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Sample records for urethral stent failure

  1. Biodegradable urethral stent in the treatment of post-traumatic urethral strictures in a war wound rabbit urethral model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Weijun; Zhang Binghong; Gao Jiangping; Hong Baofa; Zhang Lei; Yang Yong; Meng Bo; Zhu Ning; Cui Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    To prevent terrorism during anti-terror war, we developed a reproducible animal model for the induction of a urethral stricture in a war wound rabbit, and to evaluate the feasibility and effect of using a biodegradable urethral stent in the prophylaxis and treatment of urethral strictures in a war wound (or traumatic) rabbit urethral model. The urethral stricture rabbit model was successfully performed by a self-control explosion destructor. New biodegradable urethral stents were placed in the urethras of 20 war wound (traumatic) rabbits, but no stent was used in the 8 rabbits which formed the control group. Follow-up investigation included assessment of procedure success, stent changes, urethrascopy and retrograde urethrography, and histological findings were obtained after sacrifice at 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after stent placement. The urethral stricture model owing to a war wound (trauma) was tested by tissue reactions and urethroscopy. The length of the urethral strictures was 5-10 mm; the coarctatetion of the urethral lumen was more than 50%. Biodegradable stent placement was technically successful in 20 rabbits. Urethral specimens obtained from the 4 week stent placement group showed diminished inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased thickness of the papillary projections of the epithelium. There was a strong tendency towards regression of the papillary projections and regeneration of urethral mucosa epithelium in the 8 week group. In particular, the injured urethra has recovered completely in the biodegradable stent groups compared with the control group at 12 weeks. The biodegradable urethral stent seems feasible for treating and preventing urethral strictures owing to a war wound (or traumatic) urethra. There are distinct advantages in terms of safe, effective and less-invasive treatment for the reconstruction of post-traumatic urethral strictures

  2. Biodegradable urethral stent in the treatment of post-traumatic urethral strictures in a war wound rabbit urethral model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Weijun [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang Binghong [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Gao Jiangping [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Hong Baofa [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Zhang Lei [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Yang Yong [Department of Urology, Chinese People' s Liberation Army General Hospital, Military Postgraduate Medical College, No.28 Fuxing Road, Hai dian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Meng Bo [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Zhu Ning [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Lab, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2007-12-15

    To prevent terrorism during anti-terror war, we developed a reproducible animal model for the induction of a urethral stricture in a war wound rabbit, and to evaluate the feasibility and effect of using a biodegradable urethral stent in the prophylaxis and treatment of urethral strictures in a war wound (or traumatic) rabbit urethral model. The urethral stricture rabbit model was successfully performed by a self-control explosion destructor. New biodegradable urethral stents were placed in the urethras of 20 war wound (traumatic) rabbits, but no stent was used in the 8 rabbits which formed the control group. Follow-up investigation included assessment of procedure success, stent changes, urethrascopy and retrograde urethrography, and histological findings were obtained after sacrifice at 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after stent placement. The urethral stricture model owing to a war wound (trauma) was tested by tissue reactions and urethroscopy. The length of the urethral strictures was 5-10 mm; the coarctatetion of the urethral lumen was more than 50%. Biodegradable stent placement was technically successful in 20 rabbits. Urethral specimens obtained from the 4 week stent placement group showed diminished inflammatory cell infiltration and decreased thickness of the papillary projections of the epithelium. There was a strong tendency towards regression of the papillary projections and regeneration of urethral mucosa epithelium in the 8 week group. In particular, the injured urethra has recovered completely in the biodegradable stent groups compared with the control group at 12 weeks. The biodegradable urethral stent seems feasible for treating and preventing urethral strictures owing to a war wound (or traumatic) urethra. There are distinct advantages in terms of safe, effective and less-invasive treatment for the reconstruction of post-traumatic urethral strictures.

  3. Endoscopic removal of a proximal urethral stent using a holmium laser: Case report and literature review

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    Francisco Botelho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stents were initially developed for the management of urethral strictures and obstructive voiding disorders in select patients. Urethral stent complications are common and may require stent explantation, which is often quite challenging. We present our experience with endoscopic removal of an encrusted UroLume proximal urethral stent in a 72-year-old male using a holmium laser. The literature on various management options and outcomes for urethral stent removal is reviewed. Endoscopic removal of proximal urethral stents is feasible and safe and should be considered as the primary treatment option in patients requiring stent extraction.

  4. Use of an Absorbable Urethral Stent for the Management of a Urethral Stricture in a Stallion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trela, Jan M; Dechant, Julie E; Culp, William T; Whitcomb, Mary B; Palm, Carrie A; Nieto, Jorge E

    2016-11-01

    To describe the successful management of a urethral stricture with an absorbable stent in a stallion. Clinical report. Stallion with a urethral stricture. A 12-year-old Thoroughbred breeding stallion was evaluated for acute onset of colic. Uroperitoneum because of presumptive urinary bladder rupture, with urethral obstruction by a urethrolith, was diagnosed. The uroperitoneum was treated conservatively. The urethrolith was removed through a perineal urethrotomy. Approximately 15 weeks after urethrolith removal, the stallion presented with a urethral stricture. The stricture was unsuccessfully treated with an indwelling urinary catheter and 4 attempts at balloon dilation. Eight weeks after diagnosis of stricture, an absorbable polydioxanone (20 mm × 80 mm) urethral stent was implanted under percutaneous, ultrasound guidance. Urethroscopy was performed at 70, 155, and 230 days after stent placement and the endoscope passed through the affected site without complication. Urethroscopy at 155 days showed the stent had been reabsorbed. Follow-up 20 months after stent placement reports the stallion was able to void a normal urine stream. Absorbable urethral stent placement was a feasible treatment for urethral stricture in this stallion. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. Temporary urethral covered stent - third year of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovis, V.; Maksimovis, H.; Markovis, B.; Markovis, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In October 2003, a new generation of urethral stents ALLIUM, produced in Israel, were used at the Department of Interventional Radiology, CCS, in 18 patients with chronic stricture of bulbar urethra. The indications for insertion were determined according to well-known and recognized therapeutical protocols. The stent is made of nitinol wire with polyurethane cover. It is inserted under local anesthesia by a special self-expandable system that may be fixed or flexible. The stents we used were 3-6 cm long and 28 Fr wide. Radioscopic-assisted insertion was performed over formerly placed metal guide. Prior to insertion, balloon-catheter dilatation of stricture matching the stent width was carried out. Pre-insertion urethrotomy was performed in one case. The insertion technique is simple, presupposing the knowledge of older generations of techniques of urethral dilatation and insertion of self-expandable stents. The follow-up of results was done according to a priori established protocol including the following: UCG, uroflowmetry and interview with patients. Due to stent migration, the 'stent over stent' technique was applied in one case, while reposition by balloon-catheter outward traction was performed in two cases of caudal migration. No irritative discomforts were reported in the first 4 months after stent dwelling. Uroflowmetric controls verified at least four times better results than before the insertion. Given it is the question of covered stent, there is no possibility of proliferative secondary lumen obstruction. On account of soft structure and conic shape of posterior part of stent, no lesions of the external urethral sphincter were manifested. The stent is simply withdrawn after 6 months by outward traction using the forceps at the time when the stent construction turns into soft and straight wire. The first clinical experiences are very favorable and ALLIUM stent may be expected to be the stent of choice for chronic bulbar strictures

  6. Urethroplasty after Urethral Urolume Stent: an International Multicenter Experience.

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    Angulo, Javier C; Kulkarni, Sanjay; Pankaj, Joshi; Nikolavsky, Dmitriy; Suarez, Pedro; Belinky, Javier; Virasoro, Ramón; DeLong, Jessica; Martins, Francisco E; Lumen, Nicolaas; Giudice, Carlos; Suárez, Oscar A; Menéndez, Nicolás; Capiel, Leandro; López-Alvarado, Damian; Ramirez, Erick A; Venkatesan, Krishnan; Husainat, Maha M; Esquinas, Cristina; Arance, Ignacio; Gómez, Reynaldo; Santucci, Richard

    2018-05-08

    To evaluate the outcomes and factors affecting success of urethroplasty in patients with stricture recurrence after Urolume® urethral stent. Retrospective international multicenter study on patients treated with urethral reconstruction after Urolume® stent. Stricture and stent length, time between urethral stent insertion and urethroplasty, age, mode of stent retrieval, type of urethroplasty, complications and baseline and post-urethroplasty voiding parameters were analyzed. Successful outcome was defined as standard voiding, without need of any postoperative adjunctive procedure. Sixty-three patients were included. Stent was removed at urethroplasty in 61 patients. Reconstruction technique was excision and primary anastomosis in 14(22.2%), dorsal onlay buccal mucosa graft (BMG) 9(14.3%), ventral onlay BMG 6(9.5%), dorso-lateral onlay BMG 9(14.3%), ventral onlay plus dorsal inlay BMG 3(4.8%), augmented anastomosis 5(7.9%), pedicled flap urethroplasty 6(9.5%), 2-stage procedure 4(6.4%) and perineal urethrostomy 7(11.1%). Success rate was 81% at a mean 59.7+63.4months. Dilatation and/or internal urethrotomy was performed in 10(15.9%), redo-urethroplasty in 5(7.9%). Total IPSS, QoL, Qmax and PVR significantly improved (pUrethroplasty in patients with Urolume® urethral stents is a viable option of reconstruction with a high success rate and very acceptable complication rate. Numerous techniques are viable, however, urethral preservation, tine-by-tine stent extraction and use of BMG augmentation produced significantly better outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Azithromycin Failure in Mycoplasma genitalium Urethritis

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    Jensen, Jorgen S.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Read, Timothy R.H.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Hopkins, Carol A.; Moss, Lorna M.; Fairley, Christopher K.

    2006-01-01

    We report significant failure rates (28%, 95% confidence interval 15%–45%) after administering 1 g azithromycin to men with Mycoplasma genitalium–positive nongonococcal urethritis. In vitro evidence supported reduced susceptibility of M. genitalium to macrolides. Moxifloxacin administration resulted in rapid symptom resolution and eradication of infection in all cases. These findings have implications for management of urethritis. PMID:16836839

  8. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Park, Hyungkeun

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8±42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  9. Removal of retrievable self-expandable urethral stents: experience in 58 stents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Ko, Heung-Kyu; Kim, Yong Jae; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Sung, Kyu-Bo [Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Park, Hyungkeun [Asan Medical Center, Department of Urology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the safety and efficacy of removing retrievable self-expandable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the removal of 58 polyurethane or PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene)-covered stents was attempted in 33 patients using a retrieval hook wire. Indications for removal were elective removal (n=21), stent migration (n=19), formation of tissue hyperplasia around or inside of the stent (n=14), stent deformity (n=3), and severe pain (n=1). The mean time the stents remained in place was 64.8{+-}42.9 days (range, 1-177 days). Fifty-six (97%) of the 58 stents were successfully removed using the retrieval hook wire despite the following difficulties; hook wire disconnection (n=2), untied drawstrings (n=3), and polyurethane membrane disruption/separation (n=4). The removal procedure using a retrieval hook wire failed in two stents (3%) which had migrated into the urinary bladder. One of the two stents with migration into the urinary bladder was removed using a snare through the cystostomy route. The overall complication rate was 14% (seven hematuria cases and one urethral tear case), and all were minor and spontaneously resolved without further treatment. In conclusion, removal of retrievable urethral stents using a retrieval hook wire was safe and effective despite some technical difficulties. It is a useful method for allowing temporary stent placement and solving various complications of stent use. (orig.)

  10. Impacted calculus within a urethral stent: A rare cause of urinary retention

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    Shanmugasundaram Rajaian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly male presented to the emergency department with acute urinary retention. He had poor flow of urine associated with serosanguinous discharge per urethra for 3 days duration. Earlier he underwent permanent metallic urethral stenting for post TURP bulbar urethral stricture. Plain X-ray of Pelvis showed an impacted calculus within the urethral stent in bulbar urethra. Urethrolitholapaxy was done with semirigid ureteroscope. Urethral stent was patent and well covered. Subsequently he had an uneventful recovery. We describe a unique case of acute urinary retention due to calculus impaction within a urethral stent.

  11. [Urethral stent to treat a refractory traumatic urethra stricture in a male hunting dog].

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    Vogt, S; Schneider, M; Peppler, C; Günther, C; Kramer, M

    2014-01-01

    In a 1.5-year-old male hunting dog, a urethral defect distal to the pelvic flexure and the resulting urethral fistula were treated with a mucosal graft and a transurethral catheter. Six months postoperatively a stricture of the urethra occurred. Following balloon dilatation, urination was normal. One month after dilatation, urethral narrowing relapsed and was treated using a combination of balloon dilatation and urethral stent implantation. Ten months following stent implantation the dog continued to show normal urination, although a deformation of the proximal part of the stent was diagnosed radiographically. During the 1-year follow-up no additional complications were observed. In the future, urethral stents may replace surgical resection of the narrowed urethral region and re-anastomosis of the urethra.

  12. Transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue combined with temporary urethral stent placement for patients with in anterior urethral stricture

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    Cheol Yong Yoon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fibrotic scar formation is a main cause of recurrent urethral stricture after initial management with direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU. In the present study, we devised a new technique of combined the transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue and temporary urethral stenting, using a thermo-expandable urethral stent (MemokathTM 044TW in patients with anterior urethral stricture. Materials and Methods As a first step, multiple incisions were made around stricture site with cold-cutting knife and Collins knife electrode to release a stricture band. Fibrotic tissue was then resected with a 13Fr pediatric resectoscope before deployment of a MemokathTM 044TW stent (40 – 60mm on a pre-mounted sheath using 0° cystoscopy. Stents were removed within 12 months after initial placement. Results We performed this technique on 11 consecutive patients with initial (n = 4 and recurrent (n = 7 anterior urethral stricture (April 2009 – February 2013. At 18.9 months of mean follow-up (12-34 months, mean Qmax (7.8±3.9ml/sec vs 16.8 ± 4.8ml/sec, p < 0.001, IPSS (20.7 vs 12.5, p = 0.001 , and QoL score (4.7 vs 2.2, p < 0.001 were significantly improved. There were no significant procedure-related complications except two cases of tissue ingrowth at the edge of stent, which were amenable by transurethral resection. In 7 patients, an average 1.4 times (1-5 times of palliative urethral dilatation was carried out and no patients underwent open surgical urethroplasty during the follow-up period. Conclusion Combined transurethral resection and temporary urethral stenting is a effective therapeutic option for anterior urethral stricture. Further investigations to determine the long-term effects, and safety profile of this new technique are warranted.

  13. Preventing intra-urethral migration of a guidewire during antegrade placement of a JJ stent: a technical modification.

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    Bansal, Ankur; Gupta, Piyush; Dalela, Disha; Dalela, Diwakar

    2016-03-07

    A JJ stent is usually inserted in antegrade fashion after percutaneous renal surgery. We describe a new technical modification for antegrade stent insertion that prevents intraoperative intra-urethral migration of the guidewire and saves operative time and cost. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Metallic ureteral stents in malignant ureteral obstruction: clinical factors predicting stent failure.

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    Chow, Po-Ming; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Huang, Kuo-How; Yu, Hong-Jheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liang, Po-Chin

    2014-06-01

    To provide clinical outcomes of the Resonance metallic ureteral stent in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction, as well as clinical factors predicting stent failure. Cancer patients who have received Resonance stents from July 2009 to March 2012 for ureteral obstruction were included for chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, image studies, and renal function tests. Survival analysis for stent duration was used to estimate patency rate and factors predicting stent failure. A total of 117 stents were inserted successfully into 94 ureteral units in 79 patients. There were no major complications. These stents underwent survival analysis and proportional hazard regression. The median duration for the stents was 5.77 months. In multivariate analysis, age (P=0.043), preoperative serum creatinine level (P=0.0174), and cancer type (P=0.0494) were significant factors associated with stent failure. Cancer treatment before and after stent insertion had no effect on stent duration. Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions. Old age and high serum creatinine level are predictors for stent failure. Stents in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancers have longer functional duration.

  15. An Indwelling Urethral Catheter Knotted Around a Double-J Ureteral Stent: An Unusual Complication after Kidney Transplantation

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    E. G. Warmerdam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral catheterization is a common procedure with a relatively low complication rate. Knotting of an indwelling urethral catheter is a very rare complication, and there are only a few case reports on knotted catheters, most of them concerning children. We report an especially rare case where a urethral catheter formed a knot around a double-J ureteral stent after a kidney transplantation. We will discuss the various risk factors for knotting of a catheter and the methods to untangle a knot.

  16. Urethritis

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    ... urethritis. Organisms—such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae , which causes gonorrhea —can spread to the urethra during sexual intercourse ... Sometimes people have no symptoms. In men, when gonorrhea or chlamydia is the cause, there is usually ...

  17. [The Predictive Factors of Stent Failure in the Treatment of Malignant Extrinsc Ureteral Obstruction Using Internal Ureteral Stents].

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    Matsuura, Hiroshi; Arase, Shigeki; Hori, Yasuhide; Tochigi, Hiromi

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the experiences at our single institute in the treatment of malignant extrinsic ureteral obstruction (MUO) using ureteral stents to investigate the clinical outcomes and the predictive factors of stent failure. In 52 ureters of 38 patients who had radiologically significant hydronephrosis due to MUO, internal ureteral stents (The BARD(R) INLAY(TM) ureteral stent set) were inserted. The median follow-up interval after the initial stent insertion was 124.5 days (4-1,120). Stent failure occurred in 8 ureters (15.4%) of the 7 patients. The median interval from the first stent insertion to stent failure was 88 days (1-468). A Cox regression multivariate analysis showed that the significant predictors of stent failure were bladder invasion. Based on the possibility of stent failure, the adaptation of the internal ureteral stent placement should be considered especially in a patient with MUO combined with bladder invasion.

  18. Dose perturbation due to the presence of a prostatic urethral stent in patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy: an in vitro study.

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    Gez, E; Cederbaum, M; Yachia, D; Bar-Deroma, R; Kuten, A

    1997-01-01

    Temporary metallic intraprostatic stent is a new alternative treatment for patients with urinary obstructive syndrome caused by prostate cancer. Definitive radiotherapy is a treatment of choice for localized prostate cancer. This study evaluates in vitro the effect of a urethral intraprostatic metallic stent on the dose absorbed by the surrounding tissue. The study was designed to mimic the conditions under which the prostatic stent is placed in the body during pelvic irradiation. A urethral stent composed of a 50% nickel-50% titanium alloy (Uracoil-InStent) was imbedded in material mimicking normal tissue (bolus) at a simulated body depth of 10 cm. The distribution of the absorbed dose of irradiation was determined by film dosimetry using Kodak X-Omat V film. Irradiation was done in a single field at the isocenter of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a field size of 7 x 7 cm. The degree of film blackening was in direct proportion to the absorbed dose. The measurements showed an increase in dose of up to 20% immediately before the stent and a decrease of up to 18% immediately after the stent. These changes occurred within a range of 1-3 mm from both sides of the stent. In practice, irradiation in prostate cancer is given by two pairs of opposed co-axial fields; a total of four fields (Box Technique). The dose perturbations are partly cancelled in a pair of opposed beams resulting in a net variation of +/- 4%; therefore, the presence of the intraprostatic stent should not influence radiotherapy planning for prostate cancer.

  19. Posterior urethral valves: Risk factors for progression to renal failure.

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    Bilgutay, Aylin N; Roth, David R; Gonzales, Edmond T; Janzen, Nicolette; Zhang, Wei; Koh, Chester J; Gargollo, Patricio; Seth, Abhishek

    2016-06-01

    Posterior urethral valves (PUVs) are the most common etiology for congenital urethral obstruction and congenital bilateral renal obstruction. PUVs produce a spectrum of urologic and renal sequelae. Our aims were to assess outcomes of PUV patients, to determine whether vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a risk factor for progression to renal failure, and to identify other risk factors for poor outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of PUV patients from 2006 to 2014. Data collected included demographics, initial renal ultrasound (RUS) findings, creatinine at presentation and nadir, pre- and postoperative VUR status, presence or absence of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), and surgical intervention(s). Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine risk factors for renal failure. Of 104 patients, 42.3% (44/104) were diagnosed prenatally, 31.8% (14/44) of whom underwent prenatal intervention. Postnatally, 90.4% (94/104) initially underwent transurethral resection of PUVs (TUR-PUVs). Vesicostomy was the next most common index surgery (4.8%). Forty-two percent (44/104) required >1 surgery. The predominant second surgery was repeat TUR-PUV in 16 patients. At last follow-up (mean 28.8 months after initial surgery), 20.2% had chronic kidney disease (CKD) of at least stage IIIA, and 8.6% had progressed to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Antenatal diagnosis, prematurity, abnormal renal cortex, and loss of corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on initial RUS were associated with CKD and ESRD on univariate analysis, as were elevated creatinine on presentation and at nadir. Presence of pre- or postoperative VUR and recurrent UTIs were associated with the need for multiple surgeries, but not with poor renal outcomes. On multivariate analysis, nadir creatinine was the only independent predictor of final renal function. Our finding that creatinine is the only independent risk factor for poor renal outcomes in PUV patients is consistent with the

  20. Management of severe urethral complications of prostate cancer therapy.

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    Elliott, Sean P; McAninch, Jack W; Chi, Thomas; Doyle, Sean M; Master, Viraj A

    2006-12-01

    We present our management of urethral stenosis and rectourinary fistula resulting from prostate cancer therapy. We concentrated on cases refractory to minimally invasive treatment, such as dilation, urethrotomy, and urinary and/or fecal diversion. In our prospectively collected urethral reconstruction database we identified patients who underwent reconstruction of urethral stenosis or rectourinary fistula who also received prior treatment for prostate cancer. We documented demographics, prostate cancer pretreatment characteristics, prostate cancer therapy type, urethral reconstruction type and success. A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria, including 16 with rectourinary fistula and 32 with urethral stenosis. Urethral complications followed prior radical prostatectomy, brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy, cryotherapy, thermal ablation and any combination of these procedures. Stenosis repair was successful in 23 of 32 cases (73%) and it differed little between anterior and posterior urethral stenosis. Repair was accomplished by anastomotic urethroplasty in 19 cases, flap urethroplasty in 2, perineal urethrostomy in 2 and a urethral stent in 9. Prior external beam radiotherapy was a risk factor for urethral reconstruction failure. Fistula repair was successful in 14 of 15 patients (93%), excluding 1 who died postoperatively. The complexity of fistula management was dictated by fistula size and the presence or absence of coincident urethral stenosis. Urethral stenosis or rectourethral fistula following prostate cancer therapy can be managed by urethral reconstruction, such that normal voiding via the urethra is maintained, rather than abandoning the urethral outlet and performing heterotopic diversion. This can be accomplished with an acceptable rate of failure, given the complexity of the cases.

  1. EW-7197 eluting nano-fiber covered self-expandable metallic stent to prevent granulation tissue formation in a canine urethral model.

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    Kichang Han

    Full Text Available To evaluate an EW-7197-eluting nanofiber-covered stent (NFCS for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.All experiments were approved by the committee of animal research. A total of 12 NFCSs were placed in the proximal and distal urethras of six dogs. Dogs were divided into two groups with 3 dogs each. The control stent (CS group received NFCSs and the drug stent (DS group received EW-7197 (1000 μg-eluting NFCSs. All dogs were sacrificed 8 weeks after stent placement Histologic findings of the stented urethra were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test.Stent placement was technically successful in all dogs without procedure-related complications. On urethrographic analysis, the mean luminal diameter was significantly larger in the DS group than in the CS group at 4 and 8 weeks after stent placement (all p 0.05.The EW-7197-eluting NFCS is effective and safe for suppressing granulation tissue formation after stent placement in a canine urethral model.

  2. Predictive factors for the failure of endoscopic stent-in-stent self-expandable metallic stent placement to treat malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsuru; Takagi, Tadayuki; Suzuki, Rei; Konno, Naoki; Asama, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Kikuchi, Hitomi; Waragai, Yuichi; Takasumi, Mika; Sato, Yuki; Hikichi, Takuto; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2017-09-14

    To investigate the factors predictive of failure when placing a second biliary self-expandable metallic stents (SEMSs). This study evaluated 65 patients with an unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction who were examined in our hospital. Sixty-two of these patients were recruited to the study and divided into two groups: the success group, which consisted of patients in whom a stent-in-stent SEMS had been placed successfully, and the failure group, which consisted of patients in whom the stent-in-stent SEMS had not been placed successfully. We compared the characteristics of the patients, the stricture state of their biliary ducts, and the implemented endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures between the two groups. The angle between the target biliary duct stricture and the first implanted SEMS was significantly larger in the failure group than in the success group. There were significantly fewer wire or dilation devices (ERCP catheter, dilator, or balloon catheter) passing the first SEMS cell in the failure group than in the success group. The cut-off value of the angle predicting stent-in-stent SEMS placement failure was 49.7 degrees according to the ROC curve (sensitivity 91.7%, specificity 61.2%). Furthermore, the angle was significantly smaller in patients with wire or dilation devices passing the first SEMS cell than in patients without wire or dilation devices passing the first SEMS cell. A large angle was identified as a predictive factor for failure of stent-in-stent SEMS placement.

  3. Surgical management of Stenson’s duct injury by using double J stent urethral catheter

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    Suha N. Aloosi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Herein, we described an easy yet efficient technique in management of parotid duct injury using a JJ stent which is often used for urethra. We think that use of JJ stent is a valuable technique to be used in the diagnosis and surgical repair of the parotid duct during traumatic facial and/or parotid injuries.

  4. Azithromycin Treatment Failure for Chlamydia trachomatis Among Heterosexual Men With Nongonococcal Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia J; White, Scott; Manhart, Lisa E; Schwebke, Jane; Taylor, Stephanie N; Mena, Leandro; Khosropour, Christine M; Wilcox, Larissa; Schmidt, Norine; Martin, David H

    2016-10-01

    Three recent prospective studies have suggested that the 1-g dose of azithromycin for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) was less effective than expected, reporting a wide range of treatment failure rates (5.8%-22.6%). Reasons for the disparate results could be attributed to geographic or methodological differences. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the studies and attempt to harmonize methodologies to reduce misclassification as a result of false positives from early test-of-cure (TOC) or reinfection as a result of sexual exposure rather than treatment failure. Men who had sex with women, who received 1-g azithromycin under directly observed therapy for presumptive treatment of nongonococcal urethritis with confirmed Ct were included. Baseline screening was performed on urethral swabs or urine, and TOC screening was performed on urine using nucleic acid amplification tests. Posttreatment vaginal sexual exposure was elicited at TOC. Data from the 3 studies were obtained and reanalyzed. Rates of Ct retest positive were examined for all cases, and a sensitivity analysis was conducted to either reclassify potential false positives/reinfections as negative or remove them from the analysis. The crude treatment failure rate was 12.8% (31/242). The rate when potential false positives/reinfections were reclassified as negative was 6.2% (15/242) or when these were excluded from analysis was 10.9% (15/138). In these samples of men who have sex with women with Ct-related nongonococcal urethritis, azithromycin treatment failure was between 6.2% and 12.8%. This range of failure is lower than previously published but higher than the desired World Health Organization's target chlamydia treatment failure rate of < 5%.

  5. Prophylactic urethral stenting with Memokath® 028SW in prostate cancer patients undergoing prostate 125I seed implants: phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Chao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the feasibility/toxicity of urethral stenting with the Memokath® 028SW stent in patients undergoing prostate implant (PI for prostate adenocarcinoma. Material and methods: An Investigational Device Exemption from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and institutional review board (IRB approval were obtained. Twenty patients enrolled. Baseline American Urological Association (AUA score was obtained prior to PI. Follow-up information was obtained with weekly phone calls for the first 12 weeks and biweekly calls for the next 12 weeks to assess toxicity and AUA score. Removal of the stent was planned at six months after PI, or earlier due to excessive toxicity/patient request. Results: Median age was 66.5 years. The median prostate volume was 39 cc (range: 10-90. The median baseline AUA score was 7.5 (range: 1-21. Three patients required intermittent self-catheterization (ISC within 3 days after PI. No patients required ISC beyond day 3 after PI. The median duration of ISC was 1 day (range: 1-2. AUA scores returned to baseline values 6 weeks after PI. The week 6 AUA score was 10 (range: 4-16. Seven patients (35% underwent early removal because of patient preference. The reasons were: incontinence (n = 3, discomfort (n = 2, hematuria (n = 1, and obstructive symptoms (n = 1. The median time of stent removal in these patients was 13.9 weeks (range: 0.9-21.4. Thirteen patients (65% had ISC and/or urinary catheterization post stent removal. Median time for ISC use was 10 days (range: 1-90. Conclusions: Urethral stenting with Memokath® in patients undergoing PI was feasible, but resulted in relatively high rate of urinary incontinence and discomfort. Given the adverse effects experienced by patients of this study, further studies should focus only on patients with highest risk of urinary obstruction from PI or those with obstruction needing ISC.

  6. [Value of the optical coherence tomography in the treatment guided of the stent failure. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Enrico; Tellez, Alejandro; Ochoa, Jorge; Ortíz, José E

    2014-01-01

    Since the advent of bare metal and drug-eluting stents, the surgical revascularization have declined considerably, however the thrombosis and in-stent restenosis are important complications of these devices. There are several factors that predispose to thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Conventional angiography has serious limitations to determine the causes of stent failure. Optical coherence tomography is a very sensitive technique to determine the cause of thrombosis and in-stent restenosis. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Metallic ureteral stents in malignant ureteral obstruction: short-term results and radiological features predicting stent failure in patients with non-urological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Po-Ming; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Yu, Hong-Jheng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Liu, Kao-Lang

    2014-06-01

    To provide short-term result of the metallic ureteral stent in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and identify radiological findings predicting stent failure. The records of all patients with non-urological malignant diseases who have received metallic ureteral stents from July 2009 to March 2012 for ureteral obstruction were reviewed. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms and imaging studies. Survival analysis was used to estimate patency rates and factors predicting stent failure. A total of 74 patients with 130 attempts of stent insertion were included. A total of 113 (86.9 %) stents were inserted successfully and 103 (91.2 %) achieved primary patency. After excluding cases without sufficient imaging data, 94 stents were included in the survival analysis. The median functional duration of the 94 stents was 6.2 months (range 3-476 days). Obstruction in abdominal ureter (p = 0.0279) and lymphatic metastasis around ureter (p = 0.0398) were risk factors for stent failure. The median functional durations of the stents for abdominal and pelvic obstructions were 4.5 months (range 3-263 days) and 6.5 months (range 4-476 days), respectively. The median durations of the stents with and without lymphatic metastasis were 5.3 months (range 4-398 days) and 7.8 months (range 31-476 days), respectively. Metallic ureteral stents are effective and safe in relieving ureteral obstructions resulting from non-urological malignancies, and abdominal ureteral obstruction and lymphatic metastasis around ureter were associated with shorter functional duration.

  8. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). Hospital East; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-06-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  9. Self-expandable metallic stents for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Manabu; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Boku, Narikazu; Yoshida, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yoshinori; Shioyama, Yasukazu

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma have resulted in improved survival rates. However, there are few options for recurrent dysphagia due to refractory carcinoma after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma where definitive chemoradiotherapy has failed. Thirteen consecutive patients with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, in whom self-expandable metallic stents were placed after failure of primary chemoradiotherapy, were studied retrospectively. All patients had esophageal obstruction or malignant fistula. The oral alimentation status of nine of 13 patients (69%) improved after successful placement of the stent. Following placement of the stent, fever (>38 deg C) and severe chest pain occurred in 85% (11/13) of the patients. In all patients examined, C-reactive protein was elevated within 1 week of the operation. Esophageal perforation occurred in three patients. Stent-related mediastinitis and pneumonia developed in six (46%) and three (23%) patients, respectively. Seven of the 13 patients (54%) died of stent-related pulmonary complications. Although the placement of a self-expandable metallic stent for patients with recurrent esophageal carcinoma after failure of chemoradiotherapy improved their oral alimentation status, we found that this treatment increases the risk of life-threatening pulmonary complications. (author)

  10. Percutaneous transhepatic recanalization of malignant hilarobstruction: A possible rescue for early failure of endoscopic y-stenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hoon; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Dong Uk [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Ung Bae; Kang, Dae Hwan [Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan Pusan National University Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is well known as an optimal method of management of malignant hilar obstruction, but sometimes the result is not satisfactory, with early stent failure. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) has a distinct advantage over endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatoscopy in that with ultrasound guidance one or more appropriate segments for drainage can be chosen. We evaluated the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic stenting as a rescue of early failure of endoscopic stenting. Ten patients (4 men, 6 women; age range, 52-78 years; mean age, 69 years) with inoperable biliary obstruction (2 patients with gall bladder cancer and hilar invasion, and 8 patients with Klatskin tumor) and with early endoscopic stent failure were included in our study. All of the patients underwent PTBD and percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Metallic stents were placed in all patients for internal drainage. Percutaneous rescue stenting was successful in all the patients technically and clinically. Mean time for the development of biliary obstruction was 13.5 days after endoscopic stenting. The mean patency of the rescue stenting was 122 days. The mean survival time for percutaneous transhepatic rescue stenting was 226.3 days. In early failure of endoscopic biliary stenting, percutaneous transhepatic recanalization can be a possible solution.

  11. Percutaneous transhepatic recanalization of malignant hilarobstruction: A possible rescue for early failure of endoscopic y-stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Hoon; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Dong Uk; Jeon, Ung Bae; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic biliary stenting is well known as an optimal method of management of malignant hilar obstruction, but sometimes the result is not satisfactory, with early stent failure. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) has a distinct advantage over endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatoscopy in that with ultrasound guidance one or more appropriate segments for drainage can be chosen. We evaluated the effectiveness of percutaneous transhepatic stenting as a rescue of early failure of endoscopic stenting. Ten patients (4 men, 6 women; age range, 52-78 years; mean age, 69 years) with inoperable biliary obstruction (2 patients with gall bladder cancer and hilar invasion, and 8 patients with Klatskin tumor) and with early endoscopic stent failure were included in our study. All of the patients underwent PTBD and percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Metallic stents were placed in all patients for internal drainage. Percutaneous rescue stenting was successful in all the patients technically and clinically. Mean time for the development of biliary obstruction was 13.5 days after endoscopic stenting. The mean patency of the rescue stenting was 122 days. The mean survival time for percutaneous transhepatic rescue stenting was 226.3 days. In early failure of endoscopic biliary stenting, percutaneous transhepatic recanalization can be a possible solution.

  12. Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Stent URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002303.htm Stent To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A stent is a tiny tube placed into a hollow structure in your ...

  13. Failure of azithromycin 2.0 g in the treatment of gonococcal urethritis caused by high-level resistance in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gose, Severin O; Soge, Olusegun O; Beebe, James L; Nguyen, Duylinh; Stoltey, Juliet E; Bauer, Heidi M

    2015-05-01

    We report a treatment failure to azithromycin 2.0 g caused by a urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolate with high-level azithromycin resistance in California. This report describes the epidemiological case investigation and phenotypic and genetic characterization of the treatment failure isolate.

  14. Laparoscopic surgery to treat ureterosciatic herniation after ureteral stent failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Sheng Tai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a patient who presented with left flank pain for 6 months. Computed tomography and intravenous urography revealed left ureterosciatic herniation with severe hydronephrosis. Antegrade placement of the ureteral double-J stent was performed and her symptoms subsequently subsided. These symptoms recurred after the removal of the stent 1 year later with persistent hydronephrosis and herniation. We performed laparoscopic ureterolysis, ureteral fixation to psoas muscle, and sciatic hernia repair with hyaluronan-containing mesh. The result was encouraging and the follow-up image at 6 months showed no hydronephrosis and no ureteral herniation.

  15. Risk factors for technical failure of endoscopic double self-expandable metallic stent placement by partial stent-in-stent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Toyokawa, Yoshihide; Otani, Koichi; Kuwatani, Masaki; Abe, Yoko; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Kubota, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic double self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement by the partial stent-in-stent (PSIS) method has been reported to be useful for the management of unresectable hilar malignant biliary obstruction. However, it is technically challenging, and the optimal SEMS for the procedure remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for technical failure of endoscopic double SEMS placement for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction (MHBO). Between December 2009 and May 2013, 50 consecutive patients with MHBO underwent endoscopic double SEMS placement by the PSIS method. We retrospectively evaluated the rate of successful double SEMS placement and identified the risk factors for technical failure. The technical success rate for double SEMS placement was 82.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.2-90.2). On univariate analysis, the rate of technical failure was high in patients with metastatic disease and unilateral placement. Multivariate analysis revealed that metastatic disease was a significant risk factor for technical failure (odds ratio: 9.63, 95% CI: 1.11-105.5). The subgroup analysis after double guidewire insertion showed that the rate of technical success was higher in the laser-cut type SEMS with a large mesh and thick delivery system than in the braided type SEMS with a small mesh and thick delivery system. Metastatic disease was a significant risk factor for technical failure of double SEMS placement for unresectable MHBO. The laser-cut type SEMS with a large mesh and thin delivery system might be preferable for the PSIS procedure. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  16. Is there a way to predict failure after direct vision internal urethrotomy for single and short bulbar urethral strictures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraz, Ahmed M; El-Assmy, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Osama; Elbakry, Amr A; Tharwat, Mohamed; Omar, Helmy; Farg, Hashim; Laymon, Mahmoud; Mosbah, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    To identify patient and stricture characteristics predicting failure after direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) for single and short (urethroplasty. Predictors of failure were analysed. In all, 430 adult patients with a mean (SD) age of 50 (15) years were included. The main causes of stricture were idiopathic followed by iatrogenic in 51.6% and 26.3% of patients, respectively. Most patients presented with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (68.9%) and strictures were proximal bulbar, i.e. just close to the external urethral sphincter, in 35.3%. The median (range) follow-up duration was 29 (3-132) months. In all, 250 (58.1%) patients did not require any further instrumentation, while RSD was maintained in 116 (27%) patients, including 28 (6.5%) who required a redo DVIU or urethroplasty. In 64 (6.5%) patients, a redo DVIU or urethroplasty was performed. On multivariate analysis, older age at presentation [odds ratio (OR) 1.017; P = 0.03], obesity (OR 1.664; P = 0.015), and idiopathic strictures (OR 3.107; P = 0.035) were independent predictors of failure after DVIU. The failure rate after DVIU accounted for 41.8% of our present cohort with older age at presentation, obesity, and idiopathic strictures independent predictors of failure after DVIU. This information is important in counselling patients before surgery.

  17. Self-Expandable Stent Placement in Infrapopliteal Arteries After Unsuccessful Angioplasty Failure: One-Year Follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregrin, J. H.; Smirova, S.; Koznar, B.; Novotny, J.; Kovac, J.; Lastovickova, J.; Skibova, J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate whether stent placement in infrapopliteal arteries is helpful in failed percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Infrapopliteal PTA was performed in 70 arteries of 66 patients with chronic critical lower limb ischemia. The group comprised 55 males and 11 females, with an average age of 63.4 (range, 42-82) years. Diabetes mellitus was present in 92.4% of patients. Only the palpable anterior tibial and posterior tibial arteries were evaluated. Stents (Xpert stent; Abbot Vascular, Redwood City, CA, USA) were placed in 16 arteries where PTA was not successful (the failure was defined as residual stenosis >30% after PTA). In 54 arteries simple PTA was performed and was technically successful. Twenty-four nondilated arteries with no significant stenosis served as a comparison group. The 12-month patency rate was evaluated according to a combination of palpation and Doppler ultrasound. In all cases stent placement restored the flow in the artery immediately after unsuccessful PTA. Twelve-month follow-up showed a patency rate of 82% in the PTA group, 78% in the stent group, and 69% in the comparison group. We conclude that stent placement in the case of unsuccessful infrapopliteal PTA changed technical failure to success and restored flow in the dilated artery. At 12-month follow-up the patency rate of infrapopliteal arteries stented for PTA failure did not differ significantly either from nonstented arteries with an optimal PTA result or from a comparison group of nonintervened arteries.

  18. Urethral Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder and the urethra ( cystoscopy ). Treatment Bladder drainage tube Sometimes surgery (to repair urethral tears) For urethral bruises that do not result in any leakage of urine, a doctor can place a catheter ... days to drain the urine while the urethra heals. For urethral ...

  19. Outcomes of secondary self-expandable metal stents versus surgery after delayed initial palliative stent failure in malignant colorectal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Young; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2013-01-01

    When re-intervention is required due to an occluded first colorectal self-expanding metal stent for malignant colorectal obstruction, serious controversies exist regarding whether to use endoscopic re-stenting or surgery. To compare the clinical outcomes in patients who underwent stent re-insertion versus palliative surgery as a second intervention. A total of 115 patients who received either self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) insertion or palliative surgery for treatment of a second occurrence of malignant colorectal obstruction after the first SEMS placement were retrospectively studied between July 2005 and December 2009. The median overall survival (8.2 vs. 15.5 months) and progression-free survival (4.0 vs. 2.7 months) were not significantly different between the stent and surgery groups (p = 0.895 and 0.650, respectively). The median lumen patency in the stent group was 3.4 months and that in the surgery group was 7.9 months (p = 0.003). The immediate complication rate after second stent insertion was 13.9% and late complication rate was observed in 12 of 79 (15.2%) patients. There was no mortality related to the SEMS procedure. The complication and mortality rates associated with palliative surgery were 3.5% (2/57) and 12.3% (7/57), respectively. Although there is no significant difference in the overall survival between stenting and surgery, a secondary stent insertion had a lower mortality rate despite a shorter duration of temporary colorectal decompression compared to that of palliative surgery.

  20. Urethral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, B.M.; Hricak, H.; Dixon, C.; McAninch, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging in posterior urethral trauma. Fifteen patients with posttraumatic membranous urethral strictures underwent prospective MR imaging with a 1.5-T unit before open urethroplasty. All patients had transaxial T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/70) spin-echo images and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images (matrix, 192 x 256; section thickness, 4 mm with 20% gap). Conventional retrograde and cystourethrography were performed preoperatively. Compared with conventional studies, MR imaging defined the length and location of the urethral injury and provided additional information regarding the direction and degree of prostatic and urethral dislocation

  1. Remarkable increase of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with decreased susceptibility of azithromycin and increase in the failure of azithromycin therapy in male gonococcal urethritis in Sendai in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Ito, Shin; Hatazaki, Kyoko; Deguchi, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The antimicrobial resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a serious problem worldwide. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae isolated from male gonococcal urethritis in Sendai in 2014 and 2015. Furthermore, of all cases, we investigated the clinical efficacy of a single 2-g dose of extended-release azithromycin (AZM-SR) in the treatment of male gonococcal urethritis retrospectively. Sixty N. gonorrhoeae strains in 2014 and 54 strains in 2015 were isolated from male gonococcal urethritis and stored each year. The MIC of AZM was ≥1 mg/L in 4 strains (6.7%) in 2014 and in 13 strains (24.1%) in 2015 and the number of strains having ≥1 mg/L MIC increased significantly (P = 0.016). Microbiological efficacy was evaluated in 32 and 29 of these patients, and the rates of treatment success were 93.8% and 79.3%, respectively. All of the treatment failures were caused by strains having a MIC of AZM of ≥0.5 mg/L. In particular, the increase in the isolates having a MIC of AZM of ≥1 mg/L was remarkable. Therefore, it was thought that the increase in these strains was the reason for the increase in treatment failures in 2015. Because no other drug is effective, it is currently necessary to use AZM-SR to treat gonococcal infections caused by ceftriaxone-resistant strains or patients allergic to ceftriaxone. To prevent a further increase in resistance to AZM, we should not use AZM-SR to treat normal cases of gonococcal infection. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of long segment anterior urethral stricture (≥ 8cm using buccal mucosal (BM graft and penile skin (PS flap: outcome and predictors of failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Alsagheer

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To evaluate the surgical outcome and predictors of failure of substitution urethroplasty using either dorsal onlay buccal mucosal (BM graft or ventral onlay penile skin flap (PS for anterior urethral stricture ≥ 8cm. Patients and methods Between March 2010 and January 2016, 50 patients with anterior urethral stricture ≥ 8 cm were treated at our hospital. The surgical outcome and success rate were assessed. The predictors of failure were analyzed using multivariate analysis. Failure was considered when subsequent urethrotomy or urethroplasty were needed. Results Dorsal onlay BM graft was carried out in 24 patients, while PS urethroplasty in 26 patients. There was no significant difference between both groups regarding patients demographics, stricture characteristics or follow-up period. One case in the BM group was lost during follow-up. Stricture recurrence was detected in 7 (30.4% patients out of BM group while in 6 (23.1% patients out of PS group (p value= 0.5. No significant differences between both groups regarding overall early and late complications were observed. Occurrence of early complications and the stricture length were the only predictors of failure in univariate analysis, while in multivariate analysis the occurrence of early complications was only significant. Conclusion On short-term follow-up, both dorsal onlay BM graft and ventral onlay PS flap urethroplasty have similar success rates. However, BM graft has a potential advantage to reduce operative time and is also technically easier. The surgeon should avoid early local complications as they represent a higher risk for failure.

  3. Redo-urethroplasty in pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect: an audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Suresh K; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Kumar, Santosh; Devasia, Antony; Kekre, Nitin S

    2011-02-01

    To predict the outcome of redo-urethroplasty after failed single or multiple open urethral procedures for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. From January 1997 to December 2006, 43 patients underwent redo-urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect. Forty-one were referred from other centers. All had undergone open surgery along with an endoscopic procedure (one or more procedures in each patient) which included endoscopic internal urethrotomy, urethral stenting or urethral dilations. There were 43 men with mean age of 29 (range 11-52). Eleven had associated injuries: intraperitoneal bladder rupture (3), bladder neck (2), rectum (3), anal sphincter (2), combined bladder, rectum and anal sphincter (1). Trocar suprapubic cystostomy was performed in 22, rail-road procedures in 10 and open suprapubic cystostomy in 11 along with the management of associated injuries as immediate treatment. Of 43 patients, 28 had progressive perineal, and 12 had transpubic repair. Three patients had total bulbar necrosis, and they underwent prepuceal tube reconstruction (1) and staged substitution with BMG and standard scrotal inlay (2). Analysis of various factors like number of attempts at previous surgery and stricture length did not affect the outcome. A successful result was achieved in 36 (83.72%), improved and stable in five and failure in two. The overall result of redo-urethroplasty for pelvic fracture urethral distraction defect continues to be gratifying. Failures happen usually within the first 3 months. Substitution urethroplasty can be reserved for those who have long distraction defect. Long-term follow-up is essential using stringent criteria to measure success.

  4. current concepts in the management of anterior urethral strictures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iam

    such as calculi, urethral hair and stent encrustation which may be useful in ... and 7 o'clock to the prostatic urethra, 3 and 9 o'clock ... anterior urethra the use of stents is limited to but ... take such as radiotherapy, peripheral vascular disease.

  5. Directional Atherectomy in Iliac Stent Failure: Clinical Technique and Histopathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettles, Duncan F.; MacDonald, Alastair W.; Burgess, Paul A.; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Dyet, John F.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and efficacy of directional atherectomy in the treatment of iliac stent stenosis or occlusion and to evaluate the histologic composition of excised atherectomy specimens. Methods: Directional atherectomy of six occluded and 10 severely stenosed iliac stents was undertaken in 12 patients at a mean interval of 28 months (range 3-69 months) after stent insertion for occlusive aortoiliac disease. In cases of stent occlusion, atherectomy was preceded by low-dose thrombolysis. In all patients stent clearance with return of femoral pulses was achieved within 24 hr and there were no significant complications. All excised specimens were sent for histologic examination. Results: Eleven patients (92%) remain symptom free with unlimited walking distance at a mean follow-up interval of 11.5 months (range 3-31 months) after treatment. Histologic examination revealed typical myointimal hyperplasia at three excision sites, intimal fibrosis at three sites, atheroma at four sites and organized thrombus at six sites. Conclusion: Atherectomy offers an effective treatment in iliac stent occlusion and restenosis with no significant adverse effects. Debulking of these lesions seems to offer a more logical approach than simple balloon angioplasty. Clinical and duplex follow-up confirms satisfactory outcome within the first year but longer-term results are not yet known. The histologic data obtained demonstrate that stent restenosis and occlusion are likely to be multifactorial, and challenge the assumption that myointimal hyperplasia is the sole cause of iliac stent occlusion

  6. Urethral stricture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It can also occur after a disease or injury. Rarely, it may be caused by pressure from a growing tumor near the urethra. Other factors that increase the risk for this condition include: Sexually ... Injury to the pelvic area Repeated urethritis Strictures that ...

  7. Direct Vision Internal Urethrotomy for Short Anterior Urethral Strictures and Beyond: Success Rates, Predictors of Treatment Failure, and Recurrence Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, Luis A; Ernst, Lukas; Vetterlein, Malte W; Meyer, Christian P; Reiss, C Philip; Fisch, Margit; Rosenbaum, Clemens M

    2017-08-01

    To determine success rates, predictors of recurrence, and recurrence management of patients treated for short anterior urethral strictures by direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU). We identified 128 patients who underwent DVIU of the anterior urethra between December 2009 and March 2016. Follow-up was conducted by telephone interviews. Success rates were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimators. Predictors of stricture recurrence and different further therapy strategies were identified by uni- and multivariable Cox regression analyses. The mean age was 63.8 years (standard deviation: 16.3) and the overall success rate was 51.6% (N = 66) at a median follow-up of 16 months (interquartile range: 6-43). Median time to stricture recurrence was six months (interquartile range: 2-12). In uni- and multivariable analyses, only repeat DVIU (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-3.11, P= .015; and HR=1.78, 95% CI = 1.05-3.03, P = .032, respectively) was a risk factor for recurrence. Of 62 patients with recurrence, 35.5% underwent urethroplasty, 29% underwent further endoscopic treatment, and 33.9% did not undergo further interventional therapy. Age (HR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.01-1.09, P = .019) and diabetes (HR = 2.90, 95% CI = 1.02-8.26, P = .047) were predictors of no further interventional therapy. DVIU seems justifiable in short urethral strictures as a primary treatment. Prior DVIU was a risk factor for recurrence. In case of recurrence, about one-third of the patients did not undergo any further therapy. Higher age and diabetes predicted the denial of any further treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. TRICHOMONAS URETHRITIS IN MALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Duc, Ector

    1955-01-01

    Trichomonas urethritis in the male should be suspected in all chronic cases of urethritis. The diagnosis is easily established by the hanging-drop method of examining the urethral discharge, or the first-glass urine specimen. Curative treatment is readily accomplished by the use of urethral instillations of Carbarsone suspension using 1 capsule of Carbarsone per ounce of distilled water. PMID:13270111

  9. URETHROPLASTY FOR COMPLICATED ANTERIOR URETHRAL STRICTURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Katsuya; Hori, Shunta; Morizawa, Yosuke; Nakai, Yasushi; Miyake, Makito; Anai, Satoshi; Torimoto, Kazumasa; Yoneda, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Nobumichi; Yoshida, Katsunori; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    (Objectives) To compare efficacy and outcome of urethroplasty for complicated anterior urethral strictures. (Methods) Twelve patients, included 3 boys, with anterior urethral stricture underwent urethroplasty after the failure of either urethral dilatation or internal urethrotomy. We evaluated pre- and post-operative Q max and surgical outcome. (Results) Four patients were treated with end-to-end anastomosis, included a case of bulbar urethral elongation simultaneously, one patient was treated with augmented anastomotic urethroplasty, three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with prepucial flap, one patient was treated with tubed urethroplasty with prepucial flap (Ducket procedure) and three patients were treated with onlay urethroplasty with buccal mucosal graft. Postoperative Qmax improved in all patients without major complications and recurrence during follow-up periods ranging from 17 to 102 months (mean 55 months). (Conclusions) Urethroplasty is an effective therapeutic procedure for complicated anterior urethral stricture.

  10. Structural alterations of foreskin caused by chronic smoking may explain high levels of urethral reconstruction failure using foreskin flaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João P. Rosado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to perform a stereological and biochemical analysis of the foreskin of smoker subjects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Foreskin samples were obtained from 20 young adults (mean = 27.2 years old submitted to circumcision. Of the patients analyzed, one group (n = 10 had previous history of chronic smoking (a half pack to 3 packs per day for 3 to 13 years (mean = 5.8 ± 3.2. The control group included 10 nonsmoking patients. Masson's trichrome stain was used to quantify the foreskin vascular density. Weigert’s resorcin-fucsin stain was used to assess the elastic system fibers and Picrosirius red stain was applied to study the collagen. Stereological analysis was performed using the Image J software to determine the volumetric densities. For biochemical analysis, the total collagen was determined as µg of hydroxyproline per mg of dry tissue. Means were compared using the unpaired t-test (p < 0.05. RESULTS: Elastic system fibers of smokers was 42.5% higher than in the control group (p = 0.002. In contrast, smooth muscle fibers (p = 0.42 and vascular density (p = 0.16 did not show any significant variation. Qualitative analysis using Picrosirius red stain with polarized light evidenced the presence of type I and III collagen in the foreskin tissue, without significant difference between the groups. Total collagen concentration also did not differ significantly between smokers and non-smokers (73.1µg/mg ± 8.0 vs. 69.2µg/mg ± 5.9, respectively, p = 0.23. CONCLUSIONS: The foreskin tissue of smoking patients had a significant increase of elastic system fibers. Elastic fibers play an important role in this tissue’s turnover and this high concentration in smokers possibly causes high extensibility of the foreskin. The structural alterations in smokers’ foreskins could possibly explain the poor results in smoking patients submitted to foreskin fasciocutaneous flaps in urethral reconstruction surgery.

  11. When to remove the urethral catheter after endoscopic realignment of traumatic disruption of the posterior urethra?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Darawany, H M

    2017-09-01

    To detect the optimal time for urethral stent removal after endoscopic urethral realignment and its effect on the incidence of development of urethral stricture. Eighteen patients underwent endoscopic urethral realignment after traumatic disruption of the posterior urethra. Post-operative urethroscopy was done using the flexible cystoscope to assess progress of urethral healing. The urethral Foley catheter that served as a stent and for urine drainage was removed only when complete mucosal healing was observed by flexible urethroscopy. There was a post-operative follow-up period of 12-36months. Uroflowmetry was performed at the end of the follow-up period. Endoscopy 6weeks after realignment showed 50-75% mucosal epithelialization at the site of urethral disruption in all patients. Epithelialization was complete at 9weeks in 15/18 patients (83%) and at 12weeks in the remaining 3 patients (17%). One patient (5.6%) developed a mild symptomatic stricture 5months post stent removal that was successfully treated by a single session of visual urethrotomy. All 18 patients had normal uroflowmetry readings at 12-36months after realignment. Urethral stenting should be continued till mucosal healing at the site of urethral disruption became complete. Removal of the stent at this optimal time decreases the incidence of post-operative urethral stricture. Flexible urethroscopy was a safe procedure for post-operative follow-up of endoscopic urethral realignment to assess the progress and completion of mucosal healing at the site of realignment. 4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Gelman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty.

  13. Posterior Urethral Strictures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Joel; Wisenbaugh, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral injuries are typically partial and more often complete disruptions of the most proximal bulbar and distal membranous urethra. Emergency management includes suprapubic tube placement. Subsequent primary realignment to place a urethral catheter remains a controversial topic, but what is not controversial is that when there is the development of a stricture (which is usually obliterative with a distraction defect) after suprapubic tube placement or urethral catheter removal, the standard of care is delayed urethral reconstruction with excision and primary anastomosis. This paper reviews the management of patients who suffer pelvic fracture urethral injuries and the techniques of preoperative urethral imaging and subsequent posterior urethroplasty. PMID:26691883

  14. Incidence and predictors of target lesion failure in a multiethnic Asian population receiving the SYNERGY coronary stent: A prospective all-comers registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Kristanto, William; Liu, Li; Chan, Siew-Pang; Loh, Poay Huan; Tay, Edgar L; Chan, Koo Hui; Chan, Mark Y; Lee, Chi-Hang; Low, Adrian F; Tan, Huay Cheem; Loh, Joshua P

    2018-03-07

    To evaluate the target lesion failure (TLF) rate of the SYNERGY stent in all-comers, multiethnic Asian population. Currently, most drug eluting stents deliver anti-proliferative drugs from a durable polymer which is associated with a risk of late stent thrombosis. The novel everolimus-eluting, platinum chromium SYNERGY stent is coated with a bioabsorbable abluminal polymer that resolves within 4 months. This was a prospective, single center registry of consecutive patients treated with the SYNERGY stent between December 2012 and April 2015. The primary outcome was the incidence of TLF, defined as the combination of cardiac death, target vessel myocardial infarction, or clinically driven target lesion revascularization (TLR) at 1 year. A total of 807 patients received the SYNERGY stent during the study period. One-year clinical outcome data was available for 765 patients (94.8%) and were considered for statistical analysis. The mean age was 60.7 ± 10.8 years, and 83.4% were males. Patients with acute myocardial infarction consisted of 50.3% (ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 23.0%, Non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 27.3%) of the study population. The treated lesions were complex (ACC/AHA type B2/C: 72.7%). The primary end point of TLF at 1 year was 5.8%. Rates of cardiac mortality, target vessel myocardial infarction, and TLR were 4.2, 1.0, and 1.3%, respectively, at 1 year. Predictors of the incidence and time to early TLF were female gender, Malay ethnicity, diabetes mellitus, acute myocardial infarction at presentation, a prior history of coronary artery bypass surgery and the presence of lesion calcification. The incidence of definite stent thrombosis was 0.4% at 1 year. In this registry, the use of the SYNERGY stent was associated with low rates of TLF at 1 year. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khourdaji, Iyad; Parke, Jacob; Burks, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), brachytherapy (BT), photon beam therapy (PBT), high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU), urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures. PMID:26494994

  16. Treatment of Urethral Strictures from Irradiation and Other Nonsurgical Forms of Pelvic Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad Khourdaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT, brachytherapy (BT, photon beam therapy (PBT, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, and cryotherapy are noninvasive treatment options for pelvic malignancies and prostate cancer. Though effective in treating cancer, urethral stricture disease is an underrecognized and poorly reported sequela of these treatment modalities. Studies estimate the incidence of stricture from BT to be 1.8%, EBRT 1.7%, combined EBRT and BT 5.2%, and cryotherapy 2.5%. Radiation effects on the genitourinary system can manifest early or months to years after treatment with the onus being on the clinician to investigate and rule-out stricture disease as an underlying etiology for lower urinary tract symptoms. Obliterative endarteritis resulting in ischemia and fibrosis of the irradiated tissue complicates treatment strategies, which include urethral dilation, direct-vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU, urethral stents, and urethroplasty. Failure rates for dilation and DVIU are exceedingly high with several studies indicating that urethroplasty is the most definitive and durable treatment modality for patients with radiation-induced stricture disease. However, a detailed discussion should be offered regarding development or worsening of incontinence after treatment with urethroplasty. Further studies are required to assess the nature and treatment of cryotherapy and HIFU-induced strictures.

