressing emotions and that this expression can have psychotherapeutic value. A survey taken in 1973 showed there were over 400 therapists treating 3,500 drug addicts, alcoholics, and mental retardates around the country. Poetry therapists…

  13. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy is one of the most precise and advanced forms of radiation treatment available. How Proton Therapy is Delivered The patient is positioned on a table with a head frame or face mask covering the head. As the cyclotron smashes atoms, the protons released are directed toward ...

  14. Performance Characteristics of FilmArray Respiratory Panel v1.7 for Detection of Adenovirus in a Large Cohort of Pediatric Nasopharyngeal Samples: One Test May Not Fit All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eunkyung; Wang, Huanyu; Salamon, Doug; Jaggi, Preeti; Leber, Amy

    2016-06-01

    The FilmArray Respiratory Panel (RP) v1.7 assay has improved sensitivity for detection of human adenovirus (HAdV), compared to an earlier version (RP v1.6). RP v1.7 was designed for detection of species B, C, and E but may show variable detection of species A, D, and F. We sought to evaluate the clinical and analytical performance of RP v1.7 for detection of HAdV in a large pediatric cohort. Respiratory specimens obtained from a tertiary care children's hospital between February 2014 and February 2015 were tested for HAdV by RP v1.7. If the RP v1.7 results were negative for HAdV, then the specimens were reflexed to a HAdV-specific laboratory-developed PCR (LD-PCR) assay for confirmation. A subset of specimens underwent secondary confirmatory testing using another commercially available HAdV PCR assay and a molecular typing assay for species identification. Among 4,750 specimens, a total of 146 specimens (3.1%) were HAdV positive by RP v1.7. HAdV was detected by LD-PCR in an additional 220 specimens that were negative by RP v1.7. Overall, a nearly 5% increase in HAdV detection was observed when RP v1.7-negative specimens were reflexed to LD-PCR testing. RP v1.7 did not detect HAdV with either low viral burden (threshold cycle values of >30) or nonrespiratory species (species A, D, and F), as shown in both clinical and analytic data. While the level of sensitivity of RP v1.7 may be adequate for testing among otherwise healthy children, the decreased sensitivity may be problematic for immunocompromised patients, in whom low levels of HAdV in the respiratory tract may precede systemic infection and require early intervention. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. RNA interference of the nicotine demethylase gene CYP82E4v1 reduces nornicotine content and enhances Myzus persicae resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Qin, Li-Jun; Zhao, De-Gang

    2016-10-01

    The CYP82E4v1 gene was identified to encode nicotine demethylase, which catalyzed the conversion of nicotine to nornicotine. In this study, we constructed CYP82E4v1-RNAi vector and genetically transformed tobacco variety K326. The determination results of nicotine and nornicotine content via HPLC demonstrated that there was significant increase of nicotine content and reduction of nornicotine content in transgenic plants compared with those in wild-type plants. Exogenous application of IAA or GA3 could reduce the nicotine content in tobaccos, while ABA or 6-BA could increase the content of nicotine. And the more significant difference of nicotine content change in transgenic plants. Aphid-inoculation experiment demonstrated the number of aphid population in transgenic plants was significantly lower than wild-type plants at 12 d after aphid-inoculation. Meanwhile, the activity of AOEs and PAL in transgenic and wild-type tobacco plants after aphid-inoculation was measured. At 3 d after aphid-inoculation, both AOEs and PAL activity were significantly higher than controls, including wild-type plants with aphid-inoculation and transgenic plants with mock-inoculation. Also, the relative expression of these genes involved in salicylic acid/jasmonic acid (SA/JA) signaling pathways was analyzed at different stages after aphid-inoculation and the results demonstrated that there was significantly higher expression of JA-induced LOX gene in both transgenic and wild-type plants inoculated by aphid than the non-inoculated ones while no significant difference in the expression of SA-induced PR-1a gene among them was found, which indicated the JA-mediated resistance response was activated during aphid infestation. Moreover, although the expression level of BGL (another JA-induced gene) was less significant between the two inoculated tobaccos, it was significantly higher than the plant without inoculation, which was 1.4 and 2.2 folds higher than the non-inoculated controls

  16. Coupling a three-dimensional subsurface flow and transport model with a land surface model to simulate stream-aquifer-land interactions (CP v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Gautam; Huang, Maoyi; Zhou, Tian; Chen, Xingyuan; Dai, Heng; Hammond, Glenn E.; Riley, William J.; Downs, Janelle L.; Liu, Ying; Zachara, John M.

    2017-12-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional surface and subsurface land model is developed and applied to a site along the Columbia River to simulate three-way interactions among river water, groundwater, and land surface processes. The model features the coupling of the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) and a massively parallel multiphysics reactive transport model (PFLOTRAN). The coupled model, named CP v1.0, is applied to a 400 m × 400 m study domain instrumented with groundwater monitoring wells along the Columbia River shoreline. CP v1.0 simulations are performed at three spatial resolutions (i.e., 2, 10, and 20 m) over a 5-year period to evaluate the impact of hydroclimatic conditions and spatial resolution on simulated variables. Results show that the coupled model is capable of simulating groundwater-river-water interactions driven by river stage variability along managed river reaches, which are of global significance as a result of over 30 000 dams constructed worldwide during the past half-century. Our numerical experiments suggest that the land-surface energy partitioning is strongly modulated by groundwater-river-water interactions through expanding the periodically inundated fraction of the riparian zone, and enhancing moisture availability in the vadose zone via capillary rise in response to the river stage change. Meanwhile, CLM4.5 fails to capture the key hydrologic process (i.e., groundwater-river-water exchange) at the site, and consequently simulates drastically different water and energy budgets. Furthermore, spatial resolution is found to significantly impact the accuracy of estimated the mass exchange rates at the boundaries of the aquifer, and it becomes critical when surface and subsurface become more tightly coupled with groundwater table within 6 to 7 meters below the surface. Inclusion of lateral subsurface flow influenced both the surface energy budget and subsurface transport processes as a result of river-water intrusion into the

  17. Hand Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Hand Therapy Email to a friend * required fields From * ... ensure a healthy style of work. Find a Hand Therapist Search for a hand therapist in your ...

  18. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy, including: Fatigue Hair loss Skin changes Swelling/edema Nausea Sexual effects (reduced desire) Blood clots Your ... American Brain Tumor Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain ...

  19. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapists have graduate degrees and can demonstrate their competence in sex therapy by becoming credentialed by the ... ways to resolve your concerns and improve your communication and intimacy. Talking about sex and intimacy may ...

  20. Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes colon and rectal changes infertility joint changes lymphedema mouth changes secondary cancer There is a slight risk of developing cancer from radiation therapy. Following radiation treatment for cancer, you should be ...

  1. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or improve your body's ability to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Researchers are still studying how and ...

  2. Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biofeedback for learning to promote relaxation and increase oxygen flow to muscles (Schwartz & Schwartz, 1993) ; hypnotherapy for relaxation and pain relief (Hammond, 1991); magnet therapy for pain relief (Vallbona et al., 1997) ; and ...

  3. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be extra careful not to spend time with children or pregnant women. Internal Radiation Therapy Makes You Give Off Radiation With systemic radiation, your body fluids ( urine , sweat, and saliva ) will give off radiation for a while. With ...

  4. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them from ... half of all cancer patients receive it. The radiation may be external, from special machines, or internal, ...

  5. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation Written ... accelerated aging in children. Children with Progeria need Physical Therapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) as often as ...

  6. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    (Betula verrucosa) (Bet v 1), the major allergen in birch pollen, to serum IgG and IgE, separately and in competition. Sera from six birch pollen-allergic patients were obtained before and after 5 years of SAV, and binding was assessed with 125I-Bet v 1. Before SAV, IgG bound more than eight times...... the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post......-SAV IgG provided similar inhibition of Bet v 1 binding to IgE at equimolar levels, and cross inhibition studies between IgG and IgE showed low inter-individual differences. Following SAV, all sera reduced Bet v 1 binding to CD23(+) cells, correlating with reduced binding of Bet v 1 to IgE (P...

  7. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    (Betula verrucosa) (Bet v 1), the major allergen in birch pollen, to serum IgG and IgE, separately and in competition. Sera from six birch pollen-allergic patients were obtained before and after 5 years of SAV, and binding was assessed with 125I-Bet v 1. Before SAV, IgG bound more than eight times...... the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post......-SAV IgG provided similar inhibition of Bet v 1 binding to IgE at equimolar levels, and cross inhibition studies between IgG and IgE showed low inter-individual differences. Following SAV, all sera reduced Bet v 1 binding to CD23(+) cells, correlating with reduced binding of Bet v 1 to IgE (P

  8. Case Report: Reversible cabergoline-associated cardiac valvulopathy post drug discontinuation [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2jm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris G. Yedinak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 21 year old male patient diagnosed with a 2.2 cm prolactin-secreting adenoma in contact with the optic chiasm. The patient was treated with up to 6mg/week of cabergoline (total cumulative dose 814 mg and developed mild valvulopathy. Valvulopathy was subsequently reversed after discontinuation of cabergoline therapy.

  9. Test report of the melt spreading tests ECOKATS-V1 and ECOKATS-1. CONTRACT FIKS-CT1999-00003 - EX-VESSEL CORE MELT STABILIZATION RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Foit, J.J.; Messemer, G.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Haefner, W. [Becker Technologies, Eschborn (Germany); Kriscio, H.

