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Sample records for uranium-thorium carbide fuel

  1. Radionuclide Inventories for DOE SNF Waste Stream and Uranium/Thorium Carbide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K.L. Goluoglu

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to generate radionuclide inventories for the Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) waste stream destined for disposal at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain. The scope of this calculation is limited to the calculation of two radionuclide inventories; one for all uranium/thorium carbide fuels in the waste stream and one for the entire waste stream. These inventories will provide input in future screening calculations to be performed by Performance Assessment to determine important radionuclides

  2. Once-through uranium thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, S.; Cubukcu, E.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the performance of the once-through uranium-thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors is investigated. (Th-U)O 2 is used as fuel in all fuel rod clusters where Th and U are mixed homogeneously. CANDU reactors have the advantage of being capable of employing various fuel cycle options because of its good neutron economy, continuous on line refueling ability and axial fuel replacement possibility. For lattice cell calculations transport code WIMS is used. WIMS cross-section library is modified to achieve precise lattice cell calculations. For various enrichments and Th-U mixtures, criticality, heavy element composition changes, diffusion coefficients and cross-sections are calculate. Reactor core is modeled by using the diffusion code CITATION. We conclude that an overall saving of 22% in natural uranium demand can be achieved with the use of Th cycle. However, slightly enriched U cycle still consumes less natural Uranium and is a lot less complicated. (author)

  3. Study on reprocessing of uranium-thorium fuel with solvent extraction for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Rongzhou; He Peijun; Liu Bingren; Zhu Yongjun

    1992-08-01

    A single cycle process by solvent extraction with acid feed solution is suggested. The purpose is to reprocess uranium-thorium fuel elements which are of high burn-up and rich of 232 U from HTGR (high temperature gas cooled reactor). The extraction cascade tests have been completed. The recovery of uranium and thorium is greater than 99.6%. By this method, the requirement, under remote control to re-fabricate fuel elements, of decontamination factors for Cs, Sr, Zr-Nb and Ru has been reached

  4. Uranium-thorium fuel cycle in a very high temperature hybrid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, C.R.G.; Oliva, A.M.; Fajardo, L.G.; Garcia, J.A.R.; Curbelo, J.P.; Abadanes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Thorium is a potentially valuable energy source since it is about three to four times as abundant as Uranium. It is also a widely distributed natural resource readily accessible in many countries. Therefore, Thorium fuels can complement Uranium fuels and ensure long term sustainability of nuclear power. The main advantages of the use of a hybrid system formed by a Pebble Bed critical nuclear reactor and two Pebble Bed Accelerator Driven Systems (ADSs) using a Uranium-Thorium (U + Th) fuel cycle are shown in this paper. Once-through and two step U + Th fuel cycle was evaluated. With this goal, a preliminary conceptual design of a hybrid system formed by a Graphite Moderated Gas-Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor and two ADSs is proposed. The main parameters related to the neutronic behavior of the system in a deep burn scheme are optimized. The parameters that describe the nuclear fuel breeding and Minor Actinide stockpile are compared with those of a simple Uranium fuel cycle. (author)

  5. Transition from uranium to denatured uranium/thorium fuel in an existing PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether it is possible to make a gradual transition from uranium to denatured uranium/thorium (DUTH) fuel in an existing PWR by adding DUTH assemblies during each scheduled refueling and, if the transition is possible, to develop a general procedure for making it. The feasibility of the transition was established by identifying acceptable refueling schemes for a series of transition cores, and in the process, a method for identifying acceptable schemes evolved. The utility of the method was then demonstrated by applying it to a standard reactor operating under normal conditions. The vehicle used to examine proposed fuel mixtures and to select acceptable ones was a set of one-dimensional computer codes. The core was modeled as a set of five concentric fuel zones with a reflector. Fuel mixtures were proposed and the computer codes were used to determine whether a mixture was acceptable, i.e., whether it had the desired k-effective and flux and power distributions. The parameters allowed to vary in selection of proposed fuel mixtures were enrichment of fresh fuel assemblies, number of uranium and DUTH assemblies added during each refueling, and distribution of fuel in the core. Results of the research showed that a gradual transition is possible. Furthermore, there is a method that allows the identification of fuel mixtures that are likely to be acceptable. It requires the calculation of K-infinity for the entire proposed core and for some of its regions. These values of K-infinity and relationships developed in this research can be used to predict the flux distribution and the final k-effective for the proposed fuel mixture

  6. Waste arisings from a high-temperature reactor with a uranium-thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    This paper presents an equilibrium-recycle condition flow sheet for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTR) fuel cycle which uses thorium and high-enriched uranium (93% U-235) as makeup fuel. INFCE Working Group 7 defined percentage losses to various waste streams are used to adjust the heavy-element mass flows per gigawatt-year of electricity generated. Thorium and bred U-233 are recycled following Thorex reprocessing. Fissile U-235 is recycled one time following Purex reprocessing and then is discarded to waste. Plutonium and other transuranics are discarded to waste. Included are estimates of volume, radioactivity, and heavy-element content of wastes arising from HTR fuel element fabrication; HTR operation, maintenance, and decommissioning; and reprocessing spent fuel where the waste is unique to the HTR fuel cycle

  7. Adapting the deep burn in-core fuel management strategy for the gas turbine - modular helium reactor to a uranium-thorium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se; Gudowski, Waclaw [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    In 1966, Philadelphia Electric has put into operation the Peach Bottom I nuclear reactor, it was the first high temperature gas reactor (HTGR); the pioneering of the helium-cooled and graphite-moderated power reactors continued with the Fort St. Vrain and THTR reactors, which operated until 1989. The experience on HTGRs lead General Atomics to design the gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), which adapts the previous HTGRs to the generation IV of nuclear reactors. One of the major benefits of the GT-MHR is the ability to work on the most different types of fuels: light water reactors waste, military plutonium, MOX and thorium. In this work, we focused on the last type of fuel and we propose a mixture of 40% thorium and 60% uranium. In a uranium-thorium fuel, three fissile isotopes mainly sustain the criticality of the reactor: {sup 235}U, which represents the 20% of the fresh uranium, {sup 233}U, which is produced by the transmutation of fertile {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu, which is produced by the transmutation of fertile {sup 238}U. In order to compensate the depletion of {sup 235}U with the breeding of {sup 233}U and {sup 239}Pu, the quantity of fertile nuclides must be much larger than that one of {sup 235}U because of the small capture cross-section of the fertile nuclides, in the thermal neutron energy range, compared to that one of {sup 235}U. At the same time, the amount of {sup 235}U must be large enough to set the criticality condition of the reactor. The simultaneous satisfaction of the two above constrains induces the necessity to load the reactor with a huge mass of fuel; that is accomplished by equipping the fuel pins with the JAERI TRISO particles. We start the operation of the reactor with loading fresh fuel into all the three rings of the GT-MHR and after 810 days we initiate a refueling and shuffling schedule that, in 9 irradiation periods, approaches the equilibrium of the fuel composition. The analysis of the k {sub eff} and mass

  8. Adapting the deep burn in-core fuel management strategy for the gas turbine - modular helium reactor to a uranium-thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gudowski, Waclaw

    2005-01-01

    In 1966, Philadelphia Electric has put into operation the Peach Bottom I nuclear reactor, it was the first high temperature gas reactor (HTGR); the pioneering of the helium-cooled and graphite-moderated power reactors continued with the Fort St. Vrain and THTR reactors, which operated until 1989. The experience on HTGRs lead General Atomics to design the gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), which adapts the previous HTGRs to the generation IV of nuclear reactors. One of the major benefits of the GT-MHR is the ability to work on the most different types of fuels: light water reactors waste, military plutonium, MOX and thorium. In this work, we focused on the last type of fuel and we propose a mixture of 40% thorium and 60% uranium. In a uranium-thorium fuel, three fissile isotopes mainly sustain the criticality of the reactor: 235 U, which represents the 20% of the fresh uranium, 233 U, which is produced by the transmutation of fertile 232 Th, and 239 Pu, which is produced by the transmutation of fertile 238 U. In order to compensate the depletion of 235 U with the breeding of 233 U and 239 Pu, the quantity of fertile nuclides must be much larger than that one of 235 U because of the small capture cross-section of the fertile nuclides, in the thermal neutron energy range, compared to that one of 235 U. At the same time, the amount of 235 U must be large enough to set the criticality condition of the reactor. The simultaneous satisfaction of the two above constrains induces the necessity to load the reactor with a huge mass of fuel; that is accomplished by equipping the fuel pins with the JAERI TRISO particles. We start the operation of the reactor with loading fresh fuel into all the three rings of the GT-MHR and after 810 days we initiate a refueling and shuffling schedule that, in 9 irradiation periods, approaches the equilibrium of the fuel composition. The analysis of the k eff and mass evolution, reaction rates, neutron flux and spectrum at the

  9. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in 235 U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for 240 Pu, 238 U and 232 Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 μm and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core

  10. Analytical calculation of the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors for plutonium and uranium-thorium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology - KTH, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@anl.gov

    2007-01-15

    We analytically evaluated the fuel coefficient of temperature both for pebble bed and prismatic high temperature reactors when they utilize as fuel plutonium and minor actinides from light water reactors spent fuel or a mixture of 50% uranium, enriched 20% in {sup 235}U, and 50% thorium. In both cores the calculation involves the evaluation of the resonances integrals of the high absorbers fuel nuclides {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th and it requires the esteem of the Dancoff-Ginsburg factor for a pebble bed or prismatic core. The Dancoff-Ginsburg factor represents the only discriminating parameter in the results for the two different reactors types; in fact, both the pebble bed and the prismatic reactors share the same the pseudo-cross-section describing an infinite medium made of graphite filled by TRISO particles. We considered only the resolved resonances with a statistical spin factor equal to one and we took into account 267, 72, 212 resonances in the range 1.057-5692, 6.674-14485, 21.78-3472 eV for {sup 240}Pu, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, respectively, for investigating the influence on the fuel temperature reactivity coefficient of the variation of the TRISO kernel radius and TRISO particles packing fraction from 100, 200 to 300 {mu}m and from 10% to 50%, respectively. Finally, in the pebble bed core, we varied the radius of the pebble for setting a fuel temperature reactivity coefficient similar to the one of a prismatic core.

  11. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs; Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically; Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards; Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste; and Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements

  12. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

  13. A data base for PHW reactor operating on a once-through, low enriched uranium-thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, S.

    1984-04-01

    The study of a detailed data base for a new once-through uranium-thorium cycle using low enriched uranium (4 and 5,5% wt. U-235) and distinct UO 2 and ThO 2 fuel channels has been performed. With reference to a standard 638 MWe CANDU-type PHWR with 380 channels, evaluation of economics, fuel behaviour and safety has been performed. The Feinberg-Galanin method (code FEINGAL) has been used for calculation of axial flux distribution. All parameters have been provided by LATREP code following up the irradiation history. Economical assessment has shown that this fuel cycle is competitive with the natural uranium fuel cycle for 1979-based values of the parameters. Fuel behaviour and safety features modelling has shown that core behaviour of the uranium-thorium reactor under abnormal and accident conditions would be at least as good as that of the standard natural uranium reactor

  14. Fission product phases in irradiated carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewart, F.T.; Sharpe, B.M.; Taylor, R.G.

    1975-09-01

    Oxide fuels have been widely adopted as 'first charge' fuels for demonstration fast reactors. However, because of the improved breeding characteristics, carbides are being investigated in a number of laboratories as possible advanced fuels. Irradiation experiments on uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium carbides have been widely reported but the instances where segregate phases have been found and subjected to electron probe analysis are relatively few. Several observations of such segregate phases have now been made over a period of time and these are collected together in this document. Some seven fuel pins have been examined. Two of the irradiations were in thermal materials testing reactors (MTR); the remainder were experimental assemblies of carbide gas bonded oxycarbide and sodium bonded oxycarbide in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). All fuel pins completed their irradiation without failure. (author)

  15. Thermodynamic studies of thorium carbide fuel preparation and fuel-clad comptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besmann, T.M.; Beahm, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    The carbothermic reduction of thorium and uranium-thorium dioxide to monocarbide has been assessed. Equilibrium calculations have yielded Th-C-O and U-Th-C-O phase equilibria and (CO) pressures generated during reduction. The (CO) pressures were found to be at least five orders of magnitude greater than any of the other 15 gaseous species considered. This confirms that the monocarbide can successfully be prepared by carbothermic reduction. The chemical compatibility of thorium carbides with the Cr-Fe-Ni content of clad alloys has been thermodynamically avaluated. Solid solutions of 5 > and 5 > and of 7 C 3 > and 7 C 3 > were the principal reaction products. The Cr-Fe-Ni content of 316 stainless steel showed much less reaction product than that for any of the other six alloys considered. (orig.) [de

  16. Determination of natural uranium, thorium and radium isotopes in water and soil samples by alpha spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Le Cong; Tao, Chau Van; Thong, Luong Van; Linh, Duong Mong [University of Science Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Faculty of Physics and Engineering Physics; Dong, Nguyen Van [University of Science Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Faculty of Chemistry

    2011-08-15

    In this study, a simple procedure for the determination of natural uranium, thorium and radium isotopes in water and soil samples by alpha spectroscopy is described. This procedure allows a sequential extraction polonium, uranium, thorium and radium radionuclides from the same sample in two to three days. It was tested and validated with the analysis of certified reference materials from the IAEA. (orig.)

  17. Uranium, thorium and radium in soil and crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, S.; Eriksson, Aa.

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of the naturally occuring radionuclides uranium, thorium and radium in soil, plant material and drainage water was evaluated. The plant/soil concentration factors showed that very small fractions of the nuclides were available for the plants. The water/soil concentration factors were calculated; the nuclide content in drainage water generally indicated very low leaching rates. The distribution of the radionuclides was utilized with the aim to obtain reliable concentration factors which in turn could be used to calculate the transfer of nuclides within the agricultural ecosystem. Dose calculations were performed using plant/soil concentration factors based on geometric mean values. (authors)

  18. Study on the performance of fuel elements with carbide and carbide-nitride fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovchenko, Yu.M.; Davydov, E.F.; Maershin, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Characteristics, test conditions and basic results of material testing of fuel elements with carbide and carbonitride fuel irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor up to 3-10% burn-up at specific power rate of 55-70 kW/m and temperatures of the cladding up to 720 deg C are described. Increase of cladding diameter is stated mainly to result from pressure of swelling fuel. The influence of initial efficient porosity of the fuel on cladding deformation and fuel stoichiometry on steel carbonization is considered. Utilization of carbide and carbonitride fuel at efficient porosity of 20% at the given test modes is shown to ensure their operability up to 10% burn-up

  19. DH-1a: a certified uranium-thorium reference ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.; Zechanowitsch, G.

    1981-09-01

    A 122-kg sample of uranium-thorium ore, DH-1a, from Elliot Lake, Ontario, was prepared as a compositional reference material to replace the similar certified ore, DH-1. DH-1a was ground to minus 74μm, blended in one lot, and bottled in 200 g units. The homogeneity of DH-1a with respect to uranium was confirmed using the volumetric umpire method. The recommended value for uranium is based on the data from the confirmation of homogeneity. For thorium, twelve laboratories provided results in a free choice analytical program. A statistical analysis of the data gave a recommended value of 0.263 percent for uranium and 0.091 percent for thorium

  20. Acid pressure leaching of a concentrate containing uranium, thorium and rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan Xinghua; Peng Ruqing.

    1987-01-01

    The acid pressure leaching of a concentrate containing rinkolite for recovering uranium, thorium and rare earth elements is described. The laboratory and the pilot plant test results are given. Under the optimum leaching conditions, the recovery of uranium, thorium and rare earth elements are 82.9%, 86.0% and 88.3% respectively. These results show that the acid pressure leaching process is a effective process for treating the concentrate

  1. Conceptual design study of LMFBR core with carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, H.; Hojuyama, T.; Osada, H.; Ishii, T.; Hattori, S.; Nishimura, T.

    1987-01-01

    Carbide fuel is a hopeful candidate for demonstration FBR(DFBR) fuel from the plant cost reduction point of view. High thermal conductivity and high heavy metal content of carbide fuel lead to high linear heat rate and high breeding ratio. We have analyzed carbide fuel core characteristics and have clarified the concept of carbide fuel core. By survey calculation, we have obtained a correlation map between core parameters and core characteristics. From the map, we have selected a high efficiency core whose features are better than those of an oxide core, and have obtained reactivity coefficients. The core volume and the reactor fuel inventory are approximately 20% smaller, and the burn-up reactivity loss is 50% smaller compared with the oxide fuel core. These results will reduce the capital cost. The core reactivity coefficients are similar to the conventional oxide DFBR's. Therefore the carbide fuel core is regarded as safe as the oxide core. Except neutron fluence, the carbide fuel core has better nuclear features than the oxide core

  2. Cementation feasibility of a uranium-thorium based solution by physical and mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentiero, R.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.

    2002-01-01

    By reprocessing Elk River nuclear fuel, at the ENEA ITREC Plant (South of Italy), about 3 m 3 of Uranium-Thorium based solution were produced. Previously considered an intermediate product to be further treated to recover U and Th, it is now being considered a waste, due to considerable content of fission products and to phasing out of the Italian nuclear industry. Together with other treatment options, a conditioning process in cement matrix is being evaluated, supported by some chemical, physical and mechanical tests on samples prepared with simulated waste. The main components selected to simulate the real solution were thorium nitrate (at two different concentrations), ferrous nitrate and nitric acid. This solution has been neutralized with sodium carbonate (at two different concentration) and cemented by means of a properly defined formulation. Pozzolanic blend cement, at different water to cement ratio, with and without a silica type additive, has been investigated. Cubic samples were subjected to compression tests and repeated freeze-thaw cycles followed by compression tests. Cylindrical samples were subjected to a leach test (according. to the tn ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard). The obtained results are above the minimum acceptance values established by the Italian authority. The evaluated properties are the first important elements to estimate the long term-instability of conditioned radioactive waste. Meanwhile a preliminary theoretical study has been done to evaluate the gas evolution from the matrix due to radiolysis effect. The reached conclusions encourage the development of further analysis to implement a cementation facility. (Author)

  3. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E.

    2013-10-01

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  4. Fabrication of uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite experimental-fuel-element specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenzer, W.A.

    1978-01-01

    A method has been developed for fabricating uranium carbide/beryllium carbide/graphite fuel-element specimens for reactor-core-meltdown studies. The method involves milling and blending the raw materials and densifying the resulting blend by conventional graphite-die hot-pressing techniques. It can be used to fabricate specimens with good physical integrity and material dispersion, with densities of greater than 90% of the theoretical density, and with a uranium carbide particle size of less than 10 μm

  5. Determination of Uranium, Thorium and Radium 226 in Zircon containig sands by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzano, P.

    1985-01-01

    The industrial utilization of Zircon sands for the production of refractories presents radiological problems owing to the risk of inhalation of Uranium, Thorium and their decay products, present in high concentrations in such materials. A method of analysis was realized for the determination of Uranium, Thorium and Radium-226 in Zircon sands, including the total dissolution of the sample, radiochemical separation and final measurement by alpha spectrometry with surface barrier detector. The concentrations of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides presents in two samples of Zircon sands have been determined and the possibility of disequilibrium along the decay series has been pointed out

  6. Ternary carbide uranium fuels for advanced reactor design applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    1999-01-01

    Solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides such as the pseudo-ternary carbide, (U, Zr, Nb)C, hold significant promise for advanced reactor design applications because of their high thermal conductivity and high melting point (typically greater than 3200 K). Additionally, because of their thermochemical stability in a hot-hydrogen environment, pseudo-ternary carbides have been investigated for potential space nuclear power and propulsion applications. However, their stability with regard to sodium and improved resistance to attack by water over uranium carbide portends their usefulness as a fuel for advanced terrestrial reactors. An investigation into processing techniques was conducted in order to produce a series of (U, Zr, Nb)C samples for characterization and testing. Samples with densities ranging from 91% to 95% of theoretical density were produced by cold pressing and sintering the mixed constituent carbides at temperatures as high as 2650 K. (author)

  7. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process

  8. Alpha low activity determination from limitter isotopes of uranium, thorium ands radium in natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascon, J.L.; Crespo, M.T.; Acena, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    A method to concentrate uranium, thorium and radium in natural waters has been developed. The method, based on the adsorbing propert-ies of manganes dioxide, has been applied to determine the alpha emitter isotopes of these elements in drinking water of Madrid. In this work we present the description of the method, the analytical procedu-res and the obtained results. (Author)

  9. Advances in carbide fuel element development for fast reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienst, W.; Kleykamp, H.; Muehling, G.; Reiser, H.; Steiner, H.; Thuemmler, F.; Wedermeyer, H.; Weimar, P.

    1977-01-01

    The features of the carbide fuel development programme are reviewed and evaluated. Single pin and bundle irradiations are carried out under thermal, epithermal and fast flux conditions, the latter in the DFR and KNK-II reactors. Several fuel concepts in the region of representative SNR clad temperatures are compared by parameter and performance tests. A conservative concept is based on He-bonded 8 mm pins with (U,Pu)C pellets and a smear density of 75% TD, operating at 800 W/cm rod power and burnup to 70 MWd/kg. The preparation of mixed carbide fuels is carried out by carbothermic reduction of the oxides in different methods supported by equivalent carbon content, grain size and phase distribution analysis. The fuel for subassembly performance tests is produced in a pilot plant of 0,5 t/year capacity. Compatibility studies reveal that cladding carburization is the only chemical interaction with carbide fuels. This effect leads to a reduction in ductility of the stainless steel. Fission products apparently play no role in the compatibility behaviour. Comprehensive studies lead to reliable information on the chemical and thermodynamic state of the fuel under irradiation. The swelling of carbide fuels and the fission gas release are examined and analysed. Cladding plastic strain by fuel swelling occurs during steady-state operation because the irradiation creep is rather slow compared to oxide fuels. The cladding strain observed depends on the fuel porosity and the cladding strength. The development of carbide fuel pins is complemented by the application of comprehensive computer models. In addition to the steady-state tests power cycling and safety tests are under performance. Up to 1980 the results are summarized for the final design and specification. The development target of the present program is to fabricate several subassemblies for test operation in the SNR 300 by 1981

  10. Gas cooled fast breeder reactors using mixed carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kypreos, S.

    1976-09-01

    The fast reactors being developed at the present time use mixed oxide fuel, stainless-steel cladding and liquid sodium as coolant (LMFBR). Theoretical and experimental designing work has also been done in the field of gas-cooled fast breeder reactors. The more advanced carbide fuel offers greater potential for developing fuel systems with doubling times in the range of ten years. The thermohydraulic and physics performance of a GCFR utilising this fuel is assessed. One question to be answered is whether helium is an efficient coolant to be coupled with the carbide fuel while preserving its superior neutronic performance. Also, an assessment of the fuel cycle cost in comparison to oxide fuel is presented. (Auth.)

  11. Failure analysis of carbide fuels under transient overpower (TOP) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1980-06-01

    The failure of carbide fuels in the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) under Transient Overpower (TOP) conditions has been examined. The Beginning-of-Cycle Four (BOC-4) all-oxide base case, at $.50/sec ramp rate was selected as the reference case. A coupling between the advanced fuel performance code UNCLE-T and HCDA Code MELT-IIIA was necessary for the analysis. UNCLE-T was used to determine cladding failure and fuel preconditioning which served as initial conditions for MELT-III calculations. MELT-IIIA determined the time of molten fuel ejection from fuel pin

  12. Aspects of uranium/thorium series disequilibrium applications to radionuclide migration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to consider the contribution which the uranium/thorium series disequilibrium concept can make to understanding the retardation and transport of radionuclides in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository. In principle, naturally occurring isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium can be regarded as geochemical analogues of the divalent radionuclides and multivalent actinides expected to be present in the radioactive waste inventory. The study of their retardation and/or transport in real rock/water systems which have taken place over geological timescales, can make an important contribution to establishing a rational basis for long-term predictive modelling of radionuclide transport required for safety assessments. (author)

  13. The hydrolysis of thorium dicarbide and of mixed uranium-thorium dicarbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Litto, B.

    1966-09-01

    The hydrolysis of thorium dicarbide leads to the formation of a complex mixture of gaseous and condensed carbon hydrides. The temperature, between 25 and 100 deg. C, has no influence on the nature and composition of the gas phase. The reaction kinetics, however, are strongly temperature dependent. In a hydrochloric medium, an enrichment in hydrogen of the gas mixture is observed. On the other hand a decrease in hydrogen and an increase in acetylene content take place in an oxidizing medium. The general results can be satisfactorily interpreted through a reaction mechanism involving C-C radical groups. In the same way, the hydrolysis of uranium-thorium-carbon ternary alloys leads to the formation of gaseous and condensed carbon hydrides. The variation of the composition of the gas phase versus uranium content in the alloy suggests an hypothesis about the carbon-carbon distance in the alloy crystal lattice. The variation of methane content, on the other hand, has lead us to discuss the nature of the various phases present in uranium-carbon alloys and carbon-rich uranium-thorium-carbon alloys. We have reached the conclusion that these alloys include a proportion of monocarbide which is dependent upon the ratio. Th/(Th + U). We put forward a diagram of the system uranium-carbon with features proper to explain some phenomena which have been observed in the uranium-thorium-carbon ternary diagram. (author) [fr

  14. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric

    2008-01-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC R process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  15. Present status of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel development for LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Suzuki, Yasufumi

    1984-01-01

    The feature of carbide fuel is that it has the doubling time as short as about 13 years, that is, close to one half as compared with oxide fuel. The development of the carbide fuel in the past 10 years has been started in amazement. Especially in the program of new fuel development in USA started in 1974, He and Na bond fuel attained the burnup of 16 a/o without causing the breaking of cladding tubes. In 1984, the irradiation of the assembly composed of 91 fuel pins in the FFTF is expected. On the other hand in Japan, the fuel research laboratory was constructed in 1974 in the Oarai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, to carry out the studies on carbide fuel. In the autumn of 1982, two carbide fuel pins with different chemical composition have been successfully made. Accordingly, the recent status of the development is explained. The uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel is suitable to liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors because of large heat conductivity and the high density of nuclear fission substances. The thermal and nuclear characteristics of carbide fuel, the features of the reactor core using carbide fuel, the chemical and mechanical interaction of fuel and cladding tubes, the selection of bond materials, the manufacturing techniques for the fuel, the development of the analysis code for fuel behavior, and the research and development of carbide fuel in Japan are described. (Kako, I.)