  17. Predictors for success of internal urethrotomy in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young-Kwon; Choi, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Young-Tae; Lee, Seung-Ryeol

    2017-05-01

    Internal urethrotomy (IU) in patients with urethral contracture following perineal repair of pelvic fracture urethral injuries (PRPFUI) is troublesome. We evaluated the clinical factors affecting the surgical outcome of IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 35 patients who underwent IU for urethral contracture after PRPFUI between March 2004 and June 2013. Ages of patients ranged from 18 to 50, and their follow-up duration was more than 1year after IU. The urethral contracture was confirmed by retrograde urethrogram or cysto-urethroscopy. Success was defined as greater than 15mL/s of peak urinary flow rate at 1year after IU without any clinical evidence of urethral contracture. Success rates were investigated according to the number of IU. Age, body mass index, urethral defect length before PRPFUI, time interval between the original urethral injury and the PRPFUI or between a previous operation and the PRPFUI, time interval between the PRPFUI and the urethral contracture, number of PRPFUI performed, and the type of urethral lengthening procedure were compared between patients with and without success according to the number of IU. Among the 35 patients, the overall success rate of IU was 37% (13/35) during the mean follow-up period of 53 months (range: 17-148 months). There were 8 and 5 patients with success in first and second IU, respectively. However, there was no success after third IU. Urethral defect length before PRPFUI was significantly shorter in patients with success who underwent first and second IU (p<0.05). There were significant differences of success between patients with and without previous repeated failures of PRPFUI in first and second IU (p<0.05). Short urethral defect length and no previous surgical failures before PRPFUI are good prognostic factors for IU following PRPFUI. Only one or two IUs will be helpful in patients with urethral contracture following PRPFUI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  18. Endovascular stent-graft exclusion of aortic dissection combined with renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiang; Jing Zaiping; Yuan Weijie; Bao Junmin; Zhao Zhiqing; Zhao Jun; Lu Qingsheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the indications and peri-operative management of endovascular graft exclusion of aortic dissection combined with renal failure. Methods: Endovascular graft exclusion for Stanford B type thoracic aortic dissection had been preformed on 136 patients including two complicated with renal failure. Hemodialysis was preformed before operation with the fluid infusion controlled during the operation and bed-side hemodialysis after the operation for the latter. Results: All the 2 cases with renal failure complication were successfully carried out, and the peri-operative metabolism and circulation were kept on smoothly. Conclusions: Under good peri-operative management, patients having aortic dissection combined with renal failure could receive the endovascular graft exclusion of aortic dissection safely

  19. Endoscopic urethral realignment of traumatic urethral disruption: A monocentric experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mohamed El Darawany

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Endoscopic primary realignment of posterior urethral rupture is less invasive and a safer procedure, without pelvic hemorrhage or additional injuries. It has low incidence of severe urethral stricture and avoids the need for delayed open urethral reconstruction.

  20. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  1. Modified nasolacrimal duct stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Min; Jin Mei; Chen Huanjun; Li Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Traditional nasolacrimal duct stenting possesses some shortcoming including difficulty of pulling ball head guide wire from the nasal cavity with turbinate hypertrophy and nasal septal deviation. The new method of nose-oral tube track establishment can overcome the forementioned and increase the successful rate. Methods: 5 F catheter and arterial sheath were modified to be nasolacrimal duct stent delivery device respectively. Antegrade dacryocystography was taken firstly to display the obstructed site and followed by the modified protocol of inserting the guide wire through nasolacrimal duct and nasal cavity, and establishing the stent delivery track for retrograde stent placement. Results: 5 epiphora patients with failure implantation by traditional method were all succeeded through the modified stenting (100%). During 6-mouth follow-up, no serious complications and reocclusion occurred. Conclusion: The establishment of eye-nose-mouth-nose of external nasal guide wire track can improve the successful rate of nasolacrimal duct stenting. (authors)

  2. Physical simulation of the random failure of implanted braided NiTi stents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hiřmanová, Klára; Pilch, Jan; Racek, Jan; Heller, Luděk; Šittner, Petr; Recman, L.; Petrenec, M.; Sedlák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 7 (2014), s. 2650-2658 ISSN 1059-9495. [International Conference on Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies (SMST 2013). Praha, 21.05.2013-24.05.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP108/12/P111; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11058 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262806 - SmartNets Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : electron microscopy * failure analysis * mechanical testing Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.998, year: 2014

  3. Treatment efficacy, treatment failures and selection of macrolide resistance in patients with high load of Mycoplasma genitalium during treatment of male urethritis with josamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guschin, Alexander; Ryzhikh, Pavel; Rumyantseva, Tatiana; Gomberg, Mikhail; Unemo, Magnus

    2015-02-03

    Azithromycin has been widely used for Mycoplasma genitalium treatment internationally. However, the eradication efficacy has substantially declined recent decade. In Russia, josamycin (another macrolide) is the recommended first-line treatment for M. genitalium infections, however, no data regarding treatment efficacy with josamycin and resistance in M. genitalium infections have been internationally published. We examined the M. genitalium prevalence in males attending an STI clinic in Moscow, Russia from December 2006 to January 2008, investigated treatment efficacy with josamycin in male urethritis, and monitored the M. genitalium DNA eradication dynamics and selection of macrolide resistance in M. genitalium during this treatment. Microscopy and real-time PCRs were used to diagnose urethritis and non-viral STIs, respectively, in males (n = 320). M. genitalium positive patients were treated with recommended josamycin regimen and treatment efficacy was monitored using quantitative real-time PCR. Macrolide resistance mutations were identified using sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene. Forty-seven (14.7%) males were positive for M. genitalium only and most (85.1%) of these had symptoms and signs of urethritis. Forty-six (97.9%) males agreed to participate in the treatment efficacy monitoring. All the pre-treatment M. genitalium specimens had wild-type 23S rRNA. The elimination of M. genitalium DNA was substantially faster in patients with lower pre-treatment M. genitalium load, and the total eradication rate was 43/46 (93.5%). Of the six patients with high pre-treatment M. genitalium load, three (50%) remained positive post-treatment and these positive specimens contained macrolide resistance mutations in the 23S rRNA gene, i.e., A2059G (n = 2) and A2062G (n = 1). M. genitalium was a frequent cause of male urethritis in Moscow, Russia. The pre-treatment M. genitalium load might be an effective predictor of eradication efficacy with macrolides (and possibly

  4. Reconstruction and management of posterior urethral and straddle injuries of the urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Gerald H; Virasoro, Ramón; Eltahawy, Ehab A

    2006-02-01

    Urethral stricture disease, once associated mainly with gonococcal urethritis, is now most frequently a consequence of trauma, such as a fall-astride injury or a pelvic fracture. This article discusses issues and approaches related to the treatment of strictures associated with perineal straddle trauma and pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. The authors emphasize that endoscopic procedures seldom cure these strictures and in-dwelling stents are seldom useful in treatment. Primary anastomotic techniques are associated with success rates in the high 90% range and appear to be remarkably durable in most cases. In contrast, tubed reconstruction of the urethra is inevitably associated with diminished success rates and with problems of durability.

  5. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Sub; Chung, Young Sun; Suh, Chee Jang; Won, Jong Jin

    1985-01-01

    Two cases of congenital anterior urethral diverticular which have occurred in a 4 year old and one month old boy are presented. Etiology, diagnostic procedures, and its clinical results are briefly reviewed

  6. Urethral diverticulum in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-Xuan Xie

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Urethral diverticulum is rare in pregnancy. There is no clear guideline on the management of urethral diverticulum in pregnancy, but most cases were managed conservatively. We report a case of urethral diverticulum in a primigravida woman, who presented with anterior vaginal swelling at 14 weeks of gestation. She was managed conservatively and the cyst (approximately 8 cm × 13 cm was aspirated during the early stage of labor. However her labor did not progress during the second stage, which resulted in an emergency cesarean section. She underwent diverticulectomy at 1 month postpartum because of the recurrence of the swelling and persistent discomfort. We believe that her dystocia may have been caused by factors other than the diverticulum. As previously described in literature, we concluded that, even in pregnant women with a large urethral diverticulum, vaginal delivery can still be considered with prior aspiration during the early stage of labor.

  7. Posterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve J. Hodges

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in male infants is posterior urethral valves. Although the incidence has remained stable, the neonatal mortality for this disorder has improved due to early diagnosis and intensive neonatal care, thanks in part to the widespread use of prenatal ultrasound evaluations. In fact, the most common reason for the diagnosis of posterior urethral valves presently is the evaluation of infants for prenatal hydronephrosis. Since these children are often diagnosed early, the urethral obstruction can be alleviated rapidly through catheter insertion and eventual surgery, and their metabolic derangements can be normalized without delay, avoiding preventable infant mortality. Of the children that survive, however, early diagnosis has not had much effect on their long-term prognosis, as 30% still develop renal insufficiency before adolescence. A better understanding of the exact cause of the congenital obstruction of the male posterior urethra, prevention of postnatal bladder and renal injury, and the development of safe methods to treat urethral obstruction prenatally (and thereby avoiding the bladder and renal damage due to obstructive uropathy are the goals for the care of children with posterior urethral valves[1].

  8. Urethral Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer is rare and is more common in men than in women. Urethral cancer can metastasize (spread) quickly to tissues around the urethra and has often spread to nearby lymph nodes by the time it is diagnosed. Start here to find information on urethral cancer treatment.

  9. Anaerobes in men with urethritis

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, E A; Taylor-Robinson, D; Hanna, N F; Coufalik, E D

    1982-01-01

    Sixty-four men with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), seven with gonococcal urethritis (GU), and 30 who had no symptoms or signs of urethritis were studied. Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from urethral specimens taken from 22% of the men with NGU, and 18% with GU, but not from those who did not have urethritis even though 20 (67%) of them had a history of NGU, GU, or both. The chlamydial isolation rate for men having NGU for the first time was 30%. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated from ...

  10. Complex bladder-exstrophy-epispadias management: Causes of failure of initial bladder closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouame Dibi Bertin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the initial closure of the complex bladder-exstrophy remains a challenge in pediatric surgery. This study describes a personal experience of the causes of failure of the initial closure and operative morbidity during the surgical treatment of bladder-exstrophy complex. From April 2000 to March 2014, four patients aged 16 days to 7 years and 5 months underwent complex exstrophy-epispadias repair with pelvic osteotomies. There were three males and one female. Three of them had posterior pelvic osteotomy, one had anterior innominate osteotomy. Bladder Closure: Bladder closure was performed in three layers. Our first patient had initial bladder closure with polyglactin 4/0 (Vicryl ® 4/0, concerning the last three patients, initial bladder closure was performed with polydioxanone 4/0 (PDS ® 4/0. The bladder was repaired leaving the urethral stent and ureteral stents for full urinary drainage for three patients. In one case, only urethral stent was left, ureteral drainage was not possible, because stents sizes were more important than the ureteral diameter. Out of a total of four patients, initial bladder closure was completely achieved for three patients. At the immediate postoperative follow-up, two patients presented a complete disunion of the abdominal wall and bladder despite an appropriate postoperative care. The absorbable braided silk (polyglactin used for the bladder closure was considered as the main factor in the failure of the bladder closure. The second cause of failure of the initial bladder closure was the incomplete urine drainage, ureteral catheterisation was not possible because the catheters sizes were too large compared with the diameters of the ureters. The failure of the initial bladder-exstrophy closure may be reduced by a closure with an absorbable monofilament silk and efficient urine drainage via ureteral catheterisation.

  11. Congenital posterior urethral diverticula causing bladder outlet obstruction in a young male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Agrawal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of 26-year-old male presenting with mild renal failure. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of posterior urethral valve, but micturating cystourethrogram and endoscopic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of posterior urethral diverticulae. Transurethral resection of diverticulae was performed. Patient is voiding well and his renal function has stabilized.

  12. Transrectal ultrasound in male urethritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaly, A F; Taylor, P M; Goorney, B P; Haye, K R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of prostatic abnormalities in men with gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis using trans-rectal ultrasonic markers. DESIGN--A case control study of patients attending a department of genitourinary medicine with symptoms of urethritis. SETTING--Department of Genitourinary Medicine and Department of Radiology in Manchester Royal Infirmary. RESULTS--A total of 42 patients were recruited to the study: 26 with urethritis and 16 controls. Of the 26 study patie...

  13. Female urethral carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Masahiko; Kondo, Atsuo; Sakakibara, Toshihumi

    1988-01-01

    Urethral carcinoma in 2 females has been treated with irradiation together with adjunct chemotherapy. In case 1, a 73-year-old female with squamous cell carcinoma was successfully treated with irradiation of 4,000 rad and peplomycin of 60 mg intravenously given. She has been free from the disease for the past 43 months. In case 2, a 61-year-old female with transitional cell carcinoma was initially treated with irradiation of 5,000 rad together with peplomycin 90 mg, which was followed by another 5,000 rad irradiation. The tumor recurred and the patient was operated on for cystourethrectomy and partial resection of the vagina. A further chemotherapy of cisplatin, peplomycin, and mitomycin C was instituted. She died of the tumor recurrence 23 months after the first visit to our clinic. Diagnosis and treatment modalities on the female urethral carcinoma are briefly discussed. (author)

  14. Anterior Urethral Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  15. Predictors of Long-Term Results After Treatment of Iliac Artery Obliteration by Transluminal Angioplasty and Stent Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funovics, M.A.; Lackner, B.; Cejna, M.; Peloschek, P.; Sailer, J.; Philipp, M.O.; Maca, T.; Ahmadi, A.; Minar, E.; Lammer, J.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate initial and long-term success rate after percutaneous treatment of iliac artery occlusion with angioplasty and stent deployment. To investigate the influence of vascular comorbidity, lesion length, stent placement and lesion coverage as possible predictors of outcome. Methods: Between January 1994 and December 1999, 80 iliac recanalizations were performed on 78 patients, median age 61.1 ±11.5 (SD) years. All patients were followed up by clinical examinations, duplex ultrasound and intravenous digital subtraction angiography. Mean follow-up time was 2.0 ± 1.53 (SD) years.Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to determine the influence of cofactors on patency. Results: One, 2 and 4 years after recanalization, primary patency was 78.1%, 74.5% and 64.0%; secondary patency was 88.8%, 88.8% and 77.9%, respectively.Patients with shorter occlusions, complete lesion coverage and patent ipsilateral femoral arteries had significantly longer patency rates.Complications included inguinal hematoma (n=1), technical failure (n=3) aortic dissection (n=1), embolic occlusions (n=7), gluteal claudication (n=1) and genital necrosis after subsequent urethral surgery in one patient with contralateral occlusion and ipsilateral overstenting of the internal iliac artery with subsequent stenosis. Complications were of permanent clinical significance in seven of 78 (9%) of the patients. In 17 (22%) cases, percutaneous reintervention was performed with angioplasty in the stent (n=16) or deployment of a new stent (n=1). Conclusion: Endoluminal stent placement has its place in an interdisciplinary therapeutic approach as a viable therapeutic alternative to major transabdominal bypass surgery and can be performed with comparable complication rates. Patients with short occlusions, patent femoral arteries, and stents covering the entire occlusion have significant longer patency

  16. Expandable stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, J C; Carrasco, H

    1996-05-01

    Expandable metallic stents are effective in selected patients with malignant or benign airway stenoses. When used for malignant lesions, the primary purpose of the stent is to improve the quality of life; stents are usually chosen for palliation of symptoms in recognition of the low likelihood of success for other therapy. For patients with benign stenoses, the stents provide a permanent source of structural support to alleviate the narrowed segment. The advantages of the expandable metallic stents are as follows: (1) they can be inserted through an endotracheal tube or under local anesthesia with relative simplicity under fluoroscopic guidance; (2) they do not impair the drainage of sputum because ciliary movement is not interrupted; (3) over a period of a few weeks, the meshwork is gradually covered with mucosa as the stent becomes incorporated into the airway wall; (4) ventilation usually is not impaired if the metallic mesh stent covers another nonstenosed bronchus, because the interstices of the stent are nonobstructive; and (5) they are dynamic and continue to expand over time, particularly if concurrent treatment achieves an effect on the lesion that caused stenosis. Disadvantages of the expandable stent include (1) they often are only temporarily effective for tracheobronchial stenosis due to intraluminal tumor or granulation tissue, both of which can grow between the wires; (2) they are considered permanent stents because removal is difficult; and (3) they can be poorly positioned during placement or can become displaced by progressive migration after placement, and they cannot be repositioned. A relative contraindication to insertion is an inflammatory process or infection that can predispose to granulation formation, particularly at the points of maximal contact pressure of the stent to the airway mucosa. In the presence of inflammation, it may be better to use a silicone prosthesis until the inflammatory process subsides and fibrosis occurs. Granulation

  17. Calculi in female urethral diverticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B J; Hørby, J; Brynitz, S

    1989-01-01

    A case of two calculi found in the same urethral diverticulum in a 41-year-old woman with recurrent urinary tract infections is reported. The diagnostic procedures are discussed.......A case of two calculi found in the same urethral diverticulum in a 41-year-old woman with recurrent urinary tract infections is reported. The diagnostic procedures are discussed....

  18. Airway stents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Colleen

    2018-01-01

    Stents and tubes to maintain the patency of the airways are commonly used for malignant obstruction and are occasionally employed in benign disease. Malignant airway obstruction usually results from direct involvement of bronchogenic carcinoma, or by extension of carcinomas occurring in the esophagus or the thyroid. External compression from lymph nodes or metastatic disease from other organs can also cause central airway obstruction. Most malignant airway lesions are surgically inoperable due to advanced disease stage and require multimodality palliation, including stent placement. As with any other medical device, stents have significantly evolved over the last 50 years and deserve an in-depth understanding of their true capabilities and complications. Not every silicone stent is created equal and the same holds for metallic stents. Herein, we present an overview of the topic as well as some of the more practical and controversial issues surrounding airway stents. We also try to dispel the myths surrounding stent removal and their supposed use only in central airways. At the end, we come to the long-held conclusion that stents should not be used as first line treatment of choice, but after ruling out the possibility of curative surgical resection or repair. PMID:29707506

  19. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun

    1990-01-01

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable

  20. Ultrasonographic evaluation of urethral stricture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Eun; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Nam Hee; Tae, Seok; Shin, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sang Chun [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    We studied sonography of saline filled male urethra in 21 cases, who had a urinary symptoms of urethral stricture. There were 11 cases of anterior urethral stricture, 2 cases of stricture with stone, and 8 cases of posterior urethral stricture. Sonography length of urethral stricture was compared with that of retrograde urethrography. The level and length of urethral stricture in sonography and retrograde urethrography compared to surgical findings in 7 out of 21 cases. The average lengths of anterior urethral strictures measured by sonography and retrograde urethroography were 28.15 and 18.75 mm. In cases of operation, the sonographic measurement was confirmed to be more accurate than urethrographic measurement. Sonography is easier to perform, more available in follow up and has no radiation hazard to the testis than X-ray study. Sonography is more accurate to determine the site, length and degree of anterior urethral stricture than X-ray study. As sonographic evaluations concerning posterior urethra stricture is impossible because of angulations of the urethra in posterior urethra, retrograde urethrography is preferable.

  1. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-29

    Jun 29, 2010 ... Jolly type a) De novo urethral stones are generally composed ... Prepare the title page, covering letter, acknowledgement etc. using a word processor program. ... The main text of the article, beginning with the Abstract to ...

  2. Advances in urethral stricture management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Maxx A.; Santucci, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stricture/stenosis is a narrowing of the urethral lumen. These conditions greatly impact the health and quality of life of patients. Management of urethral strictures/stenosis is complex and requires careful evaluation. The treatment options for urethral stricture vary in their success rates. Urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy are the most commonly performed procedures but carry the lowest chance for long-term success (0–9%). Urethroplasty has a much higher chance of success (85–90%) and is considered the gold-standard treatment. The most common urethroplasty techniques are excision and primary anastomosis and graft onlay urethroplasty. Anastomotic urethroplasty and graft urethroplasty have similar long-term success rates, although long-term data have yet to confirm equal efficacy. Anastomotic urethroplasty may have higher rates of sexual dysfunction. Posterior urethral stenosis is typically caused by previous urologic surgery. It is treated endoscopically with radial incisions. The use of mitomycin C may decrease recurrence. An exciting area of research is tissue engineering and scar modulation to augment stricture treatment. These include the use of acellular matrices or tissue-engineered buccal mucosa to produce grafting material for urethroplasty. Other experimental strategies aim to prevent scar formation altogether. PMID:28105329

  3. A simple technique to facilitate treatment of urethral strictures with optical internal urethrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Papadatou, Aggeliki; Moschouris, Hippocrates; Kornezos, Ioannis; Pavlis, Anargiros; Christopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  4. A Simple Technique to Facilitate Treatment of Urethral Strictures with Optical Internal Urethrotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization, urethroplasty, endoscopic internal urethrotomy, and dilation. Optical internal urethrotomy offers faster recovery, minimal scarring, and less risk of infection, although recurrence is possible. However, technical difficulties associated with poor visualization of the stenosis or of the urethral lumen may increase procedural time and substantially increase the failure rates of internal urethrotomy. In this report we describe a technique for urethral catheterization via a suprapubic, percutaneous approach through the urinary bladder in order to facilitate endoscopic internal urethrotomy.

  5. Anterior urethral valves: not such a benign condition…

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar eCruz-Diaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anterior urethral valves (AUV is an unusual cause of congenital obstruction of the male urethra, being 15 to 30 times less common than posterior urethral valves (PUV. It has been suggested that patients with congenital anterior urethral obstruction have a better prognosis than those with PUV.The long term prognosis of anterior urethral valves is not clear in the literature. In this report we describe our experience and long-term follow up of patients with AUV.Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 13 patients who presented with the diagnosis of AUV in our institutions between 1994 and 2012. From the 11 patients included, we evaluated the gestational age, ultrasound and voiding cystourethrogram findings, age upon valve ablation, micturition pattern, creatinine and clinical follow up.Results: Between 1994 and 2012 we evaluated 150 patients with the diagnosis of urethral valves, where 11 patients (7.3% had AUV and an adequate follow up. Mean follow up is 6.3 years. 5 patients (45.4% had pre-natal diagnosis of AUV. The most common prenatal ultrasonographic finding was bilateral hydronephrosis and distended bladder.The mean gestational age was 37.6 weeks. Postnatally, 90% had trabeculated bladder, 80% hydronephrosis and 40% renal dysplasia. The most common clinical presentation was urinary tract infection in 5 patients (45.4%.7 patients (63.6% had primary transurethral valve resection or laser ablation and 3 patients (27.2% had primary vesicostomies. One boy (9.1% had urethrostomy with urethral diverticulum excision. 2 patients (18.2% developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD.Conclusions: Early urinary tract obstruction resulted in ESRD in 18% of our patient population. In our series, the complication rate and the evolution to renal failure are high and similar to patients with PUV. In patients with AUV we recommend long-term follow up and close evaluation of patient’s bladder and renal function.

  6. Urethral sensation following reconstructive pelvic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernethy, M G; Davis, C; Lowenstein, L; Mueller, E R; Brubaker, L; Kenton, K

    2014-11-01

    Most urethral neuromuscular function data focus on efferent rather than afferent innervation. We aimed to determine if changes exist in urethral afferent nerve function before and after reconstructive pelvic surgery (RPS). Secondarily, we compared afferent urethral innervation in women with and without stress urinary incontinence undergoing RPS. Participants underwent current perception threshold (CPT) and urethral anal reflex (UAR) testing prior to surgery and again post-operatively. Wilcoxon signed ranked test and Spearman's correlations were used and all tests were two-sided. p = 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Urethral CPT thresholds increased significantly after RPS, consistent with decreased urethral afferent function. Pre-operative urethral CPT thresholds at 5 and 250 Hz were lower in SUI women (10 [IQR 5-29], 40 [32-750]) compared with continent women (63 [14-99], 73 [51-109]; p = 0.45, p = 0.020), signifying increased urethral sensation or easier activation of urethral afferents in SUI women. Reconstructive pelvic surgery is associated with a short-term deleterious impact on urethral afferent function, as demonstrated by the higher levels of stimuli required to activate urethral afferent nerves (decreased urethral sensation) immediately after RPS. Women with SUI required lower levels of stimuli to activate urethral afferent nerves prior to RPS, although UAR latencies were similar regardless of concomitant SUI.

  7. Prospective Multicenter Study on the Challenges Inherent to Using Large Cell-Type Stents for Bilateral Stent-in-Stent Placement in Patients with Inoperable Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Jae; Kim, Jin Hong; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yoo, Byung Moo; Lee, Sang Hyub; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae; Woo, Sang Myung; Lee, Woo Jin; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng

    2018-06-22

    Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement is challenging, many recent studies have reported promising outcomes regarding technical success and endoscopic reintervention. This study aimed to evaluate the technical feasibility of stent-in-stent placement using large cell-type stents in patients with inoperable malignant hilar biliary obstruction. Forty-three patients with inoperable malignant hilar biliary obstruction from four academic centers were prospectively enrolled from March 2013 to June 2015. Bilateral stent-in-stent placement using two large cell-type stents was successfully performed in 88.4% of the patients (38/43). In four of the five cases with technical failure, the delivery sheath of the second stent became caught in the hook-cross-type vertex of the large cell of the first stent, and subsequent attempts to pass a guidewire and stent assembly through the mesh failed. Functional success was achieved in all cases with technical success. Stent occlusion occurred in 63.2% of patients (24/38), with a median patient survival of 300 days. The median stent patency was 198 days. The stent patency rate was 82.9%, 63.1%, and 32.1% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. Endoscopic re-intervention was performed in 14 patients, whereas 10 underwent percutaneous drainage. Large cell-type stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement showed acceptable functional success and stent patency when technically successful. However, the technical difficulty associated with the entanglement of the second stent delivery sheath in the hook-cross-type vertex of the first stent may preclude large cell-type stents from being considered as a dedicated standard tool for stent-in-stent placement.

  8. Revisiting the tethered ureteral stents in children: a novel modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Nabavizadeh, Behnam; Keihani, Sorena; Hosseini Sharifi, Seyed Hossein

    2015-06-01

    To propose a simple noninvasive method for ureteral stent retrieval using an extraction string sutured to the skin in children. A retrospective chart review was performed to gather relevant data from December 2005 to February 2013. After the surgeries, if indicated, a tethered double-J stent was placed in the ureter. A 5-0 non-absorbable Prolene stitch was used as an extraction string passing through the urethra and was sutured to subcoronal skin in boys or inner surface of labia majora in girls. For stent removal, a small amount of 2 % lidocaine jelly was pushed into the urethra 5 min before the procedure. The string was then pulled by continuous and gentle force until the entire stent was out. The suture was then cut to release the stent. No sedation or anesthesia was needed. A total of 378 double-J stents with extraction strings were inserted for a total of 325 patients (61.2 % male). Of the 53 patients with bilateral ureteral stents, one male patient (1.88 %) experienced early stent protrusion from urethral meatus. Two of 272 patients (0.73 %) with unilateral ureteral stent (one male and one female) encountered the same problem. All other stents were extracted successfully using the extraction string without any complications. No upward stent migration or suture site reaction was encountered. This method is a safe, easy-to-use, feasible and noninvasive alternative for cystoscopic stent removal with high success rate and minimal complications. This can lead to considerable saving in time and costs for patients, families and healthcare system.

  9. Urethral Foreign Body Management: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Andy Y.; Koh, Chester J.; Stein, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The management of urethral foreign bodies may require the use of various surgical techniques in a urologist's armamentarium. We report a unique case of a urethral foreign body requiring percutaneous and endoscopic techniques for removal.

  10. Female urethral diverticulum containing large calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Kimura

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary stones in female urethral diverticulum are rarely seen. We report a 79-year-old woman who presented with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms and vaginal cystocele with incontinence. The urethral stones in the diverticulum were successfully extracted through the trans-urethral route and anterior tension-free vaginal mesh was applied one month later. The patient has been well, with no lower urinary symptoms or incontinence for 4 months. Keywords: Female, Urethral diverticulum, Incontinence, Calculus

  11. Urethral Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer is a rare cancer. There are three types of urethral cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type. Transitional cell carcinoma of the urethra, and adenocarcinoma in the glands around the urethra are less common. Find evidence-based information on urethral cancer treatment.

  12. Technological Advances in Stent Therapies: a Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffoul, Jad; Nasir, Ammar; Klein, Andrew J P

    2018-04-07

    Stent technology has rapidly evolved since the first stainless steel bare metal stents with substantial developments in scaffolding, polymer, drug choice, drug delivery, and elution mechanisms. Most recently, there has been the evolution of bioabsorbable vascular scaffolds, potentially eliminating the need for long-term foreign object retention. These rapid developments have led to an ever-expanding selection of new stents, making the choice of which to use in which patient challenging. Operators must balance potential short- and long-term clinical ramifications, namely stent thrombosis, in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and target lesion failure. In this review, we hope to provide insight for interventional cardiologists on the details of stent technology and how this impacts outcomes, stent selection, and duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy duration post drug-eluting stent implantation.

  13. JJ Stent Removal under Ultrasound Guidance in Women: It is Simple and Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Bernard; Gupta, Sandeep; Kanwar, Vijayendra S; Lodh, Bijit; Khumukcham, Somarendra; Akoijam, Kaku Singh

    2014-12-01

    With the increase in number of patients treated for urological problems with endoscopic procedures, the number of patients with JJ stent is also increasing. The amount of workload thus incurred multiplies, even to the point that, sometimes we waste more time in the operating room removing JJ stents than the actual endourological procedures. Here in our institute, we have devised a very simple and effective way of removing JJ stents in women and also determined the efficacy, safety and cost of JJ stent removal under ultrasound guidance in women in comparison to cystoscopic removal. Two hundred women attending the Department of Urology from July 2012 to July 2013 at RIMS hospital were randomly divided into two arms. One hundred women had their JJ stent removed with cystoscope and another 100 women had their JJ stent removed under ultrasound guidance using simple surgical tools available at the hospital. The primary comparative points were waiting time for operating room appointment date, cost of the procedure, time taken for the procedure, discomfort or pain felt by the patient and urethral injuries. In all the parameters, stent removal under ultrasound guidance was significantly better except for urethral injuries where both the procedures had similar outcomes. We concluded that JJ stent removal under ultrasound guidance in women was simple, effective and safe.

  14. [Three theses on urethral disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesa-Ponce, N

    2012-01-01

    To inform about three doctorate theses on urethral stenosis, presented in the University of Paris and Montpellier by Spanish authors. Of the Canary Island students who studied medicine in France during the xix century and beginning of the xx century, three stand out for having chosen the same subject for presentation of their doctorate thesis. We briefly analyze their biographies, placing special emphasis on the content of their doctorate thesis. Urethral stenosis was a very mentioned disease during the period studied due to its high incidence. We distinguish the therapeutic changes contributed in the three theses studied. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Metallic stent in the treatment of ureteral obstruction: Experience of single institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Li

    2011-10-01

    Conclusion: Patients with ureteral obstructions can be treated sufficiently with the Resonance® metallic stent. Patients who had gynecological malignancies and received radiotherapy had a higher failure rate after Resonance® metallic stent insertion.

  16. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Broadly defined, urethral strictures are narrowing of the urethral lumen that is surrounded by corpus spongiosum, i.e., urethral meatus through the bulbar urethra. Urethral stenosis is narrowing of the posterior urethra, i.e., membranous urethra through bladder neck/prostate junction, which is not enveloped by corpus spongiosum. The disease has significant quality of life ramifications because many times younger patients are affected by this compared to many other urological diseases. Methods: A review of the scientific literature concerning urethral stricture, stenosis, treatment, and outcomes was performed using Medline and PubMed (U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health). Abstracts from scientific meetings were included in this review. Results: There is level 3 evidence regarding the etiology and epidemiology of urethral strictures, stenoses, and pelvic fracture urethral injuries. Outcomes data from literature regarding intervention for urethral stricture are largely limited to level 3 evidence and expert opinion. There is a single level 1 study comparing urethral dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy. Urethroplasty outcomes data are limited to level 3 case series. Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts. PMID:26941491

  17. A brief review on anterior urethral strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of urethral strictures remains a challenging field in urology even though there are a variety of procedures to treat it at present, as no one approach is superior over another. This paper reviewed the surgical options for the management of different sites and types of anterior urethral stricture, providing a brief discussion of the controversies regarding this issue and suggesting possible future advancements. Among the existing procedures, simple dilation and direct vision internal urethrotomy are more commonly used for short urethral strictures ( <1 cm, soft and no previous intervention. Currently, urethroplasty using buccal mucosa or penile skin is the most widely adopted clinical techniques and have proved successful. Nonetheless, complications such as donor site morbidity remain problem. Tissue engineering techniques are considered as a promising solution for urethral reconstruction, but require further investigation, as does stem cell therapy. Keywords: Anterior urethral strictures, Urethral reconstruction, Tissue engineering, Urethral strictures

  18. Simple urethral dilatation, endoscopic urethrotomy, and urethroplasty for urethral stricture disease in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Susan S W; Aboumarzouk, Omar M; Narahari, Radhakrishna; O'Riordan, Anna; Pickard, Robert

    2012-12-12

    Strictures of the urethra are the most common cause of obstructed micturition in younger men and frequently recur after initial treatment. Standard treatment comprises internal widening of the strictured area by simple dilatation or by telescope-guided internal cutting (optical urethrotomy), but these interventions are associated with a high failure rate requiring repeated treatment. The alternative option of open urethroplasty whereby the urethral lumen is permanently widened by removal or grafting of the strictured segment is less likely to fail but requires greater expertise. Findings of Improved choice of graft material and shortened hospital stay suggest that urethroplasty may be under utilised. The extent and quality of evidence guiding treatment choice for this condition are uncertain.   To determine which is the best surgical treatment for male urethral stricture disease taking into account relative efficacy, adverse event rates and cost-effectiveness.   We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 21 June 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 6), MEDLINE (January 1946 to week 2 June 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to week 25 2012), OpenSIGLE (searched 26 June 2012), clinical trials registries and reference lists of relevant articles. We included publications reporting data from randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of dilatation, urethrotomy and urethroplasty in the treatment of adult men with urethral stricture disease. Two authors evaluated trials for appropriateness for inclusion and methodological quality. Data extraction was performed using predetermined criteria. Analyses were carried out using the Cochrane Review Manager software (RevMan 5). Two randomised trials were identified. One trial compared the outcomes of surgical urethral dilatation and optical urethrotomy in 210 adult men with urethral stricture disease. No significant difference was found in the proportion of men being

  19. Long-term urethral catheterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Dickens, Nicola

    This article discusses long-term urethral catheterisation, focusing on the relevant anatomy and physiology, indications for the procedure, catheter selection and catheter care. It is important that nurses have a good working knowledge of long-term catheterisation as the need for this intervention will increase with the rise in chronic health conditions and the ageing population.

  20. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  1. Unusual giant prostatic urethral calculus | Bello | Journal of Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesico-prostatic urethral calculus is uncommon. Urethral stones rarely form primarily in the urethra, and they are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. We report a case of a 32-year-old man with giant vesico-prostatic (collar-stud) urethral stone presenting with sepsis and ...

  2. Management strategies for idiopathic urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, L; Farrelly, P; Dickson, A P; Goyal, A

    2016-02-01

    Williams and Mikhael (1971) described idiopathic urethritis (IU) as a self-limiting condition that affects boys aged 5-15 years, with symptoms of urethrorrhagia, dysuria and haematuria. However, a proportion of boys will remain symptomatic for several years, and may develop urethral stricture (Poch et al., 2007; Palagiri et al., 2003). There is no universally effective treatment for IU, although various strategies have been employed. To review the presentation and long-term outcomes of boys with IU, and present the efficacy of management strategies that have been utilised. A retrospective review was performed of all boys with IU. It was based on clinical and cystoscopic findings for presentation, medical history, management and clinical progress. Fifty-four boys were included, with a median age of 11 years (range 5-15 years) at presentation. The median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 2-132 months). The median follow-up was 18.5 months (range 1-120 months). Seven (13.0%) boys had early urethral stricture at initial cystourethroscopy, and one (1.9%) developed stricture during follow-up. Thirty-six boys (66.7%) had previous circumcision and four (7.4%) had meatal stenosis. Eight (14.8%) had previous hypospadias repair. Whilst 50% of boys with IU do not require any specific treatment, those with severe/unremitting symptoms may benefit from a trial of urethral steroids or short-term urethral catheterisation. The mechanisms of benefit from these modalities are unclear and they require further evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and morbidity of urethral Trichomonas vaginalis in Japanese men with or without urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, Kensaku; Maeda, Shin-Ichi; Kubota, Yasuaki; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Deguchi, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the pathogens causing sexually transmitted infections. This microorganism is a common pathogen among women, but its significance as a cause of morbidity among men remains uncertain. We sought to determine the prevalence and morbidity of T. vaginalis infection in Japanese men with and without urethritis. We examined urine specimens from 215 men with urethritis and 98 men without urethritis for the presence of urethral T. vaginalis by PCR assay. Only four patients-one with gonococcal urethritis, one with non-gonococcal chlamydial urethritis, one with non-gonococcal non-chlamydial urethritis and one without urethritis-were positive for T. vaginalis. The prevalence of T. vaginalis was 1.4% in men with urethritis and 1.0% in men without urethritis. A possible relation between the appearance of T. vaginalis and clinical symptoms was not confirmed. In the present study, the incidence of urethral T. vaginalis infection appears to be rare in Japanese men with or without urethritis, and T. vaginalis may be an uncommon pathogen in male urethritis in Japan.

  4. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  5. Allium Stents: A Novel Solution for the Management of Upper and Lower Urinary Tract Strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher Bahouth

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Stents are widely use in endoscopic urological procedures. One of the most important indications is the treatment of urinary tract strictures. Allium™ Medical has introduced several types of stents for the treatment of different types of urinary tract strictures, based on anatomic location. All the stents are made of nitinol and coated with a co-polymer that reduces encrustations. These stents are self-expandable and have a large caliber and a high radial force. They have different shapes, designed especially for the treatment of each type of stricture. One of the most important features of Allium-manufactured stents is the ease of removal, due to their special unraveling feature. The company has introduced the Bulbar Urethral Stent (BUS for treatment of bulbar urethral strictures; a rounded stent available in different lengths. Initial data on 64 patients with bulbar urethral stricture treated with the BUS showed a significant improvement in symptoms, with minimal complications and few adverse events. For treatment of prostate obstruction in patients unfit for surgery or unwilling to undergo a classical prostatic surgery, the Triangular Prostatic Stent (TPS was introduced, which has a triangular shape that fits in the prostatic urethra. Its body has a high radial force attached to an anchor (which prevents migration through a trans-sphincteric wire (which reduces incontinence rate. Initial data on 51 patients showed significant improvement in symptoms and in urinary peak flow rate, with a relatively small number of complications. The Round Posterior Stent (RPS was designed for treatment of post radical prostatectomy bladder neck contracture. This short, round stent has an anchor, which is placed in the bladder neck. This stent being relatively new, the clinical data are still limited. Ureteral strictures can be treated with the Ureteral Stent (URS, which is round-shaped, available in different lengths, and has an anchor option (for very

  6. SIU/ICUD Consultation on Urethral Strictures: Posterior urethral stenosis after treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschorn, Sender; Elliott, Sean; Coburn, Michael; Wessells, Hunter; Zinman, Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Posterior urethral stenosis can result from radical prostatectomy in approximately 5%-10% of patients (range 1.4%-29%). Similarly, 4%-9% of men after brachytherapy and 1%-13% after external beam radiotherapy will develop stenosis. The rate will be greater after combination therapy and can exceed 40% after salvage radical prostatectomy. Although postradical prostatectomy stenoses mostly develop within 2 years, postradiotherapy stenoses take longer to appear. Many result in storage and voiding symptoms and can be associated with incontinence. The evaluation consists of a workup similar to that for lower urinary tract symptoms, with additional testing to rule out recurrent or persistent prostate cancer. Treatment is usually initiated with an endoscopic approach commonly involving dilation, visual urethrotomy with or without laser treatment, and, possibly, UroLume stent placement. Open surgical urethroplasty has been reported, as well as urinary diversion for recalcitrant stenosis. A proposed algorithm illustrating a graded approach has been provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Outcomes of second self-expandable metallic stent insertion for malignant gastric outlet obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan Gyoo; Choi, Il Ju; Lee, Jong Yeul; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Park, Sook Ryun; Park, Young Lee

    2014-01-01

    Self-expandable metallic stents are used widely to relieve malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, restenosis or migration of first stents is a frequent complication. The purpose of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate the effectiveness of second stents as an approach to manage failure of first stents in patients with malignant GOO. A total of 222 patients with gastric cancer received first stents due to inoperable GOO at National Cancer Center in Korea between January 2008 and June 2011. Monthly follow-up interviews were performed, and second stents (stent-in-stent or stent-after-migration) were inserted in 59 patients by June 2012. Technical and clinical successes and long-term complications were evaluated. The technical and immediate clinical success rates were 98.3 % (58/59) and 91.5 % (54/59), respectively. Patients who received a second stent due to late complications involving the first stent (migration, restenosis, and fracture) showed a higher clinical success rate (95.8 % [46/48]) than patients who received a second stent due to immediate clinical failure of the first stent (72.7 % [8/11], p = 0.04). The immediate clinical success rate of stent-after-migration (100 % [11/11]) was not different from that of stent-in-stent (89.6 % [43/48], p = 1.0). The stent dysfunction rate of stent-after-migration (27.3 % [3/11]) also was similar to that of stent-in-stent (29.2 % [14/48], p = 1.0). The median patencies of stent-in-stent and stent-after-migration were 27.4 and 58.4 weeks, respectively (p = 0.177). There were no significant prognostic factors for patency of second stents. Insertion of a second stent is effective for treating the first-stent failure in gastric cancer patients with GOO, especially if the immediate outcome of the first stent was successful.

  8. Use of penile skin flap in complex anterior urethral stricture repair: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, A.; Asghar, M.; Kiani, F.; Alvi, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To present our experience of treatment of complex anterior urethral strictures using penile skin flap. Study Design: Descriptive, case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of urology Combined Military Hospital Malir Cantonment, Karachi and Armed Forces Institute of Urology, Rawalpindi from Jan 2012 to Feb 2014. Material and Methods: Total 18 patients with complex anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulborurethral strictures were included. Patients underwent repair using Orandi or circularfacio-cutaneous penile skin flap depending upon the size and site of stricture. First dressing was changed after two days and an in dwelling silicone two way foleycatheter was kept in place for three weeks. Graft was assessed with regards to local infection, fistula formation and restricturing. Re-stricture was assessed by performing uroflowmetery at 6 months and 1 year. Ascending urethrogram was reserved for cases with less than 10 ml/sec Q max on uroflowmetery. Repair failure was considered when there was a need for any subsequent urethral procedure asurethral dilatation, dorsal visual internal urethrotomy, or urethroplasty. Results: Overall success rate was 83.3 percent. Of all the patients operated 1(5.6 percent) had infection with loss of flap, 3(16.7 percent) had urethral fistula and none had re stricture confirmed by uroflowmetery. Conclusion: In our study the excellent results of the penile skin flap both in anterior urethral strictures and combined anterior and bulbar urethral strictures are quite encouraging. It is easy to harvest and seems anatomically more logical. (author)

  9. Blunt pediatric anterior and posterior urethral trauma: 32-year experience and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Bryan B; Breyer, Benjamin N; McAninch, Jack W

    2012-06-01

    To analyze our experience with delayed repair of pediatric urethral trauma. From 1978 to 2007, 26 boys posterior urethral injuries were separately stratified. There were 8 anterior and 18 posterior urethral strictures. All patients presented in a delayed fashion. Mean follow up of the anterior cohort was 2.9 years. All repairs were performed via a ventral onlay buccal graft or anastomotic approach. The mean follow up of the posterior cohort was 1.1 years, and all posterior urethral injuries were repaired via an anastomotic approach. Overall success for anterior stricture disease was 88.9% and for posterior stricture disease was 89.5%. All three urethroplasty failures responded favorably to internal urethrotomy; however, one failed anterior repair and one of the two failed posterior repairs required two internal urethrotomy operations for success. No secondary urethroplasty operations were required and ultimately all patients were voiding per urethra without need for urethral dilation. Delayed, definitive repair of pediatric urethral trauma via open urethroplasty has a high success rate. Copyright © 2011 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Urethritis Compared With Chlamydial Urethritis Among Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Jason J; Morton, Anna N; Henzell, Helen R; Berzins, Karen; Druce, Julian; Fairley, Christopher K; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Read, Tim Rh; Hocking, Jane S; Chen, Marcus Y

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the clinical characteristics associated with herpes simplex virus (HSV) urethritis in men and to compare those with chlamydial urethritis. We compared clinical and laboratory data from men diagnosed with polymerase chain reaction confirmed HSV urethritis with those of men with chlamydial urethritis presenting to Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2000 and 2015. Eighty HSV urethritis cases were identified: 55 (68%, 95% confidence interval, 58-78) were by HSV-1 and 25 (32%, 95% confidence interval, 22-42) by HSV-2. Compared with chlamydial urethritis, men with HSV urethritis were significantly more likely to report severe dysuria (20% vs 0%, P < 0.01) or constitutional symptoms (15% vs 0%, P < 0.01). Men with HSV urethritis were significantly more likely to have meatitis (62% vs 23%, P < 0.01), genital ulceration (37% vs 0%, P < 0.01), or inguinal lymphadenopathy (30% vs 0%, P < 0.01) but less likely to have urethral discharge (32% vs 69%, P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the proportion of men who had raised (≥5) polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-powered field between the two groups (P = 0.46). The clinical presentation of HSV urethritis in men may differ from those of chlamydial urethritis and guide testing for HSV in men presenting with non-gonococcal urethritis.

  11. Urethral alarm probe for permanent prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutajar, D.; Lerch, M.; Takacs, G.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a urethral dosimetry system for real time dose verification along the urethra during permanent implant prostate brachytherapy. The urethral alarm uses 'spectroscopic dosimetry' to calculate the dose rate along the urethra in real time. The application of spectroscopic dosimetry for the urethral alarm probe was verified using Monte Carlo calculations. In phantom depth dose measurements as well as isotropy measurements were performed to verify the usefulness of the urethra alarm probe as an in vivo real time dosimeter. (author)

  12. Urethral Leiomyoma: A Rare Clinical Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Beng Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extrauterine leiomyomas are encountered occasionally, which can pose a diagnostic dilemma and challenge to the gynaecologist. We report a rare case of urethral leiomyoma. A 31-year-old woman with history of primary subfertility presented with mass at her urethral meatus and lower urinary tract symptoms. She underwent examination under anaesthesia and excision of the urethral mass. Histopathological examination confirmed leiomyoma. Diagnosis and management of this common growth situated at a rare location were reviewed and discussed.

  13. Infectious Urethritis in Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meares, Edwin M.

    1975-01-01

    Acute and recurrent infectious urethritis in men and women is commonly seen by physicians. Since specific therapy varies widely with the type of urethritis present, the proper diagnosis must be clearly established if curative drug therapy is to be selected. It is valuable, therefore, to review the diagnosis and therapy of the various forms of infectious urethritis that are recognized today in both men and women. PMID:1199099

  14. The effect of stent coating on stent deliverability: direct randomised comparison of drug eluting and bare metal stents using the same stent platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminiak, Tomasz; Link, Rafał; Wołoszyn, Maciej; Kałmucki, Piotr; Baszko, Artur

    2012-01-01

    There is certain experimental and clinical evidence indicating that the covering of bare metal stents (BMS) with drug eluting polymers to produce drug eluting stents (DES) results in increased stent stiffness and modifies the mechanical properties of the stent platform. In addition, it has been speculated that the mechanical performance of DES, compared to BMS, may be related to the type of polymer used to cover stents. We aimed at evaluating the deliverability of DES with a lactate based biodegradable polymer and BMS in patients with stable coronary artery disease in a prospective randomised study. One hundred eleven consecutive patients (age: 36-77, mean 58.8 years) scheduled for routine angioplasty due to stable coronary disease were randomised to receive BMS (Chopin II(TM), Balton, Poland) or paclitaxel eluting stent (Chopin Luc(TM), Balton, Poland) using the same metal platform. Only patients scheduled for angioplasty using the direct implantation technique of a single stent were randomised. The exclusion criteria included patients 〉 80 years, multivessel disease and reference diameter of the target vessel 〉 3.5 mm. In the BMS group (n = 55; 35 males and 20 females), the mean diameter of implanted stents was 3.09 ± 0.40 and the mean length was 11.37 ± 2.80, whereas in the DES group (n = 56; 34 males and 22 females) the mean stent sizes were 3.02 ± 0.34 and 17.90 ± 7.38 mm, respectively (p 〉 0.05 for length). The groups did not significantly differ regarding the frequency of stent implantation to particular coronary vessels. The direct stenting technique was attempted and failed, leading to the stents' implantation after predilatation in five patients in the BMS group and six patients in the DES group. Failure of stent implantation and subsequent implantation of another stent type was observed in no BMS patients and in one DES patient (NS). Although stent covering with lactate based drug eluting polymer may increase its stiffness, it does not affect

  15. Critical appraisal of the Spanner™ prostatic stent in the treatment of prostatic obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McKenzie

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Patrick McKenzie1, Gopal Badlani11Department of Urology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem NC, USAAbstract: The Spanner™ stent was first used in patients to relieve bladder outlet obstruction (BOO, and has recently been used in patients following transurethral microwave thermotherapy and men unfit for surgical intervention. We review the current literature on the role of the Spanner stent in treating prostatic obstruction compared to previously reported cases involving the use of temporary stents. The Spanner stent has been found to be successful in treating patients with bladder outlet obstruction from benign prostatic hyperplasia and following high-energy transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT. Patients with the Spanner stent had an increase in peak flow rate and a decrease in post void residual and International Prostate Symptom Scores. In patients treated with TUMT, quality of life measures indicate that the Spanner stent shows increased ease of bladder drainage, decreased leakage, and no adverse effect on daily activities. In patients unfit for surgery, however, there was increased retention and pain requiring stent removal in 63% of cases. The Spanner stent offers ease of insertion with a decrease in voiding symptoms in selected patients. Based on limited data, the Spanner stent has been recommended as a treatment option for men with BOO following TUMT. However, it is not a good treatment option for men unfit for surgery based on an increased incidence of urinary retention and dysuria. The Spanner stent is the only currently approved temporary stent and, based on a literature review, it does not offer significant advantage over previously used temporary stents. It is notable that most researchers have not evaluated the role of detrusor function on the outcomes.Keywords: benign prostate hyperplasia, Spanner stent, urethral stent, minimally invasive therapy

  16. Management of bladder neck stenosis and urethral stricture and stenosis following treatment for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Helen L; Al-Hakeem, Yasser; Maldonado, Javier J; Tse, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review is to examine all urethral strictures and stenoses subsequent to treatment for prostate cancer, including radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and cryotherapy. The overall majority respond to endoscopic treatment, including dilatation, direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) or bladder neck incision (BNI). There are adjunct treatments to endoscopic management, including injections of corticosteroids and mitomycin C (MMC) and urethral stents, which remain controversial and are not currently mainstay of treatment. Recalcitrant strictures are most commonly managed with urethroplasty, while recalcitrant stenosis is relatively rare yet almost always associated with bothersome urinary incontinence, requiring bladder neck reconstruction and subsequent artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) implantation, or urinary diversion for the devastated outlet.

  17. Wing-shaped plastic stents vs. self-expandable metal stents for palliative drainage of malignant distal biliary obstruction: a randomized multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Rische, Susanne; Klinger, Christoph; Jakobs, Ralf; Bechtler, Matthias; Kähler, Georg; Dormann, Arno; Caca, Karel

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown superior patency rates for self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) compared with plastic stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. The aim of this study was to compare stent patency, patient survival, and complication rates between a newly designed, wing-shaped, plastic stent and SEMSs in patients with unresectable, malignant, distal, biliary obstruction. A randomized, multicenter trial was conducted at four tertiary care centers in Germany. A total of 37 patients underwent randomization between March 2010 and January 2013. Patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography with insertion of either a wing-shaped, plastic stent without lumen or an SEMS.  Stent failure occurred in 10/16 patients (62.5 %) in the winged-stent group vs. 4/18 patients (22.2 %) in the SEMS group (P = 0.034). The median time to stent failure was 51 days (range 2 - 92 days) for the winged stent and 80 days (range 28 - 266 days) for the SEMS (P = 0.002). Early stent failure (stent failure was significantly higher in the winged-stent group compared with the SEMS group. A high incidence of early stent failure within 8 weeks was observed in the winged-stent group. Thus, the winged, plastic stent without central lumen may not be appropriate for mid or long term drainage of malignant biliary obstruction. Study registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01063634). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Malignant duodenal obstructions: palliative treatment with covered expandable nitinol stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Chul; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Lee, Sang Hee; Kim, Sung Min; Oh, Kyung Seung; Huh, Jin Do; Cho, Young Duk [College of Medicine, Kosin Univ, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ho Young [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and clinical effectiveness of using a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent in the palliative treatment of malignant duodenal obstruction. Under fluoroscopic guidance, a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent was placed in 12 consecutive patients with malignant duodenal obstructions. All presented with severe nausea and recurrent vomiting. The underlying causes of obstruction were duodenal carcinoma (n=4), pancreatic carcinoma (n=4), gall bladder carcinoma (n=2), distal CBD carcinoma (n=1), and uterine cervical carcinoma (n=1). The sites of obstruction were part I (n=1), part II (n=8), and III (n=3). Due to pre-existing jaundice, eight patients with part II obstructions underwent biliary decompression prior to stent placement. An introducer sheath with a 6-mm outer diameter and stents 16 mm in diameter were employed, and to place the stent, and after-loading technique was used. Stent placement was technically successful in ten patients, and no procedural complications occuured. In one of two patients in whom there was technical failure, and in whom the obstructions were located in part III, the stent was placed transgastrically. Stent migration occurred in one patient four days after the procedure, and treatment involved the palcement of a second, uncovered, nitinol stent. After stent placement, symptoms improved in all patients. During follow-up, obstructive symptoms due to stent stenosis (n=1), colonic obstruction (n=1), and multiple small bowel obstruction (n=1) recurred in three patients. Two of these were treated by placing additional stents in the duodenum and colon, respectively. One of the eight patients in whom a stent was placed in the second portion of the duodenum developed jaundice. The patients died a mean 14 (median, 9) weeks after stent placement. The placement of a polyurethane-covered expandable nitinol stent seems to be technically feasible, safe and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant

  19. Thrombin Injection Failure with Subsequent Successful Stent-Graft Placement for the Treatment of an Extracranial Internal Carotid Pseudoaneurysm in a 5-Year-Old Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Monaco, R. D.; Kohan, A. A.; Martinez-Corvalan, M. P.; Cacchiarelli, N.; Peralta, O.; Wahren, C. G.

    2012-01-01

    Internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare life-threatening condition that may develop in different clinical situations. We report the case of an extracranial internal carotid artery pseudoaneurysm secondary to a throat infection in a pediatric patient that was initially treated with percutaneous thrombin injection under ultrasound guidance. However, recanalization occurred at 48 h, and definitive treatment was then performed by endovascular stent-graft placement. We briefly review the clinical characteristics of this uncommon clinical condition as well as the treatment options.

  20. Surgical treatment of anterior urethral stricture diseases: brief overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Barbagli

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed an up-to-date review of the surgical techniques suggested for the treatment of anterior urethral strictures. References for this review were identified by searching PubMed and MEDLINE using the search terms "urethral stricture" or "urethroplasty" from 1995 to 2006. Descriptive statistics of the articles were provided. Meta-analyses or other multivariate designs were not employed. Out of 327 articles, 50 (15% were determined to be germane to this review. Eight abstracts were referenced as the authors of this review attended the meetings where the abstract results were presented, thus it was possible to collect additional information on such abstracts. Urethrotomy continues to be the most commonly used technique, but it does have a high failure rate and many patients progress to surgical repair. Buccal mucosa has become the most popular substitute material in urethroplasty; however, the skin appears to have a longer follow-up. Free grafts have been making a comeback, with fewer surgeons using genital flaps. Short bulbar strictures are amenable using primary anastomosis, with a high success rate. Longer strictures are repaired using ventral or dorsal graft urethroplasty, with the same success rate. New tools such as fibrin glue or engineered material will become a standard in future treatment. In reconstructive urethral surgery, the superiority of one approach over another is not yet clearly defined. The surgeon must be competent in the use of various techniques to deal with any condition of the urethra presented at the time of surgery.

  1. Treatment of Bulbar Urethral Strictures. A Review, with Personal Critical Remarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Oosterlinck

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review article on treatment of bulbar urethral strictures with personal critical remarks on newer developments. As a treatment of first intention there exists 4 options : dilatation, urethrotomy, end to end anastomosis and free graft, open urethroplasty. Success rate of dilatation and visual urethrotomy after 4 years is only 20 en 40 % respectively. Laser urethrotomy could not fulfill expectations. End to end anastomosis obtains a very high success rate but is only applicable for short strictures. Free graft urethroplasty obtains success rates of ± 80 %. There is considerable debate on the best material for grafting. Buccal mucosa graft is the new wave, but this is not based on scientific data. Whether this graft should be used dorsally or ventrally is also a point of discussion. In view of the good results published with both techniques it is probably of no importance. Intraluminal stents are not indicated for complicated cases and give only good results in those cases which can easily be treated with other techniques. Metal self-retaining urethral stent , resorbable stents and endoscopic urethroplasty is briefly discussed. Redo’s and complicated urethral strictures need often other solutions. Here skin flap from the penile skin and scrotal flap can be used. Advantages and drawbracks of both are discussed. There is still a place for two-stage procedures in complicated redo�s. The two-stage mesh-graft urethroplasty offers advantage over the use of scrotal skin. Some other rare techniques like substitution with bowel and pudendal thigh flap, to cover deep defects, are also discussed.

  2. Posterior urethral valve in a six year old boy with nocturnal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report a case of posterior urethral valve (PUV) in a six year old boy with nocturnal eneuresis and failure to thrive as the only presenting symptoms. The clinically occult lesion was only unravelled when micturating cystourethrogram revealed a dilated posterior urethra with a distal narrow stream of opacified urine, bilateral ...

  3. [Results of anastomotic urethroplasty for male urethral stricture disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, B; Zeondo, C; Sow, Y; Sarr, A; Sine, B; Thiam, A; Faye, S T; Sow, O; Traoré, A; Diao, B; Fall, P A; Ndoye, A K; Ba, M

    2018-04-04

    To report our experience with anastomotic uretroplasty (AU) due to male urethral stricture disease (USD) and to identify factors affecting the results. We conducted a retrospective study over a period of 4 years and 6 months (July 2012 to December 2016). Any subsequent use of endoscopic urethrotomy or new urethroplasty was considered a failure. Forty-eight cases were included. The mean age of patients was 53.5±17.3 years (23-87 years). Urinary retention was the reason for consultation in 42 cases (87.5%). The most common localization of USD was the bulbar urethra (n=45). The mean length of USD was 1.23±0.62cm (0.5-3cm) with a median length of 1cm. The etiology was post-infectious in 56.3% of cases. More than half (58.3%) of patients had already undergone at least one urethral manipulation. After an average follow-up of 21.1±12.6 months (1 to 52 months), the overall success rate was 77.1%. In univariate analysis, length, cause and location of the stricture, age of patient, the presenting symptoms of the stricture, previous urethral manipulation and surgeon experience did not significantly impact on the success rate of anastomotic urethroplasty at one and two years follow-up. The AU had provided good results in our practice. The infectious origin of the stricture and previous urethral manipulation did not significantly impact the result of this surgical technique. 4. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Balloon dilatation of iatrogenic urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Acunas, G.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1988-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the urethra was performed in five patients with iatrogenic urethral strictures. The urethral strictures were successfully negotiated and dilated in all patients. Redilatation became necessary in a period ranging from 3 to 10 months. The authors believe that balloon dilatation of the urethra can be safely and successfully performed; the procedure produces minimal trauma and immediate relief of symptoms. (orig.)