    2004-11-01

    As one of the major tasks of the ECOSTAR project, two large-scale experiments on oxidic melt spreading were performed. The experimental conditions were selected to represent low flow rate of oxidic melt, released with low overheat, so that stop of the spreading process may occur during ongoing melt release, and spreading would be incomplete. Besides the basic experimental information on spreading of large melt masses under low flow conditions, the experiments were designed to be used for the final validation of spreading codes. After completion of the validation process, the computer programs would be able to predict with sufficient accuracy the spreading process in case of an accident, which is expected to occur under less critical conditions than the actual experiment. The report describes also the selection and characterization of the multi-component oxide melt, which simulates the ex-vessel oxide corium melt in an anticipated reactor accident. The melt was generated by a modified exothermic thermite reaction, and poured to the spreading surfaces under controlled conditions. To improve the information about the rheological behaviour of the selected oxide melt, a pre-test ECOKATS-V1 was performed in which the oxide melt was spread in a 1-d flow channel. Together with qualified spreading calculations, this experiment allowed for estimation of the initial viscosity of the melt and characterization of the rheological behaviour in the freezing range. Furthermore, significant information about the nature of the 1-d spreading process during onset of solidification as well as growth and failure of a front crust was gained. The large scale 2-d spreading experiment ECOKATS-1 was performed on a concrete surface, 4 m long and 3 m wide. 547 kg of oxide melt were released to the spreading surface during a period of 85 s. The melt and the spreading conditions were selected to represent the situation for which the melt stopped during the phase of melt inflow (incomplete

  10. Low resistivity WxV1-xO2-based multilayer structure with high temperature coefficient of resistance for microbolometer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Émond, Nicolas; Hendaoui, Ali; Chaker, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Materials that exhibit semiconductor-to-metal phase transition (SMT) are commonly used as sensing layers for the fabrication of uncooled microbolometers. The development of highly responsive microbolometers would benefit from using a sensing material that possesses a large thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) close to room temperature and a resistivity low enough to compromise between noise reduction and high TCR, while it should also satisfies the requirements of current CMOS technology. Moreover, a TCR that remains constant when the IR camera surrounding temperature varies would contribute to achieve reliable temperature measurements without additional corrections steps for TCR temperature dependence. In this paper, the characteristics of the SMT occurring in undoped and tungsten-doped vanadium dioxide thin films deposited on LaAlO3 (100) substrates are investigated. They are further exploited to fabricate a WxV1-xO2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 2.5) multilayer structure exhibiting a bottom-up gradient of tungsten content. This MLS displays a combination of properties that is promising for application to uncooled microbolometer, such as a large TCR of -10.4%/ °C and low resistivity values ranging from 0.012 to 0.10 Ω-cm over the temperature range 22 °C-42 °C.

  11. PENINGKATAN KETERAMPILAN PROSES, MOTIVASI, DAN HASIL BELAJAR BIOLOGI DENGAN STRATEGI PEMBELAJARAN INKUIRI TERBIMBING PADA SISWA KELAS VII SMP KARTIKA V-1 BALIKPAPAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Yuniastuti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dirancang sebagai sebuah Penelitian Tindakan Kelas (Classroom Action Research dengan tiga siklus pembelajaran yang dilaksanakan SMP Kartika V-1 Balikpapan dan bertujuan meningkatkan keterampilan proses sains, motivasi belajar, dan hasil belajar biologi siswa kelas VII melalui strategi pembelajaran inkuiri terbimbing. Selama penelitian berlangsung, peneliti bertindak sebagai guru kelas, dan selama kegiatan pengamatan, peneliti dibantu oleh rekan–rekan sejawat. Pengumpulan data lapangan dilakukan melalui pengisian lembar observasi, wawancara, pembuatan catatan lapangan, pengambilan dokumentasi, dan pengadaan tes. Analisis data secara kualitatif dilakukan untuk menjelaskan motivasi dan keterampilan proses siswa sedangkan analisis kuantifatif diperlukan untuk menjelaskan peningkatan hasil belajar siswa. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa terjadi peningkatan keterampilan proses (rata–rata keterlaksanaan 55% pada siklus I, 69,38% pada siklus II, dan 80,63% pada siklus III, motivasi belajar siswa (rata–rata keterlaksanaan 60,74% pada siklus I, 69,63% pada siklus II, dan 80,00% pada siklus III dan hasil belajar siswa (rata – rata persentase ketuntasan sebesar 45,56% pada siklus I, 58,89% pada siklus II, dan 86,67% pada siklus III. Berdasarkan analisis hasil penelitian, dapat disimpulkan bahwa pembelajaran dengan strategi inkuiri terbimbing mampu meningkatkan motivasi belajar dan keterampilan proses siswa yang secara konsekutif berdampak pada kenaikan ketuntasan belajar siswa.

  12. Ditching Tests with a 1/16-Size Model of the Navy XP2V-1 Airplane at the Langley Tank No. 2 Monorail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Lloyd J.; Tarshis, Robert P.

    1947-01-01

    Tests were made with a 1/16 size dynamically similar model of the Navy XP2V-1 airplane to study its performance when ditched. The model was ditched in calm water at the Langley tank no. 2 monorail. Various landing attitudes, speeds, and conditions of damage were simulated. The performance of the node1 was determined and recorded from visual observations, by recording time histories of the longitudinal decelerations, and by taking motion pictures of the ditchings From the results of the tests with the model the following conclusions were drawn: 1. The airplane should be ditched at the normal landing attitude. The flaps should be fully extended to obtain the lowest possible landing speed; 2. Extensive damage will occur in a ditching and the airplane probably will dive violently after a run of about 2 fuselage lengths. Maximum longitudinal decelerations up to about 4g will be encountered; and 3. If a trapezoidal hydroflap 4 feet by 2 feet by 1 foot is attached to the airplane at station 192.4, diving will be prevented and the airplane will probably porpoise in a run of about 4 fuselage lengths with a maximum longitudinal deceleration of less than 3.5g.

  13. The impacts of data constraints on the predictive performance of a general process-based crop model (PeakN-crop v1.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldararu, Silvia; Purves, Drew W.; Smith, Matthew J.

    2017-04-01

    Improving international food security under a changing climate and increasing human population will be greatly aided by improving our ability to modify, understand and predict crop growth. What we predominantly have at our disposal are either process-based models of crop physiology or statistical analyses of yield datasets, both of which suffer from various sources of error. In this paper, we present a generic process-based crop model (PeakN-crop v1.0) which we parametrise using a Bayesian model-fitting algorithm to three different sources: data-space-based vegetation indices, eddy covariance productivity measurements and regional crop yields. We show that the model parametrised without data, based on prior knowledge of the parameters, can largely capture the observed behaviour but the data-constrained model greatly improves both the model fit and reduces prediction uncertainty. We investigate the extent to which each dataset contributes to the model performance and show that while all data improve on the prior model fit, the satellite-based data and crop yield estimates are particularly important for reducing model error and uncertainty. Despite these improvements, we conclude that there are still significant knowledge gaps, in terms of available data for model parametrisation, but our study can help indicate the necessary data collection to improve our predictions of crop yields and crop responses to environmental changes.

  14. Maintenance Therapy in IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Center Home > Resources > Maintenance Therapy Go Back Maintenance Therapy Email Print + Share The term "maintenance therapy" ... are referred to as "maintenance therapies." Why is Maintenance Therapy Needed in IBD? Both Crohn's disease and ...

  15. 510-kV, 1,100-MVA main transformer installed at Tachibana Bay Power Plant of Electric Power Development Co., Ltd.; Dengen Kaihatsu (kabu) Tachibanawan karyoku hatsudensho nonyu 510kV, 1,100MVA shuhen'atsuki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-10

    Fuji Electric has installed a 510-kV, 1,100-MVA main transformer for the generator No. 2 at Tachibana Bay Power Plant of Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. Fuji Electric has already supplied Tokyo Electric Power and Tohoku Electric Power with two 275-kV, 1,100-MVA class main transformers for power plant use. The present transformer was fabricated by combining the large-capacity transformer design technologies cultivated by the above experience with the ultra-super high voltage insulation design technologies. The transformer is one of the largest class transformers in Japan. This transformer is accommodated in a sound-proof building, achieving a noise level of 65 dB or lower. The high voltage side is provided with a 420-kV high-performance gas insulated lightning arrestor at the cable draw-out. The low voltage side is connected to a phase isolating busbar. Power receiving has begun in December 1999, and commercial operation is scheduled for January 2001 after trial operation. (translated by NEDO)

  16. Family therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Altamash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Another major force not letting us succeed in the treatment of diabetes remains right inside the patients home, their family members. Hence, it is important to know the perception of the close family members about this simple and strong tool in diabetes, ′insulin′. The drug is nearing its century, it has not fully being accepted gracefully even in todays electronic savvy society. So, we need to strongly discover the reason for its non-acceptance, while trials are out inventing new drugs. One vital thing that can change this attitude is increasing the understanding of this drug, insulin in depth to close people around the patient, the ′family′. Underestimating family′s perception about disease and treatment for diabetes is detrimental to both diseased and the doctor. This consists of a biopsychosocial model; biological, psychological and social factors. Family forms the most important part of it. The strategies in family therapy include psychodynamic, structural, strategic, and cognitive-behavioral component. Diabetes has and will continue to rise, so will be the treatment options. From the clinicians side its to fix fasting first but from patients its fix family first. Family therapy demonstrates the importance of insulin initiation and maintenance in insulin naive patients, and continuation for others. The specific needs of such patients and their impact on family life are met with family therapy. Who needs family therapy? Benefits of family therapy and a case based approach is covered.

  17. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  18. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  19. Modelling runoff and soil water content with the DR2-2013© SAGA v1.1 model at catchment scale under Mediterranean conditions (NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vicente, Manuel, , Dr.; Palazón, M. Sc. Leticia; Quijano, M. Sc. Laura; Gaspar, Leticia, , Dr.; Navas, Ana, , Dr.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrological and soil erosion models allow mapping and quantifying spatially distributed rates of runoff depth and soil redistribution for different land uses, management and tillage practices and climatic scenarios. The different temporal and spatial [very small (1000 km2)] scales of numerical simulations make model selection specific to each range of scales. Additionally, the spatial resolution of the inputs is in agreement with the size of the study area. In this study, we run the GIS-based water balance DR2-2013© SAGA v1.1 model (freely downloaded as executable file at http://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/93543), in the Vandunchil stream catchment (23 km2; Ebro river basin, NE Spain). All input maps are generated at 5 x 5 m of cell size (924,573 pixels per map) allowing sound parameterization. Simulation is run at monthly scale with average climatic values. This catchment is an open hydrological system and it has a long history of human occupation, agricultural practices and water management. Numerous manmade infrastructures or landscape linear elements (LLEs: paved and unpaved trails, rock mounds in non-cultivated areas, disperse and small settlements, shallow and long drainage ditches, stone walls, small rock dams, fences and vegetation strips) appear throughout the hillslopes and streams and modify the natural runoff pathways and thus the hydrological and sediment connectivity. Rain-fed cereal fields occupy one third of the catchment area, 1% corresponds to sealed soils, and the remaining area is covered with Mediterranean forest, scrubland, pine afforestation and meadow. The parent material corresponds to Miocene sandstones and lutites and Holocene colluvial and alluvial deposits. The climate is continental Mediterranean with two humid periods, one in spring and a second in autumn that summarizes 63% of the total annual precipitation. We created a synthetic weather station (WS) from the Caseda and Uncastillo WS. The effective rainfall that reaches the soils

  20. Inference on population history and model checking using DNA sequence and microsatellite data with the software DIYABC (v1.0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornuet, Jean-Marie; Ravigné, Virgine; Estoup, Arnaud

    2010-07-28

    gap of ABC analysis. The software DIYABC V1.0 is freely available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc.