  16. Determination of uranium, thorium and potassium contents of rock samples in Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulrahman Abdul-Hadi; Wedad Al-Qadhi; Enayat El-Zeen

    2011-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium contents in 16 different rock samples from various sites in Republic of Yemen were determined using three different techniques of analysis: γ-spectrometry, Instrumental neutron activation analyses (INAA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The concentration range for thorium, uranium and potassium were found to be from 9,810 ± 272 to 3.6 ± 1.3 ppm, 1,072 ± 40 to 1.2 ± 0.7 ppm and 11 ± 1 to 0.26 ± 0.05%, respectively. (author)

  17. Preparation, sintering and leaching of optimized uranium thorium dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingant, N.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Barre, N.; Hubert, S.; Obbade, S.; Taborda, F.; Abraham, F.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently studied as potential fuels for several concepts associated to the fourth generation of nuclear reactors. These solids are generally obtained through dry chemistry processes from powder mixtures but could present some heterogeneity in the distribution of the cations in the solid. In this context, wet chemistry methods were set up for the preparation of U 1-x Th x O 2 solid solutions as model compounds for advanced dioxide fuels. Two chemical routes of preparation, involving the precipitation of crystallized precursor, were investigated: on the one hand, a mixture of acidic solutions containing cations and oxalic acid was introduced in an open vessel, leading to a poorly-crystallized precipitate. On the other hand, the starting mixture was placed in an acid digestion bomb then set in an oven in order to reach hydrothermal conditions. By this way, small single-crystals were obtained then characterized by several techniques including XRD and SEM. The great differences in terms of morphology and crystallization state of the samples were correlated to an important variation of the specific surface area of the oxides prepared after heating, then the microstructure of the sintered pellets prepared at high temperature. Preliminary leaching tests were finally undertaken in dynamic conditions (i.e. with high renewal of the leachate) in order to evaluate the influence of the sample morphology on the chemical durability of the final cohesive materials

  18. Present status of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel development for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Suzuki, Yasufumi.

    One Oarai characteristic of a carbide fuel is that its doubling time is about 13 years which is only about half as long as that of an oxide fuel. The development of carbide fuels in the past ten years has been truly remarkable. Especially, through the new fuel development program initiated in 1974 in the United States, success has been achieved with respect to He- and Na-bond fuels in obtaining a 16 a/o burning rate without damage to cladding tubes. In 1984 at FFTF, a radiation of a fuel assembly consisting 91 fuel pins is contemplated. On the other hand, in Japan, in 1974, a Fuel Research Wing specializing in the study of carbide fuels was constructed in the Oarai Laboratory of the Atomic Energy Research Institute and in the fall of 1982, was successful in fabricating two carbide fuel pins having different chemical compositions

  19. Analysis of uranium, thorium, and potassium in the soil and rocks in northwestern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyong, J.; Wu, C.

    1984-01-01

    The contents of uranium, thorium, and potassium in terrestrial samples in northwestern Taiwan were determined by field survey and core sampling techniques. NaI(Tl) scintillation survey meters were applied to field survey. Analysis of radionuclides in the soil and rocks was performed by a 60 cm 3 Ge(Li) detector connected with a 4096-channel pulse height analyzer and a minicomputer PDP 11/04. Computer programs were used to identify energies of photopeaks, to integrate peak areas, and to evaluate the contents of radionuclides to ppm order. All the factors such as counting efficiency, statistical uncertainty, dead time, etc. had been taken into consideration. Natural terrestrial radiation exposure rates ranging from 6.5 to 20.5 uR.hr -1 were observed in 65 villages or hamlets. The average concentration of each of uranium, thorium, and potassium was 3.7+.0.8 ppm, 12.0+.2.8 ppm, and 1.3+.0.5 percent respectively

  20. CANDU reactors with reactor grade plutonium/thorium carbide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Atilim Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Khan, Mohammed Javed; Ahmed, Rizwan [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Technology

    2011-08-15

    Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, accumulated as nuclear waste of commercial reactors can be re-utilized in CANDU reactors. TRISO type fuel can withstand very high fuel burn ups. On the other hand, carbide fuel would have higher neutronic and thermal performance than oxide fuel. In the present work, RG-PuC/ThC TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 60%. The fuel compacts conform to the dimensions of sintered CANDU fuel compacts are inserted in 37 zircolay rods to build the fuel zone of a bundle. Investigations have been conducted on a conventional CANDU reactor based on GENTILLYII design with 380 fuel bundles in the core. Three mixed fuel composition have been selected for numerical calculation; (1) 10% RG-PuC + 90% ThC; (2) 30% RG-PuC + 70% ThC; (3) 50% RG-PuC + 50% ThC. Initial reactor criticality values for the modes (1), (2) and (3) are calculated as k{sub {infinity}}{sub ,0} = 1.4848, 1.5756 and 1.627, respectively. Corresponding operation lifetimes are {proportional_to} 2.7, 8.4, and 15 years and with burn ups of {proportional_to} 72 000, 222 000 and 366 000 MW.d/tonne, respectively. Higher initial plutonium charge leads to higher burn ups and longer operation periods. In the course of reactor operation, most of the plutonium will be incinerated. At the end of life, remnants of plutonium isotopes would survive; and few amounts of uranium, americium and curium isotopes would be produced. (orig.)

  1. Survey of post-irradiation examinations made of mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coquerelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Post-irradiation examinations on mixed carbide, nitride and carbonitride fuels irradiated in fast flux reactors Rapsodie and DFR were carried out during the seventies and early eighties. In this report, emphasis was put on the fission gas release, cladding carburization and head-end gaseous oxidation process of these fuels, in particular, of mixed carbides. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  2. Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented

  3. Properties of zirconium carbide for nuclear fuel applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai; Vasudevamurthy, Gokul, E-mail: gvasudev@vcu.edu; Nozawa, Takashi; Snead, Lance L.

    2013-10-15

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a potential coating, oxygen-gettering, or inert matrix material for advanced high temperature reactor fuels. ZrC has demonstrated attractive properties for these fuel applications including excellent resistance against fission product corrosion and fission product retention capabilities. However, fabrication of ZrC results in a range of stable sub-stoichiometric and carbon-rich compositions with or without substantial microstructural inhomogeneity, textural anisotropy, and a phase separation, leading to variations in physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties. The effects of neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures, currently only poorly understood, are believed to be substantially influenced by those compositional and microstructural features further adding complexity to understanding the key ZrC properties. This article provides a survey of properties data for ZrC, as required by the United States Department of Energy’s advanced fuel programs in support of the current efforts toward fuel performance modeling and providing guidance for future research on ZrC for fuel applications.

  4. Sorption distribution coefficients of uranium, thorium and radium of selected Malaysian peat soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaidi Ibrahim; Zalina Laili; Muhamat Omar; Phillip, Esther

    2010-01-01

    A study on sorption of uranium, thorium and radium on Malaysian peat soils was conducted to determine their distribution coefficient (K d ) values. Batch studies were performed to investigate the influence of pH and the concentrations of radionuclides. Peat soil samples used in this study were collected from Bachok, Batu Pahat, Dalat, Hutan Melintang and Pekan. The peat samples from different location have different chemical characteristics and K d values. No correlation was found between chemical characteristics and the K d values for radium and thorium, but K d value for uranium was found correlated with humic and organic content. The K d value was found to be influenced by soluble humic substances or humic substances leach out from peat soils. (author)

  5. Possibility of determination of the Galaxy age by the method of uranium - thorium isotopic relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Malevannyj, S.V.; Panov, I.V.; Chechetkin, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    Calculations concerning the formation of heavy elements in an astrophysical fast nuclear process characteristics of the Supernova explosions are carried out in the kinetic model of nucleosynthesis. The age of the Galaxy T G has been calculated making use of the method of uranium-thorium isotopic relations supplemented with the data on 244 Pu abundance in meteorites. T G is shown to be strongly dependent upon the calculation method applied to production of nuclei in r process, upon the data on neutron-rich nuclei and as well upon the external conditions, i.e. the density and temperature in the explosing star. The possibility of nucleosynthesis takes place due to close Supernova explosion, which enriched the chemical content of earth matter with heavy elements is analyzed. The range of allowed values of parameters of the theory of nucleosynthesis is studied

  6. Chlorination of uranium ore for extraction of uranium, thorium and radium and for pyrite removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeaf, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature chlorination of uranium ore was investigated. The objective was to develop a process which is both economically viable and environmentally acceptable. Test work was directed toward obtaining high extractions of uranium, thorium and radium-226, as well as iron, sulphur and the rare earths, and consists of chlorinating samples of an Elliot Lake uranium ore at elevated temperatures and repulping the resulting calcine in dilute hydrochloric acid. The effect of temperature and chlorine throughput on the extraction of the various metals was investigated. The best conditions yielded extractions of uranium, iron and sulphur (all as chlorides) greater than 95 percent. Chlorine consumption varied between 6 and 16 percent by weight of the ore charge. (author)

  7. Hardened over-coating fuel particle and manufacture of nuclear fuel using its fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimuda, Hideharu.

    1990-01-01

    Coated-fuel particles comprise a coating layer formed by coating ceramics such as silicon carbide or zirconium carbide and carbons, etc. to a fuel core made of nuclear fuel materials. The fuel core generally includes oxide particles such as uranium, thorium and plutonium, having 400 to 600 μm of average grain size. The average grain size of the coated-fuel particle is usually from 800 to 900 μm. The thickness of the coating layer is usually from 150 to 250 μm. Matrix material comprising a powdery graphite and a thermosetting resin such as phenol resin, etc. is overcoated to the surface of the coated-fuel particle and hardened under heating to form a hardened overcoating layer to the coated-fuel particle. If such coated-fuel particles are used, cracks, etc. are less caused to the coating layer of the coated-fuel particles upon production, thereby enabling to prevent the damages to the coating layer. (T.M.)

  8. UK irradiation experience relevant to advanced carbide fuel concepts for LMFBR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, K.Q.; Batey, W.; Paris, R.; Sloss, W.M.; Snape, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Despite discouraging prognoses of fabrication and reprocessing problems, it is recognized that the quest for a carbide fuel pin design which fully exploits the favourable density and thermal conductivity of (U,Pu) monocarbide must be maintained. Studies in aid of carbide fuel development have, therefore, continued in the UK in parallel with those on oxide, albeit at a substantially lower level of effort, and a sufficient body of irradiation experience has been accumulated to allow discrimination of realistic fuel pin designs

  9. Advanced Silicon Carbide from Molecular Engineering and Actinide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, D.J.M.; Garcia, J.; Guillaneux, D.; Wong-Chi-Man, M.; Moreau, J.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of nuclear fuels studies for generation IV, carbides or oxycarbides assemblies are one of the engaged material for high temperature reactors. The design of the fuels is not yet defined but some structures are actually considered with SiC as matrix for the actinide fuel. In this work we have studied the synthesis of a multi-scale structure controlled SiC matrix using molecular silicon organometallic precursors. The aim of this work was to develop a way to obtain multi-scale SiC matrix material which could be engineered to fit in any fuel structure defined for generation IV fuels. The control of this multi-scale structure was done using several simulation methods specific of the low temperature solution synthesis of the precursor. In a first step, we have focused our effort on the synthesis of the SiC material. A first level of template was successfully done by the use of solid silica 500 nm balls. A second level of template was studied by the use of meso-porous silica, structured at a 50 nm level. At least, supra-molecular simulation in non aqueous media was considered with the difficulty to build a molecular assembly (inverse micelles). In a second step, we have functionalized the primary silane phase with actinide complexing agent in order to blend directly the actinide inside this primary phase in a controlled way. During these studies, a new one pot synthesis route to obtain the functionalized primary silane phase was developed. (authors)

  10. Uptake of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes by plants growing in dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region (Kazakhstan)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matveyeva, Ilona; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali [al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan). Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology; Jacimovic, Radojko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Planinsek, Petra; Smodis, Borut [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2016-04-01

    The activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in dominant species of plants (Xantium strumarium, Phragmites communis, Artemisia nitrosa and Artemisia serotina) growing on the territories contaminated by uranium industry of Kazakhstan (close to dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region) are presented. The obtained data showed the significant variations of activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in above ground parts. The concentrations of most of the investigated radionuclides in the root system are higher than in the aboveground parts; it can be explained by root barrier. It was found that the highest root barrier has Xantium strumarium, especially for uranium isotopes. The concentration ratios of radionuclides were calculated, and as the result it was found that the highest accumulation ability in the investigated region has Artemisia serotina.

  11. Current extraction and separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths elements from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    A new process based on solvent extraction has been developed for separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants. The Thorium cake coming from monazite source was dissolved in HNO 3 medium in presence of trace amount of HF for feed preparation. The separation of U(VI) was carried out by liquid-liquid extraction using tris-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (TEHP) in dodecane leaving thorium and rare earths elements in the raffinate. The thorium from raffinate was selectively extracted using 1M tri iso amyl phosphate (TiAP) in dodecane in organic phase leaving all rare earths elements in aqueous solution. The uranium and thorium from organic medium was quantitatively stripped using 0.05 M HNO 3 counter current mode. Results indicate the quantitative separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from thorium cake (monazite source) using organophosphorous extractant in counter current mode

  12. Uptake of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes by plants growing in dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region (Kazakhstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveyeva, Ilona; Burkitbayev, Mukhambetkali

    2016-01-01

    The activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in dominant species of plants (Xantium strumarium, Phragmites communis, Artemisia nitrosa and Artemisia serotina) growing on the territories contaminated by uranium industry of Kazakhstan (close to dam impoundment Tasotkel and the Lower Shu region) are presented. The obtained data showed the significant variations of activity concentrations of isotopes of uranium, thorium and radium-226 in above ground parts. The concentrations of most of the investigated radionuclides in the root system are higher than in the aboveground parts; it can be explained by root barrier. It was found that the highest root barrier has Xantium strumarium, especially for uranium isotopes. The concentration ratios of radionuclides were calculated, and as the result it was found that the highest accumulation ability in the investigated region has Artemisia serotina.

  13. Characterization of fuel swelling in helium-bonded carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, D.L.Y.

    1987-08-01

    This work is not only the first attempt at characterizing the swelling of (U,Pu)C fuel pellets, but it also represents the only detailed examinations on carbide fuel swelling at high fuel burnups (4 to 16 at. %). This characterization includes the contributions of fission gases, cracks and solid fission products to fuel swelling. Significantly, the contributions of fission gases and cracks were determined by using the image analysis technique (IAT) which allows researchers to take areal measurements of the irradiated fuel porosity and cracks from the photographs of metallographic fuel samples. However, because areal measurements for varying depths in the fuel pellet could not be obtained, the crack areal measurements could not be converted into volumetric quantities. Consequently, in this situation, an areal fuel swelling analysis was used. The macroscopic fission-gas induced fuel swelling (MAS) caused by fission-gas bubbles and pores > 1 μm was determined using the measured irradiated fuel porosity because the measuring range of IAT is limited to bubbles and pores >1 μm. Conversely, for fuel swelling induced by fission-gas bubbles < 1 μm, the microscopic fission-gas induced fuel swelling (MIS) was estimated using an areal fuel swelling model

  14. Simultaneous determinations of uranium, thorium, and plutonium in soft tissues by solvent extraction and alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Zimmerman, C.J.; Lewis, L.L.; Wrenn, M.E.

    1984-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure for the simultaneous determination of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, in soft tissues has been developed. The weighed amounts of tissues, spiked with 232 U, 242 Pu, and 229 th tracers, are wet ashed. Uranium, thorium, and plutonium are coprecipitated with iron as hydroxides, dissolved in concentrated HCl and the acidity adjusted to 10 M. Uranium and plutonium are extracted into 20% TLA solution in xylene, leaving thorium in the aqueous phase. Plutonium is back-extracted by reducing to the trivalent state with 0.05 M NH 4 I solution in 8 M HCl, and uranium is back-extracted with 0.1 M HCl. Thorium is extracted into 20% TLA solution from 4 M HNO 3 and back-extracted with 10 M HCl. Uranium, thorium and plutonium are electrodeposited separately onto platinum discs and counted alpha-spectrometrically using surface barrier silicon diodes and a multichannel analyzer. The method was developed using bovine liver and applied to dog and human tissues. The mean radiochemical recoveries of these actinides in different organs were better than 70%. 6 references, 2 tables

  15. Irradiation of a 19 pin subassembly with mixed carbide fuel in KNK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithoff, D.; Mühling, G.; Richter, K.

    1992-06-01

    The presentation deals with the fabrication, irradiation and nondestructive postirradiation examinations of LMR fuel pins with mixed (U, Pu)-carbide fuels. The mixed carbide fuel was fabricated by the European Institute of Transuranium Elements using various fabrication procedures. Fuel composition varied therefore in a wide range of tolerances with respect to oxygen and phase content and microstructure. The 19 carbide pins were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of the KNK II reactor to a burn-up of about 7 at% without any failure in the centre of a KNK "carrier element" at a maximum linear rating of 800 W/cm. After dismantling in the Hot Cells of KfK nondestructive examinations were carried out comprising dimensional controls, radiography, γ-scanning and eddy-current testing. The results indicate differences in fuel behaviour with respect to composition of the fuel.

  16. Mixed Uranium/Refractory Metal Carbide Fuels for High Performance Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for advanced, high-performance reactors. Earlier studies of mixed carbides focused on uranium and either thorium or plutonium as a fuel for fast breeder reactors enabling shorter doubling owing to the greater fissile atom density. However, the mixed uranium/refractory carbides such as (U, Zr, Nb)C have a lower uranium densities but hold significant promise because of their ultra-high melting points (typically greater than 3700 K), improved material compatibility, and high thermal conductivity approaching that of the metal. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders, while hypo-stoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.92 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing, dynamic magnetic compaction, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for high performance, ultra-safe nuclear reactor applications. (authors)

  17. Uranium, thorium and trace elements in geologic occurrences as analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Brookins, D.G.; Cohen, L.H.; Flexser, S.; Abashian, M.; Murphy, M.; Williams, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Contact zones between intrusive rocks and tuff, basalt, salt and granitic rock were investigated as possible analogues of nuclear waste repository conditions. Results of detailed studies of contacts between quartz monzonite of Laramide age, intrusive into Precambrian gneiss, and a Tertiary monzonite-tuff contact zone indicate that uranium, thorium and other trace elements have not migrated significantly from the more radioactive instrusives into the country rock. Similar observations resulted from preliminary investigations of a rhyodacite dike cutting basalt of the Columbia River plateau and a kimberlitic dike cutting bedded salt of the Salina basin. This lack of radionuclide migration occurred in hydrologic and thermal conditions comparable to, or more severe than those expected in nuclear waste repository environments and over time periods of the order of concern for waste repositories. Attention is now directed to investigation of active hydrothermal systems in candidate repository rock types, and in this regard a preliminary set of samples has been obtained from a core hole intersecting basalt underlying the Newberry caldera, Oregon, where temperatures presently range from 100 to 265 0 C. Results of mineralogical and geochemical investigations of this core should indicate the alteration mineralogy and behavior of radioelements in conditions analogous to those in the near field of a repository in basalt

  18. Uranium, thorium and their decay products in human food-chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeambrun, M.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and their decay products are present in trace amounts in all rocks on Earth. Weathering, Mechanisms of soil formation and soil-plant transfers lead to the presence of these radionuclides in all the components of the environment and, through the food-chain transfers, they are also present in animals and men. The objective of this study consists in improving the knowledge on the levels and the variability of the activities of these radionuclides in various foodstuffs and on their sources and transfers. This study is based on the geological variability of the studied sites (granitic, volcanic and alluvial areas) where various foodstuffs are sampled (vegetables, cereals, meat, eggs and dairy products). The possible sources of radionuclides (irrigation waters and soils for plants; water, food and soils for animals) are also sampled in order to study their contribution to the measured activities in the foodstuffs. The results obtained present high variability of the activities in plants, less pronounced in animal products. For plants, the main radionuclide source seems to be the crop soils. Irrigation water, soil particle resuspension and their adhesion to plant surface seems to be important in some cases. For the activities in animal products, a significant contribution of the soil to thorium activity was highlighted. Water contribution to uranium activity in meat and eggs is an area worth further researches. Thus, this study of the possible sources of radionuclides highlights the importance of their role in the understanding of the radionuclide transfers to foodstuffs. (author)

  19. Loss-of-flow transient characterization in carbide-fueled LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothrock, R.B.; Morgan, M.M.; Baars, R.E.; Elson, J.S.; Wray, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    One of the benefits derived from the use of carbide fuel in advanced Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is a decreased vulnerability to certain accidents. This can be achieved through the combination of advanced fuel performance with the enhanced reactivity feedback effects and passive shutdown cooling systems characteristic of the current 'inherently safe' plant concepts. The calculated core response to an unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident has frequently been used as a benchmark test of these designs, and the advantages of a high-conductivity fuel in relation to this type of transient have been noted in previous analyses. To evaluate this benefit in carbide-fueled LMFBRs incorporating representative current plant design features, limited calculations have been made of a ULOF transient in a small ('modular') carbide-fueled LMFBR

  20. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multi-Megawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samim Anghaie; Knight, Travis W.; Plancher, Johann; Gouw, Reza

    2004-01-01

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors

  1. Calculation of vapour pressures over mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Vapour pressure over the uranium-plutonium mixed carbide (Usub(l-p) Pusub(p C) was calculated in the temperature range of 1300-9000 for various compositions (p=0.1 to 0.7). Effects of variation of the sesquicarbide content were also studied. The principle of corresponding states was applied to UC and mixed carbides to obtain the equation of state. (author)

  2. Safety research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study initiated at UCLA during the academic year 1974--1975 to evaluate and review the potential safety related research needs for carbide and nitride fueled LMFBR's are presented. The tasks included the following: (1) Review Core and primary system designs for any significant differences from oxide fueled reactors, (2) Review carbide (and nitride) fuel element irradiation behavior, (3) Review reactor behavior in postulated accidents, (4) Examine analytical methods of accident analysis to identify major gaps in models and data, and (5) Examine post accident heat removal. (TSS)

  3. Estimation of sesqui-carbide fraction for MARK-I fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana Varamban, S.; Ananthasivan, K.

    2016-01-01

    Sesqui-carbide content of FBTR bi-phasic mixed carbide is specified as 5-20 wt.%. For each batch of fuel production, the sesqui-carbide (M2C3) content is being determined by a K-ratio method using XRD information. There is a need to evolve an alternate method for qualitative determination of M2C3 content for a fabricated FBTR fuel pellet. Two independent approaches resulted in a correlation between overall carbon content and the M2C3 phase fraction. The thermodynamic calculations agree well with the stoichiometric correlation between the overall carbon content and the M2C3 phase fraction in FBTR MARK I fuel

  4. Status of steady-state irradiation testing of mixed-carbide fuel designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The steady-state irradiation program of mixed-carbide fuels has demonstrated clearly the ability of carbide fuel pins to attain peak burnup greater than 12 at.% and peak fluences of 1.4 x 10 23 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Helium-bonded fuel pins in 316SS cladding have achieved peak burnups of 20.7 at.% (192 MWd/kg), and no breaches have occurred in pins of this design. Sodium-bonded fuel pins in 316SS cladding have achieved peak burnups of 15.8 at.% (146 MWd/kg). Breaches have occurred in helium-bonded fuel pins in PE-16 cladding (approx. 5 at.% burnup) and in D21 cladding (approx. 4 at.% burnup). Sodium-bonded fuel pins achieved burnups over 11 at.% in PE-16 cladding and over 6 at.% in D9 and D21 cladding

  5. Design and fuel fabrication processes for the AC-3 mixed-carbide irradiation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Chidester, K.M.; Stratton, R.W.; Ledergerber, G.; Ingold, F.

    1992-01-01

    The AC-3 test was a cooperative U.S./Swiss irradiation test of 91 wire-wrapped helium-bonded U-20% Pu carbide fuel pins irradiated to 8.3 at % peak burnup in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The test consisted of 25 pins that contained spherepac fuel fabricated by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and 66 pins that contained pelletized fuel fabricated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Design of AC-3 by LANL and PSI was begun in 1981, the fuel pins were fabricated from 1983 to 1985, and the test was irradiated from 1986 to 1988. The principal objective of the AC-3 test was to compare the irradiation performance of mixed-carbide fuel pins that contained either pelletized or sphere-pac fuel at prototypic fluence and burnup levels for a fast breeder reactor

  6. Analysis of refabricated fuel: determination of carbon in uranium plutonium mixed carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwyler, S.

    1977-09-01

    In developing uranium plutonium mixed carbide which represents an advanced fuel for breeder reactors carbon analysis is an important means of determining the stoichiometry. Methods of carbon determination are briefly reviewed. The carbon determination using a LECO WR-12 Carbon Determinator is treated in detail and experience of three years operation communicated. Problems arising from operating the LECO-apparatus in a glove box are discussed. It is pointed out that carbon determination with the LECO-apparatus is a very fast method with good precision and well suited for the routine analysis of mixed carbide fuel. The accuracy of the method is checked by means of a standard. (Auth.)

  7. A review of the breeding potentials of carbide, nitride and oxide fueled LMFBRs and GCFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo

    1977-11-01

    The effects of design parameters in large variation on compound system doubling time of large advanced-fueled LMFBR are described on the base of recent U.S. results. The fuel element design by Combustion Engineering Inc. in step-by-step substitution of the initial oxide fuel subassemblies with carbide ones is explained. Breeding characteristics of the oxide-fueled LMFBR and its potential design modifications are expounded. The gas cooled fast breeder program in West Germany and in the United States are briefed. Definitions of the breeding ratio and doubling time in overall fuel cycle are given. (auth.)

  8. Review of the literature for dry reprocessing oxide, metal, and carbide fuel: The AIROX, RAHYD, and CARBOX pyrochemical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyt, R.C.; Rhee, B.W. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Energy Systems Group

    1979-09-30

    The state of the art of dry processing oxide, carbide, and metal fuel has been determined through an extensive literature review. Dry processing in one of the most proliferation resistant fuel reprocessing technologies available to date, and is one of the few which can be exported to other countries. Feasibility has been established for oxide, carbide, and metal fuel on a laboratory scale, and large-scale experiments on oxide and carbide fuel have shown viability of the dry processing concept. A complete dry processing cycle has been demonstrated by multicycle processing-refabrication-reirradiation experiments on oxide fuel. Additional experimental work is necessary to: (1) demonstrate the complete fuel cycle for carbide and metal fuel, (2) optimize dry processing conditions, and (3) establish fission product behavior. Dry process waste management is easier than for an aqueous processing facility since wastes are primarily solids and gases. Waste treatment can be accomplished by techniques which have been, or are being, developed for aqueous plants.

  9. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  10. A high-temperature, short-duration method of fabricating surrogate fuel microkernels for carbide-based TRISO nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevamurthy, G.; Radecka, A.; Massey, C. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology is a frontrunner among generation IV nuclear reactor designs. Among the advanced nuclear fuel forms proposed for these reactors, dispersion-type fuel consisting of microencapsulated uranium di-oxide kernels, popularly known as tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel, has emerged as the fuel form of choice. Generation IV gas-cooled fast reactors offer the benefit of recycling nuclear waste with increased burn-ups in addition to producing the required power and hydrogen. Uranium carbide has shown great potential to replace uranium di-oxide for use in these fast spectrum reactors. Uranium carbide microkernels for fast reactor TRISO fuel have traditionally been fabricated by long-duration carbothermic reduction and sintering of precursor uranium dioxide microkernels produced using sol-gel techniques. These long-duration conversion processes are often plagued by issues such as final product purity and process parameters that are detrimental to minor actinide retention. In this context a relatively simple, high-temperature but relatively quick-rotating electrode arc melting method to fabricate microkernels directly from a feedstock electrode was investigated. The process was demonstrated using surrogate tungsten carbide on account of its easy availability, accessibility and the similarity of its melting point relative to uranium carbide and uranium di-oxide.