  5. Hydraulic urethral dilatation after optical internal urethrotomy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the rate of early recurrence of urethral stricture in the first six months in patients who perform hydraulic urethral dilatation(HUD) after optical internal urethrotomy (OIU) and compare the early recurrence Fate in patients who perform HUD after OIU with the recurrence rates in patients reported in the ...

  6. [Transurethral thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lai; Zhang, Xi-Ling; Liu, Yi-Li; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of endourethrotomy with thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. We treated 36 cases of urethral stricture or atresia by endourethrotomy with thulium laser, restored the urethral continuity by vaporization excision of the scar tissue, and observed the clinical effects and complications. The mean operation time was 35 min, ranging from 10 to 90 min. Smooth urination was achieved after 2-6 weeks of catheter indwelling, with no urinary incontinence. The patients were followed up for 4-24 (mean 12) months, during which 27 did not need any reintervention, 5 developed urinary thinning but cured by urethral dilation, 3 received another laser urethrotomy for previous negligence of timely urethral dilation, and the other 1 underwent open urethroplasty. Thulium laser urethrotomy is a safe and effective minimally invasive option for short urethral stricture, which is also suitable for severe urethral stricture and urethral atresia. Its short-term outcome is satisfactory, but its long-term effect remains to be further observed.

  7. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  8. Corynebacterium propinquum associated with acute, nongonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrasouli, Alireza; Roushan, Azita

    2013-10-01

    Corynebacterium propinquum is usually considered part of the normal human oropharyngeal flora and is rarely responsible for clinical infection. We report here what seems to be the first case of acute purulent urethral discharge in a young Iranian man with urethritis acquired after orogenital contact. Attention should be devoted to less common nondiphtheriae Corynebacterium species for differential diagnosis.

  9. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.E. Mensah

    ees.elsevier.com/afju · www.sciencedirect.com. Case report. Bladder exstrophy associated with complete urethral duplication: Bladder can be augmented with dorsal urethral mucosa. J.E. Mensaha,∗. , K.N. Ampadua, M.Y. Kyeia, B. Edusieb.

  10. The diastal urethral stenosis in female children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauer, W.

    1985-01-01

    The distal urethral stenosis in female children is a pathological reality. It is represented by the hymenal hood, the meatal stenosis and the distal urethral ring. Diagnosis and localisation of the stenosis is maintained by calibration with bougies a boule. Therapeutical consequences are: internal urethrotomy, bilateral meatotomy and excision of hymenal hoods. (Author)

  11. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traboulsi, S.L.; Witjes, J.A.; Kassouf, W.

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation

  12. A clinicopathological study of urethritis in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Khawer; Mumtaz, Babar; Raza, Naeem

    2009-12-01

    To determine the etiology and frequency of different types of urethritis in adult males. A case series. The Dermatology Department of PNS Shifa Hospital, Karachi, from June 2004 to December 2007. One hundred male patients having complaints of urethral discharge and dysuria reporting in the skin OPD were included in the study. Patients who had received systemic treatment for their complaints and those who had other systemic infections were excluded. A detailed history including history of sexual contact was taken. Dermatological examination including examination of external genitalia was also performed. All these patients were subjected to complete physical examination, complete urine examination, urethral pus for gram staining and culture, endo-urethral swab with urethral loop for seeing Chlamydia antigen by fluorescent microscopy, cultures for ureaplasma and Wet mount specimen microscopy for trichomonas along with HIV (serum ELISA) test. Non-gonococcal urethritis was diagnosed on the presence of more than five polymorphonuclear leucocytes per high power field in at least five fields of Gram stained urethral smear, in the absence of Gram negative diplococci. The mean age was 29.2 + or - 5.8 years. Seventy (70%) cases were diagnosed as gonococcal urethritis and 30 (30%) cases as non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). History of illicit sexual exposure was available in 25 (25%) patients. The interval period between initiation of symptoms and reporting of patient in gonococcal urethritis was 4 to 30 days (mean 12.8 days) and 4 days to 2 months (mean 20.7 days) in non-gonococcal urethritis. The patients with gonococcal urethritis presented with purulent discharge in 66 (84%) cases, and dysuria in 49 (70%) cases. In the NGU group, 25 (80%) cases had mucoid discharge and 18 (65%) had dysuria. in 70%, Neisseria gonorrhoeae was isolated, Chlamydia trachomatis in 16%, ureaplasma in 8%, and Trichomonas vaginalis in 4%. No organism could be detected in 2% cases. HIV test was

  13. Imaging of the female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, P.; Long, S.S.; Long, C.M.; Genadry, R.R.; Macura, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Female urethral diverticulum is a localized out-pouching of the urethra that is becoming increasingly prevalent, but often poses a diagnostic challenge. Traditionally, conventional voiding cystourethrography has been used to make the preoperative diagnosis. With the development of higher-resolution images acquired through ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the anatomy and various abnormalities of the female urethra can be better elucidated. This article focuses on the imaging features of female urethral diverticulum, with emphasis on diagnostic pearls, particularly using MRI. Female urethral diverticulum can be best identified by their location in the posterolateral urethra and by their communication with the urethral lumen. Improved imaging techniques combined with increased physician awareness of urethral diverticulum will lead to more prompt and accurate diagnosis of this entity, leading to better treatment of affected patients

  14. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for ...

  15. Podophyllin induced urethral stricture in a young Nigerian male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.O. Areo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is an abnormal narrowing or loss of distensibility due to fibrosis in the peri-urethral tissues. Some substances can induce chemical urethritis severe enough to cause stricture. We present a case of long segment anterior urethral stricture in a young Nigerian patient cause by self-application of podophyllin for the treatment of genital warts.

  16. Aetiology of Urethral Strictures at Moi Teaching and Refferal Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16.3 years. Conclusion. Urethritis, iatrogenic and accidental trauma are still the commonest causes of urethral strictures in our environment. These causes are preventable. Introduction. Urethral stricture disease is caused by any process that injures the urethral epithelium or the underlying spongiosum leading to healing by.

  17. Endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement for malignant hilar obstruction using a large cell type stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Myung; Lee, Sang Hyub; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Jang, Dong Kee; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Jae Min; Paik, Woo Hyun

    2016-12-01

    Bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) self-expandable metal stent placement is technically challenging for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar obstruction. In the SIS technique, the uniform large cell type biliary stent facilitates contralateral stent deployment through the mesh of the first metallic stent. This study aimed to assess the technical success and clinical effectiveness of this technique with a uniform large cell type biliary stent. Thirty-one patients who underwent bilateral SIS placement using a large cell type stent were reviewed retrospectively. All patients showed malignant hilar obstruction (Bismuth types II, III, IV) with different etiologies. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male. The mean age of the patients was 67.0+/-14.0 years. Most patients were diagnosed as having hilar cholangiocarcinoma (58.1%) and gallbladder cancer (29.0%). Technical success rate was 83.9%. Success was achieved more frequently in patients without masses obstructing the biliary confluence (MOC) than those with MOC (95.2% vs 60.0%, P=0.03). Functional success rate was 77.4%. Complications occurred in 29.0% of the patients. These tended to occur more frequently in patients with MOC (50.0% vs 19.0%, P=0.11). Median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 188 days and median survival was 175 days. The large cell type stent can be used efficiently for bilateral SIS placement in malignant hilar obstruction. However, the risk of technical failure increases in patients with MOC, and caution is needed to prevent complications for these patients.

  18. Impact of Chronic Renal Failure on Safety and Effectiveness of Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents for Femoropopliteal Artery Disease: Subgroup Analysis from Zilver PTX Post-Market Surveillance Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukihisa; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Ohki, Takao; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Nakamura, Masato; Komori, Kimihiro; Nanto, Shinsuke; O'Leary, Erin E; Lottes, Aaron E; Saunders, Alan T; Dake, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    Favorable long-term outcomes of the Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent (DES) in femoropopliteal lesions have been demonstrated. Chronic renal failure (CRF) has been shown to be a risk factor for restenosis and decreased limb salvage. The results of the DES in patients with CRF have not previously been reported. This study compares the results with the DES in patients with CRF and those without CRF. This retrospective analysis from the Zilver PTX Japan Post-Market Surveillance Study included 321 patients with CRF and 584 patients without CRF. Outcomes included freedom from target lesion revascularization (TLR) and patency. Of the patients included in this subgroup analysis, 2-year data were available for 209 patients in the CRF group and 453 patients in the non-CRF group. The two groups were similar in terms of lesion length and the frequency of in-stent restenosis. Critical limb ischemia, severe calcification, and diabetes were more common in patients with CRF, whereas total occlusion was more common in patients without CRF. Freedom from TLR rates were 81.4 versus 84.9% (p = 0.24), and patency rates were 70.7 versus 70.3% (p = 0.95) in patients with and without CRF at 2 years, respectively. This is the first comparative study of the DES in femoropopliteal artery lesions in patients with and without CRF. These results indicate that the DES placed in femoropopliteal artery lesions of CRF patients is safe and effective with similar patency and TLR rates to patients without CRF. Level 3, Post-Market Surveillance Study.

  19. Percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Given, M F

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous antegrade ureteric stent removal using a rigid alligator forceps. Twenty patients were included in our study. Indications for ureteric stent insertion included stone disease (n = 7), malignancy (n = 8) and transplant anastomotic strictures (n = 5). Stent retrieval was carried out for proximal stent placement\\/migration in seven patients and encrustation in the remaining 13. Twenty-two stents were successfully retrieved in 20 patients. There was one technical failure (5%). There were no major complications. We had four minor complications, which included nephrostomy site pain (n = 2), periprocedural sepsis (n = 1) and a small urinoma (n = 1). All patients settled with conservative management. Percutaneous radiologically guided antegrade ureteric stent removal with an alligator forceps is safe and effective, particularly when initial surgical removal has failed.

  20. French experience of silicone tracheobronchial stenting in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayon, Michael; Donato, Lionel; de Blic, Jacques; Labbé, André; Becmeur, François; Mely, Laurent; Dutau, Hervé

    2005-01-01

    Silicone stents were inserted into the trachea or left main-stem bronchus in 14 children aged 2-69 months (median, 7 months). Indications were as follows: tracheomalacia or airway kinking (7 cases), vascular compression (5 cases), and surgically corrected congenital tracheal stenoses (2 cases). The best results were obtained in tracheomalacia. Overall, 6 cases out of 14 (43%) were considered successful, with a stent placement duration of 3-15 months (median, 7 months). Two cases were considered a technical success, although they were clinical failures. Five cases were considered failures primarily due to stent migration. A retrospective analysis of failures suggests that most of these could have been avoided by the use of larger stents. One patient died of stent obstruction. No wall erosion was observed, and the development of granulation tissue was infrequent. Endoscopic removal of the prostheses was uneventful. The biocompatibility of silicone stents appears to be better than what is reported for metal ones, although the stability of the former is less satisfactory. The present study shows the feasibility of silicone stent placement in infants. These stents should be considered as a possible therapeutic option in certain types of childhood airway disorders, although further studies are required.

  1. The urethral smear as a tool in diagnosing adenovirus-induced urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønsberg, E; Hartgill, U

    2014-12-01

    Adenovirus is a recognised cause of non-gonococcal urethritis, and is not uncommonly associated with extragenital signs and symptoms. This case report describes a patient with symptoms of conjunctivitis, meatitis and urethritis. The urethral smear revealed almost exclusively monocytes microscopically, raising the suspicion of a viral aetiology. Results confirmed the presence of adenovirus in both the eyes and urethra. Despite waning reliance on the urethral smear in sexual health clinics, it can still be an important diagnostic tool in assessing the aetiology of non-specific urethritis. Finding an obvious monocytic cell response in the urethral smear can indicate a viral cause and allow the clinician to optimise management, counsel appropriately, and potentially reduce unnecessary antibiotic use. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. A rare case of giant urethral calculus and multiple urethral diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agarwal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stones in adults are rare and usually encountered with urethral stricture or diverticulum. We report a 54 years old gentleman who presented with urinary retention due to a large urethral calculus impacted in bulbar urethra with multiple stones in anterior and posterior urethral diverticulum. On examination a mass of size 5.5cmx4cmx3cm was palpable at anterior perineum with a fistulous tract from which pus was oozing out. On retrograde urethrogram a large urethral calculus with bulbar diverticulum and multiple radio opacity in prostatic area were revealed. Patient was managed by suprapubic cystostomy initially and later on by external urethrotomy, diverticulectomy, urethroscopic removal of multiple stones in prostatic urethral diverticulum and urethroplasty. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 46-48 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6838

  3. Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting Overview Carotid angioplasty (kuh-ROT-id AN-jee-o-plas-tee) and stenting ... to better see and examine the blood vessels. Food and medications You'll receive instructions on what ...

  4. Urethral syndrome” in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Dutkiewicz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A contemporary overview of knowledge is presented on the subject of the so-called urethral syndrome in women, the causes of which have yet to be clearly identified. For practical reasons, the following three forms of the syndrome have been distinguished: interstitial cystitis, the “infectious” form and the “clean” form. In women who do not show symptoms of inflammation of the reproductive organs, bacterial urethritis should be distinguished from the urethral syndrome by evaluating the symptoms, the bacteriological tests and the risk of infection.

  5. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-09-18

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing.

  6. Routine short-term ureteral stent in living donor renal transplantation: introduction of a simple stent removal technique without using anesthesia and cystoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J; Lu, J; Zu, Q; Yang, S; Sun, S; Cai, W; Zhang, L; Zhang, X

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated routine short-time insertion of ureteral stent in living donor renal transplant at a single center. It was easy to remove the stent without cystoscopy and anesthesia. Between October 2007 and July 2010, a single surgeon performed 76 living donor renal transplantations at one institute. All recipients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy with a 2-0 silk suture passed through the venting side hole of the double-J stent into the bladder; a quadruple knot prevented the suture's slippage or distraction from the stent. After removal of the indwelling catheter at 5 days posttransplantation, the 2-0 silk passed with the urinary stream within 72 hours. The double-J stent was removed at 7 to 10 (mean 8.4) days after kidney transplantation by pulling the 2-0 silk out of the urethral orifice without anesthesia or cystoscopy. There was only one case of stenosis, which was resolved by surgery. No patient developed urinary leakage. There were three episodes of urinary tract infection in 70 patients during first 6 months' follow-up. Routine short-term stenting is a safe and effective technique in living donor renal transplantation. Removal of the stent is feasible without cystoscopy or anesthesia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Urethritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... groin area Tender and swollen penis A digital rectal exam will also be performed. Women will have ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  8. Progress in the study of drug-eluting intra-stent thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhifu; Zheng Xing; Qin Yongwen

    2007-01-01

    Durg-eluting stent has been regarded as the milestone in the history of PCI for their efficiency in the prevention of coronary arterial restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. But unfortunately intra-stent thrombosis continues to be a serious complication of contemporary DES use. The incidence of drug-eluting stents thrombosis is at least not lower than that of bare metal stents at present. The clinical consequences of stent thrombosis are frequently catastrophic, including death in 40% to 50% of the cases or major myocardial infarction in 60% to 70%. Premature discontinuation of standard antiplatelet therapy is by far the most important predictor of stent thrombosis with DES and other predictors included renal failure, diabetes, bifurcation lesions, multiple lesions or multivessel disease, long stents, female, advanced age, stent underexpansion and residual stenosis etc. The delayed endothelialization may be the underling mechanism of DES thrombosis. (authors)

  9. Computational micromechanics of bioabsorbable magnesium stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, J A; Leen, S B; McHugh, P E

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium alloys are a promising candidate material for an emerging generation of absorbable metal stents. Due to its hexagonal-close-packed lattice structure and tendency to undergo twinning, the deformation behaviour of magnesium is quite different to that of conventional stent materials, such as stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium L605. In particular, magnesium exhibits asymmetric plastic behaviour (i.e. different yield behaviours in tension and compression) and has lower ductility than these conventional alloys. In the on-going development of absorbable metal stents it is important to assess how the unique behaviour of magnesium affects device performance. The mechanical behaviour of magnesium stent struts is investigated in this study using computational micromechanics, based on finite element analysis and crystal plasticity theory. The plastic deformation in tension and bending of textured and non-textured magnesium stent struts with different numbers of grains through the strut dimension is investigated. It is predicted that, unlike 316L and L605, the failure risk and load bearing capacity of magnesium stent struts during expansion is not strongly affected by the number of grains across the strut dimensions; however texturing, which may be introduced and controlled in the manufacturing process, is predicted to have a significant influence on these measures of strut performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transperineal Ultrasonographic findings of female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jin Han; Koo, Bong Sik; Nam, Ki Dong; Choi, Jong Cheol; Park, Byeong Ho; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kweon, Heon Young

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the role of sonography for women with a suspected urethral diverticulum and to evaluate the transperineal ultrasonographic findings of female urethral diverticulum. Eight women (mean age, 44 years) who presented with urethral symptoms and clinically suspected urethral diverticula underwent transperineal ultrasonography; sagittal and coronal images were obtained. Sonography was done with either a 7-5 MHz curved array transducer or 10-5 MHz linear transducer, placed on the perineum at the level of the urethra. Ultrasonograms were assessed for the presence, size, location, shape, echogenicity, and septum. Five patients underwent voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). Results of the sonograms and VCUGs were compared with each other and with surgical findings. Longitudinally, all lesions were located in a middle third of the urethra. In axial plane, 4 diverticula wrapped around 50-100% of the urethra. 3 cases located posteriorly, and 1 case laterally. Seven diverticula contained echogenic debris. Three cases have septa in the diverticulum. The outer margin of the diverticula was smooth in 2 patients and was lobulated in 6 patients. In 3 of 5 cases who underwent VCUG, diverticula were filled with contrast, and appeared to be smaller than those of ultrasonography. In addition, all were single diverticulum in VCUG. Most urethral diverticulum were located in a middle third of the urethra, wrapped around the urethra or round posteriorly. Many cases appear unilocular or multilocular with echogenic debris. Transperineal ultrasonography is easy to operate and accurate for showing urethral diverticulum, and it may be useful for diagnosing this group of women with urethral symptoms and suspected urethral diverticulum. It provides information on the extent and location of the diverticulum, which are important in surgical excision.

  11. Current management of urethral stricture disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Smith

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Progress is being made toward consistent terminology, and nomenclature which will, in turn, help to standardize treatment within the field of urology. Treatment for urethral stricture and stenosis remains inconsistent between reconstructive and nonreconstructive urologists due to varying treatment algorithms and approaches to disease management. Tissue engineering appears to be future for reconstructive urethral surgery with reports demonstrating feasibility in the use of different tissue substitutes and grafts.

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of urethritis in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, John R

    2010-04-01

    Symptoms of urethritis in men typically include urethral discharge, penile itching or tingling, and dysuria. A diagnosis can be made if at least one of the following is present: discharge, a positive result on a leukocyte esterase test in first-void urine, or at least 10 white blood cells per high-power field in urine sediment. The primary pathogens associated with urethritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Racial disparities in the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections persist in the United States, with rates of gonorrhea 40 times higher in black adolescent males than in white adolescent males. Recent studies have focused on identifying causes of nongonococcal urethritis and developing testing for atypical organisms, such as Mycoplasma genitalium and Ureaplasma species. Less common pathogens identified in patients with urethritis include Trichomonas species, adenovirus, and herpes simplex virus. History and examination findings can help distinguish urethritis from other urogenital syndromes, such as epididymitis, orchitis, and prostatitis. The goals of treatment include alleviating symptoms; preventing complications in the patient and his sexual partners; reducing the transmission of coinfections (particularly human immunodeficiency virus); identifying and treating the patient's contacts; and encouraging behavioral changes that will reduce the risk of recurrence. The combination of azithromycin or doxycycline plus ceftriaxone or cefixime is considered first-line empiric therapy in patients with urethritis. Expedited partner treatment, which involves giving patients prescriptions for partners who have not been examined by the physician, is advocated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has been approved in many states. There is an association between urethritis and an increased human immunodeficiency virus concentration in semen.

  13. Iatrogenic Urethral Defect Repairment: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulas Fidan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Iatrogenic urethral defect is a complication that occurs after vaginal surgical procedures. Many surgical methods according to place of defect are described in case of injury of urethra. In this article, we reported the repairment of distal urethral defect with the help of greft taken from labia minor. This defect is made by the excision of the granulation tissue that occurred after chronic paraurethral  gland infection.

  14. Chlamydia trachomatis in non-specific urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terho, P

    1978-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis was isolated from 58.5% of 159 patients with non-specific urethritis (NSU) using irradiated McCoy cell cultures. Patients with persistent Chlamydia-positive NSU remained Chlamydia-positive each time they were examined before treatment and patients with Chlamydia-negative NSU remained Chlamydia-negative during the course of the illness. Neither the duration of symptoms of urethritis nor a history of previous urethritis affected the chlamydial isolation rate significantly. Of 40 patients with severe discharge 30 (75%) harboured C. trachomatis. One-third of the Chlamydia-positive patients had a severe urethral discharge, while this was present in only 15% of Chlamydia-negative patients. Complications--such as conjunctivitis, arthritis, and epididymitis--were more severe in men with Chlamdia-positive NSU than in those with Chlamydia-negative NSU. Of 64 men matched for sexual promiscuity but without urethritis, none harboured C. trachomatis in his urethra. This differs significantly (P less than 0.001) when compared with patients with NSU. C. trachomatis was isolated from the urogenital tract in 24 (42%) out of 57 female sexual contacts of patients with NSU. The presence of C. trachomatis in the women correlated significantly (P less than 0.001) with the isolation of the agent from their male contacts. These findings give further evidence for the aetiological role of C. trachomatis in non-specific urethritis and its sexual transmission. PMID:678958

  15. Radiological findings of congenital urethral valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kook, Shin Ho

    1990-01-01

    Congenital urethral valve is the common cause of hydronephrosis in newborn infants and the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in male children. We reviewed and analysed radiological findings and associated anomalies of 16 cases of congenital urethral valve which were examined during the period from January 1985 to December 1989. The most frequent age was under one year old (56%). The main symptoms were urinary dribbing (37.5%), weak stream (25%) and urinary frequency and incontinence (25%). Anterior urethral valve (AUV) was 5 cases (31%) and posterior urethral valve (PUV) was 11 cases(69%), in which 10 cases were Type I and one case was Type III. Bladder wall thickening was seen in all cases and its severity was partly correlated with the degree of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). VUR was observed in 12 cases (75%), and relatively severe in older age group. The degree of VUR was milder in AUV than PUV. Hydronephrosis was more severe in PUV than in anterior one, and its degree was correlated with the severity of VUR. Associated anomalies were ectopic urethral opening (2 cases), PDA (1 case), congenital megacolon (1 case) and patent urachus (1 case) in PUV. So early diagnosis and treatment of congenital urethral valve is essential to the prevention of renal damage

  16. Urethral prolapse in dogs: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Jennifer G; Tobias, Karen M; Smith, Laura

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the signalment, clinical signs, treatment, and outcome of dogs with urethral prolapse and identify risk factors associated with prolapse or treatment. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 48) with urethral prolapse. Medical records (May 1995-June 2010) from 2 referral centers were reviewed. Retrieved data included signalment, clinical signs, laboratory findings, treatment, complications, results of long-term follow-up. Records from Veterinary Medical Data Base (VMDB) were evaluated to determine odds ratios. Odds ratio for urethral prolapse in English bulldogs compared to all breeds was 366.99 (95% CI: 265.83, 506.65). Of 48 affected dogs, 46 had either resection and anastomosis (43 dogs) or urethropexy (3 dogs). The most common early postoperative complication was hemorrhage (39%); postoperative hemorrhage was less common when a simple continuous pattern was used for resection and anastomosis. Prolapse recurred in 57% of dogs available for long-term follow-up; recurrence was less common in dogs that were administered postoperative butorphanol or acepromazine. Gender was not associated with urethral prolapse or postoperative complications. Urethral prolapse occurs most commonly in English bulldogs. Postoperative hemorrhage and prolapse recurrence may be reduced with use of a simple continuous pattern for urethral anastomosis and by administration of postoperative sedation, respectively. Castration status did not appear to affect prolapse development or outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Nasolacrimal Stenting: Toward Improving Outcomes with a Simple Modification of the Song Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanciego, Carlos; Miguel, Silvia De; Padilla, Manuel; Perea, Miguel; Rodriguez-Merlo, Rufo; Garcia-Garcia, Lorenzo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in a prospective, single-center study, the effectiveness of Song's polyurethane stents, modified 'in-house,' in the percutaneous management of epiphora. Patients (n = 170; age range 18-83, mean = 64; 50 male, 120 female) with severe epiphora had the modified stents inserted (183 eyes/195 stents) to treat unilateral/bilateral and complete/partial obstruction of the nasolacrimal system. The etiology of the obstruction was idiopathic in 119 cases (61%) and chronic dacryocystitis in 76 (39%). The set designed by Song was used in all patients but modified by us such that the extreme end is cone-shaped. The original technique was slightly modified by us and the procedure was conducted on an outpatient basis. The initial technical success rate of stent placement was 97%. Resolution of epiphora was complete in 180 eyes and partial in 3. On follow-up (mean = 18 months; range: 2 days to 24 months), 165 of 195 stents (85%) remained patent. Primary patency rates at follow-up were 86%, 84%, 84%, and 79% in the first 6 months, second and third 6 months, and the present (24 months), respectively. Stents became obstructed in 30 patients, but all but 2 were easily withdrawn and 20 of these patients remained asymptomatic for a mean of 14 months (secondary patency of 67%). Following stent removal, the withdrawn stent was replaced with a new stent in the same intervention on 14 occasions. In another six cases, patency was re-established without the need of a second stent. The procedure is simple and safe, both in stent insertion as well as in mechanical de-blocking and withdrawal when occluded. Success was >80 % in the short term (1-year follow-up). Stenting failure does not preclude other treatment because with the modification that we had introduced, the extreme end of the stent becomes more accessible to mechanical de-blocking, withdrawal, and relocation. The levels of primary and secondary patencies are promising and warrant more

  18. Comparison of urethral diameters for calculating the urethral dose after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Osamu; Hayashi, Shinya; Matsuo, Masayuki; Nakano, Masahiro; Kubota, Yasuaki; Maeda, Sunaho; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Deguchi, Takashi; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    No studies have yet evaluated the effects of a dosimetric analysis for different urethral volumes. We therefore evaluated the effects of a dosimetric analysis to determine the different urethral volumes. This study was based on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) combined findings in 30 patients who had undergone prostate brachytherapy. Postimplant CT/MRI scans were performed 30 days after the implant. The urethra was contoured based on its diameter (8, 6, 4, 2, and 0 mm). The total urethral volume-in cubic centimeters [UrV150/200 (cc)] and percent (UrV150%/200%), of the urethra receiving 150% or 200% of the prescribed dose-and the doses (UrD90/30/5) in Grays to 90%, 30%, and 5% of the urethral volume were measured based on the urethral diameters. The UrV150 (cc) and UrD30 were statistically different between the of 8-, 6-, 4-, 2-, and 0-mm diameters, whereas the UrD5 was statistically different only between the 8-, 6-, and 4-mm diameters. Especially for UrD5, there was an approximately 40-Gy difference between the mean values for the 8- and 0-mm diameters. We recommend that the urethra should be contoured as a 4- to 6-mm diameter circle or one side of a triangle of 5-7 mm. By standardizing the urethral diameter, the urethral dose will be less affected by the total urethral volume. (author)

  19. Urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza; Dianat, SeyedSaeid; Nezami, Behtash G; Mahboubi, Amir Hassan; Sina, Alireza

    2010-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of urethral hydrodistension for management of urethral hypoplasia in prune belly syndrome (PBS). During a 10-year period, 7 infants with PBS and urethral hypoplasia presented either with open urachus or surgically created urinary diversion referred to our hospital. Five milliliters of normal saline was pushed via a 22-gauge plastic angiocatheter into the urethra with simultaneous finger pressure on the perineum to occlude the proximal urethra that was repeated with higher volumes of the solution (up to 20 mL). The procedure was continued until a 6F or 8F feeding tube catheter confirmed the urethral patency. Hydrodistension was repeated in 3-month intervals till complete patency was confirmed by imaging. Median age of the infants was 6 (1-8) months. All urethral hydrodistension were successful after 1 to 3 sessions. Follow-up imaging studies showed significant improvement in all patients except one. Natural and surgically created urinary diversions were closed in 6 infants. The hydrodistension create an equal and constant pressure into the urethral wall without any urethral damage. This technique can be considered along with the other available methods for management of urethral hypoplasia in selected cases of PBS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Laparoscopic omentoplasty to support anastomotic urethroplasty in complex and redo pelvic fracture urethral defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sanjay B; Barbagli, Guido; Joshi, Pankaj M; Hunter, Craig; Shahrour, Walid; Kulkarni, Jyotsna; Sansalone, Salvatore; Lazzeri, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that a new surgical technique using elaborated perineal anastomotic urethroplasty combined with laparoscopic omentoplasty for patients with complex and prior failed pelvic fracture urethral defect repair was feasible, safe, and effective. We performed a prospective, observational, stage 2a study to observe treatment outcomes of combined perineal and laparoscopic approach for urethroplasty in patients with pelvic fracture urethral defect at a single center in Pune, India, between January 2012 and February 2013. Complex and redo patients with pelvic fracture urethral defect occurring after pelvic fracture urethral injury were included in the study. Anterior urethral strictures were excluded. The primary study outcome was the success rate of the surgical technique, and the secondary outcome was to evaluate feasibility and safety of the procedure. The clinical outcome was considered a failure when any postoperative instrumentation was needed. Fifteen male patients with a median age of 19 years were included in the study. Seven patients were adolescents (12-18 years) and 8 patients (53.3%) were adults (19-49 years). The mean number of prior urethroplasties was 1.8 (range, 1-3). All patients underwent elaborated bulbomembranous anastomosis using a perineal approach with inferior pubectomy combined with laparoscopic mobilization of the omentum into the perineum to envelope the anastomosis and to fill the perineal dead space. Of 15 patients, 14 (93.3%) were successful and 1 (6.6%) failed. One adolescent boy 14 years old developed a recurrent stricture 2 months after the procedure and was managed using internal urethrotomy. Median follow-up was 18 months (range, 13-24 months). Combining a laparoscopic omentoplasty to a membranobulbar anastomosis for complex and redo pelvic fracture urethral injury is successful, feasible, safe, and with minimal additional morbidity to the patient. The technique has the advantage of a perineal incision and the ability

  1. Comparison of retrievable stents and permanent stents for Budd-Chiari syndrome due to obstructive inferior vena cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yonghua; Chen, Hongmei; Ding, Penxu; Ren, Jianzhuang; Han, Xinwei

    2018-05-30

    To compare long-term outcomes of retrievable stents and permanent stents for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC. Between July 2000 and August 2016, 42 patients with BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC were treated with retrievable stents (RS) and 41 patients were treated with permanent stents (PS). The retrievable stents was removed eventually after thrombus disappeared. Patients were subsequently followed-up by color Doppler sonography or CT scanning. All retrievable stent placements were successfully, and 37 retrievable stents were retrieved 8 to 29 days later. Forty-two stents were implanted in PS Group. One failure retrieval of retrievable stents occurred, and two failures of cannulations were found in PS Group. Two deaths may procedure-related and died from acute pulmonary thromboembolism perioperatively. One patient developed acute cerebral infarction and recovered after treatment. In PS Group, minor complications were found in 3 patients. The length of IVC lesion segment, length and thickness of IVC thrombus decreased significantly, and diameter of retrocaval IVC and diaphragm IVC increased significantly in both groups. During follow up, 3 patients died from liver failure in RS Group and 2 patients died in PS Group. RS Group showed a significantly higher primary patency rate than PS Group. Cumulative 1-, 3-, and 5-year secondary patency rates were 95.2%, 89.6%, 89.6% in RS Group, and 100%, 96.6%, 96.6% in PS Group (p= 0.7109). Retrievable stents is effective for BCS due to long-segment obstructive IVC, with a higher primary patency rate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Circumferential Stent Fracture: Novel Detection and Treatment with the Use of StentBoost

    OpenAIRE

    Ramegowda, Raghu T.; Chikkaswamy, Srinivas B.; Bharatha, Ashalatha; Radhakrishna, Jayashree; Krishnanaik, Geetha B.; Nanjappa, Manjunath C.; Panneerselvam, Arunkumar

    2012-01-01

    Circumferential stent fracture is extremely uncommon, and in rare cases, it can cause stent thrombosis. Recognizing stent fracture can be difficult on conventional fluoroscopy because of poor stent radiopacity. We found that StentBoost image acquisition yields improved visibility of stent struts, enabling the identification of stent fracture and the precise positioning of new stents over previously stented segments.

  3. A comparison of clinical efficacy between covered stent-grafts and bare stents in transjuglar in-trahepatic portosystemic shunt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yongbin; Zhang Xitong; Zhang Wei; Xia Yonghui; Liang Songnian; Xu Ke

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical efficacy between covered stent and uncovered stent in transjuglar in-trahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). Methods: Thirty patients with liver cirrhosis (portal hypertension), who received TIPS, were retrospectively studied. All patients were divided into two groups covered-stent group (n=20) and uncovered-stent group (n=10). For each patient, portal pressure was measured before and after operation, and the patency of shunt was evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound after operation. The mortality, recurrent bleeding rate and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy were analyzed by Fisher exact probability test. Results: The TIPS treatment was successful in all patients, the portal pressure in the covered-stent group reduced from (3.78 ± 0.50)kPa to (2.13 ± 0.44) kPa and that of the uncovered-stent group reduced from (3.67 ± 0.48)kPA TO (2.13 ± 0.35)kPa. Twenty-six cases were postoperatively followed-up (17 cases in covered-stent group, 9 cases in uncovered-stent group). the follow-up period varied from 7 days to 62 months (median follow-up period was 23 months). Thirteen patients died of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and hepatic failure. The difference of mortality between covered-stent group (8/17) and uncovered-stent group (5/17) and the uncovered-stent group (3/9) was not different too (P>0.05). The incidence of hepatic encephalopathy in the covered-stent group (4/17) was not different from that of the uncovered-stent group (2/9) (P>0.05). The patency rates of 6 months and 12 months reached 100% in the covered-stent group, which were higher than those in the uncovered-stent group 77.8% (7/9) and 55.6%(5/9) (P<0.05). Conclusions: The patency rate of shunt at 12 months after TIPS was higher in the covered-stent group than the uncovered-stent group, while the mortality, recurrent bleeding rate and incidence of hepatic encephalopathy were not significantly different between the two groups. (authors)

  4. A review of stent’s failure on patent ductus arteriosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazim, Zulfaqih; Ismail, Al Emran; Taib, Ishkrizat; Atan, Bainun Akmal Mohd

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a review of stent’s failure on patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Ductus arteriosus (DA) is an opening for newborn babies and some patient that experienced cynotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) should maintain the duct opening for survival. To date, there are no specific research on mechanical stent failure study at DA. The challenging of the stent implantation on PDA is the PDA morphology. The failure of stent in term of stent fracture have been reported and reviewed in this paper. Furthermore, the failure prediction of stent is important for further stent design development. The morphology of PDA, stent type and material used in PDA and method for accessing the failure of stent is reviewed.

  5. Urethral Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urethral cancer occurs in men and women and can spread quickly to lymph nodes near the urethra. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for urethral cancer.

  6. Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management of Posterior Urethral Valves in Rural. Kenya .... Antwi S. Audit of Posterior Urethral Valve (PUV) in Children at ... Community Paediatrics Committee, Infectious. Diseases ... Effect of Circumcision on Risk of Urinary Tract. Infection in ...

  7. Nitinol Stents in the Femoropopliteal Artery: A Mechanical Perspective on Material, Design, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleckis, Kaspars; Anttila, Eric; Aylward, Paul; Poulson, William; Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2018-05-01

    Endovascular stenting has matured into a commonly used treatment for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) due to its minimally invasive nature and associated reductions in short-term morbidity and mortality. The mechanical properties of the superelastic Nitinol alloy have played a major role in the explosion of peripheral artery stenting, with modern stents demonstrating reasonable resilience and durability. Yet in the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, even the newest generation Nitinol stents continue to demonstrate clinical outcomes that leave significant room for improvement. Restenosis and progression of native arterial disease often lead to recurrence of symptoms and reinterventions that increase morbidity and health care expenditures. One of the main factors thought to be associated with stent failure in the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) is the unique and highly dynamic mechanical environment of the lower limb. Clinical and experimental data demonstrate that the FPA undergoes significant deformations with limb flexion. It is hypothesized that the inability of many existing stent designs to conform to these deformations likely plays a role in reconstruction failure, as repetitive movements of the leg and thigh combine with mechanical mismatch between the artery and the stent and result in mechanical damage to both the artery and the stent. In this review we will identify challenges and provide a mechanical perspective of FPA stenting, and then discuss current research directions with promise to provide a better understanding of Nitinol, specific features of stent design, and improved characterization of the biomechanical environment of the FPA to facilitate development of better stents for patients with PAD.

  8. Auxetic coronary stent endoprosthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal; Ali, Murtaza Najabat; Ansari, Umar

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular heart disease is one of the leading health issues in the present era and requires considerable health care resources to prevent it. The present study was focused on the development of a new coronary stent based on novel auxetic geometry which enables the stent to exhibit...... a negative Poisson's ratio. Commercially available coronary stents have isotropic properties, whereas the vascular system of the body shows anisotropic characteristics. This results in a mismatch between anisotropic-isotropic properties of the stent and arterial wall, and this in turn is not favorable...... for mechanical adhesion of the commercially available coronary stents with the arterial wall. It is believed that an auxetic coronary stent with inherent anisotropic mechanical properties and negative Poisson's ratio will have good mechanical adhesion with the arterial wall. METHODS: The auxetic design...

  9. Localized urethral cancer in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.; Fowler, J.E. Jr.; Clayton, M.

    1987-01-01

    The results of treatments for localized carcinoma of the urethra were assessed in 21 consecutive women treated at our institutions over a twenty year period. Only one of the tumors was confined to the distal urethra. Eighty-six percent invaded the periurethral tissues and 24% were known to be associated with regional lymph node metastases. Fifty-seven percent were adenocarcinomas. Five patients refused active therapeutic intervention and expired within one to 30 months following diagnosis. Sixteen patients were treated with extirpative surgery, radiation therapy, or combinations of the two. Four are free of disease at one, four, eleven, and 15 years after treatment. Nine developed pelvic recurrences, two developed pelvic recurrences and distant metastases and one developed distant metastases only from six to 72 months (mean, 19 months) after initial treatment. Eight of these 12 patients died at two to 13 months (mean, 8 months) after secondary treatment, two are alive with residual pelvic tumor, and two are clinically free of disease at 7 and 48 months. Only six patients were known to have distant metastases at the time of death and five of these six had adenocarcinomas. Advanced localized urethral cancer in women is difficult to eradicate and usually fatal

  10. Minimally invasive surgical approach to treat posterior urethral diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossamah Alsowayan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral diverticulum is a localized saccular or fusiform out-pouching of the urethra. It may occur at any point along the urethra in both male and females. Male urethral diverticulum is rare, and could be either congenital or acquired, anterior or posterior. The mainstay treatment of posterior urethral diverticulum (PUD is the open surgical approach. Here we discuss our minimally invasive surgical approach (MIS in managing posterior urethral diverticulum.

  11. Management of recurrent anterior urethral strictures following buccal mucosal graft-urethroplasty: A single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, Tarun Dilip; Katti, Amit; Nagaraj, Harohalli K

    2016-01-01

    To describe the safety, feasibility and outcome of redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty in patients presenting with recurrent anterior urethral stricture following previous failed BMG urethroplasty. This was a retrospective chart review of 21 patients with recurrent anterior urethral stricture after buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty, who underwent redo urethroplasty at our institute between January 2008 to January 2014. All patients underwent preoperative evaluation in the form of uroflowmetry, RGU, sonourethrogram and urethroscopy. Among patients with isolated bulbar urethral stricture, who had previously undergone ventral onlay, redo dorsal onlay BMG urethroplasty was done and vice versa (9+8 patients). Three patients, who had previously undergone Kulkarni-Barbagli urethroplasty, underwent dorsal free graft urethroplasty by ventral sagittal urethrotomy approach. One patient who had previously undergone urethroplasty by ASOPA technique underwent 2-stage Bracka repair. Catheter removal was done on 21(st) postoperative day. Follow-up consisted of uroflow, PVR and AUA-SS. Failure was defined as requirement of any post operative procedure. Idiopathic urethral strictures constituted the predominant etiology. Eleven patients presented with stricture recurrence involving the entire grafted area, while the remaining 10 patients had fibrotic ring like strictures at the proximal/distal graft-urethral anastomotic sites. The success rate of redo surgery was 85.7% at a mean follow-up of 41.8 months (range: 1 yr-6 yrs). Among the 18 patients who required no intervention during the follow-up period, the graft survival was longer compared to their initial time to failure. Redo buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty is safe and feasible with good intermediate term outcomes.

  12. Transvaginal bladder neck closure with posterior urethral flap for devastated urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Eric S; Goudelocke, Colin M; Gilchrist, Alienor; Lebed, Brett

    2011-07-01

    To present a modified transvaginal bladder neck closure (TV BNC) technique using a posterior urethral flap to minimize the potential risk of ureteral injury and fistula formation. Urethral and bladder neck destruction owing to chronic indwelling urethral catheters in female neurogenic patients is a devastating complication. A retrospective review was performed of all patients undergoing TV BNC at a single institution during a 3-year period. All patients had had a nonfunctional or destroyed urethra because of a long-term indwelling urethral catheter. In brief, the devastated outlet was closed using the dorsally bivalved urethra as a flap that was rotated cephalad onto the incised anterior bladder wall for closure, thereby rotating the suture line high into the retropubic space. A postoperative cystogram was obtained at 2-3 weeks. A total of 11 consecutive female patients with a devastated outlet underwent TV BNC, as described, with placement of a suprapubic tube. One patient experienced failure at 6 weeks postoperatively. The mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 9.6 months (range 1-36). Serial upper tract imaging at the last follow-up visit revealed no new hydroureteronephrosis. The results of our study have shown that TV BNC with a posterior urethral flap provides satisfactory early results. This technique creates a suture line far removed from the ureteral orifices, minimizing the risk of upper tract injury during closure. Also, the rotation of the posterior urethra onto the anterior bladder wall secures the suture line high into the retropubic space, minimizing the risk of failure and postoperative fistula formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Male urethral strictures and their management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Lindsay A.; McAninch, Jack W.; Breyer, Benjamin N.

    2014-01-01

    Male urethral stricture disease is prevalent and has a substantial impact on quality of life and health-care costs. Management of urethral strictures is complex and depends on the characteristics of the stricture. Data show that there is no difference between urethral dilation and internal urethrotomy in terms of long-term outcomes; success rates range widely from 8–80%, with long-term success rates of 20–30%. For both of these procedures, the risk of recurrence is greater for men with longer strictures, penile urethral strictures, multiple strictures, presence of infection, or history of prior procedures. Analysis has shown that repeated use of urethrotomy is not clinically effective or cost-effective in these patients. Long-term success rates are higher for surgical reconstruction with urethroplasty, with most studies showing success rates of 85–90%. Many techniques have been utilized for urethroplasty, depending on the location, length, and character of the stricture. Successful management of urethral strictures requires detailed knowledge of anatomy, pathophysiology, proper patient selection, and reconstructive techniques. PMID:24346008

  14. Management of posterior urethral disruption injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Jeremy B; McAninch, Jack W

    2009-03-01

    Posterior urethral disruption is a traumatic injury to the male urethra, which most often results from pelvic fracture. After trauma, the distraction defect between the two ends of the urethra often scars and becomes fibrotic, blocking the urethra and bladder emptying. Increasing evidence suggests that many posterior urethral disruptions occur at the junction between the membranous urethra and the bulbar urethra, which is distal to the rhabdosphincter. In the acute setting, when a posterior urethral disruption is suspected, retrograde urethrography should be performed. Posterior urethral disruptions can be managed acutely by realignment of the urethra over a urethral catheter or by placement of a suprapubic catheter for bladder drainage only. Once fibrosis has stabilized, the patient can undergo posterior urethroplasty. In most cases, this procedure can be performed via a perineal approach in a single-stage surgery. The results of this single-stage perineal urethroplasty are excellent, and a patent urethra can be re-established in the majority of men who undergo surgery.

  15. Long-term effect of urethral dilatation and internal urethrotomy for urethral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeratterapillay, Rajan; Pickard, Rob S

    2012-11-01

    Urethral dilatation and direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) are widely used minimally invasive options to manage men with urethral strictures. Advances in open urethroplasty with better long-term cure rates have fuelled the continuing debate as to which treatment is best for primary and recurrent urethral strictures. We reviewed recent literature to identify contemporary practice of urethral dilatation and DVIU and the long-term outcome of these procedures. Systematic literature search for the period January 2010 to December 2011 showed that urethral dilatation and DVIU remain frequently used treatment options as confirmed by surveys of urologists in the USA and the Netherlands. Multiple reports of laser DVIU confirm the safety of this approach but long-term data were lacking. Stricture free rates from urethra dilatation and DVIU vary from 10 to 90% at 12 months, although adjunctive intermittent self-dilatation can reduce time to recurrence. Although quality-of-life benefit appears good in the short term, repeated procedures may harm sexual function in the long-term. Urethral dilatation and DVIU remain widely used in urethral stricture management but high-level comparative evidence of benefit and harms against urethroplasty in the short and long-term is still lacking.

  16. Editorial comment on “Etiology of male urethral strictures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My colleagues and I are strongly convinced that urethral stricture disease presents different etiologies and pathological characteris- tics in developed compared to developing countries [1]. Recently, we reported the differences in posterior urethral stricture after pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects in developing (India) ...

  17. 21 CFR 876.4590 - Interlocking urethral sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interlocking urethral sound. 876.4590 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4590 Interlocking urethral sound. (a) Identification. An interlocking urethral sound is a device that consists of two metal sounds...

  18. Urethral catheterization:The need for adequate undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.V. Ezenwa

    2016-12-26

    Dec 26, 2016 ... urethral catheterization procedure and precautionary methods taken while carrying out the procedure. Also assessed was the ... Conclusion: Newly recruited interns have poor practical exposure to urethral catheterization. Efforts should .... ska B. Treatment of posterior and anterior urethral trauma. BJU Int.

  19. Meatal Swabs Contain Less Cellular Material and Are Associated with a Decrease in Gram Stain Smear Quality Compared to Urethral Swabs in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stephen J; Schwebke, Jane R; Aaron, Kristal J; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Hook, Edward W

    2017-07-01

    Urethral swabs are the samples of choice for point-of-care Gram stain testing to diagnose Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection and nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) in men. As an alternative to urethral swabs, meatal swabs have been recommended for the collection of urethral discharge to diagnose N. gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infection in certain populations by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT), as they involve a less invasive collection method. However, as meatal swabs could be sampling a reduced surface area and result in fewer collected epithelial cells compared to urethral swabs, the adequacy of meatal swab specimens to collect sufficient cellular material for Gram stain testing remains unknown. We enrolled 66 men who underwent either urethral or meatal swabbing and compared the cellular content and Gram stain failure rate. We measured the difference in swab cellular content using the Cepheid Xpert CT/NG sample adequacy control crossing threshold (SAC CT ) and determined the failure rate of Gram stain smears (GSS) due to insufficient cellular material. In the absence of discharge, meatal smears were associated with a significant reduction in cellular content ( P = 0.0118), which corresponded with a GSS failure rate significantly higher than that for urethral swabs (45% versus 3%, respectively; P < 0.0001). When discharge was present, there was no difference among results from urethral and meatal swabs. Therefore, if GSS testing is being considered for point-of-care diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infection or NGU in men, meatal swabs should be avoided in the absence of a visible discharge. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Long-term bladder dysfunction and renal function in boys with posterior urethral valves based on urodynamic findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.I. Ghanem (Mazen); K.P. Wolffenbuttel (Katja); A. de Vylder (Ann); R.J.M. Nijman (Rien)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of congenital obstructive uropathy leading to renal failure in childhood. We investigate the influence of bladder dysfunction on renal function impairment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116

  1. Long-term bladder dysfunction and renal function in boys with posterior urethral valves based on urodynamic findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghanem, MA; Wolffenbuttel, KP; De Vylder, A; Nijman, RJ

    Purpose: Posterior urethral valves are the most common cause of congenital obstructive uropathy leading to renal failure in childhood. We investigate the influence of bladder dysfunction on renal function impairment. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 116 patients with

  2. The detection of microorganisms related to urethritis from the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong Thi; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Furubayashi, Keiichi; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Kawai, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Takamasa; Uehara, Kazutaka; Murakami, Norihiko; Yoshioka, Masaru; Nakayama, Ken; Shiono, Yutaka; Muraoka, Keisuke; Suzuki, Masahiko; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the presence of microorganisms related to urethritis in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis and the efficacies of antimicrobials for urethritis on microorganisms in the oral cavity. Ninety-two male patients with urethritis and 17 male controls participated to this study at 12 urology clinics in Japan between March 2014 and March 2015. The first voided urine (FVU) and oral wash fluid (OWF) specimens were collected from the participants. The microorganisms in both FVU and OWF specimens were detected by nucleic acid amplification tests at the first and follow-up visit. The efficacies of antimicrobials were evaluated after 1-4 weeks treatment completion. In a total of 92 male patients with urethritis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma urealyticum, Ureaplasma parvum, Trichomonas vaginalis and Gardnerella vaginalis were detected from OWF specimens of 12%, 3%, 9%, 0%, 12%, 3%, 3% and 15% patients, respectively. From control males, no microorganism was detected from OWF specimens. Among 46 patients who could be evaluated for antimicrobial efficacies at the follow-up visit, 5 in FVU specimens failed by azithromycin (AZM), and 10 failed in OWF specimens (7 by AZM, 2 by tetracycline, 1 by spectinomycin; p = 0.002). Especially, a high prevalence of G. vaginalis remained positive after treatment for urethritis in the oral cavity. Microorganisms related to urethritis were detected in the oral cavity of male patients with urethritis. Antimicrobials that focused on urethritis, especially AZM regimen seem to be less effective for microorganisms in the oral cavity. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Stent placement of gastroenteric anastomoses formed by magnetic compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, C; Clark, T W; Ginsberg, G; Habecker, P

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the use of stents for prolonging the patency of gastroenteric anastomoses (GEA) induced by magnet compression. Rare earth magnets were inserted perorally and serially in 15 dogs so as to mate across the gastric and jejunal walls. After magnet excretion, the resulting GEA was identified endoscopically, dilated (n = 1), and stented with bare (n = 2) or partially covered (n = 6) flared 10-mm or 12-mm Z stents. The GEA was followed at 2-4-week intervals for patency; malfunctioning shunts were irrigated, or dilated with angioplasty balloons. Gross and histologic examination of the anastomotic tissues was performed in 14 animals. Magnet pairs were excreted in 5-7 days. Of the 19 magnet placements in 15 animals, stent placement was not possible because of early GEA closure (n = 6), failure to locate (n = 2), pancreatic abscess (n = 1), and magnet perforation with peritonitis (n = 1). Estimated duration of GEA patency was 19 days after balloon dilation, 40-64 days with bare Z stents, and 58-147 days (mean, 90 days) with partially covered Z stents. Shunt function was commonly hindered by bezoars. Stent narrowing or occlusion was caused by tissue overgrowth through bare stents (n = 2), between covered stent struts and through partially detached membrane (n = 2). Serious morbidity (n = 2) was due to malpositioned magnets across the pancreas in one animal and gastric perforation in the other. One dog was euthanized because of unsuspected kidney infection. Partially covered stents significantly extend the anatomic patency rate of magnetic GEA to 7 weeks or more. Functional patency is frequently impaired by bezoars. Ongoing improvements in covered stent design should provide longer-term GEA patency.

  4. Abnormal electromyographic activity of the urethral sphincter, voiding dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries: a new syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, C. J.; Christmas, T. J.; Chapple, C. R.; Parkhouse, H. F.; Kirby, R. S.; Jacobs, H. S.

    1988-01-01

    A potential association between abnormal electromyographic activity--that is, decelerating bursts and complex repetitive discharges--of the urethral sphincter and difficulty in voiding was examined in 57 women with urinary retention. Abnormal electromyographic activity was found in 33. Ultrasonography of the ovaries in 22 of the 33 women showed that 14 had polycystic ovaries. Of the other eight women, two had had oophorectomies, one had shrunken ovaries and ovarian failure, and one had previo...

  5. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravej, Maryam; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals. PMID:21845076

  6. Successful Treatment of Bronchoesophageal Fistula With Esophageal and Bronchial Stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Yi Wang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Bronchoesophageal fistula is reported in 5-10% of patients with esophageal cancer. In most of these cases, the insertion of a single stent, either a tracheobronchial or an esophageal stent, is sufficient to seal off the fistula. In this case we describe a 67-year-old man with esophageal cancer and complications of bronchoesophageal fistula, which resulted in repeated pneumonia and acute respiratory failure. Initially, two expandable metallic membranous esophageal stents were placed to cover the fistula. However, the esophageal stent failed to stop the air leak and dislodged into the stomach. Thereafter, a bronchial stent was placed at the right intermediate bronchus and successfully stopped the air leak. The patient was then weaned from the ventilator 1 week after the insertion of a bronchial stent. In conclusion, stenting in both the esophagus and airways should be considered when both are severely invaded by malignancy, when the airway is compressed, or when the fistula is insufficiently sealed by an esophageal stent.

  7. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moravej

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals.

  8. Isotretinoin-induced urethritis versus non-gonococcal urethritis in a man who has sex with men: an open debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballout, Rami A; Maatouk, Ismael

    2018-01-01

    This is the case of a young man presenting with urethritis despite a negative infectious work-up. Careful history taking elucidated a strong correlation between symptom onset and a recent dose escalation of isotretinoin for treatment of his refractory cystic acne. The urethral symptoms quickly resolved with dose reduction, suggesting urethritis as a rare adverse reaction of isotretinoin.

  9. Reintervention for stent occlusion after bilateral self-expandable metallic stent placement for malignant hilar biliary obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Naitoh, Itaru; Okumura, Fumihiro; Ozeki, Takanori; Anbe, Kaiki; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Nishie, Hirotada; Mizushima, Takashi; Sano, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Yoneda, Masashi; Joh, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Endoscopic reintervention for stent occlusions following bilateral self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) placement for malignant hilar biliary obstruction (MHBO) is challenging, and time to recurrent biliary obstruction (RBO) of the revisionary stent remains unclear. We aimed to clarify a suitable reintervention method for stent occlusions following bilateral SEMS placement for MHBO. Between 2002 and 2014, 52 consecutive patients with MHBO who underwent endoscopic reintervention for stent occlusion after bilateral SEMS placement were enrolled at two university hospitals and one tertiary care referral center. We retrospectively evaluated the technical and functional success rates of the reinterventions, and the time to RBO of the revisionary stents. Technical and functional success rates of the reinterventions were 92% (48/52) and 90% (43/48), respectively. Univariate analysis did not determine any significant predictive factors for technical and functional failures. Median time to RBO of the revisionary stents was 68 days. Median time to RBO was significantly longer for revisionary SEMS placement than for plastic stent placement (131 days vs 47 days, respectively; log-rank test, P = 0.005). Revisionary SEMS placement was the only independent factor that was significantly associated with a longer time to RBO of the revisionary stent in the multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis (hazard ratio 0.37; 95% confidence interval 0.14-0.95; P = 0.039). Revisionary SEMS placement is a suitable endoscopic reintervention method for stent occlusion following bilateral SEMS placement from the perspective of time to RBO of the revisionary stent. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  10. Combined antegrade and retrograde ureteral stenting: the rendezvous technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macri, A.; Magno, C.; Certo, A.; Basile, A.; Scuderi, G.; Crescenti, F.; Famulari, C.

    2005-01-01

    Ureteral stenting is a routine procedure in endourology. To increase the success rate in difficult cases, it may be helpful to use the rendezvous technique, a combined antegrade and retrograde approach. We performed 16 urological rendezvous in 11 patients with ureteral strictures or urologic lesions. The combined approach was successful in all patients, without morbidity or mortality. In our experience the rendezvous technique increased the success rate of antegrade ureteral stenting from 78.6 to 88.09% (p>0.05). This procedure is a valid option in case of failure of conventional ureteral stenting

  11. Evaluation of the Effects of Temporary Covered Nitinol Stent Placement in the Prostatic Urethra: Short-Term Study in the Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisostomo, Veronica; Song, Ho Young; Maynar, Manuel; Sun, Fei; Soria, Federico; Lima, Juan Rafael; Yoon, Chang Jin; Uson-Gargallo, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effect of temporary stent placement on the canine prostatic urethra. Methods. Retrievable PTFE-covered nitinol stents were placed in the prostatic urethras of 8 beagle dogs under fluoroscopic guidance. Retrograde urethrography was obtained before and after stenting. Retrograde urethrography and endoscopy were performed 1 and 2 months after deployment. The endoscopic degree of hyperplasia was rated on a scale of 0 to 4 (0 absence, 4 = occlusion). On day 60, stents were removed and urethrography was performed immediately before euthanasia. Pathologic analysis was performed to determine the degree of glandular atrophy, periurethral fibrosis, and urethral dilation. Results. Stent deployment was technically successful in 7 animals, and failed in 1 dog due to a narrow urethral lumen. Complete migration was seen in 2 animals at 1 month, and an additional stent was deployed. On day 30, endoscopy showed slight hyperplasia (grade 1) in 3 animals. On day 60, moderate hyperplasia (grade 2) was evidenced in 4 cases. No impairment of urinary flow was seen during follow-up. Retrieval was technically easy to perform, and was successful in all dogs. The major histologic findings were chronic inflammatory cell infiltrates; prostate glandular atrophy, with a mean value of 1.86 (SD 0.90); periurethral fibrosis, with a mean ratio of 29.37 (SD 10.41); and dilatation of the prostatic urethra, with a mean ratio of 6.75 (SD 3.22). Conclusion. Temporary prostatic stent placement in dogs is safe and feasible, causing marked enlargement of the prostatic urethral lumen. Retrievable covered stents may therefore be an option for bladder outlet obstruction management in men

  12. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Samer L; Witjes, Johannes Alfred; Kassouf, Wassim

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation therapy in women. There are no clear-cut indications for the choice of the most appropriate treatment modality. Organ-preserving modalities have shown effective and should be used whenever they do not compromise the oncological safety to decrease the physical and psychological trauma of dismemberment or loss of sexual/urinary function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Repeat urethrotomy and dilation for the treatment of urethral stricture are neither clinically effective nor cost-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, T J; Castle, C; Andrich, D E; MacDonald, J T; Nicol, D L; Mundy, A R

    2004-07-01

    We developed an algorithm for the management of urethral stricture based on cost-effectiveness. United Kingdom medical and hospital costs associated with the current management of urethral stricture were calculated using private medical insurance schedules of reimbursement and clean intermittent self-catheterization supply costs. These costs were applied to 126 new patients treated endoscopically for urethral stricture in a general urological setting between January 1, 1991 and December 31, 1999. Treatment failure was defined as recurrent symptomatic stricture requiring further operative intervention following initial intervention. Mean followup available was 25 months (range 1 to 132). The costs were urethrotomy/urethral dilation 2,250.00 pounds sterling (3,375.00 dollars, ratio 1.00), simple 1-stage urethroplasty 5,015.00 pounds sterling (7,522.50 dollars, ratio 2.23), complex 1-stage urethroplasty 5,335.00 pounds sterling (8,002.50 dollars, ratio 2.37) and 2-stage urethroplasty 10,370 pounds sterling (15,555.00 dollars, ratio 4.61). Of the 126 patients assessed 60 (47.6%) required more than 1 endoscopic retreatments (mean 3.13 each), 50 performed biweekly clean intermittent self-catheterization and 7 underwent urethroplasty during followup. The total cost per patient for all 126 patients for stricture treatment during followup was 6,113 pounds sterling (9,170 dollars). This cost was calculated by multiplying procedure cost by the number of procedures performed. A strategy of urethrotomy or urethral dilation as first line treatment, followed by urethroplasty for recurrence yielded a total cost per patient of 5,866 pounds sterling (8,799 dollars). A strategy of initial urethrotomy or urethral dilation followed by urethroplasty in patients with recurrent stricture proves to be the most cost-effective strategy. This financially based strategy concurs with evidence based best practice for urethral stricture management.