  1. Study on electrical conductivity and phase transition in singly doped BIPBVOX (Bi2V1-xPbxO5.5-x/2) solid electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beg, Saba; Naqvi, Faria K.; Al-Areqi, Niyazi A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Samples of bismuth lead vanadium oxide (BIPBVOX) (Bi2V1-xPbxO5.5-x/2) singly substituted system in the composition range 0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.20 were prepared by sol-gel synthesis route. Structural investigations were carried out by using a combination of differential thermal analysis (DTA) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) technique. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDXA) of doped samples was carried out to predict the sample purity and doping concentration. Transitions, α↔β, β↔γ and γ‧↔γ were detected by XRD, DTA and variation in the Arrhenius plots of conductivity. The ionic conductivity was measured by AC impedance spectroscopy. The solid solutions with composition x ≤ 0.07 undergo α↔β phase transition, at 329 °C and β↔γ phase transition at 419 °C. The highly conducting γ‧-phase was effectively stabilized at room temperature for compositions with x ≥ 0.17 whose thermal stability increases with Pb content. At 300 °C, the highest value of conductivity 6.234 × 10-5 S cm-1 was obtained for composition x = 0.15 and at 600 °C the highest value of conductivity 0.65 S cm-1 is observed for x = 0.17. AC impedance plots reveal that the conductivity is mainly due to the grain contribution to oxide ion conductivity.

  2. Impaired action potential initiation in GABAergic interneurons causes hyperexcitable networks in an epileptic mouse model carrying a human Na(V)1.1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Liautard, Camille; Kirschenbaum, Daniel; Pofahl, Martin; Lavigne, Jennifer; Liu, Yuanyuan; Theiss, Stephan; Slotta, Johannes; Escayg, Andrew; Dihné, Marcel; Beck, Heinz; Mantegazza, Massimo; Lerche, Holger

    2014-11-05

    Mutations in SCN1A and other ion channel genes can cause different epileptic phenotypes, but the precise mechanisms underlying the development of hyperexcitable networks are largely unknown. Here, we present a multisystem analysis of an SCN1A mouse model carrying the NaV1.1-R1648H mutation, which causes febrile seizures and epilepsy in humans. We found a ubiquitous hypoexcitability of interneurons in thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus, without detectable changes in excitatory neurons. Interestingly, somatic Na(+) channels in interneurons and persistent Na(+) currents were not significantly changed. Instead, the key mechanism of interneuron dysfunction was a deficit of action potential initiation at the axon initial segment that was identified by analyzing action potential firing. This deficit increased with the duration of firing periods, suggesting that increased slow inactivation, as recorded for recombinant mutated channels, could play an important role. The deficit in interneuron firing caused reduced action potential-driven inhibition of excitatory neurons as revealed by less frequent spontaneous but not miniature IPSCs. Multiple approaches indicated increased spontaneous thalamocortical and hippocampal network activity in mutant mice, as follows: (1) more synchronous and higher-frequency firing was recorded in primary neuronal cultures plated on multielectrode arrays; (2) thalamocortical slices examined by field potential recordings revealed spontaneous activities and pathological high-frequency oscillations; and (3) multineuron Ca(2+) imaging in hippocampal slices showed increased spontaneous neuronal activity. Thus, an interneuron-specific generalized defect in action potential initiation causes multisystem disinhibition and network hyperexcitability, which can well explain the occurrence of seizures in the studied mouse model and in patients carrying this mutation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414874-16$15.00/0.

  3. Hearing loss without overt metabolic acidosis in ATP6V1B1 deficient MRL mice, a new genetic model for non-syndromic deafness with enlarged vestibular aqueducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cong; Gagnon, Leona H; Longo-Guess, Chantal; Korstanje, Ron; Sheehan, Susan M; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Schrader, Angela D; Lett, Jaclynn M; Johnson, Kenneth R

    2017-10-01

    Mutations of the human ATP6V1B1 gene cause distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA; OMIM #267300) often associated with sensorineural hearing impairment; however, mice with a knockout mutation of Atp6v1b1 were reported to exhibit a compensated acidosis and normal hearing. We discovered a new spontaneous mutation (vortex, symbol vtx) of Atp6v1b1 in an MRL/MpJ (MRL) colony of mice. In contrast to the reported phenotype of the knockout mouse, which was developed on a primarily C57BL/6 (B6) strain background, MRL-Atp6v1b1vtx/vtx mutant mice exhibit profound hearing impairment, which is associated with enlarged endolymphatic compartments of the inner ear. Mutant mice have alkaline urine but do not exhibit overt metabolic acidosis, a renal phenotype similar to that of the Atpbv1b1 knockout mouse. The abnormal inner ear phenotype of MRL- Atp6v1b1vtx/vtx mice was lost when the mutation was transferred onto the C57BL/6J (B6) background, indicating the influence of strain-specific genetic modifiers. To genetically map modifier loci in Atp6v1b1vtx/vtx mice, we analysed ABR thresholds of progeny from a backcross segregating MRL and B6 alleles. We found statistically significant linkage with a locus on Chr 13 that accounts for about 20% of the hearing threshold variation in the backcross mice. The important effect that genetic background has on the inner ear phenotype of Atp6v1b1 mutant mice provides insight into the hearing loss variability associated with dRTA caused by ATP6V1B1 mutations. Because MRL-Atp6v1b1vxt/vtx mice do not recapitulate the metabolic acidosis of dRTA patients, they provide a new genetic model for nonsyndromic deafness with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA; OMIM #600791). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  5. [Corporal therapy in sexual therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonierbale, M

    1977-12-01

    The use of corporal therapy in treating sexual problems is discussed. The erotic zones of the body are established very early in infancy. The central nervous system continues to develop 6 months after birth in human beings. Experiments done with rats show that rats that are stimulated by noise, handling, etc., develop denser and more numerous nerve cells. Touch, rhythm, and facial expression are established as the interface with the self's erotic image (established in infancy) and the world. Corporal therapy can modify the physiological functioning of the libido. It is also necessary that one accept one's sociocultural identity. Relational massage, bioenergy, and relaxation are 3 types of corporal therapy used to ameliorate sexual problems.

  6. The Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model: a unified model with different ranges of complexity based on the molecular surrogate approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvidat, F.; Sartelet, K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the Secondary Organic Aerosol Processor (SOAP v1.0) model is presented. This model determines the partitioning of organic compounds between the gas and particle phases. It is designed to be modular with different user options depending on the computation time and the complexity required by the user. This model is based on the molecular surrogate approach, in which each surrogate compound is associated with a molecular structure to estimate some properties and parameters (hygroscopicity, absorption into the aqueous phase of particles, activity coefficients and phase separation). Each surrogate can be hydrophilic (condenses only into the aqueous phase of particles), hydrophobic (condenses only into the organic phases of particles) or both (condenses into both the aqueous and the organic phases of particles). Activity coefficients are computed with the UNIFAC (UNIversal Functional group Activity Coefficient; Fredenslund et al., 1975) thermodynamic model for short-range interactions and with the Aerosol Inorganic-Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC) parameterization for medium- and long-range interactions between electrolytes and organic compounds. Phase separation is determined by Gibbs energy minimization. The user can choose between an equilibrium representation and a dynamic representation of organic aerosols (OAs). In the equilibrium representation, compounds in the particle phase are assumed to be at equilibrium with the gas phase. However, recent studies show that the organic aerosol is not at equilibrium with the gas phase because the organic phases could be semi-solid (very viscous liquid phase). The condensation-evaporation of organic compounds could then be limited by the diffusion in the organic phases due to the high viscosity. An implicit dynamic representation of secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) is available in SOAP with OAs divided into layers, the first layer being at the center of the particle (slowly

  7. Inference on population history and model checking using DNA sequence and microsatellite data with the software DIYABC (v1.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estoup Arnaud

    2010-07-01

    computation within an ABC framework, hence filling up a gap of ABC analysis. The software DIYABC V1.0 is freely available at http://www1.montpellier.inra.fr/CBGP/diyabc.

  8. A nonallergenic birch pollen allergy vaccine consisting of hepatitis PreS-fused Bet v 1 peptides focuses blocking IgG toward IgE epitopes and shifts immune responses to a tolerogenic and Th1 phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marth, Katharina; Breyer, Isabella; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Blatt, Katharina; Shamji, Mohamed H; Layhadi, Janice; Gieras, Anna; Swoboda, Ines; Zafred, Domen; Keller, Walter; Valent, Peter; Durham, Stephen R; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-04-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only allergen-specific and disease-modifying treatment for allergy. The construction and characterization of a vaccine for birch pollen allergy is reported. Two nonallergenic peptides, PA and PB, derived from the IgE-reactive areas of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were fused to the hepatitis B surface protein, PreS, in four recombinant fusion proteins containing different numbers and combinations of the peptides. Fusion proteins expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity showed a lack of IgE reactivity and allergenic activity when tested with sera and basophils from patients allergic to birch pollen. Compared to Bet v 1 allergen, peptides PA and PB showed reduced T cell activation in PBMCs from allergic patients, whereas PreS fusion proteins induced less IL-5 and more IL-10 and IFN-γ. Immunization of rabbits with the fusion proteins, in particular with a PreS fusion protein 2PAPB-PreS, containing two copies of each peptide, induced high levels of IgG Abs against the major IgE-reactive site on Bet v 1 and related allergens. These IgG Abs inhibited allergic patients' IgE binding to Bet v 1 better than did IgG induced by immunization with complete Bet v 1. Furthermore, 2PAPB-PreS-induced IgG inhibited Bet v 1-induced basophil activation in allergic patients and CD23-facilitated allergen presentation. Our study exemplifies novel beneficial features for a PreS carrier-based peptide vaccine for birch pollen, which, in addition to the established reduction in allergenic activity, include the enhanced focusing of blocking Ab responses toward IgE epitopes, immunomodulatory activity, and reduction of CD23-facilitated allergen presentation.