  11. Reprocessing flowsheet and material balance for MEU spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, L.

    1978-10-01

    In response to nonproliferation concerns, the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) Fuel Recycle Development Program is investigating the processing requirements for a denatured medium-enriched uranium--thorium (MEU/Th) fuel cycle. Prior work emphasized the processing requirements for a high-enriched uranium--thorium (HEU/Th) fuel cycle. This report presents reprocessing flowsheets for an HTGR/MEU fuel recycle base case. Material balance data have been calculated for reprocessing of spent MEU and recycle fuels in the HTGR Recycle Reference Facility (HRRF). Flowsheet and mass flow effects in MEU-cycle reprocessing are discussed in comparison with prior HEU-cycle flowsheets

  12. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, H.

    2001-01-01

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report

  13. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  14. Irradiation performance of helium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Petty, R.L.; Kerrisk, J.F.; DeMuth, N.S.; Levine, P.J.; Boltax, A.

    1979-01-01

    The current irradiation program of helium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide elements is achieving its original goals. By August 1978, 15 of the original 171 helium-bonded elements had reached their goal burnups including one that had reached the highest burnup of any uranium--plutonium carbide element in the U.S.--12.4 at.%. A total of 66 elements had attained burnups over 8 at.%. Only one cladding breach had been identified at that time. In addition, the systematic and coordinated approach to the current steady-state irradiation tests is yielding much needed information on the behavior of helium-bonded carbide fuel elements that was not available from the screening tests (1965 to 1974). The use of hyperstoichiometric (U,Pu)C containing approx. 10 vol% (U,Pu) 2 C 3 appears to combine lower swelling with only a slightly greater tendency to carburize the cladding than single-phase (U,Pu)C. The selected designs are providing data on the relationship between the experimental parameters of fuel density, fuel-cladding gap size, and cladding type and various fuel-cladding mechanical interaction mechanisms

  15. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (C.E.A.), Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC{sup R} process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  16. Gamma scanning of mixed carbide and oxide fuel pins irradiated in FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraj, V.V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Ulaganathan, T.; Venkiteswaran, C.N.; Divakar, R.; Joseph, Jojo; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Fission in nuclear fuels results in a number of fission products that are gamma emitters in the energy range of 100 keV to 3 MeV. The gamma emitting fission products are therefore amenable for detection by gamma detectors. Assessment of the fission product distribution and their migration behavior through gamma scanning is important for characterizing the in reactor behavior of the fuel. Gamma scanning is an important non destructive technique used to evaluate the behavior of irradiated fuels. As a part of Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE), axial gamma scanning has been carried out on selected fuel pins of the FBTR Mark I mixed carbide fuel sub-assemblies and PFBR MOX test fuel sub-assembly irradiated in FBTR. This paper covers the results of gamma scanning and correlation of gamma scanning results with other PIE techniques

  17. Nuclear-fuel-cycle education: Module 2. Exploration, reserve estimation, mining, milling, conversion, and properties of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1981-12-01

    In this module geological and geochemical data pertinent to locating, mining, and milling of uranium are examined. Chapters are devoted to: uranium source characteristics; uranium ore exploration methods; uranium reserve estimation for sandstone deposits; mining; milling; conversion processes for uranium; and properties of uranium, thorium, plutonium and their oxides and carbides

  18. Post irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels irradiated at low linear power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Iwai, Takashi; Aizawa, Sakuei; Ohwada, Isao; Aizawa, Masao; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1988-11-01

    Two pins containing uranium-plutonium carbide fuels which are different in stoichiometry, i.e. (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 , were constructed into a capsule, ICF-37H, and were irradiated in JRR-2 up to 1.0 at % burnup at the linear heat rate of 420 W/cm. After being cooled for about one year, the irradiated capsule was transferred to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility where the non-destructive examinations of the fuel pins in the β-γ cells and the destructive ones in two α-γ inert gas atmosphere cells were carried out. The release rates of fission gas were low enough, 0.44 % from (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel pin and 0.09% from (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel pin, which is reasonable because of the low central temperature of fuel pellets, about 1000 deg C and is estimated that the release is mainly governed by recoil and knock-out mechanisms. Volume swelling of the fuels was observed to be in the range of 1.3 ∼ 1.6 % for carbide fuels below 1000 deg C. Respective open porosities of (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel were 1.3 % and 0.45 %, being in accordance with the release behavior of fission gas. Metallographic observation of the radial sections of pellets showed the increase of pore size and crystal grain size in the center and middle region of (U,Pu)C 1.0 pellets. The chemical interaction between fuel pellets and claddings in the carbide fuels is the penetration of carbon in the fuels to stainless steel tubes. The depth of corrosion layer in inner sides of cladding tubes ranged 10 ∼ 15 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel and 15 #approx #25 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel, which is correlative with the carbon potential of fuels posibly affecting the amount of carbon penetration. (author)

  19. High 240Pu FTR/EMC experiments and analysis: Carbide fuel and UO2 blanket subassembly worths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombrellaro, P.A.

    1977-06-01

    Carbide-plutonium fuel and UO 2 blanket subassembly worth measurements performed at ANL in the EMC/LWR were analyzed. Composition exchange worth calculations were performed for: (a) the replacement of high- 240 Pu fuel composition for low- 240 Pu fuel composition and carbide-plutonium fuel composition, successively, in the center subassembly of the core; (b) the replacement of low- 240 Pu fuel composition for carbide--plutonium fuel composition in one outer driver subassembly; and (c) the replacement of the radial reflector composition with UO 2 blanket composition in one subassembly of the radial reflector. The composition exchange worth calculations were performed in two-dimensional x,y geometry, using diffusion theory and perturbation theory. Each method produces about the same calculated-to-experimental bias factors

  20. High burnup, high power irradiation behavior of helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, P.J.; Nayak, U.P.; Boltax, A.

    1983-01-01

    Large diameter (9.4 mm) helium-bonded mixed carbide fuel pins were successfully irradiated in EBR-II to high burnup (12%) at high power levels (100 kW/m) with peak cladding midwall temperatures of 550 0 C. The wire-wrapped pins were clad with 0.51-mm-thick, 20% cold-worked Type 316 stainless steel and contained hyperstoichiometric (Usub(0.8)Pusub(0.2))C fuel covering the smeared density range from 75-82% TD. Post-irradiation examinations revealed: extensive fuel-cladding mechanical interaction over the entire length of the fuel column, 35% fission gas release at 12% burnup, cladding carburization and fuel restructuring. (orig.)

  1. The compatibility of stainless steels with particles and powders of uranium carbide and low-sulphur UCS fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, S.

    1978-05-01

    Slightly hyperstoichiometric (U,Pu)C is a potential nuclear fuel for fast breeder reactors. The excess carbon above the stoichiometric amount results in a higher carbon activity in the fuel, and carbon is transferred to the stainless steel cladding, resulting in embrittlement of the cladding. It is with this problem of carbon transfer from the fuel to the cladding that this thesis is concerned. For practical reasons, UC and not (U,Pu)C was used as the fuel. The theory of decarburisation of carbide fuel and the carburisation of stainless steel, the facilities constructed for the project at the Atomic Energy Board, and the experimental techniques used, including preparation of the fuels, are discussed. The effect of a number of variables of uranium carbide fuel on its compatibility behaviour with stainless steels was investigated, as well as the effect om microstructure and type of stainless steel (304, 304 L and 316) on the rate of carburisation. These studies can be briefly summarised under the following headings: powder-particle size; surface oxidation of uranium carbide; preparation temperature of uranium carbide; low sulfur UCS fuels; uranium sulfide and the microstructure and type of steel. The author concludes that: the effect of surface oxidation and particle size must be taken into account when evaluating out-of-pile tests; the possible effects of surface oxidation must be taken into account when considering vibro-compacted carbide fuels; there is no advantage in replacing a fraction of the carbon atoms by sulphur atoms in slightly hyperstoichiometric carbide fuels, and the type and thermo-mechanical treatment of the stainless steel used as cladding material in a fuel pin is not important as far as the rate of carburisation by the fuel is concerned

  2. The influence of Uranium-Thorium ratio and heating time during gelation using as a CCl4(NH3) on the Gel quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indra-Suryawan; Sukarsono, R; Setyo-Sulardi

    1996-01-01

    Gel has been prepared from a uranium-thorium sol using CCI 4 (NH 3 ) as a gelling medium. The uranium-thorium ratio and the heating time during gelation have been chosen as variables. The sol was prepared by mixing Th(NO 3 ) 4 and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 solutions, heating the solution at 95 o C and adding NH 4 OH solution drop by drop until colloidal particles were formed. Sol was then fed into a gelation column containing CCI 4 (NH 3 ), where the sol was transformed into gel. A good gel has properties such as sphere in shape and elastic which it will not crack when it is dropped from 2 metres height. The experimental work resulted a good gel when the percentage of uranium was about 15 - 25 % at heating time of 40 - 50 minutes

  3. Evaluation of catalytic properties of tungsten carbide for the anode of microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; Zhao, Feng; Quaas, Marion; Wulff, Harm; Schroeder, Uwe; Scholz, Fritz [Universitaet Greifswald, Institut fuer Biochemie, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 4, 17487 Greifswald (Germany)

    2007-07-31

    In this communication we discuss the properties of tungsten carbide, WC, as anodic electrocatalyst for microbial fuel cell application. The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide is evaluated in the light of its preparation procedure, its structural properties as well as the pH and the composition of the anolyte solution and the catalyst load. The activity of the noble-metal-free electrocatalyst towards the oxidation of several common microbial fermentation products (hydrogen, formate, lactate, ethanol) is studied for microbial fuel cell conditions (e.g., pH 5, room temperature and ambient pressure). Current densities of up to 8.8 mA cm{sup -2} are achieved for hydrogen (hydrogen saturated electrolyte solution), and up to 2 mA cm{sup -2} for formate and lactate, respectively. No activity was observed for ethanol electrooxidation. The electrocatalytic activity and chemical stability of tungsten carbide is excellent in acidic to pH neutral potassium chloride electrolyte solutions, whereas higher phosphate concentrations at neutral pH support an oxidative degradation. (author)

  4. Determining the minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, Jacob W.; Lindemer, Terrence B.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Reif, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert N.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels is calculated. • More nuclear and chemical factors have been included for more useful predictions. • The effect of transmutation products, like Pu and Np, on the oxygen distribution is included for the first time. - Abstract: Three important failure mechanisms that must be controlled in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel for certain higher burnup applications are SiC layer rupture, SiC corrosion by CO, and coating compromise from kernel migration. All are related to high CO pressures stemming from O release when uranium present as UO 2 fissions and the O is not subsequently bound by other elements. In the HTGR kernel design, CO buildup from excess O is controlled by the inclusion of additional uranium apart from UO 2 in the form of a carbide, UC x and this fuel form is designated UCO. Here general oxygen balance formulas were developed for calculating the minimum UC x content to ensure negligible CO formation for 15.5% enriched UCO taken to 16.1% actinide burnup. Required input data were obtained from CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) chemical thermodynamic models and the Serpent 2 reactor physics and depletion analysis tool. The results are intended to be more accurate than previous estimates by including more nuclear and chemical factors, in particular the effect of transmuted Pu and Np oxides on the oxygen distribution as the fuel kernel composition evolves with burnup.

  5. Uranium, Thorium and Potassium concentrations and volumetric heat production rates at the eastern border of the Parana basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Telma C.Q.; Ribeiro, Fernando B.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations were measured and volumetric heat production rates were calculated for rocks from the exposed basement at the eastern-southeastern border of the Parana Basin between 23 deg S and 32 deg S. Heat generating element concentration data available in the literature were also used when possible, for volumetric heat production calculations. The uranium concentrations vary from below determination limit (0.51 ppm) and 16 ppm whereas the thorium concentrations vary from below the determination limit (1.26 ppm) and 68 ppm, and K concentrations vary between 0.08% and 5.6%. Volumetric heat production rates vary between 0.07 μW/m 3 to 6.2 μW/m 3 , and the obtained results show a variable heat generation rate with high heat producing bodies scattered along this Parana Basin border. The higher observed values concentrate in the Ribeira fold belt at about 23 deg S and between 30 deg S and 32 deg S in the Down Feliciano fold belt. Isolated high heat production rates can also be observed between 26 deg S and 28 deg S. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Uranium, thorium, gross alpha and gross beta assessment in fountain waters in towns of the Iron Quadrangle, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Claudia A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Dalmazio, Ilza, E-mail: cferreiraquimica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: help@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: rda@cdtn.br, E-mail: id@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The Iron Quadrangle region is known worldwide for its diversity, both ores and rock types, which record a long and important period of Earth's history. For thousands of years erosive processes have exposed ancient rocks, Archean and Proterozoic, in this region. The concentration of uranium, thorium, gross alpha and gross beta activities has been assessed in 34 fountains water samples collected from different towns in the Iron Quadrangle. The results obtained were compared to values established by CONAMA nº 396/2008 and Decree nº 2914/2011 by the Ministry of Health. For Th in water consumption there is no value established in the Brazilian legislation and the concentrations in all samples were lower than 0.01 μg L{sup -1}. For uranium, the values ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.61 μg L{sup -1}, and all results were lower than the value allowed of 15 μg L{sup -1} and 30 μg L{sup -1} established by the legislations above, respectively. The results for the radiation levels of gross alpha and gross beta activity in some fountains waters were slightly above the limits (0.5 Bq L{sup -1} and 1.0 Bq L{sup -1}) established by CONAMA nº 396/2008 and Decreet nº 2914/2011, respectively. (author)

  7. Uranium, thorium, gross alpha and gross beta assessment in fountain waters in towns of the Iron Quadrangle, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Claudia A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Chaves, Renata D.A.; Dalmazio, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Quadrangle region is known worldwide for its diversity, both ores and rock types, which record a long and important period of Earth's history. For thousands of years erosive processes have exposed ancient rocks, Archean and Proterozoic, in this region. The concentration of uranium, thorium, gross alpha and gross beta activities has been assessed in 34 fountains water samples collected from different towns in the Iron Quadrangle. The results obtained were compared to values established by CONAMA nº 396/2008 and Decree nº 2914/2011 by the Ministry of Health. For Th in water consumption there is no value established in the Brazilian legislation and the concentrations in all samples were lower than 0.01 μg L -1 . For uranium, the values ranged from less than 0.002 to 0.61 μg L -1 , and all results were lower than the value allowed of 15 μg L -1 and 30 μg L -1 established by the legislations above, respectively. The results for the radiation levels of gross alpha and gross beta activity in some fountains waters were slightly above the limits (0.5 Bq L -1 and 1.0 Bq L -1 ) established by CONAMA nº 396/2008 and Decreet nº 2914/2011, respectively. (author)

  8. Multi-criteria methodology to design a sodium-cooled carbide-fueled Gen-IV reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauff, N.

    2011-01-01

    Compared with earlier plant designs (Phenix, Super-Phenix, EFR), Gen IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor requires improved economics while meeting safety and non-proliferation criteria. Mixed Oxide (U-Pu)O 2 fuels are considered as the reference fuels due to their important and satisfactory feedback experience. However, innovative carbide (U-Pu)C fuels can be considered as serious competitors for a prospective SFR fleet since carbide-fueled SFRs can offer another type of optimization which might overtake on some aspects the oxide fuel technology. The goal of this thesis is to reveal the potentials of carbide by designing an optimum carbide-fueled SFR with competitive features and a naturally safe behavior during transients. For a French nuclear fleet, a 1500 MW(e) break-even core is considered. To do so, a multi-physic approach was developed taking into account neutronics, fuel thermo-mechanics and thermal-hydraulic at a pre-design stage. Simplified modeling with the calculation of global neutronic feedback coefficients and a quasi-static evaluation was developed to estimate the behavior of a core during overpower transients, loss of flow and/or loss of heat removal transients. The breakthrough of this approach is to provide the designer with an overall view of the iterative process, emphasizing the well-suited innovations and the most efficient directions that can improve the SFR design project.This methodology was used to design a core that benefits from the favorable features of carbide fuels. The core developed is a large carbide-fueled SFR with high power density, low fissile inventory, break-even capability and forgiving behaviors during the un-scrammed transients studied that should prevent using expensive mitigate systems. However, the core-peak burnup is unlikely to significantly exceed 100 MWd/kg because of the large swelling of the carbide fuel leading to quick pellet-clad mechanical interaction and the low creep capacity of carbide. Moderate linear power fuel

  9. Sequential extraction procedure for determination of uranium, thorium, radium, lead and polonium radionuclides by alpha spectrometry in environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Carvalho, F. P.

    2006-01-01

    A sequential extraction technique was developed and tested for common naturally-occurring radionuclides. This technique allows the extraction and purification of uranium, thorium, radium, lead, and polonium radionuclides from the same sample. Environmental materials such as water, soil, and biological samples can be analyzed for those radionuclides without matrix interferences in the quality of radioelement purification and in the radiochemical yield. The use of isotopic tracers (232U, 229Th, 224Ra, 209Po, and stable lead carrier) added to the sample in the beginning of the chemical procedure, enables an accurate control of the radiochemical yield for each radioelement. The ion extraction procedure, applied after either complete dissolution of the solid sample with mineral acids or co-precipitation of dissolved radionuclide with MnO2 for aqueous samples, includes the use of commercially available pre-packed columns from Eichrom® and ion exchange columns packed with Bio-Rad resins, in altogether three chromatography columns. All radioactive elements but one are purified and electroplated on stainless steel discs. Polonium is spontaneously plated on a silver disc. The discs are measured using high resolution silicon surface barrier detectors. 210Pb, a beta emitter, can be measured either through the beta emission of 210Bi, or stored for a few months and determined by alpha spectrometry through the in-growth of 210Po. This sequential extraction chromatography technique was tested and validated with the analysis of certified reference materials from the IAEA. Reproducibility was tested through repeated analysis of the same homogeneous material (water sample).

  10. Internal-standard method for the determination of uranium, thorium, lanthanum and europium in carbonaceous shale and monazite by epithermal neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shuenn-Gang; Tsai, Hui-Tuh; Wu, Shaw-Chii [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Lung-Tan (Taiwan, Republic of China)

    1981-10-03

    An internal-standard method was applied for the determination of uranium, thorium, lanthanum and europium is carbonaceous shale samples and monazite sand by epithermal neutron activation analysis using gold as an internal standard element. The samples were irradiated in a zero-power reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research and measured with a high-resolution Ge(Li) detector. The detection limit is 0.1 ppm for uranium and europium, 1 ppm for thorium, 5 ppm for lanthanum, and the realative error of all elements is within +-2.6%.

  11. Viability utilization of one Se sup(75) source in the analysis of uranium, thorium and rare earths for use on energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nova Mussel, W. da.

    1989-01-01

    This work is a study about the viable utilization of one Se sup(75) source as an excitation source for the use of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), in the analysis of Uranium, Thorium and the Rare Earths. The following arrangement was build up: a HPGE detector, two Se sup(75) sources in 30 sup(0) positions of castle, deadtime of 5%. Using this arrangement the calibration curve for U and Th was measured and the angular correlation coeficient was r+ 0,999, and for the Rare Earths was superior r+ 0,960. The answer given for this system was considered very fine. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  13. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H 3 BO 3 ). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  14. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  15. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lloyd J.; Willey, Melvin G.; Tiegs, Sue M.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  16. Certified reference materials for the determination of uranium, thorium, and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoliquido, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is the Department of Energy's Nuclear Materials Measurements and Standards Laboratory. As part of its mission, NBL provides certified reference materials (CRMs) for the analysis of various types of materials encountered in the nuclear fuel cycle. The reference material program at NBL gained greater prominence in 1981, when an interagency agreement between NBL and NBS established NBL as the distributor of one category of SRMs, the special nuclear materials SRMs. When NBS reorganized and became NIST in 1987, NBL bought out the remaining inventory of these particular SRMs which it was already distributing and renamed them as CRMs. The difference between the radioactivity SRMs which NIST still provides and the nuclear material CRMs which NBL provides will be explained. NBL CRMs are distributed worldwide and are used in nuclear safeguards applications and in geological and environmental research. The current NBL CRM inventory will be described

  17. A Review of Carbide Fuel Corrosion for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Butt, Darryl P.

    1994-07-01

    At the operation conditions of interest in nuclear thermal propulsion reactors, carbide materials have been known to exhibit a number of life limiting phenomena. These include the formation of liquid, loss by vaporization, creep and corresponding gas flow restrictions, and local corrosion and fuel structure degradation due to excessive mechanical and/or thermal loading. In addition, the radiation environment in the reactor core can produce a substantial change in its local physical properties, which can produce high thermal stresses and corresponding stress fractures (cracking). Time-temperature history and cyclic operation of the nuclear reactor can also accelerate some of these processes. The University of New Mexico's Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, under NASA sponsorship has recently initiated a study to model the complicated hydrogen corrosion process. In support of this effort, an extensive review of the open literature was performed, and a technical expert workshop was conducted. This paper summarizes the results of this review.

  18. A review of carbide fuel corrosion for nuclear thermal propulsion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; El-Genk, M.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    At the operation conditions of interest in nuclear thermal propulsion reactors, carbide materials have been known to exhibit a number of life limiting phenomena. These include the formation of liquid, loss by vaporization, creep and corresponding gas flow restrictions, and local corrosion and fuel structure degradation due to excessive mechanical and/or thermal loading. In addition, the radiation environment in the reactor core can produce a substantial change in its local physical properties, which can produce high thermal stresses and corresponding stress fractures (cracking). Time-temperature history and cyclic operation of the nuclear reactor can also accelerate some of these processes. The University of New Mexico`s Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, under NASA sponsorship has recently initiated a study to model the complicated hydrogen corrosion process. In support of this effort, an extensive review of the open literature was performed, and a technical expert workshop was conducted. This paper summarizes the results of this review.

  19. Apparatus for surface treatment of U-Pu carbide fuel samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Susumu; Arai, Yasuo; Handa, Muneo; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Shiozawa, Ken-ichi.

    1979-05-01

    Apparatus has been constructed for treating the surface of U-Pu carbide fuel samples for EPMA. The treatment is to clean off oxide layer on the surface, then coat with an electric-conductive material. The apparatus, safe in handling plutonium, operates as follows. (1) To avoid oxidation of the analyzing surface by oxygen and water in the air, series of cleaning and coating, i.e. ion-etching and ion-coating or ion-etching and vacuum-evaporation is done at the same time in an inert gas atmosphere. (2) Ion-etching is possible on samples embedded in non-electric-conductive and low heat-conductive resin. (3) Since the temperature rise in (2) is negligible, there is no deterioration of the samples. (author)

  20. Review of experimental studies of zirconium carbide coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of zirconium carbide(ZrC) coated fuel particles were reviewed from the viewpoints of fuel particle designs, fabrication, characterization, fuel performance, and fission product retentiveness. ZrC is known as a refractory and chemically stable compound, so ZrC is a candidate to replace the silicon carbide(SiC) coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particles. The irradiation experiments, the postirradiation heating tests, and the out-of-reactor experiments showed that the ZrC layer was less susceptible than the SiC layer to chemical attack by fission products and fuel kernels, and that the ZrC-coated fuel particles performed better than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, especially above 1600degC. The ZrC-coated fuel particles demonstrated better cesium retention than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles though the ZrC layer showed a less effective barrier to ruthenium than the SiC layer. (author) 51 refs

  1. Practical aspects of monitoring and dosimetry of long-lived dust in uranium mines and mills - determination of the annual limit on intake for uranium and uranium/thorium ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duport, P.; Horvath, F.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the recommendations of ICRP Publication 26, the dosimetric and metabolic data of ICRP Publication 30, and using available information on the physical and solubility characteristics of uranium and uranium/thorium ore, the ALI values for airborne ore dust were calculated. Four hypothetical types of ore were considered: uranium ore with no radon emanation, uranium ore with 50% radon emanation, uranium/thorium ore with neither 222 Rn nor thoron emanation, and uranium/thorium ore with 50% 22 Rn and 220 Rn emanation. Furthermore, the ALI values were calculated assuming the radionuclides present in the ore were all: (a) solubility class Y: (b) solubility class W; and (c) equal parts of classes Y and W. The ALI values were also calculated for Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameters (AMAD) ranging from 1 to 10 μm. The results of the calculations show that the solubility class of the radionuclides is the single most important factor that governs ALI values. The ALI value for uranium and uranium-thorium ore dust is proportional to (AMAD) 0.5 for class Y materials, (AMAD) 0.2 for a mixture of equal parts of class Y and class W materials, and is independent of the AMAD for class W materials. A series of graphs is given from which it is possible to evaluate the ALI for airborne ore dust when the AMAD of the dust and the solubility characteristics are known approximately. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the mechanical performance of silicon carbide in TRISO fuel at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohbeck, Nadia, E-mail: nadia.rohbeck@manchester.ac.uk; Xiao, Ping, E-mail: p.xiao@manchester.ac.uk

    2016-09-15

    The HTR design envisions fuel operating temperatures of up to 1000 °C and in case of an accident even 1600 °C are conceivable. To ensure safety in all conditions a thorough understanding of the impact of an extreme temperature environment is necessary. This work assesses the high temperature mechanical performance of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer within the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle as it poses the main barrier against fission product release into the primary circuit. Therefore, simulated fuel was fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition; varying the deposition conditions resulted in strongly differing SiC microstructures for the various samples. Subsequently the TRISO particles were annealed in inert atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 1600 °C up to 2200 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that strong disintegration of the SiC layer occurred from 2100 °C onwards, but initial signs of porosity formation were visible already at 1800 °C. Still, the elastic modulus and hardness as measured by nanoindentation were hardly impaired. After annealing stoichiometric SiC coatings showed a reduction in fracture strength as determined by a modified crush test, however the actual annealing temperature from 1600 °C to 2000 °C had no measureable effect. Furthermore, a technique was developed to measure the elastic modulus and hardness in situ up to 500 °C using a high temperature nanoindentation facility. This approach allows conducting tests while the specimen and indenter tip are heated to a specific measurement temperature, thus obtaining reliable values for the temperature dependent mechanical properties of the material. For the SiC layer in TRISO particles it was found that the elastic modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to 500 °C, whereas the hardness was reduced more severely to approximately half of its ambient temperature value.

  3. Evaluation of the Mechanical Performance of Silicon Carbide in TRISO Fuel at High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohbeck, N.; Xiao, P.