  14. Preoperative biliary decompression preceding pancreaticoduodenectomy with plastic or self-expandable metallic stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapamäki, C; Seppänen, H; Udd, M; Juuti, A; Halttunen, J; Kiviluoto, T; Sirén, J; Mustonen, H; Kylänpää, L

    2015-06-01

    The rainage (PBD) prior to pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is controversial. If PBD is required, large bore self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are thought to maintain better drainage and have fewer postoperative complications than plastic stents. The confirming evidence is scarce. The aim of the study was to compare outcomes of surgery in patients who underwent PBD with SEMS or plastic stents deployed at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). This is a retrospective study of 366 patients having had PD during 2000-2009. Preceding endoscopic PBD was performed in 191 patients and nine had had percutaneous transhepatic drainage (PTD). At the time of operation, 163 patients had a plastic stent and 28 had SEMS. Due to stent exchanges, 176 plastic stents and 29 SEMS were placed in all. The stent failure rate was 7.4% for plastic stents and 3.4% for SEMS (p = 0.697). A bilirubin level under 50 µmol/L was reached by 80% of the patients with plastic stents and by 61% of the patients with SEMS (p = 0.058). A postoperative infection complication and/or a pancreatic fistula was found in 26% while using plastic stents and in 25% using SEMS (p = 1.000). In unstented patients with biliary obstruction, the bile juice was sterile significantly more often than in endoscopically stented patients (100% vs 1%, p stented and unstented patients were compared regarding postoperative infection complications, there was no significant difference between the groups (p = 0.365). Plastic stents did not differ from SEMS regarding the stent failure rate, bilirubin level decrease, amount of bacteria in the bile juice, or postoperative complications when used for PBD. The significantly higher price of SEMS suggests their use in selected cases only. © The Finnish Surgical Society 2014.

  15. Deferred endoscopic urethral realignment: Role in management of traumatic posterior urethral disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Elgammal

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: When early realignment is postponed for any reason, deferred endoscopic realignment is considered an adequate substitute because urethral continuity can be achieved in a group of patients without increase incidence of impotence and incontinence.

  16. Changes in the mechanical environment of stenotic arteries during interaction with stents: computational assessment of parametric stent designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Stadler, Michael; Gasser, Thomas C

    2005-02-01

    Clinical studies have identified factors such as the stent design and the deployment technique that are one cause for the success or failure of angioplasty treatments. In addition, the success rate may also depend on the stenosis type. Hence, for a particular stenotic artery, the optimal intervention can only be identified by studying the influence of factors such as stent type, strut thickness, geometry of the stent cell, and stent-artery radial mismatch with the wall. We propose a methodology that allows a set of stent parameters to be varied, with the aim of evaluating the difference in the mechanical environment within the wall before and after angioplasty with stenting. Novel scalar quantities attempt to characterize the wall changes inform of the contact pressure caused by the stent struts, and the stresses within the individual components of the wall caused by the stent. These quantities are derived numerically and serve as indicators, which allow the determination of the correct size and type of the stent for each individual stenosis. In addition, the luminal change due to angioplasty may be computed as well. The methodology is demonstrated by using a full three-dimensional geometrical model of a postmortem specimen of a human iliac artery with a stenosis using imaging data. To describe the material behavior of the artery, we considered mechanical data of eight different vascular tissues, which formed the stenosis. The constitutive models for the tissue components capture the typical anisotropic, nonlinear and dissipative characteristics under supra-physiological loading conditions. Three-dimensional stent models were parametrized in such a way as to enable new designs to be generated simply with regard to variations in their geometric structure. For the three-dimensional stent-artery interaction we use a contact algorithm based on smooth contact surfaces of at least C-continuity, which prevents numerical problems known from standard facet-based contact

  17. Evaluation of the Anti-migration Effect of Barbed Prostatic Stents: In Vitro Study in Urethra-mimicking Bovine Pericardium Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Han Kyu; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Nam, Deok Ho; Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60° toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push–pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P < 0.001). Median AMF was far greater for eight-barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60° toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  18. Evaluation of the anti-migration effect of barbed prostatic stents: in vitro study in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Han Kyu; Song, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Nam, Deok Ho; Park, Jung-Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2013-02-01

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60° toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push-pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60° toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  19. Evaluation of the Anti-migration Effect of Barbed Prostatic Stents: In Vitro Study in Urethra-mimicking Bovine Pericardium Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Han Kyu, E-mail: hankyu1324@empas.com; Song, Ho-Young, E-mail: hysong@amc.seoul.kr; Kim, Jin Hyoung, E-mail: m1fenew@hanmail.net [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Deok Ho, E-mail: namjindan@paran.com [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Hoon, E-mail: jhparkz@amc.seoul.kr [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, In Gab, E-mail: uroman2000@yahoo.co.kr; Kim, Choung-Soo, E-mail: cskim@amc.seoul.kr [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to compare the migration rates of covered stents with eight, four, and zero barbs in urethra-mimicking bovine pericardium models. Three types of polytetrafluoroethylene-covered retrievable self-expandable prostatic stents, with eight, four, and zero barbs, were tested in bovine pericardium models, consisting of normal saline-filled acrylic containers with tubes at both ends and a replica of the human urethra. The barbs were 2 mm in length and projected 60 Degree-Sign toward the urinary bladder. The anti-migration force (AMF) and resistance force against stent removal (RFSR) were measured by an automatic push-pull gauge system at a fixed rate (2 mm/s). Significant differences in AMF among the three stent types were detected (P < 0.001). Median AMF was far greater for eight-barbed than for four-barbed stents (11.96 vs. 7.55 N, P = 0.003). For stent removal, the difference between 4- and 8-barbed stents were not significant in median static (5.54 vs. 6.08 N, P = 0.15) or sliding (prostatic urethra, 5.32 vs. 5.59 N, P = 0.65; membranous urethra, 7.78 vs. 8.57 N, P = 0.364) RFSR. No perforations or scratched traces were observed during removal of these stents. The inclusion of eight barbs projecting 60 Degree-Sign toward the urinary bladder were not only effective against stent migration in this model but suggests that these stents may be suitable for the treatment of prostatic urethral strictures without severely irritating the tissue. However, whether these results translate into living urethral tissue is unclear, necessitating further studies.

  20. Female urethral strictures: successful management with long-term clean intermittent catheterization after urethral dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ariana L; Ferlise, Victor J; Rovner, Eric S

    2006-07-01

    To report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of urethral stricture in women. A retrospective review of records and video-urodynamics identified women treated for urethral stricture between 1999 and 2004 at one institution by one surgeon. Urethral stricture was defined as a fixed anatomical narrowing between the bladder neck and distal urethra of or = 30 F. After a period of indwelling catheterization, the women were placed on clean intermittent self-catheterization (CISC) at least once daily, and monitored every 3-6 months. At each follow-up, the urethra was catheterized to exclude recurrence. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom scores were obtained at presentation and at the initial 3 month follow-up. Seven women met the criteria for urethral stricture, and were followed for a mean (range) of 21 (6-34) months. All were initially maintained on daily CISC, and some were gradually reduced to weekly CISC for the duration of follow-up. No patient had a recurrent stricture while on CISC, and none has had a urethral reconstruction to manage their condition. AUA symptom scores improved in all of the women by a mean of 10.7 points. No complications related to catheterization were noted. Urethral stricture is rare in women. Long-term CISC in these women is safe and effective, and can avoid the need for major reconstructive surgery.

  1. The use of balloon-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of pediatric tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, R H; Backer, C L; Dunham, M E; Donaldson, J; Mavroudis, C; Holinger, L D

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate the use of balloon-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of children with tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia in whom conventional therapy has failed. Retrospective case series. Tertiary pediatric otolaryngology and cardiothoracic surgery referral center. Six patients were identified as having undergone bronchoscopic placement of metallic balloon-expandable stents between 1994 and 1997. The age at stent placement, prior surgical interventions, and indications for and sites of stent placement were noted. Also, the complications related to stent placement and the current airway status of the patients were reviewed. Twelve balloon-expandable metallic angioplasty stents (Palmaz; Johnson & Johnson Interventional Systems Co, Warren, NJ) were placed bronchoscopically in 6 patients. Six stents were placed in the lower trachea, and 6 were placed in the main bronchi. The stents were balloon expanded under fluoroscopic guidance. Discontinuation of mechanical ventilation. The age at stent placement ranged from 1.5 to 38 months (mean age at placement, 10 months). The indications for stent placement were (1) tracheomalacia or bronchomalacia, (2) pericardial patch or slide tracheoplasty failure, and (3) bronchomalacia caused by tetralogy of Fallot and large pulmonary arteries. The primary complication of stent placement was postoperative granulation tissue formation. One patient required the removal of 2 tracheal stents because of granulation tissue formation. There were 2 deaths in the series, 1 possibly related to stent placement. Four of the 6 patients were weaned from mechanical ventilation, and 3 experienced prolonged relief of airway obstruction. Metallic balloon-expandable stents are effective in relieving lower tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia in select patients. Only patients in whom conventional therapy has failed should be considered for stent placement.

  2. Use of Self-Expanding Stents for the Treatment of Vertebral Artery Ostial Stenosis: a Single Center Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Sun Young; Lee, Deok Hee; Choi, Jin Woo; Choi, Byung Se; In, Hyun Sin; Kim, Sun Mi; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon; Suh, Dae Chul

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate our early experience using self-expanding stents to treat atherosclerotic vertebral artery ostial stenosis (VAOS), with respect to technical feasibility and clinical and imaging follow-up results. A total of 20 lesions in 20 patients underwent stenting of the VAOS using a self-expanding stent (Precise RX; Cordis Neurovascular, Miami Lakes, FL). Two patients were asymptomatic. We analyzed the technical success rate, causes of technical failure, occurrence of any vascular or neurological event, and the occurrence of any neurological abnormality or in-stent restenosis (ISR) seen on follow-up. The imaging follow-up was performed with Doppler ultrasound (DUS) as a primary screening modality. One instance of technical failure was caused by failure of the guidewire passage. The stent diameter was 5 mm, and post-stenting balloon dilatations were necessary in all cases. Stent misplacement requiring placement of an additional stent occurred in four cases. Following a 14.8 month average clinical follow-up time, two patients showed anterior circulation ischemia, which was not attributed to the VAOS we treated. Following a 13.7 month average DUS follow-up, five patients showed a mild degree of diffuse or focal intimal thickening in the stent lumen; however, none of the stenosis showed luminal loss of more than 50% and no stent fracture was noted. The use of self-expanding stents for treating VAOS was technically feasible and helped to improve artery patency during our limited follow-up interval

  3. The role of airway stenting in pediatric tracheobronchial obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón-Pacheco, Juan L; Cabezalí, Daniel; Tejedor, Raquel; López, María; Luna, Carmen; Comas, Juan V; de Miguel, Eduardo

    2008-06-01

    Tracheobronchial obstruction is infrequent in the pediatric age group but it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to review the results of a single institution experience with endoscopic stent placement in children with benign tracheobronchial obstruction, and with special concern on safety and clinical effectiveness. Twenty-one patients with severe airway stenosing disease in which stent placement was performed between 1993 and 2006. Inclusion criteria according to the clinical status were: failure to wean from ventilation, episode of apnea, frequent respiratory infections (>3 pneumonia/year), and severe respiratory distress. Additional criteria for stent placement were: failure of surgical treatment, bronchomalacia, and tracheomalacia refractory to previous tracheostomy. Selection of the type of stent depended on the site of the lesion, the patient's age, and the stent availability when time of presentation. The following variables were retrospectively evaluated: age, type of obstruction, associated malformations, stent properties, technical and clinical success, complications and related reinterventions, outcome and follow-up period. Thirty-three stents were placed in the trachea (n=18) and/or bronchi (n=15) of 21 patients with a median age of 6 months (range, 9 days-19 years). Etiology of the airway obstruction included severe tracheomalacia and/or bronchomalacia in 19 cases (90%), and postoperative tracheal stenosis in two. Twelve children had a total of 20 balloon-expandable metallic stents placed, and 10 had 13 silicone-type stents (one patient had both). In nine patients (42%) more than one device was placed. Stent positioning was technically successful in all but one patient. Clinical improvement was observed in 18 patients (85%) but complications occurred in five of them (27%). Eight patients died during follow-up but only in one case it was related to airway stenting. Thirteen patients (62%) are alive and

  4. Incomplete urethral duplication in an adult male.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davis, N F

    2012-09-01

    Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly with less than 200 cases reported. It predominantly occurs in males and is nearly always diagnosed in childhood or adolescence. It is defined as a complete second passage from the bladder to the dorsum of the penis or as an accessory pathway that ends blindly on the dorsal or ventral surface.

  5. Early endoscopic realignment in posterior urethral injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Baidya, J L

    2013-01-01

    Posterior urethral injury requires meticulous tertiary care and optimum expertise to manage successfully. The aim of our study is to describe our experiences with pelvic injuries involving posterior urethra and their outcome after early endoscopic realignment. A prospective study was carried out in 20 patients with complete posterior urethral rupture, from November 2007 till October 2010. They presented with blunt traumatic pelvic fracture and underwent primary realignment of posterior urethra in our institute. The definitive diagnosis of urethral rupture was made after retrograde urethrography and antegrade urethrography where applicable. The initial management was suprapubic catheter insertion after primary trauma management in casualty. After a week of conservative management with intravenous antibiotics and pain management, patients were subjected to the endoscopic realignment. The follow up period was at least six months. The results were analyzed with SPSS software. After endoscopic realignment, all patients were advised CISC for the initial 3 months. All patients voided well after three months of CISC. However, 12 patients were lost to follow up by the end of 6 postoperative months. Out of eight remaining patients, two had features of restricture and were managed with DVU followed by CISC again. One patient with restricture had some degree of erectile dysfunction who improved significantly after phospodiesterase inhibitors. None of the patients had features of incontinence. Early endoscopic realignment of posterior urethra is a minimally invasive modality in the management of complete posterior urethral injury with low rates of incontinence and impotency.

  6. Male Urethral Diverticulum Having Multiple Stones

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle fibers in their wall, commonly encountered in adults, and involve the posterior urethra. Differential diagnosis for UD includes syringoceles (cystic dilatation of the Cowper's gland), sequestration cysts, epidermoid and epithelial inclusion cysts. Male Urethral Diverticulum Having Multiple Stones. Mohanty D, Garg PK, ...

  7. StentBoost Visualization for the Evaluation of Coronary Stent Expansion During Percutaneous Coronary Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cura, Fernando; Albertal, Mariano; Candiello, Alfonsina; Nau, Gerardo; Bonvini, Victor; Tricherri, Hernan; Padilla, Lucio T.; Belardi, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate stent implantation is associated with stent thrombosis and restenosis. StentBoost can enhance stent visualization and evaluate stent expansion. Currently, there are limited comparison studies between StentBoost and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We aimed to test the correlation and agreement between IVUS and StentBoost measurements. Methods From December 2010 to December 2011, 38 patients (54 stents) were analyzed using IVUS and StentBoost. Minimal stent diameter and...

  8. [Urethroplasty with transection of urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of urethral plate: highly applicable to the treatment of hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Min; Qiu, Wei-Feng; Qian, Chong

    2010-07-01

    To explore the feasibility of urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate in the treatment of hypospadias. Forty-eight patients with hypospadias (18 of the coronal type, 21 the penile type, 8 the penoscrotal type and 1 the perineal type) underwent urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate. The surgical effects were observed by following up the patients for 3-27 months. One-stage surgical success was achieved in 44 of the cases, with satisfactory functional and cosmetic results but no complications. Two cases developed urinary fistula and another 2 urethral stricture, but all cured by the second surgery. Urethroplasty with transection of the urethral orifice and preservation and lengthening of the urethral plate is a simple, safe and effective surgical procedure for the treatment of hypospadias.

  9. The management of unimplantable stent during endovascular procedure:report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jiang; Wang Lijun; Guo Wei; Liu Xiaoping; Yin Tai; Jia Xin; Ma Xiaohui; Liu Meng; Zhang Hongpeng; Zhang Minhong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of dealing with the difficulty of the stent implantation encountered in the endovascular procedure. Methods: The causes of unimplantable stent encountered in the endovascular procedure included the delivery system entraping due to the stenosis and shrinking of peripheral self-expandable stent, the balloon expandable stent implantation and retrievement failure due to the rupture-balloon or stent edge opening, and the delivery system entraping due to aortic stent graft for aorta kinking. The balloon dilation for the stenosis and shrinking stent, the large caliber introducer sheath for removal of the rupture-balloon and edge opening, the expandable stent and balloon-assisted delivery system retrieve were used to solve the above three dilemma of unimplantable stent occurred in the endovascular procedure. Results: These three dilemma of stent unimplantable problem in the endovascular therapy were solved by endovascular method while little additional incision injury was added to the patients. Conclusion: For solving stent unimplantable problem the endovascular technique is the method of first choice, nevertherless, it is very important for the operator to be highly skilled in manipulating endovascular procedure. (authors)

  10. Self-expendable metallic stents for palliative treatment of malignant esophagogastric strictures: experiences in 103 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ah; Do, Young Soo; Lee, Byung Hee; Oh, Hoon Il; Kim, Soo Ah; Kim, Ki Soo; Chin, Soo Yil [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate the effects and complication of self-expandable metallic stent for the treatment of malignant esophagogastric strictures. From September 1991 to March 1995, 110 stents were placed under fluoroscopic guidance in 103 patients. Of the 103 patients, there were 73 patients with esophageal cancer, 14 patients with gastric cancer, 12 patients with recurrence after surgery, three patients with esophageal compression by metastatic mediastinal lymphadenopathy, and one patient with esophageal invasion by lung cancer. Seventeen patients had esophagorespiratory fistulas. Under fluoroscopic guidance, 113 self-expandable metallic stents (99 Song stents, 14 Strecker stents) were placed in 103 patients. After stent placement, 68 (66%) of the patients could ingest solid food, 26 (25.2%) could ingest soft food whereas three (2.9%) were not able to have food. Esophagorespiratory fistulas were occluded immediately after stent insertion. All stents were placed without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. Complications included restenosis in 13, gastroesophageal reflux in 11, stent tube migration in eight, massive bleeding in four, delayed esophageal perforation in one, stent obstruction by food impaction in one patient. Self-expandable metallic stent seems to be relatively safe and effective procedure in the palliative treatment of malignant esophagogastric stricture.

  11. Predictors of early stent occlusion among plastic biliary stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Kim, Katherine; Hutfless, Susan; Lennon, Anne Marie; Kalloo, Anthony N; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-09-01

    A major disadvantage of plastic biliary stents is their short patency rates. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of early stent occlusion among patients receiving conventional plastic biliary stents. Early stent occlusion was defined as worsening cholestatic liver test results of a severity sufficiently significant to warrant ERCP with stent exchange prior to the planned stent exchange, or as symptoms of cholangitis. The association of cumulative stent diameter, demographics, stricture location, procedure indication, Charlson comorbidity index, history of prior early stent occlusion, presence of gallbladder, and performance of sphincteromy with the occurrence of early stent occlusion was studied using logistic regression and multivariate analysis. Our patient cohort comprised 343 patients (mean age 59.3 years) who underwent 561 ERCP procedures with the placement of one or more plastic biliary stents (mean number of stents per procedure 1.2, mean total diameter of stents per procedure 12 Fr). Early stent occlusion occurred in 73 (13 %) procedures. Female gender was protective against early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 0.54, 95 % CI 0.32-0.90, p = 0.02), while hilar stricture location was independently associated with a significantly increased risk of early stent occlusion (adjusted OR 3.41, 95 % CI 1.68-6.90, p = 0.0007). Early occlusion of conventional biliary stents occurred in 13 % of cases. While female gender decreased the risk of early stent occlusion, hilar stricture location was a significant predictor of early stent occlusion. Our results suggest that physicians should consider early elective stent exchange in patients with hilar strictures.

  12. Functional effects of renal artery stent placement on treated and contralateral kidneys.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leertouwer, T.C.; Derkx, F.H.M.; Pattynama, P.M.; Deinum, J.; Dijk, L.C. van; Schalekamp, M.A.D.H.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined the effects of stent placement for renal artery stenosis on the function of treated and contralateral kidneys. METHODS: Eighteen patients who underwent stent placement for unilateral renal artery stenosis presenting with hypertension and/or renal failure were studied

  13. Automatic segmentation of the wire frame of stent grafts from CT data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, A.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Oostveen, L.J.; Hoogeveen, Y.L.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Renema, W.K.J.; Slump, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic replacement (EVAR) is an established technique, which uses stent grafts to treat aortic aneurysms in patients at risk of aneurysm rupture. Late stent graft failure is a serious complication in endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms. Better understanding of the motion

  14. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chi-Lun; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent-cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis.

  15. Percutaneous Ureteral stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook; Choi, Woo Suk; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-10-15

    Percutaneous ureteral stent insertion is a treatment of permanent or temporary urinary diversion to maintain continuity and function of the obstructed and injured ureter. We performed 31 cases of percutaneous double pig tall ureteral stent insertion in 21 patients, included 13 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and eight patients with injured ureter as well as benign inflammatory stricture. Satisfactory resulted was obtained in all patients but one, who need percutaneous nephrostomy on week later for urinary diversion. No significant complication was encountered. The authors concluded that percutaneous ureteral stent insertion, an interventional procedure alternative to urologic retrograde method, is an effective method for urinary diversion.

  16. Microscopy of Stained Urethral Smear in Male Urethritis; Which Cutoff Should be Used?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Harald; Hartgill, Usha; Skullerud, Kristin Helene; Reponen, Elina J; Syvertsen, Line; Moghaddam, Amir

    2017-03-01

    The microscopical diagnosis of male urethritis was recently questioned by Rietmeijer and Mettenbrink, lowering the diagnostic criteria of the diagnosis to ≥2 polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) per high power field (HPF), and adopted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in their 2015 STD Treatment Guidelines. The European Non-Gonococcal Urethritis Guideline advocates a limit of ≥5 PMNL/HPF. To determine if syndromic treatment of urethritis should be considered with a cutoff value of ≥2 PMNL/HPF in urethral smear. The design was a cross-sectional study investigating the presence and degree of urethritis relative to specific infections in men attending an STI clinic as drop-in patients. The material included 2 cohorts: a retrospective study of 13,295 men and a prospective controlled study including 356 men. We observed a mean chlamydia prevalence of 2.3% in the 0-9 stratum, and a 12-fold higher prevalence (27.3%) in the strata above 9. Of the chlamydia cases, 89.8% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For Mycoplasma genitalium, the prevalence was 1.4% in the 0-9 stratum and 11.2% in the stratum ≥10, and 83.6% were diagnosed in strata above 9. For gonorrhea, a significant increase in the prevalence occurred between the 0-30 strata and >30 strata from 0.2% to 20.7%. The results of the prospective study were similar. Our data do not support lowering the cutoff to ≥2 PMNL/HPF. However, a standardization of urethral smear microscopy seems to be impossible. The cutoff value should discriminate between low and high prevalence of chlamydia, mycoplasma, and gonorrhea to include as many as possible with a specific infection in syndromic treatment, without overtreating those with few PMNL/HPF and high possibility of having nonspecific or no urethritis.

  17. Impact of prior urethral manipulation on outcome of anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra P; Andankar, Mukund G; Swain, Sanjaya K; Das, Krishanu; Dassi, Vimal; Kaswan, Harish K; Agrawal, Vipul; Pathak, Hemant R

    2010-01-01

    To determine the impact of earlier urethral interventions on the outcomes of anastomotic urethroplasty in post-traumatic stricture urethra. From October 1995 to March 2008, a total of 58 patients with post-traumatic posterior urethral stricture underwent anastomotic urethroplasty. Eighteen patients had earlier undergone urethral intervention in the form of urethrotomy (3), endoscopic realignment (7), or open urethroplasty (8). Success was defined as no obstructive urinary symptoms, maximum urine flow rate > or = 15 mL/s, normal urethral imaging and/or urethroscopy, and no need of any intervention in the follow-up period. Patients who met the above objective criteria after needing 1 urethrotomy following urethroplasty were defined to have satisfactory outcome and were included in satisfactory result rate along with patients who had a successful outcome. Results were analyzed using unpaired t test, chi-square test, binary logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier curves, and log rank test. Previous interventions in the form of endoscopic realignment or urethroplasty have significant adverse effect on the success rate of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty for post-traumatic posterior urethral strictures (P urethrotomies (up to 2 times) did not affect the outcome of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Length of stricture and age of patient did not predict the outcome in traumatic posterior urethral strictures in logistic regression analysis. Previous failed railroading or urethroplasty significantly decrease the success of subsequent anastomotic urethroplasty. Hence, a primary realignment or urethroplasty should be avoided in suboptimal conditions and the cases of post-traumatic urethral stricture should be referred to centers with such expertise. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of non-gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moi, Harald; Blee, Karla; Horner, Patrick J

    2015-07-29

    Non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), or inflammation of the urethra, is the most common treatable sexually transmitted syndrome in men, with approximately 20-50 % of cases being due to infection with Chlamydia trachomatis and 10-30 % Mycoplasma genitalium. Other causes are Ureaplasma urealyticum, Trichomonas vaginalis, anaerobes, Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and adenovirus. Up to half of the cases are non-specific. Urethritis is characterized by discharge, dysuria and/or urethral discomfort but may be asymptomatic. The diagnosis of urethritis is confirmed by demonstrating an excess of polymorpho-nuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) in a stained smear. An excess of mononuclear leucocytes in the smear indicates a viral etiology. In patients presenting with symptoms of urethritis, the diagnosis should be confirmed by microscopy of a stained smear, ruling out gonorrhea. Nucleid acid amplifications tests (NAAT) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis and for M. genitalium. If viral or protozoan aetiology is suspected, NAAT for HSV, adenovirus and T. vaginalis, if available. If marked symptoms and urethritis is confirmed, syndromic treatment should be given at the first appointment without waiting for the laboratory results. Treatment options are doxycycline 100 mg x 2 for one week or azithromycin 1 gram single dose or 1,5 gram distributed in five days. However, azithromycin as first line treatment without test of cure for M. genitalium and subsequent Moxifloxacin treatment of macrolide resistant strains will select and increase the macrolide resistant strains in the population. If positive for M. genitalium, test of cure samples should be collected no earlier than three weeks after start of treatment. If positive in test of cure, moxifloxacin 400 mg 7-14 days is indicated. Current partner(s) should be tested and treated with the same regimen. They should abstain from intercourse until both have completed treatment. Persistent or recurrent NGU must be confirmed with microscopy

  19. Respiratory failure due to tracheobronchomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, P.; Freitag, L.; Reynaert, M. S.; Rodenstein, D. O.; Francis, C.

    1996-01-01

    A case is described of tracheobronchomegaly progressing to extensive tracheomalacia, complicated by episodic choking, recurrent pulmonary infections, and irreversible hypercapnic respiratory failure. A Y-shaped tracheobronchial stent was placed endoscopically to splint the trachea open, with excellent clinical and physiological improvement. New stent designs may provide long term palliation in selected cases of diffuse tracheal collapse or stenosis, and offer an alternative to surgical repair. PMID:8711665

  20. Respiratory failure due to tracheobronchomalacia.

    OpenAIRE

    Collard, P.; Freitag, L.; Reynaert, M. S.; Rodenstein, D. O.; Francis, C.

    1996-01-01

    A case is described of tracheobronchomegaly progressing to extensive tracheomalacia, complicated by episodic choking, recurrent pulmonary infections, and irreversible hypercapnic respiratory failure. A Y-shaped tracheobronchial stent was placed endoscopically to splint the trachea open, with excellent clinical and physiological improvement. New stent designs may provide long term palliation in selected cases of diffuse tracheal collapse or stenosis, and offer an alternative to surgical repair.

  1. Intravascular ultrasound assessed incomplete stent apposition and stent fracture in stent thrombosis after bare metal versus drug-eluting stent treatment the Nordic Intravascular Ultrasound Study (NIVUS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosonen, Petteri; Vikman, Saila; Jensen, Lisette Okkels

    2012-01-01

    This prospective multicenter registry used intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in patients with definite stent thrombosis (ST) to compare rates of incomplete stent apposition (ISA), stent fracture and stent expansion in patients treated with drug-eluting (DES) versus bare metal (BMS) stents. ST...... is a rare, but potential life threatening event after coronary stent implantation. The etiology seems to be multifactorial....

  2. Evaluating the urethral closure mechanism after pelvic organ prolapse surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine

    2017-01-01

    . By measuring urethral opening pressure at an abdominal pressure of 50 mmH2O (PO-Abd 50), it is the only method that has succeeded in distinguishing between women with and without SUI. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate the urethral closure mechanism before and after anterior and posterior......, the woman has occult SUI. However, only half of all women with occult SUI actually develop de novo SUI postoperatively and therefore, the usefulness of the test has been questioned. Studies investigating how POP reduction and POP surgery affect the urethral closure mechanism have used conventional urethral...... pressure profilometry, a method that has shown wide overlaps in the results of women with and without SUI. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR), a method that assesses the urethral closure mechanism by means of acoustic reflectometry, has proven highly reproducible in women with and without SUI...

  3. Urethral pressure reflectometry during intra-abdominal pressure increase—an improved technique to characterize the urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise; Klarskov, Niels; Lose, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    to assess the urethral closure function by urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) during intra-abdominal pressure-increase in SUI and continent women.......to assess the urethral closure function by urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) during intra-abdominal pressure-increase in SUI and continent women....

  4. Percutaneous placement of ureteral stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hyup; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Joon Koo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-12-15

    Antegrade placement of ureteral stents has successfully achieved in 41 of 46 ureters. When it was difficult to advance ureteral stents through the lesion, it was facilitated by retrograde guide-wire snare technique through urethra. Complications associated with the procedure were non-function of ureteral stent by occlusion, upward migration,and spontaneous fracture of ureteral stent. These complications were managed by percutaneous nephrostomy and removal of ureteral stents by guide-wire snare technique and insertion of a new ureteral stent. While blood cell in urine was markedly increased in about 50% of patients following the procedure.

  5. Recognition and Treatment of Nongonococcal Urethritis in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiadinso, O. O. A.

    1980-01-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis is a relatively common disorder in sexually active individuals. The incidence is almost as high, if not higher, than gonorrhea. This syndrome may present with signs and symptoms indistinguishable from acute gonococcal urethritis. It is essential to differentiate the two diseases, as treatment protocols are different. Early recognition of nongonococcal urethritis and proper therapy will often lead to complete resolution and prevention of annoying complications. PMID:6999164

  6. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-01-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi.

  7. Adenocarcinoma arising in female urethral diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patanaphan, V.; Prempree, T.; Sewchand, W.; Hafiz, M.A.; Jaiwatana, J.

    1983-01-01

    Cancer arising from a female urethral diverticulum is rare, and because of its rarity, a review of the medical literature reveals significant nonuniformity in its management. We report an additional 2 cases of this disease, one of which has an even rarer feature of being mucin-producing. The management of our 2 cases is presented in detail and in line with the management of female urethral cancer. From our extensive literature search, diverticulectomy alone showed poor results with the highest rate of recurrence (67%). Extensive surgery, either in the form of cystourethrectomy or anterior exenteration, offered results comparable with those of combined therapy (diverticulectomy and full course of irradiation for early cases; preoperative irradiation followed by cystourethrectomy for late cases). Individualization of radiation treatment and cooperative effort between urologist and radiation oncologist are essential if best results are to be achieved

  8. Late presentation of posterior urethral valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbani, Imran Khan; Biyabani, Syed Raziuddin

    2014-05-01

    Presence of posterior urethral valves (PUV) is the most common cause of urinary tract obstruction in the male neonate. Late presentation occurs in 10% of cases. We present a case of PUVs in an adult male who presented with history of obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and hematuria. On evaluation, he was found to have raised serum creatinine level. A voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) could not be completely performed because of narrowing in the posterior urethra. A rigid urethrocystoscopy was performed at which he was found to have type-I posterior urethral valve which were fulgurated. A repeat uroflowmetry revealed maximum flow rate of 12 ml/second. This case highlights that PUVs is not solely a disease of infancy but may also present late. VCUG is the radiological investigation of choice but the diagnosis may be missed. A urethrocystoscopy is advised if there is a high index of suspicion.

  9. Urethral anatomy and semen flow during ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diane

    2016-11-01

    Ejaculation is critical for reproductive success in many animals, but little is known about its hydrodynamics. In mammals, ejaculation pushes semen along the length of the penis through the urethra. Although the urethra also carries urine during micturition, the flow dynamics of micturition and ejaculation differ: semen is more viscous than urine, and the pressure that drives its flow is derived primarily from the rhythmic contractions of muscles at the base of the penis, which produce pulsatile rather than steady flow. In contrast, Johnston et al. (2014) describe a steady flow of semen through the crocodilian urethral groove during ejaculation. Anatomical differences of tissues associated with mammalian and crocodilian urethral structures may underlie these differences in flow behavior.

  10. Asymptomatic urethral lymphogranuloma venereum: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Louise; Fafard, Judith; Greenwald, Zoë R

    2018-07-01

    Since 2003, there has been a resurgence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), a variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), among men who have sex with men (MSM) in several urban areas of Europe and North America. LGV infection occurs most often at anal sites causing proctitis. Urethral and oropharyngeal infections are rare. In Quebec, LGV incidence has been increasing exponentially in recent years and the current guidelines support systematic LGV genotype testing among anorectal CT-positive samples only. This case report describes a patient with a urethral LGV infection, remarkable due to its prolonged asymptomatic development prior to the manifestation of an inguinal bubo. Physicians should be vigilant of potential cases of LGV and forward CT-positive samples occurring among individuals with LGV risk factors for genotype testing.

  11. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described.

  12. Posterior urethral polyps and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Jain

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral polyp is a rare finding in young children. Fibroepithelial polyps of the urethra are usually diagnosed during the first decade of life. They present with obstruction, voiding dysfunction and hematuria. They can be associated with other congenital urinary tract anomalies. They are usually benign fibroepithelial lesions with no tendency to recur and are treated by surgical ablation, fulguration or laser therapy.

  13. Calculi in a Female Urethral Diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sung Shim

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Urinary stones are rarely seen in the urethra and are usually encountered in men with urethral stricture or diverticulum. The case of a 52-year-old woman presented, who consulted for weak stream associated with repeated urinary infections. The diverticulum was approached via vaginal route and the extraction was successful. The patient has been well, with no dysuria, dyspareunia, incontinence for 3-month follow-ups.

  14. Reverse waffle cone technique in management of stent dislodgement into intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao-Bao; Lai, Yen-Jun; Teng, Michael Mu-Huo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo

    2013-09-01

    Stent-assisted coil embolization (SACE) is a common method to manage intracranial wide-neck aneurysm. Using this technique, a stent must be successfully deployed into the parent artery to cross the aneurysm neck. We describe the reverse waffle cone technique in management of intra-procedural stent dislodgement during SACE of internal carotid artery (ICA) wide-neck aneurysms. Two patients with unruptured wide-neck ICA aneurysms underwent SACE. Intra-procedural forward stent migration occurred during catheterization with proximal stent dislodgement and migration into the aneurysm sac. Navigation of a second stent to bridge the aneurysm neck failed in one patient because the second stent was impeded by the dislodged stent. Using the reverse waffle cone technique, a microcatheter was navigated into the aneurysm sacs. Coils were safely detached into each aneurysm sac without any device assistance. The two wide-neck aneurysms were successfully treated with preservation of flow to the internal carotid arteries. The complication of intra-procedural distal stent migration and dislodgement, with proximal stent prolapse into an aneurysm sac, may not result in a failure to coil the aneurysm. The reverse waffle cone technique provides an effective treatment in the management of this complication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polypoidal Intestinal Metaplasia and Dysplasia of the External Urethral Meatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral mucosa with intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia is a rare occurrence. To date only a single case has been reported in a male with long-standing urethral stricture. We present a 33-year-old female with polypoid intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia of the external urethral meatus in the absence of an inciting factor. Intestinal metaplasia of the urethral mucosa may undergo dysplasia, emphasizing the necessity of a high degree of clinical suspicion and vigilant pathological examination of these lesions.

  16. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae strains isolated from the urethra of men with acute urethritis and/or epididymitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Shin; Hatazaki, Kyoko; Horie, Kengo; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Nakane, Keita; Mizutani, Kosuke; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Shimuta, Ken; Ohnishi, Makoto; Muratani, Tetsuro; Nakano, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    We determined minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 41 antimicrobial agents for 73 clinical strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from the urethra of men with acute urethritis and/or epididymitis and examined the strains for the production of β-lactamase. We also compared their antimicrobial susceptibilities with those of H. influenzae strains from respiratory tract or otorhinolaryngological infections that were reported in Japan. The proportion of β-lactamase-nonproducing ampicillin-resistant strains from acute urethritis and/or epididymitis appeared to be lower, but that of β-lactamase-producing ampicillin-resistant strains appeared to be higher, compared with those from respiratory tract or otorhinolaryngological infections. However, their antimicrobial susceptibilities to a variety of other antimicrobial agents would be similar to those from respiratory tract or otorhinolaryngological infections. Almost all of the strains of H. influenzae from acute urethritis and/or epididymitis were susceptible to the agents, including ceftriaxone, quinolones, macrolides, and tetracyclines, commonly prescribed for treatment of acute urethritis based on the MIC breakpoints recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. Ceftriaxone and quinolones could be effective on H. influenzae-induced urethritis. However, azithromycin treatment failures were reported in acute urethritis caused by H. influenzae strains considered susceptible to azithromycin. Further studies will be needed to determine MIC breakpoints of antimicrobial agents, which are recommended for treatment of urogenital infections, for H. influenzae strains causing these infections. Nevertheless, this study provides useful data regarding antimicrobial susceptibilities of H. influenzae strains isolated from the urogenital tract, which have rarely been studied. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier

  17. Drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies for in-stent restenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The implantation of metallic stents has become a standard procedure to improve the outcome after angioplasty of peripheral vessels. However, the occurrence of in-stent restenosis is hampering the long-term efficacy of these procedures and is associated with re-occurrence of symptoms. The optimal treatment modality for in-stent-restenosis in the peripheral vasculature is not well examined. This review discusses the existing evidence for the treatment of in-stent restenosis with drug eluting stents and modern stent technologies.

  18. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  19. Urethral Foreign Body: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Enginyurt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Urethral insertion of foreign bodies is not very common. It is often associated with psychological problems and sexual alerts. In men due to the longer urethra this situation remains generally limited to the urethra, in women due to the short urethra foreign body can pass to the bladder. 40 years old, mentally retarded male patient was admitted to the emergency department with a complaint of urethrorrhagia. Physical examination revealed needle like structure in the urethra. The patient was taken into the operating room and under general anestesia by using cysto panendoscopy the foreign body has been identified as an old syringe needle, foreign body was removed with the help of forceps. Endoscopic methods should be utilized for the realization of the diagnosis and treatment of urethral foreign bodies. Foreign body in the urethra is usually encountered in patients with psychiatric disorders. For this reason, a detailed psychiatric evaluation is important in patients with urethral foreign bodies. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 62-65

  20. Concomitant urethral triplication, bladder, and colon duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourchi, Ali; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Khakpour, Mahshid; Mohammadi Nejad, Payam; Mousavian, Amir-Abbas; Kalantary, Mahdi

    2012-02-01

    The concomitant presence of urethral triplication and caudal duplication is extremely rare with no previous reported cases. We report a case of urethral triplication associated with bladder, sigmoid, and rectum duplication. The patient was initially referred with a history of fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infection. Physical examination revealed 2 meatal opening on the glans penis. Further investigation revealed three distinct urinary streams, two terminating on the glans penis, and one in the rectum in voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography. Computed tomography demonstrated the bladder divided into two compartments by a complete sagittal septum. The patient was managed by the excision of the rectal ending urethra and removal of the bladder sagittal septum during which, two sigmoidal and rectal segments (the right one filled with fecal) were revealed. The right sigmoid and rectum was resected. The two ventral urethras were kept intact. The postoperative course was uneventful. At his 4 month readmission for colostomy closure, the patient reported good urethral voiding with no complication and recurrence of urinary tract infection and the colostomy was closed with no major complication.

  1. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    OpenAIRE

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-01-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed...

  2. The risk and prognostic impact of definite stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis after coronary stent implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thayssen, Per; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Data are limited on the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with coronary stents. We examined the prognostic impact of stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis in patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods and results......: All patients who underwent stent implantation from 2002 to 2005 were identified in the Western Denmark Heart Registry. The hazard ratio (HR) for death associated with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis was estimated with a Cox regression analysis with stent thrombosis or in-stent restenosis...... as time-dependent variables. A total of 12,277 patients were treated with stent implantation. Stent thrombosis was observed in 111 (0.9%) patients and in-stent restenosis in 503 (4.1%) patients within 12 months after the index PCI. Occurrence of stent thrombosis was associated with an increased risk...

  3. Laser ablation of posterior urethral valves by fetal cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José María; Masoller, Narcis; Devlieger, Roland; Passchyn, Esther; Gómez, Olga; Rodo, Joan; Deprest, Jan A; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of fetal cystoscopic laser ablation of posterior urethral valves (PUV) in a consecutive series in two referral centers. Twenty pregnant women with a presumptive isolated PUV were treated with fetal cystoscopy under local anesthesia. Identification and fulguration of the PUV by one or several firing-contacts with diode laser were attempted. Perinatal and long-term outcomes were prospectively recorded. The median gestational age at procedure was 18.1 weeks (range 15.0-25.6), and median operation time was 24 min (range 15-40). Access to the urethra was achieved in 19/20 (95%) cases, and postoperative, normalization of bladder size and amniotic fluid was observed in 16/20 (80%). Overall, there were 9 (45%) terminations of pregnancy and 11 women (55%) delivered a liveborn baby at a mean gestational age of 37.3 (29.1-40.2) weeks. No infants developed pulmonary hypoplasia and all were alive at 15-110 months. Eight (40% of all fetuses, 72.7% of newborns) had normal renal function and 3 (27.3%) had renal failure awaiting renal transplantation. Fetoscopic laser ablation for PUV can achieve bladder decompression and amniotic fluid normalization with a single procedure in selected cases with anyhydramnios. There is still a significant risk of progression to renal failure pre or postnatally. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  5. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shinji; Aoki, Katsuya; Kaneko, Yoshiteru; Samma, Shoji; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2014-05-01

    A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  6. Renal PTA stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsetis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Renal artery stenosis (RAS) is a common condition that may lead to hypertension, progressive renal dysfunction and cardiovascular morbidity. Catheter-based therapy for symptomatic, haemodynamically significant, RAS has become the preferred method of revascularization. Balloon angioplasty has been the traditional treatment of choice for fibromuscular dysplasia, however stents are increasingly used for the treatment of atheromatous lesions; in many cases-such as in ostial lesions-, direct stenting is strongly indicated. Despite the increased use of endovascular therapy for renal artery stenosis, there is still controversy regarding the optimal management and the net benefit of this treatment. Several randomized trials of balloon angioplasty or stenting for renal artery stenosis compared with medical therapy alone have been conducted, however these could not show definite advantage of endovascular therapy. Problems encountered with those trials include enrollment of small number of patients, frequent crossover from medical to interventional therapy compromising the intention-to-treat results, or selection of patients that are not expected to show clear benefit. The Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) is the most important of these trials; however, it,s study design was faulty and therefore did not provide conclusive evidence to answer the question of whether angioplasty and stenting or medical therapy is the best treatment for haemodynamically significant RAS. All expectations are now focused on the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial which was designed to answer the same question, and its methodologies took into consideration the weaknesses of the ASTRAL trial. Regarding stent device itself, it seems that the optimal design is probably a stainless steel, laser cut, open-cells stent mounted on a rapid exchange delivery balloon catheter compatible with 0.014-in and 0.018-in guidewire. As a future

  7. The urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise

    2014-02-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) occurs when the bladder pressure exceeds the urethral pressure in connection with physical effort or exertion or when sneezing or coughing and depends both on the strength of the urethral closure function and the abdominal pressure to which it is subjected. The urethral closure function in continent women and the dysfunction causing SUI are not known in details. The currently accepted view is based on the concept of a sphincteric unit and a support system. Our incomplete knowledge relates to the complexity of the closure apparatus and to inadequate assessment methods which so far have not provided robust urodynamic diagnostic tools, severity measures, or parameters to assess outcome after intervention. Urethral Pressure Reflectometry (UPR) is a novel method that measures the urethral pressure and cross-sectional area (by use of sound waves) simultaneously. The technique involves insertion of only a small, light and flexible polyurethane bag in the urethra and therefore avoids the common artifacts encountered with conventional methods. The UPR parameters can be obtained at a specific site of the urethra, e.g. the high pressure zone, and during various circumstances, i.e. resting and squeezing. During the study period, we advanced the UPR technique to enable faster measurement (within 7 seconds by the continuous technique) which allowed assessment during increased intra-abdominal pressure induced by physical straining. We investigated the urethral closure function in continent and SUI women during resting and straining by the "fast" UPR technique. Thereby new promising urethral parameters were provided that allowed characterization of the closure function based on the permanent closure forces (primarily generated by the sphincteric unit, measured by the Po-rest) and the adjunctive closure forces (primarily generated by the support system, measured by the abdominal to urethral pressure impact ratio (APIR)). The new parameters enabled

  8. Future developments in biliary stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair CD

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Clark D Hair,1 Divyesh V Sejpal21Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Section of Gastroenterology, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY, USAAbstract: Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting.Keywords: plastic stents, self-expandable metal stents, drug eluting stents, bioabsorbable stents, malignant biliary strictures, benign biliary strictures

  9. Early Realignment Versus Delayed Urethroplasty in Management of Pelvic Fracture Urethral Injury: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmanto, Rama; Irdam, Gampo A; Wahyudi, Irfan

    2016-04-01

    this meta-analysis study will evaluate the incidence of urethral stricture as a successfull parameter in the management of PFUI through early realignment, compared with delayed urethroplasty. Long-term complications such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence on both methods will also be evaluated. online literature was sourced from Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane, and Google Scholar. The incidence of stricture was evaluated from the entire study group of ER and DU. Stricture of the urethra is diagnosed by the symptoms such as the obstruction that felt by the patient, uroflowmetry examination, and urine residual post micturition that supported by urethrography examination at regular interval. In some cases the incidence of stricture also diagnosed by urethroscopy. The patient is assessed as not having stricture when it is no longer needed to do urethral dilatation or advanced urethrotomy. The rate of incontinence was assessed subjectively from the patient's complaints. The erectile function assessed subjectively; decreased of tumesen's degree, reduced the duration of erection, and penetration failure diagnosed as erection dysfunction. The data were processed as dichotomy data to calculate the risk ratio using Review Manager 5.1. five relevant literatures reviewed in this study. The incidence of urethral strictures are statistically significant lower in early realignment group (RR=0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.99, Purethroplasty method. Between the two methos, the complications such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence; however, there was no significant difference.

  10. Heterogeneous Intravascular Ultrasound Findings of Stent Thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Morofuji, Toru; Inaba, Shinji; Aisu, Hiroe; Takahashi, Kayo; Saito, Makoto; Higashi, Haruhiko; Yoshii, Toyofumi; Sumimoto, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The underlying mechanisms of stent thrombosis are not completely understood. Methods We experienced 12 definite stent thrombosis cases (1 early, 1 late, and 10 very late) at our hospital from July 2011 to April 2016 and evaluated the possible causes of stent thrombosis by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Results Five different potential morphological causes of stent thrombosis (neoatherosclerosis, stent malapposition, stent fracture, edge dissection, and stent underexpansion) were d...

  11. A single 2 g oral dose of extended-release azithromycin for treatment of gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Ito, Shin; Kido, Akira; Hamano, Kiminari; Uchijima, Yutaka; Uwatoko, Noriyasu; Kusuyama, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Akiko; Miyamura, Ryuzou; Miyata, Kazutoyo; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We treated gonococcal urethritis in men with a single 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release formulation (azithromycin-SR) to determine its microbiological outcomes and tolerability. We enrolled 189 Japanese men with gonococcal urethritis between April 2009 and December 2013. The patients were given a single 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR. Microbiological efficacy was evaluated by the results of the post-treatment molecular testing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. MIC testing was performed only for pretreatment isolates of N. gonorrhoeae collected from the patients. We evaluated 130 patients for microbiological outcomes. Of these patients, 122 (93.8%) were judged to be microbiologically cured on the basis of negative test results. All isolates for which the azithromycin MICs were ≤0.25 mg/L were eradicated, whereas 5 of 12 isolates for which the MICs were 1 mg/L persisted after the treatment. Forty-six adverse events occurred in 41 patients. However, all adverse events were classified as mild. The eradication rate of N. gonorrhoeae was 93.8% in men with gonococcal urethritis treated with a single 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR. The breakpoint MIC of a 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR for gonococcal urethritis associated with clinical treatment failures appeared to be 1 mg/L. With regard to side effects of higher doses of azithromycin, the 2 g dose of azithromycin-SR appeared to improve tolerability. However, the widespread use of a high-dose regimen of azithromycin might lead to the development of further resistance to azithromycin. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Urethral advancement in hypospadias with a distal division of the corpus spongiosum: outcome in 158 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiry, S; Gorduza, D; Mouriquand, P

    2014-06-01

    Outcome of urethral mobilization and advancement (Koff procedure) in hypospadias with a distal division of the corpus spongiosum and redo cases with distal urethral failure. From January 1999 to November 2012, 158 children with a distal hypospadias (115 primary cases and 43 redo cases) underwent surgical repair using the Koff technique with a median age at surgery of 21 months (range, 12-217 months). Mean follow-up was 19 months (median, 14 months). Thirty patients (19%) presented with a complication (13.9% in primary cases and 32.5% in redo surgery) mostly at the beginning of our experience. Meatal stenosis was the most common one (3.5% in primary case, 6% overall). Ventral curvature (>10°), which is considered as a possible long-term iatrogenic complication of the Koff procedure, was not found in patients with fully grown penis except in one redo patient who had, retrospectively, an inadequate indication for this type of repair. Of 158 patients, 33 reached the age of puberty (>14 years old) with a mean follow-up of 34 months, only one presented with a significant ventral curvature. Urethral mobilization and advancement is a reasonable alternative for anterior hypospadias and distal fistula repair in selected cases. It has two major advantages compared to other techniques: it avoids any urethroplasty with non-urethral tissue and eliminates dysplastic tissues located beyond the division of the corpus spongiosum, which may not grow at the same pace as the rest of the penis. Significant iatrogenic curvature in fully grown penis is not supported by this series. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical presentation and treatment of urethral stricture: Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.N. Ekeke

    2016-08-23

    Aug 23, 2016 ... demography, aetiology, site, treatment and outcome of treatment of USD were collated and analyzed using. SPSS 20.0. Results: ... Eighty two patients (42.27%) had anterior urethral stricture; while 78 (40.20%) had posterior urethral strictures. ..... to leave a catheter and, if so, for what duration [34,4,35–37] in.

  14. Visual Internal Urethrotomy in the Management of Anterior Urethral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Urethral stricture disease is common in our environment. The aim of this study is to report our experience with visual internal urethrotomy (VIU) in the management of this disease. Patients and Methods: Seventy male patients with a mean age of 30.6 years were treated for anterior urethral stricture by VIU at the Jos ...

  15. A descriptive study of urethral discharge among men in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunavinaka, Lavenia; Balak, Dashika; Varman, Sumanthla; Ram, Sharan; Graham, Stephen M

    2014-10-17

    Urethral discharge is a common presentation of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in men and known pathogens include Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. There are no published data of the burden of urethral discharge among men in Fiji. To evaluate urethral discharge among men to determine the incidence, the frequency of recurrence and reported at-risk behaviour. We conducted a retrospective, descriptive study of clinical records of all men presenting with urethral discharge to two major reproductive health clinics. Data collected included self-reported at-risk behaviours, results of abnormal syphilis serology and antibiotics prescribed. The frequency of recurrence in the following 1-2 years of initial presentation was determined along with microbiological findings from urethral swab in this group. A total of 748 males presented with urethral discharge to the clinic in one year. This represents an incidence rate of at least 295 per 100,000 adult males per year in the study population. Within the next 1-2 years of the initial presentation, 102 (14%) of these re-presented out of which 42 had urethral swab taken for etiological diagnosis. The commonest isolate was Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Results of syphilis tests were available for 560 (75%) of patients and 29 (5%) were positive. Recurrence was not associated with self-reported at-risk behaviours. The incidence of urethral discharge among males in Fiji is very high and prevention strategies are urgently needed.

  16. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  17. Female Urethral Anomalies in Pediatric Age Group: Uncovered

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urogenital sinus in females (ectopia of the external urethral opening in the urogenital sinus). All the variants of female hypospadias must be surgically corrected as transposition of the external opening of the urethra from the vagina on the perineum under the clitoris in chronic urethritis. The second case mentioned above.

  18. Urethritis due to corynebacterium striatum: An emerging germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikh, Mohammed; El Yaagoubi, Imad; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Corynedbacterium striatum (CS) is a Gram-positive coryneform bacillus that is part of mucous and skin flora. It has been considered as a causative agent of many infections in intensive care, neurology, traumatology and urology, but was never implicated in non-gonococcal urethritis. We report the case of a nosocomial urethritis due to Corynebacterium striatum following resection of an intrameatus condyloma.

  19. Transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum in the female

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, J; Honnens de Lichtenberg, M

    1989-01-01

    A new technique of transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum was successfully used in two women. The method described is safe, simple and shortens operating time.......A new technique of transurethral incision of urethral diverticulum was successfully used in two women. The method described is safe, simple and shortens operating time....

  20. Gonococcal Conjunctivitis Despite Successful Treatment of Male Urethritis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Remco P H; Verweij, Stephan P; McIntyre, James A; Schaftenaar, Erik

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of progressive, cephalosporin-susceptible, Neisseria gonorrhoeae conjunctivitis despite successful treatment of male urethritis syndrome. We hypothesize that conjunctival infection progressed due to insufficient penetration of cefixime and azithromycin and point out that extragenital infection and male urethritis may not be cured simultaneously in settings where the syndromic approach is used.

  1. Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated Gonococcal Urethritis in Males by Rosoxacin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Tiwari

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty eight male patients with acute gonococcal, urethritis were treated, with rosoxacin 300 mg capsule, (Eradacil as a single- dose oral therapy. Twenty six patients were cured, while two patients did not improve. Four patients developed post-gonococcal urethritis (PGU.

  2. Congenital urethral polyps: a report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, D.; Vivas, I.; Torres, E.; Garcia, L.; Fernandez-Villa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Congenital urethral polyps are uncommon lesions, very few cases of which have been previously reported in the literature. We present two cases of congenital urethral polyps in children, describing the clinical and radiological features and the diagnostic method employed, as well as reviewing the literature. (Author) 6 refs

  3. Original article Urethral Stricture and HIV: Unusual Presentations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    cause of urethral stricture in this series was traumatic injury The other important cause was post-inflammatory (after gonococcal urethritis) with HIV co-infection. These patients posed a challenge due to our lack of experience and the absence of literature guidelines on the optimal management. The first unusual feature in the ...

  4. Epidemiology of urethral stricture at Tygerberg Hospital | Steenkamp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a 12-month period, 120 consecutive male patients with confirmed urethral stricture were prospectively studied with regard to the epidemiology of the disease. Specific urethritis is the main aetiological factor (45%) and internal and external trauma account for an alarming 38,3% of cases. The prevalence is highest ...

  5. Results of surgical excision of urethral prolapse in symptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mary E; Oyesanya, Tola; Cameron, Anne P

    2017-11-01

    Here, we present the clinical presentation and surgical outcomes of women with symptomatic urethral prolapse presenting to our institution over 20 years, and seek to provide treatment recommendations for management of symptomatic urethral prolapse and caruncle. A retrospective review of medical records from female patients who underwent surgery for symptomatic urethral prolapse from June 1995 to August 2015 was performed. Surgical technique consisted of a four-quadrant excisional approach for repair of urethral prolapse. A total of 26 patients were identified with a mean age of 38.8 years (range 3-81). The most common presentations were vaginal bleeding, hematuria, pain, and dysuria. All patients underwent surgical excision of urethral prolapse via a standard approach. Follow-up data was available in 24 patients. Six patients experienced temporary postoperative bleeding, and one patient required placement of a Foley catheter for tamponade. One patient experienced temporary postoperative urinary retention requiring Foley catheter placement. Three patients had visible recurrence of urethral prolapse, for which one later underwent re-excision. Surgical excision of urethral prolapse is a reasonable treatment option in patients who have tried conservative management without relief, as well as in those who present with severe symptoms. Possible complications following excision include postoperative bleeding and recurrence, and patients must be counseled accordingly. In this work, we propose a treatment algorithm for symptomatic urethral prolapse. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever in 31 patients, urethral bleeding in 14 and epididymitis in 17 patients.

  7. Direct vision internal urethrotomy in 459 urethral stricture patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Direct vision, internal, urethrotomy, urethral and stricture.;. Four hundred and fifty nine patients seen with simple urethral strictures between 1990 and 1998 underwent direct vision urethrotomy.. The procedure was successful in 441 patients and failed in only 18 patients. Postoperative complications included fever.