  9. Differential effect of D623N variant and wild-type Na(v)1.7 sodium channels on resting potential and interspike membrane potential of dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hye-Sook; Vasylyev, Dmytro V; Estacion, Mark; Macala, Lawrence J; Shah, Palak; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-09-05

    Sodium channel NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sympathetic ganglion neurons. Gain-of-function NaV1.7 mutations/variants have been identified in the painful disorders inherited erythromelalgia and small-fiber neuropathy (SFN). DRG neurons transfected with these channel variants display depolarized resting potential, reduced current-threshold, increased firing-frequency and spontaneous firing. Whether the depolarizing shift in resting potential and enhanced spontaneous firing are due to persistent activity of variant channels, or to compensatory changes in other conductance(s) in response to expression of the variant channel, as shown in model systems, has not been studied. We examined the effect of wild-type NaV1.7 and a NaV1.7 mutant channel, D623N, associated with SFN, on resting potential and membrane potential during interspike intervals in DRG neurons. Resting potential in DRG neurons expressing D623N was depolarized compared to neurons expressing WT-NaV1.7. Exposure to TTX hyperpolarized resting potential by 7mV, increased current-threshold, decreased firing-frequency, and reduced NMDG-induced-hyperpolarization in DRG neurons expressing D623N. To assess the contribution of depolarized resting potential to DRG neuron excitability, we mimicked the mutant channel's depolarizing effect by current injection to produce equivalent depolarization; the depolarization decreased current threshold and increased firing-frequency. Voltage-clamp using ramp or repetitive action potentials as commands showed that D623N channels enhance the TTX-sensitive inward current, persistent at subthreshold membrane voltages, as predicted by a Hodgkin-Huxley model. Our results demonstrate that a variant of NaV1.7 associated with painful neuropathy depolarizes resting membrane potential and produces an enhanced inward current during interspike intervals, thereby contributing to DRG neuron hyperexcitability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  10. [The value of terminal force of P wave in V1 lead in the diagnosis of coal-worker's pneumoconiosis with pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ying

    2012-01-01

    To determine the value of terminal force of P wave in V1 lead (Ptf-V1) in the diagnosis of coal-workers' pneumoconiosis with pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy. Select the coal-worker with pneumoconiosis postmortem examination cases which were pathologically diagnosed as pulmonary heart disease complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy and can measure Ptf-V1. Select 14 cases with ECG left axis deviation, no deviation and right axis deviation. Measure and analyze the Ptf-V1 value, the thickness of left and right ventricular wall. There's obvious discrepancy in ventricular wall thickness mean in ECG left axis deviation, no deviation and right axis deviation groups, the discrepancy have statistical significance (F1 = 32.18, P left ventricular wall is thicker in ECG left axis deviation group [(1.81 +/- 0.18) cm] than in no deviation [(1.47 +/- 0.15) cm] and right axis deviation groups [(1.39 +/- 0.10) cm], the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left axis deviation group [(0.79 +/- 0.14) cm] than in no deviation group [(0.58 +/- 0.14) cm], the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P axis deviation group [(0.71 +/- 0.14) cm] than in no deviation group, the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left axis deviation Ptf-V1 relevance ratio 85.71% is higher than in no deviation (35.70%) and right axis deviation groups (28.57%), the discrepancy have statistical significance with (P left ventricular wall thickness in ECG left axis deviation and no deviation groups (r1 = 0.92, P left ventricular morphosis and function especially left atrium loading change. ECG Ptf-V1 combined with ECG left axis deviation is valuable to the diagnosis of coal-workers with pneumoconiosis complicated by left ventricular hypertrophy.

  11. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  12. Narrative therapy, family therapy and history

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This article was inspired by listening to the interesting plenary on the influence of narrative therapy on family therapy at the AFT annual conference in Manchester in September 2008. One of the issues raised concerned the historical connections between narrative therapy and the broader family therapy field. The contributors seemed keen to avoid a split between narrative therapy and the broader family therapy field and, instead, to find connections but this issue seemed difficult to negotiate...

  13. Antiproton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Knudsen, Helge V; Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd-Jürgen; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Ratib, Osman; Solberg, Timothy D; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most important means we have for the treatment of localised tumours. It is therefore essential to optimize the technique, and a lot of effort goes into this endeavour. Since the proposal by Wilson in 1946 [R.R. Wilson, Radiology use of fast protons, Radiology 47 (1946) 487.] that proton beams might be better than photon beams at inactivating cancer cells, hadron therapy has been developed in parallel with photon therapy and a substantial knowledge has been gained on the effects of pions, protons and heavy ions (mostly carbon ions). Here we discuss the recent measurements by the CERN ACE collaboration of the biological effects of antiprotons, and argue that these particles very likely are the optimal agents for radiotherapy.

  14. [Functional therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lima, G R

    1977-03-01

    This article attempts to present and explain the therapy for the most common gynecological and nongynecological problems caused by oral contraception (OC). Carcinogenic side effects include vulvar and cervical cancer, which can be treated with cryosurgery, breast cancer, usually treated either by termination of OC, or by additional hormonal therapy, endometritis, and endometrial hyperplasia and adenocarcinoma, a result of the action of progesterone on tissues continuously stimulated by estrogen. Endocrinal aspects of OC include all menopausal syndromes, most dermatological side effects, such as acne and hirsutism, nonpuerperal galactorrhea, usually due to hyperprolactinemia, and which responds very well to treatment with bromocriptine, and infections such as herpes genitalis, candida albicans, and others. OC can also cause vulvar distrophy, to be treated with testosterone propionate, and anovulation, which responds very well to treatment with clomiphene.

  15. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  16. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  17. MUSIC THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Archana Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Music Therapy is an established health profession in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address to physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of individuals. After assessing the strength and needs of each client, the qualified music therapist provides the indicated treatment including creating, singing, moving to and/or listening to music. Through musical involvement in therapeutic context, clients, abilities are strengthened and transfer to other areas of their liv...

  18. Types of hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor for regular checkups when taking HT. Alternative Names HRT- types; Estrogen replacement therapy - types; ERT- types of hormone therapy; Hormone replacement therapy - types; Menopause - types of hormone therapy; HT - types; Menopausal hormone ...

  19. About Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if}} {{{tweet}}} About Occupational Therapy What Is Occupational Therapy? Occupational therapy practitioners ask, "What matters to you?" not, " ... about our science-driven and evidence-based profession. Occupational Therapy: Improving Function While Controlling Costs 4 4 The ...

  20. Radiation Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving Teens a Voice in Health Care Decisions Radiation Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Radiation Therapy Print A ... have many questions and concerns about it. About Radiation Therapy In radiation therapy, high-energy radiation from ...

  1. Case Report: Pregnancy in a patient with recurrent glioblastoma [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/27s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Flechl

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a woman with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM who recently gave birth. She announced her pregnancy shortly after the sixth cycle of a dense regimen of temozolomide, prescribed for treating the first recurrence of glioblastoma. Three years ago, in April 2008, she had undergone gross total resection of a glioblastoma multiforme in the postcentral region of the right hemisphere and had subsequently received treatment according to the actual standard therapy consisting of radiotherapy up to 60 Gy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The complete amount of temozolomide given before this pregnancy was 20.9 mg/m2. Nevertheless, she delivered a 1890 g child by caesarean section in the 32/6 week of pregnancy. The child showed no anomalies and is developing normally under close surveillance by paediatricians.

  2. Case Report: Group B Streptococcus meningitis in an adolescent  [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3u4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselle Vittorino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS usually colonizes the gastrointestinal and lower genital tracts of asymptomatic hosts, yet the incidence of invasive disease is on the rise. We describe a case of an 18 year old woman, recently diagnosed with lupus, who reported a spontaneous abortion six weeks prior to her hospitalization.  She presented with fever, altered mental status, and meningeal signs, paired with a positive blood culture for GBS. Magnetic resonance imaging of her brain demonstrated an extra-axial fluid collection, and she was diagnosed with meningitis.  She received prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy and aggressive treatment for lupus, leading to clinical recovery. This case illustrates the importance of recognizing GBS as a potential pathogen in all patients presenting with CNS infection.  

  3. SRB/GEWEX evapotranspiration (Penman-Monteith) L4 3 hour 0.5 degree x 0.5 degree V1 (WC_PM_ET_050) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SRB/GEWEX evapotranspiration (Penman-Monteith) L4 3 hour 0.5 degree x 0.5 degree V1 is a global, 24-year (1984-2007), satellite-derived evapotranspiration over land...

  4. Cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2, PAP2d, with two different transcripts PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liyun; Gu, Shaohua; Sun, Yaqiong; Zheng, Dan; Wu, Qihan; Li, Xin; Dai, Jianfeng; Dai, Jianliang; Ji, Chaoneng; Xie, Yi; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the cloning and characterization of a novel human phosphatidic acid phosphatase type 2 isoform cDNAs (PAP2d) from the foetal brain cDNA library. The PAP2d gene is localized on chromosome 1p21.3. It contains six exons and spans 112 kb of the genomic DNA. By large-scale cDNA sequencing we found two splice variants of PAP2d, PAP2d_v1 and PAP2d_v2. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 1722 bp in length and spans an open reading frame from nucleotide 56 to 1021, encoding a 321aa protein. The PAP2d_v2 cDNA is 1707 bp in length encoding a 316aa protein from nucleotide 56-1006. The PAP2d_v1 cDNA is 15 bp longer than the PAP2d_v2 cDNA in the terminal of the fifth exon and it creates different ORF. Both of the proteins contain a well-conserved PAP2 motif. The PAP2d_v1 is mainly expressed in human brain, lung, kidney, testis and colon, while PAP2d_v2 is restricted to human placenta, skeletal muscle, and kidney. The two splice variants are co-expressed only in kidney.