    2014-01-01

    The HTR design envisions fuel operating temperatures of up to 1000°C and in case of an accident even 1600°C are conceivable. To ensure safety in all conditions a thorough understanding of the impact of an extreme temperature environment is necessary. This work assesses the high temperature mechanical performance of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer within the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle as it poses the main barrier against fission product release into the primary circuit. Therefore simulated fuel was fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition; varying the deposition conditions resulted in strongly differing SiC microstructures for the various samples. Subsequently the TRISO particles were annealed in inert atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 1600°C up to 2200°C. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that strong disintegration of the SiC layer occurred from 2100°C onwards, but initial signs of porosity formation were visible already at 1800°C. Still, the elastic modulus and hardness as measured by nanoindentation were hardly impaired. After annealing stoichiometric SiC coatings showed a reduction in fracture strength as determined by a modified crush test, however the actual annealing temperature from 1600°C to 2000°C had no measureable effect. Furthermore, a technique was developed to measure the elastic modulus and hardness in-situ up to 500°C using a high temperature nanoindentation facility. This approach allows conducting numerous tests on small sample volumes and thus promises to improve our knowledge of irradiation effects on the mechanical properties. For the SiC layer in TRISO particles it was found that the elastic modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to 500°C, whereas the hardness was reduced more severely to approximately half of its ambient temperature value. (author)

  4. Evaluation of the mechanical performance of silicon carbide in TRISO fuel at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohbeck, Nadia; Xiao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The HTR design envisions fuel operating temperatures of up to 1000 °C and in case of an accident even 1600 °C are conceivable. To ensure safety in all conditions a thorough understanding of the impact of an extreme temperature environment is necessary. This work assesses the high temperature mechanical performance of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer within the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle as it poses the main barrier against fission product release into the primary circuit. Therefore, simulated fuel was fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition; varying the deposition conditions resulted in strongly differing SiC microstructures for the various samples. Subsequently the TRISO particles were annealed in inert atmosphere at temperatures ranging from 1600 °C up to 2200 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy showed that strong disintegration of the SiC layer occurred from 2100 °C onwards, but initial signs of porosity formation were visible already at 1800 °C. Still, the elastic modulus and hardness as measured by nanoindentation were hardly impaired. After annealing stoichiometric SiC coatings showed a reduction in fracture strength as determined by a modified crush test, however the actual annealing temperature from 1600 °C to 2000 °C had no measureable effect. Furthermore, a technique was developed to measure the elastic modulus and hardness in situ up to 500 °C using a high temperature nanoindentation facility. This approach allows conducting tests while the specimen and indenter tip are heated to a specific measurement temperature, thus obtaining reliable values for the temperature dependent mechanical properties of the material. For the SiC layer in TRISO particles it was found that the elastic modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to 500 °C, whereas the hardness was reduced more severely to approximately half of its ambient temperature value.

  5. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO; Difusion de plata a traves de carburo de silicio en combustibles nucleares microencapsulados TRISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E., E-mail: Felix.cancino@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Col. Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  6. Design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) which improve fuel utilization in light water reactors (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, H.C.; Freeman, L.B.

    1981-08-01

    This report surveys reactor core design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor which make possible improved fuel utilization in light water reactor systems and breeding with the uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The impact of developing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle on utilization of nuclear fuel resources is discussed. The specific core design features related to improved fuel utilization and breeding which have been implemented in the Shippingport LWBR core are presented. These design features include a seed-blanket module with movable fuel for reactivity control, radial and axial reflcetor regions, low hafnium Zircaloy for fuel element cladding and structurals, and a closely spaced fuel rod lattice. Also included is a discussion of several design modifications which could further improve fuel utilization in future light water reactor systems. These include further development of movable fuel control, use of Zircaloy fuel rod support grids, and fuel element design modifications

  7. Thermophysical properties of reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibowitz, L.

    1981-01-01

    A review is presented of the literature on the enthalpy of uranium, thorium, and plutonium oxide and an approach is described for calculating the vapor pressure and gaseous composition of reactor fuel. In these calculations, thermodynamic functions of gas phase molecular species (obtained from matrix-isolation spectroscopy) are employed in conjunction with condensed phase therodynamics. A summary is presented of the status of this work

  8. Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides in phosphate rocks and phosphate fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, K; Yanagisawa, M; Sakurai, J; Sakanoue, M

    1985-10-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium contents and radioactive equilibrium states of the uranium and thorium series nuclides have been studied for 2 phosphate rocks and 7 phosphate fertilizers. Uranium contents were found to be rather high (39-117 ppm) except for phosphate rock from Kola. The uranium series nuclides were found to be in various equilibration states, which can be grouped into following three categories. Almost in the equilibrium state, 238U approximately 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra and 238U greater than 230Th greater than 210Pb greater than 226Ra. Thorium contents were found to be, in general, low and appreciable disequilibrium of the thorium series nuclides was not observed except one sample. Potassium contents were also very low (less than 0.3% K2O) except for complex fertilizers. Based on the present data, discussions were made for the radiation exposure due to phosphate fertilizers.

  9. Characterisation of nuclear dispersion fuels. The non-destructive examination of silicon carbide by selenium immersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambler, J.F.R.; Ferguson, I.F.

    1974-07-15

    The non-destructive microscopic examination of silicon-carbide-coated spheres containing uranium carbide, which involves immersing the coated spheres in selenium, is particularly suited for the examination of flaws in the coats but it is not possible to measure coating thicknesses by this method. Some coats are found to be opaque and this is related to their porosity. (auth)

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of Di-n-butyl phosphate in radioactive lean organic solvent of FBTR carbide fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velavendan, P.; Ganesh, S.; Pandey, N.K.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Natarajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work Di-n- butyl phosphate (DBP) a degraded product of Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) formed by acid hydrolysis and radiolysis in the PUREX process was analyzed. Lean organic streams of different fuel burn-up FBTR carbide fuel reprocessing solution was determined by standard Gas Chromatographic technique. The method involves the conversion of non-volatile Di-n-butyl phosphate into volatile and stable derivatives by the action of diazomethane and then determined by Gas Chromatograph (GC). A calibration graph was made for DBP concentration range of 200-2000 ppm with correlation coefficient of 0.99587 and RSD 1.2 %. (author)

  11. Process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for electrochemical fuel cells. Verfahren zur Herstellung eines Brennstoffkatalysators aus Wolframcarbid fuer elektrochemische Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baresel, D.; Gellert, W.; Scharner, P.

    1982-05-19

    The invention refers to a process for the manufacture of a fuel catalyst made of tungsten carbide for the direct generation of electrical energy by the oxidation of hydrogen, formaldehyde or formic acid in electrochemical fuel cells. Tungsten carbide is obtained by carburisation of tungsten or tungsten oxide by carbon monoxide. The steps of the process are as follows: dissolving the commercial-quality tungstic acid in ammonium hydroxide; precipitating the tungstic acid with concentrated hydrochloric acid; drying in a vacuum and then heating to 200/sup 0/C to remove the water of crystallisation forming tungsten trioxide; and mixing the tungsten trioxide with zinc powder and heating to 600/sup 0/C. The zinc oxide is dissolved with hydrochloric acid after cooling. The finely divided tungsten obtained in this way is converted with carbon monoxide in a quartz tube at 700/sup 0/C.

  12. Analysis of alternative light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Boegel, A.J.; Jenquin, U.P.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Lewallen, M.A.; Merrill, E.T.; Nolan, A.M.

    1979-12-01

    Nine alternative LWR fuel cycles are analyzed in terms of the isotopic content of the fuel material, the relative amounts of primary and recycled material, the uranium and thorium requirements, the fuel cycle costs and the fraction of energy which must be generated at secured sites. The fuel materials include low-enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium-uranium (MOX), highly-enriched uranium-thorium (HEU-Th), denatured uranium-thorium (DU-Th) and plutonium-thorium (Pu-Th). The analysis is based on tracing the material requirements of a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a 30-year period at constant annual energy output. During this time period all the created fissile material is recycled unless its reactivity worth is less than 0.2% uranium enrichment plant tails

  13. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Silicon Carbide and Pyrocarbon Coatings on Fuel Particles for High Temperature Reactors (HTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, V.; Charollais, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA, BP 1, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Dugne, O. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SCGS BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Garcia, C. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR CNRS 5801, 3 allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France); Perez, M. [CEA Grenoble DRT/DTH/LTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cea and AREVA NP have engaged an extensive research and development program on HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel. The improving of safety of (very) high temperature reactors (V/HTR) is based on the quality of the fuel particles. This requires a good knowledge of the properties of the four-layers TRISO particles designed to retain the uranium and fission products during irradiation or accident conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize exhaustively the structure and the thermomechanical properties of each unirradiated layer (silicon carbide and pyrocarbon coatings) by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SEAD), thermo reflectance microscopy and nano-indentation. The long term objective of this study is to define pertinent parameters for fuel performance codes used to better understand the thermomechanical behaviour of the coated particles. (authors)

  14. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  15. Synthesis of carbide fuels from nano-structured precursors: impact on carbo-reduction and physico-chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saravia, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The classical way classically used for manufacturing carbide fuels consists of carbo-reducing at high temperature (1600 C) and under primary vacuum a mixture of AnO 2 and graphite powders. These conditions are disadvantageous for the synthesis of mixed (U,Pu)C carbides on account of plutonium volatilization. Therefore, one of the main aims of these studies is to decrease the carbo-reduction temperature. The experiments focused mainly on the lowering of the uranium oxide temperature. This result has been obtained with the use of uranium oxide and carbon nano-structured precursors. To achieve this goal colloidal suspensions of uranium oxide have been prepared and stabilized by cellulosic ethers. Cellulosic ethers are both stabiliser for uranium oxide nanoparticles and carbon source for carbo-reduction. It has been shown that these precursors are more efficient for carbo-reduction than the standard precursors: a reduction of 300 C of carbo-reduction temperature has been obtained. The impact of these precursors on carbo-reduction and on physico-chemical properties as well as the structural and microstructural characterizations of the obtained carbides have been carried out. (author) [fr

  16. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) with Silicon-Carbide-Matrix Coated-Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C. W.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2012-01-01

    The FHR is a new reactor concept that uses coated-particle fuel and a low-pressure liquid-salt coolant. Its neutronics are similar to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The power density is 5 to 10 times higher because of the superior cooling properties of liquids versus gases. The leading candidate coolant salt is a mixture of 7 LiF and BeF 2 (FLiBe) possessing a boiling point above 1300 C and the figure of merit ρC p (volumetric heat capacity) for the salt slightly superior to water. Studies are underway to define a near-term base-line concept while understanding longer-term options. Near-term options use graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel where the graphite is both a structural component and the primary neutron moderator. It is the same basic fuel used in HTGRs. The fuel can take several geometric forms with a pebble bed being the leading contender. Recent work on silicon-carbide-matrix (SiCm) coated-particle fuel may create a second longer-term fuel option. SiCm coated-particle fuels are currently being investigated for use in light-water reactors. The replacement of the graphite matrix with a SiCm creates a new family of fuels. The first motivation behind the effort is to take advantage of the superior radiation resistance of SiC compared to graphite in order to provide a stable matrix for hosting coated fuel particles. The second motivation is a much more rugged fuel under accident, repository, and other conditions.

  17. Highly efficient transition metal and nitrogen co-doped carbide-derived carbon electrocatalysts for anion exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratso, Sander; Kruusenberg, Ivar; Käärik, Maike; Kook, Mati; Puust, Laurits; Saar, Rando; Leis, Jaan; Tammeveski, Kaido

    2018-01-01

    The search for an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to replace platinum in fuel cell cathode materials is one of the hottest topics in electrocatalysis. Among the many non-noble metal catalysts, metal/nitrogen/carbon composites made by pyrolysis of cheap materials are the most promising with control over the porosity and final structure of the catalyst a crucial point. In this work we show a method of producing a highly active ORR catalyst in alkaline media with a controllable porous structure using titanium carbide derived carbon as a base structure and dicyandiamide along with FeCl3 or CoCl2 as the dopants. The resulting transition metal-nitrogen co-doped carbide derived carbon (M/N/CDC) catalyst is highly efficient for ORR electrocatalysis with the activity in 0.1 M KOH approaching that of commercial 46.1 wt.% Pt/C. The catalyst materials are also investigated by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to characterise the changes in morphology and composition causing the raise in electrochemical activity. MEA performance of M/N/CDC cathode materials in H2/O2 alkaline membrane fuel cell is tested with the highest power density reached being 80 mW cm-2 compared to 90 mW cm-2 for Pt/C.

  18. Preconcentration of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium with oxine supported on microcrystalline naphthalene and their determinations by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naveen Kumar, P.; Sanjay Kumar; Vijay Kumar; Nandakishore, S.S.; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid method for the determination of uranium, thorium, zirconium, titanium, molybdenum and vanadium by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) after solid-liquid extraction with microcrystalline naphthalene is developed. Analytes were quantitatively adsorbed as their oxinate complexes on naphthalene and determined by ICP-AES after stripping with 2 M HCl. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, reagent amounts, naphthalene amount and stripping conditions on the determination of these elements was investigated in detail. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the detection limits of this method for U (VI), Th (IV), Zr (IV), Ti (IV), Mo (VI) and V (V) were 20.0 ng mL -1 and the relative standard deviations obtained for three replicate determinations at a concentration of 1.0 µg mL -1 were 1.5-3.0%. The proposed method has been applied in the analysis of SY-2, SY-3 and pre-analysed samples for U, Th, Zr, Ti, Mo and V the analytical results are in good agreement with recommended values. (author)

  19. Studies relating to construction materials to be used in different options for head end treatment in reprocessing of mixed carbide fuel of plutonium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, S.K.; Palamalai, A.; Ravi, T.N.; Sampath, M.; Raman, V.R.; Balasubramanian, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mixed carbide of uranium and plutonium has been chosen as the fuel for the first core of Fast Breeder Test Reactor, installed in the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research. Reprocessing of this fuel is one of the vital steps to prove the viability of the fuel cycle. The head end treatment process introduces constraints in the reprocessing of carbide fuel when compared to the commonly used mixed oxide fuel. Three head end processes, namely direct oxidation, pyrohydrolysis and direct dissolution in nitric acid with oxidation of organic acids were considered for study for exercising the choice. The paper briefly describes the three processes. In each process probable material of construction and related problems are discussed. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  20. Actinide production in different HTR-fuel cycle concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filges, D.; Hecker, R.; Mirza, N.; Rueckert, M.

    1978-01-01

    At the 'Institut fuer Reaktorentwicklung der Kernforschungsanlage Juelich' the production of α-activities in the following HTR-OTTO cycle concepts were studied: 1. standard HTR cycle (U-Th); 2. low enriched HTR cycle (U-Pu); 3. near breeder HTR cycle (U-Th); 4. combined system (conventional and near breeder HTR). The production of α-activity in HTR Uranium-Thorium fuel cycles has been investigated and compared with the standard LWR cycles. The production of α-activity in HTR Uranium-Thorium fuel cycles has been investigated and compared with the standard LWR cycles. The calculations were performed by the short depletion code KASCO and the well-known ORIGEN program

  1. The hydrolysis of thorium dicarbide and of mixed uranium-thorium dicarbides; L'hydrolyse du dicarbure de thorium et des dicarbures mixtes d'uranium et de thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Litto, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-09-01

    The hydrolysis of thorium dicarbide leads to the formation of a complex mixture of gaseous and condensed carbon hydrides. The temperature, between 25 and 100 deg. C, has no influence on the nature and composition of the gas phase. The reaction kinetics, however, are strongly temperature dependent. In a hydrochloric medium, an enrichment in hydrogen of the gas mixture is observed. On the other hand a decrease in hydrogen and an increase in acetylene content take place in an oxidizing medium. The general results can be satisfactorily interpreted through a reaction mechanism involving C-C radical groups. In the same way, the hydrolysis of uranium-thorium-carbon ternary alloys leads to the formation of gaseous and condensed carbon hydrides. The variation of the composition of the gas phase versus uranium content in the alloy suggests an hypothesis about the carbon-carbon distance in the alloy crystal lattice. The variation of methane content, on the other hand, has lead us to discuss the nature of the various phases present in uranium-carbon alloys and carbon-rich uranium-thorium-carbon alloys. We have reached the conclusion that these alloys include a proportion of monocarbide which is dependent upon the ratio. Th/(Th + U). We put forward a diagram of the system uranium-carbon with features proper to explain some phenomena which have been observed in the uranium-thorium-carbon ternary diagram. (author) [French] L'hydrolyse du dicarbure de thorium conduit a la formation d'un melange complexe d'hydrures de carbone gazeux et condenses. La temperature entre 25 et 100 deg. C n'a pas d'influence sur la nature ef la composition de la phase gazeuse. Par contre la cinetique en depend fortement. En milieu chlorhydrique, on observe un enrichissement en hydrogene du melange gazeux. Au contraire, en milieu oxydant il se produit une diminution du taux d'hydrogene et une augmentation tres nette du taux d'acetylene. L'ensemble des resultats obtenus peut etre interprete d'une maniere

  2. The significance of strength of silicon carbide for the mechanical integrity of coated fuel particles for HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.; Scheer, A.; Schuster, H.; Taeuber, K.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrocarbon are used as coating material for the HTR fuel particles. The PyC shell having a certain strength acts as a pressure vessel for the fission gases whereas the SiC shell has to retain the solid fission products in the fuel kernel. For measuring the strength of coating material the so-called Brittle Ring Test was developed. Strength and Young's modulus can be measured simultaneously with this method on SiC or PyC rings prepared out of the coating material of real fuel particles. The strength measured on the ring under a certain stress distribution which is characteristic for this method is transformed with the aid of the Weibull formalism for brittle fracture into the equivalent strength of the spherical coating shell on the fuel particle under uniform stress caused by the fission gas pressure. The values measured for the strength of the SiC were high (400-700MN/m 2 ), it could therefore be assumed that a SiC layer might contribute significantly also to the mechanical strength of the fuel coating. This assumption was confirmed by an irradiation test on coated particles with PyC-SiC-PyC coatings. There were several particles with all PyC layers broken during the irradiation, whereas the SiC layers remained intact having to withstand the fission gas pressure alone. This fact can only be explained assuming that the strength of the SiC is within the range of the values measured with the brittle ring test. The result indicates that, in optimising the coating of a fuel particle, the PyC layers of a multilayer coating should be considered alone as prospective layers for the SiC. The SiC shell, besides acting as a fission product barrier, is then also responsible for the mechanical integrity of the particle

  3. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of the spatial distribution of uranium, thorium and rare earth elements of surficial sediments from Black sea coast nearby Istanbul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akyuz, T; Bolcal, C.; Akyuz, S.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.; Mirsagatova, A.A

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The Black Sea is an inland sea between south-eastern Europe and Asia minor. It is the largest anoxic marine basin in the word and connected to the Mediterranean Sea by the Bosporus and the Sea of Marmara, to the Sea of Azov by the Strait of Kerch. One of the most useful approaches to long-term monitoring of aquatic systems is the analysis of marine sediments. In this study the abundance of uranium, thorium and some rare earth elements was analysed in surface sediments of the Southern part of the Black Sea using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The spatial distribution patterns of the elements studied were investigated. The surficial sediment samples (0-4 cm) were collected during 1999-2005, from 18 sampling stations of the Turkish Coast of the Black Sea, by using a Lenz Bottom Sampler and were deposited into plastic bags. The samples were dried at 40 degrees Celcius for 24 hours, crushed and homogenised prior to the analysis and were irradiated simultaneously with reference materials at a fission spectra neutron flux of the density of 5.10 1 3 cm - 2.s - 1 (WWR-SM) nuclear reactor of Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The gamma-spectra were measured in a gamma-spectrometer. A linear regression correlation test was performed to investigate the correlation between the elemental concentrations of our sediment samples. Correlation analysis revealed close relationships between Th and U (r=0.82), Th and La (r=0.87), Th and Ce (r=0.89). In nature, rare earth elements are often associated to thorium, thus the results indicate that Th and Lanthanides have a natural origin. The mean values of thorium (8.38) to uranium (3.80) is found to be Th/U= 2.20

  4. Loads on pebble bed fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E.; Maly, V.

    1974-03-15

    A comparison is made of key parameters for multi-recycle pebbles and single-pass once-through (OTTO) pebbles. The parameters analyzed include heat transfer characteristics with burn-up, temperature profiles, power per element as a function of axial position in the core, and burn-up. For the OTTO-scheme, the comparisons addressed the use of the conventional fuel element and the advanced "shell ball" designed to reduce the peak fuel temperature in the center of the fuel element. All studies addressed the uranium-thorium fuel cycle.

  5. Fabrication and control of fuels made of mixed carbides (U, Pu)C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzelli, R.; Delaroche, P.

    1980-01-01

    Fabrication of this type of advanced fuel is described. The fuel is prepared by reduction of oxides with carbon and natural sintering. Density, thermal stability and thermal conductibility are more particularly studied [fr

  6. Universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for FBR mixed uranium and plutonium carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Takahashi, Ichiro; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    1978-10-01

    A universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for LMFBR advanced fuels was installed in Plutonium Fuel Laboratory, Oarai Research Establishment. Design, construction and performance of the apparatus are described. With the apparatus, heat treatment of the fuel under a controlled gas atmosphere and quenching of the fuel with blowing helium gas are possible. Equipment to measure impurity gas release of the fuel is also provided. Various plutonium enclosure techniques, e.g., a gas line filter with new exchange mechanics, have been developed. In performance test, results of the enclosure techniques are described. (author)

  7. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1964-04-01

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might he reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  8. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1964-04-15

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might be reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  9. Performance of a sphere-pac mixed carbide fuel pin irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR 527/1 experiment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischoff, K.; Smith, L.; Stratton, R.W.

    1980-10-01

    The DFR 527/1 experiment was the first irradiation of EIR sphere-pac uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel in a fast flux. The experiment has been successfully irradiated to a burn-up of 7.3% FIMA at ratings between 45 and 62 kW m - 1 and clad temperatures between 300 and 600 0 C. Restructuring and elemental redistribution has been found to be similar to the pattern established for pellet type fuel and follows effects seen in earlier sphere-pac carbide tests. Gas release of 12-14% has been measured. A preliminary comparison of radial temperature distribution calculations using a first version of the fuel behaviour modelling code SPECKLE with the actual metallography has been attempted. (Auth.)

  10. The solubility of U, Np, Pu, Th and Tc in a geological disposal vault for used nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemire, R.J.; Garisto, F.

    1989-12-01

    This document describes the solubility model used to calculate the concentrations of uranium, thorium, technetium, neptunium and plutonium in a geological disposal vault for used nuclear fuel. This model is incorporated in the vault model of SYVAC3-CC3 - the third generation of the Systems Variability Analysis Code used to assess the long-term safety of the disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The data for the solubility model and the sources for these data are also reported

  11. Reactor physics measurements with 19-element ThOsub(2)-sup(235)UOsub(2) cluster fuel in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, P.M.

    1985-02-01

    Low power lattice physics measurements have been performed with a single rod of 19-element thorium oxide fuel enriched with 1.45 wt. percent sub(235)UOsub(2) (93 percent enriched) in a simulated heavy water moderated and cooled power reactor core. The experiments were designed to provide data relevant to a power reactor irradiation and to obtain some basic information on the physics of uranium-thorium fuel material. Some theoretical flux calculations are summarized and show reasonable agreement with experiment

  12. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured titanium carbide for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Paviter; Singh, Harwinder; Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Manpreet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Akshay, E-mail: akshaykumar.tiet@gmail.com [Advanced Functional Material Laboratory, Department of Nanotechnology,, Sri Guru Granth Sahib World University, Fatehgarh Sahib-140 406 Punjab (India); Kumar, Manjeet [Department of Materials Engineering, Defense Institute of Advanced Technology (DU), Pune-411 025 (India); Bala, Rajni [Department of Mathematics Punjabi University Patiala-147 002 Punjab (India)

    2016-04-13

    Titanium carbide (TiC) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reaction of titanium and acetone at 800 °C. This method is relatively low temperature synthesis route. It can be used for large scale production of TiC. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA) techniques. XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase TiC. XRD analysis confirmed that the particles are spherical in shape with an average particle size of 13 nm. DTA analysis shows that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications.

  13. Chemistry of uranium, thorium, and radium isotopes in the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, M. M.; Krishnaswami, S.; somayajulu, B. L. K.; Moore, W. S.

    1990-05-01

    The most comprehensive data set on uranium, thorium, and radium isotopes in the Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the major river systems of the world, is reported here. The dissolved 238U concentration in these river waters ranges between 0.44 and 8.32 μ/1, and it exhibits a positive correlation with major cations (Na + K + Mg + Ca). The 238U /∑Cations ratio in waters is very similar to that measured in the suspended sediments, indicating congruent weathering of uranium and major cations. The regional variations observed in the [ 234U /238U ] activity ratio are consistent with the lithology of the drainage basins. The lowland tributaries (Chambal, Betwa, Ken, and Son), draining through the igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Deccan Traps and the Vindhyan-Bundelkhand Plateau, have [ 234U /238U ] ratio in the range 1.16 to 1.84. This range is significantly higher than the near equilibrium ratio (~1.05) observed in the highland rivers which drain through sedimentary terrains. The dissolved 226Ra concentration ranges between 0.03 and 0.22 dpm/1. The striking feature of the radium isotopes data is the distinct difference in the 228Ra and 226Ra abundances between the highland and lowland rivers. The lowland waters are enriched in 228Ra while the highland waters contain more 226Ra. This difference mainly results from the differences in their weathering regimes. The discharge-weighted mean concentration of dissolved 238U in the Ganga (at Patna) and in the Brahmaputra (at Goalpara) are 1.81 and 0.63 μ/1, respectively. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system constitutes the major source of dissolved uranium to the Bay of Bengal. These rivers transport annually about 1000 tons of uranium to their estuaries, about 10% of the estimated global supply of dissolved uranium to the oceans via rivers. The transport of uranium by these rivers far exceeds that of the Amazon, although their water discharge is only about 20% of that of the Amazon. The high intensity of weathering of uranium in

  14. Distribution and transport of radionuclides in a boreal mire – assessing past, present and future accumulation of uranium, thorium and radium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Ramebäck, Henrik; Bengtsson, Åsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2013-01-01

    The spatial distribution of 238 U, 226 Ra, 40 K and the daughters of 232 Th, 228 Ra and 228 Th, were measured in a small mire in northern Sweden. High activity concentrations of 238 U and 232 Th (up to 41 Bq 238 U kg −1 ) were observed in parts of the mire with a historical or current inflow of groundwater from the surrounding till soils, but the activities declined rapidly further out in the mire. Near the outlet and in the central parts of the mire the activity concentrations were low, indicating that uranium and thorium are immobilized rapidly upon their entering the peat. The 226 Ra was found to be more mobile with high activity concentrations further out into the mire (up to 24 Bq kg −1 ), although the central parts and the area near the outlet of the mire still had low activity concentrations. Based on the fluxes to and from the mire, it was estimated that approximately 60–70% of the uranium and thorium entering the mire currently is retained within it. The current accumulation rates were found to be consistent with the historical accumulation, but possibly lower. Since much of the accumulation still is concentrated to the edges of the mire and the activities are low compared to other measurements of these radionuclides in peat, there are no indications that the mire will be saturated with respect to radionuclides like uranium, thorium and radium in the foreseen future. On the contrary, normal peat growth rates for the region suggest that the average activity concentrations of the peat currently may be decreasing, since peat growth may be faster than the accumulation of radionuclides. In order to assess the total potential for accumulation of radionuclides more thoroughly it would, however, be necessary to also investigate the behaviour of other organophilic elements like aluminium, which are likely to compete for binding sites on the organic material. Measurements of the redox potential and other redox indicators demonstrate that uranium possibly could

  15. Design report for an annular fuel element for accommodation of a carbide test bundle on the ring position of the KNK II/2 test zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, H.E.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes an annular oxide element with Mark II rods for accommodation of a 19-pin carbide test bundle on position 201 in the test zone of the second core of KNK II as well as its behavior during the period of operation. The ring element comprises within a driver wrapper in three rows of pins 102 fuel pins of 7.6 mm diameter and six structural rods for fixing the spark eroded spacers. The report deals with the ring element with its individual components fuel rod, bundle, wrappers, head and foot and describes methods, criteria and results concerning the design. The carbide test bundle to be accommodated by the annular carrier element will be treated in a separate report. The loadability of the annular element with its components is demonstrated by generally valid standards for strength criteria

  16. Design and performance of sodium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.; DeMuth, N.S.; Petty, R.L.; Latimer, T.W.; Vitti, J.A.; Jones, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent results from irradiation tests indicate that sodium-bonded elements provide a practical advanced fuel element design for use in LMFBRs. Shroud tubes have effectively controlled fuel-cladding mechanical interaction; thicker and stronger claddings have also been effective in this respect. Burnups to 11 at.% have been achieved under typical operating conditions. A hetrogeneous core with a breeding ratio of 1.55 and a compound system doubling time of less than 13 years has been designed using these element designs

  17. Magnesium carbide synthesis from methane and magnesium oxide - a potential methodology for natural gas conversion to premium fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Diversification of the raw materials base for manufacturing premium fuels and chemicals offers U.S. and international consumers economic and strategic benefits. Extensive reserves of natural gas in the world provide a valuable source of clean gaseous fuel and chemical feedstock. Assuming the availability of suitable conversion processes, natural gas offers the prospect of improving flexibility in liquid fuels and chemicals manufacture, and thus, the opportunity to complement, supplement, or displace petroleum-based production as economic and strategic considerations require. The composition of natural gas varies from reservoir to reservoir but the principal hydrocarbon constituent is always methane (CH{sub 4}). With its high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, methane has the potential to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich products. However, methane is a very chemically stable molecule and, thus, is not readily transformed to other molecules or easily reformed to its elements (H{sub 2} and carbon). In many cases, further research is needed to augment selectivity to desired product(s), increase single-pass conversions, or improve economics (e.g. there have been estimates of $50/bbl or more for liquid products) before the full potential of these methodologies can be realized on a commercial scale. With the trade-off between gas conversion and product selectivity, a major challenge common to many of these technologies is to simultaneously achieve high methane single-pass conversions and high selectivity to desired products. Based on the results of the scoping runs, there appears to be strong indications that a breakthrough has finally been achieved in that synthesis of magnesium carbides from MgO and methane in the arc discharge reactor has been demonstrated.