  8. A rare case of congenital Y-type urethral duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Tiwari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. We report a case of Y-type of urethral duplication with the accessory urethra arising from posterior urethra and opening in the perineum. The orthotopic urethra was normal. The accessory urethral tract was cored, transfixed and divided. At 1 year of follow-up, the patient has no urinary complaints

  9. Posterior urethral valves: search for a diagnostic reference standard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Dik, Pieter; Chrzan, Rafal; Klijn, Aart J.; de Kort, Laetitia

    2008-01-01

    To test the agreement among pediatric urologists regarding endoscopic findings concerning posterior urethral valves. A total of 25 experienced pediatric urologic surgeons observed 11 video fragments of cystourethroscopy in boys. For most of these boys, a strong suspicion of urethral obstruction had

  10. Delayed primary realignment of posterior urethral rupture | Shittu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The treatment of acute posterior urethral rupture is controversial. Twelve patients who presented with acute posterior urethral rupture over a five--year period were treated by delayed primary realignment of the injury. The technique of this procedure and the outcome are the subject of this presentation. Eight patients had ...

  11. Urethral Stricture as seen in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    urethritis have increasingly been incriminated as a major etiological factor of inflammatory urethral stricture especially in the developed world. Organisms which fall in this group include. Ureaplasma (T-strain), Mycoplasma, Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida albicans, and Haemophilus vaginalis, Herpes simplex virus type II, ...

  12. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures by a unilateral urethral mobilization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra P; Pathak, Hemant R; Andankar, Mukund G

    2009-04-01

    For management of long segment anterior urethral stricture, dorsal onlay urethroplasty is currently the most favored single-stage procedure. Conventional dorsal onlay urethroplasty requires circumferential mobilization of the urethra, which might cause ischemia of the urethra in addition to chordee. To determine the feasibility and short-term outcomes of applying a dorsolateral free graft to treat anterior urethral stricture by unilateral urethral mobilization through a perineal approach. A prospective study from September 2005 to March 2008 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Seventeen patients with long or multiple strictures of the anterior urethra were treated by a dorsolateral free buccal mucosa graft. The pendulous urethra was accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. The urethra was not separated from the corporal bodies on one side and was only mobilized from the midline on the ventral aspect to beyond the midline on the dorsal aspect. The urethra was opened in the dorsal midline over the stricture. The buccal mucosa graft was secured on the ventral tunica of the corporal bodies. Mean and median. After a follow-up of 12-30 months, one recurrence developed and 1 patient needed an internal urethrotomy. A unilateral urethral mobilization approach for dorsolateral free graft urethroplasty is feasible for panurethral strictures of any length with good short-term success.

  13. Direct stent puncture technique for intraluminal stent recanalization in the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries in-stent occlusion: Outcomes from a prospective clinical analysis of diabetics with critical limb ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palena, Luis Mariano, E-mail: marianopalena@hotmail.com; Manzi, Marco

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of “Direct Stent Puncture” technique for intraluminal stent recanalization in the femoro-popliteal segments. Methods and Materials: A cohort of diabetics who had symptomatic in-stent occlusion of the superficial femoral or popliteal arteries underwent endovascular recanalization. After antegrade failure, direct stent puncture technique was performed. The primary end-point was to efficacy assessment, intended as technical success and clinical improvement. The secondary end-point was safety assessment, intended as free of complication rate. Results: Fifty-four patients (37 men; 73.6 ± 8.5 years) underwent direct stent puncture technique, after several unsuccessful antegrade attempts to cross the occluded stent. Technical success for intraluminal stent recanalization was achieved in 53/54 (98.2%) of cases and failed in 1/54 (1.8%). Clinical improvement was obtained in 51/54 (94.4%) of cases, with regression of the clinical symptoms and improvement of the TcPO{sub 2}, from 3 ± 18 mmHg to 43 ± 11 mmHg after 15 days (p < 0.001). Free of complications rate was 92.5%. In 2/54 (3.7%) of cases distal embolization occurred, in 1/54 (1.9%) case a sudden vessel thrombosis was diagnosed after 12 hours and in 1/54 (1.9%) case hematoma at the stent puncture site was observed. Conclusions: Direct Stent Puncture technique is an efficacy and safety option for intraluminal stent recanalization in the femoro-popliteal segment in-stent occlusion.

  14. The effect of penile urethral fat graft application on urethral angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, M; Yazıcı, I; Boybeyi, O; Ayva, S; Aslan, M K; Senyucel, M F; Soyer, T

    2015-10-01

    Autologous fat grafts are rich in adipose-derived stem cells, providing optimal soft-tissue replacement and significant quantities of angiogenic growth factor. Although fat grafts (FG) are used in several clinical conditions, the use of FG in urethral repairs and the effects of FG to urethral repairs have not yet been reported. An experimental study was performed to evaluate the effect of FG on urethral angiogenesis and tissue growth factor (GF) levels. Sixteen Wistar albino, adult, male rats were allocated into two groups: the control group (CG) (n = 8) and the experiment group (EG) (n = 8). After anesthetization of all rats, 3-mm vertical incisions were made on the urethras, and then sutured with interrupted 5/0 vicryl sutures. The operations were performed under a stereo dissecting microscope under magnification (×20). In the CG, no additional procedure was performed. In the EG after the same surgical procedure, 1 mm(3) FG was removed from the inguinal region by sharp dissection with a knife. The grafts were trimmed to 1 × 1 mm dimensions on millimeter paper. The FGs were placed on the repaired urethras. The skin was then closed. Samples from urethral and penile skin were taken 21 days after surgery in both groups. Density and intensity of staining with vascular-endothelial GF (VEGF), VEGF-receptor, and endothelial-GF receptor (EGFR) in the endothelial and mesenchymal cells of the penile urethral vessels were immunohistochemically evaluated. Data obtained from immunohistochemical evaluations were analyzed with SPSS 15.0. The P-values lower than 0.05 were considered as significant. Density of VEGF staining was significantly decreased in the vascular endothelium of the EG compared to the CG (P factor levels, which is contrary to the literature data. Fat grafting has an immunohistochemical effect on the growth factor levels that are related to angiogenesis after urethral repair. It is difficult to make a firm conclusion about the role of fat grafting on urethral

  15. Clinical Efficacy of a Single Two Gram Dose of Azithromycin Extended Release for Male Patients with Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takahashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the clinical efficacy of a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release for heterosexual male patients with urethritis, and the current antimicrobial sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to azithromycin, a prospective clinical trial was conducted from 2011–2013. In patients with gonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.9% (30 of 33. The susceptibility rates of isolated Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin, cefixime and azithromycin were 100%, 100%, 95.3% (41/43 and 37.2% (16/43, respectively. In the patients with nongonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.0% (45 of 50. The microbiological eradication rates for the pathogens were 90.9% (30/33 for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 91.5% (43/47 for Chlamydia trachomatis, 71.4% (5/7 for Mycoplasma genitalium, and 100% (13/13 for Ureaplasma urealyticum. The main adverse event was diarrhea and its manifestation rate was 35.2% (32 of 120. The symptom of diarrhea was mostly temporary and resolved spontaneously. The conclusion was that the treatment regimen with a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release would be effective for patients with urethritis. However, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium should be carefully monitored because of possible treatment failure.

  16. Clinical Efficacy of a Single Two Gram Dose of Azithromycin Extended Release for Male Patients with Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Kiyota, Hiroshi; Ito, Shin; Iwasawa, Akihiko; Hiyama, Yoshiki; Uehara, Teruhisa; Ichihara, Koji; Hashimoto, Jiro; Masumori, Naoya; Sunaoshi, Kenichi; Takeda, Koichi; Suzuki, Nobukazu; Hosobe, Takahide; Goto, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Onodera, Shoichi

    2014-04-02

    To clarify the clinical efficacy of a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release for heterosexual male patients with urethritis, and the current antimicrobial sensitivity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to azithromycin, a prospective clinical trial was conducted from 2011-2013. In patients with gonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.9% (30 of 33). The susceptibility rates of isolated Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains to ceftriaxone, spectinomycin, cefixime and azithromycin were 100%, 100%, 95.3% (41/43) and 37.2% (16/43), respectively. In the patients with nongonococcal urethritis, the eradication rate was 90.0% (45 of 50). The microbiological eradication rates for the pathogens were 90.9% (30/33) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 91.5% (43/47) for Chlamydia trachomatis, 71.4% (5/7) for Mycoplasma genitalium, and 100% (13/13) for Ureaplasma urealyticum. The main adverse event was diarrhea and its manifestation rate was 35.2% (32 of 120). The symptom of diarrhea was mostly temporary and resolved spontaneously. The conclusion was that the treatment regimen with a single oral 2 g dose of azithromycin extended-release would be effective for patients with urethritis. However, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Mycoplasma genitalium should be carefully monitored because of possible treatment failure.

  17. In vivo measurement of urethral dose profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toye, W.C.; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology,; Duchesne, G.M.; Das, K.R.; Cee, A.; Mameghan, H.; Johnston, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Quality assurance becomes a critical requirement when radiographs are routinely used in planning of treatments. In HDR prostate brachytherapy, the surrounding organs at risk of complications are the bladder and the rectum. However, of particular concern is the urethra that runs centrally through the prostate gland, as an unavoidably high dose can occur in the central region in order to achieve a minimum peripheral dose to a small target volume. Although high urethral doses have previously been related to increased urinary symptoms, some recent studies have not found such a correlation. The aim of this study was firstly, to identify dosimetric indicators of urethral morbidity following HDR prostate brachytherapy (4F x of 5.0 Gy), and secondly, to test the validity of calculated dose values. The in vivo measurements utilised a TLD (LiF:Mg,Ti) train formed by loading eight TLD rods alternating with 1,0 cm brass spacers into a fine plastic flexible tube. The length and diameter of plastic tubing was approximately 45cm and 0.15cm respectively, while the train length was 11.8 cm from the tip of the tube. The TLD train was placed into the central lumen of an 18 F three-way urethral catheter prior to its insertion. Significant urinary morbidity was defined prospectively as a score of a total of 3 or more points for severity from 5 symptoms categories. The five symptoms evaluated were hesitancy, frequency/nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. The introduction of in vivo measurements to enhance the existing dosimetric analysis may be required to fully test the quantitative relationships (e.g. dose-volume ratios). Placement of TLDs within the urethra results in measurements whose accuracy is unaffected by internal organ motion as the hollow urethra must move with the prostate. The dose recorded by the TLDs is determined independently of the predictive algorithm used by the treatment planning system, and prostate location errors (e.g. due to image

  18. Rescue patient from tracheal obstruction by dislocated bronchial stent during tracheostomy surgery with readily available tools: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hung-Yu; Man, Kee-Ming; Liao, Kate Hsiurong; Chiang, Yi-Ying; Chen, Kuen-Bao

    2017-09-01

    Airway stenting is a well-established method that relieves symptoms and maintains airway patency in patients with airway obstruction. Serious complications caused by airway stents such as stent dislocation and airway obstruction during surgery are life-threatening. An 80-year-old man was treated with bronchial stent for left bronchus obstruction caused by metastatic esophageal cancer. During tracheostomy surgery, he suffered from acute tracheal obstruction caused by dislocated bronchial stent. Esophageal cancer, left bronchus obstruction, respiratory failure, tracheal obstruction. Threading a 5.0-sized endotracheal tube combined with an Eschmann tracheal tube introducer to prop up the collapsed stent. The bronchial stent was re-expanded and threaded into right main bronchus and ventilation restored. Patient with airway stent undergoing surgery with airway involved should be performed under the support of a backup physician and equipment that are capable of handling potentially life-threatening complications of airway stent. If not, in the emergent situation of tracheal obstruction due to tracheal/bronchial stent, protruding through the stent with a suitable, small-sized endotracheal tube with Eschmann tracheal tube introducer may be an alternative skill for saving life weighted with possible complications.

  19. Surveillance Duplex Ultrasonography of Stent Grafts for Popliteal Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Danielle M; Troutman, Douglas A; Dougherty, Matthew J; Calligaro, Keith D

    2016-05-01

    Stent grafts, also known as covered stents, have become an increasingly acceptable treatment for popliteal artery aneurysms. However, endovascular exclusion confers lower primary patency compared to traditional open bypass and exclusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether duplex ultrasonography (DU) can reliably diagnose failing stent grafts placed for popliteal artery aneurysms prior to occlusion. Between June 5, 2007, and March 11, 2014, 21 stent grafts (Viabahn; Gore, Flagstaff, Arizona) were placed in 19 patients for popliteal artery aneurysms. All patients had at least 1 follow-up duplex scan postoperatively. Mean follow-up was 28.9 months (9-93 months). Postoperative DU surveillance was performed in our Intersocietal Accreditation Commission noninvasive vascular laboratory at 1 week postprocedure and every 6 months thereafter. Duplex ultrasonography measured peak systolic velocities (PSVs) and ratio of adjacent PSVs (Vr) every 5 cm within the stent graft and adjacent arteries. We retrospectively classified the following factors as "abnormal DU findings": focal PSV > 300 cm/s, uniform PSVs 3.0. These DU criteria were derived from laboratory-specific data that we previously published on failing stent grafts placed for lower extremity occlusive disease. Four of the 21 stent grafts presented with symptomatic graft thrombosis within 6 months of a normal DU. Three of these 4 patients presented with rest pain and underwent thrombectomy (2) or vein bypass (1), and 1 elected for nonintervention for claudication. Our results suggest that surveillance DU using criteria established for grafts placed for occlusive disease may not be useful for predicting stent graft failure in popliteal artery aneurysms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Juxtarenal Modular Aortic Stent Graft Infection Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Novotný

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We are presenting a case report of an infected modular abdominal stent graft. Case Presentation. A 67-year-old male patient three years after Cook’s modular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA graft implantation for juxtarenal AAA with an implantation of a stent extension into the right common iliac artery for type Ib endoleak. The patient was admitted into our center in severe condition with suspected retroperitoneal bleeding. Computed tomography angiography (CTAG confirmed retroperitoneal bleeding in the right common iliac artery. An urgent surgical revision was indicated; destructed arterial wall around the stent extension in the right common iliac artery was discovered. Due to the severe state of health of the patient, a resection of the infected stent and affected arterial wall was performed, followed by an iliac-femoral crossover bypass. The patient was transported to the intensive care unit with hepatic and renal failure, with maximal catecholamine support. Combined antibiotic treatment was started. The patient died five hours after the procedure. The cause of death was multiorgan failure caused by sepsis. Hemocultures and perioperative microbiological cultures showed the infection agent to be Staphylococcus aureus methicillin sensitive. Conclusion. Stent graft infection is a rare complication. Treatment is associated with high mortality and morbidity.

  1. Large Cluster of Neisseria meningitidis Urethritis in Columbus, Ohio, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Jose A; Turner, Abigail Norris; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Retchless, Adam C; Kretz, Cecilia B; Briere, Elizabeth; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Stephens, David S; Maierhofer, Courtney; Del Rio, Carlos; Abrams, A Jeanine; Trees, David L; Ervin, Melissa; Licon, Denisse B; Fields, Karen S; Roberts, Mysheika Williams; Dennison, Amanda; Wang, Xin

    2017-07-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (Nm) is a Gram-negative diplococcus that normally colonizes the nasopharynx and rarely infects the urogenital tract. On Gram stain of urethral exudates, Nm can be misidentified as the more common sexually transmitted pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In response to a large increase in cases of Nm urethritis identified among men presenting for screening at a sexually transmitted disease clinic in Columbus, Ohio, we investigated the epidemiologic characteristics of men with Nm urethritis and the molecular and phylogenetic characteristics of their Nm isolates. The study was conducted between 1 January and 18 November 2015. Seventy-five Nm urethritis cases were confirmed by biochemical and polymerase chain reaction testing. Men with Nm urethritis were a median age of 31 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 24-38) and had a median of 2 sex partners in the last 3 months (IQR = 1-3). Nm cases were predominantly black (81%) and heterosexual (99%). Most had urethral discharge (91%), reported oral sex with a female in the last 12 months (96%), and were treated with a ceftriaxone-based regimen (95%). A minority (15%) also had urethral chlamydia coinfection. All urethral Nm isolates were nongroupable, ST-11 clonal complex (cc11), ET-15, and clustered together phylogenetically. Urethral Nm isolates were similar by fine typing (PorA P1.5-1,10-8, PorB 2-2, FetA F3-6), except 2, which had different PorB types (2-78 and 2-52). Between January and November 2015, 75 urethritis cases due to a distinct Nm clade occurred among primarily black, heterosexual men in Columbus, Ohio. Future urogenital Nm infection studies should focus on pathogenesis and modes of sexual transmission. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Vascular stents: Coupling full 3-D with reduced-order structural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avdeev, I; Shams, M

    2010-01-01

    Self-expanding nitinol stents are used to treat peripheral arterial disease. The peripheral arteries are subjected to a combination of mechanical forces such as compression, torsion, bending, and contraction. Most commercially available peripheral self-expanding stents are composed of a series of sub-millimeter V-shaped struts, which are laser-cut from a nitinol tube and surface-treated for better fatigue performance. The numerical stent models must accurately predict location and distribution of local stresses and strains caused by large arterial deformations. Full 3-D finite element non-linear analysis of an entire stent is computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive, especially for longer stents. Reduced-order models based on beam or shell elements are fairly accurate in capturing global deformations, but are not very helpful in predicting stent failure. We propose a mixed approach that combines the full 3-D model and reduced-order models. Several global-local, full 3-D/reduced-order finite element models of a peripheral self-expanding stent were validated and compared with experimental data. The kinematic constraint method used to couple various elements together was found to be very efficient and easily applicable to commercial FEA codes. The proposed mixed models can be used to accurately predict stent failure based on realistic (patient-specific), non-linear kinematic behavior of peripheral arteries.

  3. Feasibility of using bulk metallic glass for self-expandable stent applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen Kumar, Gideon; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Tavakoli, Rouhollah; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-10-01

    Self-expandable stents are widely used to restore blood flow in a diseased artery segment by keeping the artery open after angioplasty. Despite the prevalent use of conventional crystalline metallic alloys, for example, nitinol, to construct self-expandable stents, new biomaterials such as bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are being actively pursued to improve stent performance. Here, we conducted a series of analyses including finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the feasibility of using a prototypical Zr-based BMG for self-expandable stent applications. We model stent crimping of several designs for different percutaneous applications. Our results indicate that BMG-based stents with diamond-shaped crowns suffer from severe localization of plastic deformation and abrupt failure during crimping. As a possible solution, we further illustrate that such abrupt failure could be avoided in BMG-based stents without diamond shape crowns. This work would open a new horizon for a quest toward exploiting superior mechanical and functional properties of metallic glasses to design future stents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1874-1882, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Nitinol Stents in the Femoropopliteal Artery: A Mechanical Perspective on Material, Design, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleckis, Kaspars; Anttila, Eric; Aylward, Paul; Poulson, William; Desyatova, Anastasia; MacTaggart, Jason; Kamenskiy, Alexey

    2018-01-01

    Endovascular stenting has matured into a commonly used treatment for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) due to its minimally invasive nature and associated reductions in short-termmorbidity and mortality. The mechanical properties of the superelastic Nitinol alloy have played a major role in the explosion of peripheral artery stenting, with modern stents demonstrating reasonable resilience and durability. Yet in the superficial femoral and popliteal arteries, even the newest generation Nitinol stents continue to demonstrate clinical outcomes that leave significant room for improvement. Restenosis and progression of native arterial disease often lead to recurrence of symptoms and reinterventions that increase morbidity and health care expenditures. One of the main factors thought to be associated with stent failure in the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) is the unique and highly dynamic mechanical environment of the lower limb. Clinical and experimental data demonstrate that the FPA undergoes significant deformations with limb flexion. It is hypothesized that the inability of many existing stent designs to conform to these deformations likely plays a role in reconstruction failure, as repetitive movements of the leg and thigh combine with mechanical mismatch between the artery and the stent and result in mechanical damage to both the artery and the stent. In this review we will identify challenges and provide a mechanical perspective of FPA stenting, and then discuss current research directions with promise to provide a better understanding of Nitinol, specific features of stent design, and improved characterization of the biomechanical environment of the FPA to facilitate development of better stents for patients with PAD. PMID:29470746

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Malignant Rectal Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Park, Soo Jung

    2018-01-01

    Self-expandable metal stents are widely used to treat malignant colorectal obstruction. However, data on clinical outcomes of stent placement for rectal obstruction specifically are lacking. We aimed to investigate the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stents in malignant rectal obstruction in comparison with those in left colonic obstruction and to identify factors associated with clinical failure and complication. This was a retrospective study. The study was conducted at a tertiary care center. Between January 2005 and December 2013, medical charts of patients who underwent stent placement for malignant rectal or left colonic obstruction were reviewed retrospectively. Study intervention included self-expandable metal stent placement. Technical success, clinical success, and complications were measured. Technical success rates for the 2 study groups (rectum vs left colon, 93.5% vs 93.1%; p = 0.86) did not differ significantly; however, the clinical success rate was lower in patients with rectal obstruction (85.4% vs 92.1%; p = 0.02). In addition, the complication rate was higher in patients with rectal obstruction (37.4% vs 25.1%; p = 0.01). Patients with rectal obstruction showed higher rates of obstruction because of extracolonic malignancy (33.8% vs 15.8%; p stent use for palliation (78.6% vs 56.3%; p stent usage to be independent risk factors for clinical failure. Factors predictive of complications in the palliative group were total obstruction, obstruction because of extracolonic malignancy, and covered stent usage. This was a retrospective, single-center study. The efficacy and safety of stent placement for malignant rectal obstruction were comparable with those for left colonic obstruction. However, obstruction attributed to extracolonic malignancy, use of covered stents, and total obstruction negatively impacted clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent placement and must be considered by endoscopists. See Video Abstract at http

  6. Haemophilus parainfluenzae urethritis among homosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Meng-Shiuan; Wu, Mei-Yu; Lin, Tsui-Hsien; Liao, Chun-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Haemophilus parainfluenzae is a common inhabitant of the human upper respiratory tract of the normal oral microflora. We report three men who had been having unprotected sex with men (MSM) and subsequently acquired H. parainfluenzae urethritis, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Two men were treated with ceftriaxone and doxycycline, and the third man was treated with clarithromycin. All three patients responded to treatment. This case series highlights the potential role of H. parainfluenzae as a sexually transmitted genitourinary pathogen. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Mycoplasmas and Non-gonococcal Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 692 heterosexual males which included 130 men with non-gonoccal urethritis (NGU and 562 age-matched controls, were studied. Mycoplasmas were cultivated in liquid PPLO medium tubes containing arionine and urea. Mycoplasmas were isolated in 24 (18.59o of the 130 patients and 76 (13.60/o of the 562 controls. Ureaplasma urealyticum was isolated in 18 (13.9% gatients with NGU and in 21 (3.8% controls. Mycoplasma hominiq was isolated in 6 (4.6% patientuft NGU and in 55 (9.8% controls. Ureaplasma urealyticurm has a definite in NGU.

  8. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-van Marle M Elske

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13 and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13, decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96, but increased significantly in intensive care (IC and coronary care (CC units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17. The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16 and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18 and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96 and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90. The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an existing guideline can lead to better adherence and cost savings. Especially, hospitals which use a lot of urethral catheters or

  9. Aetiology of male urethritis in patients recruited from a population with a high HIV prevalence.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, P.D.J.; Moodley, P.; Khan, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Govender, K.; Connolly, C.E.; Sturm, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The aetiology of urethritis, the significance of potential pathogens and the relation of urethritis to HIV infection were determined in 335 men (cases) with and 100 men (controls) without urethral symptoms. Urethral swab specimens were tested for different organisms by PCR or by culture for

  10. Modified gianturco biliary stent in benign and malignant obstruction: Results of long-term follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Young; Song, Ho Young; Han, Hyun Young; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Jae Kyu

    1993-01-01

    Modified biliary gianturco stents were placed in 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. From July 1990 to October 1992, 46 two-seven connected stents of 8-12 mm in diameter (Myungsung Meditech, Seoul, Korea) were placed in 5 patients with benign biliary stricture and 22 patients with malignant biliary stricture in three university hospitals; 12 in Chonbuk National University Hospital, 12 in Wonkwang University Hospital, and 3 in Chonnam National University Hospital. Nineteen were men and eight were women, ranged in age from 34 to 76 years (average, 55 years). The stents were placed percutaneously through a transhepatic approach using a 8.5 Fr. introducing sheath. All stents were placed successfully without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. All patients complained dull abdominal pain for 1 to 3 days after the stent placement. In a follow-up period of 7-46 weeks, reocclusions were observed in one of the patients with benign stricture (20%) and three of the patients with malignant stricture (16%). Two patients with recurrent jaundice due to the obstruction of the stent were treated with placement of additional stent, one patient was treated with external catheter drainage. Migration of stent occurred in one patient. The application of the expandable biliary metallic stent is suggested as an effective treatment for benign and malignant biliary obstructive jaundice

  11. Stent angioplasty for the treatment of symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Huisheng; Niu Huiming; Chao Yuanxiang; Li Xiaoning; Wu Dingfeng; Zhang Chenhong; Yang Jie; Zhang Liang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the safety and feasibility of endovascular stent angioplasty in treating symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. Methods: Endovascular angioplasty with coronary stents was performed in 27 patients with symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. The clinical results were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Of the total 27 patients, successful placement of the coronary stents was achieved in 24. Angiography immediately after the procedure showed that the stenotic degree of the diseased artery was markedly decreased from preoperative (80 ± 19)% to postoperative (8 ±4)%, the improvement was very obvious. Percutaneous transcatheter angioplasty had to be employed in two cases because of the failure of stent placement. A mean follow-up period of 18 months was carried out. During the following up period no transient cerebral ischemia attack occurred in 25 patients and no newly-developed cerebral infarction in region fed by the responsible vessels occurred either.Re-irrigation cerebral hemorrhage was seen in one patient, which occurred three hours after the placement of the stent. In one case the placed stent fell off and immigrated into the siphon of internal carotid artery, and the displaced stent was took out later with a catching apparatus. In another case re-stenosis occurred six months after the stenting. Conclusion: Percutaneous endovascular stent angioplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery, although its long-term results need to be further evaluated. (authors)

  12. Modified gianturco biliary stent in benign and malignant obstruction: Results of long-term follow up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Young; Song, Ho Young; Han, Hyun Young; Han, Young Min; Chung, Gyung Ho; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul; Roh, Byung Suk; Kim, Jae Kyu [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    Modified biliary gianturco stents were placed in 27 patients with obstructive jaundice. From July 1990 to October 1992, 46 two-seven connected stents of 8-12 mm in diameter (Myungsung Meditech, Seoul, Korea) were placed in 5 patients with benign biliary stricture and 22 patients with malignant biliary stricture in three university hospitals; 12 in Chonbuk National University Hospital, 12 in Wonkwang University Hospital, and 3 in Chonnam National University Hospital. Nineteen were men and eight were women, ranged in age from 34 to 76 years (average, 55 years). The stents were placed percutaneously through a transhepatic approach using a 8.5 Fr. introducing sheath. All stents were placed successfully without any technical failures or procedural morbidity or mortality. All patients complained dull abdominal pain for 1 to 3 days after the stent placement. In a follow-up period of 7-46 weeks, reocclusions were observed in one of the patients with benign stricture (20%) and three of the patients with malignant stricture (16%). Two patients with recurrent jaundice due to the obstruction of the stent were treated with placement of additional stent, one patient was treated with external catheter drainage. Migration of stent occurred in one patient. The application of the expandable biliary metallic stent is suggested as an effective treatment for benign and malignant biliary obstructive jaundice.

  13. Placement of tracheobronchial silicone Y-stents: Multicenter experience and systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderpaul Singh Sehgal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Airway obstruction or tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF near the tracheal carina requires placement of Y-shaped stents. Herein, we describe our multicenter experience with the placement of Dumon silicone Y-stents. We also conduct a systematic review for studies describing the deployment of airway silicone Y-stents. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive subjects who underwent placement of silicone Y-stents. The clinical details including the underlying diagnosis, indication for the placement of silicone Y-stents, success of stent placement, and follow-up are presented. The PubMed and EMBASE databases were also reviewed for studies describing the placement of silicone Y-stents. Results: During the study, 27 silicone Y-stents were placed. The mean (standard deviation age of the study population (85.2% males was 57.7 (13.5 years. The stents were placed for airway obstruction in 77.8% and TEF in 29.6% of the patients. The most common underlying disease was carcinoma of the esophagus. The degree of airway obstruction was grade 3–4 in 18 subjects, and respiratory failure was encountered in 18 subjects. The stent was deployed successfully in all the subjects. No deaths were encountered during stent placement. Most subjects had rapid relief of symptoms following the procedure. Excessive secretions and mucostasis were the most common stent-related complications followed by the development of granulation tissue. The systematic review yielded nine studies (338 subjects with airway obstruction and/or TEF. The most common indication for silicone Y-stent placement was tracheobronchial obstruction and TEF due to malignancy. Benign disorders that necessitated stent placement included postintubation tracheal stenosis, airway malacia, and others. The stent was successfully placed in 98% with only one periprocedural death. Granulation tissue formation and mucostasis were the most common stent-related complications. Conclusion

  14. Long-term followup of visual internal urethrotomy for management of short (less than 1 cm) penile urethral strictures following hypospadias repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husmann, D A; Rathbun, S R

    2006-10-01

    We reviewed the results of direct vision urethrotomy for short (less than 1 cm) penile urethral strictures following hypospadias surgery. Patients with less than 1 cm anterior penile urethral strictures located proximal to the meatus underwent direct vision urethrotomy. Based on the type of initial urethroplasty patients were randomly divided into treatment with direct vision urethrotomy vs direct vision urethrotomy plus clean intermittent catheterization for 3 months. Success was defined as absent obstructive voiding symptoms and a normal urine flow 2 years following the last patient instrumentation. Of patients with urethral strictures following hypospadias repair 44% (32) had previously undergone tubularized graft urethroplasty and 56% (40) had previously undergone flap urethroplasty, including a tubularized island flap in 18, an onlay flap in 11 and urethral plate urethroplasty in 11. Direct vision urethrotomy alone was performed in 51% of patients (37), and direct vision urethrotomy and clean intermittent catheterization were performed in 49% (35). Success with the 2 methods was similar, that is 24% (9 of 37 patients) vs 22% (8 of 35). Following direct vision urethrotomy all patients with tubularized graft urethroplasty showed failure (0 of 32). Success was noted in 11% of patients (2 of 18) with tubularized island flap urethroplasty compared to 72% (8 of 11) with onlay urethroplasty and 63% (7 of 11) with urethral plate urethroplasty (each p urethrotomy does not improve the likelihood of success. Direct vision urethrotomy for short (less than 1 cm) urethral stricture usually fails following any type of tubularized graft or flap urethroplasty but it had moderate success following onlay flap and urethral plate urethroplasties.

  15. Penile hair tourniquet resulting in hypospadias failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisieux E Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile hair tourniquet (PHT is a painless form of penile ischemia, typically seen in toddlers with long-haired mothers, caused by entanglement of hair on the balano-prepucial sulcus, normally associated with circumcision. Its association with hypospadias has been reported only once. A school-aged boy admitted for surgery to treat hypospadias failure was incidentally detected to have PHT and severe hourglass deformity of the penis. Urethral anastomosis and glanuloplasty were done after removal of the constricting ring, without complications. Normal erections were reported during follow up. Treatment may involve urethral reconstruction and penile reimplantation in extreme cases.

  16. Long-term outcome of primary endoscopic realignment for bulbous urethral injuries: risk factors of urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ill Young; Lee, Jea Whan; Park, Seung Chol; Rim, Joung Sik

    2012-12-01

    Although endoscopic realignment has been accepted as a standard treatment for urethral injuries, the long-term follow-up data on this procedure are not sufficient. We report the long-term outcome of primary endoscopic realignment in bulbous urethral injuries. Patients with bulbous urethral injuries were treated by primary endoscopic realignment between 1991 and 2005. The operative procedure included suprapubic cystostomy and transurethral catheterization using a guide wire, within 72 hours of injury. The study population included 51 patients with a minimum follow-up duration of 5 years. The most common causes of the injuries were straddle injury from falling down (74.5%), and pelvic bone fracture (7.8%). Gross hematuria was the most common complaint (92.2%). Twenty-three patients (45.1%) had complete urethral injuries. The mean time to operation after the injury was 38.8±43.2 hours. The mean operation time and mean indwelling time of a urethral Foley catheter were 55.5±37.6 minutes and 22.0±11.9 days, respectively. Twenty out of 51 patients (39.2%) were diagnosed with urethral stricture in 89.1±36.6 months after surgery. A multivariate analysis revealed that young age and operation time were independent risk factors for strictures as a complication of urethral realignment (hazard ratio [HR], 6.554, P=0.032; HR, 6.206, P=0.035). Urethral stricture commonly developed as a postoperative complication of primary endoscopic urethral realignment for bulbous urethral injury, especially in young age and long operation time.

  17. 'Stent in a stent'--an alternative technique for removing partially covered stents following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilikostas, Georgios; Sanmugalingam, Nimalan; Khan, Omar; Reddy, Marcus; Groves, Chris; Wan, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic stenting is a relatively new technique for the treatment of post sleeve gastrectomy complications. Partially covered stents are used in this method to minimise the risk of migration but they are associated with difficulties with removal. Patients requiring emergency stenting following sleeve gastrectomy underwent insertion of a partially covered metallic stent. One month later, if the stent was not easily removable, a fully covered overlapping stent was inserted and the patient was readmitted 2 weeks later for removal of both stents. Four patients required stenting following sleeve gastrectomy leaks, and one patient required stenting for a stricture. In these cases, a 'stent in a stent' technique was used for removal. This technique allows the safe removal of partially covered stents inserted following sleeve gastrectomy complications.

  18. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyuz, Mehmet; Sertkaya, Zulfu; Koca, Orhan; Calıskan, Selahattin; Kutluhan, Musab Ali; Karaman, Muhammet Ihsan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US) were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors. PMID:27256189

  19. Adult urethral stricture: practice of Turkish urologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akyuz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To evaluate national practice patterns in the treatment of male anterior urethral strictures among Turkish urologists. Materials and Methods: A survey form including 12 questions prepared to determine active Turkish urologists' approach to diagnosis and treatment of the adult urethral stricture (US were filled out. Based on the survey results, the institutions which 218 urologists work and their years of expertise, methods they used for diagnosis and treatment, whether or not they perform open urethroplasty and timing of open urethroplasty were investigated. Results: Optic internal urethrotomy and dilatation are the most commonly used minimal invasive procedures in treatment of US with the ratios of 93.5% and 63.3% respectively. On the other hand it was seen that urethroplasty was a less commonly used procedure, compared to minimal invasive techniques, with the ratio of 36.7%. Survey results showed us that the number of US cases observed and open urethroplasty procedures performed increases with increasing years of professional experience. Conclusions: As a method demanding special surgical experience and known as a time-consuming and challenging procedure, open urethroplasty will be able to take a greater part in current urological practice with the help of theoretical education and practical courses given by specific centers and experienced authors.

  20. [Neisseria meningitidis urethritis: Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, C; Liegeon, A-L; Fabbro, C; Truchetet, F

    2017-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (NM) is a commensal bacteria present in the oropharyngeal flora that causes invasive infections. There have been rarer reports of presence in the genital region. Herein, we present two cases of acute NM urethritis. Two men aged 30 and 31years, one of whom is homosexual and seropositive for HIV infection, presented urethral discharge which was diagnosed as acute urethritis. The unit through samples indicated the presence of NM of serogroups B and C. One of the antibiotic sensitivity tests revealed intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and to amoxicillin. The clinical presentation of acute NM urethritis is non-specific, because of which urethral samples should be taken wherever acute urethritis is suspected. NM urethritis is infrequent and primarily affects men who have sex with men (MSM). Its current increase is due to unprotected oral-genital sexual practices. Due to the emergence of resistance to NM, antibiotic susceptibility testing should be carried out routinely to ensure appropriate therapy and prophylaxis. Cases of invasive serogroup C meningococcal infections have been recorded within the MSM population with hypothetical sexual port of entry. Thus, the French High Public Health Authority recommends vaccination against meningitis C in this population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Advances in the Understanding and Treatment of Male Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Laura H; Manhart, Lisa E; Martin, David H; Seña, Arlene C; Dimitrakoff, Jordan; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2015-12-15

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis are well-documented urethral pathogens, and the literature supporting Mycoplasma genitalium as an etiology of urethritis is growing. Trichomonas vaginalis and viral pathogens (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 and adenovirus) can cause urethritis, particularly in specific subpopulations. New data are emerging regarding the potential role of bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria in urethritis, although results are inconsistent regarding the pathogenic role of Ureaplasma urealyticum in men. Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma parvum do not appear to be pathogens. Men with suspected urethritis should undergo evaluation to confirm urethral inflammation and etiologic cause. Although nucleic acid amplification testing would detect N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis (or T. vaginalis if utilized), there is no US Food and Drug Administration-approved clinical test for M. genitalium available in the United States at this time. The varied etiologies of urethritis and lack of diagnostic options for some organisms present treatment challenges in the clinical setting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesić, Sonja; Vukićević, Jelica; Gvozdenović, Eleonora; Skiljević, Dusan; Janosević, Slobodanka; Medenica, Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection in men, with vast majority of the etiological agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis, followed by urogenital mycoplasmas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in nongonococcal urethritis in men, and to examine infections associated with these agents. Material and methods 299 sexually active, heterosexual men with nongonococcal urethritis were included into the study. Urethral samples were taken with a dacron swab placed into the urethra up to 2-3 cm. The Direct immunofluorescence technique was performed for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis were detected with Mycoplasma IST assay. Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 22.75%, Uraeplasma urealyticum in 21.08% and Mycoplasma hominis in 8.02% cases. We found no significant differences in prevalence between Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticym (p > 0.05). Monoinfections were found in 51.85% with significantly higher rate (p urethritis with prevalence of 51.85% in monoinfections and 11.70% in associated infections. In 36.45% of cases the etiology of urethritis was not elucidated. These results suggest that more sensitive diagnostic tool should be applied when searching for the derailed etiology of nongonococcal urethritis.

  3. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002953.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery To use the sharing features ... to remove plaque buildup ( endarterectomy ) Carotid angioplasty with stent placement Description Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is ...

  4. [Efficacy and safety of levofloxacin to non-gonorrheal urethritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Shoichi; Onoe, Yasuhiko; Hosobe, Takahide; Kato, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Masaki

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of levofloxacin (LVFX) 500mg once a day in patients with non-gonorrheal urethritis. Men, aged 20 years or older, with urethritis symptoms, and detection of Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) or Mycoplasma genitalium (M. genitalium) by a microbiological examination were eligible for this study. Patients were administered LVFX 500mg, orally, once a day and the dosage period was seven days. We assumed 22 patients for a safety and efficacy analysis. In 22 patients, 17 patients had urethritis with C. trachomatis, 4 patients urethritis with M. genitalium, and one patient mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium. In the clinial study, the primary endpoint was set as the bacteriological eradication rate at two to four weeks after completion of treatment. The bacterial eradication rate in the urethritis was 86.4% (19/22). The bacterial eradication rate in the urethritis with C. trachomatis, M. genitalium, and mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium were 94.1% (16/17), 50.0% (2/4), 100% (1/1), respectively. A significant difference was not recognized among the three groups. The clinical efficacy at two to four weeks after completion of treatment was 90.9% (20/22). The clinical efficacy rates in the urethritis with C. trachomatis, M. genitalium, and mixed infection of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium were 100% (17/17), 50.0% (2/4), 100% (1/1), respectively. The efficacy rate of urethritis with M. genitalium was significantly low. No adverse drug reactions were observed. These results suggest that once-a-day levofloxacin (500mg) is effective and safe treatment for non-gonorrheal urethritis.

  5. Prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium in men with urethritis and in high risk asymptomatic males in Tel Aviv: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Tamar; Yossepowitch, Orit; Samra, Zmira; Rosenberg, Shoshana; Dan, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We sought to investigate the prevalence of Mycoplasma genitalium, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis in men presenting to a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic, with special attention to M. genitalium, its occurrence in Israeli patients, coinfections, and risk factors. In a cross-sectional study, 259 men were successively enrolled in the Tel Aviv Levinsky Clinic for STIs between November 2008 and November 2010. There were 118 men with urethritis and 141 high-risk men without symptoms. M. genitalium, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, and T. vaginalis were detected using nucleic acid amplification tests. Demographic characteristics and risk factors were documented. The overall prevalence of infection with M. genitalium, C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae, and T. vaginalis, were 6.6%, 12.7%, 23.1%, and 0%, respectively. Prevalences in men with urethritis were 11.9%, 22%, and 49%, for M. genitalium, C. trachomatis, and N. gonorrhoeae, respectively. Prevalences in men without symptoms were 2.1%, 5.0%, and 1.4%, for M. genitalium, C. trachomatis, and N. gonorrhoeae, respectively. Co-infections were found only in symptomatic individuals, in whom 5.9% were infected concomitantly with C. trachomatis and N. gonorrhoeae, and 2.5% had dual infection with M. genitalium and N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae, C. trachomatis, and M. genitalium were significantly more prevalent in patients with urethritis. M. genitalium was significantly more prevalent in the heterosexual population than in homosexual males. To conclude, we have found that M. genitalium infection is associated with urethritis in Israeli men, and more so in the heterosexual population. Testing men for M. genitalium as a cause of non-gonococcal urethritis is warranted, particularly because of its poor response to doxycycline and possible failure of azithromycin.

  6. The Effect of Stent Cell Geometry on Carotid Stenting Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alparslan, Burcu, E-mail: burcu.alparslan@gmail.com [Yozgat State Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Eritmen, Ulku Turpcu, E-mail: drulkutur@hotmail.com.tr [Special Eregli Anatolia Hospital, Radiology Clinic (Turkey); Duran, Selcen, E-mail: selcenduran16@hotmail.com [Yerkoy State Hospital, Neurology Clinic (Turkey); Ozkaya, Guven, E-mail: ozkaya@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics (Turkey); Hakyemez, Bahattin, E-mail: bhakyemez@uludag.edu.tr [Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2016-04-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study was to investigate the effect of stent cell geometry on midterm results of carotid artery stenting (CAS).Materials and MethodOne hundred fifty-five patients underwent CAS between February 2010 and December 2012. Ninety-one open- and 84 closed-cell stents were used in this non-randomized, retrospective study. Periprocedural complications were defined as the ones happened during the procedure or within 30 days afterwards. Starting from the 6th month after the procedure, in-stent restenosis was detected with multidetector computed tomography angiography and classified into four groups from focal restenosis to occlusion.ResultsEleven complications were encountered in the periprocedural period (four on the open- and seven on the closed-cell group). Total complication rate was 6.3 % (11/175). No significant difference was detected in terms of periprocedural complications between two groups (p = 0.643). There was statistically significant difference between stent design groups in regard to radiological findings (p = 0.002). Sixteen of open-cell stents and three of closed-cell stents had focal restenosis. One closed-cell stent had diffuse proliferative restenosis and one open-cell stent had total occlusion.ConclusionIn-stent restenosis was more common in open-cell stent group, which have larger free cell area than closed-cell stents. Although our radiologic findings promote us to use closed-cell design if ‘possible’, no difference was detected in terms of clinical outcomes.

  7. A CLINICAL STUDY OF POSTERIOR URETHRAL VALVE AND ITS IMPACT ON RENAL FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nischal Prasad Reddy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: T he most common congenital anomaly is Posterior Urethral valve (PUV and has as incidence of 1 in 8000 male births. It is the most common obstructive cause of end stage renal disease in children. Vesicoureteric reflux, recurrent UTI, voiding dysfunction and late onset renal failure are the long term major problems in these children. There are few long term outcome studies of children with PUV from India. These studies mainly concentrate on the surgical aspects. The study is aimed to assess the long term impact of PUV on renal function and th e growth of these children. METHODS: The study was conducted at AJ hospital, Mangalore between July 2010 - June 2011. Thirty children, with posterior urethral valve, five years or more post - surgery were included in the study. The details of children were obtained from records regarding age, presenting symptoms serum creatinine, presence of or absence of vesicoureteric reflux. Outcomes measured were stunting, renal failure (GFR, tubular functions and bladder functions. Results were analysed. RESULTS: Thirt y children were analysed. The age at presentation varied from antenatal detection to six years. About 46.6% of patients presented between 0 - 1 month, 36.6% between one month to one year, 16.8% between one to six years. The median age at presentation was thr ee months. Primary surgery done in the neonatal period in 33% children. Of the 28 children who had antenatal ultrasound, 20 had normal USS and eight had antenatally detected hydronephrosis (28.6%. Five out of eight had associated oligohydramnios. All thes e five children had GFR <90 m/m/1.73m 2 at follow up. CONCLUSION: Poor bladder function was seen in one - third of patients. Interventions as and when needed on follow - up are important in the management of all children with posterior urethral valve. Comprehen sive care should be the rule by a team comprising paediatrician, pediatric surgeon and pediatric nephrologists

  8. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author)

  9. Self-expandable metalic endotracheal stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Young Soo; Cho, Dae Soon; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Young Soo; Lee, Mi Jae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-01-01

    Six bare stents and six covered stents were inserted in the trachea of 12 dogs under general anesthesia. After 1-10 weeks of observation, the dogs were killed, and the trachea and lung were examined grossly and histologically. Pneumonia and stent migration were observed more frequently at covered stent group. Inflammatory change of the trachea was more severe at covered stent group. In conclusion, we believe that it is inadequate to insert silicone covered stent in the tracheobronchial tree. (Author).

  10. Delayed complications after flow-diverter stenting: reactive in-stent stenosis and creeping stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John Moshe; Moscovici, Samuel; Leker, Ronen R; Itshayek, Eyal

    2014-07-01

    We assessed the frequency and severity of changes in stent configuration and location after the treatment of intracranial aneurysms, and patterns of in-stent stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed data for consecutive aneurysm patients managed with endovascular implantation of flow-diverter stents (Silk Flow Diverter [Balt Extrusion, Montmorency, France] and Pipeline Embolization Device [ev3/Coviden, Minneapolis, MN, USA]) from October 2011 to July 2012. Routine 2, 6, 9-12, and 16-20 month follow-up angiograms were compared, with a focus on changes in stent configuration and location from immediately after deployment to angiographic follow-up, and the incidence and development of in-stent stenosis. Thirty-four patients with 42 aneurysms met inclusion criteria. The Silk device was implanted in 16 patients (47%, single device in 15), the Pipeline device in 18 (53%, single device in 16). On first follow-up angiography, in-stent stenosis was observed in 38% of Silk devices and 39% of Pipeline devices. In-stent stenosis was asymptomatic in 12 of 13 patients. One woman presented with transient ischemic attacks and required stent angioplasty due to end tapering and mild, diffuse in-stent stenosis. Configuration and location changes, including stent creeping and end tapering were seen in 2/16 patients (13%) with Silk devices, and 0/18 patients with Pipeline devices. We describe stent creeping and end tapering as unusual findings with the potential for delayed clinical complications. In-stent stenosis, with a unique behavior, is a frequent angiographic finding observed after flow-diverter stent implant. The stenosis is usually asymptomatic; however, close clinical and angiographic monitoring is mandatory for individualized management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of urethral pressure profilometry and contrast radiography in the diagnosis of incompetence of the urethral sphincter mechanism in bitches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, S.P.; Cripps, P.J.; Holt, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Three diagnostic indicators of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence were compared in 25 continent and 25 incontinent anaesthetised bitches: the resting urethral pressure profile, the stressed urethral pressure profile and the radiographic position of the bladder neck. Logistic regression indicated that the best predictor of continence status was the stressed urethral pressure profile as assessed by the percentage of negative peaks extending below the resting intravesical pressure; it classified 43 of the 50 dogs correctly. The radiographic position of the bladder neck was a better predictor of continence than either the measurement of functional profile length or the maximum urethral closure pressure from the resting urethral pressure profile, whether alone or in combination. By combining the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed profile with the position of the bladder neck, 46 of the 50 dogs were classified correctly. Cut-off values for the percentage of negative peaks on the stressed urethral pressure profile, and for the radiographic position of the bladder neck are suggested for use in evaluating incontinent bitches in clinical practice

  12. Long-Term Results after Placement of Aortic Bifurcation Self-Expanding Stents: 10 Year Mortality, Stent Restenosis, and Distal Disease Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J. Graeme; Bhat, Raj; Ross, Rose; Stonebridge, Peter A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the 10 year follow-up results in patients who had 'kissing' self-expanding stent aortic bifurcation reconstruction. Methods. Forty-three patients were treated with 'kissing' self-expanding stents for aortoiliac occlusive disease. Early follow-up with clinical and ankle brachial pressure indices (ABPI) was performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months and with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography at 12-24 months; clinical and angiographic follow-up was performed for symptom recurrence up to 10 years after treatment. Retrospective record review was performed to assess mortality, clinical patency, angiographic patency, and secondary assisted patency of both stents and downstream peripheral vessels at 5 and 10 years follow-up. Results. The 2 year primary angiographic and secondary assisted stent patencies were 89% and 93%, respectively. At 10 years follow-up in 40 patients the mortality was 38% (due to myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic renal failure, malignancy, and liver failure). At 5 and 10 years follow-up the primary clinical stent patency was 82% and 68%, and the secondary assisted stent patency 93% and 86%, respectively. At 5 and 10 years, the distal vessel patency was 86% and 72%, and the secondary assisted distal vessel patency treated by surgical or endovascular techniques was 94% and 88%, respectively. At 10 years there was no limb loss. Conclusion. The long-term (10 year) results of aortic bifurcation arterial self-expanding stent placement in patients with arterial occlusive disease show a 10 year primary stent patency rate of 68% but a secondary assisted patency rate of 86%. In addition there is a high overall mortality due to other cardiovascular causes and the rate of distal disease progression and loss of patency is similar to the loss of stent patency rate

  13. Delayed ischemic cecal perforation despite optimal decompression after placement of a self-expanding metal stent: report of a case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip Krag; Pilsgaard, Bo; Meisner, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic deployment of self-expanding metal stents offers an alternative to surgical intervention in rectocolonic obstructions. Reported clinical failures in the literature are all related to the site of stent placement. We report a case of serious intra-abdominal disease after technically...... and clinically successful stent deployment: a potentially dangerous situation of which the surgeon should be aware. A previously healthy 72-year-old female was referred to our department with symptoms of an obstructing colorectal tumor. Successful stent placement resulted in resolution of the obstructive......, probably caused by ischemic conditions developed before stent-decompression of the colon was revealed during the operation. The patient died in the postoperative course. We discuss the observation of patients treated with self-expanding metal stents based on the selection-strategy used to allocate patients...

  14. COVERED STENTS IN IATROGENIC CORONARY ARTERY FISTULA; A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Poormoghaddas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery fistula is an abnormal communication between a coronary artery and a cardiac chamber or major cardiac vessels, mostly congenital but some of them are acquired as a consequence of coronary artery perforation.    CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of cavity spilling coronary artery perforation during percutaneous coronary intervention 7 years ago. Because of continuing symptoms and risk of developing heart failure and pulmonary hypertension we were ought to treat this iatrogenically formed coronary artery fistula. We used stent graft implantation to treat it with acceptable results.    CONCLUSION: Beside their application as a rescue for acute coronary artery perforations, stent grafts can be used with acceptable results in iatrogenically acquired coronary artery coronary artery fistula      Keywords: Coronary artery perforation, Coronary artery fistula, Stent graft.

  15. Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drug-eluting stents - discharge; PCI - discharge; Percutaneous coronary intervention - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - discharge; Coronary angioplasty - discharge; Coronary artery angioplasty - discharge; Cardiac ...

  16. Indications for stenting during thrombolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Broholm, R; Just, Sven Richardt Lundgren

    2013-01-01

    of a stent in this position is the treatment of choice facilitating the venous flow into an unobstructed outflow tract either from the femoral vein or the deep femoral vein or both. The stent, made of stainless steel or nitinol, has to be self-expandable and flexible with radial force to overcome...... the challenges in this low-pressure system. The characteristics of the anatomy with external compression and often a curved vein segment with diameter difference make stent placement necessary. Ballooning alone has no place in this area. The proportion of inserted stents varies in the published materials...

  17. Single stage: dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using perineal route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Prabha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of single stage dorsolateral onlay buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures (>4cm long using a perineal incision. Materials and Methods From August 2010 to August 2013, 20 patients underwent BMG urethroplasty. The cause of stricture was Lichen sclerosis in 12 cases (60%, Instrumentation in 5 cases (25%, and unknown in 3 cases (15%. Strictures were approached through a perineal skin incision and penis was invaginated into it to access the entire urethra. All the grafts were placed dorsolaterally, preserving the bulbospongiosus muscle, central tendon of perineum and one-sided attachement of corpus spongiosum. Procedure was considered to be failure if the patient required instrumentation postoperatively. Results Mean stricture length was 8.5cm (range 4 to 12cm. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (range 12 to 36 months. Overall success rate was 85%. There were 3 failures (meatal stenosis in 1, proximal stricture in 1 and whole length recurrent stricture in 1. Other complications included wound infection, urethrocutaneous fistula, brownish discharge per urethra and scrotal oedema. Conclusion Dorsolateral buccal mucosal urethroplasty for long anterior urethral strictures using a single perineal incision is simple, safe and easily reproducible by urologists with a good outcome.

  18. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane (Dept. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)), e-mail: jhc@rn.dk; Holmberg, Mats (Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud (Dept. of Urology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Fisker, Rune V. (Dept. of Radiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  19. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  20. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V

    2011-05-01

    A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed.

  1. Self-expanding nitinol stents for treatment of infragenicular arteries following unsuccessful balloon angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepe, Gunnar; Heller, Stephan; Wiskirchen, Jakub; Fischmann, Arne; Claussen, Claus D.; Zeller, Thomas; Coerper, Stephan; Beckert, Stefan; Balletshofer, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of self-expanding nitinol stents for treatment of infragenicular arteries following unsuccessful balloon angioplasty was assessed. Options for lower limb percutaneous revascularization are limited, especially for complex vessel obstruction. Depending on the lesion and the experience of the interventionalist, the failure rate of balloon angioplasty (PTA) ranges between 10 and 40%. Until recently, no self-expanding stent for the use in the infragenicular arteries was available. This is the first report of the results for 18 consecutive patients who received 4F sheath compatible self-expanding nitinol stents following unsuccessful PTA or early restenosis. Twenty-four stents were implanted in 21 lesions for various indications residual stenosis >50% due to heavy calcification, flow-limiting dissection, occluding thrombus resistant to thrombolyis, thrombaspiration, and PTA, and early restenosis after previous PTA. Stent implantation was feasible in all cases. No complications occurred. After the stent implantation, all primarily unsuccessful interventions could be transformed into successful procedures with no residual stenosis >30% in any case. After 6 ± 2 months, two of the 18 patients died, and 14 of the 16 remaining patients improved clinically. At follow-up, the patency could be assessed in 14 stented arteries. Three stents were occluded, one stent showed some neointimal hyperplasia (50-70% restenosis), the remaining ten stents showed no restenosis (0-30%). The use of self-expanding nitinol stents in tibioperoneal and popliteal arteries is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of unsuccessful PTA. The 6-months patency is high. (orig.)

  2. The stenting strategy of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports regarding the relationship between the length and diameter of implanted drug-eluting stents and clinical and angiographic outcomes in dialysis patients are limited. Aim: We investigated the efficiency of drug-eluting stents for coronary artery disease in patients on dialysis from the viewpoint of stent sizing. Methods: Sirolimus-eluting stents were implanted in 88 lesions and bare metal stents were implanted in 43 lesions. We compared stenting strategy, major adverse cardiac events, and angiographic results between sirolimus-eluting stent and bare metal stent groups. Results: Stent diameter was smaller and stent length was longer in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group in our routine practices. There was no significant between-group difference in late diameter loss. Rates of angiographic restenosis and target lesion revascularization were significantly higher in the sirolimus-eluting stent group than in the bare metal stent group. Although stent length was significantly longer and stent diameter was smaller in the sirolimus-eluting stent group, sirolimus-eluting stents did not improve the subsequent clinical and angiographic results compared with bare metal stents in dialysis patients. Conclusion: In dialysis patients, a longer length and/or smaller diameter sirolimus-eluting stent implantation was associated with high rates of restenosis and target lesion revascularization compared with bare metal stents.

  3. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajith Ananthakrishna Pillai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging.

  4. Primary care management of sexually transmitted urethritis in adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Claire E

    2003-04-01

    To describe current knowledge about diagnosis, screening, and treatment of sexually transmitted urethritis among adolescent and young adult males. Current research, systematic reviews, consensus guidelines and the author's clinical experience. Urethritis, the most common sexually transmitted syndrome in young males, is most frequently caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Neisseria gonorrhea. Symptoms include dysuria and penile discharge, although up to 50% of males are asymptomatic. Risky sexual behaviors and lack of access to healthcare increase incidence of this infection. Transmission to female partners can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, infertility, and neonatal infection. Young males with urethritis must be treated as soon as diagnosis is established. Consensus guidelines exist for diagnosis and treatment of gonococcal and non-gonococcal urethritis. Careful patient education is necessary to ensure successful treatment. Prevention of repeat infections requires partner treatment and detailed education about safer sexual practices. Improved access to preventive services for young males should be a healthcare priority.

  5. A novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaynar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To propose a novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization procedures. Technique: The sheath tip of an intravenous catheter is cut off, replaced to the needle tip and pushed through the distal drainage side hole to Foley catheter tip, and finally withdrawn for cannulation. In situations making urethral catheterization difficult, a guide wire is placed under direct vision. The modified Foley catheter is slid successfully over the guide wire from its distal end throughout the urethral passage into the bladder. Results: The modified Foley catheter was used successfully in our clinic in cases requiring difficult urethral catheterization. Conclusions: This easy and rapid modification of a Foley catheter may minimize the potential complications of blind catheter placement in standard catheterization.

  6. Patient knowledge of urethral stricture disease in a state sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M. Barnard

    2018-02-16

    Feb 16, 2018 ... Introduction: The knowledge urethral stricture patients in a developing country Specialist Clinic have ... A systematic review done by DeWalt et al. confirms that low literacy ... The questionnaire was translated into Afrikaans and.

  7. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant Urethral Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ra

    2009-03-16

    Mar 16, 2009 ... 2, 2009. 103. 103-106. Case Report. Contralateral Fracture of the Penis with Concomitant. Urethral ... Examination revealed ecchymosis and swelling of the proximal shaft and ... of impotence due to infection and cavernosal.

  8. Hinged Transpubic Approach to Delayed Repair of Posterior Urethral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to the management of one of the most challenging injuries of the lower urinary tract. ... This patient underwent a successful re-operation with full recovery. ... delayed repair of urethral distraction defects complicating pelvic fracture is feasible.

  9. Duplex evaluation following femoropopliteal angioplasty and stenting: criteria and utility of surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Marone, Luke K

    2012-07-01

    Surveillance following lower extremity bypass, carotid endarterectomy, and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the standard of care at most institutions. Conversely, surveillance following lower extremity endovascular interventions is performed somewhat sporadically in part because the duplex criteria for recurrent stenoses have been ill defined. It appears that duplex surveillance after peripheral endovascular interventions, as with conventional bypass, is beneficial in identifying recurrent lesions which may preclude failure and occlusion. In-stent stenosis following superficial femoral artery angioplasty and stenting can be predicted by both peak systolic velocity and velocity ratio data as measured by duplex ultrasound. Duplex criteria have been defined to determine both ≥50% in-stent stenosis and ≥80% in-stent stenosis. Although not yet well studied, it appears that applying these criteria during routine surveillance may assist in preventing failure of endovascular interventions.