  5. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  6. Nutritional Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Julie

    2016-03-01

    This article provides the reader with steps needed to accurately assess patient nutrition behaviors that contribute to weight gain, inability to lose weight, or inability to sustain weight loss. Evidence-based approaches in nutrition therapy that can create the daily energy deficit needed to produce 1/2 to 2 pounds of weight loss per week, and the strategies to create the energy deficit, are presented. To optimize health, long-term weight loss maintenance is needed. The benefits of using a multidisciplinary team approach in treating obesity are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Comparison and validation of the results of the AZNHEX v.1.0 code with the MCNP code simulating the core of a fast reactor cooled with sodium; Comparacion y validacion de los resultados del codigo AZNHEX v.1.0 con el codigo MCNP simulando el nucleo de un reactor rapido refrigerado con sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L.; Bastida O, G. E. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Esquivel E, J., E-mail: blink19871@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The development of the AZTLAN platform for the analysis and design of nuclear reactors is led by Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) and divided into four working groups, which have well-defined activities to achieve significant progress in this project individually and jointly. Within these working groups is the users group, whose main task is to use the codes that make up the AZTLAN platform to provide feedback to the developers, and in this way to make the final versions of the codes are efficient and at the same time reliable and easy to understand. In this paper we present the results provided by the AZNHEX v.1.0 code when simulating the core of a fast reactor cooled with sodium at steady state. The validation of these results is a fundamental part of the platform development and responsibility of the users group, so in this research the results obtained with AZNHEX are compared and analyzed with those provided by the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5, software worldwide used and recognized. A description of the methodology used with MCNP-5 is also presented for the calculation of the interest variables and the difference that is obtained with respect to the calculated with AZNHEX. (Author)

  9. Internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR: an open trial [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/8l

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Spence

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT can reduce symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. This study examined the efficacy of an internet-delivered treatment protocol that combined iCBT and internet-delivered eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (iEMDR, in an uncontrolled trial. Eleven of the 15 participants completed post-treatment questionnaires. Large effect sizes were found from pre-treatment to 3-month follow-up (d = 1.03 – 1.61 on clinician-assessed and self-reported measures of PTSD, anxiety and distress, with moderate effect sizes (d = 0.59 – 0.70 found on measures of depression and disability. At post-treatment, 55% of the participants no longer met criteria for PTSD and this was sustained at follow-up. Symptom worsening occurred in 3 of 15 (20% of the sample from pre- to post-treatment; however, these participants reported overall symptom improvement by follow-up. Future research directions for iEMDR are discussed.

  10. Recent advances in understanding/managing eosinophilic esophagitis in adults [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5rn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Katzka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is an exciting time for research in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE. As a new and increasingly prevalent disease, it is receiving considerable attention in the medical world, resulting in a flood of new insights. Clearly, a genetic predisposition seems likely with the identification of abnormalities in thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, calpain14, and eotaxin-3 genes. There are also well-defined abnormalities described in esophageal epithelial barrier function in these patients. The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and EoE remains unclear, but emerging data suggest that the concept of proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPIREE may retain less importance, as this subset of patients becomes a likely subset of EoE in general. Finally, we approach the looming issue of long-term maintenance therapy. Although we lack adequate specific data on how to provide long-term pharmacologic treatment, studies clearly show that for most patients, this is a progressive disease that warrants such consideration.

  11. Case Report: A case report of acromegaly associated with primary aldosteronism [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2ny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Matrozova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a rare combination of acromegaly and primary aldosteronism. A 37 year-old female patient was diagnosed with acromegaly on the basis of typical clinical, hormonal and image characteristics. She presented also with one of the most common co-morbidities – arterial hypertension. The patient has been regularly followed-up and after three surgical interventions, irradiation and adjuvant treatment with a dopamine agonist, acromegaly was finally controlled in 2008 (20 years after diagnosis. Arterial hypertension however, remained a therapeutic problem even after prescription of four antihypertensive drugs. She had normal biochemical parameters, except for low potassium levels 3.2 (3.5-5.6 mmol/l. This raised the suspicion of primary hyperaldosteronism, confirmed by a high aldosterone to plasma rennin activity ratio, high aldosterone level after a Captopril challenge test and visualization of a 35 mm left adrenal nodule on a CT scan. After an operation, the patient recovered from hypokalemia and antihypertensive therapy was reduced to a small dose of a Ca blocker. Co-morbid arterial hypertension is common in acromegaly, though it is rare for this to be caused by Conn’s adenoma. The association of Conn’s adenoma with acromegaly has been interpreted in two lines: as a component of multiple endocrine neoplasia type (MEN1 syndrome or as a direct mitogenic effect of hyperactivated GH-IGF1 axis.

  12. MC-TESTER v. 1.23: A universal tool for comparisons of Monte Carlo predictions for particle decays in high energy physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, N.; Golonka, P.; Przedziński, T.; Waş, Z.

    2011-03-01

    .2.4 and 4.3.2 with g77/gfortran Computer: Tested on various platforms Operating system: Tested on operating systems: Linux SLC 4.6 and SLC 5, Fedora 8, Ubuntu 8.2 etc. Classification: 11.9 External routines: HepMC ( https://savannah.cern.ch/projects/hepmc/), PYTHIA8 ( http://home.thep.lu.se/~torbjorn/Pythia.html), LaTeX ( http://www.latex-project.org/) Catalog identifier of previous version: ADSM_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 157 (2004) 39 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The decays of individual particles are well defined modules of a typical Monte Carlo program chain in high energy physics. A fast, semi-automatic way of comparing results from different programs is often desirable for the development of new programs, in order to check correctness of the installations or for discussion of uncertainties. Solution method: A typical HEP Monte Carlo program stores the generated events in event records such as HepMC, HEPEVT or PYJETS. MC-TESTER scans, event by event, the contents of the record and searches for the decays of the particle under study. The list of the found decay modes is successively incremented and histograms of all invariant masses which can be calculated from the momenta of the particle decay products are defined and filled. The outputs from the two runs of distinct programs can be later compared. A booklet of comparisons is created: for every decay channel, all histograms present in the two outputs are plotted and parameter quantifying shape difference is calculated. Its maximum over every decay channel is printed in the summary table. Reasons for new version: Interface for HepMC Event Record is introduced. Setup for benchmarking the interfaces, such as τ-lepton production and decay, including QED bremsstrahlung effects is introduced as well. This required significant changes in the algorithm. As a consequence, a new version of the code was introduced. Restrictions: Only the first

  13. In vitro retention of a new thermoplastic titratable mandibular advancement device [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/509

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Braem

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral appliance (OA therapy with a mandibular advancement device (OAm is a non-invasive, alternative approach to maintaining upper airway patency. The main requirement for an OAm to be effective is the adequate retention on the teeth while the patient is asleep. We evaluated the retentive forces of a new low-cost, customizable, titratable, thermoplastic OAm (BluePro®; BlueSom, France. Dental impressions and casts were made for one patient with complete upper and lower dental arches including the third molars and class II bite proportions. A setup based on Frasaco ANA-4 models was also used. Two protrusive positions of the mandible were investigated: 3 mm and 8 mm, representing respectively 25% and 65% of the maximal protrusion. The forces required to remove the BluePro® device from the carriers were recorded continuously over 730 cycles (=365 days, twice a day to simulate 1 year of clinical use. At 8 mm protrusion the BluePro® device showed retentive forces of ~27N. There was a slight but non-significant decrease in retentive forces in the tests on the epoxified carriers which was not found on the ANA-4 carriers. There were no significant differences between the carriers as a function of protrusion. The BluePro® device tested in the present study possesses sufficient retention forces to resist initial jaw opening forces and full mouth opening forces estimated to be ~20N. It could therefore broaden the indications for use of thermoplastic OAms. It could provide a temporary OAm while a custom-made OAm is being manufactured or repaired. Patients could be provided with a low-cost try-out device capable of reliable titration, providing an indication of effectiveness and of patient acceptance of an OAm, although the effect of device shape and size on therapeutic outcome is not yet known. Finally it could provide an affordable OAm solution in resource-restricted healthcare settings.

  14. Methodological framework to identify possible adverse drug reactions using population-based administrative data [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Sauer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a framework for detecting possible adverse drug reactions (ADRs using the Utah Medicaid administrative data. We examined four classes of ADRs associated with treatment of dementia by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs: known reactions (gastrointestinal, psychological disturbances, potential reactions (respiratory disturbance, novel reactions (hepatic, hematological disturbances, and death. Methods: Our cohort design linked drug utilization data to medical claims from Utah Medicaid recipients. We restricted the analysis to 50 years-old and older beneficiaries diagnosed with dementia-related diseases. We compared patients treated with AChEI to patients untreated with anti-dementia medication therapy. We attempted to remove confounding by establishing propensity-score-matched cohorts for each outcome investigated; we then evaluated the effects of drug treatment by conditional multivariable Cox-proportional-hazard regression. Acute and transient effects were evaluated by a crossover design using conditional logistic regression. Results: Propensity-matched analysis of expected reactions revealed that AChEI treatment was associated with gastrointestinal episodes (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 2.02; 95%CI: 1.28-3.2, but not psychological episodes, respiratory disturbance, or death. Among the unexpected reactions, the risk of hematological episodes was higher (HR: 2.32; 95%CI: 1.47-3.6 in patients exposed to AChEI. AChEI exposure was not associated with an increase in hepatic episodes. We also noted a trend, identified in the case-crossover design, toward increase odds of experiencing acute hematological events during AChEI exposure (Odds Ratio: 3.0; 95% CI: 0.97 - 9.3. Conclusions: We observed an expected association between AChEIs treatment and gastrointestinal disturbances and detected a signal of possible hematological ADR after treatment with AChEIs in this pilot study. Using this analytic framework may raise awareness of potential