  18. Thermal-Hydraulic Aspects of Changing the Nuclear Fuel-Cladding Materials from Zircaloy to Silicon Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, Bojan; Pouchon, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The accident in Fukushima has drastically shown the drawbacks of Zircaloy claddings despite their beneficial properties in normal use. The effect of the lack of cooling and the production of hydrogen would not have been so strong if the fuel cladding had not consisted of a zirconium (or metal) alloy. International activities have been started to search for an alternative to Zircaloy, however, still on a limited basis. A project sponsored by Swissnuclear has been conducted at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) with the aim to close the gap in knowledge on application of silicon carbides (SiC) as potential replacement for Zircaloys as material for nuclear fuel cladding. The work was interdisciplinary, result of collaboration between different laboratories at PSI, and has focused on SiC cladding material properties, implication of its usage on neutronics and on thermal-hydraulics. This paper summarizes thermal-hydraulic aspects of changing Zircaloy for SiC as the cladding material. The change of cladding material inevitably changes the surface properties thus making a significant impact on boiling curve, and critical heat flux (CHF). Low chemical reactivity of SiC means fewer particles in the flow (less crud), which leads to fewer failures, but also decreases the CHF. Due to differences in physical properties between SiC and Zircaloys, higher brittleness of SiC in particular, might have impact on fuel-rod assembly design, which has direct influence on flow patterns and heat transfer in the fuel assembly. Higher melting (i.e. decomposition) point for SiC means that severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) should have to be re-assessed. Not only would the core degrade later than in the case of conventional fuels, but the production of hydrogen would be quite different as well. All these issues are explored in this work in two steps; first the SiC properties which may have influence on thermal-hydraulics are outlined, then each thermal-hydraulic issues is explained from

  19. Methanol electro-oxidation on platinum modified tungsten carbides in direct methanol fuel cells: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Tian; Lin, Xiao; Chen, Zhao-Yang; Hu, P; Sun, Shi-Gang; Chu, You-Qun; Ma, Chun-An; Lin, Wen-Feng

    2015-10-14

    In exploration of low-cost electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), Pt modified tungsten carbide (WC) materials are found to be great potential candidates for decreasing Pt usage whilst exhibiting satisfactory reactivity. In this work, the mechanisms, onset potentials and activity for electrooxidation of methanol were studied on a series of Pt-modified WC catalysts where the bare W-terminated WC(0001) substrate was employed. In the surface energy calculations of a series of Pt-modified WC models, we found that the feasible structures are mono- and bi-layer Pt-modified WCs. The tri-layer Pt-modified WC model is not thermodynamically stable where the top layer Pt atoms tend to accumulate and form particles or clusters rather than being dispersed as a layer. We further calculated the mechanisms of methanol oxidation on the feasible models via methanol dehydrogenation to CO involving C-H and O-H bonds dissociating subsequently, and further CO oxidation with the C-O bond association. The onset potentials for the oxidation reactions over the Pt-modified WC catalysts were determined thermodynamically by water dissociation to surface OH* species. The activities of these Pt-modified WC catalysts were estimated from the calculated kinetic data. It has been found that the bi-layer Pt-modified WC catalysts may provide a good reactivity and an onset oxidation potential comparable to pure Pt and serve as promising electrocatalysts for DMFCs with a significant decrease in Pt usage.

  20. Postirradiation results and evaluation of helium-bonded uranium--plutonium carbide fuel elements irradiated in EBR-II. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latimer, T.W.; Barner, J.O.; Kerrisk, J.F.; Green, J.L.

    1976-02-01

    An evaluation was made of the performance of 74 helium-bonded uranium-plutonium carbide fuel elements that were irradiated in EBR-II at 38-96 kW/m to 2-12 at. percent burnup. Only 38 of these elements have completed postirradiation examination. The higher failure rate found in fuel elements which contained high-density (greater than 95 percent theoretical density) fuel than those which contained low-density (77-91 percent theoretical density) fuel was attributed to the limited ability of the high-density fuel to swell into the void space provided in the fuel element. Increasing cladding thickness and original fuel-cladding gap size were both found to influence the failure rates for elements containing low-density fuel. Lower cladding strain and higher fission-gas release were found in high-burnup fuel elements having smear densities of less than 81 percent. Fission-gas release was usually less than 5 percent for high-density fuel, but increased with burnup to a maximum of 37 percent in low-density fuel. Maximum carburization in elements attaining 5-10 at. percent burnup and clad in Types 304 or 316 stainless steel and Incoloy 800 ranged from 36-80 μm and 38-52 μm, respectively. Strontium and barium were the fission products most frequently found in contact with the cladding but no penetration of the cladding by uranium, plutonium, or fission products was observed

  1. Fuel fabrication processes, design and experimental conditions for the joint US-Swiss mixed carbide test in FFTF (AC-3 test)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, R.W.; Ledergerber, G.; Ingold, F.; Latimer, T.W.; Chidester, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The preparation of mixed carbide fuel for a joint (US-Swiss) irradiation test in the US Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is described, together with the experiment design and the irradiation conditions. Two fabrication routes were compared. The US produced 66 fuel pins containing pellet fuel via the powder-pellet (dry) route, and the Swiss group produced 25 sphere pac pins of mixed carbide using the internal gelation (wet) route. Both sets of fuel met all t the requirements of the specifications concerning soichiometry, chemical composition and structure. The pin designs were as similar as possible. The test operated successfully in the FFTF for 620 effective full power days until October 1988 and reached over 8% burn up with peak powers of around 80 kW/m. The conclusions were that the choice of sphere pac or pellet fuel for reactor application is dependent on preferred differences in fabrication (e.g. economics and environmental factors) and not on differences in irradiation behaviour. (orig.)

  2. Effect of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic silicon carbide coatings for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    Silicon carbide coatings on HTGR microsphere fuel act as the barrier to contain metallic fission products. Silicon carbide coatings were applied by the decomposition of CH 3 SiCl 3 in a 13-cm-diam (5-in.) fluidized-bed coating furnace. The effects of temperature, CH 3 SiCl 3 supply rate and the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio on coating properties were studied. Deposition temperature was found to control coating density, whole particle crushing strength, coating efficiency, and microstructure. Coating density and microstructure were also partially determined by the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio. From this work, it appears that the rate at which high quality SiC can be deposited can be increased from 0.2 to 0.5 μm/min

  3. Neutronics performances study of silicon carbide as an inert matrix to achieve very high burn-up for light water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, C.; Coulon-Picard, E.; Pelletier, M.

    2007-01-01

    In order to extend the actual limits of light water reactors, the Cea has put emphasis on the exploration of major fuel innovations that would allow us to increase the competitiveness, the safety and flexibility, while keeping the standard PWR environment. Different fuel concepts have been chosen and are actually studied to evaluate their advantages and drawbacks. The objectives of these new fuels are to increase the safety performances and to achieve a very high burn-up. One concept is a CERCER fuel with silicon carbide (SiC) as an inert matrix devoted to reduce the fuel temperature at nominal conditions. Besides the investigation of the neutronic performance, analyses on the thermomechanical performances, the fuel fabrication, the fuel reprocessing and economic aspects have been performed. This paper presents particularly neutronic results obtained for the CERCER fuel. The results show that a very high burn-up, a high safety performance and a better competitiveness cannot be achieved with this fuel concept. (authors)

  4. Fracture and Residual Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Cobalt Coatings on High Strength Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Donald S

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt coatings applied via high velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray deposition are essentially anisotropic composite structures with aggregates of tungsten carbide particles bonded...

  5. High surface area synthesis, electrochemical activity, and stability of tungsten carbide supported Pt during oxygen reduction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhina, H.; Campbell, S.; Kesler, O.

    The oxidation of carbon catalyst supports to carbon dioxide gas leads to degradation in catalyst performance over time in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The electrochemical stability of Pt supported on tungsten carbide has been evaluated on a carbon-based gas diffusion layer (GDL) at 80 °C and compared to that of HiSpec 4000™ Pt/Vulcan XC-72R in 0.5 M H 2SO 4. Due to other electrochemical processes occurring on the GDL, detailed studies were also performed on a gold mesh substrate. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured both before and after accelerated oxidation cycles between +0.6 V and +1.8 V vs. RHE. Tafel plots show that the ORR activity remained high even after accelerated oxidation tests for Pt/tungsten carbide, while the ORR activity was extremely poor after accelerated oxidation tests for HiSpec 4000™. In order to make high surface area tungsten carbide, three synthesis routes were investigated. Magnetron sputtering of tungsten on carbon was found to be the most promising route, but needs further optimization.

  6. High surface area synthesis, electrochemical activity, and stability of tungsten carbide supported Pt during oxygen reduction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhina, H. [Automotive fuel cell corporation, 9000 Glenlyon Parkway, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 5 King' s College Road, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Campbell, S. [Automotive fuel cell corporation, 9000 Glenlyon Parkway, Burnaby, BC (Canada); Kesler, O. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, 5 King' s College Road, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-04-15

    The oxidation of carbon catalyst supports to carbon dioxide gas leads to degradation in catalyst performance over time in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The electrochemical stability of Pt supported on tungsten carbide has been evaluated on a carbon-based gas diffusion layer (GDL) at 80 C and compared to that of HiSpec 4000 trademark Pt/Vulcan XC-72R in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Due to other electrochemical processes occurring on the GDL, detailed studies were also performed on a gold mesh substrate. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was measured both before and after accelerated oxidation cycles between +0.6 V and +1.8 V vs. RHE. Tafel plots show that the ORR activity remained high even after accelerated oxidation tests for Pt/tungsten carbide, while the ORR activity was extremely poor after accelerated oxidation tests for HiSpec 4000 trademark. In order to make high surface area tungsten carbide, three synthesis routes were investigated. Magnetron sputtering of tungsten on carbon was found to be the most promising route, but needs further optimization. (author)

  7. Method for increasing the activity of fuel cell electrodes containing tungsten carbide. Verfahren zur Steigerung der Aktivitaet von Brennstoffelektroden, die Wolframcarbid enthalten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, H.; Koehling, A.; Kuhn, W.; Lindner, W.; Sandstede, G.

    1977-10-13

    An increase in the activity of electrodes containing tungsten carbide for a low-temperature fuel cell with sulfuric acid as electrolyte can be achieved, if one operates the electrodes for a few hours (5-20 h) in the presence of hydrogen and a means of reduction (formaldehyde, hydrazene) in a voltage range of between +500 and +800 mV (relative to the H/sub 2/ electrode). A corrosion resistant layer is formed, which is assumed to have the composition WC/sub X/O/sub y/H/sub z/.

  8. Resources of nuclear fuels and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, K [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan); Kamiyama, Teiji; Hayashi, S; Hida, Noboru; Okano, T

    1974-11-01

    In this explanatory article, data on the world resources of nuclear fuels and materials, their production, and the present state of utilization are presented by specialists in varied fields. Main materials taken up are uranium, thorium, beryllium, zirconium, niobium, rare earth elements, graphite, and materials for nuclear fusion (heavy hydrogen and tritium). World reserves and annual production of these materials listed in a number of tables are cited from statistics of the period 1970-1973 or given by estimation. These data may be used as valuable numerical data for various projects and problems of atomic power industries.

  9. Long-term testing of HTR fuel elements in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickel, H.

    1986-12-01

    The extensive results from irradiation experiments carried out on coated particles, on graphitic matrices of different composition and on integral fuel elements have shown that the spherical fuel elements with high-enriched uranium/thorium mixed-oxide particles and optimized graphitic matrix are available for use in the planned HTR facilities. A concentrated qualification programme is on the way in order to bring the fuel elements with particles from low-enriched uranium dioxide (LEU) and TRISO coating to a comparable level of experience and knowledge, i.e. to make them licensable for the planned HTR facilities. (orig.) [de

  10. Fuel cycle related parametric study considering long lived actinide production, decay heat and fuel cycle performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, X.; Damian, F.; Lenain, R.; Lecomte, M.

    2001-01-01

    One of the very attractive HTGR reactor characteristics is its highly versatile and flexible core that can fulfil a wide range of diverse fuel cycles. Based on a GTMHR-600 MWth reactor, analyses of several fuel cycles were carried out without taking into account common fuel particle performance limits (burnup, fast fluence, temperature). These values are, however, indicated in each case. Fuel derived from uranium, thorium and a wide variety of plutonium grades has been considered. Long-lived actinide production and total residual decay heat were evaluated for the various types of fuel. The results presented in this papers provide a comparison of the potential and limits of each fuel cycle and allow to define specific cycles offering lowest actinide production and residual heat associated with a long life cycle. (author)

  11. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  12. Processing of FRG high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements at General Atomic under the US/FRG cooperative agreement for spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.D.; Strand, J.B.; Schwarz, F.A.; Drake, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the United States (US) are cooperating on certain aspects of gas-cooled reactor technology under an umbrella agreement. Under the spent fuel treatment development section of the agreement, both FRG mixed uranium/ thorium and low-enriched uranium fuel spheres have been processed in the Department of Energy-sponsored cold pilot plant for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel processing at General Atomic Company in San Diego, California. The FRG fuel spheres were crushed and burned to recover coated fuel particles suitable for further treatment for uranium recovery. Successful completion of the tests described in this paper demonstrated certain modifications to the US HTGR fuel burining process necessary for FRG fuel treatment. Results of the tests will be used in the design of a US/FRG joint prototype headend facility for HTGR fuel

  13. Sensitivity of nuclear fuel-cycle cost to uncertainties in nuclear data. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1980-11-01

    An improved capability for assessing the economic implications of uncertainties in nuclear data and methods on the power reactor fuel cycle was developed. This capability is applied to the sensitivity analysis of fuel-cycle cost with respect to changes in nuclear data and related computational methods. Broad group sensitivities for both a typical BWR and a PWR are determined under the assumption of a throwaway fuel cycle as well as for a scenario under which reprocessing is allowed. Particularly large dollar implications are found for the thermal and resonance cross sections of fissile and fertile materials. Sensitivities for the throwaway case are found to be significantly larger than for the recycle case. Constrained sensitivities obtained for cases in which information from critical experiments or other benchmarks is used in the design calculation to adjust a parameter such as anti ν are compared with unconstrained sensitivities. Sensitivities of various alternate fuel cycles were examined. These included the extended-burnup (18-month) LWR cycle, the mixed-oxide (plutonium) cycle, uranium-thorium and denatured uranium-thorium cycles, as well as CANDU-type reactor cycles. The importance of the thermal capture and fission cross sections of 239 Pu is shown to be very large in all cases. Detailed, energy dependent sensitivity profiles are provided for the thermal range (below 1.855 eV). Finally, sensitivity coefficients are combined with data uncertainties to determine the impact of such uncertainties on fuel-cycle cost parameters

  14. Core Designs and Economic Analyses of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saglam, Mehmet; Sapyta, Joe J.; Spetz, Stewart W.; Hassler, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to develop equilibrium fuel cycle designs for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with homogeneously mixed uranium-thorium dioxide (ThO 2 -UO 2 ) fuel and compare those designs with more conventional UO 2 designs.The fuel cycle analyses indicate that ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel cycles are technically feasible in modern PWRs. Both power peaking and soluble boron concentrations tend to be lower than in conventional UO 2 fuel cycles, and the burnable poison requirements are less.However, the additional costs associated with the use of homogeneous ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel in a PWR are significant, and extrapolation of the results gives no indication that further increases in burnup will make thoria-urania fuel economically competitive with the current UO 2 fuel used in light water reactors

  15. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing

  16. Evaluation of fuel fabrication and the back end of the fuel cycle for light-water- and heavy-water-cooled nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.L.; Olsen, A.R.

    1979-06-01

    The classification of water-cooled nuclear reactors offers a number of fuel cycles that present inherently low risk of weapons proliferation while making power available to the international community. Eight fuel cycles in light water reactor (LWR), heavy water reactor (HWR), and the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) systems have been proposed to promote these objectives in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) program. Each was examined in an effort to provide technical and economic data to INFCE on fuel fabrication, refabrication, and reprocessing for an initial comparison of alternate cycles. The fuel cycles include three once-through cycles that require only fresh fuel fabrication, shipping, and spent fuel storage; four cycles that utilize denatured uranium--thorium and require all recycle operations; and one cycle that considers the LWR--HWR tandem operation requiring refabrication but no reprocessing.

  17. Behaviour of a VVER-1000 fuel element with boron carbide/steel absorber tested under severe fuel damage conditions in the CORA facility (Results of experiment CORA-W2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, S.; Hofmann, P.; Noack, V.; Schanz, G.; Schumacher, G.; Sepold, L.

    1994-10-01

    The 'Severe Fuel Damage' (SFD) experiments of the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK), Federal Republic of Germany, were carried out in the out-of-pile facility 'CORA' as part of the international Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) research. The experimental program was set up to provide information on the failure mechanisms of Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel elements in a temperature range from 1200 C to 2000 C and in few cases up to 2400 C. Between 1987 and 1992 a total of 17 CORA experiments with two different bundle configurations, i.e. PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) bundles were performed. These assemblies represented 'Western-type' fuel elements with the pertinent materials for fuel, cladding, grid spacer, and absorber rod. At the end of the experimental program two VVER-1000 specific tests were run in the CORA facility with identical objectives but with genuine VVER-type materials. The experiments, designated CORA-W1 and CORA-W2 were conducted on February 18, 1993 and April 21, 1993, respectively. Test bundle CORA-W1 was without absorber material whereas CORA-W2 contained one absorber rod (boron carbide/steel). As in the earlier CORA tests the test bundles were subjected to temperature transients of a slow heatup rate in a steam environment. The transient phases of the tests were initiated with a temperature ramp rate of 1 K/s. With these conditions a so-called small-break LOCA was simulated. The temperature escalation due to the exothermal zircon/niobium-steam reaction started at about 1200 C, leading the bundles to maximum temperatures of approximately 1900 C. The thermal response of bundle CORA-W2 is comparable to that of CORA-W1. In test CORA-W2, however, the temperature front moved faster from the top to the bottom compared to test CORA-W1 [de

  18. SILICON CARBIDE GRAIN BOUNDARY DISTRIBUTIONS, IRRADIATION CONDITIONS, AND SILVER RETENTION IN IRRADIATED AGR-1 TRISO FUEL PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillo, T. M.; Rooyen, I. J.; Aguiar, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    Precession electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope was used to map grain orientation and ultimately determine grain boundary misorientation angle distributions, relative fractions of grain boundary types (random high angle, low angle or coincident site lattice (CSL)-related boundaries) and the distributions of CSL-related grain boundaries in the SiC layer of irradiated TRISO-coated fuel particles. Two particles from the AGR-1 experiment exhibiting high Ag-110m retention (>80%) were compared to a particle exhibiting low Ag-110m retention (<19%). Irradiated particles with high Ag-110m retention exhibited a lower fraction of random, high angle grain boundaries compared to the low Ag-110m retention particle. An inverse relationship between the random, high angle grain boundary fraction and Ag-110m retention is found and is consistent with grain boundary percolation theory. Also, comparison of the grain boundary distributions with previously reported unirradiated grain boundary distributions, based on SEM-based EBSD for similarly fabricated particles, showed only small differences, i.e. a greater low angle grain boundary fraction in unirradiated SiC. It was, thus, concluded that SiC layers with grain boundary distributions susceptible to Ag-110m release were present prior to irradiation. Finally, irradiation parameters were found to have little effect on the association of fission product precipitates with specific grain boundary types.

  19. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  20. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  1. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.; Yeheskel, J.; Agam, S.; Edelstein, D.; Lebovits, O.; Ron, Y.

    1991-04-01

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  2. A study of uranium-thorium mixed lattices; Etude de reseaux mixtes uranium - thorium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacher, P; Eckert, R; Mazancourt, R de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    Some subcritical experiments have been carried out during the charging of the pile G1 by introducing thorium bars in a regular lattice into the pile. The spreading out of these experiments over a period of three months has permitted: a) work on a pile gradually increasing in size and b) measurements on comparable charges in so far that they have either the same number of bars of thorium, or the same concentration of thorium. From the measurements at constant charge and at constant concentration, it is possible by extrapolation to determine the critical charges and concentrations. The values obtained have showed that the material Laplacian of the lattice depends linearly on the thorium concentration and must cancel out for a concentration T = 8.8 {+-} 0.3 per cent by volume. These results have been found, to a very good approximation, by a simple calculation. (author) [French] Des experiences sous-critiques ont ete effectuees au cours du chargement de la pile G1 en introduisant des barres de thorium reparties suivant un reseau regulier dans la pile. L'etalement de ces experiences sur trois mois a permis d'operer sur une pile de plus en plus grosse et de faire un grand nombre de mesures sur des chargements comparables par le fait qu'ils avaient soit le meme nombre de barres de thorium, soit la meme concentration en thorium. A partir des mesures a chargement constant et a concentration constante, il a ete possible de determiner par extrapolation les chargements et concentrations critiques. Les valeurs obtenues ont montre que le laplacien matiere moyen du reseau dependait lineairement de la concentration en thorium, et devrait s'annuler pour une concentration T = 8,8 {+-} 0,3% en volume. Ces resultats ont ete retrouves avec une tres bonne approximation par un calcul elementaire. (auteur)

  3. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  4. NPP fuel cycle and assessment of possible options for long-term fuel supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatenko, E.I.; Lebedev, V.M.; Davidenko, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some results of the analysis of the possible options for Russian NPPs fuel supply. In the classical consideration these are four fuel cycles: uranium cycle based on natural uranium, this cycle has several economical advantages with the use of CANDU type reactors with a heavy-water moderator; uranium cycle based on enriched uranium, it is a basis for the current and future nuclear power; uranium-thorium fuel cycle with capabilities which are very promising but unfortunately difficult to implement in practice; plutonium-uranium cycle, in terms of its potential capabilities it is an excellent option, but it is extremely difficult to implement it in practice due to a high activity and toxicity of nuclear materials under recycle. The nuclear power of Russia is currently aimed at using the cheapest fuel resources, that is first of all, uranium reprocessed from industrial reactor fuel and slag-heaps accumulated on the past in isotope-separation plant sites. These resources are enough for the Russian large-scale nuclear power to be developed [ru

  5. Use of non-proliferation fuel cycles in the HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, A.M.; Merrill, M.H.; Dahlberg, R.C.

    1978-10-01

    All high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) built or designed to date utilize a uranium-thorium fuel cycle (HEU/Th) in which fully-enriched uranium (93% U-235) is the initial fuel and thorium is the fertile material. The U-233 produced from the thorium is recycled in subsequent loadings to reduce U-235 makeup requirements. However, the recent interest in proliferation-proof fuel cycles for fission reactors has prompted a review and evaluation of possible alternate cycles in the HTGR. This report discusses these alternate fuel cycles, defines those considered usable in an HTGR core, summarizes their advantages and disadvantages, and briefly describes the effect on core design of the most important cycles. Examples from design studies are also given. These studies show that the flexibility afforded by the HTGR coated-particle fuel design allows a variety of alternative cycles, each having special advantages and attractions under different circumstances. Moreover, these alternate cycles can all use the same fuel block, core layout, control scheme, and basic fuel zoning concept

  6. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  7. Thermal-hydraulics analysis of a PWR reactor using zircaloy and carbide silicon reinforced with type S fibers as fuel claddings: Simulation of a channel blockage transient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuck, Vinicius; Ramos, Mario C.; Faria, Rochkhudson B.; Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: rochkdefaria@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: matuck747@gmail.com, E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    A detailed thermal-hydraulic reactor model using as reference data from the Angra 2 Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) has been developed and SiC reinforced with Hi-Nicalon type S fibers (SiC HNS) was used as fuel cladding. The goal is to compare its behavior from the thermal viewpoint with the Zircaloy, at the steady- state and transient conditions. The RELAP-3D was used to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis and a blockage transient has been investigated at full power operation. The transient considered is related to total obstruction of a core cooling channel of one fuel assembly. The calculations were performed using a point kinetic model. The reactor behavior after this transient was analyzed and the time evolution of cladding and coolant temperatures mass flow and void fraction are presented. (author)

  8. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  9. High performance nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mordarski, W.J.; Zegler, S.T.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel-pellet composition is disclosed for use in fast breeder reactors. Uranium carbide particles are mixed with a powder of uraniumplutonium carbides having a stable microstructure. The resulting mixture is formed into fuel pellets. The pellets thus produced exhibit a relatively low propensity to swell while maintaining a high density

  10. A study on the formation of uranium carbide in an induction furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Young; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Don Bae; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Uranium is a typical carbide-forming element. Three carbides, UC, U 2 C 3 and UC 2 , are formed in the uranium-carbon system. The most important of these as fuel is uranium monocarbide UC. It is well known that Uranium carbides can be obtained by three basic methods: 1) by reaction of uranium metal with carbon; 2) by reaction of uranium metal powder with gaseous hydrocarbons; 3) by reaction of uranium oxides with carbon. The use of uranium monocarbide, or materials based on it, has great prospects as fuel for nuclear reactors. It is quite possible that uranium dicarbide UC 2 may also acquire great importance as a fuel, particularly in dispersion fuel elements with graphite matrix. In the present study, uranium carbides are obtained by direct reaction of uranium metal with graphite in a high frequency induction furnace

  11. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  12. Carbon potential measurement on some actinide carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthonysamy, S.; Ananthasivan, K.; Kaliappan, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Mathews, C.K.; Jacob, K.T.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium-Plutonium mixed carbides with a Pu/(U+Pu) ratio of 0.55 are to be used as the fuel in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India. Carburization of the stainless steel clad by this fuel is determined by its carbon potential. Because the carbon potential of this fuel composition is not available in the literature, it was measured by the methane-hydrogen gas equilibration technique. The sample was equilibrated with purified hydrogen and the equilibrium methane-to-hydrogen ratio in the gas phase was measured with a flame ionization detector. The carbon potential of the ThC-ThC 2 as well as Mo-Mo 2 C system, which is an important binary in the actinide-fission product-carbon systems, were also measured by this technique in the temperature range 973 to 1,173 K. The data for the Mo-Mo 2 C system are in agreement with values reported in the literature. The results for the ThC-ThC 2 system are different from estimated values with large uncertainty limits given in the literature. The data on (U, Pu) mixed carbides indicates the possibility of stainless steel clad attack under isothermal equilibrium conditions

  13. Titanium carbide and its core-shelled derivative TiC-TiO2 as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignaszak, Anna; Song, Chaojie; Zhu, Weimin; Zhang, Jiujun; Bauer, Alex; Baker, Ryan; Neburchilov, Vladimir; Ye, Siyu; Campbell, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Both TiC and core-shelled TiC-TiO 2 are investigated as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). TiC is thermally stable, possesses both low solubility in sulphuric acid and high electronic conductivity. However, TiC undergoes irreversible electrochemical oxidation in dilute perchloric acid and the operating potential range of 0–1.2 V RHE . TiC-TiO 2 core–shell composite is found to be more stable than TiC. Both these materials are used as supports for Pt and Pt–Pd alloy catalysts (Pt/TiC, Pt 3 Pd/TiC and Pt 3 Pd/TiC-TiO 2 ) and are synthesized by microwave-assisted polyol process. The catalytic activities of both Pt 3 Pd/TiC and Pt 3 Pd/TiC-TiO 2 toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are much higher than those for Pt/TiC. Accelerated durability tests show that TiC supported catalysts are not electrochemically stable. The corresponding TiC-TiO 2 supported catalyst is more stable than that supported by TiC, indicating that with a protective oxide layer on the TiC core, TiC-TiO 2 is a promising PEMFC catalyst support.