  10. Drug-eluting stent implantation for the percutaneous treatment of vertebro-basilar arterial stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Rujun; Liu Jianmin; Huang Haiqing; Hong Bo; Xu Yi; Zhao Wenyuan; Zhao Rui; Chen Jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the early results and mid-term outcomes following angioplasty of vertebro-basilar arterial stenosis with drug-eluting stents. Methods: All of the patients presented with recurrent TIA or ceretral infarction with >50% stenoses in vertebro-basilar arteries, and having failure in maximal medical therapy. All of the lesions were treated with primary stenting under local or general anesthesia and followed by continual anticoagulant therapy of clopidogrel and aspirin together with clinical follow-up and vascular imagings. Results: Of 28 stenoses (27 patients), 27 lesions were successfully treated with implantation of 24 Cypher stents, 2 Taxus stents and one Firebird stent. The mean stenotic severity reduced from (74 ± 6.7)% to (8.7 ± 4.4)%. Two patients had inchemic events relating to penetration vascular obstruction. During 2-14 months follow-up, the patients were clinically asymptomatic with no recurrent TIA/stoke. Angiographic follow-up was obtained in 14 patients at a mean of 7.2 months. Proximal restenosis (<50%) occurred in one patient (3.3%), and corrected with restenting, while others were free of intra-stent restenoses. Conclusion: Using DES in cerebrovascular stenosis is safe and effective with lowing the risk of intra-stent restenosis in comparison with bare stent. Further study for long term efficiency is still in need. (authors)

  11. The role of stents in the treatment of congenital heart disease: Current status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Bjoern; Ewert, Peter; Berger, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular or intracardiac stenoses occur in many forms of congenital heart disease (CHD). Therefore, the implantation of stents has become an accepted interventional procedure for stenotic lesions in pediatric cardiology. Furthermore, stents are know to be used to exclude vessel aneurysm or to ensure patency of existing or newly created intracardiac communications. With the further refinement of the first generation of devices, a variety of “modern” stents with different design characteristics have evolved. Despite the tremendous technical improvement over the last 20 years, the “ideal stent” has not yet been developed. Therefore, the pediatric interventionalist has to decide which stent is suitable for each lesion. On this basis, currently available stents are discussed in regard to their advantages and disadvantages for common application in CHD. New concepts and designs developed to overcome some of the existing problems, like the failure of adaptation to somatic growth, are presented. Thus, in the future, biodegradable or growth stents might replace the currently used generation of stents. This might truly lead to widening indications for the use of stents in the treatment of CHD

  12. Expandable metallic stents: An experimental study in the nasolacrimal systems of dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Young [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Hwang, Eui Il; Chung, Gyung Ho; Shon, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju(Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    Balloon dacryocystoplasty has been reported to be a safe, easy and effective nonoperative treatment for nasolacrimal stenosis. The results were not encouraging, however, because of its high failure and recurrence rates. To evaluate the feasibility of using modified Gianturco expandable metallic stents for maintenance of the dilated nasolacrimal system(NLS), 20 stents of 3 mm in diameter and 10 mm long were placed in 20 nasolacrimal ducts of 10 dogs for 1 month to 10 months. It was more difficult to introduce the stents into the proximal portion(A) of the NLS than into the distal portion(B) due to the narrow and bony canal of the A portion. Twenty stents showed no migration in follow-up studies of up to 10 months. One complete occlusion occurred in a stent placed in A portion. Autopsy studies showed stents were covered with epithelium within 2 months after placement. Our experience suggest that the placement of Gianturco self-expandable stents may be a useful method of dilating and maintaining the luminal diameter of the NLS, although care must be taken to select the proper stent size.

  13. Expandable metallic stents: An experimental study in the nasolacrimal systems of dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ho Young; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Hwang, Eui Il; Chung, Gyung Ho; Shon, Myung Hee; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul

    1993-01-01

    Balloon dacryocystoplasty has been reported to be a safe, easy and effective nonoperative treatment for nasolacrimal stenosis. The results were not encouraging, however, because of its high failure and recurrence rates. To evaluate the feasibility of using modified Gianturco expandable metallic stents for maintenance of the dilated nasolacrimal system(NLS), 20 stents of 3 mm in diameter and 10 mm long were placed in 20 nasolacrimal ducts of 10 dogs for 1 month to 10 months. It was more difficult to introduce the stents into the proximal portion(A) of the NLS than into the distal portion(B) due to the narrow and bony canal of the A portion. Twenty stents showed no migration in follow-up studies of up to 10 months. One complete occlusion occurred in a stent placed in A portion. Autopsy studies showed stents were covered with epithelium within 2 months after placement. Our experience suggest that the placement of Gianturco self-expandable stents may be a useful method of dilating and maintaining the luminal diameter of the NLS, although care must be taken to select the proper stent size

  14. Dysphagia with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction: treatment with self-expandable nitinol stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness, patency and safety of a self-expandable nitinol stent for palliative treatment of malignant stricture of gastroesophageal junction. An esophageal stent was inserted in five consecutive patients with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction. Histologically, four cases were adenocarcinoma, and one was squamous cell carcinoma. The location and severity of stricture were evaluated with gastrografin just before stent insertion. In one patient with past subtotal gastrectomy, esophagography revealed fistulous fract at stricture site. No technical failure or procedural complications occurred, and improvement of dysphagia was noted in all patients soon after stent insertion. On follow up esophagograms performed 3 to 7 days after stent insertion, all stents were completely expanded and unchanged in positions. In one patient with fistulous connection at stricture site, esophagogram immediately after the procedure revealed complete occlusion of the fistula. Three patients died within 4, 7 and 8 consecutive months after stent insertion. Two patients are alive maintaining adequate body weight and passing most diet. Seft-expandable nitinol stent with it's good longitudinal flexibility and efficient radial force was effective in the palliative treatment of dysphagia in patient with malignant stricture at esophagogastric junction

  15. Dysphagia with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction: treatment with self-expandable nitinol stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness, patency and safety of a self-expandable nitinol stent for palliative treatment of malignant stricture of gastroesophageal junction. An esophageal stent was inserted in five consecutive patients with malignant stricture of esophagogastric junction. Histologically, four cases were adenocarcinoma, and one was squamous cell carcinoma. The location and severity of stricture were evaluated with gastrografin just before stent insertion. In one patient with past subtotal gastrectomy, esophagography revealed fistulous fract at stricture site. No technical failure or procedural complications occurred, and improvement of dysphagia was noted in all patients soon after stent insertion. On follow up esophagograms performed 3 to 7 days after stent insertion, all stents were completely expanded and unchanged in positions. In one patient with fistulous connection at stricture site, esophagogram immediately after the procedure revealed complete occlusion of the fistula. Three patients died within 4, 7 and 8 consecutive months after stent insertion. Two patients are alive maintaining adequate body weight and passing most diet. Seft-expandable nitinol stent with it's good longitudinal flexibility and efficient radial force was effective in the palliative treatment of dysphagia in patient with malignant stricture at esophagogastric junction.

  16. THE ROLE OF OPTICAL INTERNAL URETHROTOMY FOR MALE URETHRAL STRICTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Urethral stricture is characterized by decrease in urethral flow severe enough to cause acute urinary retention. Urethral strictures may develop after traumas to urethral epithelium and/or corpus spongiosum. Complication rates due to untreated urethral stricture are very high. Although various treatment methods have been described, the second most common method after urethral dilation in practice is cold-knife internal urethrotomy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate data of patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy in our clinic. Methods:This study included patients who were treated with internal urethrotomy due to internal stricture between January 2011 and May 2015. Demographic, clinical, radiological, uroflowmetric (maximum and mean urine flow rate and operative datas of the patients were retrospectively evaluated and recorded. Results:This study included 155 patients with a mean (±standard deviation age of 71.70 (±13.7. Etiologically the most common reason was urological surgical procedures (67% and the most common stricture was seen at bulbomembranous urethra region (85.2%. Mean length of stricture was 5.4±2.4mm. Mean duration to remove the catheter was 1.8±1.3 days. Regional anesthesia was used in 67.7% of the patients. Our success rate was 78,1%. Comparison of maximum and mean urine flow rates pre and postoperatively revealed significant increases postoperatively. Conclusion:Internal urethrotomy is a first line treatment method for urethral strictures because it is easily applied, has a low complication rate, and can be applied with local aenesthesia in high risk patients who are unable to take general anesthesia. Although recurrence rate is high, repeatability is its greatest advantage and it causes significant relief in patients with urethral strictures, but it must be kept in mind that definitive treatment is urethroplasty.

  17. Cutting-balloon angioplasty of resistant ureteral stenosis as bridge to stent insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iezzi, R., E-mail: iezzir@virgilio.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, ' A. Gemelli' Hospital - Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy); Di Stasi, C.; Simeone, A.; Bonomo, L. [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, ' A. Gemelli' Hospital - Catholic University, L.go A Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    Ureteral stenting is a routine, minimally invasive procedure performed for relief of benign or malignant obstruction. In case of ureteral stenosis, to allow a correct insertion of the stent, a predilatation of the ureter stenosis with a conventional balloon catheter can be necessary. In exceptional cases, it can be difficult to advance an 7-8 Fr JJ-catheter over a tight resistant ureter stenosis following unsuccessful high-pressure balloon dilatation. In the present report, we describe two cases of resistant ureter stenosis successfully dilated by a cutting-balloon following the failure of high-pressure balloon dilatation, allowing a correct and uncomplicated antegrade stent insertion.

  18. Cutting-balloon angioplasty of resistant ureteral stenosis as bridge to stent insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iezzi, R.; Di Stasi, C.; Simeone, A.; Bonomo, L.

    2011-01-01

    Ureteral stenting is a routine, minimally invasive procedure performed for relief of benign or malignant obstruction. In case of ureteral stenosis, to allow a correct insertion of the stent, a predilatation of the ureter stenosis with a conventional balloon catheter can be necessary. In exceptional cases, it can be difficult to advance an 7-8 Fr JJ-catheter over a tight resistant ureter stenosis following unsuccessful high-pressure balloon dilatation. In the present report, we describe two cases of resistant ureter stenosis successfully dilated by a cutting-balloon following the failure of high-pressure balloon dilatation, allowing a correct and uncomplicated antegrade stent insertion.

  19. Renal Transplant Ureteral Stenosis: Treatment by Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantasdemir, Murat; Kantarci, Fatih; Numan, Furuzan; Mihmanli, Ismail; Kalender, Betul

    2003-01-01

    We report the use of a metallic stent in a transplant ureteral stenosis. A 28-year-old man with chronic renal failure due to chronic pyelonephritis, who received a living-donor renal transplant, presented with transplant ureteral stenosis. The stenosis was unresponsive to balloon dilation and was treated by antegrade placement of a self-expanding Memotherm stent. The stentedureter stayed patent for 3 years. It may be reasonable to treat post-transplant ureteral stenosis resistant to balloon dilation with self-expanding metallic stents. However, long-term follow-up is required to evaluate the efficacy of this treatment

  20. Treatment for long bulbar urethral strictures with membranous involvement using urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbernat, H; Arance, I; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; Andrés, G; Angulo, J C

    2014-10-01

    Urethroplasty with oral mucosa grafting is the most popular technique for treating nontraumatic bulbar urethral strictures; however, cases involving the membranous portion are usually treated using progressive perineal anastomotic urethroplasty. We assessed the feasibility of performing dorsal (or ventral) graft urethroplasty on bulbar urethral strictures with mainly membranous involvement using a modified Barbagli technique. This was a prospective study of 14 patients with bulbomembranous urethral strictures who underwent dilation urethroplasty with oral mucosa graft between 2005 and 2013, performed using a modified technique Barbagli, with proximal anchoring of the graft and securing of the graft to the tunica cavernosa in 12 cases (85.7%) and ventrally in 2 (14.3%). The minimum follow-up time was 1 year. We evaluated the subjective (patient satisfaction) and objective (maximum flow [Qmax] and postvoid residual volume [PVRV], preoperative and postoperative) results and complications. Failure was defined as the need for any postoperative instrumentation. A total of 14 patients (median age, 64+13 years) underwent surgery. The main antecedent of note was transurethral resection of the prostate in 9 cases (64.3%). The median length of the stenosis was 45+26.5mm. Prior to surgery, 50% of the patients had been subjected to dilatations and 4% to endoscopic urethrotomy. The mean surgical time and hospital stay were was 177+76min and 1.5+1 day, respectively. The preoperative Qmax and PVRV values were 4.5+4.45mL/sec and 212.5+130 cc, respectively. The postoperative values were 15.15+7.2mL/sec and 6+21.5cc, respectively (Purethroplasty with free oral mucosa grafts represents a viable alternative for patients with nontraumatic etiology and little fibrosis. The dilation of the urethral lumen achieves good results with minimum failure rates and little probability of complications. For many of these patients, the length of the stricture is too long to perform the tension

  1. Retrograde or antegrade double-pigtail stent placement for malignant ureteric obstruction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uthappa, M.C.; Cowan, N.C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the optimum approach for double-pigtail stent placement in malignant ureteric obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrograde stent placement was attempted in a consecutive series of patients presenting with malignant ureteric obstruction. If retrograde stent placement was unsuccessful, percutaneous nephrostomy was performed immediately followed by elective antegrade stent placement. Identical digital C-arm fluoroscopy for image-guidance and conditions for anaesthesia and analgesia were employed for both retrograde and antegrade procedures. Identical 8 Fr (20-26 cm) double-pigtail hydrophilic coated stents were used for each approach. RESULTS: Retrograde placement was attempted in 50 ureters in 30 patients {19 male, 11 female, average age 61.4 yr (range 29-90 yr)} over a 24-month period. The success rate for retrograde ureteric stent placement was 50% (n=25/50). Technical failures were due to failure to identify the ureteric orifice (n=22), failure to cross the stricture (n=1), failure to pass the stent (n=1) and failure to pass a 4 Fr catheter (n=1). Antegrade placement was attempted in 25 ureters with a success rate of 96% (n=24/25). Failure in the one case was due to inability to cross an upper third stricture secondary to pyeloureteritis cystica. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that retrograde route should be the initial approach if imaging shows no involvement of ureteric orifice (UO), when nephrostomy is technically very difficult or in cases of solitary kidney. The antegrade route is preferred if imaging shows tumour occlusion of the UO or if there is a tight stricture very close to the uretero-vesical junction (UVJ) making purchase within the ureter difficult for crossing the stricture

  2. Sacral neuromodulation effects on periurethral sensation and urethral sphincter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Jonathan L; Kenton, Kimberly; Greer, W Jerod; Ramm, Olga; Szychowski, Jeff M; Wilson, Tracey; Richter, Holly E

    2013-06-01

    To characterize the effect of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) on urethral neuromuscular function. Following IRB approval, women with refractory overactive bladder (OAB) underwent standardized urethral testing prior to and after Stage 1 SNM implantation. Periurethral sensation was measured using current perception thresholds (CPT). Striated urethral sphincter activity was quantified using concentric needle electromyography (CNE) and Multi-Motor Unit Action Potential (MUP) analysis software. Nonparametric analyses were used to characterize pre/post changes with intervention. Baseline CPT and CNE findings were compared between SNM responders and non-responders. Twenty-seven women were enrolled in this pilot study with a mean age of 61 ± 13 years. Twenty of 26 women (76.9%) responded to SNM and went to Stage 2 permanent implantation. Four (14.8%) withdrew after Stage 1 implantation; three of the four withdrawals had not had therapeutic responses to SNM. CPT and CNE parameters did not significantly differ from baseline 2 weeks after SNM. Pre-SNM urethral sensation was not significantly different between responders and non-responders. However, responders had larger amplitude, longer duration and more turns and phases at baseline approaching significance, reflecting more successful urethral reinnervation, than non-responders. SNM does not alter urethral neuromuscular function 2 weeks post Stage 1 implantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Comparison of radiographic and sonographic urethrography for assessing urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babnik Peskar, Darja; Visnar Perovic, Alenka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiourethrography (RUG) and sonourethrography (SUG) for assessment of urethral strictures and to evaluate whether RUG underestimates stricture length, as has been reported. Fifty-one men with suspected urethral strictures were evaluated by both methods performed consecutively. Stricture lengths and diameters measured by RUG were significantly greater (mean 22%, 30%) than those measured by SUG because of radiographic magnification. Both methods, however, detected a similar percentage lumen reduction and similarly graded stricture severity. Equally significant non-correlation between both methods for length measurements in the bulbar and penile urethra (p 2 =0.33 and 0.34, respectively) supported radiographic magnification. Previous inaccuracies appear to relate to RUG measurements of the central tight stricture (mean 44% of the entire length in our series), not the full stricture length. Use of sonographic contrast medium intra-urethrally improved the definition of long narrow strictures. The SUG gave information about peri-urethral tissues not provided by RUG. Once radiographic magnification was taken into account, there were no major differences in the assessment of urethral strictures by both methods. With correct measurement methods, RUG does not underestimate stricture length. For full assessment, the combination of RUG and SUG, which gives information about peri-urethral disease, is optimal in many patients. (orig.)

  4. Dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmeet Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Female urethral stricture is an underdiagnosed and overlooked cause of female bladder outlet obstruction. The possible etiologies may be infection, prior dilation, difficult catheterization with subsequent fibrosis, urethral surgery, trauma, or idiopathic. We present our technique and results of dorsal onlay full thickness vaginal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was performed on 16 female patients with mid-urethral stricture who underwent dorsal onlay vaginal graft urethroplasty from January 2007 to June 2011.Of these, 13 patients had previously undergone multiple Hegar dilatations, three had previous internal urethrotomies. The preoperative work up included detailed voiding history, local examination, uroflowmetry, calibration, and micturating cystourethrogram. Results: All patients had mid-urethral stricture. Mean age was 47.5 years. Mean Q max improved from 6.2 to 27.6 ml/s. Mean residual volume decreased from 160 to 20 ml. Mean duration of follow-up was 24.5 months (6 months to 3 years. Only one patient required self-calibration for 6 months after which her stricture stabilized. None of the patient was incontinent. Conclusion: Dorsal vaginal onlay graft urethroplasty could be considered as an effective way to treat female urethral stricture.

  5. Urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder Diverticulum stones: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeke Linus I

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary urethral stone although rare, commonly arises from the kidneys, bladder or are seen in patients with urethral stricture. These stones are either found in the posterior or anterior urethra and do result in acute urinary retention. We report urethral obstruction from dislodged bladder diverticulum stones. This to our knowledge is the first report from Nigeria and in English literature. Case presentation A 69 year old, male, Nigerian with clinical and radiological features of acute urinary retention, benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum. He had a transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP and was lost to follow up. He re-presented with retained urethral catheter of 4months duration. The catheter was removed but attempt at re-passing the catheter failed and a suprapubic cystostomy was performed. Clinical examination and plain radiograph of the penis confirmed anterior and posterior urethral stones. He had meatotomy and antegrade manual stone extraction with no urethra injury. Conclusions Urethral obstruction can result from inadequate treatment of patient with benign prostate enlargement and bladder diverticulum stones. Surgeons in resource limited environment should be conversant with transurethral resection of the prostate and cystolithotripsy or open prostatectomy and diverticulectomy.

  6. Effect of fesoterodine on urethral closure function in women with stress urinary incontinence assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Darekar, Amanda; Scholfield, David

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim was to evaluate, using urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR), the effect of fesoterodine on urethral function in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: Women aged 18 to 65 years were eligible for this randomised, double-blind, placebo...... significant differences were seen between fesoterodine 4 mg or fesoterodine 8 mg and placebo in opening urethral pressure (primary endpoint) or other UPR endpoints. No statistically significant differences were seen between either fesoterodine dose and placebo in the change from baseline in the bladder diary...... variables (total urinary incontinence, SUI, or urgency urinary incontinence episodes per 24 h). Adverse events were reported by 8 participants taking fesoterodine 4 mg, 17 taking fesoterodine 8 mg, and 8 taking placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Fesoterodine did not affect urethral pressure or significantly decrease...

  7. The Efficacy of Bulbar Urethral Mobilization for Anastomotic Anterior Urethroplasty in a Case With Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Fukui

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A 2-month-old boy was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. Voiding cystourethrography showed bulbar and anterior urethral strictures, and endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed. He developed febrile urinary tract infection again and revealed the recurrence of the anterior urethral stricture. Consequently, endoscopic internal urethrotomy was performed 4 times. Because the anterior urethral stricture had not improved, he was referred to us. Anterior urethroplasty was performed when he was 5 years. After excision of the scarred portions of the urethra, the defect of the urethra was 20 mm. Transperineal bulbar urethral mobilization was performed, and a single-stage end-to-end anterior urethroplasty without tension could be performed simultaneously.

  8. A misleading urethral smear with polymorphonuclear leucocytes and intracellular diplococci; case report of urethritis caused by Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genders, R E; Spitaels, D; Jansen, C L; van den Akker, Th W; Quint, K D

    2013-12-01

    The primary pathogens found in men with urethritis are Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Rapid diagnosis of N. gonorrhoeae infection can be made based on a Gram- or methylene blue-stained urethral smear. We describe a case of a man with purulent penile discharge, in which microscopic examination led to the presumptive diagnosis of gonorrhoea. A nucleic acid amplification test was negative for N. gonorrhoeae but positive for C. trachomatis. Culture showed Gram-negative diplococci which were identified as Neisseria meningitidis. N. meningitidis can be sporadically pathogenic in the genito-urinary tract and mimicks gonococcal urethritis, and appears identical by microscopy. When a gonococcal urethritis is suspected based on clinical signs and microscopic examination, but investigatory tests cannot confirm the diagnosis, a N. meningitidis infection should be considered.

  9. Intravascular stent graft with polyurethane and metallic stent: experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Young Soo; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Boo Kyung Han; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Hak Jong; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Jong Won; Ha, Jongwon

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a new model of the stent graft, and of tissue response related to placement of the stent graft. The stent graft was constructed from polyurethane (Pellethane) graft and Hanaro stent(12mm in diameter, 45mm in length, 10 bends). A stent grafts was inserted into the lower thoracic aorta in each of six adult mongrel dogs(body weight, 12-16kg). At one, two, four, and six months, follow-up studies of angiography and spiral CT angiography were preformed to evaluate wascular patency, vascular stenosis, and thrombus formation. Two dogs were sacrificed at 1month, 2months, and 6months after insertion of the stent graft and macroscopic, light microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic examinations of the aortic segment including the stent graft were performed to evaluate intimal hyperplasia, endothelial growth to the graft, and thrombus formation. During follow-up at one, two, four, and six months, angiography or spiral CT angiography showed 20-100% luminal stenosis or occlusion of the lower thoracic aorta by the thrombus and perigraft leaks in three dogs(50%), and collateral vessels caused by occlusion of the aorta in two (33.3%). On gross examination, there were thrombi of 1-5mm thickness at the graft portions in all dogs, and this thickness gradually increased. The mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the stent portion gradually increased from 120μm to 227μm and the mean thickness of intimal hyperplasia at the graft portion from 93μm to 914μm. This thickness was greater at the graft portion than at the stent portion. Scanning electron microscopy showed elliptical endothelial lining on the neointimal surfaces at each end of the graft. Thrombi caused stenosis or occlusion of the stent graft. In order for such a graft to be ideal, further study is needed

  10. Stent fabric fatigue of grafts supported by Z-stents versus ringed stents: an in vitro buckling test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Lu; Guidoin, Robert; Nutley, Mark; Song, Ge; Zhang, Ze; Du, Jia; Douville, Yvan

    2014-03-01

    Stent-grafts externally fitted with a Z-shaped stents were compared to devices fitted with ringed stents in an in vitro oscillating fatigue machine at 200 cycles per minute and a pressure of 360 mmHg for scheduled durations of up to 1 week. The devices fitted with Z-stents showed a considerably lower endurance limit to buckling compared to the controls. The contact between the apexes of adjacent Z-stents resulted in significant damage to the textile scaffolds and polyester fibers due to the sharp angle of the Z-stents. The ringed stents did not cause any fraying in the textile scaffolds.

  11. Percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totev, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) is an X-ray or US guided procedure that involves the injection of a contrast material directly into the bile ducts inside the liver to produce pictures of them. If a blockage or narrowing is found, additional procedures may be performed: 1. insertion of a catheter to drain excess bile out of the body or both - internal and external; 2. plastic endoprothesis placement; 3. self-expandable metal stents placement to help open bile ducts or to bypass an obstruction and allow fluids to drain. Current percutaneous biliary interventions include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and biliary drainage to manage benign and malignant obstructions. Internal biliary stents are either plastic or metallic, and various types of each kind are available. Internal biliary stents have several advantages. An external tube can be uncomfortable and have a psychological disadvantage. An internal stent prevents the problems related to external catheters, for example, pericatheter leakage of bile and the need for daily flushing. The disadvantages include having to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or new PTC procedures to obtain access in case of stent obstruction. Better patency rates are reported with metallic than with plastic stents in cases of malignant obstruction, though no effect on survival is noted. Plastic internal stents are the cheapest but reportedly prone to migration. Metallic stents are generally not used in the treatment of benign disease because studies have shown poor long-term patency rates. Limited applications may include the treatment of patients who are poor surgical candidates or of those in whom surgical treatment fails. Most postoperative strictures are treated surgically, though endoscopic and (less commonly) percutaneous placement of nonmetallic stents has increasingly been used in the past few years. Now there are some reports about use of biodegradable biliary

  12. Early Realignment Versus Delayed Urethroplasty in Management of Pelvic Fracture Urethral Injury: A Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Firmanto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: this meta-analysis study will evaluate the incidence of urethral stricture as a successfull parameter in the management of PFUI through early realignment, compared with delayed urethroplasty. Long-term complications such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence on both methods will also be evaluated. Methods: online literature was sourced from Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane, and Google Scholar. The incidence of stricture was evaluated from the entire study group of ER and DU. Stricture of the urethra is diagnosed by the symptoms such as the obstruction that felt by the patient, uroflowmetry examination, and urine residual post micturition that supported by urethrography examination at regular interval. In some cases the incidence of stricture also diagnosed by urethroscopy. The patient is assessed as not having stricture when it is no longer needed to do urethral dilatation or advanced urethrotomy. The rate of incontinence was assessed subjectively from the patient’s complaints. The erectile function assessed subjectively; decreased of tumesen’s degree, reduced the duration of erection, and penetration failure diagnosed as erection dysfunction. The data were processed as dichotomy data to calculate the risk ratio using Review Manager 5.1. Results: five relevant literatures reviewed in this study. The incidence of urethral strictures are statistically significant lower in early realignment group (RR=0.70, 95% CI 0.50-0.99, P<0.05. There were no statistically significant differences between both treatment groups on the incidence of erectile dysfunction (RR=0.72, 95% CI 0.39-1.34 nor the incidence of incontinence (RR=0.74, 95% CI 0.36-1.51. Conclusion: early realignment decrease the occurrence of stricture on PFUI treatment compared to delayed urethroplasty method. Between the two methos, the complications such as erectile dysfunction and incontinence; however, there was no significant difference.

  13. Standard treatment regimens for nongonococcal urethritis have similar but declining cure rates: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhart, Lisa E; Gillespie, Catherine W; Lowens, M Sylvan; Khosropour, Christine M; Colombara, Danny V; Golden, Matthew R; Hakhu, Navneet R; Thomas, Katherine K; Hughes, James P; Jensen, Nicole L; Totten, Patricia A

    2013-04-01

    Azithromycin or doxycycline is recommended for nongonococcal urethritis (NGU); recent evidence suggests their efficacy has declined. We compared azithromycin and doxycycline in men with NGU, hypothesizing that azithromycin was more effective than doxycycline. From January 2007 to July 2011, English-speaking males ≥16 years, attending a sexually transmitted diseases clinic in Seattle, Washington, with NGU (visible urethral discharge or ≥5 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per high-power field [PMNs/HPF]) were eligible for this double-blind, parallel-group superiority trial. Participants received active azithromycin (1 g) + placebo doxycycline or active doxycycline (100 mg twice daily for 7 days) + placebo azithromycin. Urine was tested for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Ureaplasma urealyticum biovar 2 (UU-2), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) using nucleic acid amplification tests. Clinical cure (urethral symptoms and absence of discharge) and microbiologic cure (negative tests for CT, MG, and/or UU-2) were determined after 3 weeks. Of 606 men, 304 were randomized to azithromycin and 302 to doxycycline; CT, MG, TV, and UU-2 were detected in 24%, 13%, 2%, and 23%, respectively. In modified intent-to-treat analyses, 172 of 216 (80%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 74%-85%) receiving azithromycin and 157 of 206 (76%; 95% CI, 70%-82%) receiving doxycycline experienced clinical cure (P = .40). In pathogen-specific analyses, clinical cure did not differ by arm, nor did microbiologic cure differ for CT (86% vs 90%, P = .56), MG (40% vs 30%, P = .41), or UU-2 (75% vs 70%, P = .50). No unexpected adverse events occurred. Clinical and microbiologic cure rates for NGU were somewhat low and there was no significant difference between azithromycin and doxycycline. Mycoplasma genitalium treatment failure was extremely common. Clinical Trials Registration.NCT00358462.

  14. Role of vesicostomy in the management of posterior urethral valve in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukong, C S; Ameh, E A; Mshelbwala, P M; Jabo, B A; Gomna, A; Anumah, M A; Nmadu, P T; Mfuh, A Y

    2014-02-01

    To review the role of vesicostomy in the management of posterior urethral valve (PUV), in neonates and infants, given the limitations for endoscopic treatment in this setting. A review of 35 patients who presented with posterior urethral valve over a 10-year period. Demographic and clinical information were prospectively recorded on a structured pro forma, and the data extracted analysed using SPSS 11.0. The 35 boys were aged 3 days to 10 years (median 3 weeks). Twenty-three (65.7%) had a vesicostomy (age range 3 days-3 years, median 3 weeks). The mode of presentation was poor urinary stream 15 (65.2%), urinary retention 4 (17.4%), and renal failure 6 (26.1%). Main findings were palpable bladder 23 (100%), hydronephrosis 4 (17.4%). Abdominal ultrasound confirmed hydronephrosis and thickened bladder wall, and voiding/expressive cystourethrogram confirmed dilated posterior urethra and vesicoureteric reflux in all 23 patients. Complications following vesicostomy were stoma stenosis 1 (4.3%), bladder mucosal prolapse 1 (4.3%), perivesicostomy abscess 1 (4.3%); there was no mortality. Following vesicostomy, 10 (43.5%) patients had excision of the valves and vesicostomy closure at age 2-8 years (median 4 years). They are well, with normal renal ultrasonographic findings, bladder capacity range 115-280 ml, and normal urea, serum electrolytes, creatinine, at 3 years of follow up. Thirteen (56.5%) are still awaiting valvotomy but have remained well and with normal ultrasonographic renal findings. Vesicostomy is a useful temporising mode of urinary diversion in neonates and infants with posterior urethral valve (in the absence of unobstructed upper tracts) when facilities for endoscopic valve ablation are not readily available. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Significance of early diagnosis of posterior urethral valves in fetus for further development - own experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzemień, Grażyna; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Zofia; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of posterior urethral valves is estimated to be from 3:1000 to 8:1000 and this is one of the most common causes of obstruction of urinary tract in boys. About 13-17% of children with posterior urethral valves develop end stage renal failure. We present a  6-month-old boy with late diagnosis of posterior urtehral valves. Antenatal ultrasound investigation of the urinary tract was normal. A small degree of oligohydramnios was found during delivery. At the age of six months the boy was admitted to hospital because of urinary tract infection, hypertension (130/90 mmHg) and acute kidney injury (urea - 46 mg/dL, creatinine - 1.1 mg/dL, GFR - 35.5 mL/min/1.73 m2 ). Bilateral hydronephrosis and megaureters, low-capacity bladder with hypertrophied wall were seen on ultrasound examination. Voiding cystourethrograhy revealed vesicoureteral refluxes (III/V), hypertrophy of the bladder wall with numerous diverticula and dilated posterior urethra. During urethroscopy urethral valves were resected. Increased intravesical pressure (leak point up to 305 cm H2 O) was found on urodynamic test. Renal scintigraphy (99mTc-EC) revealed decreased intake of isotope in the left kidney (5%), and the right kidney intake was 95% ERPF. The patient was qualified for left-sided nephrectomy, which was postponed because of high leak point and high risk of worsening of vesicoureteral reflux to right kidney after nephrectomy. Anticholinergic and α-blocker treatment was started. At the age of 11 months left-side nephrectomy was performed because of recurrent urinary tract infections. After 3.5-year follow-up blood pressure, physical development, kidney function tests, and urinalysis are normal. Additionally to this investigation the significance of early diagnosis including prenatal (PUV) for further development as well as further therapeutic procedure is discussed.

  16. Endotracheal expandable metallic stent placement in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, S; Tanabe, Y; Fujiwara, Y; Koyama, T; Tanigawa, N; Kobayashi, M; Katsube, Y; Nakamura, H [Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan). Dept. of Radiology Research Inst. for Microbial Diseases, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-01-01

    Various types of Gianturco zig-zag wire stent were implanted into the tracheas of 4 dogs to define the suitable characteristics of the endotracheal wire stent in these animals. These stents were constructed of 0.45, and 0.33 mm stainless steel wire. The diameter of the fully expanded stents was 3 cm and their lengths were 2, 3, and 4 cm. The 2 cm stent constructed of 0.33 mm wire showed minimum pathologic changes of the trachea of the dog compared to the other stents, and at the same time had a complete covering of ciliated columnar epithelium over the stent surface. (orig.).

  17. Trends in the prevalence of pathogens causing urethritis in Asturias, Spain, 1989-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, José A; Otero, Luis; García, María José; Palacio, Virgilo; Carreño, Francisco; Cuesta, Mar; Sánchez, Carmen; Vázquez, Fernando

    2003-04-01

    There are few studies of recent trends in the etiology and epidemiologic characteristics of specific microorganisms causing urethritis in men. The objective of the current study was to show the clinical experience in our country and to evaluate the trends in the prevalence of the pathogens in male urethritis, as well as the epidemiologic patterns in a series of 2101 patients. This was a descriptive study of the etiological agents causing urethritis in our sexually transmitted disease clinics in a period of 12 years (1989-2000), with a comparison of two periods of time. There were 97 cases of gonococcal urethritis (4.6%), 2004 of nongonococcal urethritis (95.4%), and 82 of mixed urethritis (3.9%). An association was found between gonococcal urethritis and heterosexual men; between chlamydial urethritis and homosexual/bisexual men; Ureaplasma urealyticum urethritis and heterosexual men and patients younger than 30 years of age; and between trichomonal urethritis and patients more than 30 years of age and the presence of HIV antibodies. During the period of research there was a significant decrease in cases of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis urethritis and an increase in those of U urealyticum urethritis. In conclusion, this report describes changes in the etiology and epidemiologic patterns of urethritis in our country in recent years.

  18. Preliminary Report of Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Tapered Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Woo; Kim, Dong Hyun; Hong, Seung; Jeong; Kim, Young Suk; Byun, Joo Nam; Oh, Jae Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seong Hwan [Dept. of Neurology, Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To analyze the results of carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent and to evaluate the effectiveness of the tapered stent compared to previously reported studies using non-tapered stents. From October 2008 to August 2010, elective carotid artery stenting using a tapered stent was attempted in 39 lesions from 36 consecutive patients. Post-procedural complications were evaluated by neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging. Restenosis or occlusion was evaluated by carotid Doppler ultrasound and computerized tomography with angiography. Newly developed neurologic symptoms were evaluated clinically. The self-expandable tapered stent was placed across the carotid artery stenosis. A total stroke was noted in 3 patients, while a major stroke was noted in 1 patient. On diffusion weighted imaging, new lesions were observed in 15 patients, but 13 patients were clinically silent. Follow-up imaging studies were performed in the 13 clinically silent lesions, and no evidence of restenosis or occlusion was found any of the 13 lesions. During clinical follow-up in 34 lesions from 31 patients, there were newly developed neurological symptoms in only 1 patient.

  19. Radial force measurement of endovascular stents: Influence of stent design and diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsubara, Yutaka; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsuda, Daisuke; Okadome, Jun; Morisaki, Koichi; Inoue, Kentarou; Tanaka, Shinichi; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    Angioplasty and endovascular stent placement is used in case to rescue the coverage of main branches to supply blood to brain from aortic arch in thoracic endovascular aortic repair. This study assessed mechanical properties, especially differences in radial force, of different endovascular and thoracic stents. We analyzed the radial force of three stent models (Epic, E-Luminexx and SMART) stents using radial force-tester method in single or overlapping conditions. We also analyzed radial force in three thoracic stents using Mylar film testing method: conformable Gore-TAG, Relay, and Valiant Thoracic Stent Graft. Overlapping SMART stents had greater radial force than overlapping Epic or Luminexx stents (P stents was greater than that of all three endovascular stents (P stents, site of deployment, and layer characteristics. In clinical settings, an understanding of the mechanical characteristics, including radial force, is important in choosing a stent for each patient. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. [The application of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents in the thoracostomach-airway fistula: a single center, 11 years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Li, Tengfei; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Gang; Ren, Jianzhuang; Ren, Kewei; Lu, Huibin; Zhang, Quanhui; Li, Zongming

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents (Y-stents) in the management of thoracostomach-airway fistula. Retrospective analysis was performed for 108 patients treated for thoracostomach-airway fistula with Y-shaped self-expandable coated metal stents between April 2003 and October 2014. Y-stents were designed based on the dimensions of trachea and bronchus and sites of the fistula and then were inserted under DSA monitoring. There were 65 cases with single big Y-stent placement, 26 cases with single small Y-stent placement, 23 cases with double Y-stents placement, and 1 case with 3 Y-stents placement. Stent implantation was successfully accomplished with single manipulation in all patients. Complete occlusion of the fistula was obtained in 104 patients after the primary manipulation, and 4 patients required a secondary manipulation where a double Y-stents was inserted because of failure of primary manipulate. Ninety-two patients completed the follow-up , while 16 were lost. Fifty-nine patients died while 33 were alive with marked improvement in their quality of life. The placement of Y-stents can effectively occlude the thoracostomach-airway fistula in patients who had had the esophageal tumors resected. The technique is not only feasible but reliable to improve the quality of life of the patients.

  1. Mycoplasma genitalium in male urethritis: diagnosis and treatment in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasuna, Ryoichi

    2013-07-01

    Male urethritis is a common disease for urologists, with the most common pathogens being, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. When the tests fail to detect these pathogens, the presented urethritis is called non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis. Mycoplasma genitalium is one of the pathogens for non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis. The test for detecting M. genitalium, which is commercially available in Japan, is not accepted by the Japanese insurance system now. The detection rate of M. genitalium from patients with non-gonococcal urethritis is 10-20% in Japan. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for M. genitalium showed that macrolide has the strongest activity and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of tetracyclines were not substantially lower. Some kinds of fluoroquinolones, such as sitafloxacin and moxifloxacin, have stronger activities against M. genitalium. For non-gonococcal urethritis, macrolides and tetracycline are recommended in some guidelines. In clinical studies, tetracyclines are less effective against M. genitalium than azithromycin, and azithromycin regimens including 1 g stat or 2 g stat are now recommended for urethritis with M. genitalium. However, macrolide-resistant M. genitalium strains have recently emerged and are spreading worldwide. This macrolide-resistance is closely related to mutations on the 23S rRNA gene. Sitafloxacin and moxifloxacin have shown good efficacies for M. genitalium in some clinical studies. If the azithromycin regimens fail, we must consider the use of fluoroquinolones, such as sitafloxacin, in Japan. The most important issues include the acceptance of M. genitalium examinations by the national insurance system and the individual treatment of C. trachomatis and M. genitalium in the not-too-distant future. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Direct implantation of rapamycin-eluting stents with bioresorbable drug carrier technology utilising the Svelte coronary stent-on-a-wire: the DIRECT II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheye, Stefan; Khattab, Ahmed A; Carrie, Didier; Stella, Pieter; Slagboom, Ton; Bartunek, Jozef; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W

    2016-08-05

    Our aim was to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the Svelte sirolimus-eluting coronary stent-on-a-wire Integrated Delivery System (IDS) with bioresorbable drug coating compared to the Resolute Integrity zotarolimus-eluting stent with durable polymer in patients with de novo coronary artery lesions. Direct stenting, particularly in conjunction with transradial intervention (TRI), has been associated with reduced bleeding complications, procedure time, radiation exposure and contrast administration compared to conventional stenting with wiring and predilatation. The low-profile Svelte IDS is designed to facilitate TRI and direct stenting, reducing the number of procedural steps, time and cost associated with coronary stenting. DIRECT II was a prospective, multicentre trial which enrolled 159 patients to establish non-inferiority of the Svelte IDS versus Resolute Integrity using a 2:1 randomisation. The primary endpoint was angiographic in-stent late lumen loss (LLL) at six months. Target vessel failure (TVF), as well as secondary clinical endpoints, will be assessed annually up to five years. At six months, in-stent LLL was 0.09±0.31 mm in the Svelte IDS group compared to 0.13±0.27 mm in the Resolute Integrity group (p<0.001 for non-inferiority). TVF at one year was similar across the Svelte IDS and Resolute Integrity groups (6.5% vs. 9.8%, respectively). DIRECT II demonstrated the non-inferiority of the Svelte IDS to Resolute Integrity with respect to in-stent LLL at six months. Clinical outcomes at one year were comparable between the two groups.

  3. Drug-eluting stent thrombosis: results from the multicenter Spanish registry ESTROFA (Estudio ESpañol sobre TROmbosis de stents FArmacoactivos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Hernández, José M; Alfonso, Fernando; Hernández, Felipe; Elizaga, Jaime; Sanmartin, Marcelo; Pinar, Eduardo; Lozano, Iñigo; Vazquez, Jose M; Botas, Javier; Perez de Prado, Armando; Hernández, Jose M; Sanchis, Juan; Nodar, Juan M Ruiz; Gomez-Jaume, Alfredo; Larman, Mariano; Diarte, Jose A; Rodríguez-Collado, Javier; Rumoroso, Jose R; Lopez-Minguez, Jose R; Mauri, Josepa

    2008-03-11

    This study sought to assess the incidence, predictors, and outcome of drug-eluting stent(DES) thrombosis in real-world clinical practice. The DES thromboses in randomized trials could not be comparable to those observed in clinical practice, frequently including off-label indications. We designed a large-scale, nonindustry-linked multicentered registry, with 20 centers in Spain. The participant centers provided follow-up data for their patients treated with DES, reporting a detailed standardized form in the event of any angiography-documented DES-associated thrombosis occurring. Of 23,500 patients treated with DES, definite stent thrombosis(ST) developed in 301: 24 acute, 125 subacute, and 152 late. Of the late, 62 occurred >1 year(very late ST). The cumulative incidence was 2% at 3 years. Antiplatelet treatment had been discontinued in 95 cases(31.6%). No differences in incidences were found among stent types. Independent predictors for subacute ST analyzed in a subgroup of 14,120 cases were diabetes, renal failure, acute coronary syndrome, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, stent length, and left anterior descending artery stenting, and for late ST were ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, stenting in left anterior descending artery, and stent length. Mortality at 1-year follow-up was 16% and ST recurrence 4.6%. Older age, left ventricular ejection fraction <45%, nonrestoration of Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow grade 3, and additional stenting were independent predictors for mortality. The cumulative incidence of ST after DES implantation was 2% at 3 years. No differences were found among stent types. Patient profiles differed between early and late ST. Short-term prognosis is poor, especially when restoration of normal flow fails.

  4. Predictors for adverse outcome after iliac angioplasty and stenting for limb-threatening ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timaran, Carlos H; Stevens, Scott L; Freeman, Michael B; Goldman, Mitchell H

    2002-09-01

    The role of iliac artery angioplasty and stenting (IAS) for the treatment of limb-threatening ischemia is not defined. IAS has been used primarily for patients with disabling claudication. Because poorer results have been shown in patients with critical ischemia after iliac artery angioplasty, the purpose of this study was to estimate the influence of risk factors on the outcome of iliac angioplasty and stent placement in patients with limb-threatening ischemia. During a 5-year period (from 1996 to 2001), 85 iliac angioplasty and stent placement procedures (107 stents) were performed in 31 women and 43 men with limb-threatening ischemia. Patients with claudication were specifically excluded. The criteria prepared by the Ad Hoc Committee on Reporting Standards (Society for Vascular Surgery/International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery) were followed to define the variables. The TransAtlantic InterSociety Consensus classification was used to characterize the type of iliac lesions. Both univariate (Kaplan-Meier [KM]) and multivariate analyses (Cox proportional hazards model) were used to determine the association between variables, cumulative patency, limb salvage, and survival. Indications for iliac angioplasty with stenting were ischemic rest pain (56%) and tissue loss (44%). Primary stenting was performed in 36 patients (42%). Stents were placed selectively after iliac angioplasty mainly for residual stenosis or pressure gradient (43%). Overall, primary stent patency rate was 90% at 1 year, 74% at 3 years, and 69% at 5 years. Primary stent patency rate was significantly reduced in women compared with men (KM, log-rank test, P 1.6 mg/dL; KM, log-rank test, P IAS. Limb salvage, as shown in this study, is not affected by previous iliac stent failure.

  5. Delayed surgical repair of posttraumatic posterior urethral distraction defects in children and adolescents: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podesta, Miguel; Podesta, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    : 1) restricted surgical access to reach a high lying proximal urethral end, 2) long distraction defects, 3) simultaneous bladder neck and membranous urethral lesions and 4) small urethral caliber. In our experience and that of others (Turner Warwick, 1989 and Ranjan, 2012), radiographic and endoscopic findings provide information on stricture features; however, the final choice of surgical exposure to restore urethral continuity is made at operative time based on PFUDD complexity. Perineal exposure usually allows performing DAU in 2 cm long PFUDDs. Ten percent of our patients treated with perineal DAU developed recurrent strictures attributed to inappropriate access selection or unrecognized PFUDD complexity. Failures were treated endoscopically (1) and by perineal/partial pubectomy anastomotic urethroplasty (4) with 100% final success. We used perineal/partial pubectomy DAU in 43% of the cases to excise pelvic scarring and bridge long urethral gaps, with urethral rerouting in 8 cases. Success rate of initial perineal and perineal/partial pubectomy anastomotic procedures was 82% and 100%, respectively. Koraitim (1997), Orabi (2008) and Ranjan (2012) reported excellent outcomes in children with either transperineal or transpubic anastomotic repair, as opposed to poor results in those undergoing substitution urethroplaties. Most reports rarely evaluate urinary incontinence after successful DAU. At the end of follow-up only 2 of our 9 initial incontinent cases remain with acceptable stress incontinence. Retrospectively, in 5 cases the original trauma comprised the bladder neck and the membranous sphincter mechanism. In our series erectile dysfunction after trauma did not change after DAU except in 1 patient who regained potency 1 year after repair. All patients were referred after initial treatment was done elsewhere, thus they may represent the most severe PFUDDs cases. Additionally, erection dysfunction was not investigated in the kind of detail required due to

  6. A Novel Attempt to Standardize Results of CFD Simulations Basing on Spatial Configuration of Aortic Stent-Grafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Polanczyk

    Full Text Available Currently, studies connected with Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD techniques focus on assessing hemodynamic of blood flow in vessels in different conditions e.g. after stent-graft's placement. The paper propose a novel method of standardization of results obtained from calculations of stent-grafts' "pushing forces" (cumulative WSS--Wall Shear Stress, and describes its usefulness in diagnostic process. AngioCT data from 27 patients were used to reconstruct 3D geometries of stent-grafts which next were used to create respective reference cylinders. We made an assumption that both the side surface and the height of a stent-graft and a reference cylinder were equal. The proposed algorithm in conjunction with a stent-graft "pushing forces" on an implant wall, allowed us to determine which spatial configuration of a stent-graft predispose to the higher risk of its migration. For stent-grafts close to cylindrical shape (shape factor φ close to 1 WSS value was about 267 Pa, while for stent-grafts different from cylindrical shape (φ close to 2 WSS value was about 635 Pa. It was also noticed that deformation in the stent-graft's bifurcation part impaired blood flow hemodynamic. Concluding the proposed algorithm of standardization proved its usefulness in estimating the WSS values that may be useful in diagnostic process. Angular bends or tortuosity in bifurcations of an aortic implant should be considered in further studies of estimation of the risk of implantation failure.

  7. Long anterior urethral stricture: Reconstruction by dorsally quilted penile skin flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayed Abdel-Kader

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Free penile skin flaps offer good results (functional and cosmetic in long anterior urethral stricture. Meticulously fashioned longitudinal, circular or spiral penile skin flaps could bridge urethral defects up to 15 cm long.

  8. Tissue Engineering for Human Urethral Reconstruction : Systematic Review of Recent Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kemp, Vincent; de Graaf, Petra; Fledderus, Joost O.; Bosch, JLHR; de Kort, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    Background Techniques to treat urethral stricture and hypospadias are restricted, as substitution of the unhealthy urethra with tissue from other origins (skin, bladder or buccal mucosa) has some limitations. Therefore, alternative sources of tissue for use in urethral reconstructions are

  9. A randomized multicenter comparison of hybrid sirolimus-eluting stents with bioresorbable polymer versus everolimus-eluting stents with durable polymer in total coronary occlusion: rationale and design of the Primary Stenting of Occluded Native Coronary Arteries IV study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teeuwen Koen

    2012-12-01

    tomography is performed in the first 60 randomized patients at 9 months to assess neointima thickness, percentage of neointima coverage, and stent strut malapposition and coverage. Personnel blinded to the allocated treatment will review all angiographic and optical coherence assessments. Secondary clinical endpoints include major adverse cardiac events, clinically driven target vessel revascularization, target vessel failure and stent thrombosis to 5-year clinical follow-up. An independent clinical event committee blinded to the allocated treatment will review all clinical events. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov: NCT01516723. Patient recruitment started in February 2012.

  10. Identification of treatment strategies for Mycoplasma genitalium-related urethritis in male patients by culturing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamasuna, Ryoichi

    2013-02-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium was first isolated from urethral swab specimens of male patients with non-gonococcal urethritis. However, the isolation of M. genitalium strains from clinical specimens has been difficult. Co-cultivation with Vero cells is one available technique for the isolation of M. genitalium. The strains that can be used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by broth dilution or agar dilution methods are limited. Macrolides, such as azithromycin (AZM), have the strongest activity against M. genitalium. However, AZM-resistant strains have emerged and spread. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene contribute to the organism's macrolide resistance, which is similar to the effects of the mutations in macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Of the fluoroquinolones, moxifloxacin (MFLX) and sitafloxacin have the strongest activities against M. genitalium, while levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are not as effective. Some clinical trials on the treatment of M. genitalium-related urethritis are available in the literature. A doxycycline regimen was microbiologically inferior to an AZM regimen. For cases of treatment failure with AZM regimens, MFLX regimens were effective.

  11. Angiographic CT: in vitro comparison of different carotid artery stents-does stent orientation matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettau, Michael; Bendszus, Martin; Hähnel, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the in vitro visualization of different carotid artery stents on angiographic CT (ACT). Of particular interest was the influence of stent orientation to the angiography system by measurement of artificial lumen narrowing (ALN) caused by the stent material within the stented vessel segment to determine whether ACT can be used to detect restenosis within the stent. ACT appearances of 17 carotid artery stents of different designs and sizes (4.0 to 11.0 mm) were investigated in vitro. Stents were placed in different orientations to the angiography system. Standard algorithm image reconstruction and stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction was performed. For each stent, ALN was calculated. With standard algorithm image reconstruction, ALN ranged from 19.0 to 43.6 %. With stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction, ALN was significantly lower and ranged from 8.2 to 18.7 %. Stent struts could be visualized in all stents. Differences in ALN between the different stent orientations to the angiography system were not significant. ACT evaluation of vessel patency after stent placement is possible but is impaired by ALN. Stent orientation of the stents to the angiography system did not significantly influence ALN. Stent-optimized algorithm image reconstruction decreases ALN but further research is required to define the visibility of in-stent stenosis depending on image reconstruction.

  12. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A. Babaeer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC was 29.5 × 103/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 103/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  13. Necrotizing Urethritis due to Aerococcus urinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeer, Abdulrahman A; Nader, Claudia; Iacoviello, Vito; Tomera, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old male presented to the emergency with hematuria and pain in the shaft of the penis for one day. The patient was found to be in a state of shock. The shaft of the penis and the scrotum were swollen and tender. No skin necrosis was observed and no crepitus was palpable. Serum white count (WBC) was 29.5 × 10(3)/μL. A CT scan showed gas in the corpus spongiosum. Antibiotics were started with IV metronidazole, vancomycin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Metronidazole was then replaced by clindamycin. Exploration was performed but no necrotic tissue was identified. Cystourethroscopy revealed dusky looking urethra. A suprapubic tube and a urethral catheter were placed in the bladder. WBC trended down to 13.9 × 10(3)/μL on the fourth postoperative day. Urine culture grew Aerococcus urinae and blood cultures grew Alpha Hemolytic Streptococcus. On the sixth day, the patient was feeling worse and WBC increased. MRI revealed absent blood flow to the corpus spongiosum. Urethroscopy revealed necrosis of the urethra. Urethrectomy was performed via perineal approach. The patient immediately improved. The patient was discharged on the sixth postoperative day to continue ampicillin/sulbactam IV every 6 hours for a total of 4 weeks from the day of urethrectomy.

  14. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilciler, Mete; Basal, Seref; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Zor, Murat; Istanbulluoglu, Mustafa Okan; Dayanc, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV) is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy. PMID:20379394

  15. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanc, Murat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy.

  16. Prediction of the persistence of Mycoplasma genitalium after antimicrobial chemotherapy by quantification of leukocytes in first-void urine from patients with non-gonococcal urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin; Mizutani, Kohsuke; Seike, Kensaku; Sugawara, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is regarded as another pathogen of male non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). Failure to eradicate this mycoplasma is associated with persistent or recurrent NGU, but this mycoplasma is not routinely examined in clinical practice. In cases of M. genitalium-positive NGU, therefore, some criteria are needed to assess the success or failure of antimicrobial chemotherapy other than microbiological outcomes. We enrolled 49 men with M. genitalium-positive non-chlamydial NGU. At successive visits after treatment, we inquired about their symptoms, observed their urethral meatus for urethral discharge, and examined their first-void urine (FVU) for quantification of leukocytes and for the persistence of M. genitalium. M. genitalium was eradicated in 34 patients after treatment, whereas the mycoplasma persisted in 15. Urethritis symptoms and urethral discharges were not found to be predictors of the persistence of M. genitalium up to the 25th day after the start of treatment. Leukocyte counts in FVU from the patients with persistence of M. genitalium were significantly higher than those from the patients with eradication of the mycoplasma. Leukocyte counts of 10 leukocytes/μl or more between the 18th and 24th day after the start of treatment were most significantly associated with the persistence of M. genitalium. Quantification of leukocytes in FVU would appear to be crucial to judge the outcome of treatment in patients with non-chlamydial NGU and could be helpful to predict the persistence of M. genitalium after treatment when M. genitalium is not routinely examined in clinical specimens in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Enterovesical Fistula: A Rare Complication of Urethral Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Hawary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the case of an eighty-two-year old lady with an indwelling urethral catheter inserted eight years prior to her presentation to manage her urinary incontinence. She underwent radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (stage T2b in 1991 and had a laparotomy and drainage of an appendicular abscess in her early twenties. She presented with a short history of fecaluria, pneumaturia, and passage of urine per rectum. On laparotomy she was found to have an inflated catheter balloon that has eroded through the bladder wall into the lumen of a terminal ileal segment. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in literature of a patient developing an enterovesical fistula as a result of a urethral catheter eroding through the bladder wall into the bowel lumen. There are numerous known complications of long-term urethral catheterization. They include recurrent urinary tract infections, recurrent pyelonephritis, sepsis, urethral stricture, blocked and retained catheters, among many other reported complications. This case describes an unusual presentation secondary to an even more unusual complication. This should be considered when handling patients with indwelling urethral catheters inserted in unhealthy bladders.

  18. [Urethral pain syndrome: fact or fiction--an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, N M; Degener, S; Roth, S; Brandt, A S; Lazica, D A

    2015-09-01

    Urethral pain syndrome is a symptom complex including dysuria, urinary urgency and frequency, nocturia and persistent or intermittent urethral and/or pelvic pain in the absence of proven infection. These symptoms overlap with several other conditions, such as interstitial cystitis bladder pain syndrome and overactive bladder. Urethral pain syndrome may occur in men but is more frequent in women. The exact etiology is unknown but infectious and psychogenic factors, urethral spasms, early interstitial cystitis, hypoestrogenism, squamous metaplasia as well as gynecological risk factors are discussed. These aspects should be ruled out or confirmed in the diagnostic approach. Despite the assumption of a multifactorial etiology, pathophysiologically there is a common pathway: dysfunctional epithelium of the urethra becomes leaky which leads to bacterial and abacterial inflammation and ends in fibrosis due to the chronic impairment. The therapeutic approach should be multimodal using a trial and error concept: general treatment includes analgesia, antibiotics, alpha receptor blockers and muscle relaxants, antimuscarinic therapy, topical vaginal estrogen, psychological support and physical therapy. In cases of nonresponding patients intravesical and/or surgical therapy should be considered. The aim of this review is to summarize the preliminary findings on urethral pain syndrome and to elucidate the diagnostic and therapeutic options.

  19. Urethral triplication with meatuses terminating on the penis: a rare case presenting with bifid urinary stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirselj, Daniel A.; Jayanthi, Venkata R.; Lowe, Gregory K.

    2009-01-01

    Urethral duplication is an uncommon clinical finding, and classification systems have been described to explain the clinical findings. Urethral triplication is an extremely uncommon diagnosis, with few published case reports. We present the rare case of an infant noted to have a bifid urinary stream and found to have urethral triplication on voiding cystourethrography. (orig.)

  20. Neisseria meningitidis ST11 Complex Isolates Associated with Nongonococcal Urethritis, Indiana, USA, 2015-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Evelyn; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Batteiger, Byron E; Williams, James A; Arno, Janet N; Tai, Albert; Batteiger, Teresa A; Nelson, David E

    2017-02-01

    At a clinic in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, we observed an increase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae-negative men with suspected gonococcal urethritis who had urethral cultures positive for N. meningitidis. We describe genomes of 2 of these N. meningitidis sequence type 11 complex urethritis isolates. Clinical evidence suggests these isolates may represent an emerging urethrotropic clade.

  1. Soap induced urethral pain in boys | Okeke | West African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The symptoms started suddenly while bathing with soap. Penile erections at onset occurred in 14(78%). Two (11%) had purulent urethral discharge and 1(5.5%) had meatal stenosis. Application of bland petroleum jelly to the external urethral meatus before each soap bath satisfactorily controlled the urethral pains.