  15. Differential state-dependent modification of rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Bingjun [College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Soderlund, David M., E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu [Department of Entomology, Cornell University, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We expressed rat Na{sub v}1.6 sodium channels in combination with the rat {beta}1 and {beta}2 auxiliary subunits in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and evaluated the effects of the pyrethroid insecticides tefluthrin and deltamethrin on expressed sodium currents using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Both pyrethroids produced concentration-dependent, resting modification of Na{sub v}1.6 channels, prolonging the kinetics of channel inactivation and deactivation to produce persistent 'late' currents during depolarization and tail currents following repolarization. Both pyrethroids also produced concentration dependent hyperpolarizing shifts in the voltage dependence of channel activation and steady-state inactivation. Maximal shifts in activation, determined from the voltage dependence of the pyrethroid-induced late and tail currents, were {approx} 25 mV for tefluthrin and {approx} 20 mV for deltamethrin. The highest attainable concentrations of these compounds also caused shifts of {approx} 5-10 mV in the voltage dependence of steady-state inactivation. In addition to their effects on the voltage dependence of inactivation, both compounds caused concentration-dependent increases in the fraction of sodium current that was resistant to inactivation following strong depolarizing prepulses. We assessed the use-dependent effects of tefluthrin and deltamethrin on Na{sub v}1.6 channels by determining the effect of trains of 1 to 100 5-ms depolarizing prepulses at frequencies of 20 or 66.7 Hz on the extent of channel modification. Repetitive depolarization at either frequency increased modification by deltamethrin by {approx} 2.3-fold but had no effect on modification by tefluthrin. Tefluthrin and deltamethrin were equally potent as modifiers of Na{sub v}1.6 channels in HEK293 cells using the conditions producing maximal modification as the basis for comparison. These findings show that the actions of tefluthrin and deltamethrin of Na{sub v}1.6 channels

  16. Vista ampliada para Gerencia de Proyectos usando mejores prácticas del PMBok® cuarta edición y CMMI®-SVC V.1.2 nivel de capacidad o madurez 2

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Periñán, Ingrid Lucía; Gómez Arenas, Liliana del Socorro

    2011-01-01

    El artículo presenta de forma resumida la comparación realizada entre los modelos CMMI®- DEV V.1.2 y CMMI®-SVC V1.2 con el objetivo de decidir con cuál de ellos se realizará el posterior cruce y comparación con la Guía del PMBok® Cuarta Edición, producto de la cual surge la propuesta de un modelo o vista ampliada para ser usado como referencia de mejora en organizaciones de servicios o consultoría que utilizan para la gerencia de sus proyectos buenas prácticas tanto de la Guía del PMBok® como...

  17. Identification of an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120 influencing neutralization by anti-V3 antibodies and soluble CD4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Hemming, A; Bolmstedt, A

    1994-01-01

    affecting viral infectivity in cell culture. We found that the mutated virus lacking an N-linked glycan in the V1-loop of gp120 was more resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies to the V3-loop and neutralization by soluble recombinant CD4 (sCD4). Both viruses were equally well neutralized by Con...... in the V1-loop of HIV-1 gp120. Lack of an N-linked glycan was verified by a mobility enhancement of mutant gp120 in SDS-gel electrophoresis. The mutated virus showed no differences in either gp120 content per infectious unit or infectivity, indicating that the N-linked glycan was neither essential nor...

  18. Isolation of Mal d 1 and Api g 1 - specific recombinant antibodies from mouse IgG Fab fragment libraries - Mal d 1-specific antibody exhibits cross-reactivity against Bet v 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Jaana; Niemi, Merja H; Iljin, Kristiina; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Takkinen, Kristiina; Laukkanen, Marja-Leena

    2015-05-27

    Around 3-5% of the population suffer from IgE-mediated food allergies in Western countries and the number of food-allergenic people is increasing. Individuals with certain pollen allergies may also suffer from a sensitisation to proteins in the food products. As an example a person sensitised to the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is often sensitised to its homologues, such as the major allergens of apple, Mal d 1, and celery, Api g 1, as well. Development of tools for the reliable, sensitive and quick detection of allergens present in various food products is essential for allergic persons to prevent the consumption of substances causing mild and even life-threatening immune responses. The use of monoclonal antibodies would ensure the specific detection of the harmful food content for a sensitised person. Mouse IgG antibody libraries were constructed from immunised mice and specific recombinant antibodies for Mal d 1 and Api g 1 were isolated from the libraries by phage display. More detailed characterisation of the resulting antibodies was carried out using ELISA, SPR experiments and immunoprecipitation assays. The allergen-specific Fab fragments exhibited high affinity towards the target recombinant allergens. Furthermore, the Fab fragments also recognised native allergens from natural sources. Interestingly, isolated Mal d 1-specific antibody bound also to Bet v 1, the main allergen eliciting the cross-reactivity syndrome between the birch pollen and apple. Despite the similarities in Api g 1 and Bet v 1 tertiary structures, the isolated Api g 1-specific antibodies showed no cross-reactivity to Bet v 1. Here, high-affinity allergen-specific recombinant antibodies were isolated with interesting binding properties. With further development, these antibodies can be utilised as tools for the specific and reliable detection of allergens from different consumable products. This study gives new preliminary insights to elucidate the mechanism behind the pollen

  19. Vaccination for birch pollen allergy. Induction of affinity-matured or blocking IgG antibodies does not account for the reduced binding of IgE to Bet v 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenson, Morten; Jacobi, Henrik H; Bødtger, Uffe

    2003-01-01

    Specific allergy vaccination (SAV) is associated with increased levels of allergen specific IgG in serum. It is not clear, however, to what extent qualitative changes in allergen binding to IgG may be induced as well. We therefore analyzed the binding of the major allergen in pollen of birch...... (Betula verrucosa) (Bet v 1), the major allergen in birch pollen, to serum IgG and IgE, separately and in competition. Sera from six birch pollen-allergic patients were obtained before and after 5 years of SAV, and binding was assessed with 125I-Bet v 1. Before SAV, IgG bound more than eight times...... the amount of Bet v 1 compared with IgE, and together they accounted for more than 85% of the serum binding capacity. While SAV induced minimal changes in IgE binding, the IgG binding capacities increased 6-32 times. In contrast, the binding avidities (K(d) 28-40pM) changed less than 20%, pre- and post...

  20. Deciding about hormone therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to continue seeing your doctor for regular checkups. Alternative Names HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - ...

  1. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  2. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Physical Therapy Physical therapy may be an important component of treating dystonia ... everyday tasks, Since dystonia is a neurological disorder, physical therapy does not treat the dystonia directly but rather ...

  3. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features on ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used to: ...

  4. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Late for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Occupational Therapy KidsHealth > For Parents > Occupational Therapy Print A A ... for some kids. continue Kids Who Might Need Occupational Therapy According to the AOTA, kids with these medical ...

  5. Music therapy and depression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    .... This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression...

  6. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  7. Endobronchial ablative therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Joseph C; Musani, Ali I

    2013-09-01

    Endobronchial ablative therapies are used to address a variety of malignant and benign airway lesions. By utilizing endobronchial ablative techniques patients with symptomatic airway lesions may receive significant symptom improvement, improved quality of life, and improved life expectancy. Endobronchial ablative therapies include laser, electrocautery, argon plasma coagulation, cryotherapy, brachytherapy, and photodynamic therapy. The choice to use one therapy versus another depends on technical and patient specific factors. This article reviews indications and contraindications for each therapy, discusses details related to each endobronchial ablative therapy, complications of endobronchial ablative therapies, and briefly discusses practical consideration with endobronchial ablative therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photodissociation of ketene: CH2CO → CH2(a1A1) + CO(v=1) rates and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, Elisabeth Ayn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The rotational energy release in the dissociation of ketene (CH2CO) along its singlet potential energy surface is observed and compared with several statistical and dynamical theories. Rotational distributions for the product, CO($\\tilde{X}$1Σ+)(v=1), are measured from the threshold for production of CH2($\\tilde{a}$ 1A1) (0,0,0) + CO($\\tilde{X}$1Σ+)(v=1) to 1720 cm-1 above. Near threshold (E≤ 200 cm-1 over threshold), phase space theory (PST) matches the observed distributions. At 357 and 490 cm-1, PST constrained by the measured state distributions of the methylene fragment, provides a good fit to these CO(v=1) rotational distributions. For E > 490 cm-1, the constrained PST matches the average rotational energy observed but predicts distributions which are broader than observed. This contrasts to the rotational distributions of the 1CH2 fragment which become shifted to lower rotational states than PST as energy increases from 200 cm-1 above threshold. Dynamical models, the impulsive model and Franck-Condon mapping, do not account for the product rotational state distributions. The CO(v=1) rotational distributions for E > 200 cm-1 contain no measurable product from triplet channel fragmentation. Therefore, they can be compared with the previously determined CO(v=0) rotational distributions in order to partition the CO(v=0) yield between singlet and triplet channels and recalculate the singlet yield. This new yield is found to be at the upper limits of the range previously reported. Rate constants and quantum yields have been determined for the photodissociation of ketene to produce CH2(a 1A1) (0,0,0) + CO(X 1Σ+)(v=1). At 57, 110, 200, 357, and 490 cm-1 above this product threshold, vibrational branching ratios for the singlet products were measured and

  9. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) for ...