  14. Pilot production of 325 kg of uranium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clozet, C.; Dessus, J.; Devillard, J.; Guibert, M.; Morlot, G.

    1969-01-01

    This report describes the pilot fabrication of uranium carbide rods to be mounted in bundles and assayed in two channels of the EL 4 reactor. The fabrication process includes: - elaboration of uranium carbide granules by carbothermic reduction of uranium dioxide; - electron bombardment melting and continuous casting of the granules; - machining of the raw ingots into rods of the required dimensions; finally, the rods will be piled-up to make the fuel elements. Both qualitative and quantitative results of this pilot production chain are presented and discussed. (authors) [fr

  15. Metal Carbides for Biomass Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine E. Chan-Thaw

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides have been utilized as an alternative catalyst to expensive noble metals for the conversion of biomass. Tungsten and molybdenum carbides have been shown to be effective catalysts for hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation and isomerization reactions. The satisfactory activities of these metal carbides and their low costs, compared with noble metals, make them appealing alternatives and worthy of further investigation. In this review, we succinctly describe common synthesis techniques, including temperature-programmed reaction and carbothermal hydrogen reduction, utilized to prepare metal carbides used for biomass transformation. Attention will be focused, successively, on the application of transition metal carbide catalysts in the transformation of first-generation (oils and second-generation (lignocellulose biomass to biofuels and fine chemicals.

  16. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  17. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  18. Minimization of actinide waste by multi-recycling of thoriated fuels in the EPR reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttin A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The multi-recycling of innovative uranium/thorium oxide fuels for use in the European Pressurized water Reactor (EPR has been investigated. If increasing quantities of 238U, the fertile isotope in standard UO2 fuel, are replaced by 232Th, then a greater yield of new fissile material (233U is produced during the cycle than would otherwise be the case. This leads to economies of natural uranium of around 45% if the uranium in the spent fuel is multi-recycled. In addition we show that minor actinide and plutonium waste inventories are reduced and hence waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are up to a factor of 20 lower after 103 years. Two innovative fuel types named S90 and S20, ThO2 mixed with 90% and 20% enriched UO2 respectively, are compared as an alternative to standard uranium oxide (UOX and uranium/plutonium mixed oxide (MOX fuels at the longest EPR fuel discharge burn-ups of 65 GWd/t. Fissile and waste inventories are examined, waste radio-toxicities and decay heats are extracted and safety feedback coefficients are calculated.

  19. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  20. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  1. Determination of uranium, thorium and radium isotope ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolova, Z.A.

    1983-01-01

    The problems connected with the study of isotope composition of natural radioactive elements in natural objects are considered. It is pointed out that for minerals, ores and rocks the following ratios are usually determined: 234 U/ 238 U, 230 Th/ 238 U, 226 Ra/ 238 U, 228 Th/ 230 Th, 228 Th/ 232 Th and lead isotopes; for natural waters, besides the enumerated - 226 Ra/ 228 Ra. General content of uranium and thorium in the course of isotope investigations is determined from separate samples, most frequently by the X-ray spectral method, radium content - by usual radiochemical method, uranium and radium content in waters -respectively by calorimetric and emanation methods. Radiochemical preparation of geologic powder and aqueous samples for isotope analysis is described in detail. The technique of measuring and calculating isotope ratios (α-spectrometry for determining isotope composition of uranium and thorium and emanation method for determining 226 Ra/ 228 Ra) is presented

  2. Concentrations of Uranium,Thorium and Potassium in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunholm, Bo; Linden, Anders H.; Gustafsson, Bosse

    2005-04-01

    This report is largely a result of the Swedish contribution to an IAEA co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on the use of selected safety indicators in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The CRP was focusing on the assessment of the longterm safety of radioactive waste disposal by means of additional safety indicators based on data from natural systems with emphasis on description of existing data on radioactive elements and radionuclides. A major part of the work was focused on collecting data on geophysics as well as geochemistry and groundwater chemistry; mainly uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K). Data were interpreted resulting in maps and statistical description

  3. Uranium, thorium and bismuth photofission cross sections at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, O.A.P.

    1973-01-01

    The U 238 , Th 232 and Bi 209 photofission using nuclear emulsion technique for fission fragments detection is presented. The photofission cross sections were measured using Bremsstrahlung photon which were produced irradiating thin tungsten radiators with electrons accelerated at the energy range from 1,0 to 5,5 GeV in the ''Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron'' (Hamburg), and aluminium radiator with electrons accelarated at 16,0 GeV in Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. A special revelation technique for nuclear emulsion pellicles loaded with uranium and thorium, allowed the discrimination between alpha particles tracks and fission fragments tracks. The results show a decrease in the cross sections, which is in good agreement, within experimental errors, with the conclusions of other authors. The estimations from the two-step mechanism for high energy nuclear reactions (intranuclear cascade followed by fission-evaporation competition) show that, the primary interaction according to the photomesonic model and the quasi-deuteron photon interaction are sufficient to explain the general behavior exhibited by photofission cross sections for investigated nuclei. The calculations show a resonant structure around 300 MeV, with a width at half maximum of 200 MeV, and another not so pronounced, near to 700 MeV. (Author) [pt

  4. Uranium-thorium disequilibrium in north-east Atlantic waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.J.; Leon Vintro, L.; Mitchell, P.I.; Bally de Bois, P.; Boust, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we report and compare the concentrations of 234 Th and 238 U measured in surface and subsurface waters collected in the course of a sampling campaign in the north east Atlantic in June-July 1998. Dissolved 234 Th concentrations in surface waters ranged from 5 to 20 Bq m -3 , showing a large deficiency relative to 238 U concentrations (typically 42 Bq m -3 ). This disequilibrium is indicative of active 234 Th scavenging from surface waters. Observed 234 Th/ 238 U activity ratios, together with corresponding 234 Th particulate concentrations, were used to calculate mean residence times for 234 Th with respect to scavenging onto particles (τ diss ) and subsequent removal from surface waters (τ part ). Residence times in the range 5-30 days were determined for τ diss and 4-18 days for τ part (n=14). In addition, ultrafiltration experiments at six stations in the course of the same expedition revealed that in north-east Atlantic surface waters a significant fraction (46±17%; n=6) of the thorium in the (operationally-defined) dissolved phase ( 234 Th is rapidly absorbed by colloidal particles, which then aggregate, albeit at a slower rate, into larger filterable particles. In essence, colloids act as intermediaries in the transition from the fully dissolved to the filter-retained (>0.45 μm) phase. Thus, the time (τ c ) for fully dissolved 234 Th to appear in the filter-retained fraction is dependent on the rate of colloidal aggregation. Here, we determined τ c values in the range 3-17 days

  5. Alkaline autoclave leaching of refractory uranium-thorium minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, S. A.; Sam, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of an innovative method for processing the Oman placer ores by alkaline leaching in ball mill autoclaves, where grinding and leaching of the refractory minerals take place simultaneously. This was followed by the selective separation of thorium and uranium from lanthanides by autoclave leaching of the hydroxide cake with ammonium carbonate-bicarbonate solutions. The introduced method is based on the fact that thorium and uranium form soluble carbonate complexes with ammonium carbonate, while lanthanides form sparingly soluble double carbonates. It was found that a complete alkaline leaching of Oman placer ores (98.0 P ercent ) was attained at 150 and 175 d egree C within 2.5 and 2h, respectively. Oman placer ores leaching was intensified and accelerated in a ball mill autoclaves as a result of the grinding action of steel balls, removal of the hydroxide layer covering ores grains and the continuous contact of fresh ore grains with alkaline solution. The study of selective carbonate processing of hydroxide cake with ammonium carbonate-bicarbonate solutions on autoclave under pressure revealed that the complete thorium recovery (97.5 P ercent ) with uranium recovery (90.8 P ercent ) and their separation from the lanthanides were attained at 70-80 d egree C during l-2h. The extraction of lanthanides in carbonate solution was low and did not exceed 4.6 P ercent .

  6. Brazil's uranium/thorium deposits: geology, reserves, potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeil, M.

    1979-01-01

    With its area of 8.5 million square kilometers (3.3 million square miles) Brazil is the world's fifth largest nation, occupying almost one half of the continent of South America. Its vastness and its wide variety of geological terrain suggest that parts of Brazil may be favorable for many kinds of uranium deposits. The nation's favorability for uranium is indicated by the high correspondence between discoveries and the amount of exploration done to date. For the first time, the uranium and thorium resources of Brazil and their geologic setting are described here in a single volume. 270 refs

  7. Concentrations of Uranium,Thorium and Potassium in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thunholm, Bo; Linden, Anders H.; Gustafsson, Bosse [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-04-01

    This report is largely a result of the Swedish contribution to an IAEA co-ordinated research programme (CRP) on the use of selected safety indicators in the assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The CRP was focusing on the assessment of the longterm safety of radioactive waste disposal by means of additional safety indicators based on data from natural systems with emphasis on description of existing data on radioactive elements and radionuclides. A major part of the work was focused on collecting data on geophysics as well as geochemistry and groundwater chemistry; mainly uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K). Data were interpreted resulting in maps and statistical description.

  8. Radiation damage of uranium-thorium oxide, irradiated in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloem, P.J.C.; Nagel, W.; Plas, T. van der; Kema, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    A suspension in water of spherical particles of UO 2 -ThO 2 with diameter 5μm has been considered as the working fluid in an aqueous, homogeneous, thermal nuclear reactor. Irradiation experiments have shown that these particles suffer a gradual breakdown when irradiated in water. This behaviour is markedly different from that shown on irradiation in absence of water. As damage was defined the amount of solid dissolved by an etching liquid. Electron microscopic pictures showed that at higher irradiation temperatures in water the actual damage was larger than the etching values indicated. (orig.) [de

  9. Dependence of silicon carbide coating properties on deposition parameters: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-05-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain a layer of pyrolytic silicon carbide, which acts as a pressure vessel and provides containment of metallic fission products. The silicon carbide (SiC) is deposited by the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) in an excess of hydrogen. The purpose of the current study is to determine how the deposition variables affect the structure and properties of the SiC layer

  10. Study of the catalytic activity of mixed non-stoichiometric uranium-thorium oxides in carbon monoxide oxidation; Etude de l'activite catalytique des oxydes mixtes d'uranium et de thorium non stoechiometriques dans l'oxydation du monoxyde de carbone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brau, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-06-01

    The aim of this work has been to study the catalytic properties of non-stoichiometric uranium-thorium oxides having the general formula U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y}, for the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The preparation of pure, homogeneous, isotropic solids having good structural stability and a surface area as high as possible calls for a strict control of the conditions of preparation of these oxides right from the preparation of 'mother salts': the mixed oxalates U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}, 2H{sub 2}O. A study has been made of their physico-chemical properties (overall and surface chemical constitution, texture, structure, electrical conductivity), as well as of their adsorption properties with respect to gaseous species occurring in the catalytic reaction. This analysis has made it possible to put forward a reaction mechanism based on successive oxidations and reductions of the active surface by the reactants. A study of the reactions kinetics has confirmed the existence of this oxidation-reduction mechanism which only occurs for oxides having a uranium content of above 0.0014. The carbon dioxide produced by the reaction acts as an inhibitor by blocking the sites on which carbon monoxide can be adsorbed. These non-stoichiometric mixed oxides are a particularly clear example of catalysis by oxygen exchange between the solid and the gas phase. (author) [French] Ce travail a pour but l'etude des proprietes catalytiques des oxydes mixtes d'uranium et de thorium non stoechiometriques de formule generale U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2+y} dans l'oxydation du monoxyde de carbone. L'obtention de solides purs, homogenes, isotropes, de bonne stabilite structurale et d'aire specifique aussi elevee que possible, exige de controler rigoureusement les conditions de preparation de ces oxydes des l'elaboration de leurs 'ascendants': les oxalates mixtes U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}, 2H{sub 2}O. Leurs proprietes physico-chimiques (composition

  11. Technology of the production of breeder fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funke, P.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of the fabrication of oxide and carbide fuels and of the fuel rod for fast breeders (KNK, SNR-300). The advantages of the chosen methods are explained. The main points of development concerning the oxide fuel rod are gone into. The process sequence for plutonium oxide and plutonium carbide processing is presented in a flow chart. (HR) [de

  12. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei, E-mail: jwchen@scu.edu.cn; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin, E-mail: rl.wang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A hybrid catalyst was prepared via a quite green and simple method to achieve an one-pot synthesis of the N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides. It exhibited comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability and ability to methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C to ORR. - Highlights: • A novel type of hybrid Fe/Co/WC@NC catalysts have been successfully synthesized. • The hybrid catalyst also exhibited better durability and methanol tolerance. • Multiple effective active sites of Fe{sub 3}C, Co{sub 3}C, WC, and NC help to improve catalytic performance. - Abstract: This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe{sub 3}C and Co{sub 3}C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe{sub 3}C, and Co{sub 3}C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  13. Texaco, carbide form hydrogen plant venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Texaco Inc. and Union Carbide Industrial Gases Inc. (UCIG) have formed a joint venture to develop and operate hydrogen plants. The venture, named HydroGEN Supply Co., is owned by Texaco Hydrogen Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Texaco, and UCIG Hydrogen Services Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of UCIG. Plants built by HydroGEN will combine Texaco's HyTEX technology for hydrogen production with UCIG's position in cryogenic and advanced air separation technology. Texaco the U.S. demand for hydrogen is expected to increase sharply during the next decade, while refinery hydrogen supply is expected to drop. The Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 require U.S. refiners to lower aromatics in gasoline, resulting in less hydrogen recovered by refiners from catalytic reforming units. Meanwhile, requirements to reduce sulfur in diesel fuel will require more hydrogen capacity

  14. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  15. Performance evaluation of WDXRF as a process control technique for MOX fuel fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, A.; Khan, F.A.; Das, D.K.; Behere, P.G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents studies on Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), as a powerful non destructive technique (NDT) for the compositional analysis of various types of MOX fuels. The sample has come after mixing and milling of UO 2 and PuO 2 powder for the estimation of plutonium, as a process control step of fabrication of (U, Pu)O 2 mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. For the characterization for heavy metal in various MOX fuel, a WDXRF method was established as a process control technique. The attractiveness of our system is that it can analyze the samples in solid form as well as in liquid form. The system is adapted in a glove box for handling of plutonium based fuels. The glove box adapted system was optimized with Uranium and Thorium based MOX sample before introduction of Pu. Uranium oxide and thorium oxide have been estimated in uranium thorium MOX samples. Standard deviation for the analysis of U 3 O 8 and ThO 2 were found to be 0.14 and 0.15 respectively. The results are validated against the conventional wet chemical methods of analysis. (author)

  16. Hydrotreatment activities of supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolce, G.M.; Savage, P.E.; Thompson, L.T. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    The growing need for alternative sources of transportation fuels encourages the development of new hydrotreatment catalysts. These catalysts must be active and more hydrogen efficient than the current commercial hydrotreatment catalysts. Molybdenum nitrides and carbides are attractive candidate materials possessing properties that are comparable or superior to those of commercial sulfide catalysts. This research investigated the catalytic properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides. These catalysts were synthesized via temperature-programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides with ammonia or methane/hydrogen mixtures. Phase constituents and compositions were determined by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and neutral activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface properties of the catalysts. Specific activities of the molybdenum nitrides and carbides were competitive with those of a commercial sulfide catalyst for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). For HDN and HDS, the catalytic activity on a molybdenum basis was a strong inverse function of the molybdenum loading. Product distributions of the HDN, HDO and HDS of a variety of heteroatom compounds indicated that several of the nitrides and carbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalyst. 35 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Environmental control aspects for fabrication, reprocessing and waste disposal of alternative LWR and LMFBR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, A.M.; Lewallen, M.A.; McNair, G.W.

    1979-11-01

    Environmental control aspects of alternative fuel cycles have been analyzed by evaluating fabrication, reprocessing, and waste disposal operations. Various indices have been used to assess potential environmental control requirements. For the fabrication and reprocessing operations, 50-year dose commitments were used. Waste disposal was evaluated by comparing projected nuclide concentrations in ground water at various time periods with maximum permissible concentrations (MPCs). Three different fabrication plants were analyzed: a fuel fabrication plant (FFP) to produce low-activity uranium and uranium-thorium fuel rods; a plutonium fuel refabrication plant (PFRFP) to produce plutonium-uranium and plutonium-thorium fuel rods; and a uranium fuel refabrication plant (UFRFP) to produce fuel rods containing the high-activity isotopes 232 U and 233 U. Each plant's dose commitments are discussed separately. Source terms for the analysis of effluents from the fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) were calculated using the fuel burnup codes LEOPARD, CINDER and ORIGEN. Effluent quantities are estimated for each fuel type. Bedded salt was chosen for the waste repository analysis. The repository site is modeled on the Waste Isolation Pilot Program site in New Mexico. Wastes assumed to be stored in the repository include high-level vitrified waste from the FRP, packaged fuel residue from the FRP, and transuranic (TRU) contaminated wastes from the FFP, PFRFP, and UFRFP. The potential environmental significance was determined by estimating the ground-water concentrations of the various nuclides over a time span of a million years. The MPC for each nuclide was used along with the estimated ground-water concentration to generate a biohazard index for the comparison among fuel compositions

  18. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  19. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  20. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  1. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  2. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  3. Dissolution of nuclear fuel samples for analytical purposes. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krtil, J.

    1983-01-01

    Main attention is devoted to procedures for dissolving fuels based on uranium metal and its alloys, uranium oxides and carbides, plutonium metal, plutonium dioxide, plutonium carbides, mixed PuC-UC carbides and mixed oxides (PuU)O 2 . Data from the literature and experience gained with the dissolution of nuclear fuel samples at the Central Control Laboratory of the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez are given. (B.S.)

  4. Epithermal neutron activation analysis using a boron carbide irradiation filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmann, W.D.; Brueckner, J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of boron carbide as a thermal neutron filter in epithermal neutron activation (ENAA) analysis has been investigated. As compared to the use of a cadmium filter, boron provides a greater reduction of activities from elements relatively abundant in terrestrial rocks and fossil fuels, such as Na, La, Sc and Fe. These elements have excitation functions which follow the 1/v law in the 1 to 10 eV lower epithermal region. This enhances the sensitivity of ENAA for elements such as U, Th, Ba and etc. which have strong resonances in the higher epithermal region above 10 eV. In addition, a boron carbide filter has the advantages over cadmium of acquiring a relatively low level of induced activity which poses minimal radiation safety problems, when used for ENAA. (author)

  5. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450ee)C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800ee)C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  6. Control rod studies for alternative fuel cycles in the GA 1160 MW(e) high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neef, H. J.

    1975-06-15

    The control system, which is investigated in this paper for both the low enriched uranium high enriched uranium/thorium fuel cycles, has been developed to control the General Atomics (GA) thorium fuel cycle 1160 MW(e) reactor. It has been shown in this investigation that its effectiveness in the low enriched and subsequent thorium cycle switch-over reactor is equivalent to the effectiveness in the thorium cycle. The shutdown margin in the low enriched core is even higher compared to the thorium core, mainly due to the presence of Pa-233 in the thorium cycle. As long as the fuel cycle for the thorium cycle is not closed with the recycling of U-233, the low enriched cycle will offer an attractive alternative. It was found that the GA 1160 MW(e) control system has enough built-in control rod capacity to accommodate the low enriched uranium cycle and to perform a later switch-over to a thorium-based fuel cycle.

  7. Irradiation and examination results of the AC-3 mixed-carbide test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.E.; Hoth, C.W.; Stratton, R.W.; Botta, F.

    1992-01-01

    The AC-3 test was a cooperative Swiss/US irradiation test of mixed-carbide, (U,Pr)C, fuel pins in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The test included 25 Swiss-fabricated sphere-pac-type fuel pins and 66 U.S. fabricated pellet-type fuel pins. The test was designed to operate at prototypical fast reactor conditions to provide a direct comparison of the irradiation performance of the two fuel types. The test design and fuel fabrication processes used for the AC-3 test are presented

  8. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  9. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  10. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  11. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  12. Review of thermal expansion and density of uranium and plutonium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, J.F.; Latimer, T.W.

    1975-07-01

    The published literature on linear thermal expansion and density of uranium and plutonium carbide nuclear fuels, including UC, PuC, (U,Pu)C, U 2 C 3 , Pu 2 C 3 , and (U,Pu) 2 C 3 , is critically reviewed. Recommended values are given in tabular form and additional experimental studies needed for completeness are outlined. 16 tables, 52 references

  13. NOVEL SUPPORTED BIMETALLIC CARBIDE CATALYSTS FOR COPROCESSING OF COAL WITH WASTE METERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Ted Oyama; David F. Cox; Chunshan Song; Fred Allen; Weilin Wang; Viviane Schwartz; Xinqin Wang; Jianli Yang

    2001-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to explore the potential of novel monometallic and bimetallic Mo-based carbide catalysts for heavy hydrocarbon coprocessing, and to understand the fundamental chemistry related to the reaction pathways of coprocessing and the role of the catalysts in the conversion of heavy hydrocarbon resources into liquid fuels based on the model compound reactions.

  14. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  15. Iron Carbides in Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Theoretical and Experimental Understanding in Epsilon-Iron Carbide Phase Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xing-Wu; Cao, Zhi; Zhao, Shu; Gao, Rui

    2017-01-01

    As active phases in low-temperature Fischer–Tropsch synthesis for liquid fuel production, epsilon iron carbides are critically important industrial materials. However, the precise atomic structure of epsilon iron carbides remains unclear, leading to a half-century of debate on the phase assignment of the ε-Fe 2 C and ε’-Fe 2.2 C. Here, we resolve this decades-long question by a combining theoretical and experimental investigation to assign the phases unambiguously. First, we have investigated the equilibrium structures and thermal stabilities of ε-Fe x C, (x = 1, 2, 2.2, 3, 4, 6, 8) by first-principles calculations. We have also acquired X-ray diffraction patterns and Mössbauer spectra for these epsilon iron carbides, and compared them with the simulated results. These analyses indicate that the unit cell of ε-Fe 2 C contains only one type of chemical environment for Fe atoms, while ε’-Fe 2.2 C has six sets of chemically distinct Fe atoms.

  16. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  17. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  18. Elastic modulus and fracture of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Walther, G.

    1978-12-01

    The elastic modulus of hot-pressed boron carbide with 1 to 15% porosity was measured at room temperature. K/sub IC/ values were determined for the same porosity range at 500 0 C by the double torsion technique. The critical stress intensity factor of boron carbide with 8% porosity was evaluated from 25 to 1200 0 C

  19. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  20. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  1. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  2. The flashcal process for the fabrication of fuel-metal oxides using the whiteshell roto-spray calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    A one-step, continuous, thermochemical calcination process, called the FLASHCAL (Flash Calcination) process has been developed for the production of single- and mixed-oxide powders of fuel metals (uranium, thorium and plutonium) from the respective nitrate solutions using the Whiteshell Roto-Spray Calciner (RSC). The metal-nitrate feed solution, either by itself or mixed with a suitable chemical reactant or additive, is converted to its oxide powder in the RSC at temperatures between 300 and 600 0 C. Rapid denitration takes place in the calciner, yielding the metal-oxide powders while simultaneously destroying any excess chemical additive and reaction by-products. In the production of precursor oxide powders suitable for fuel fabrication, the FLASHCAL process has advantages over batch calcination and other processes that involve precipitation and filtration steps because fewer processing and handling operations are needed. Results obtained with thorium nitrate and uranium nitrate-thorium nitrate mixtures indicate that some measure of control over the size distribution and morphology of the oxide product powders is possible in this process with the proper selection of chemical additive, as well as the operating parameters of the calciner

  3. Fabrication and characterization of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terrani, K.A., E-mail: kurt.terrani@gmail.com [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kiggans, J.O.; Katoh, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shimoda, K. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Montgomery, F.C.; Armstrong, B.L.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hinoki, T. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hunn, J.D. [Fuel Cycle and Isotopes Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The current generation of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels, consisting of Tristructural Isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix, is fabricated by hot pressing. Matrix powder feedstock is comprised of alumina-yttria additives thoroughly mixed with silicon carbide nanopowder using polyethyleneimine as a dispersing agent. Fuel compacts are fabricated by hot pressing the powder-fuel particle mixture at a temperature of 1800-1900 Degree-Sign C using compaction pressures of 10-20 MPa. Detailed microstructural characterization of the final fuel compacts shows that oxide additives are limited in extent and are distributed uniformly at silicon carbide grain boundaries, at triple joints between silicon carbide grains, and at the fuel particle-matrix interface.