  2. Urethral triplication with meatuses terminating on the penis: a rare case presenting with bifid urinary stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirselj, Daniel A.; Jayanthi, Venkata R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, Columbus, OH (United States); Lowe, Gregory K. [The Ohio State University Medical Center, Department of Urology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2009-11-15

    Urethral duplication is an uncommon clinical finding, and classification systems have been described to explain the clinical findings. Urethral triplication is an extremely uncommon diagnosis, with few published case reports. We present the rare case of an infant noted to have a bifid urinary stream and found to have urethral triplication on voiding cystourethrography. (orig.)

  3. Neisseria meningitidis ST11 Complex Isolates Associated with Nongonococcal Urethritis, Indiana, USA, 2015–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Evelyn; Gangaiah, Dharanesh; Batteiger, Byron E.; Williams, James A.; Arno, Janet N.; Tai, Albert; Batteiger, Teresa A.

    2017-01-01

    At a clinic in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, we observed an increase in Neisseria gonorrhoeae–negative men with suspected gonococcal urethritis who had urethral cultures positive for N. meningitidis. We describe genomes of 2 of these N. meningitidis sequence type 11 complex urethritis isolates. Clinical evidence suggests these isolates may represent an emerging urethrotropic clade. PMID:28098538

  4. Comparison of TVT and TOT on urethral mobility and surgical outcomes in stress urinary incontinence with hypermobile urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavkaytar, Sabri; Kokanalı, Mahmut Kuntay; Guzel, Ali Irfan; Ozer, Irfan; Aksakal, Orhan Seyfi; Doganay, Melike

    2015-07-01

    To compare the change of urethral mobility after midurethral sling procedures in stress urinary incontinence with hypermobile urethra and assess these findings with surgical outcomes. 141 women who agreed to undergo midurethral sling operations due to stress urinary incontinence with hypermobile urethra were enrolled in this non-randomized prospective observational study. Preoperatively, urethral mobility was measured by Q tip test. All women were asked to complete Urogenital Distress Inventory Short Form (UDI-6) and Incontinence Impact Questionnaire Short Form (IIQ-7) to assess the quality of life. Six months postoperatively, Q tip test and quality of life assessment were repeated. The primary surgical outcomes were classified as cure, improvement and failure. Transient urinary obstruction, de novo urgency, voiding dysfunction were secondary surgical outcomes. Of 141 women, 50 (35. 5%) women underwent TOT, 91 (64.5%) underwent TVT. In both TOT and TVT groups, postoperative Q tip test values, IIQ-7 and UDI-6 scores were statistically reduced when compared with preoperative values. Postoperative Q tip test value in TVT group was significantly smaller than in TOT group [25°(15-45°) and 20° (15-45°), respectively]. When we compared the Q-tip test value, IIQ-7 and UDI-6 scores changes, there were no statistically significant changes between the groups. Postoperative urethral mobility was more frequent in TOT group than in TVT group (40% vs 23.1%, respectively). Postoperative primary and secondary outcomes were similar in both groups. Although midurethral slings decrease the urethtal hypermobility, postoperative mobility status of urethra does not effect surgical outcomes of midurethral slings in women with preoperative urethral hypermobility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracranial Stent Implantation for Drug Resistant Atherosclerotic Stenosis: Results of 52 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kuk Seon; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Ko, Young Hwan; Kang, Ik Won; Lee, Eil Seong; Han, You Mie; Kim, In Soo; Hur, Choon Woong

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of intracranial stent implantation for treatment of drug resistant atherosclerotic stenoses. Between March 2004 and July 2007, we tried intracranial stent implantation in 49 patients with 52 lesions (anterior circulation 48 cases, posterior circulation 4 cases) who had an ischemic stroke with more than 50% of major cerebral artery stenosis. We classified the lesions by their location and morphology, analyzed the results in terms of the success rate, complication rate, and restenosis rate during the follow-up period. Intracranial stent implantation was performed successfully in 43 cases (82.7%). In eight of the nine cases, the stent implantation failure was due to the tortuosity of the target vessel. There was no major periprocedural complication. One patient showed cerebellar infarction after the procedure. Mean residual stenoses decreased from 70.2% to 13.0%. Four cases (9.3%) demonstrated in-stent restenoses and more than 50% during the mean and 25.3/month after the follow-up period. Success rate of intracranial stent implantation may improve on developing technique and more experience. Low rate of complication and restenosis suggest that we can consider intracranial stent implantation for treatment of drug resistant atherosclerotic stenoses.

  6. [Coronary stents: 30 years of medical progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvain, Johanne; Cayla, Guillaume; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Fargeot, Catherine; Montalescot, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    The history of interventional cardiology has been marked by several technologic revolutions since the late 1970s. The first key step was the use of inflatable balloon angioplasty as an alternative to CABG surgery for coronary revascularization, followed by intracoronary delivery of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug eluting stents (DES) to drastically reduce intracoronary restenosis observed with BMS. Improved stents platforms and polymers (absorbable or biocompatible) led to a dramatic reduction in the rate of late stent thrombosis. Self-expanding stents are now available to improve stent a position especially in acute myocardial infarction. The emergence of new fully bioabsorbable stents that can be combined with antiproliferative drugs is the ongoing revolution. A new generation of stents is continuously improving and likely to become the ideal stent for coronary revascularization in the near future. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  7. Genomic Characterization of Urethritis-Associated Neisseria meningitidis Shows that a Wide Range of N. meningitidis Strains Can Cause Urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kevin C; Unemo, Magnus; Jeverica, Samo; Kirkcaldy, Robert D; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohnishi, Makoto; Grad, Yonatan H

    2017-12-01

    Neisseria meningitidis , typically a resident of the oro- or nasopharynx and the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia, is capable of invading and colonizing the urogenital tract. This can result in urethritis, akin to the syndrome caused by its sister species, N. gonorrhoeae , the etiologic agent of gonorrhea. Recently, meningococcal strains associated with outbreaks of urethritis were reported to share genetic characteristics with the gonococcus, raising the question of the extent to which these strains contain features that promote adaptation to the genitourinary niche, making them gonococcus-like and distinguishing them from other N. meningitidis strains. Here, we analyzed the genomes of 39 diverse N. meningitidis isolates associated with urethritis, collected independently over a decade and across three continents. In particular, we characterized the diversity of the nitrite reductase gene ( aniA ), the factor H-binding protein gene ( fHbp ), and the capsule biosynthetic locus, all of which are loci previously suggested to be associated with urogenital colonization. We observed notable diversity, including frameshift variants, in aniA and fHbp and the presence of intact, disrupted, and absent capsule biosynthetic genes, indicating that urogenital colonization and urethritis caused by N. meningitidis are possible across a range of meningococcal genotypes. Previously identified allelic patterns in urethritis-associated N. meningitidis strains may reflect genetic diversity in the underlying meningococcal population rather than novel adaptation to the urogenital tract. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Correlation between prostate brachytherapy-related urethral stricture and peri-apical urethral dosimetry: A matched case–control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earley, James J.; Abdelbaky, Ather M.; Cunningham, Melanie J.; Chadwick, Eliot; Langley, Stephen E.M.; Laing, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiation dose to the bulbomembranous urethra has been shown to correlate with urethral stricture formation. This retrospective case–control study was designed to explore the relationship between dose to the apical/peri-apical regions of the urethra and development of brachytherapy (BXT)-related urethral stricture. Materials and methods: Cases were patients who developed urethral stricture after treatment with BXT as monotherapy and who had urethral dosimetry post-implant. Each case was matched with a control that had not developed urethral stricture. Dosimetry was compared between cases and controls. Results: Twenty-three cases were pair matched with 23 controls. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of age, presenting Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) or Gleason score. The dose delivered to the peri-apical and apical urethra was significantly higher for cases when compared with controls (peri-apical urethra: mean V 150 1.1 Vs 0.8 cc [p = 0.02]; apical urethra: mean dose 200 Vs 174 Gy [p = 0.01]). The distance from the prostate apex to isodose lines was also found to be significant in predicting stricture formation. Conclusion: There was evidence to suggest that the development of BXT-related stricture was associated with radiation dose at the apical and peri-apical urethra. Attention to the dose delivered to those areas may minimise the risk of developing such morbidity.

  9. Vaginal Swab Test Compared With the Urethral Q-tip Test for Urethral Mobility Measurement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Isuzu; Szychowski, Jeff M; Illston, Jana D; Parden, Alison M; Richter, Holly E

    2016-02-01

    To assess whether use of a vaginal cotton-tipped swab is equivalent to the standard Q-tip test regarding urethral mobility. Secondarily, to examine whether both tests agree in hypermobility diagnosis, discomfort level, and patients' preference. In this randomized crossover trial, women with stress urinary incontinence without prolapse beyond the hymen were randomized to undergo either a vaginal or urethral mobility test first followed by the alternate approach. The primary outcome was the difference in rotation angle, from resting to maximum strain, between tests. The equivalence margin was ±10°. The secondary outcome was agreement in hypermobility diagnosis using two definitions: 1) maximum straining angle of 30° or greater from the horizontal plane; and 2) rotation angle 30° or greater. Discomfort was assessed using a 0-10 visual analog scale. Using 90% power assuming a standard deviation of 20°, 36 and 139 patients were needed for 10° and 5° equivalence margins, respectively. From January 2014 to March 2015, 140 women were randomized. The mean difference between the two tests was 5.1° (95% confidence interval 3.2-6.9°), meeting the predefined equivalence criteria. In the hypermobility diagnosis, the urethral and vaginal tests had no disagreement using definition 1 (P=.23), whereas the two tests disagreed using definition 2 (P=.03). The urethral approach had a higher discomfort level (Pstandard Q-tip test in measuring urethral mobility with less discomfort and is preferred by patients.

  10. Looking beyond oral mucosa: Initial results of everted saphenous vein graft urethroplasty (eSVGU) in long anterior urethral strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Arif; Khattar, Nikhil; Goel, Hemant; Rao, Swatantra; Tanwar, Raman; Sood, Rajeev

    2017-09-01

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility and initial results of an everted saphenous vein graft (eSVG) as a dorsolateral onlay, in patients with long anterior urethral strictures and/or chronic tobacco users. In all, 20 patients with long anterior urethral strictures (>7 cm) and/or chronic tobacco exposed oral mucosa were included in the study. The harvested SVG was hydro-distended, detubularised, and everted. Substitution urethroplasty using an eSVG was performed using a dorsolateral onlay technique. Symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and uroflowmetry at 1, 3 and 6 months; and voiding and retrograde urethrograms, and urethroscopy were done at 3 months. Failure was defined as failure to void, need for interventions in form of direct-vision internal urethrotomy or endodilatation. Three patients were excluded because they underwent a staged urethroplasty. In all, 17 patients underwent eSVG substitution urethroplasty. The mean (SD, range) follow-up of our patients was 17.64 (5.23, 10-26) months. The mean (SD, range) length of the strictured segment was 14 (2.5, 10-18) cm and the length of the harvested SVG was 16.3 (2.7, 12-20) cm. The mean (SD) IPSS at 1, 3 and 6 months after catheter removal was 10 (2.8), 10 (3.4) and 10 (1.4) and the quality-of-life score was 1.76 (0.5), 2.05 (1.0) and 2.05 (1.0), respectively. Postoperatively, endodilatation was required in two patients. Complete failure occurred in one patient. An eSVG, as a dorsolateral onlay graft, is a promising and prudent option for long anterior urethral strictures, especially in patients with poor oral hygiene and chronic tobacco use.

  11. [Non-gonococcal infectious urethritis : pathogen spectrum and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, S

    2015-01-01

    For many years an increase in cases of urethritis has been observed in western Europe. In order to be able to combat this continuous rise, the perception of sexually transmitted diseases must be promoted, the clarification and screening must be intensified and therapy must be rapidly and correctly carried out. In addition to the commonest pathogens causing urethritis, namely chlamydia and gonococci, many other pathogenic microbes must be taken into consideration in the diagnostics. With respect to therapy, apart from the increasing resistance formation of Mycoplasma genitalium, the decreasing effectiveness of standard forms of treatment of other microbes must be emphasized. For chronic and recurrent urethritis in particular a broad clarification of the pathogen should be carried out to enable targeted treatment and also partner treatment. Priority must again be given to primary prevention.

  12. Sonourethrography in the evaluation of anterior urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Kwag, Jin Geun

    1994-01-01

    To determine the reliability of sonourethrography (SUG) in the evaluation of male anterior urethral strictures. Both SUG with retrograde saline infusion and retrograde urethrography (RUG) were performed in 5 young normal volunteers and 20 patients with symptoms of impaired urine flow. Those findings were compared with urethroscopic and operative findings in all patients. SUG was more accurate in the evaluation of the stricture length and degree than RUG in 7 patients with anterior urethral strictures, when compared with their subsequent open urethroplasty findings. Only SUG could classify the degree of spongiofibrosis surrounding the strictures in 15 patients. So, SUG was diagnostically as efficacious as or, superior to, RUG in all 20 patients. SUG can be used as one of complementary and reliable tools for diagnosis, evaluation and follow-up of anterior urethral strictures

  13. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  14. Where do patients go for treatment of urethritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscan, Mustafa Burak; Tunckiran, Ahmet; Oksay, Taylan; Ozorak, Alper; Ozkardes, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    Urethritis is characterized by urethral inflammation, and it can result from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. Physicians and other health care providers play a critical role in preventing and treating urethritis. The aim of this study was to describe and identify predictors of health care seeking behavior among men with urethritis. In total, 98 male patients aged between 16 to 52 years-of-age (mean 30.9 ± 8.0 years), who attended our clinic with symptoms of urethritis, were included in the study. We conducted face-to-face interviews with the patients using a 9-item survey questionnaire. Patients were divided into three groups according to their level of education as follows: group I (n = 44), elementary school; group II (n = 38), high school; and group III (n = 16), university. Among the 98 patients evaluated, the source of treatment was physicians in 44 patients (44.9%), drugstores in 38 cases (38.77%), and friends in 16 patients (16.32%). There was a statistically significant difference found between the groups according to the source of treatment (P < 0.001). The most common factors associated with seeking care from other sources, rather than physicians, were economic reasons in 19 patients (35.18%), confidentiality concerns in 24 (44.4%), and ease of access in 11 patients (20.37%). A substantial proportion of patients with urethritis sought help from other sources, rather than physicians. The results of our study show that the patients with higher levels of education were more likely to seek help from health care services. It is important to promote the public's knowledge through informative studies and educational materials in order to encourage patients to seek rapid and effective treatment from proper sources.

  15. Urethral stricture following high dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Lisa; Williams, Scott G.; Tai, Keen Hun; Foroudi, Farshad; Cleeve, L.; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, timing, nature and outcome of urethral strictures following high dose rate brachytherapy (HDRB) for prostate carcinoma. Methods and materials: Data from 474 patients with clinically localised prostate cancer treated with HDRB were analysed. Ninety percent received HDRB as a boost to external beam radiotherapy (HDRBB) and the remainder as monotherapy (HDRBM). Urethral strictures were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Results: At a median follow-up of 41 months, 38 patients (8%) were diagnosed with a urethral stricture (6-year actuarial risk 12%). Stricture location was bulbo-membranous (BM) urethra in 92.1%. The overall actuarial rate of grade 2 or more BM urethral stricture was estimated at 10.8% (95% CI 7.0-14.9%), with a median time to diagnosis of 22 months (range 10-68 months). All strictures were initially managed with either dilatation (n = 15) or optical urethrotomy (n = 20). Second line therapy was required in 17 cases (49%), third line in three cases (9%) and 1 patient open urethroplasty (grade 3 toxicity). Predictive factors on multivariate analysis were prior trans-urethral resection of prostate (hazard ratio (HR) 2.81, 95% CI 1.15-6.85, p = 0.023); hypertension (HR 2.83, 95% CI 1.37-5.85, p = 0.005); and dose per fraction used in HDR (HR for 1 Gy increase per fraction 1.33, 95% CI 1.08-1.64, p = 0.008). Conclusions: BM urethral strictures are the most common late grade 2 or more urinary toxicity following HDR brachytherapy for prostate cancer. Most are manageable with minimally invasive procedures. Both clinical and dosimetric factors appear to influence the risk of stricture formation.

  16. Aortic Stent-Graft Infection Following Septic Complications of a Kidney Stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. Rogier van den; Leijdekkers, Vanessa J.; Vahl, Anco

    2006-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was treated because of a renal pelvis blowout of the left kidney for which he received a nephrostomy catheter without antibiotic prophylaxis. Almost a year previously this patient had undergone endovascular repair of a symptomatic infrarenal abdominal aorta aneurysm. Four weeks after the diagnosis and treatment of the ruptured renal pelvis, a new computed tomography scan and ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the diagnosis of infected aortic stent-graft. An extra-anatomic axillo-uniiliac bypass and graft excision was performed. Two weeks after discharge the patient returned to the hospital with an occlusion of his left renal artery and died of renal failure. This is the first time an infected aortic stent-graft after a renal pelvis blowout has been reported. Although infections of aortic stent-grafts occur rarely, one should be aware of the possibility in aortic stent-graft patients undergoing abdominal procedures without antibiotic prophylaxis

  17. Mechanical stability of the diamond-like carbon film on nitinol vascular stents under cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jong; Moon, Myoung-Woon; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Seok, Hyun-Kwang; Han, Seung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Woo; Shin, Kyong-Min; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical stability of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films coated on nitinol vascular stents was investigated under cyclic loading condition by employing a stent crimping system. DLC films were coated on the vascular stent of a three dimensional structure by using a hybrid ion beam system with rotating jig. The cracking or delamination of the DLC coating occurred dominantly near the hinge connecting the V-shaped segments of the stent where the maximum strain was induced by a cyclic loading of contraction and extension. However the failures were significantly suppressed as the amorphous Si (a-Si) buffer layer thickness increased. Interfacial adhesion strength was estimated from the spalled crack size in the DLC coating for various values of the a-Si buffer layer thickness

  18. Male non-gonococcal urethritis: From microbiological etiologies to demographic and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shin; Hanaoka, Nozomu; Shimuta, Ken; Seike, Kensaku; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Yokoi, Shigeaki; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohnishi, Makoto; Deguchi, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To detect microorganisms responsible for male acute urethritis and to define the microbiology of non-gonococcal urethritis. The present study comprised 424 men with symptoms and signs compatible with acute urethritis. Their urethral swabs and first-voided urine underwent detection of the microorganisms. Demographic characteristics and clinical features of Mycoplasma genitalium-, Ureaplasma urealyticum-, Haemophilus influenza-, adenovirus- or Herpes simplex virus-positive monomicrobial non-gonococcal urethritis, or all-examined microorganism-negative urethritis in heterosexual men were compared with urethritis positive only for Chlamydia trachomatis. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was detected in 127 men (30.0%). In 297 men with non-gonococcal urethritis, C. trachomatis was detected in 143 (48.1%). In 154 men with non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis, M. genitalium (22.7%), M. hominis (5.8%), Ureaplasma parvum (9.1%), U. urealyticum (19.5%), H. influenzae (14.3%), Neisseria meningitidis (3.9%), Trichomonas vaginalis (1.3%), human adenovirus (16.2%), and Herpes simplex virus types 1 (7.1%) and 2 (2.6%) were detected. Although some features of monomicrobial non-chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis or all-examined microorganism-negative urethritis were significantly different from those of monomicrobial chlamydial non-gonococcal urethritis, most features were superimposed. Predicting causative microorganisms in men with non-gonococcal urethritis based on demographic and clinical features is difficult. However, the present study provides useful information to better understand the microbiological diversity in non-gonococcal urethritis, and to manage patients with non-gonococcal urethritis appropriately. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  19. Delayed ischemic cecal perforation despite optimal decompression after placement of a self-expanding metal stent: report of a case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip Krag; Pilsgaard, Bo; Meisner, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Endoscopic deployment of self-expanding metal stents offers an alternative to surgical intervention in rectocolonic obstructions. Reported clinical failures in the literature are all related to the site of stent placement. We report a case of serious intra-abdominal disease after technically...... and clinically successful stent deployment: a potentially dangerous situation of which the surgeon should be aware. A previously healthy 72-year-old female was referred to our department with symptoms of an obstructing colorectal tumor. Successful stent placement resulted in resolution of the obstructive...... condition. Three days after stent deployment, x-ray examinations revealed a small-bowel obstruction and emergency surgery was performed. Intraoperative findings demonstrated a segment of ileum fixated to the tumor in the small pelvis, resulting in the obstructive condition. Furthermore, a cecal perforation...

  20. Urethral Lymphogranuloma Venereum Infections in Men With Anorectal Lymphogranuloma Venereum and Their Partners: The Missing Link in the Current Epidemic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C.

    2013-01-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in

  1. Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum infections in men with anorectal lymphogranuloma venereum and their partners: the missing link in the current epidemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vrieze, Nynke Hesselina Neeltje; van Rooijen, Martijn; Speksnijder, Arjen Gerard Cornelis Lambertus; de Vries, Henry John C

    2013-08-01

    Urethral lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is not screened routinely. We found that in 341 men having sex with men with anorectal LGV, 7 (2.1%) had concurrent urethral LGV. Among 59 partners, 4 (6.8%) had urethral LGV infections. Urethral LGV is common, probably key in transmission, and missed in current routine LGV screening algorithms.

  2. Clinical and angiographic outcomes after stent-assisted coiling of cerebral aneurysms with Enterprise and Neuroform stents: a comparative analysis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brent; Vaziri, Sasha; Singla, Amit; Fargen, Kyle M; Mocco, J

    2015-12-01

    The most widely used intracranial stents for stent-assisted coiling are Neuroform (NEU) and Enterprise stents (ENT). This study compares published outcomes between the ENT and NEU coil-assist systems and comments on the published safety and efficacy of stent-assisted coiling in general. A literature search was performed through PubMed for all published series of ENT or NEU stent-assisted coiling of cerebral aneurysms from 2004 to 2014. All studies including 10 or more published cases of stent-assisted coiling with ENT or NEU were included. 47 studies met the inclusion criteria, containing 4238 aneurysms in 4039 patients. 2111 aneurysms were treated with NEU and 2127 were treated with ENT. Mean follow-up was 14.1 months. Overall, thromboembolic events occurred in 6.4% of aneurysms, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in 2.6%, permanent morbidity in 3.9%, and mortality in 2.3%. Initial and final 100% angiographic occlusion was seen in 53% and 69% of patients, respectively. Deployment failures (pstent-assisted coiling devices to date, containing over 4200 aneurysms in more than 4000 patients. Comparative analyses demonstrate that both devices are reported to be safe and effective with comparable permanent morbidity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Bleomycin induced urethral stricture in Hodgkin′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Tapkire

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a glycoprotein that is extensively used in combination with other anti-cancer agents because of its relative lack of hematological and gastrointestinal toxicity. However, pulmonary toxicity is common with bleomycin and limits its therapeutic utility. Urethral stricture as a result of bleomycin toxicity has not been reported in literature. In this case report, a young male patient who developed urethral stricture after bleomycin-based chemotherapy is described and the possible effects of bleomycin on the urethra are discussed.

  4. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding.

  5. Urethral Triplication Without Bladder Duplication: Endourologic Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ruben; Burgos, Laura; Angulo, Jose Maria

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Urethral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the lower urinary system, with urethra ending in glans. At the beginning of toilet training, urine output was observed along the rectum. Rigid cystoscopy shows a perineal urethra starting in the posterior urethra. Subsequently, flexible cystoscopy showed entry of epispadic urethra in the bladder immediately superior to the bladder neck. It was running parallel to primary urethra. Then, we observed two most frequent types of urethral duplication in the sagittal plane in a single patient. PMID:29675475

  6. Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, M.H.; Barnhart, M.D.; Barthez, P.Y.; Smeak, D.D.

    1998-01-01

    Incomplete urethral duplication with cyst formation was diagnosed in a dog that had soft, fluctuant, subcutaneous swellings in the ventral perineal and penile areas and a history of nocturia and incontinence during recumbency that were unresponsive to treatment with antibiotics. Retrograde urethrocystography, voiding urethrography, double-contrast cystography, radiography after direct administration of contrast medium into cystic structures, and excretory urography were performed to evaluate the urinary tract. Communication between the cysts and the urethra was demonstrated radiographically only after intralesional injection of contrast medium. Nocturia and incontinence resolved after surgical removal of the urethral duplication and cysts. The dog was clinically normal 1 year after surgery

  7. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding. PMID:28163815

  8. A novel ureteral stent material with antibacterial and reducing encrustation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Cao, Zhiqiang [General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Shenyang 110840 (China); Ren, Ling; Chen, Shanshan; Zhang, Bingchun; Liu, Rui [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2016-11-01

    Ureteral stents have been used to relieve ureterostenosis. Complications such as infection and encrustation occur in the long time of stent implantation, which is a clinical problem needs to be resolved. Indwelling ureteral stents have shown to develop microbial biofilm that may lead to recurrent infection and encrustation. This study was aiming to reduce those complications by using a novel material, Cu-bearing antibacterial stainless steel. The antibacterial performance, encrustation property, and biocompatibility were examined by SEM, image analysis, MTT and would healing. The in vitro immersion test showed that 316LCu-bearing stainless steel (316LCu-SS) not only inhibited proliferation of bacteria and formation of biofilm, but also had less encrustation deposition. Its antibacterial effectiveness against Escherichia coli reached to 92.7% in the artificial urine for 24 h and 90.3% in the human urine for 6 h. The encrustation surface coverage percentage was 30.2% by 12 weeks, which was nearly one half of NiTi alloy. The in vitro tests showed that 316LCu-SS had no toxicity, and promoted the migration of urethral epithelial cells. - Highlights: • 316LCu-SS exhibited strong antibacterial performance against E.coli in the urine. • 316LCu-SS had less crystals deposition on its surface compared to NiTi. • 316LCu-SS showed no toxicity and promoted migration of epithelial cells. • 316LCu-SS is prospective to be a new candidate material to relieve UTIs.

  9. A novel ureteral stent material with antibacterial and reducing encrustation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jing; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ren, Ling; Chen, Shanshan; Zhang, Bingchun; Liu, Rui; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral stents have been used to relieve ureterostenosis. Complications such as infection and encrustation occur in the long time of stent implantation, which is a clinical problem needs to be resolved. Indwelling ureteral stents have shown to develop microbial biofilm that may lead to recurrent infection and encrustation. This study was aiming to reduce those complications by using a novel material, Cu-bearing antibacterial stainless steel. The antibacterial performance, encrustation property, and biocompatibility were examined by SEM, image analysis, MTT and would healing. The in vitro immersion test showed that 316LCu-bearing stainless steel (316LCu-SS) not only inhibited proliferation of bacteria and formation of biofilm, but also had less encrustation deposition. Its antibacterial effectiveness against Escherichia coli reached to 92.7% in the artificial urine for 24 h and 90.3% in the human urine for 6 h. The encrustation surface coverage percentage was 30.2% by 12 weeks, which was nearly one half of NiTi alloy. The in vitro tests showed that 316LCu-SS had no toxicity, and promoted the migration of urethral epithelial cells. - Highlights: • 316LCu-SS exhibited strong antibacterial performance against E.coli in the urine. • 316LCu-SS had less crystals deposition on its surface compared to NiTi. • 316LCu-SS showed no toxicity and promoted migration of epithelial cells. • 316LCu-SS is prospective to be a new candidate material to relieve UTIs.

  10. Measurement of urethral closure function in women with stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, N; Scholfield, D; Soma, K

    2009-01-01

    , double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study 17 women with stress urinary incontinence or mixed urinary incontinence received 4 mg esreboxetine or placebo for 7 to 9 days followed by a washout period before crossing over treatments. Urethral pressure reflectometry and urethral pressure profilometry......, and had a positive and clinically relevant effect on urethral closure function and symptoms of stress urinary incontinence....... esreboxetine patients had significantly fewer incontinence episodes and reported a treatment benefit (global impression of change) compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: The opening pressure measured with urethral pressure reflectometry was less variable compared to the parameters measured with urethral pressure...

  11. A Critical Review on Metallic Glasses as Structural Materials for Cardiovascular Stent Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Praveen Kumar, Gideon; Branicio, Paulo Sergio; Seifi, Mohsen; Lewandowski, John J; Cui, Fangsen

    2018-02-27

    Functional and mechanical properties of novel biomaterials must be carefully evaluated to guarantee long-term biocompatibility and structural integrity of implantable medical devices. Owing to the combination of metallic bonding and amorphous structure, metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit extraordinary properties superior to conventional crystalline metallic alloys, placing them at the frontier of biomaterials research. MGs have potential to improve corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, strength, and longevity of biomedical implants, and hence are promising materials for cardiovascular stent applications. Nevertheless, while functional properties and biocompatibility of MGs have been widely investigated and validated, a solid understanding of their mechanical performance during different stages in stent applications is still scarce. In this review, we provide a brief, yet comprehensive account on the general aspects of MGs regarding their formation, processing, structure, mechanical, and chemical properties. More specifically, we focus on the additive manufacturing (AM) of MGs, their outstanding high strength and resilience, and their fatigue properties. The interconnection between processing, structure and mechanical behaviour of MGs is highlighted. We further review the main categories of cardiovascular stents, the required mechanical properties of each category, and the conventional materials have been using to address these requirements. Then, we bridge between the mechanical requirements of stents, structural properties of MGs, and the corresponding stent design caveats. In particular, we discuss our recent findings on the feasibility of using MGs in self-expandable stents where our results show that a metallic glass based aortic stent can be crimped without mechanical failure. We further justify the safe deployment of this stent in human descending aorta. It is our intent with this review to inspire biodevice developers toward the realization of MG-based stents.

  12. A Critical Review on Metallic Glasses as Structural Materials for Cardiovascular Stent Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jafary-Zadeh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional and mechanical properties of novel biomaterials must be carefully evaluated to guarantee long-term biocompatibility and structural integrity of implantable medical devices. Owing to the combination of metallic bonding and amorphous structure, metallic glasses (MGs exhibit extraordinary properties superior to conventional crystalline metallic alloys, placing them at the frontier of biomaterials research. MGs have potential to improve corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, strength, and longevity of biomedical implants, and hence are promising materials for cardiovascular stent applications. Nevertheless, while functional properties and biocompatibility of MGs have been widely investigated and validated, a solid understanding of their mechanical performance during different stages in stent applications is still scarce. In this review, we provide a brief, yet comprehensive account on the general aspects of MGs regarding their formation, processing, structure, mechanical, and chemical properties. More specifically, we focus on the additive manufacturing (AM of MGs, their outstanding high strength and resilience, and their fatigue properties. The interconnection between processing, structure and mechanical behaviour of MGs is highlighted. We further review the main categories of cardiovascular stents, the required mechanical properties of each category, and the conventional materials have been using to address these requirements. Then, we bridge between the mechanical requirements of stents, structural properties of MGs, and the corresponding stent design caveats. In particular, we discuss our recent findings on the feasibility of using MGs in self-expandable stents where our results show that a metallic glass based aortic stent can be crimped without mechanical failure. We further justify the safe deployment of this stent in human descending aorta. It is our intent with this review to inspire biodevice developers toward the realization

  13. Emergency and elective implantation of covered stent systems in iatrogenic arterial injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, J.P.; Kickuth, R.; Bastuerk, P.; Hoppe, H.; Triller, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of covered stents for the management of iatrogenic arterial injury. Materials and Methods: Between 03/1998 and 12/2009, 31 patients underwent selective covered stent implantation after iatrogenic arterial injury. 12/31 of these patients (38.7 %) were hemodynamically unstable. Six different endovascular covered stent types were utilized. The primary endpoints of this study were technical and clinical success and rates of minor and major complications. Results: Initial angiograms demonstrated active extravasation in 19 (61.3 %) patients and pseudoaneurysms in 12 (38.7 %) patients. The following sites of bleeding origin were detected: axillary artery, subclavian artery, common iliac artery, external iliac artery, internal iliac artery, common femoral artery, superficial femoral artery, popliteal and fibular artery, femoro-popliteal and popliteo-crural bypasses, common hepatic artery, aberrant hepatic artery, cystic and gastroduodenal artery. In all patients bleeding was effectively controlled by covered stent implantation resulting in an immediate technical success of 100 %. Clinical success attributed to covered stent implantation was documented in 30 of the 31 patients (96.8 %). Major complications included death in four patients (11.1 %), acute thrombosis with arm ischemia in one patient (2.8 %) and stent fracture with associated pseudoaneurysm in another patient (2.8 %). In 2/31 patients (6.5 %) covered stent failure was detected and successfully treated by implantation of a second covered stent. Conclusion: Emergency and elective implantation of covered stents may be used for minimally invasive and effective management of iatrogenic arterial injury. (orig.)

  14. The use of self expandable metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Gi Seok; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-15

    Self expandable metallic stent is a good alternative of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage because it can eliminate numerous problems caused by external drainage catheter, such as tube dislodgement, bile leakage and psychotic problems. Authors analyzed initial results of self expandable metallic stents used in the patient with malignant biliary obstruction to evaluate the efficacy of the procedure and to find the technical problems in the procedure. Self expandable metallic stents were inserted in 14 patients: three with recurrent stomach cancer: three with gallbladder cancer: seven with Klaskin tumor: one with common duct cancer. Gianturco type stent was used in 9 cases ans Wallstent was used in 2 cases. In remaining three case, both Z-stent and Wallstent were used in the same patient. The average period of follow up was 104 days (4-409 days). In 13 cases, the patency of the bile duct was restored by the stent (technical success: 92.9%). Occlusions of the stent were found in two cases, after two and 13 months, respectively. Causes of failure and stent occlusion were associated duodenal obstruction, tumor overgrowth and shortening of Wallstent. In remaining 11 patients, one patient was lost to follow up an 10 patients did not show recurrent jaundice until death or last follow up. There was no major complication related to the procedure. The insertion of self expandable metallic stent is a safe procedure and can eliminate major disadvantages of PTBD. Overstenting, overlapping and evaluation of associated GI tract obstruction is crucial for obtaining technical success and long-term patency.

  15. A Critical Review on Metallic Glasses as Structural Materials for Cardiovascular Stent Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Praveen Kumar, Gideon

    2018-01-01

    Functional and mechanical properties of novel biomaterials must be carefully evaluated to guarantee long-term biocompatibility and structural integrity of implantable medical devices. Owing to the combination of metallic bonding and amorphous structure, metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit extraordinary properties superior to conventional crystalline metallic alloys, placing them at the frontier of biomaterials research. MGs have potential to improve corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, strength, and longevity of biomedical implants, and hence are promising materials for cardiovascular stent applications. Nevertheless, while functional properties and biocompatibility of MGs have been widely investigated and validated, a solid understanding of their mechanical performance during different stages in stent applications is still scarce. In this review, we provide a brief, yet comprehensive account on the general aspects of MGs regarding their formation, processing, structure, mechanical, and chemical properties. More specifically, we focus on the additive manufacturing (AM) of MGs, their outstanding high strength and resilience, and their fatigue properties. The interconnection between processing, structure and mechanical behaviour of MGs is highlighted. We further review the main categories of cardiovascular stents, the required mechanical properties of each category, and the conventional materials have been using to address these requirements. Then, we bridge between the mechanical requirements of stents, structural properties of MGs, and the corresponding stent design caveats. In particular, we discuss our recent findings on the feasibility of using MGs in self-expandable stents where our results show that a metallic glass based aortic stent can be crimped without mechanical failure. We further justify the safe deployment of this stent in human descending aorta. It is our intent with this review to inspire biodevice developers toward the realization of MG-based stents

  16. The use of self expandable metallic stent in the management of malignant biliary obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung; Han, Gi Seok; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    Self expandable metallic stent is a good alternative of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage because it can eliminate numerous problems caused by external drainage catheter, such as tube dislodgement, bile leakage and psychotic problems. Authors analyzed initial results of self expandable metallic stents used in the patient with malignant biliary obstruction to evaluate the efficacy of the procedure and to find the technical problems in the procedure. Self expandable metallic stents were inserted in 14 patients: three with recurrent stomach cancer: three with gallbladder cancer: seven with Klaskin tumor: one with common duct cancer. Gianturco type stent was used in 9 cases ans Wallstent was used in 2 cases. In remaining three case, both Z-stent and Wallstent were used in the same patient. The average period of follow up was 104 days (4-409 days). In 13 cases, the patency of the bile duct was restored by the stent (technical success: 92.9%). Occlusions of the stent were found in two cases, after two and 13 months, respectively. Causes of failure and stent occlusion were associated duodenal obstruction, tumor overgrowth and shortening of Wallstent. In remaining 11 patients, one patient was lost to follow up an 10 patients did not show recurrent jaundice until death or last follow up. There was no major complication related to the procedure. The insertion of self expandable metallic stent is a safe procedure and can eliminate major disadvantages of PTBD. Overstenting, overlapping and evaluation of associated GI tract obstruction is crucial for obtaining technical success and long-term patency

  17. A decade of using intraluminal tracheal/bronchial stents in the management of tracheomalacia and/or bronchomalacia: is it better than aortopexy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerie, Evans P; Durrant, Audrey C; Forte, Vito; Wales, Paul; Chait, Peter; Kim, Peter C W

    2005-06-01

    We compared the efficacy and clinical outcomes of aortopexy versus tracheal stents in the management of tracheomalacia. A retrospective analysis of 25 consecutive patients undergoing aortopexy (n = 11; 8 boys, 3 girls) or tracheal stents (n = 14; 9 boys, 5 girls) between 1993 and 2003 was performed. Both treatment groups, aortopexy versus stents, were comparable in their mean age of diagnosis, timing of intervention, surgical indications ("dying spell" or failed extubation), and previous underlying conditions. The operative time (190 vs 72 minutes) and blood loss (26 vs 0 mL) were significantly greater in aortopexy group (P stents in place for a mean of 15 (range 2-41) months, 3 of 8 patients with stent removal had significant granulation tissue requiring further dilatation. No death was observed in aortopexy group, whereas 1 stent-related death and 1 cardiac arrest requiring median sternotomy occurred during stent removal in 44 and 32 months' follow-up, respectively. Both aortopexy and tracheal stents are effective treatment modalities in the management of tracheomalacia. However, although aortopexy is associated with early perioperative complications, tracheal stents are associated with higher failure rate and more severe stent-related morbidity and mortality.

  18. The dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Tollenaar, Bryan G.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: There is a paucity of data regarding the incidence of urethral strictures after prostate brachytherapy. In this study, we evaluate multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters to identify factors associated with the development of brachytherapy-induced urethral strictures. Methods and Materials: 425 patients underwent transperineal ultrasound-guided prostate brachytherapy using either 103 Pd or 125 I for clinical T1b/T3a NxM0 (1997, American Joint Committee on Cancer) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland from April 1995 to October 1999. No patient was lost to follow-up. 221 patients were implanted with 103 Pd and 204 patients with 125 I. The median patient age was 68 years (range 48-81 years). The median follow-up was 35.2 months (range 15-72 months). Follow-up was calculated from the day of implantation. Thirteen patients developed brachytherapy-induced strictures, and all strictures involved the membranous urethra. A control group of 35 patients was rigorously matched to the stricture patients in terms of treatment approach; i.e., choice of isotope, plus or minus radiation therapy, and plus or minus hormonal manipulation. Nine of the 13 stricture patients had detailed Day 0 urethral dosimetry available for review. The apex of the prostate gland and the membranous urethra were defined by CT evaluation. Urethral dosimetry was reported for the prostatic urethra, the apical slice of the prostate gland, and the membranous urethra which was defined as extending 20 mm in length. Results: The 5-year actuarial risk of a urethral stricture was 5.3%, with a median time to development of 26.6 months (range 7.8-44.1 months). Of multiple clinical and treatment parameters evaluated, only the duration of hormonal manipulation (>4 months, p=0.011) was predictive for the development of a urethral stricture. The radiation dose to the membranous urethra was significantly greater in patients with strictures than those without: 97.6%±20.8% vs. 81.0%±19.8% of

  19. Dorsolateral onlay urethroplasty for anterior urethral strictures by a unilateral urethral mobilization approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra P Singh

    2009-01-01

    Settings and Design: A prospective study from September 2005 to March 2008 in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with long or multiple strictures of the anterior urethra were treated by a dorsolateral free buccal mucosa graft. The pendulous urethra was accessed by penile eversion through the perineal wound. The urethra was not separated from the corporal bodies on one side and was only mobilized from the midline on the ventral aspect to beyond the midline on the dorsal aspect. The urethra was opened in the dorsal midline over the stricture. The buccal mucosa graft was secured on the ventral tunica of the corporal bodies. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and median. Results: After a follow-up of 12-30 months, one recurrence developed and 1 patient needed an internal urethrotomy. Conclusions: A unilateral urethral mobilization approach for dorsolateral free graft urethroplasty is feasible for panurethral strictures of any length with good short-term success.

  20. The urethral closure function in continent and stress urinary incontinent women assessed by urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, Marie-Louise

    2014-01-01

    , the parameters showed highly significant negative correlation with ICIQ-SF, pad test and the number of incontinence episodes per week and are therefore valid as urodynamic severity measures. UPR in SUI women before and after TVT demonstrated a more efficient urethral closure function after the operation. The Po......-rest was unchanged suggesting that the sphincteric unit was virtually unaltered and hence the permanent closure forces unchanged. However, the resting opening elastance increased by 18% indicating that at the resting state the TVT somewhat improves the closure function by providing increased resistance against...... the dilation of the urethra, which probably explains the decreased maximum urine flow rate found after TVT in this and previous studies. The APIR increased in all patients after TVT suggesting that the support system was re-established and thus the adjunctive closure forces improved, regardless of the type...

  1. Stent migration after right ventricular outflow tract stenting in the severe cyanotic Tetralogy of Fallot case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Hayashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report our experience with a stent migration after right ventricle outflow tract stenting and converted to patent ductus arteriosus stenting in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF with severe infundibular stenosis. Finally, the patient achieved to TOF repair, and the migrated stent was removed without any complication.

  2. Outcome of retrograde ureteric stenting as a urinary drainage procedure in ureteric obstruction related to malignant lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayarathna, S; Suvendran, S; Ishak, M; Weligamage, A; Epa, A; Munasinghe, S; Abeygunaskera, A M

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the outcome of endoscopic retrograde ureteric stenting (RUS) in patients with ureteric obstruction related to malignant lesions. Data were prospectively collected from patients with ureteric obstruction related to malignant lesions treated at a single urology unit from 1 January 2011 to 30 April 2014. All patients had radiologically significant hydronephrosis by ultrasonography and CT scanning. First choice of urinary drainage was placing a retrograde ureteric stent cystoscopically. Outcome of patients who had stenting were recorded after following them until death or removal of stents. Eighty two patients with ureteric obstruction related to malignant lesions had complete data. In 33 (25%) patients, retrograde ureteric stenting was possible. Fifteen of them had recurrent tumour in the pelvis at the time of stenting and 13 (87%) were dead within 3 months of stenting. Four of the five patients who did not have pelvic tumour recurrence were alive at the end of the study. All eight patients who underwent stenting before surgery as a prophylactic measure and three of the five patients who had retroperitoneal tumour mass and underwent RUS were alive. Stenting was not possible in 42 patients. Thirty eight of them had pelvic tumour recurrences and two were having retroperitoneal tumour masses. Only one did not have tumour in the pelvis.CT evidence of tumour recurrence in the pelvis (OR 12.7; 95% CI 1.3-117.6; p=0.026) and high serum creatinine (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.6-11.7; p=0.004) were associated with failure to ureteric stenting. Chances of successful RUS were low in patients with ureteric obstruction in the presence of tumour recurrences or elevated serum creatinine. Even if ureteric stenting was successful, their life expectancy was short.

  3. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Il Kwon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs] have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations.

  4. Stenting or not prior to extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy for ureteral stones? Results of a prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfoungaristos, Stavros; Polimeros, Nikolaos; Kavouras, Adamantios; Perimenis, Petros

    2012-06-01

    To determine the need for pre-treatment stenting in patients undergoing extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) for ureteral stones sized 4-10 mm. A prospective randomized study was conducted between September 2009 and March 2011. Included 156 patients randomized in stented and non-stented groups and underwent a maximum of 3 ESWL sessions. Radiographic follow-up was used to assess the stone fragmentation and clearance. Results were compared in terms of stone-free rates, post-treatment morbidity and complications. Overall efficacy was 76.9%. Stone-free rates were statistically significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the stented group (68.6%) compared to the non-stented ones (83.7%). Furthermore, stenting was significantly correlated with post-treatment lower urinary tract symptoms (P ≤ 0.001), need for more ESWL sessions (P = 0.019) and possibility for operation due to ESWL failure (P = 0.026). A multivariate analysis was conducted to identify the parameters which may predict complete stone removal after ESWL. Stone size (P = 0.026), stone location (P = 0.011) and stenting (P = 0.007) were the most significant factors. ESWL is an efficient and safe treatment for 4- to 10-mm ureteral stones. Pre-treatment stenting is limiting stone-free rates and is significantly influencing post-ESWL morbidity and quality of life in a negative manner, while it contributes minimally to the prophylaxis of complications.

  5. Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000235.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - carotid artery - discharge To use the sharing ... the hospital. You may have also had a stent (a tiny wire mesh tube) placed in the ...

  6. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007393.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries To use the sharing features ... inside the arteries and block blood flow. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that keeps ...

  8. Rosoxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated acute gonococcal urethritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagaskar S

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available A total of 112 male patients presenting with acute gonococcal urethritis were admitted to the hospital. The diagnosis was confirmed by smear, culture, oxidase reaction and sugar fermentation tests. The patients were treated with a single 300 mg capsule of rosoxacin. All patients except one showed adequate response to rosoxacin.

  9. Oral mucosa grafts for urethral reconstruction | Mungadi | Annals of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urethral reconstruction has continued to present formidable and enormous challenges for urologic, paediatric and plastic surgeons as diverse opinions have been expressed on the quality and type of ideal substitution material. This literature review is aimed at drawing attention of surgeons to the versatile ...

  10. Outcome of urethral strictures treated by endoscopic urethrotomy and urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinaut-Ranera, Javier; Arrabal-Polo, Miguel Ángel; Merino-Salas, Sergio; Nogueras-Ocaña, Mercedes; López-León, Víctor Manuel; Palao-Yago, Francisco; Arrabal-Martín, Miguel; Lahoz-García, Clara; Alaminos, Miguel; Zuluaga-Gomez, Armando

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the outcomes of patients with urethral stricture who underwent surgical treatment within the past 5 years. This is a retrospective study of male patients who underwent surgery for urethral stricture at our service from January 2008 to June 2012. We analyzed the comorbidities, type, length and location of the stricture and the surgical treatment outcome after endoscopic urethrotomy, urethroplasty or both. In total, 45 patients with a mean age of 53.7 ± 16.7 years underwent surgical treatment for urethral stricture. Six months after surgery, 46.7% of the patients had a maximum urinary flow greater than 15 mL/s, whereas 87.3% of the patients exhibited no stricture by urethrography after the treatment. The success rate in the patients undergoing urethrotomy was 47.8% versus 86.4% in those undergoing urethroplasty (p = 0.01). Twenty percent of the patients in whom the initial urethrotomy had failed subsequently underwent urethroplasty, thereby increasing the treatment success. In most cases, the treatment of choice for urethral stricture should be urethroplasty. Previous treatment with urethrotomy does not appear to produce adverse effects that affect the outcome of a urethroplasty if urethrotomy failed, so urethrotomy may be indicated in patients with short strictures or in patients at high surgical risk.

  11. Treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation: A forgotten tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stricture is a common condition that can lead to serious complications such as urinary infections and renal insufficiency secondary to urinary retention. Treatment options include catheterization and dilation, urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy as well. Although treatment option depends on the type, length and aetiology of stricture, the choice can be influenced to varying degrees by the simplicity of the method, the preferences of the patient the available accoutrements and the patient health condition. Both urethroplasty and endoscopic internal urethrotomy require anaesthesia and thus are not suitable for many elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients. On the other hand, dilations are easy to perform in every day clinical practice however they have been associated with iatrogenic urethral trauma. In contrast, balloon dilation under vision dilates by radial application of forces against the stricture, avoiding the potentially shearing forces associated with sequential rigid dilation. Since it reduces the possibility of an iatrogenic urethral trauma and the subsequent spongiofibrosis may lead into improved therapeutic outcomes. In this report we describe a technique for the treatment of urethral strictures with balloon dilation in elder and unfit for surgical treatment patients.

  12. Urethroplasty for male urethral strictures: Experience from a national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Fall

    The success of urethroplasty was more frequent for urethral strictures between 1 and 5 cm (46/69) than in ... advent, endoscopic internal urethrotomy (EIU) raised great hopes because it is a .... The comparative analysis of the variables was performed with .... thral stricture are neither clinically effective nor cost-effective.

  13. Congenital anterior urethral valves and diverticula: Diagnosis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: We propose that, the patients of AUVs, if not excessively delayed for treatment are otherwise well in terms of general condition as opposed to patients of posterior urethral valves. The diagnosis is easily established by VCUG and the severity is revealed by a sonogram. Open surgical excision is the method of ...

  14. Pelvic fracture urethral injuries revisited: A systematic review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In children, the urethra and bladder neck may be directly torn by the sharp edge of bone fragments. Retrograde urethrography remains the cornerstone for the diagnostic appraisal of posterior urethral injury. Of the three conventional treatment methods primary suturing has the greatest complication rates of incontinence and ...

  15. Review: Management of anterior urethral strictures with buccal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urethral stricture management is a challenging surgery. Multiplicity of techniques means that none of them is ideal. No single technique is appropriate for all situations and the successful surgeon should have a store of operations to choose from according to each specific case. This review aims to provide an update on the ...

  16. The Treatment of Complex Urethral Strictures Using Ventral Onlay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the outcome of free onlay Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG) with onlay penile Skin Island Flap (SIF) urethroplasty in the treatment of complex urethral strictures. Patients and Methods: A prospective comparative study was conducted at the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

  17. Prostatic urethral lift vs transurethral resection of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gratzke, Christian; Barber, Neil; Speakman, Mark J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare prostatic urethral lift (PUL) with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) with regard to symptoms, recovery experience, sexual function, continence, safety, quality of life, sleep and overall patient perception. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 80 patients with lower...

  18. Posterior Urethral Valves in Children: Pattern of Presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of congenital lower urinary tract outflow obstruction in male infants with an ... Talabi, et al.: Surgical treatment and initial outcome of posterior urethral valve in children. 152 ... stabilizing the patients by controlling infection, correction of fluid, electrolyte ..... have predictive value or be responsible for the long term development ...

  19. Posterior urethral valves and Down syndrome | Lazarus | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The broad range of renal and urinary tract abnormalities associated with Down syndrome are not well known. We present two cases from a single institution of posterior urethral valves associated with Down syndrome. The cases illustrate the potential for delayed diagnosis and the management challenges. The literature is ...

  20. Semen-like urethral discharge during the use of mazindol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Meyboom, R H

    Two case reports are described of male patients experiencing a semen-like urethral discharge during micturition, suspected to be induced by mazindol. Mazindol has an indirect sympathomimetic action and is known to cause urogenital side effects such as urinary retention and testicular pain. It is

  1. Analysis of short-term results of monsieur′s tunica albuginea urethroplasty as a definitive procedure for pan-anterior urethral stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adittya K Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Long anterior urethral strictures are fairly common in developing world and the treatment is equally challenging. Aim: To assess the results and efficacy of Monsieur′s Tunica Albuginea Urethroplasty (TAU for anterior urethral stricture. Settings and Design: We analyzed the results in 10 consecutive patients with pan-anterior urethral stricture, who underwent Monsieur′s urethroplasty. Materials and Methods: The procedure involves mobilization of strictured urethra and laying it open with a dorsal slit. Edges of the slit-open urethra are sutured to edges of the urethral groove to the tunica of corporal bodies with catheter in situ. Results were assessed postoperatively 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Patients were categorized as success and failure by comparative analysis of patient satisfaction along with urethroscopy, retrograde urethrogram, uroflowmetry. All patients were taken for post-operative urethroscopic analysis at 6 months to allow better understanding of both successful and failed cases. Results: Mean follow-up of 15.2 (11-19 months showed an 80% success rate. Mean uroflow rate showed Qmax 24.5 cc/sec with 8 cases showing no residual or recurrent stricture. Two cases failed and required intervention. Urethroscopic visualization of the reconstruction site showed wide, patent and distensible neourethra appearing epithelized over roof formed by tunica albuginea of the corpora cavernosa in successful cases. Conclusion: Monsieur′s TAU is effective technique in treatment of anterior urethral stricture especially cases with unavailable buccal mucosa, with results fairly acceptable at the end of one year.

  2. Management of stent dislodgment in coarctoplasty of aorta with three overlapping self-expandable nitinol stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, Payam; Haji-Zeinali, Ali-Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of native coarctation of aorta managed with three self-expandable nitinol stents. After balloon pre-dilation, the first and second stents were dislodged. The coarcted area was successfully treated with the third stent overlapped with the previous stents. During follow up (30 months), the patient was free of complications. It seems that implantation of multiple overlapping self-expandable stents in aortic coarctation patients, if needed, is safe and possible.

  3. A Method for Recording Urethral Pressure Profiles in Female Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengfei Xu

    Full Text Available Urethral pressure profile (UPP and leak-point pressure (LPP measurements as well as external urethral sphincter (EUS electromyography (EMG and videourodynamic analyses are the primary methods for evaluating urethral function in humans. However, UPP recording in female rats, a widely used animal model, is challenging due to their small body sizes. This study reports a novel method for recording UPP in female rats.Seventeen anesthetized female rats were studied. LPP data for 14 rats were included. The other 3 rats were excluded because of death or abnormal urogenital organs. UPP curves were recorded using a modified water-perfusion catheter system, with the lateral hole facing the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o'clock positions in a randomized sequence. LPP, functional urethral length (FUL and maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP were analyzed.The mean LPP was 64.39 ± 20.29 cm H2O. The mean FUL and MUCP values at the 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-o'clock positions were 12.90 ± 1.20, 16.70 ± 1.95, 13.90 ± 2.42, and 11.60 ± 0.97 mm, respectively, and 38.70 ± 11.85, 33.90 ± 11.82, 37.40 ± 11.95, and 71.90 ± 23.01 cm H2O, respectively. The FUL at the 6-o'clock position and MUCP at the 12-o'clock position were significantly greater than those at the other 3 positions. The FUL and MUCP of repeated UPP recordings were not significantly different than those of the first recordings.UPP recording using a modified method based on a water-perfusion catheter system is feasible and replicable in female rats. It produces UPP curves that sensitively and appreciably reflect detailed pressure changes at different points within the urethra and thus provides opportunity to evaluate urethral structures, especially the urethral sphincter, in detail. These results may enhance the utility of female rat models in research of urinary sphincter mechanisms.

  4. Neointima development in externally stented saphenous vein grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Węglarz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The main limitation of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG is rapid neointimal hyperplasia leading to graft failure. Aim : To assess plaque formation in saphenous vein grafts (SVG covered by an external Dacron stent in comparison with the classical technique. Material and methods : In the study group vein grafts covered by external stent mesh made of Dacron were implanted. An intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS study was performed in 35 aorto-coronary SVG covered by an external Dacron stent and in 64 normal SVG during the first year after CABG. In each SVG 25 mm of good quality IVUS image, volumes of lumen, plaque (neointima, outer border of the vein graft (external SVG and adventitia were calculated in three time periods: 0–130 days, 130–260 days and 260–390 days. Results : Between the first and second time period, lumen volume (mm3 was reduced from 10.33 ±4.4, to 6.80 ±2.23 in the second period and 5.69 ±1.26 in the third one. This effect was much less marked in normal grafts. The corresponding lumen volume (mm3 was: 10.90 ±3.9, 9.15 ±2.94 and 8.92 ±2.93 in consecutive time periods. Plaque volume (mm3 did not change in control grafts during the course of the study, but it increased very significantly in stented grafts from 0.86 ±1.24 in the first period to 2.70 ±1.58 in the second and 3.29 ±2.66 in the third one. Conclusions : The experimental technique of implanting SVG covered with an external elastic Dacron stent seems to be inferior to traditional ones. This is probably due to the more complicated process of vein implantation and higher micro-injury occurrence during the surgery.

  5. Application of High Entropy Alloys in Stent Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagarsamy, Karthik

    High entropy alloys (HEAs) are alloys with five or more principal elements. Due to these distinct concept of alloying, the HEA exhibits unique and superior properties. The outstanding properties of HEA includes higher strength/hardness, superior wear resistance, high temperature stability, higher fatigue life, good corrosion and oxidation resistance. Such characteristics of HEA has been significant interest leading to researches on these emerging field. Even though many works are done to understand the characteristic of these HEAs, very few works are made on how the HEAs can be applied for commercial uses. This work discusses the application of High entropy alloys in biomedical applications. The coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States kills more than 350,000 persons/year and it costs $108.9 billion for the nation each year in spite of significant advancements in medical care and public awareness. A cardiovascular disease affects heart or blood vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) or both by blocking the blood flow. As a surgical interventions, stent implants are deployed to cure or ameliorate the disease. However, the high failure rate of stents has lead researchers to give special attention towards analyzing stent structure, materials and characteristics. Many works related to alternate material and/or design are carried out in recent time. This paper discusses the feasibility of CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs in stent implant application. This work is based on the speculation that CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs are biocompatible material. These HEAs are characterized to determine the microstructure and mechanical properties. Computational modeling and analysis were carried out on stent implant by applying CoCrFeNiMn and Al0.1CoCrFeNi HEAs as material to understand the structural behavior.

  6. Plastic biliary stents for malignant biliary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibregtse, Inge; Fockens, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plastic biliary endoprostheses have not changed much since their introduction more than 3 decades ago. Although their use has been challenged by the introduction of metal stents, plastic stents still remain commonly used. Much work has been done to improve the problem of stent obstruction but

  7. Therapies targeting inflammation after stent implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Since the introduction of coronary vessel scaffold by metallic stent, percutaneous coronary intervention has become widely performed all over the world. Although drug-eluting stent technology has further decrease the incidence of in-stent restenosis, there still remaining issues related to stent implantation. Vessel inflammation is one of the causes that may be related to stent restenosis as well as stent thrombosis. Therefore, systemic therapies targeting inflammation emerged as adjunctive pharmacological intervention to improve outcome. Statins, corticosteroids, antiplatelets, and immunosuppresive or anti-cancer drugs are reported to favorably impact outcome after bare-metal stent implantation. In type 2 diabetic patients, pioglitazone may be the most promising drug that can lower neointimal proliferation and, as a result, lower incidence of restenosis and target lesion revascularization. On the other hand, several new stent platforms that might decrease inflammatory response after drug-eluting stent implantation have been introduced. Because durable polymer used in the first generation drug-eluting stents are recognized to be responsible for unfavorable vessel response, biocompatible or bioabsorbable polymer has been introduce and already used clinically. Furthermore, polymer-free drug-eluting stent and bioresorbable scaffold are under investigation. Although vessel inflammation may be reduced by using these new drug-eluting stents or scaffold, long-term impact needs to be investigated further.

  8. Incidence and predictors of coronary stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Bollati, Mario; Clementi, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    Stent thrombosis remains among the most feared complications of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting. However, data on its incidence and predictors are sparse and conflicting. We thus aimed to perform a collaborative systematic review on incidence and predictors of stent...