  10. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  11. HIV exposed infants vaccinated with a MF59/rgp120 vaccine have higher magnitude anti-V1V2 IgG responses than adults immunized with the same vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Erin P; Fong, Youyi; Toote, Christopher; Cunningham, Coleen K; McFarland, Elizabeth J; Borkowsky, William; Barnett, Susan; Itell, Hannah L; Kumar, Amit; Gray, Glenda; McElrath, M Julianna; Tomaras, Georgia D; Permar, Sallie R; Fouda, Genevieve G

    2017-10-11

    In the RV144 vaccine trial, IgG responses against the HIV envelope variable loops 1 and 2 (V1V2) were associated with decreased HIV acquisition risk. We previously reported that infants immunized with a MF59 adjuvanted rgp120 vaccine developed higher magnitude anti-V1V2 IgG responses than adult RV144 vaccinees. To determine if the robust antibody response in infants is due to differences in vaccine regimens or to inherent differences between the adult and infant immune systems, we compared Env-specific IgG responses in adults and infants immunized with the same MF59 and Alum adjuvanted HIV envelope vaccines. At peak immunogenicity, the magnitude of gp120 and V1V2-specific IgG responses was comparable between adults and infants immunized with the Alum/MNrg120 vaccine (gp120 median MFI infant: 7,118; adult: 11,510; p=0.070; V1V2 median MFI infant: 512; adult: 804;; p=0.50), whereas infants immunized with the MF59/SF-2 rgp120 vaccine had higher magnitude antibody levels than adults (gp120 median MFI infant: 15,509; adult: 2,290; padult: 1538; padults. Anti-V1V2 IgG3 antibodies that were associated with decreased HIV-1 risk in RV144 vaccinees were present in 43% of MF59/rgp120 vaccinated infants but only in 12% of the vaccinated adults (p=0.0018). Finally, in contrast to rare vaccine-elicited Env-specific IgA in infants, rg120 vaccination elicited Env-specific IgA were frequently detected in adults. Our results suggest that vaccine adjuvants differently modulate gp120-specific antibody responses in adults and infants, and that infants can robustly respond to HIV Env immunization.IMPORTANCE More than 150,000 pediatric HIV infections continue to occur yearly, despite the availability of antiretroviral prophylaxis. A pediatric HIV vaccine could reduce the number of these ongoing infant infections, and also prime for long term immunity prior to sexual debut. We previously reported that immunization of infants with a MF59 adjuvanted recombinant gp120 vaccine induced higher

  12. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  13. Identification of the binding sites of the SR49059 nonpeptide antagonist into the V1a vasopressin receptor using sulfydryl-reactive ligands and cysteine mutants as chemical sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtaoui, Chouaïb; Balestre, Marie-Noëlle; Klotz, Philippe; Rognan, Didier; Barberis, Claude; Mouillac, Bernard; Hibert, Marcel

    2003-10-10

    To identify the binding site of the human V1a vasopressin receptor for the selective nonpeptide antagonist SR49059, we have developed a site-directed irreversible labeling strategy that combines mutagenesis of the receptor and use of sulfydryl-reactive ligands. Based on a three-dimensional model of the antagonist docked into the receptor, hypothetical ligand-receptor interactions were investigated by replacing the residues potentially involved in the binding of the antagonist into cysteines and designing analogues of SR49059 derivatized with isothiocyanate or alpha-chloroacetamide moieties. The F225C, F308C, and K128C mutants of the V1a receptor were expressed in COS-7 or Chinese hamster ovary cells, and their pharmacological properties toward SR49059 and its sulfydryl-reactive analogues were analyzed. We demonstrated that treatment of the F225C mutant with the isothiocyanate-derivative compound led to dose-dependent inhibition of the residual binding of the radio-labeled antagonist [125I]HO-LVA. This inhibition is probably the consequence of a covalent irreversible chemical modification, which is only possible when close contacts and optimal orientations exist between reactive groups created both on the ligand and the receptor. This result validated the three-dimensional model hypothesis. Thus, we propose that residue Phe225, located in transmembrane domain V, directly participates in the binding of the V1a-selective nonpeptide antagonist SR49059. This conclusion is in complete agreement with all our previous data on the definition of the agonist/antagonist binding to members of the oxytocin/vasopressin receptor family.

  14. [Influence of Heat-reinforcing Needling on Expression of Plasma Atp 5 O mRNA and Atp 6 V 1 B 2 mRNA in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis of Wind-cold-damp Retention Type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao-Zheng; Wang, Jin-Hai; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Tian, Jie-Xiang; Qin, Xiao-Guang; Fang, Xiao-Li; Tian, Liang; Yuan, Bo

    2016-08-25

    To observe influences of heat-reinforcing needling (HRN) on scores of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) symptoms and expression of plasma ATP synthase subunit O (Atp 5 O) mRNA and lysosomal V 1 subunit B 2 (Atp 6 V 1 B 2) mRNA in patients with wind-cold-damp retention type rheumatoid arthritis (RA), so as to investigate its biological mechanisms in "heat production". Sixty wind-cold-damp retention type RA patients were randomly allocated to HRN group (n=30) and control group (n=30). Guanyuan (CV 4), Qihai (CV 6), bilateral Zusanli (ST 36), and local acupoints near the knee-joint were selected for needling stimulation. Patients of the HRN group were treated by manipulating the acupuncture needle with HRN, and those of the control group treated by manipulating the needle with uniform reinforcing-reducing method. The treatments were performed once daily, 5 days a week, and two weeks altogether. The other 30 healthy volunteers were recruited as the normal control group. The TCM symptom scoring system (0-31 points, 11 items as the severities of pain, swelling and tenderness of the knee-joint) was used to evaluate the status of RA, and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of plasma Atp 5 O mRNA and Atp 6 V 1 B 2 mRNA following removal of red blood cells. After the treatment, the TCM scores of both the HRN and control groups were significantly decreased (PB 2 mRNA in RA patients were significantly lower than those of the normal group (PB 2 mRNA were significantly increased in both HRN and control groups compared to pre-treatment in the same one group (PB 2 mRNA levels were remarkably higher in the control group than in the HRN group (PB 2 mRNA.

  15. Progressive impairment of CaV1.1 function in the skeletal muscle of mice expressing a mutant type 1 Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (G93A) linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqollari, Donald; Romberg, Christin F; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Martini, Martina; Voss, Andrew A; Musarò, Antonio; Bannister, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder that is typically fatal within 3-5 years of diagnosis. While motoneuron death is the defining characteristic of ALS, the events that underlie its pathology are not restricted to the nervous system. In this regard, ALS muscle atrophies and weakens significantly before presentation of neurological symptoms. Since the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) is a key regulator of both mass and force, we investigated whether CaV1.1 function is impaired in the muscle of two distinct mouse models carrying an ALS-linked mutation. We recorded L-type currents, charge movements, and myoplasmic Ca(2+) transients from dissociated flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers to assess CaV1.1 function in two mouse models expressing a type 1 Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase mutant (SOD1(G93A)). In FDB fibers obtained from "symptomatic" global SOD1(G93A) mice, we observed a substantial reduction of SR Ca(2+) release in response to depolarization relative to fibers harvested from age-matched control mice. L-type current and charge movement were both reduced by ~40 % in symptomatic SOD1(G93A) fibers when compared to control fibers. Ca(2+) transients were not significantly reduced in similar experiments performed with FDB fibers obtained from "early-symptomatic" SOD1(G93A) mice, but L-type current and charge movement were decreased (~30 and ~20 %, respectively). Reductions in SR Ca(2+) release (~35 %), L-type current (~20 %), and charge movement (~15 %) were also observed in fibers obtained from another model where SOD1(G93A) expression was restricted to skeletal muscle. We report reductions in EC coupling, L-type current density, and charge movement in FDB fibers obtained from symptomatic global SOD1(G93A) mice. Experiments performed with FDB fibers obtained from early-symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and skeletal muscle autonomous MLC/SOD1(G93A) mice support the idea that events occurring locally in the skeletal

  16. Tetrapod V1R-like ora genes in an early-diverging ray-finned fish species: the canonical six ora gene repertoire of teleost fish resulted from gene loss in a larger ancestral repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapilko, Veronika; Korsching, Sigrun I

    2016-01-27

    Chemical senses serve a multitude of essential functions across the animal kingdom. Vertebrates employ four GPCR families to detect odors, among them the v1r/ora gene family. The V1R family is known to evolve rapidly in the lobe-finned lineage giving rise to tetrapods, but the homologous ORA family consists of just six highly conserved genes in teleost fish, with direct orthologs in the lobe-finned fish coelacanth. Thus, the teleost repertoire of six canonical ora genes was assumed to be the ancestral feature before the divergence of ray-finned and lobe-finned fish. So far, this hypothesis has not been tested with earlier diverging ray-finned fish. We have newly identified the complete ora gene repertoires of five teleost species, and of spotted gar, a basal ray-finned fish, using thorough data mining and extensive phylogenetic analysis. The genomes of eight further teleost species were re-analyzed for their ORA repertoires. We report that direct orthologs of the six canonical ora genes (ora1-6) were present in all newly analyzed species, with faithfully preserved exon/intron structure and mostly preserved genomic arrangement in symmetric pairs for ora1-4. In four teleost species including medaka and cave fish we observe species-specific gene duplication events. Thus, the ora gene repertoire in teleost fish is not quite as strictly conserved as previously assumed. In fact, the examination of non-synonymous vs. synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) shows pronounced negative selection in five of the six ora genes, but also rare occurrence of positive selection in ora3 and ora6. Surprisingly, spotted gar possesses beyond the six canonical genes three additional genes, ora7-8b, orthologous to coelacanth genes v1r07-10. No orthologs for these genes were found in teleosts and cartilaginous fish. Early diverging ray-finned fish such as the spotted gar possess several v1r-like genes previously assumed to be restricted to the lobe-finned lineage, but now found to be already

  17. Occupational therapy students' perceptions of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, Merrill June; Rodger, Sylvia; Hall, Anna R

    2012-10-01

    An understanding of students' perceptions of occupational therapy on entry is required to recognise how professional socialisation occurs through curriculum. Findings pertain to a qualitative study investigating students' perceptions of occupational therapy upon entry to two occupational therapy programmes in Australia. Students commencing Bachelor of Occupational Therapy and Masters of Occupational Therapy Studies programmes participated in the study (n = 462). A purpose-designed questionnaire was distributed to students in the first lecture of each programme. Preliminary analysis comprised identification of keywords/phrases and coding categories were generated from patterns of keywords. Frequency counts and percentages of keywords/phrases within categories were completed. Students' responses were categorised as 'what' occupational therapists do; 'how' they do it; 'why' they do it; and 'who' they work with. In 'what' occupational therapists do students frequently described 'helping' people. Both undergraduate and graduate entry masters students used the term 'rehabilitation' to describe how occupational therapy is done, with graduate entry students occasionally responding with 'through occupation' and 'modifying the environment'. Students perceived the 'why' of occupational therapy as getting back to 'everyday activities', with some students emphasising returning to 'normal' activities or life. Regarding the 'who' category, students also thought occupational therapists worked with people with an 'injury' or 'disability'. Students entered their occupational therapy programmes with perceptions consistent with the general public's views of occupational therapy. However, graduate entry students exposed to a pre-reading package prior to entry had more advanced occupational therapy concepts than undergraduate students. © 2011 The Authors. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal © 2011 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  18. UPC Language Specifications V1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    UPC Consortium

    2005-05-31

    UPC is an explicitly parallel extension to the ISO C 99Standard. UPC follows the partitioned global address space programming model. This document is the formal specification for the UPC language syntax and semantics.