  4. A new metal electrocatalysts supported matrix: Palladium nanoparticles supported silicon carbide nanoparticles and its application for alcohol electrooxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Hong; Chen Yanling; Lin Yanyu; Xu Guifang; Yang Caiping; Tong Yuejin; Guo Longhua; Chen Guonan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a facile approach for palladium nanoparticles load using silicon carbide nanoparticles as the new supported matrix and a familiar NaBH 4 as reducer. Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the resultant products indicated that palladium nanoparticles are successfully immobilized onto the surface of the silicon carbide nanoparticles with uniform size distribution between 5 and 7 nm. The relative electrochemical characterization clearly demonstrated excellent electrocatalytic activity of this material toward alcohol in alkaline electrolytes. Investigation on the characteristics of the electrocatalytic activity of this material further indicated that the palladium nanoparticles supporting on SiC are very promising for direct alcohol fuel cells (DMFCs), biosensor and electronic devices. Moreover, it was proved that silicon carbide nanoparticles with outstanding properties as support for catalysis are of strong practical interest. And the silicon carbide could perform attractive role in adsorbents, electrodes, biomedical applications, etc.

  5. The German carbide program: Performance, experimental findings, and evaluation of irradiation results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.; Freund, D.; Geithoff, D.

    1982-09-01

    In this report a synopsis of the German carbide program is presented. The program comprises the irradiation of about 100 carbide pins equipped with pelletted fuel. Most of these fuel pins were He-bonded, the sodium bonding concept taken as a back-up solution. The main design parameters such as smear and pellet density, gap size, pin diameter and wall thickness as well as the irradiation conditions were varied mostly within wide ranges. Based on a compilation of relevant pin parameters, irradiation conditions, and the results of various irradiation experiments conclusions on the optimum ranges of the main design parameters are drawn. Furthermore, some important aspects of fuel pin behaviour are discussed based on quantitative results from post irradiation examinations. (orig.) [de

  6. Fast breeder fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Basic elements of the ex-reactor part of the fuel cycle (reprocessing, fabrication, waste handling and transportation) are described. Possible technical and proliferation measures are evaluated, including current methods of accountability, surveillance and protection. The reference oxide based cycle and advanced cycles based on carbide and metallic fuels are considered utilizing conventional processes; advanced nonaqueous reprocessing is also considered. This contribution provides a comprehensive data base for evaluation of proliferation risks

  7. Overview of chemical characterization of FBTR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, V.; Nandi, C.; Patil, A.B.; Prakash, Amrit; Khan, K.B.; Arun Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Uranium Plutonium mixed carbide fuel is the driver fuel for Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at IGCAR. The fuel is being fabricated at Radiometallurgy Division, BARC by conventional powder metallurgy route. During the fabrication of fuel, chemical quality control of process intermediates is very important to reach stringent specification of the final fuel product. Different steps are involved in the fabrication of uranium-plutonium carbide (MC) for FBTR. The main steps in the fabrication of MC fuel pellets are carbothermic reduction (CR) of mixture of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and graphite powder to prepare MC clinkers, crushing and milling of MC clinkers and consolidation of MC powders into fuel pellets and sintering. As a part of process control, analysis of uranium (U), plutonium (Pu), carbon in oxide graphite mixture and U, Pu, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, MC, M 2 C 3 contents in mixed carbide powder (MC clinkers) are carried out at our laboratory. Analysis of U, Pu, carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, MC and M 2 C 3 contents in mixed carbide sintered pellets are carried out as a part of quality control. This paper describes an overview of analytical instruments used during chemical quality control of mixed carbide fuel

  8. Plasma metallization of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroleva, E.B.; Klinskaya, N.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of treatment conditions in plasma on properties of produced metallized powders of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbides with the main particle size of 40-80 μm is considered. It is shown that plasma treatment permits to produce metallized powders of carbide materials with the 40-80 μm particle size. The degree of metallization, spheroidization, chemical and phase composition of metallized carbide powders are controlled by dispersivity of the treated material, concentration of a metal component in the treated mixtures, rate of plasma flow and preliminary spheroidization procedure

  9. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  10. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, A.; Borisov, Y.; Shavlovsky, E.; Mits, I.; Castermans, L.; Jongbloed, R.

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 o C. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  11. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  12. Advanced fast reactor fuels program. Second annual progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.D.

    1978-12-01

    Results of steady-state (EBR-II) irradiation testing, off-normal irradiation design and testing, fuel-cladding compatibility, and chemical stability of uranium--plutonium carbide and nitride fuels are presented

  13. Thermal-hydraulics and neutronics studies on the FP7 CP-ESFR oxide and carbide cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammirabile, L.; Tsige-Tamirat, H. [European Commission, JRC, Inst. for Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of the the Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR) two core designs that are currently being proposed for the 3600 MWth sodium-cooled reactor concept: one is based on oxide fuel and the other on carbide fuel. Using the European Safety Assessment Platform (ESAP), JRC-IE has conducted static calculation on neutronics (incl. reactivity coefficients) and thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both oxide and carbide reference cores. The quantities evaluated include: keff, coolant heat-up, void, and Doppler reactivity coefficients, axial and radial expansion reactivity coefficients, pin-by-pin calculated power profiles, average and peak channel temperatures. This paper presents the ESAP models applied in the study together with the relevant results for the oxide and carbide core. (author)

  14. Thermal-hydraulics and neutronics studies on the FP7 CP-ESFR oxide and carbide cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammirabile, L.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the the Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR) two core designs that are currently being proposed for the 3600 MWth sodium-cooled reactor concept: one is based on oxide fuel and the other on carbide fuel. Using the European Safety Assessment Platform (ESAP), JRC-IE has conducted static calculation on neutronics (incl. reactivity coefficients) and thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both oxide and carbide reference cores. The quantities evaluated include: keff, coolant heat-up, void, and Doppler reactivity coefficients, axial and radial expansion reactivity coefficients, pin-by-pin calculated power profiles, average and peak channel temperatures. This paper presents the ESAP models applied in the study together with the relevant results for the oxide and carbide core. (author)

  15. 1982 Annual Status Report Plutonium Fuels and Actinide Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The programme of the Transuranium Institute has long included work on advanced fuels for fast breeder reactors. Study of the swelling of carbide and nitride fuels is now nearing completion, the retention of fission gases in bubbles of different sizes in the fuel having been quantified as function of burn-up and temperature. An important step forward has been achieved in the studies of the Equation of State of Nuclear Fuels up to 5000 K. Formation of some of the less abundant isotopes in PWR fuel has been determined experimentally. Aerosol formation during the fabrication of plutonium containing fuels, part of the activity Safe Handling of Plutonium Fuel has been studied. Head-End Processing of carbide fuels has continued experiments with high burn up mixed carbides. In the field of actinide research the preparation and characterisation of pure specimens is carried out. Effect of actinides on the properties of waste glasses is investigated

  16. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Savino, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H 2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  17. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64 ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  18. Fabrication of carbide and nitride pellets and the nitride irradiations Niloc 1 and Niloc 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, H.

    1991-01-01

    Besides the relatively well-known advanced LMFBR mixed carbide fuel an advanced mixed nitride is also an attractive candidate for the optimised fuel cycle of the European Fast Reactor, but the present knowledge about the nitride is still insufficient and should be raised to the level of the carbide. For such an optimised fuel cycle the following general conditions have been set up for the fuel: (i) the burnup of the optimised MN and MC should be at least 15 a/o or even beyond, at moderate linear ratings of less than 75 kW/m (ii) the fuel will be used in a He-bonding pin concept and (iii) as far as available an advanced economic pellet fabrication method should be employed. (iv) The fuel structure must contain 15 - 20% porosity in order to accomodate the fission product swelling at high burnup. This report gives a comprehensive description of fuel and pellet fabrication and characterization, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination. From the results important conclusions can be drawn about future work on nitrides

  19. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  20. High temperature evaporation of titanium, zirconium and hafnium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaporation of cubic nonstoichiometric carbides of titanium, zirconium and hafnium in a comparatively low-temperature interval (1800-2700) with detailed crystallochemical sample certification is studied. Titanium carbide is characterized by the maximum evaporation rate: at T>2300 K it loses 3% of sample mass during an hour and at T>2400 K titanium carbide evaporation becomes extremely rapid. Zirconium and hafnium carbide evaporation rates are several times lower than titanium carbide evaporation rates at similar temperatures. Partial pressures of metals and carbon over the carbides studied are calculated on the base of evaporation rates

  1. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  2. Chemical compatibility between cladding alloys and advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1975-05-01

    The National Advanced Fuels Program requires chemical, mechanical, and thermophysical properties data for cladding alloys. The compatibility behavior of cladding alloys with advanced fuels is critically reviewed. in carbide fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding carburization, diffusion of carbon into the cladding matrix accompanied by carbide precipitation. Carburization changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. The extent of carburization increases in sodium (versus gas) bonded fuels. The depth of carburization increases with increasing sesquicarbide (M 2 C 3 ) content of the fuel. In nitride fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding nitriding, diffusion of nitrogen into the cladding matrix accompanied by nitride precipitation. Nitriding changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. In both carbide and nitride fuel pins, fission products do not migrate appreciably to the cladding and do not appear to contribute to cladding attack. 77 references. (U.S.)

  3. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosughi, A.; Hadian, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300 d eg C a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250 d eg C . The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  4. Phase relations, crystal structures and physical properties of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, Hiroaki; Fujino, Takeo; Tateno, Jun

    1975-07-01

    Phase relations, crystal structures and physical properties of the compounds for nuclear fuels are presented, including melting point, thermal expansion, diffusion and magnetic and electric properties. Emphasis is on oxides, carbides and nitrides of thorium, uranium and plutonium. (auth.)

  5. Low temperature chemical processing of graphite-clad nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Robert A.

    2017-10-17

    A reduced-temperature method for treatment of a fuel element is described. The method includes molten salt treatment of a fuel element with a nitrate salt. The nitrate salt can oxidize the outer graphite matrix of a fuel element. The method can also include reduced temperature degradation of the carbide layer of a fuel element and low temperature solubilization of the fuel in a kernel of a fuel element.

  6. Performance of HVOF carbide coatings under erosion/corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, S.; Arsenault, B.; Legoux, J.G.; Hawthorne, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Cermet based materials are known to have an excellent performance under several wear conditions. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technology allows the deposition of such hard materials in the form of protective coatings onto different surfaces. Under slurry erosion, the performance of the coatings is influenced by the occurrence of corrosion reactions on the metallic matrix. Indeed, wet conditions promote the dissolution of metallic binder resulting in a potential synergic effect between the corrosion and wear mechanisms. The composition of the metallic matrix plays a key role on the stability of the coatings and their degradation rate. In this work, four coatings based on tungsten carbide embedded in different metallic binders were evaluated with regard to corrosion and wear. (author)

  7. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A.M.; Mosca, H.O.

    2014-01-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure

  8. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  9. Generation of damage cross section for silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jonghwa; Lee, Wonjae

    2013-01-01

    There is practically no cross section library for current reactor physics codes which will be used for DPA calculation. Silicon carbide(SiC) is an important material used in gas-cooled reactor, advanced nuclear fuel, and fusion applications. There are more than 200 polytypes of SiC. However β-SiC, which is produced under 1700 .deg. C, is the polytype interesting for a nuclear application. This work has been carried out under the Korea-US I-NERI program supported by Korea Ministry of Education Science and Technology and US Department of Energy. Authors express gratitude to C. S. Gil of KAERI nuclear data center for NJOY processing

  10. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  11. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  12. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  13. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  14. Determination of free carbon content in boron carbide ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, A.R.M. de; Lima, N.B. de; Paschoal, J.O.A.

    1990-01-01

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material of technological importance due to its hardness and high chemical and thermal stabilities. Free carbon is always found as a process dependent impurity in boron carbide. The development of procedures for its detection is required because its presence leads to a degradation of the boron carbide properties. In this work, several procedures for determining free carbon content in boron carbide specimens are reported and discussed for comparison purposes. (author) [pt

  15. Morphology study of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrda, J.; Blazhikova, Ya.

    1982-01-01

    Refractory carbides were investigated using JSM-U3 electron microscope of Joelco company at 27 KV accelerating voltage. Some photographs of each powder were taken with different enlargements to characterise the sample upon the whole. It was shown that morphological and especially topographic study of powders enables to learn their past history (way of fabrication and treatment). The presence of steps of compact particle fractures and cracks is accompanied by occurence of fine dispersion of carbides subjected to machining after facrication. On the contrary, the character of crystallographic surfaces and features of surface growth testify to the way of crystallization

  16. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  17. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, H.

    1984-01-01

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 950 0 C, and 1200 0 , showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author) [pt

  18. Research and development of thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Jun.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear properties of thorium are summarized and present status of research and development of the use of thorium as nuclear fuel is reviewed. Thorium may be used for nuclear fuel in forms of metal, oxide, carbide and nitride independently, alloy with uranium or plutonium or mixture of the compound. Their use in reactors is described. The reprocessing of the spent oxide fuel in thorium fuel cycle is called the thorex process and similar to the purex process. A concept of a molten salt fuel reactor and chemical processing of the molten salt fuel are explained. The required future research on thorium fuel cycle is commented briefly. (T.H.)

  19. Correlation of radioactive waste treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: fabrication of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel containing uranium-233 and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, J.W.; Blanco, R.E.; Hill, G.S.; Moore, R.E.; Seagren, R.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of various radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials from model High-Temperature Gas-Cooled (HTGR) fuel fabrication plants and to determine the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the released materials on the environment. The study is designed to assist in defining the term ''as low as reasonably achievable'' as it applies to these nuclear facilities. The base cases of the two model plants, a fresh fuel fabrication plant and a refabrication plant, are representative of current proposed commercial designs or are based on technology that is being developed to fabricate uranium, thorium, and graphite into fuel elements. The annual capacities of the fresh fuel plant and the refabrication plant are 450 and 245 metric tons of heavy metal (where heavy metal is uranium plus thorium), as charged to about fifty 1000-MW(e) HTGRs. Additional radwaste treatment systems are added to the base case plants in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The capital and annual costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding reductions in dose commitments are calculated for each case. In the final analysis, the cost/benefit of each case, calculated as additional cost of radwaste system divided by the reduction in dose commitment, is tabulated or the dose commitment is plotted with cost as the variable. The status of each of the radwaste treatment methods is discussed. 48 figures, 74 tables

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Eye, R.W.M.; Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel element with particles from ceramic fissionable material (e.g. uranium carbide), each one being coated with pyrolitically deposited carbon and all of them being connected at their points of contact by means of an individual crossbar. The crossbar consists of silicon carbide produced by reaction of silicon metal powder with the carbon under the influence of heat. Previously the silicon metal powder together with the particles was kneaded in a solvent and a binder (e.g. epoxy resin in methyl ethyl ketone plus setting agent) to from a pulp. The reaction temperature lies at 1750 0 C. The reaction itself may take place in a nitrogen atmosphere. There will be produced a fuel element with a high overall thermal conductivity. (DG) [de

  1. Project fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, R.W.

    1981-05-01

    The activities continued on lab-scale production of uranium-plutonium carbide fuel for the fast reactor using gelation methods, irradiation testing and performance evaluation. Whereas in earlier years a balance was maintained between research and development or with emphasis on research, 1980 was marked by a concentrated equipment development effort for an increased throughput with improved process control and product reproducability and installation of new equipment for large pin fabrication. (Auth.)

  2. Preparation of aluminum nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite powder by the nitridation of aluminum silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itatani, K.; Tsukamoto, R.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Okada, I.

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum nitride (AlN)-silicon carbide (SiC) nanocomposite powders were prepared by the nitridation of aluminum-silicon carbide (Al4SiC4) with the specific surface area of 15.5 m2·g-1. The powders nitrided at and above 1400°C for 3 h contained the 2H-phases which consisted of AlN-rich and SiC-rich

  3. Growth and structure of carbide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, C.M.; Wong, E.W.; Dai, H.; Maynor, B.W.; Burns, L.D.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research on the growth and structure of carbide nanorods is reviewed. Carbide nanorods have been prepared by reacting carbon nanotubes with volatile transition metal and main group oxides and halides. Using this approach it has been possible to obtain solid carbide nanorods of TiC, SiC, NbC, Fe 3 C, and BC x having diameters between 2 and 30 nm and lengths up to 20 microm. Structural studies of single crystal TiC nanorods obtained through reactions of TiO with carbon nanotubes show that the nanorods grow along both [110] and [111] directions, and that the rods can exhibit either smooth or saw-tooth morphologies. Crystalline SiC nanorods have been produced from reactions of carbon nanotubes with SiO and Si-iodine reactants. The preferred growth direction of these nanorods is [111], although at low reaction temperatures rods with [100] growth axes are also observed. The growth mechanisms leading to these novel nanomaterials have also been addressed. Temperature dependent growth studies of TiC nanorods produced using a Ti-iodine reactant have provided definitive proof for a template or topotactic growth mechanism, and furthermore, have yielded new TiC nanotube materials. Investigations of the growth of SiC nanorods show that in some cases a catalytic mechanism may also be operable. Future research directions and applications of these new carbide nanorod materials are discussed

  4. Surface metallurgy of cemented carbide tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, K.L.; Kashyap, S.C.; Rao, T.V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Transition metal carbides, owing to their high melting point, hardness and wear resistance, are potential candidates for specific application in rockets, nuclear engineering equipment and cutting tools. Tungsten carbide sintered with a binder (either cobalt metal or a mixture of Co + TiC and/or TaC(NbC)) is used for cutting tools. The surface metallurgy of several commercially available cemented carbide tools was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The tool surfaces were contaminated by adsorbed oxygen up to a depth of nearly 0.3 μm causing deterioration of the mechanical properties of the tools. Studies of fractured samples indicated that the tool surfaces were prone to oxygen adsorption. The fracture path passes through the cobalt-rich regions. The ineffectiveness of a worn cutting tool is attributed to the presence of excessive iron from the steel workpiece and carbon and oxygen in the surface layers of the tool. The use of appropriate hard coatings on cemented carbide tools is suggested. (Auth.)

  5. Silicon Carbide Power Devices and Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Samsel, Isaak; LaBel, Ken; Chen, Yuan; Ikpe, Stanley; Wilcox, Ted; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Topper, Alyson

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the NASA NEPP Program Silicon Carbide Power Device subtask is given, including the current task roadmap, partnerships, and future plans. Included are the Agency-wide efforts to promote development of single-event effect hardened SiC power devices for space applications.

  6. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  7. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  8. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  9. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...

  10. Uranium/thorium dating of Late Pleistocene peat deposits in NW Europe, uranium/thorium isotope systematics and open-system behaviour of peat layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnis, H.; Plicht, J. van der

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of dating peat by the uranium-series disequilibrium method is discussed. In principle, this method can be used to date peat to approximately 350 ka. The application of the U/Th disequilibrium method (UTD) on peat provides us with the probability of constructing a new chronology for

  11. REFEL silicon carbide. The development of a ceramic for a nuclear engineering application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, P.; Shennan, J. V.

    1974-10-15

    REFEL silicon carbide is a strong, uniform, fine-grain material which retains its strength and is stable in an oxidizing environment up to 1400 deg C. REFEL silicon carbide tube can be produced in quantity and by a combination of process controls, visual examination, NDT and proof testing, a very consistent product can be made. The material was developed as a nuclear fuel cladding capable of operating at temperatures o 1100 deg C in a CO2-cooled reactor and the combination of excellent physical, mechanical and chemical properties together with product consistency ave confirmed the feasibility of this application. In a series of irradiation experiments, REFEL silicon carbide clad fuel pins have behaved predictably. At irradiation temperatures below about 800 deg C, the thermal conductivity falls sharply, the associate thermal stress increases, and the probability of failure, for the same rating, increases. It has been demonstrated theoretically that this effect can be overcome by halving the tube wall thickness. In addition to the thermal stress enhancement, the strength and Weibull modulus also fall under irradiation and consequently the safe working stress is reduced, Calculations show that in the absence of irradiation a fourfold increase in rating cold be tolerated. Thus, the material should have excellent thermal stress resistance in non-nuclear applications such as gas turbine components. (auth)

  12. 1981 Annual Status Report. Plutonium fuels and actinide programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In this 1981 report the work carried out by the European Institute for Transuranium elements is reviewed. Main topics are: operation limits of plutonium fuels: swelling of advanced fuels, oxide fuel transients, equation of state of nuclear materials; actinide cycle safety: formation of actinides (FACT), safe handling of plutonium fuel (SHAPE), aspects of the head-end processing of carbide fuel (RECARB); actinide research: crystal chemistry, solid state studies, applied actinide research

  13. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueneau, C.; Piron, J.P.; Dumas, J.C.; Bouineau, V.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO 2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  14. Molybdenum Carbide Synthesis Using Plasmas for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    S. A. Hong, I. H. Oh, and S. J. Shin, “Performance and life time analysis of the kW-class PEMFC stack,” Journal of Power Sources, vol. 106, pp. 295...pp. 591–596, 1998. [25] M. Gotz and H. Wendt, “Binary and ternary anode catalyst formulations including the elements W, Sn and Mo for PEMFCs ...and R. C. Urian, “Electrocatalysis of CO Tolerance by Carbon-Supported PtMo Electrocatalysts in PEMFCs ,” Journal of Electrochemical Society, vol

  15. Reactor Physics Assessment of Thick Silicon Carbide Clad PWR Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    approach is left to future investigators, in addition to analysis of the impact of axial power on DNB calculations. 2.5 Plutonium Vector The...H23 F06 H40 H75 G42 07 1 G13 H49 G84 H13 G66 H14 G29 H67 G21 H38 G57 H57 G74 H08 F08 08 1 F26 H80 H25 F25 H47 F11 H63...J52 H58 H73 H22 J74 H39 J24 H38 06 1 H16 J68 H15 H51 H81 G31 J48 G15 J06 G23 J23 G06 J40 J75 H42 07 1 H13 J49 H84 J13 H66

  16. Molten fuel-coolant interaction behaviours of various fast reactor fuels (Paper No. HMT-45-87)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    A parametric computational model of molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) including a particle size distribution is developed and employed to analyse behaviours of various possible reactor fuels, such as oxide, carbide and metal in MFCI scenario. It is observed that while higher thermal conductivity and lower specific heat of carbide compared to oxide is responsible for higher peak pressure and work done per unit mass, the trend is not observed in the metal fuel. The reason for this is the lower operation temperature and latent heat of metallic fuel. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig

  17. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  18. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  19. Characterization and performances of cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten carbides as anode catalyst for PEFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izhar, Shamsul; Yoshida, Michiko; Nagai, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of carbon-supported cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten carbides and their activity as an anode catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell were investigated. The electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction over the catalysts was evaluated using a single-stack fuel cell and a rotating disk electrode. The characterization of the catalysts was performed by XRD, temperature-programmed carburization, temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The maximum power densities of the 30 wt% 873 K-carburized cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten mixed with Ketjen carbon (cobalt-tungsten carbide (CoWC)/Ketjen black (KB) and molybdenum-tungsten carbide (MoWC)/KB) were 15.7 and 12.0 mW cm -2 , respectively, which were 14 and 11%, compared to the in-house membrane electrode assembly (MEA) prepared from a 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst. The CoWC/KB catalyst exhibited the highest maximum power density compared to the MoWC/KB and WC/KB catalysts. The 873 K-carburized CoW/KB catalyst formed the oxycarbided and/or carbided CoW that are responsible for the excellent hydrogen oxygen reaction

  20. Silver release from coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.E.; Nabielek, H.

    1977-03-01

    The fission product Ag-110 m released from coated particles can be the dominant source of radioactivity from the core of a high temperature reactor in the early stages of the reactor life and possibly limits the accessability of primary circuit components. It can be shown that silver is retained in oxide fuel by a diffusion process (but not in carbide or carbon-diluted fuel) and that silver is released through all types of pyrocarbon layers. The retention in TRISO particles is variable and seems to be mainly connected with operating temperature and silicon carbide quality. (orig.) [de

  1. Tribological Characteristics of Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Arc Sprayed Coatings using Different Carbide Grain Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tillmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide reinforced coatings play an important role in the field of surface engineering to protect stressed surfaces against wear. For thermally sprayed coatings, it is already shown that the tribological properties get mainly determined by the carbide grain size fraction. Within the scope of this study, the tribological characteristics of iron based WC-W2C reinforced arc sprayed coatings deposited using cored wires consisting of different carbide grain size fractions were examined. Microstructural characteristics of the produced coatings were scrutinized using electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses. Ball-on-disk test as well as Taber Abraser and dry sand rubber wheel test were employed to analyze both the dry sliding and the abrasive wear behavior. It was shown that a reduced carbide grain size fraction as filling leads to an enhanced wear resistance against sliding. In terms of the Taber Abraser test, it is also demonstrated that a fine carbide grain size fraction results in an improved wear resistant against abrasion. As opposed to that, a poorer wear resistance was found within the dry sand rubber wheel tests. The findings show that the operating mechanisms for both abrasion tests affect the stressed surface in a different way, leading either to microcutting or microploughing.

  2. Neutron irradiation damage in transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hisayuki; Nesaki, Kouji; Kiritani, Michio

    1991-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the physical properties of light transition metal carbides, TiC x , VC x and NbC x , were examined, emphasizing the characterization of irradiation induced defects in the nonstoichiometric composition. TiC x irradiated with 14 MeV (fusion) neutrons showed higher damage rates with increasing C/Ti (x) ratio. A brief discussion is made on 'cascade damage' in TiC x irradiated with fusion neutrons. Two other carbides (VC x and NbC x ) were irradiated with fission reactor neutrons. The irradiation effects on VC x were not so simple, because of the complex irradiation behavior of 'ordered' phases. For instance, complete disordering was revealed in an ordered phase, 'V 8 C 7 ', after an irradiation dose of 10 25 n/m 2 . (orig.)

  3. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  4. METHOD FOR PRODUCING CEMENTED CARBIDE ARTICLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onstott, E.I.; Cremer, G.D.

    1959-07-14

    A method is described for making molded materials of intricate shape where the materials consist of mixtures of one or more hard metal carbides or oxides and matrix metals or binder metals thereof. In one embodiment of the invention 90% of finely comminuted tungsten carbide powder together with finely comminuted cobalt bonding agent is incorporated at 60 deg C into a slurry with methyl alcohol containing 1.5% paraffin, 3% camphor, 3.5% naphthalene, and 1.8% toluene. The compact is formed by the steps of placing the slurry in a mold at least one surface of which is porous to the fluid organic system, compacting the slurry, removing a portion of the mold from contact with the formed object and heating the formed object to remove the remaining organic matter and to sinter the compact.

  5. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4 C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests

  6. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH 3 ) 2 Si][CH 3 Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 150 0 C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  7. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatavuk, J.; Goldenstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author) [pt

  8. High resolution imaging of boron carbide microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKinnon, I.D.R.; Aselage, T.; Van Deusen, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Two samples of boron carbide have been examined using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). A hot-pressed B 13 C 2 sample shows a high density of variable width twins normal to (10*1). Subtle shifts or offsets of lattice fringes along the twin plane and normal to approx.(10*5) were also observed. A B 4 C powder showed little evidence of stacking disorder in crystalline regions

  9. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, Evan; Lin, Yen-Shan; Meyers, Marc A.; Olevsky, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A tantalum carbide powder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The specimens were processed under various temperature and pressure conditions and characterized in terms of relative density, grain size, rupture strength and hardness. The results are compared to hot pressing conducted under similar settings. It is shown that high densification is accompanied by substantial grain growth. Carbon nanotubes were added to mitigate grain growth; however, while increasing specimens' rupture strength and final density, they had little effect on grain growth.