  9. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ureteral stent. 876.4620 Section 876.4620 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent...

  10. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vaginal stent. 884.3900 Section 884.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to...

  11. Thulium laser urethrotomy for urethral stricture: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhui; Wang, Zhixiang; Yang, Bo; Yang, Qing; Sun, Yinghao

    2010-09-01

    The outcome of thulium laser urethrotomy for patients with urethral stricture had not been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate outcome of endourethrotomy with the thulium laser as a minimally invasive treatment for urethral stricture. Twenty-one consecutive patients with urethral stricture were evaluated by retrograde uroflowmetry, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), and quality of life preoperatively at a single academic center. All patients were treated with thulium laser urethrotomy. All patients were followed up for 12-24 months postoperatively by uroflowmetry and by retrograde with voiding cystourethrogram every 3 months. And all patients were followed up by mailed questionnaire, including IPSS and quality of life. Retrograde endoscopic thulium laser urethrotomy was performed in all 21 patients. Most patients (N = 16; 76.2%) did not need any reintervention. Five patients developed recurrent strictures, of them two patients were treated by another laser urethrotomy, one patient was treated by open urethroplasty with buccal mucosa and the other two patients' reintervention were treated by urethral dilation. No intraoperative complications were encountered, although in 9.5% (N = 2) of patients, a urinary tract infection was diagnosed postoperatively. No gross hematuria occurred. Including two patients treated with repeat laser urethrotomy, 17(81.0%) showed good flow of urine (Q(ave)>16.0 ml/second) and adequate caliber urethra in retrograde urethrogram (RGU) 12 months after operation. Three (14.3%) patients showed narrow stream of urine (Q(ave)urethrotomy. The thulium laser urethrotomy was a safe and effective minimally invasive therapeutic modality for urethral stricture. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. [Oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for complicated urethral strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Akio; Sumitomo, Makoto; Kanbara, Taiki; Tsujita, Yujiro; Yoshii, Takahiko; Yoshii, Hidehiko; Satoh, Akinori; Asakuma, Junichi; Ito, Keiichi; Hayakawa, Masamichi; Asano, Tomohiko

    2010-03-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and outcome of one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty, which is currently the procedure of choice for treating lengthy and complicated urethral strictures not amenable to excision and primary end-to-end anastomosis. Seven patients 33 to 74 years old (mean age = 53.7) underwent one-stage oral mucosa graft urethroplasty for a stricture in either the bulbar urethra (four patients), penile urethra (two patients), or pan-anterior urethra (one patient). Three of the strictures were due to trauma, one was due to inflammation, and one was due to a failed hypospadia repair. The other two were iatrogenic. All patients had previously undergone either internal urethrotomy or repeated urethral dilation. Three patients received a tube graft, three received a ventral onlay, and one received a dorsal onlay. A free graft of oral mucosa was harvested from the inside of each patient's left cheek, and if necessary to obtain a sufficient length, the harvest was extended to include mucosa from the lower lip and the right cheek. The graft lengths ranged from 2.5 to 12 cm (mean = 4.6 cm). A urethral catheter was left in place for 3 weeks postoperatively. While no severe complications at the donor site were observed during follow-up periods ranging from 3 to 55 months (mean = 14 months), two patients who had received a tube graft developed distal anastomotic ring strictures that were managed by internal urethrotomy. The other five required no postoperative urological procedure even though one who had received a ventral onlay developed a penoscrotal fistula. Oral mucosa is an ideal urethral graft, and oral mucosa graft urethroplasty is an effective procedure for repairing complicated urethral strictures involving long portions of the urethra.

  13. Coronary and peripheral stenting in aorto-ostial protruding stents: The balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, Tarek A; Sanchez, Carlos E; Bailey, Steven R

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of aorto-ostial in-stent restenosis lesions represents a challenge for interventional cardiologists. Excessive protrusion of the stent into the aorta may lead to multiple technical problems, such as difficult catheter reengagement of the vessel ostium or inability to re-wire through the stent lumen in repeat interventions. We describe a balloon assisted access to protruding stent technique in cases where conventional coaxial engagement of an aorto-ostial protruding stent with the guide catheter or passage of the guide wire through the true lumen is not feasible. This technique is applicable both in coronary and peripheral arteries. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Three-dimensional translabial ultrasound assessment of urethral supports and the urethral sphincter complex in stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassadó Garriga, Jordi; Pessarrodona Isern, Antoni; Rodríguez Carballeira, Monica; Pallarols Badia, Mar; Moya Del Corral, Manuela; Valls Esteve, Marta; Huguet Galofré, Eva

    2017-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanism of incontinence is multifactorial. We evaluated the role of 3D-4D ultrasound in the assessment of the fascial supports of the urethra and the urethral sphincter complex (USC) for diagnosing stress urinary incontinence. Observational case-control study in women with and without stress urinary incontinence attending a urogynecology service and a general gynecology service. All women were interviewed, examined, and classified according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) and underwent a 3D-4D translabial ultrasound. Fascial supports of the urethra were assessed by tomographic ultrasound and were considered to be intact or absent if it was possible to identify them at eight levels on each side, urethral mobility was assessed on maximal Valsalva in sagittal section and the length and volume of the USC at rest and on maximal Valsalva were determined using the Virtual Organ Computer-aided Analysis (VOCAL) program. Variables were compared between continent and incontinent women. A total of 173 women were examined, 78 continent and 95 incontinent. There was a significant difference in urethral mobility between continent and incontinent women (12.82 mm vs. 21.85 mm, P rest was significantly shorter (P continent and incontinent women. However, the length of the USC at rest was shorter and urethral mobility was higher in incontinent women. Neurourol. Urodynam. 9999:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Causes of failure with Szabo technique – An analysis of nine cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajendra Kumar; Padmanabhan, T.N.C.; Chitnis, Nishad

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this case series is to identify and define causes of failure of Szabo technique in rapid-exchange monorail system for ostial lesions. Methods and results From March 2009 to March 2011, 42 patients with an ostial lesion were treated percutaneously at our institution using Szabo technique in a monorail stent system. All patients received unfractionated heparin during intervention. Loading dose of clopidogrel, followed by clopidogrel and aspirin was administered. In 57% of patients, drug-eluting stents were used and in 42.8% patients bare metal stents. The stent was advanced over both wires, the target wire and the anchor wire. The anchor wire, which was passed through the proximal trailing strut of the stent helps to achieve precise stenting. The procedure was considered to be successful if stent was placed precisely covering the lesion and without stent loss or anchor wire prolapsing. Of the total 42 patients, the procedure was successful in 33, while failed in 9. Majority of failures were due to wire entanglement, which was fixed successfully in 3 cases by removing and reinserting the anchor wire. Out of other three failures, in one stent dislodgment occurred, stent could not cross the lesion in one and in another anchor wire got looped and prolapsed into target vessel. Conclusion This case series shows that the Szabo technique, in spite of some difficulties like wire entanglement, stent dislodgement and resistance during stent advancement, is a simple and feasible method for treating variety of ostial lesions precisely compared to conventional angioplasty. PMID:23809379

  16. Causes of failure with Szabo technique - an analysis of nine cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajendra Kumar; Padmanabhan, T N C; Chitnis, Nishad

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this case series is to identify and define causes of failure of Szabo technique in rapid-exchange monorail system for ostial lesions. From March 2009 to March 2011, 42 patients with an ostial lesion were treated percutaneously at our institution using Szabo technique in a monorail stent system. All patients received unfractionated heparin during intervention. Loading dose of clopidogrel, followed by clopidogrel and aspirin was administered. In 57% of patients, drug-eluting stents were used and in 42.8% patients bare metal stents. The stent was advanced over both wires, the target wire and the anchor wire. The anchor wire, which was passed through the proximal trailing strut of the stent helps to achieve precise stenting. The procedure was considered to be successful if stent was placed precisely covering the lesion and without stent loss or anchor wire prolapsing. Of the total 42 patients, the procedure was successful in 33, while failed in 9. Majority of failures were due to wire entanglement, which was fixed successfully in 3 cases by removing and reinserting the anchor wire. Out of other three failures, in one stent dislodgment occurred, stent could not cross the lesion in one and in another anchor wire got looped and prolapsed into target vessel. This case series shows that the Szabo technique, in spite of some difficulties like wire entanglement, stent dislodgement and resistance during stent advancement, is a simple and feasible method for treating variety of ostial lesions precisely compared to conventional angioplasty. Copyright © 2013 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSPU B IC URETHROPLASTY FOR RECURRENT URETHRAL STR U CTURE IN PELVIC FRACTURE URETHRAL DISTRACTION DEFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudegowdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE STUDY: Effectiveness of Transpubic urethroplasty in recurrent (failed urethral strictures due to pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. INTRODUCTION: Urethral distraction injuries occur upto 10% of pelvic fracture cases. The principle indication of Transpubic urethroplasty is length >3 c ms, recur rent (failed repairs of posterior urethral stricture. Though other procedures like primary anastomotic urethroplasty, rerouting of the urethra under the corporal body, urethral substitution with tubularised flaps, two stage urethroplasty are described, Tr anspubic urethroplasty is said to produce the best results especially when repeat procedures are required. MATERIALS & METHODS: This is a prospective study from 2004 to 2014 consisting of 17 patients having recurrent stricture urethra secondary to pelvic f racture urethral distraction defects (PFUDD. All the patients were males and their age ranged from 15year to 45 years. Pre - op evaluation included X - ray KUB, Ultrasound abdomen & pelvis, retrograde urethrogram (RGU, micturating cystourethrogram (MCU, up and down Cystoscopy, urine culture and renal biochemical parameters. Urethra was approched through progressive perineal and abdominal approach with total pubectomy, followed by excising fibrosed stricture and tension free end to end anastomosis. Post opera tively pericatheteral RGU was carried out after 4 weeks and Catheter removed if there was no leak. RGU, MCU uroflowmetry and PVR were done one month after removal of catheter. Subsequently UFR, PVR and obstructive symptoms were assessed periodically. RESUL TS: All 17 Cases were followed up for a period of 3 - 11 years. Out of 17patients, 14(80% patients maintained good uroflow (UFR and insignificant PVR and procedure was considered successful. In 3 patients procedure failed, of which 2 patients had pericathe ter leak and reduced urinary flow with significant PVR and were followed up with CIC and 1 patient remained on permanent

  18. Experimental absorbable stent permits airway remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Liu, Yun-Hen; Peng, Yi-Jie; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2011-02-01

    Despite metallic and silicone stents being effective in treating various airway lesions, many concerns still remain. A bioresorbable stent that scaffolds the airway lumen and dissolves after the remodeling process is completed has advantages over metallic and silicone stents. We designed and fabricated a new mesh-type bioresorbable stent with a backbone of polycaprolactone (PCL), and evaluated its safety and biocompatibility in a rabbit trachea model. The PCL stent was fabricated by a laboratory-made microinjection molding machine. In vitro mechanical strength of the PCL stents was tested and compared to that of commercial silicone stents. The bioresorbable stents were surgically implanted into the cervical trachea of New Zealand white rabbits (n=6). Animals received bronchoscopic examination at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was completed to evaluate the biocompatibility of the stents. No animals died during the period of study. Distal stent migration was noted in 1 rabbit. In-stent secretion accumulation was found in 2 rabbits. Histological examination showed intact ciliated epithelium and marked leukocyte infiltration in the submucosa of the stented area at 10 and 28 weeks. Stent degradation was minimal, and the mechanical strength was well preserved at the end of 33 weeks. These preliminary findings showed good safety and biocompatibility of the new PCL stent when used in the airway remodeling. PCL could be a promising bioresorbable material for stent design if prolonged degradation time is required. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Symptoms of non-gonococcal urethritis in heterosexual men: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iser, P; Read, Tr H; Tabrizi, S; Bradshaw, C; Lee, D; Horvarth, L; Garland, S; Denham, I; Fairley, C K

    2005-04-01

    To determine microbial and behavioural factors contributing to non-gonococcal urethral symptoms in men. Case-control study of heterosexual men with non-gonococcal urethral symptoms (cases) and without urethral symptoms (controls) attending Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, Australia. Sexual behaviour and condom use were measured by questionnaire. First stream urine was tested for potential pathogens: Chlamydia trachomatis (ligase chain reaction), Mycoplasma genitalium (polymerase chain reaction, PCR), Ureaplasma urealyticum (culture and PCR), and Streptococcus spp, Gardnerella vaginalis, and Haemophilus species (culture). Urethral smears from cases were examined for polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 80 cases and 79 controls were recruited over 4 months in 2002-3. 49 cases (61%) had urethritis by microscopic criteria, 17 (21%) had Chlamydia trachomatis (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4 to 222)), five (6%) had Mycoplasma genitalium (OR 6.1 (95% CI: 0.6 to 61)), and 11 (14%) had Gardnerella vaginalis (OR 9.0 (95% CI: 1.6 to 52)). Other organisms were not significantly associated with urethral symptoms. The presence of urethritis on urethral smear did not predict the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis (OR 1.7 (95% CI: 0.5 to 5.4)). Urethral symptoms were significantly associated with unprotected vaginal sex with more than one casual partner (OR 9.3 (95% CI: 1.3 to 65)) and unprotected anal sex with a regular partner in the past month (OR 3.5 (95% CI: 1.0 to 13)). Gardnerella vaginalis and unprotected anal sex may cause symptoms of non-gonococcal urethritis. Microscopy of the urethral smear to diagnose urethritis in this population does not help to identify which men with urethral symptoms require treatment for chlamydia.

  20. The use of coronary stent in hepatic artery stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Mingsheng; Shan Hong; Jiang Zaibo; Li Zhengran; Zhu Kangshun; Guan Shouhai; Qian Jiesheng; Chen Guihua; Lu Minqiang; Yang Yang

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of coronary stent placement in hepatic artery stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Materials and methods: Of 430 consecutive adult orthotopic liver transplant recipients between November 2003 and September 2005, 17 had hepatic artery stenosis (HAS). Fourteen of them underwent coronary stent placement in the HAS. The technical results, complications, hepatic artery patency and clinical outcome were reviewed. Results: Technical and immediate success was 100%. After a mean follow-up of 159.4 days (range, 9-375 days), all patients obtained patent hepatic arteries except 2 patients occurred hepatic artery restenoses at 26 and 45 days after stent placement, respectively. Kaplan-Meier curve of patency showed cumulated stent patency at 3, 6, and 12 months of 78%, 58% and 45%, respectively. During the follow-up, 8 patients survived, 5 died of septic multiple-organ failure, 1 received retransplantation because of refractory biliary infection. Hepatic artery dissection induced by a guiding catheter occurred in one patient and was successfully treated with a coronary stent. Conclusion: Hepatic artery stenosis after OLT can be successfully treated with coronary stent placement with low complication rate and an acceptable 1-year hepatic artery patency rate

  1. Endoscopic Stenting for Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learned From a 15-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Enrico; Lamazza, Antonietta; Sterpetti, Antonio V; Schillaci, Alberto

    The aim of our prospective study was to analyze the results of endoscopic stenting to treat obstruction due to colorectal cancer and complications after colorectal resection for cancer. Endoscopic stenting for obstructing colorectal cancer has become a common place in clinical practice. However, there is a 2% to 5% risk of bowel perforation, and a percentage of technical failure of 2% to 10%. In a 15-year period (August, 1999 to December, 2013), 153 patients with colorectal cancer had endoscopic placement of a self-expandable metal stent for treatment of an obstructing colorectal cancer (133 patients) or for treatment of complications after colorectal resection for cancer (20 patients). They were prospectively evaluated in a database and they form the basis of this report. There was no case of mortality or major morbidity. Overall technical success was 94.8%. After introducing the use of a pediatric nasogastroscope to pass the obstruction (71 patients), technical success was 100%. Complications in patients in whom the stent was left in place during the follow-up were frequent, requiring a close observation. We had 20 patients with fecal obstruction, 4 cases of stent dislodgment, and 8 cases of obstruction from ingrowth of the tumor. All patients were treated successfully endoscopically. Placement of self-expandable metal stents represents a valid technique. A proper training is required.

  2. Urethral diverticulum after laparoscopically-assisted anorectal pull-through (LAARP) for anorectal malformation: is resection of the diverticulum always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pedro José; Guelfand, Miguel; Angel, Lorena; Paulos, Angélica; Cadena, Yair; Escala, José M; Letelier, Nelly; Zubieta, Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    With the increased use of minimally invasive surgery, the urethral diverticulum after anorectal surgery has become an issue. The few cases reported have been managed by surgical excision. We hereby report a case of urethral diverticulum after a laparoscopically-assisted anorectal pull-through (LAARP)procedure with a successful outcome after a period of active surveillance. A full-term boy who displayed a high anorectal malformation (ARM) and a rectoprostatic fistula underwent colostomy on the first day. He also showed associated malformations: bilateral low-grade reflux, horseshoe kidney and thoracic hemivertebrae; however, there were no signs of spinal cord tethering. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was started. At the age of 3 months, he underwent a LAARP with a 3 abdominal-port approach. After complete dissection of the distal bowel, the recto-prostatic fistula was identified and tied with metallic clips. A 10 mm trocar was inserted through the centre of the sphincteric complex, which had been previously identified under laparoscopic view during perineal electrical stimulation. The anorectal pull-through was accomplished without tension. The bladder remained stented for 14 days. On the 18th postoperative day, a voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) showed a 15 X 5 mm image of the diverticulum at the level of the membranous urethra. After 6 months, a new VCUG showed a normal urethra with neither signs of the diverticulum nor strictures; persistence of grade 2 reflux on the right side and resolution of the reflux on the left. When the boy was one year old his colostomy was closed uneventfully. Six months later he had not come into the emergency since the operation and voided with a normal flow. This report suggests that LAARP is a feasible approach for ARM, although urethral diverticulum is a major concern. It may evolve without complications, and eventually resolve spontaneously. Active surveillance might be an option in selected asymptomatic patients; however a longer

  3. Microvascular stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents: feasibility, ischemia time, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ralf; Vorwig, Oliver; Wöltje, Michael; Gaudin, Robert; Luebke, Andreas M; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Rheinnecker, Michael; Heiland, Max; Grupp, Katharina; Gröbe, Alexander; Hanken, Henning

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a novel microvascular anastomosis technique using N-fibroin stents. Cylinder stents of 1 mm diameter and 5 mm length were fabricated using N-fibroin from silkworms. In 22 rats, aortas were dissected, and the stent was inserted into the two ends of the aorta and fixed using methylmethacrylate. Stent anastomosis was successful in 21 (96%) rats. The mean ischemia time was 7.4 minutes, significantly shorter than the 15.9 minutes in the control group with conventional sutures (P stent anastomosis cases, and marked host rejection was evident at the stent anastomosis sites. Around the stents, thrombi were frequent (52%). Our study demonstrated the basic feasibility of stent anastomosis using N-fibroin stents and reduced ischemia time. However, thrombus formation, frequent and severe abdominal infections, and heavy host rejection remain critical issues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoscopic stent suture fixation for prevention of esophageal stent migration during prolonged dilatation for achalasia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, E; Asari, R; Paireder, M; Lenglinger, J; Schoppmann, S F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare endoscopic stent suture fixation with endoscopic clip attachment or the use of partially covered stents (PCS) regarding their capability to prevent stent migration during prolonged dilatation in achalasia. Large-diameter self-expanding metal stents (30 mm × 80 mm) were placed across the gastroesophageal junction in 11 patients with achalasia. Stent removal was scheduled after 4 to 7 days. To prevent stent dislocation, endoscopic clip attachment, endoscopic stent suture fixation, or PCS were used. The Eckardt score was evaluated before and 6 months after prolonged dilatation. After endoscopic stent suture fixation, no (0/4) sutured stent migrated. When endoscopic clips were used, 80% (4/5) clipped stents migrated (p = 0.02). Of two PCS (n = 2), one migrated and one became embedded leading to difficult stent removal. Technical adverse events were not seen in endoscopic stent suture fixation but were significantly correlated with the use of clips or PCS (r = 0.828, p = 0.02). Overall, 72% of patients were in remission regarding their achalasia symptoms 6 months after prolonged dilatation. Endoscopic suture fixation of esophageal stents but not clip attachment appears to be the best method of preventing early migration of esophageal stents placed at difficult locations such as at the naive gastroesophageal junction. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Angulated Stents-A Novel Stent Improvisation to Manage Difficult Post-tuberculosis Bronchial Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Chee Kiang; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Kim, Hojoong

    2017-10-18

    Post-tuberculosis bronchostenosis (PTBS), a complication of endobronchial tuberculosis is currently treated by bronchial stenting. However, in cases of angulated bronchial stenoses, difficulty is often encountered in stent insertion and maintenance, resulting in stent migration, granulation tissue overgrowth, and restenosis. To accommodate the angulated alignment of the stenosis, we devised an "angulated stent"-a novel improvisation of the conventional stent via splicing and suturing to achieve a resultant angulated shape. A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the performance of this stent. Among 283 PTBS patients who underwent interventional bronchoscopy at our center from 2004 to 2014, 21 were treated with at least one angulated stent. Clinical outcomes, including the stenting duration were investigated. After a median follow-up of 26 months, stent removal was successful in 7 (33.3%) out of 21 patients. In patients managed with angulated stents, the median duration to stent change or eventual removal was longer than those treated with straight tube stents (392 days vs. 86 days; p < 0.05). Angulated stents are a feasible treatment option in patients with angulated PTBS by reducing complications and prolonging the stent-changing interval.

  6. Primary and revision efficacy of cross-wired metallic stents for endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement in malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Moon, J H; Kim, J H; Park, D H; Lee, S S; Choi, H J; Cho, Y D; Park, S H; Kim, S J

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic bilateral drainage for inoperable malignant hilar biliary strictures (HBS) using metal stents is considered to be technically difficult. Furthermore, endoscopic revision of bilateral stenting after occlusion can be challenging. This study was performed to evaluate the long-term efficacy of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents in high-grade malignant HBS and planned endoscopic bilateral revision. A total of 84 patients with inoperable high-grade malignant HBS were enrolled from three academic tertiary referral centers. Two cross-wired metal stents were inserted using a bilateral stent-in-stent placement method. Bilateral endoscopic revision was also performed during follow-up using either identical metal stents or plastic stents. The main outcome measurements were technical and functional success, complications, stent patency, and endoscopic revision efficacy. The technical and clinical success rates of endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents were 95.2% (80/84) and 92.9% (78/84), respectively. Median patency (range) and survival were 238 days (10-429) and 256 days (10-1130), respectively. Obstruction of primary bilateral stents occurred in 30.8% (24/78) of patients with functionally successful stent placement. The technical and clinical success rates of planned bilateral endoscopic revision for occluded stents were 83.3% (20/24) and 79.2% (19/24), respectively. For revision, bilateral metallic stents were placed in 11 patients (55.0%); the remaining patients received plastic stents. Palliative endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of cross-wired metallic stents was effective in patients with inoperable HBS. Revision endoscopic bilateral stenting may be feasible and successful in cases where the primary deployed metal stents are occluded. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Development of a dynamic in vitro model of a stented blood vessel to evaluate the effects of stent strut material selection and surface coating on smooth muscle cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Bradley Huegh

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in The United States and Europe, accounting for approximately half of all deaths. The most common form of cardiovascular disease is atherosclerosis, which is characterized by the formation of fatty atheromatous plaques that can grow to occlude the vessel lumen, thus causing ischemia distal to the occlusion. This is commonly treated using balloon angioplasty, which is usually done in conjunction with the deployment of a stent. Stent deployment helps hold the vessel open following the local injury caused by balloon inflation and prevents elastic recoil and subsequent negative remodeling. Stenting has been shown to significantly reduce restenosis rates from approximately 20-50% without a stent to about 10-30% with stent deployment. However, restenosis still remains the main cause of long-term stent failure. In basic terms, a balloon angioplasty procedure is a forceful displacement of an atherosclerotic lesion serving to widen the vessel lumen to increase blood flow. This procedure causes stretching of the vessel wall, tears in the atherosclerotic plaques, and general damage to the vessel in turn signaling a complex cascade of thrombosis, inflammation, intimal thickening, and vascular remodeling. Stent deployment also further complicates the immunological response by triggering a foreign body response from the implantation of a biomaterial into the body. When performing an angioplasty procedure, particularly in conjunction with stent deployment, a certain degree of vascular injury is inevitable. However, the initial injury can be further complicated by the body's local reaction to the implanted biomaterial, the severity of which can ultimately dictate the degree of restenosis and subsequently affect procedural success. The proliferative response of VSMCs to the various afore mentioned stimuli results in the formation of often copious amounts of neointimal tissue, generally known as intimal hyperplasia. The

  8. Endobronchial Occlusion Stent: A Preliminary Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yo Won; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Heo, Jeong Nam; Jeon, Seok Chol [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Song, Ho Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and the technical feasibility of the use of an endobronchial occlusion stent and to get preliminary data for the development of the optimal material required for endobronchial occlusions. A commercialized, self-expandable tracheobronchial stent was modified; one half had a polyurethane cover with an occluded end and the other half was uncovered with a flaring configuration. The occluded end was placed such that it would face the distal lung. Under fluoroscopic guidance, seven stents were placed at the lower lobar bronchus in 6 mini-pigs. The bronchial obstruction was examined immediately after stent placement. Chest radiographs were taken at days 1, 7, 14, and 28 after stent placement and the removed airways from two, two, one, and one mini-pigs sacrificed on corresponding days were examined for the maintenance of bronchial obstruction. Stents were successfully placed and induced the immediate bronchial obstruction in all mini-pigs. Five of seven airways with occlusion stents maintained an obstruction until the mini-pigs were sacrificed. Proximal stent migration occurred in two mini-pigs (29%), and pulmonary consolidations were observed distal to four of the stents (57%). The placement of an endobronchial occlusion stent and the obstruction of targeted bronchi seem to be feasible, but an add-on check valve should be considered to prevent stent migration and obstructive pneumonia

  9. The effect of single oral doses of duloxetine, reboxetine, and midodrine on the urethral pressure in healthy female subjects, using urethral pressure reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Niels; Cerneus, Dirk; Sawyer, William

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effect on urethral pressure of reference drugs known to reduce stress urinary incontinence symptoms by different effect size and mechanisms of action on urethral musculature under four test conditions in healthy female subjects using urethral pressure reflectometry. METHODS......: Healthy females aged 18-55 years were recruited by advertising for this phase 1, single site, placebo-controlled, randomized, four-period, crossover study. The interventions were single oral doses of 10 mg Midodrine, 80 mg Duloxetine, 12 mg Reboxetine, and placebo. The endpoints were the opening urethral...... pressure measured in each period at four time points (predose and 2, 5.5, and 9 h after dosing). RESULTS: Twenty-nine females were enrolled; 25 randomized and 24 completed the study. The opening urethral pressure was higher in all measurements with filled bladder compared with empty bladder, and during...

  10. Fatigue Assessment of Nickel-Titanium Peripheral Stents: Comparison of Multi-Axial Fatigue Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Dario; Berti, Francesca; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2018-02-01

    Peripheral Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) stents exploit super-elasticity to treat femoropopliteal artery atherosclerosis. The stent is subject to cyclic loads, which may lead to fatigue fracture and treatment failure. The complexity of the loading conditions and device geometry, coupled with the nonlinear material behavior, may induce multi-axial and non-proportional deformation. Finite element analysis can assess the fatigue risk, by comparing the device state of stress with the material fatigue limit. The most suitable fatigue model is not fully understood for NiTi devices, due to its complex thermo-mechanical behavior. This paper assesses the fatigue behavior of NiTi stents through computational models and experimental validation. Four different strain-based models are considered: the von Mises criterion and three critical plane models (Fatemi-Socie, Brown-Miller, and Smith-Watson-Topper models). Two stents, made of the same material with different cell geometries are manufactured, and their fatigue behavior is experimentally characterized. The comparison between experimental and numerical results highlights an overestimation of the failure risk by the von Mises criterion. On the contrary, the selected critical plane models, even if based on different damage mechanisms, give a better fatigue life estimation. Further investigations on crack propagation mechanisms of NiTi stents are required to properly select the most reliable fatigue model.

  11. Fatigue Assessment of Nickel-Titanium Peripheral Stents: Comparison of Multi-Axial Fatigue Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegretti, Dario; Berti, Francesca; Migliavacca, Francesco; Pennati, Giancarlo; Petrini, Lorenza

    2018-03-01

    Peripheral Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) stents exploit super-elasticity to treat femoropopliteal artery atherosclerosis. The stent is subject to cyclic loads, which may lead to fatigue fracture and treatment failure. The complexity of the loading conditions and device geometry, coupled with the nonlinear material behavior, may induce multi-axial and non-proportional deformation. Finite element analysis can assess the fatigue risk, by comparing the device state of stress with the material fatigue limit. The most suitable fatigue model is not fully understood for NiTi devices, due to its complex thermo-mechanical behavior. This paper assesses the fatigue behavior of NiTi stents through computational models and experimental validation. Four different strain-based models are considered: the von Mises criterion and three critical plane models (Fatemi-Socie, Brown-Miller, and Smith-Watson-Topper models). Two stents, made of the same material with different cell geometries are manufactured, and their fatigue behavior is experimentally characterized. The comparison between experimental and numerical results highlights an overestimation of the failure risk by the von Mises criterion. On the contrary, the selected critical plane models, even if based on different damage mechanisms, give a better fatigue life estimation. Further investigations on crack propagation mechanisms of NiTi stents are required to properly select the most reliable fatigue model.

  12. [Absorbable coronary stents. New promising technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Böse, Dirk; Haude, Michael; Kordish, Igor; Churzidze, Sofia; Malyar, Nasser; Konorza, Thomas; Sack, Stefan

    2007-06-01

    Coronary stent implantation started in Germany 20 years ago. In the beginning, the progress was very slow and accelerated 10 years later. Meanwhile, coronary stent implantation is a standard procedure in interventional cardiology. From the beginning of permanent stent implantation, research started to provide temporary stenting of coronary arteries, first with catheter-based systems, later with stent-alone technology. Stents were produced from polymers or metal. The first polymer stent implantation failed except the Igaki-Tamai stent in Japan. Newly developed absorbable polymer stents seem to be very promising, as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography have demonstrated. Temporary metal stents were developed based on iron and magnesium. Currently, the iron stent is tested in peripheral arteries. The absorbable magnesium stent (Biotronik, Berlin, Germany) was tested in peripheral arteries below the knee and meanwhile in the multicenter international PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and Angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) study. The first magnesium stent implantation was performed on July 30, 2004 after extended experimental testing in Essen. The magnesium stent behaved like a bare-metal stent with low recoil of 5-7%. The stent struts were absorbed when tested with IVUS. Stent struts were not visible by fluoroscopy or computed tomography (CT) as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). That means, that the magnesium stent is invisible and therefore CT and MRI can be used for imaging of interventions. Only using micro-CT the stent struts were visible. The absorption process could be demonstrated in a patient 18 days after implantation due to suspected acute coronary syndrome, which was excluded. IVUS showed a nice open lumen. Stent struts were no longer visible, but replaced by tissue indicating the previous stent location. Coronary angiography after 4 months showed an ischemia-driven target lesion

  13. A comparative evaluation of early stent occlusion among biliary conventional versus wing stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashab, Mouen A; Hutfless, Susan; Kim, Katherine; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia I; Jagannath, Sanjay B; Okolo, Patrick I; Shin, Eun Ji; Singh, Vikesh K

    2012-06-01

    Conventional plastic stents with a lumen typically have limited patency. The lumenless wing stent was engineered to overcome this problem. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of early stent occlusion (symptomatic occlusion/cholangitis necessitating re-insertion within 90 days) for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Patients with biliary pathology treated with plastic biliary stenting during the period 2003-2009 comprised the study cohort. Patients who had at least one biliary wing stent placed comprised the wing stent group, whereas patients who underwent only conventional stent plastic placement comprised the conventional stent group. Patients were stratified by indication: benign biliary strictures (group 1), malignant biliary strictures (group 2), or benign biliary non-stricture pathology (group 3). The association of stent type with the occurrence of primary outcome by indication was analyzed by use of multivariable logistic regression. Three-hundred and forty-six patients underwent 612 ERCP procedures with placement of plastic biliary stent(s). On multivariate analysis, early stent occlusion did not differ between the wing and conventional groups in groups 1, 2, and 3. Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 2, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (6.7% vs. 39.1%, P = 0.03). Among patients who achieved primary outcome in group 3, significantly fewer patients in the wing group had cholangitis (10% vs. 50%, P = 0.03). Early stent occlusion was similar for wing stents and conventional plastic stents. Wing stents, however, were associated with a lower incidence of cholangitis in patients with malignant biliary obstruction and benign non-stricturing biliary pathology.

  14. Stent thrombosis and restenosis: what have we learned and where are we going? The Andreas Grüntzig Lecture ESC 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Robert A.; Joner, Michael; Kastrati, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Modern-day stenting procedures leverage advances in pharmacotherapy and device innovation. Patients treated with contemporary antiplatelet agents, peri-procedural antithrombin therapy and new-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have excellent outcomes over the short to medium term. Indeed, coupled with the reducing costs of these devices in most countries there remain very few indications where patients should be denied treatment with standard-of-care DES therapy. The two major causes of stent failure are stent thrombosis (ST) and in-stent restenosis (ISR). The incidence of both has reduced considerably in recent years. Current clinical registries and randomized trials with broad inclusion criteria show rates of ST at or stent failure neoatherosclerotic change within the stented segment represents a final common pathway for both thrombotic and restenotic events. In future, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this process may translate into improved late outcomes. Moreover, the predominance of non-stent-related disease as a cause of subsequent myocardial infarction during follow-up highlights the importance of lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeted at modification of the underlying disease process. Finally, although recent developments focus on strategies which circumvent the need for chronically indwelling stents—such as drug-coated balloons or fully bioresorbable stents—more data are needed before the wider use of these therapies can be advocated. PMID:26417060

  15. Efficacy of standard therapies against Ureaplasma species and persistence among men with non-gonococcal urethritis enrolled in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosropour, Christine M.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Gillespie, Catherine W.; Lowens, M. Sylvan; Golden, Matthew R.; Jensen, Nicole L.; Kenny, George E.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective U. urealyticum biovar 2 (UU-2) but not U. parvum (UP) has been associated with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU), but little is known about species-specific responses to standard therapies. We examined species-specific treatment outcomes and followed men with treatment failure for 9 weeks. Methods From May 2007-July 2011, men aged ≥16 attending an STD clinic in Seattle, Washington with NGU (urethral discharge or urethral symptoms plus ≥5 PMNs/HPF) were enrolled in a double-blind, randomized trial. Participants received active azithromycin (1g) + placebo doxycycline or active doxycycline (100mg bid × 7d) + placebo azithromycin. Ureaplasmas were detected in culture followed by species-specific PCR. Outcomes were assessed at 3, 6, and 9 weeks. At 3 weeks, men with persistent Ureaplasmas received “reverse therapy” (e.g., active doxycycline if they first received active azithromycin). At 6 weeks, persistently-positive men received moxifloxacin (400mg × 7d). Results Of 490 men, 107 (22%) and 60 (12%) were infected with UU-2 and UP, respectively, and returned at 3 weeks. Persistent infection was similar for UU-2-infected men initially treated with azithromycin or doxycycline (25% vs. 31%, P=0.53), but differed somewhat for men with UP (45% vs. 24%; P=0.11). At 6 weeks, 57% of UU-2-infected and 63% of UP-infected men who received both drugs had persistent infection. Failure after moxifloxacin occurred in 30% and 36%, respectively. Persistent detection of UU-2 or UP was not associated with signs/symptoms of NGU. Conclusion Persistent infection after treatment with doxycycline, azithromycin, and moxifloxacin was common for UU and UP, but not associated with persistent urethritis. PMID:25616607

  16. Recurrence of Subacute Stent Thrombosis and In-Stent Restenosis during Five Months after Stent Implantation in the LAD. A Case Report.

    OpenAIRE

    島田, 弘英; 大和, 眞史; 櫻井, 俊平; 疋田, 博之; 池田, 修一

    2001-01-01

    A coronary stent was deployed in the left anterior descending artery of an 82-year-old woman with unstable angina.Recurrence of subacute stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis occurred frequently during the five months after initial stent implantation.Balloon angioplasty and cutting balloon angioplasty failed to prevent these complications,but they ceased after re-stenting in the initial stent.In this case,tissue protrusion through the stent strut, deformation of the coil stent and inadequa...

  17. Predictors of stent dysfunction after self-expandable metal stent placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: tumor ingrowth in uncovered stents and migration of covered stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Yasuki; Naitoh, Itaru; Hayashi, Kazuki; Ban, Tesshin; Natsume, Makoto; Okumura, Fumihiro; Nakazawa, Takahiro; Takada, Hiroki; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Jinno, Naruomi; Togawa, Shozo; Ando, Tomoaki; Kataoka, Hiromi; Joh, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Endoscopic metallic stenting is widely accepted as a palliation therapy for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). However, the predictors of stent dysfunction have not been clarified. We aimed to evaluate the predictors, especially tumor ingrowth in uncovered self-expandable metallic stents (U-SEMS) and migration of covered self-expandable metallic stents (C-SEMS), which are the main causes related to the stent characteristics. In this multicenter retrospective study, we compared patients with U-SEMS and C-SEMS in terms of clinical outcomes, and predictors of stent dysfunction. In total, 252 patients (126 with U-SEMS and 126 with C-SEMS) were enrolled. There were no significant differences in technical success, clinical success, GOO score, or time to stent dysfunction. Tumor ingrowth was significantly more frequent in U-SEMS (U-SEMS, 11.90% vs. C-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.002), and stent migration was significantly more frequent for C-SEMS (C-SEMS, 8.73% vs. U-SEMS, 0.79%; p = 0.005). Karnofsky performance status (p = 0.04), no presence of ascites (p = 0.02), and insufficient (stent expansion (p = 0.003) were significantly associated with tumor ingrowth in U-SEMS. Meanwhile, a shorter stent length (p = 0.05) and chemotherapy (p = 0.03) were predictors of C-SEMS migration. Both U-SEMS and C-SEMS are effective with comparable patencies. Tumor ingrowth and stent migration are the main causes of stent dysfunction for U-SEMS and C-SEMS, respectively. With regard to stent dysfunction, U-SEMS might be a good option for patients receiving chemotherapy, while C-SEMS with longer stents for patients in good condition. (Clinical trial registration number: UMIN000024059).

  18. Acquired urethral diverticulum in a man with paraplegia presenting with a scrotal mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Ammari Jalal Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Male urethral diverticula are rare. Patients with paraplegia may present with acquired diverticula as a result of prolonged catheterization. Diverticula may be asymptomatic or lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rarely, the diverticulum may initially present as a scrotal mass. Case presentation We report the case of a male 45-year-old Arab with paraplegia who presented with a mass in the peno-scrotal junction. He had in his medical history iterative prolonged urethral catheterizations associated with urine leakage through the urethral meatus upon applying compression. Diagnosis confirmation of urethral diverticula is obtained by retrograde urethrography. The patient underwent a diverticulectomy with urethroplasty. Conclusion Male acquired urethral diverticula can be found in patients who have a spinal cord injury because of prolonged urethral catheterization. Clinical presentations are different and sometimes can be misleading. Retrograde urethrography is the key to diagnosis and open surgery is the treatment of reference.

  19. Clinical experience in coronary stenting with the Vivant Z Stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K H; Siaw, F S; Chan, C G; Chong, W P; Imran, Z A; Haizal, H K; Azman, W; Tan, K H

    2005-06-01

    This single centre study was designed to demonstrate feasibility, safety and efficacy of the Vivant Z stent (PFM AG, Cologne, Germany). Patients with de novo lesion were recruited. Coronary angioplasty was performed with either direct stenting or after balloon predilatation. Repeated angiogram was performed 6 months later or earlier if clinically indicated. Between January to June 2003, a total of 50 patients were recruited (mean age 55.8 +/- 9 years). A total of 52 lesions were stented successfully. Mean reference diameter was 2.77 mm (+/-0.59 SD, range 2.05-4.39 mm) with mean target lesion stenosis of 65.5% (+/-11.6 SD, range 50.1-93.3%). Forty-six lesions (88.5%) were American College of Cardiologist/American Heart Association class B/C types. Direct stenting was performed in 18 (34.6%) lesions. Mean stent diameter was 3.18 mm (+/-0.41 SD, range 2.5-4 mm), and mean stent length was 14.86 mm (+/-2.72 SD, range 9-18 mm). The procedure was complicated in only one case which involved the loss of side branch with no clinical sequelae. All treated lesions achieved Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 3 flow. Mean residual diameter stenosis was 12.2% (+/-7.55 SD, range 0-22.6%) with acute gain of 1.72 mm (+/-0.50 SD, range 0.5-2.8). At 6 months, there was no major adverse cardiovascular event. Repeated angiography after 6 months showed a restenosis rate of 17% (defined as >50% diameter restenosis). Mean late loss was 0.96 mm (+/-0.48 SD) with loss index of 0.61 (+/-0.38 SD). The restenosis rate of those lesions less than 3.0 mm in diameter was 22.2% compared with 6.25% in those lesions more than 3.0 mm in diameter. The Vivant Z stent was shown to be safe and efficacious with low restenosis rate in de novo coronary artery lesion.

  20. A method to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to international standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt-Wunderlich Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The kink behavior of vascular stents is of particular interest for clinicians, stent manufacturers and regulatory as a kinked stent generates a lumen loss in the stented vessel and can lead to in-stent restenosis. In this study methods to determine the kink resistance of stents and stent delivery systems according to the ISO 25539-2 and FDA guidance no. 1545 were presented. The methods are applicable for balloon expandable stents as well as for self-expanding stents and determine the lumen loss and residual diameter change dependent on the specific bending radius.

  1. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  2. Stent malapposition, as a potential mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after bare-metal stent implantation: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuma, Takumi, E-mail: higuma@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp; Abe, Naoki; Hanada, Kenji; Yokoyama, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Okumura, Ken

    2014-04-15

    A 90-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. He had a history of post-infarction angina pectoris 79 months ago and had a bare-metal stent (BMS) implanted in the proximal left anterior descending artery at our hospital. Emergent coronary angiography demonstrated thrombotic occlusion in the previously stented segment. After catheter thrombectomy, antegrade flow was restored, but 90% stenosis with haziness persisted in the proximal and distal portions of the previously stented segment. Intravascular ultrasound imaging showed interstrut cavities or stent malapposition at the proximal and distal sites of stented segment. In close proximity to the sites, residual thrombi were also observed. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated neither lipid-laden neointimal tissue nor rupture but clearly demonstrated residual thrombus adjacent to the malapposed region in addition to the stent malapposition. PCI with balloon was successfully performed and stent apposition was confirmed by OCT. Stent malapposition is an unusual mechanism of very late stent thrombosis after BMS implantation. OCT can clearly reveal the etiology of stent thrombosis.

  3. An in Vitro Twist Fatigue Test of Fabric Stent-Grafts Supported by Z-Stents vs. Ringed Stents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Guidoin, Robert; Du, Jia; Wang, Lu; Douglas, Graeham; Zhu, Danjie; Nutley, Mark; Perron, Lygia; Zhang, Ze; Douville, Yvan

    2016-02-16

    Whereas buckling can cause type III endoleaks, long-term twisting of a stent-graft was investigated here as a mechanism leading to type V endoleak or endotension. Two experimental device designs supported with Z-stents having strut angles of 35° or 45° were compared to a ringed control under accelerated twisting. Damage to each device was assessed and compared after different durations of twisting, with focus on damage that may allow leakage. Stent-grafts with 35° Z-stents had the most severe distortion and damage to the graft fabric. The 45° Z-stents caused less fabric damage. However, consistent stretching was still seen around the holes for sutures, which attach the stents to the graft fabric. Larger holes may become channels for fluid percolation through the wall. The ringed stent-graft had the least damage observed. Stent apexes with sharp angles appear to be responsible for major damage to the fabrics. Device manufacturers should consider stent apex angle when designing stent-grafts, and ensure their devices are resistant to twisting.

  4. Long-term results after carotid artery stenting. Restenosis after carotid artery stenting using self-expandable stent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Yasushi; Furui, Eisuke; Tsuboi, Ken; Takahashi, Akira; Ezura, Masayuki

    2008-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting has emerged as an acceptable treatment alternative in patients with carotid artery stenosis. Although early clinical results of carotid artery stenting have shown promise, long, term clinical results remain less certain. We report the frequency, management, and clinical results of in-stent restenosis after carotid artery stenting using a self-expandable stent. Between August 1998 and September 2004, 80 carotid artery stenting procedures in 78 patients were performed. We evaluated 76 of the 80 procedures in 75 of the 78 patients treated during this period who had a minimum 6-month clinical and imaging (ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance angiography) follow-up. Recurrent stenosis (≥50%) after carotid artery stenting occurred in 3 (3.9%) patients. The recurrent stenosis occurred within one year after the procedure in all cases. The low rate of in-stent restenosis using self-expandable stent suggested that carotid artery stenting may be an effective alternative treatment for carotid artery stenosis, but more data of long-term follow-up are required. (author)

  5. Radiological findings of male urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Jung; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae

    2004-01-01

    Urethral duplication or accessory urethra is a rare congenital anomaly. Even rarer, is its association with bladder duplication. We report a case of urethral duplication associated with bladder duplication in a seven-year-old boy who underwent retrograde urethrography, sonography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. WhiIe retrograde urethrography can demonstrate the extent of the duplicated urethra, MR imaging and sonography can provide detailed information on the anatomy of the adjacent tissues as well as urethral duplication

  6. [Current approaches to the treatment of non-gonococcal urethritis in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrat'eva, Iu S; Neĭmark, A I

    2011-01-01

    The study was made of 50 men suffering from non-gonococcal urethritis caused by mixed pathogenic and opportunistic urogenital infection. Clinical characteristics of urethritis in relation to infection pathogen are shown. The results of clinical and laboratory examinations were considered in choice of antibacterial therapy. Safocid, a combined antibacterial medicine, demonstrated its clinical and microbiological efficacy in the treatment of patients with non-gonococcal urethritis of mixed etiology.

  7. Comparative Efficacy of Penicillin and Doxycycline in Gonococcal Urethritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K Sharma

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety two episodes of gonococcal urethritis treated with one of the following regimens viz: (A 3 m. u. of fortified procaine penicillin made by adding 1 m.u. of crystalline penicillin to 2 m.u. of fortified procaine penicillin intramuscularly with one gram of probenecid orally, (B 3 m.u. of above fortified procaine penicillin intramuscularly alone, and (C 400 mg single oral dose of doxycycline produced success rates of 95,76.2 and 66.7% respectively. Post gonococcal urethritis was detected in 37% patients. Thirty four (45.94% of the 74 isolates of N. gonorrhoeae were relatively resistant (MIC 0. 12 units ml to penicillin. None of the 74 Neisseria gonorrhoeac strains was beta lactamase producing.

  8. The Structure of Urethral Epithelium in Merinos Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile RUS

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate by histological techniques the structure of urethral epithelium in lambs. In this study, we harvested several fragments (prostatic, membranous and cavernous from urethra from 5 merino’s lambs of 3 months old. The first anatomical segment, the prostatic urethra, is lined by a urinary epithelium. The intermediary layer of this epithelium is formed of 5-6 rows of oval cells. The second segment of urethra has the same type of epithelium but the intermediary layer is formed of 6-7 rows of oval cells. In the last anatomical segment, the penile urethra, the epithelium is the same, but the intermediary layer has 3-4 rows of oval cells. In lambs, the urethra is lined by urinary epithelium. The urethral epithelium does not have the same thickness in all segments. The thinner epithelium it is in the cavernous urethra, the ticker is the membranous urethra.

  9. Urethral pressure reflectometry in women with pelvic organ prolapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khayyami, Yasmine; Lose, Gunnar; Klarskov, Niels

    2017-01-01

    at an abdominal pressure of 50 cmH2O (PO-Abd 50). UPR can help identify women with POP at risk of postoperative de novo SUI. The aim of this study was to investigate the reproducibility of UPR in women with POP. METHODS: Women with anterior or posterior vaginal wall prolapse were recruited for this prospective......INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The mechanism of continence in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) before and after surgery remains unknown. Urethral pressure reflectometry (UPR) separates women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from continent women by measuring urethral opening pressure...... studies to help reveal urodynamic features predictive of postoperative de novo SUI in women with POP....

  10. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted

  11. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

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    Matthias C. Burg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13 mm filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results. Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy. 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L. Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique.

  12. Idiopathic urethritis in children: Classification and treatment with steroids.

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    Jayakumar, Sivasankar; Pringle, Kirsty; Ninan, George K

    2014-07-01

    Idiopathic urethritis [IU] in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We propose a classification for IU based on cystourethroscopy findings and symptoms (Grade 1 - 4) and report our experience with use of topical and oral steroids in IU. Retrospective data collection of all male children (0-16 years) diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years between 2005 and 2012 at our institution. Data was collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystourethroscopy findings, management and outcomes. A total of 19 male children were diagnosed with IU. The median age of the patients was 13(7-16) years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 12; hematuria in 9; loin pain in 6; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Both patients with scrotal pain had previous left scrotal exploration that revealed epididymitis. Serum C-reactive protein and Full blood count was tested in 15 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Cystourethroscopy revealed urethritis of grade-I in 2; grade-II in 11; and grade-III in 3 patients. There were 3 patients with systemic symptoms from extra-urethral extension of inflammation (grade-IV). Mean follow up was 18.9(1-74) months. All patients had steroid instillation at the time of cystourethroscopy. Three patients with IU grade IV required oral steroids (prednisolone) in view of exacerbation of symptoms and signs despite steroid instillation. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 18(94.7%) patients. Significant improvement in symptoms and signs was noted in 1(5.3%) patient who is still undergoing treatment. IU in male children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation, especially in grade I and II. Grade III, will need steroid instillation but treatment of scarring and stricture will necessitate longer duration of treatment. In children with IU and extra-urethral symptoms (grade IV), oral steroids may be required.

  13. A young man with oligoarthritis preceded by urethritis and diarrhea

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    Ahmed Zedan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is a form of seronegative spondyloarthritis temporally triggered by an apparent infection, usually gastroenteritis or urethritis. This arthritis typically starts within a few weeks of the inciting infection. It commonly affects young adults and is strongly associated with the MHC class I antigen HLA-B27. Here we present an interesting case of young man with HLA-B27 positive reactive arthritis in whom the presumptive diagnosis was reached early in the course of his illness.

  14. Idiopathic urethritis in children: Classification and treatment with steroids

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    Sivasankar Jayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic urethritis [IU] in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We propose a classification for IU based on cystourethroscopy findings and symptoms (Grade 1 - 4 and report our experience with use of topical and oral steroids in IU. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data collection of all male children (0-16 years diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years between 2005 and 2012 at our institution. Data was collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystourethroscopy findings, management and outcomes. Results: A total of 19 male children were diagnosed with IU. The median age of the patients was 13(7-16 years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 12; hematuria in 9; loin pain in 6; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Both patients with scrotal pain had previous left scrotal exploration that revealed epididymitis. Serum C-reactive protein and Full blood count was tested in 15 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Cystourethroscopy revealed urethritis of grade-I in 2; grade-II in 11; and grade-III in 3 patients. There were 3 patients with systemic symptoms from extra-urethral extension of inflammation (grade-IV. Mean follow up was 18.9(1-74 months. All patients had steroid instillation at the time of cystourethroscopy. Three patients with IU grade IV required oral steroids (prednisolone in view of exacerbation of symptoms and signs despite steroid instillation. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 18(94.7% patients. Significant improvement in symptoms and signs was noted in 1(5.3% patient who is still undergoing treatment. Conclusions: IU in male children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation, especially in grade I and II. Grade III, will need steroid instillation but treatment of scarring and stricture will necessitate longer duration of treatment. In children with IU and extra-urethral symptoms (grade IV, oral

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA bacterial load in men with symptomatic and asymptomatic gonococcal urethritis.

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    Priest, David; Ong, Jason J; Chow, Eric P F; Tabrizi, Sepehr; Phillips, Sam; Bissessor, Melanie; Fairley, Christopher K; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Read, Tim R H; Garland, Suzanne; Chen, Marcus

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have quantified bacterial loads of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the pharynx and rectum of men but not the urethra. We quantified the bacterial load of N. gonorrhoeae in men with symptomatic and asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea infections. Consecutive men diagnosed with urethral gonorrhoea by Aptima Combo 2 testing of urine at the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between March and July 2016 were eligible for the study: symptomatic men with purulent urethral discharge and asymptomatic men with no urethral symptoms. The gonococcal bacterial load in both groups was measured by urethral swab using a standardised collection method and real-time quantitative PCR targeting the opa gene. Twenty men were recruited into the study: 16 had purulent urethral discharge and 4 had asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea. The median gonococcal bacterial load was significantly higher among symptomatic men (3.7×10 6 copies per swab, IQR 2.5×10 6 -4.7×10 6 ) compared with asymptomatic men (2.0×10 5 copies per swab, IQR 2.7×10 4 -4.5×10 5 ) (p=0.002). Gonococcal loads in men with urethral discharge were higher than loads seen with asymptomatic urethral gonorrhoea and loads seen in asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal gonorrhoea infections in previous studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Female urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention: Reporting the largest diverticulum with review of literature

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    Manas Ranjan Pradhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Female urethral diverticulum is a rare entity with diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations. It is a very rare cause of bladder outlet obstruction and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in females presenting with acute urinary retention associated with a vaginal mass. Strong clinical suspicion combined with thorough physical examination and focused radiological investigations are vital for its diagnosis. Herein we report a case of giant urethral diverticulum presenting with acute urinary retention in a young female. It was managed by excision and urethral closure, and is the largest urethral diverticulum reported till date in the literature.

  17. Suprapubic cystostomy for the management of urethral injuries during penile prosthesis implantation.

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    Anele, Uzoma A; Le, Brian V; Burnett, Arthur L

    2014-12-01

    Urethral injury is an uncommon surgical complication of penile prosthesis (PP) surgery. Conventional dogma requires abortion of the procedure if the adjacent corporal body is involved or delayed implantation to avert device infection associated with urinary extravasation. Besides the setback of the aborted surgery, this management approach also presents the possible difficulty of encountering corporal fibrosis at the time of reoperation. We report an approach using primary urethral repair and temporary suprapubic cystostomy for the management of incidental urethral injuries in a cohort of patients allowing for successful completion of unaborted PP implantation. We performed a retrospective analysis of all patients receiving PPs from 1990 to 2014 in which incidental urethral injuries were repaired and PP implantation was completed with suprapubic cystostomy (suprapubic tube [SPT] insertion). After allowing for urethral healing and urinary diversion via SPT for 4-8 weeks, the PP was activated. Successful management was determined by the absence of perioperative complications within 6 months of implantation. We identified four cases, all receiving inflatable PPs, managed with temporary suprapubic cystostomy. These patients sustained urethral injuries during corporal dissection (one patient), corporal dilation (one patient), and penile straightening (two patients). All patients were managed safely and successfully. Primary urethral repair followed by temporary suprapubic cystostomy offers a surgical approach to complete PP implantation successfully in patients who sustain urethral injury complications, particularly for complex PP surgeries. Anele UA, Le BV, and Burnett AL. Suprapubic cystostomy for the management of urethral injuries during penile prosthesis implantation.

  18. Use of Self-Expanding Metallic Ureteral Stents in the Secondary Treatment of Ureteral Stenosis Following Kidney Transplantation.

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    Xu, Guibin; Li, Xun; He, Yongzhong; Zhao, Haibo; Yang, Weiqing; Xie, Qingling

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expanding metal stents in the treatment of ureteral stenosis following kidney transplantation. Seven patients who developed benign stenosis after kidney transplantation were treated by a self-expanding metallic stent implantation from June 2007 to March 2014. All patients had undergone at least one open surgical procedure and one endourologic procedure for treatment of the stenosis. The extent of stenosis varied from 1.2 to 3.7 cm. Ultrasonography, urography, diuretic renography, and urine culture were performed every 3 months after stent insertion. Ureteroscopic examination was performed when needed. Stent placement was technically effective in all cases. The mean operative time was 37 minutes (range, 26-59 minutes). Lower urinary-tract symptoms and the ipsilateral flank pain were common early-stage complications and were greatly relieved after an average of 3 months. The mean follow-up duration was 38 months (range, 13-86 months), and no stent migration or fragmentation was observed. Urothelial hyperplasia occurred in only one patient and was effectively managed with a Double-J stent. Five patients had normal stable renal function; the remaining two had impaired renal function, including one patient with a preoperative renal failure who required dialysis at the end of the follow-up period (36 months). As an alternative to open surgery, implantation of a self-expanding metal stent is a safe and effective treatment for ureteral stenosis in patients who have undergone kidney transplantation.

  19. Fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction and post-operative gastroenterostomy anastomotic stricture

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    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Lee, Sang Young; Lee, Soo Teik; Yang, Doo Hyun

    2001-07-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of fluoroscopic-guided covered metallic stent placements in providing palliative care for patients with inoperable malignant gastric outlet obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Under fluoroscopic guidance, placement of self-expandable, covered stents was attempted in 20 patients with inoperable or recurrent gastric cancer (age range 36-79 years). All patients had inoperable gastric outlet obstruction, 13 with native anatomy and seven with post-operative anatomy (gastrointestinal anastomotic sites). All patients had intolerance to oral alimentation and/or vomiting after ingestion. Success was defined both technically and clinically. RESULTS: The placement of the stent was technically successful in 18 patients and failed in two patients (technical success: 90%). The cause of the technical failures was an inability to negotiate the guide wire through the obstruction sites in spite of the use of both fluoroscopic and endoscopic guidance. After stent placement, 15 patients were able to ingest at least liquids and had a markedly decreased incidence of vomiting (clinical success: 75%). During the mean follow-up of 6 weeks, there have been no stent reocclusion and no life-threatening complications except migration of two stents in one patient. CONCLUSION: Fluoroscopically guided covered metallic stent placement appears to be valuable for the palliative treatment of malignant obstruction of gastric outlet and post-operative gastrointestinal anastomoses. Lee, J.M. et al. (2001)

  20. Polymeric Biodegradable Stent Insertion in the Esophagus

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    Kai Yang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal stent insertion has been used as a well-accepted and effective alternative to manage and improve the quality of life for patients diagnosed with esophageal diseases and disorders. Current stents are either permanent or temporary and are fabricated from either metal or plastic. The partially covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS has a firm anchoring effect and prevent stent migration, however, the hyperplastic tissue reaction cause stent restenosis and make it difficult to remove. A fully covered SEMS and self-expanding plastic stent (SEPS reduced reactive hyperplasia but has a high migration rate. The main advantage that polymeric biodegradable stents (BDSs have over metal or plastic stents is that removal is not require and reduce the need for repeated stent insertion. But the slightly lower radial force of BDS may be its main shortcoming and a post-implant problem. Thus, strengthening support of BDS is a content of the research in the future. BDSs are often temporarily effective in esophageal stricture to relieve dysphagia. In the future, it can be expect that biodegradable drug-eluting stents (DES will be available to treat benign esophageal stricture, perforations or leaks with additional use as pallia