  19. Asteroid Occultations V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is intended to include all reported timings of observed asteroid, planet, and planetary satellite occultation events as well as occultation axes...

  20. GAI LIGHTNING GROUND STRIKES V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is restricted to EOS affiliated researchers. The U.S. National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial lightning detection network operated by...

  1. OLS ANALOG DERIVED LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global lightning signatures from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) have been analyzed from the filmstrip imagery....

  2. NAMMA DIODE LASER HYGROMETER (DLH) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH), a near-infrared spectrometer operating from aircraft platforms, was developed by NASA's Langley and Ames Research Centers. It...

  3. NAMMA LIGHTNING ZEUS DATA V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Lightning ZEUS data is provided by World-ZEUS Long Range Lightning Monitoring Network Data obtained from radio atmospheric signals located at thirteen...

  4. ACES ELECTRIC FIELD MILL V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ALTUS Cloud Electrification Study (ACES) was based at the Naval Air Facility Key West in Florida. ACES researchers in August 2002 conducted overflights of...

  5. INFRARED GLOBAL GEOSTATIONARY COMPOSITE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Infrared Global Geostationary Composite dataset was produced by the Aviation Weather Center (AWC) of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)...

  6. ASTEROID PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Asteroid Photometric Catalog (3rd update), Lagerkvist, et.al., 1993 [LAGERKVISTETAL1993], is a compilation of all asteroid lightcurve photometry published up to...

  7. CAMEX-4 JPL LASER HYGROMETER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Laser Hygrometer measures in situ water vapor content using a tuneable laser emitting at 1.37 microns. Absorption at that wavelength is a function of water vapor...

  8. CAMEX-4 JPL LASER HYGROMETER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CAMEX-4 JPL Laser Hygrometer dataset contains water vapor volume and mixing ratio concentractions collected during the CAMEX-4 campaign to study tropical...

  9. Molecules in Studio v. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-22

    A Powersim Studio implementation of the system dynamics’ ‘Molecules of Structure’. The original implementation was in Ventana’s Vensim language by James Hines. The molecules are fundamental constructs of the system dynamics simulation methodology.

  10. TC4 COSTA RICA LIGHTNING V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) mission TC4 field experiment was completed during July and August 2007 based out of San Jose, Costa Rica....

  11. GRIP FLIGHT TRACKS AND ANIMATIONS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Flight Tracks and Animations dataset includes both KML files and animation files. The KML files use Google Earth to show the flight tracks on a map. The...

  12. GEOGRAPHOS RADAR V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Delay-Doppler images and continuous wave, dual-polarization spectra of 1620 Geographos taken during the August 1994 closest approach to Earth (0.0333AU at minimum).

  13. NEAR SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of NEAR SPICE data files (kernel files'), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contain geometric and...

  14. ASTEROID RADAR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset is intended to include all asteroid radar detections. An entry for each detection reports radar cross-section and circular polarization, if known, as...

  15. SAWYER ASTEROID SPECTRA V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Partial spectral data for the plots presented in S. Sawyer's PhD Thesis, 'A High Resolution Spectroscopic Survey of Low Albedo Main Belt Asteroids', 1991.

  16. NAMMA DC-8 DROPSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The DC-8 dropsonde system uses an integrated, highly accurate, GPS-located atmospheric profiling dropsonde, which measures and records current atmospheric conditions...

  17. CAMEX-3 GOES-8 PRODUCTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In support of the third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), imagery from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite 8 (GOES-8) was collected and...

  18. CAMEX-4 TOGA RADAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TOGA radar dataset consists of browse and radar data collected from the TOGA radar during the CAMEX-4 experiment. TOGA is a C-band linear polarized doppler radar...

  19. TCSP TICOSONDE-AURA 2005 V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Ticosonde/Aura-TCSP 2005 radiosonde data set consists of 4 soundings per day (00, 06, 12 and 18 UT) launched from Juan Santamaria International Airport, WMO...

  20. GAI LONG RANGE LIGHTNING NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The US National Lightning Detection Network is a commercial network that records the time, polarity, signal strength, and number of cloud-to-ground lightning flashes...

  1. Omics Metadata Management Software v. 1 (OMMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-09-09

    Our application, the Omics Metadata Management Software (OMMS), answers both needs, empowering experimentalists to generate intuitive, consistent metadata, and to perform bioinformatics analyses and information management tasks via a simple and intuitive web-based interface. Several use cases with short-read sequence datasets are provided to showcase the full functionality of the OMMS, from metadata curation tasks, to bioinformatics analyses and results management and downloading. The OMMS can be implemented as a stand alone-package for individual laboratories, or can be configured for web-based deployment supporting geographically dispersed research teams. Our software was developed with open-source bundles, is flexible, extensible and easily installed and run by operators with general system administration and scripting language literacy.

  2. ASTEROID FAMILY IDENTIFICATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a compilation of the family memberships of numbered asteroids in five different asteroid family analyses. These include the analyses of Zappala et al.,...

  3. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) dataset was collected by the Lightning Instrument Package (LIP), which consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field...

  4. Emiliania huxleyi v1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan

    2008-10-01

    We discuss how to find tandem duplicates and look at: (1) self aligning, proteomes - [Blastp]; (2) convert into symmetric similarity matrix; (3) cluster into familites - [MCL]; (4) annotate families with Pfam - [Hmmer]; and (5) classify families by taxa; and (6) look for interesting stuff.

  5. CCD OBSERVATIONS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Charged Coupled Device (CCD) cameras from ESO were used by groups to observe the outburst of comet Halley using a variety of telescopes and chip sets.

  6. CASSINI SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of Cassini SPICE data files (kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains geometric...

  7. NAMMA SENEGAL RAIN GAUGE NETWORK V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Senegal Rain Gauge Network consisted of 40 rain gauge sites (AMMA 1-40) located in various places throughout Senegal, West Africa. The Rain Gauge Network...

  8. cluster trials v. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-21

    This software contains a set of python modules – input, search, cluster, analysis; these modules read input files containing spatial coordinates and associated attributes which can be used to perform nearest neighbor search (spatial indexing via kdtree), cluster analysis/identification, and calculation of spatial statistics for analysis.

  9. NAMMA PRAIA CAPE VERDE RADIOSONDE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Praia Cape Verde Radiosonde data used Sippican MarkIIa DGPS (LOS) radiosondes, which were launched in support of NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary...

  10. ASTEROID PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Asteroid Photometric Catalog (3rd update), Lagerkvist, et.al., 1993 [LAGERKVISTETAL1993], is a compilation of all asteroid lightcurve photometry published up to...

  11. MESSENGER SPICE KERNELS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the complete set of MESSENGER SPICE data files (''kernel files''), which can be accessed using SPICE software. The SPICE data contains...

  12. BINARY MINOR PLANETS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a data table giving basic physical and orbital parameters for known binary minor planets in the Solar System (and Pluto/Charon) based on published...

  13. GeoPlace v. 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-02

    GeoPlace software solves several problems related to efficient sensor placement for remote sensing. It consists of several components. “GeoFoot” finds efficient locations for centering a set of camera images, in order to ensure that the collection of images contains an entire region. It is built on a modified version of “Simple MPS”. GeoSubFoot selects non-overlapping rectangular subregions of a single camera image, in order to devote more resources for higher-fidelity sub-images of those regions. The goal is for the rectangular subregions to contain many user-specified pixels of interest. Simple MPS is a generic program that produces point-sample distributions with blue noise characteristics over arbitrary-dimensional squares. GeoFoot includes an extension of it to sampling from polygons in 2d, including both the inside of the polygon and slightly outside it.

  14. GRIP LIGHTNING INSTRUMENT PACKAGE (LIP) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lightning Instrument Package (LIP) consists of 6 rotating vane type electric field sensors along with a central computer to record and monitor the instruments....

  15. Swine in biomedical research. V. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumbleson, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents information on the following topics: the history of pigs; conceptual and operational history of the development of miniature swine; breeding program and population standards of the Gottingen miniature swine; moral, social and scientific aspects of the use of swine in research; fertility in gilts inseminated with frozen boar semen stored at -196 C for eight years; ultrastructure of piglet liver; porcine models in surgical research; anesthesia in swine; pulse monitoring, intravascular and instramuscular injection sites in pigs; collagen biosynthesis and collagen content as a measure of dermal healing in experimental wounds in domestic swine; methods for hair removal; swine as a cardiac surgical model; bone marrow transplantation in miniature swine; technical aspects of small intestinal transplantation in young pigs; models; the pig in studies of diarrhea pathophysiology; use of swine to validate airflow perturbation device for airways resistance measurements in humans; swine as a model for human diabetes; and the weanling Yorkshire pig as an animal model for measuring percutaneous penetration.

  16. CAMEX-4 MIPS CEILOMETER V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) is a mobile atmospheric profiling system. It includes a 915 MHz Doppler...

  17. NAMMA DIODE LASER HYGROMETER (DLH) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA Diode Laser Hygrometer (DLH) dataset uses the DLH, a near-infrared spectrometer operating from aircraft platforms, was developed by NASA's Langley and Ames...

  18. LARSON FTS SPECTRA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains 107 asteroid spectra obtained between the years 1975 and 1982 inclusive, with the infrared fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) of H. P....

  19. GASNet Specification, v1.8.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonachea, Dan; Hargrove, P.

    2017-08-31

    GASNet is a language-independent, low-level networking layer that provides network-independent, high-performance communication primitives tailored for implementing parallel global address space SPMD languages and libraries such as UPC, UPC++, Co-Array Fortran, Legion, Chapel, and many others. The interface is primarily intended as a compilation target and for use by runtime library writers (as opposed to end users), and the primary goals are high performance, interface portability, and expressiveness. GASNet stands for "Global-Address Space Networking".

  20. INFRARED GLOBAL GEOSTATIONARY COMPOSITE V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Center for Environmental Prediction/Aviation Weather Center Infrared Global Geostationary Composite data set contains global composite images from the...