  10. HCl removal using cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xin; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Wenjing; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles is used to remove HCl. • The optimum temperature for HCl removal of cycled carbide slag is 700 °C. • The presence of CO 2 restrains HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • CO 2 capture conditions have important effects on HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • HCl removal capacity of carbide slag drops with cycle number rising from 1 to 50. - Abstract: The carbide slag is an industrial waste from chlor-alkali plants, which can be used to capture CO 2 in the calcium looping cycles, i.e. carbonation/calcination cycles. In this work, the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping cycles for CO 2 capture was proposed to remove HCl in the flue gas from the biomass-fired and RDFs-fired boilers. The effects of chlorination temperature, HCl concentration, particle size, presence of CO 2 , presence of O 2 , cycle number and CO 2 capture conditions in calcium looping cycles on the HCl removal behavior of the carbide slag experienced carbonation/calcination cycles were investigated in a triple fixed-bed reactor. The chlorination product of the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping after absorbing HCl is not CaCl 2 but CaClOH. The optimum temperature for HCl removal of the cycled carbide slag from the carbonation/calcination cycles is 700 °C. The chlorination conversion of the cycled carbide slag increases with increasing the HCl concentration. The cycled carbide slag with larger particle size exhibits a lower chlorination conversion. The presence of CO 2 decreases the chlorination conversions of the cycled carbide slag and the presence of O 2 has a trifling impact. The chlorination conversion of the carbide slag experienced 1 carbonation/calcination cycle is higher than that of the uncycled calcined sorbent. As the number of carbonation/calcination cycles increases from 1 to 50, the chlorination conversion of carbide slag drops gradually. The high calcination temperature and high CO 2

  11. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  12. Laser deposition of carbide-reinforced coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, W.; Martinella, R.; Mor, G.P.; Bianchi, P.; D'Angelo, D.

    1991-01-01

    CO 2 laser cladding with blown powder presents many advantages: fusion bonding with the substrate with low dilution, metallurgical continuity in the metallic matrix, high solidification rates, ease of automation, and reduced environmental contamination. In the present paper, laser cladding experimental results using families of carbides (tungsten and titanium) mixed with metallic alloys are reported. As substrates, low alloy construction steel (AISI 4140) (austenitic stainless steel) samples have been utilized, depending on the particular carbide reinforcement application. The coating layers obtained have been characterized by metallurgical examination. They show low dilution, absence of cracks, and high abrasion resistance. The WC samples, obtained with different carbide sizes and percentages, have been characterized with dry and rubber wheel abrasion tests and the specimen behaviour has been compared with the behaviour of materials used for similar applications. The abrasion resistance proved to be better than that of other widely used hardfacing materials and the powder morphology have a non-negligible influence on the tribological properties. (orig.)

  13. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimbert, J.

    1999-01-01

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  14. Microhardness and grain size of disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Effect of the disordered nonstoichiometric titanium carbide on its microhardness and grain size is studied. It is established that decrease in defectiveness of carbon sublattice of disordered carbide is accompanied by microhardness growth and decrease in grain size. Possible causes of the TiC y microhardness anomalous behaviour in the area 0.8 ≤ y ≤ 0.9 connected with plastic deformation mechanism conditioned by peculiarities of the electron-energetic spectrum of nonstoichiometric carbide are discussed [ru

  15. Fabrication of chamfered uranium-plutonium mixed carbide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Shiozawa, Kenichi; Handa, Muneo

    1985-10-01

    Chamfered uranium-plutonium mixed carbide pellets for high burnup irradiation test in JMTR were fabricated in glove boxes with purified argon gas. The size of die and punch in a press was decided from pellet densities and dimensions including the angle of chamfered parts. No chip or crack caused by adopting chamfered pellets was found in both pressing and sintering stages. In addition to mixed carbide pellets, uranium carbide pellets used as insulators were also successfully fabricated. (author)

  16. Design and Thermal Analysis for Irradiation of Pyrolytic Carbon/Silicon Carbide Diffusion Couples in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerczak, Tyler J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Tristructural-isotropic (TRISO)–coated particle fuel is a promising advanced fuel concept consisting of a spherical fuel kernel made of uranium oxide and uranium carbide, surrounded by a porous carbonaceous buffer layer and successive layers of dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC), silicon carbide (SiC) deposited by chemical vapor , and dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC). This fuel concept is being considered for advanced reactor applications such as high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) and molten salt reactors (MSRs), as well as for accident-tolerant fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). Development and implementation of TRISO fuel for these reactor concepts support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy mission to promote safe, reliable nuclear energy that is sustainable and environmentally friendly. During operation, the SiC layer serves as the primary barrier to metallic fission products and actinides not retained in the kernel. It has been observed that certain fission products are released from TRISO fuel during operation, notably, Ag, Eu, and Sr [1]. Release of these radioisotopes causes safety and maintenance concerns.

  17. Fuel performance in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950's prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material

  18. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  19. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  20. Effect of Liquid Phase Content on Thermal Conductivity of Hot-Pressed Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Kwang-Young; Jang, Hun; Lee, Seung-Jae; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising material for Particle-Based Accident Tolerant (PBAT) fuel, fission, and fusion power applications due to its superior physical and thermal properties such as low specific mass, low neutron cross section, excellent radiation stability, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and high thermal conductivity. Thermal conductivity of PBAT fuel is one of very important factors for plant safety and energy efficiency of nuclear reactors. In the present work, the effect of Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 content on the microstructure and thermal properties of the hot pressed SiC ceramics have been investigated. Suppressing the β to α phase transformation of SiC ceramics is beneficial in increasing the thermal conductivity of liquid-phase sintered SiC ceramics. Developed SiC ceramics with Y 2 O 3 -Sc 2 O 3 additives are very useful for thermal conductivity on matrix material of the PBAT fuel

  1. HTGR fuel and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotts, A.L.; Homan, F.J.; Balthesen, E.; Turner, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    Significant advances have occurred in the development of HTGR fuel and fuel cycle. These accomplishments permit a wide choice of fuel designs, reactor concepts, and fuel cycles. Fuels capable of providing helium outlet temperatures of 750 0 C are available, and fuels capable of 1000 0 C outlet temperatures may be expected from extension of present technology. Fuels have been developed for two basic HTGR designs, one using a spherical (pebble bed) element and the other a prismatic element. Within each concept a number of variations of geometry, fuel composition, and structural materials are permitted. Potential fuel cycles include both low-enriched and high-enriched Th- 235 U, recycle Th- 233 U, and Th-Pu or U-Pu cycles. This flexibility offered by the HTGR is of great practical benefit considering the rapidly changing economics of power production. The inflation of ore prices has increased optimum conversion ratios, and increased the necessity of fuel recycle at an early date. Fuel element makeup is very similar for prismatic and spherical designs. Both use spherical fissile and fertile particles coated with combinations of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Both use carbonaceous binder materials, and graphite as the structural material. Weak-acid resin (WAR) UO 2 -UC 2 fissile fuels and sol-gel-derived ThO 2 fertile fuels have been selected for the Th- 233 U cycle in the prismatic design. Sol-gel-derived UO 2 UC 2 is the reference fissile fuel for the low-enriched pebble bed design. Both the United States and Federal Republic of Germany are developing technology for fuel cycle operations including fabrication, reprocessing, refabrication, and waste handling. Feasibility of basic processes has been established and designs developed for full-scale equipment. Fuel and fuel cycle technology provide the basis for a broad range of applications of the HTGR. Extension of the fuels to higher operating temperatures and development and commercial demonstration of fuel

  2. Physicochemical analysis of interaction of oxide fuel with pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium pressure of (CO+Kr,Xe) gases inside fuel particle with oxide kern depending on design features of fuel particle, on temperature. on (O/U) initial composition and fuel burnup is calculated using the suggested model. Analysis of possibility for gas pressure reduction by means of uranium carbide alloying of kern and degree increase of solid fission product retention (Cs for example) during alumosilicate alloying of uranium oxide is conducted

  3. Fluidized bed deposition and evaluation of silicon carbide coatings on microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, J.I.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel element for the HTGR is an array of closely packed fuel microspheres in a carbonaceous matrix. A coating of dense silicon carbide (SiC), along with pyrocarbon layers, is deposited on the fueled microspheres to serve as a barrier against diffusion of fission products. The microspheres are coated with silicon carbide in a fluidized bed by reaction of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) and hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The principal variables of coating temperature and reactant gas composition (H 2 /MTS ratio) have been correlated with coating rate, morphology, stoichiometry, microstructure, and density. The optimum temperature for depositing highly dense coatings is in the range 1475 to 1675 0 C. Lower temperatures result in silicon-rich deposits, while higher temperatures may cause unacceptable porosity. The optimum H 2 /MTS ratio for highly dense coatings is 20 or more (approximately 5% MTS or less). The amount of grown-in porosity increases as the H 2 /MTS ratio decreases below 20. The requirement that the H 2 /MTS ratio be about 20 or more imposes a practical restraint on coating rate, since increasing the total flow rate would eventually expel microspheres from the coating tube. Evaluation of stoichiometry, morphology, and microstructure support the above mentioned optimum conditions of temperature and reactant gas composition. 18 figures, 3 tables

  4. Interim development report: engineering-scale HTGR fuel particle crusher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, J.W.; Strand, J.B.

    1978-09-01

    During the reprocessing of HTGR fuel, a double-roll crusher is used to fracture the silicon carbide coatings on the fuel particles. This report describes the development of the roll crusher used for crushing Fort-St.Vrain type fissile and fertile fuel particles, and large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fissile fuel particles. Recommendations are made for design improvements and further testing

  5. Creation of leak-proof silicon carbide diffusion barriers by means of pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, A.-M.; Lustfeld, M.; Lippmann, W., E-mail: wolfgang.lippmann@tu-dresden.de; Hurtado, A.

    2014-05-01

    TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles are a crucial element of the HTR safety concept. While TRISO coated particles have been proven as a very efficient barrier for a large range of fission products in HTR experimental reactors, some particular fission products could still diffuse at a considerable rate. Most importantly, radioactive silver {sup 110m}Ag was found to be released from coated particles. In future HTRs with active components like a gas turbine in the primary circuit, such silver contamination may severely limit maintainability of these parts with the result of reduced life-time performance. So far, experimental analyses on silver diffusion through silicon carbide have led to contradictory results. In this work, an alternative method was used to generate silicon carbide layers as a basis for analysis of silver diffusion. With pulsed laser deposition (PLD), it is possible to generate coatings of different materials and various kinds of compounds. In particular, this technology allows the generation of layers very well defined with respect to their composition, purity and density. The microstructure can precisely be manipulated through various parameters. Based on different silicon carbide coatings with well-defined properties, we are going to investigate the silver diffusion process. Our goal is to derive the properties of an ideal silicon carbide coating preventing silver diffusion entirely. In this paper we present the major aspects of our work creating crystalline SiC layers as well as silver and CsI layers both on plane and spherical substrates. Analyses with X-ray diffraction, X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry show that complex multilayer systems comprising a graphite substrate, a crystalline SiC layer and an intermediate silver layer were successfully created. Major challenges to approach in the future are the handling of high-level intrinsic stresses forming in the layer structure as well as the high vapour

  6. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  7. Reactor irradiation effect on the physical-mechanical properties of zirconium carbides and niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrievskij, R.A.; Vlasov, K.P.; Shevchenko, A.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Pritchin, S.A.; Klyushin, V.V.; Kurushin, S.P.; Maskaev, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of the reactor radiation by a flux of neutrons 1.5x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>=1 meV) at radiation temperatures of 150 and 1100 deg C on the physico-mechanical properties of carbides of zirconium and niobium and their equimolar hard solution. A difference has been discovered in the behaviour of the indicated carbides under the effect of radiation. Under the investigated conditions of radiation the density of zirconium carbide is being decreased, while in the niobium carbide no actual volumetric changes occur. The increase of the lattice period in ZrC is more significant than in NbC. The electric resistance of ZrC is also changed more significantly than in the case of NbC, while for the microhardness a reverse relationship is observed. Strength and elasticity modulus change insignificantly in both cases. Resistance to crack formation shows a higher reduction for ZrC than for NbC, while the thermal strength shows an approximately similar increase. The equimolar hard solution of ZrC and NbC behaves to great extent similar to ZrC, although the change in electric resistance reminds of NbC while thermal strength changes differently. The study of the microstructure of the specimens has shown that radiation causes a large number of etching patterns-dislocations in NbC which are almost absent in ZrC

  8. Radiation effects in fuel materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes that occur in fuel materials during fission are described. Emphasis is placed on the fuels used today, or those foreseen for the future, hence oxides and carbides of uranium and plutonium. Examples are given to illustrate the most interesting neutron effects. (author)

  9. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandergraaf, T. T.; Wikjord, A. G.

    1973-10-15

    Instrumentel neutron activation analysis was used to determine trace constituents in silicon carbide. Four commercial powders of different origin, an NBS reference material, and a single crystal were characterized. A total of 36 activation species were identified nondestructively by high resolution gamma spectrometry; quantitative results are given for 12 of the more predominant elements. The limitations of the method for certain elements are discussed. Consideration is given to the depression of the neutron flux by impurities with large neutron absorption cross sections. Radiation fields from the various specimens were estimated assuming all radionuclides have reached their saturation activities. (auth)

  10. Crack propagation and fracture in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.G.; Lange, F.F.

    1975-01-01

    Fracture mechanics and strength studies performed on two silicon carbides - a hot-pressed material (with alumina) and a sintered material (with boron) - have shown that both materials exhibit slow crack growth at room temperature in water, but only the hot-pressed material exhibits significant high temperature slow crack growth (1000 to 1400 0 C). A good correlation of the observed fracture behaviour with the crack growth predicted from the fracture mechanics parameters shows that effective failure predictions for this material can be achieved using macro-fracture mechanics data. (author)

  11. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 1600 0 C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH 3 Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  12. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  13. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, D G; Cho, K Y; Riu, D H; Jin, E J

    2011-01-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al 2 O 3 . Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200deg. C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  14. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, D G; Cho, K Y; Riu, D H [Nanomaterials Team, Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, 233-5 Gasan-dong, Guemcheon-gu, Seoul 153-801 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, E J, E-mail: dhriu15@seoultech.ac.kr [Battelle-Korea Laborotary, Korea University, Anamdong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-29

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200deg. C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  15. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. G.; Cho, K. Y.; Jin, E. J.; Riu, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al2O3. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200°C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  16. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  17. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based com- posites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ...

  18. Determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankaran, P.S.; Kulkarni, Amit S.; Pandey, K.L.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Sayi, Y.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and fast method for the determination of free and combined carbon in boron carbide samples, based on combustion in presence of oxygen at different temperatures, has been developed. Method has been standardized by analyzing mixture of two different boron carbide samples. Error associated with the method in the determination of free carbon is less than 5%. (author)

  19. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  20. Process for the preparation of fine grain metal carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortsema, F.P.

    1976-01-01

    Fine grain metal carbide powders are conveniently prepared from the corresponding metal oxide by heating in an atmosphere of methane in hydrogen. Sintered articles having a density approaching the theoretical density of the metal carbide itself can be fabricated from the powders by cold pressing, hot pressing or other techniques. 8 claims, no drawings

  1. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    the stabilization of soil will ensure economy in road construction, while providing an effective way of disposing calcium carbide waste. KEYWORDS: Cement, Calcium carbide waste, Stabilization, Ikpayongo laterite, Pavement material. INTRODUCTION. Road building in the developing nations has been a major challenge to ...

  2. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  3. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardary, Z.; Reynolds, C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for fabricating an essentially uniformly dense boron carbide article of a length-to-diameter or width ratio greater than 2 to 1 comprising the steps of providing a plurality of article segments to be joined together to form the article with each of said article segments having a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5 to 1. Each segment is fabricated by hot pressing a composition consisting of boron carbide powder at a pressure and temperature effective to provide the article segment with a density greater than about 85% of theoretical density, providing each article segment with parallel planar end surfaces, placing a plurality of said article segments in a hot-pressing die in a line with the planar surfaces of adjacent article segments being disposed in intimate contact, and hot pressing the aligned article segments at a temperature and pressure effective to provide said article with a density over the length thereof in the range of about 94 to 98 percent theoretical density and greater than the density provided in the discrete hot pressing of each of the article segments and to provide a bond between adjacent article segments with said bond being at least equivalent in hardness, strength and density to a remainder of said article

  4. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these open-quotes reduced activityclose quotes materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Interim design report: fuel particle crushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, J.W.; Strand, J.B.; Cook, E.J.; Miller, C.M.

    1977-11-01

    The double-roll fuel particle crusher was developed to fracture the silicon carbide coatings of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fertile and fissile and large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fissile fuel particles. The report details the design task for the fuel particle crusher, including historical test information on double-roll crushers for carbide-coated fuels and the design approach selected for the cold pilot plant crusher, and shows how the design addresses the equipment goals and operational objectives. Design calculations and considerations are included to support the selection of crusher drive and gearing, the materials chosen for crushing rolls and housing, and the bearing selection. The results of the initial testing for compliance with design objectives and operational capabilities are also presented. 8 figures, 4 tables

  6. Uranium, thorium and rare earth elements distribution from different iron quadrangle spring waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cláudia A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria A. de B.C.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.H., E-mail: cferreiraquimica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: help@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: pchr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the concentrations of thorium, uranium and the rare earth elements (REE) in 26 spring waters, as well as the patterns of the REE of the samples from the Cercadinho, Moeda and Caue aquifers in different municipalities of the Iron Quadrangle (Quadrilatero Ferrifero), located in the central-southeast of Minas Gerais state. The pH value of the ground waters ranged from 3.8 to 7.0, indicating an acid nature of most of the spring waters. The investigation of REE speciation showed that all the REEs exist in the free X{sup 3+} ionic forms, under the prevailing Eh and pH conditions. In the studied samples the uranium concentrations (<2.3-1176 ng L{sup -1}) were below the guideline level set by Brazilian legislation (Ministry of Health 518- 03/2004). Thorium concentrations ranged from <0.39-11.0 ng L{sup -1} and the sum of the REE ranged from 6.0 to 37657 ng L{sup -1}. As there are no permissible limits related for the REE and thorium for different water quality standards in Brazil, more attention must be paid to the local residents' health risk caused by spring waters (REEs were > 1000 ng L{sup -1}) originating from aquifers located in Sabara, Barao de Cocais, Santa Barbara, Mario Campos, Congonhas and Lavras Novas. The REEs patterns in the spring waters from the Cercadinho, Caue and Moeda aquifers are characterized by middle REE (MREE) enrichment compared to light REE (LREE) and heavy REEs (HREE), negative Ce anomalies (except for one sample) and positive Eu anomalies in all three aquifers studied. (author)

  7. Uranium, thorium and rare earth elements distribution from different iron quadrangle spring waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Cláudia A.; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Menezes, Maria A. de B.C.; Rodrigues, Paulo C.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the concentrations of thorium, uranium and the rare earth elements (REE) in 26 spring waters, as well as the patterns of the REE of the samples from the Cercadinho, Moeda and Caue aquifers in different municipalities of the Iron Quadrangle (Quadrilatero Ferrifero), located in the central-southeast of Minas Gerais state. The pH value of the ground waters ranged from 3.8 to 7.0, indicating an acid nature of most of the spring waters. The investigation of REE speciation showed that all the REEs exist in the free X"3"+ ionic forms, under the prevailing Eh and pH conditions. In the studied samples the uranium concentrations ( 1000 ng L"-"1) originating from aquifers located in Sabara, Barao de Cocais, Santa Barbara, Mario Campos, Congonhas and Lavras Novas. The REEs patterns in the spring waters from the Cercadinho, Caue and Moeda aquifers are characterized by middle REE (MREE) enrichment compared to light REE (LREE) and heavy REEs (HREE), negative Ce anomalies (except for one sample) and positive Eu anomalies in all three aquifers studied. (author)

  8. Comparative uptake of uranium, thorium, and plutonium by biota inhabiting a contaminated Tennessee floodplain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Bondietti, E.A.; Walker, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of 238 U, 232 Th, and 239 Pu from soil by fescue, grasshoppers, and small mammals was compared at the contaminated White Oak Creek floodplain in East Tennessee. Comparisons of actinide uptake were based on analyses of radionuclide ratios (U/Pu and Th/Pu) in soil and biota. U:Pu ratios in small mammal carcasses (shrews, mice, and rats) and bone samples from larger mammals (rabbit, woodchuck, opossum, and raccoon) were significantly greater (P less than or equal to 0.05) than U/Pu ratios in soil (based on 8M HNO 3 extractable). There was no significant difference between Th/Pu ratios in animals and soil. The order of actinide accumulation by biota from the site relative to contaminated soil was U > Th approx. = Pu

  9. Solvent extraction of uranium, thorium, and rare earths with dialkyldithiophosphoric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haiduc, I.; Curtui, M.

    1986-01-01

    The separation conditions for throium (IV) in the presence of trivalent rare earths was investigated. The distribution ratios (D), extraction effectivity values (E%) and separation factor(S) were calculated for binary systems Th-La, Th-Ce, Th-Pr, Th-Sm. Di-(2-ethyl-hexyl)dithiophosphoric acid (HEhdtp) alone or mixtures of HEhdtp and trioctylphosphoshine oxide (TOPO) can be successfully used for separation of Thorium (IV) and rare earths

  10. Uranium/thorium dating of late Pleistocene peat deposits in N.W. Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnis, Hendrik

    1992-01-01

    Dating of peat by means of uranium series disequilibrium (230-Th/234-U, also known as UTD) with special emphasis on dating the early Weichselian interstadial and last interglacial peats in north western Europe, is the subject of this study. ... Zie: Introduction

  11. Uranium-thorium dating of quaternary carbonate accumulations in the Nevada Test Site region, southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, B.J.; Carr, W.J.; Gottschall, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A useful way to approach the problem of tectonic activity in an arid region is through study of the history of movement of faults and fractures and of the young alluvial material they displace. Easily datable materials are scarce in these deposits, but carbonates such as caliche, calcrete, travertine, calcite vein, and tufa are common. Several types of these carbonates from the Nevada Test Site area in the southern Great Basin have been collected and dated by the uranium-series method. A variety of geologic settings are represented. The carbonate samples were subjected to a complex treatment process, and the resulting preparations were counted on an alpha spectrometer. Some of the samples from obviously closed systems yielded reasonable ages; others gave only a minimum age for a material or event. Many of the ages obtained agree well with estimates of age determined from dated volcanic units, fault-scarp morphology, and displaced alluvial units. Among the significant ages obtained were three dates of greater than 400,000 years on calcite-filling fractures above and below the water table in an exploratory drill hole for a possible candidate nuclear waste repository site at Yucca Mountain. Another date on calcrete from immediately below the youngest basalt in the region gave an age of 345,000 years, which agrees extremely well with the K-Ar age determined for the basalt of about 300,000 years. Undisturbed travertine that fills faults in several areas gave ages from about 75,000 years to greater than 700,000 years. Soil caliche and calcretes slightly displaced or broken by repeated movement on faults gave minimum ages in the range from more than 5000 to more than about 25,000 years

  12. 232Th Mass Determination in a Uranium/Thorium Mixture for Safeguards Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nangu, M.; Marumo, B.; Mbedzi, E.; Rasweswe, M.; Croft, S.; McElroy, R.; Chapman, J.; Bosko, A.

    2015-01-01

    In nuclear safeguards it is required that thorium content in safeguarded material should be quantified and reported as appropriate. As such the South African State System of Control and Accounting (SSAC) on discovering a number of safeguarded waste drums which contained considerable quantities of thorium decided to initiate a project to properly quantify their thorium content using a high purity germanium detector and In Situ Object Counting System (ISOCS) efficiency calibration software. These metal waste drums are contained inside overpacks which for health reasons cannot be opened and thus giving rise to the challenge of determining the exact fill heights and the density of the material. Fill heights determined using transmission sources and the material density calculated from them together with the geometry used for the overpacks could be used to further refine the ISOCS calibration geometry and thus improving the quantitative result. In order to have confidence on the ISOCS measurements, it was decided to also validate the ISOCS results through the preparation of similar density standards that would be used for the efficiency calibration in the determination of the 232Th activity in the material. In addition, MGAU v4.2, which was used to determine uranium enrichment in a measured material, also provides an approximate 232Th abundance relative to uranium content. ISOCS measurements of 232Th masses in waste drums were compared to MGAU results. Results of these studies are presented in this paper. (author)

  13. Using airborne GAMMA-ray spectrometry (uranium, thorium, potassium) to quantify weathering and erosion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, F.

    2005-01-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry survey carried out on the Armorican Massif provided soil contents in U, Th and K in ppm. Chemical and mechanical erosion processes within a homogeneous geological unit have been estimated using their variations and those of the 137 Cs. Our new approach, based on a multivariate analysis (hierarchic ascending classification), integrates the airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data, with their broad spatial distribution, together with precisely located station data (major elements, traces and isotopic geochemistry) resulting from a soil and river water erosion products survey. The total export of potassium was estimated in any point of an area catchment (50-m resolution) until 17+2 t/km 2 /a for a 50-m thick weathering profile. Erosion study by river sampling provide important biases, for the perennial river does not integrate the whole range of erosion products: the geochemical signature of the valleys is currently more represented than plateau areas. (author)

  14. Distribution of uranium, thorium and potassium in the alkaline rocks of Pocos de Caldas massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, E.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Pocos de Caldas massif, with area about 800 Km 2 , represents the greatest complex of alkaline rocks existent in the American continent. Although values of U and Th are well Known in the mineralized areas, few has been registered with respect to the distribution of those elements outside the ore deposits. The rocks of the massif, in general, present high contents of U and Th when confronted with the surrouding country rocks. The distribution of the U and Th appoint a relevant additional data in the discussion on the hypothesis of nepheline syenites bodies formation in Pocos de Caldas by crystal fractionation processes. In this work are provided results of the U, Th and K distribution in the main petrographic facies occurring in the several studies places of the massif, yielded by gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of the samples. Those analysis disclose that khibinites present average values about 38 ppm U and 120 ppm Th; lujavrites, about 14 ppm U and more than 70 ppm Th; U-Th depleted nepheline synites, about 12 ppm U and 38 ppm Th, Th/U ratios are close to 3,0 in the nepheline syenites, about 3,7 in the phonolites, reaching values close to 4,0 in the khibinites. These values are comparable with others Th/U ratios of selected series of alkaline rocks reported in the international literature. Uranium and Th comparative data, attained by delayed neutron counting activation analysis also are given. The results obtained for the fluorimetric analysis show loss of U leaching is greater in the fine-grained rocks (phonolites) than coarse-grained ones (lujavrites, Khibinites). The autoradiographic studies reveal that radioactive elements are found concentrated in mineral phases. A new assessment of the radiogenic heat production it is also available. (Author) [pt

  15. Uranium-thorium disequilibria and partitioning on melting of garnet peridotite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beattie, P.

    1993-01-01

    The abundances of isotopes in the 238 U decay series can be used as both tracers and chronometers of magmatic processes. In the subsolidus asthenosphere, the activity of each daughter isotope (defined as the product of its concentration and decay constant, and denoted by parentheses) is assumed to be equal to that of its parent. By contrast, ( 230 Th/ 238 U) is greater than unity in most recent mid-ocean-ridge and ocean-island basalts, implying that thorium is more incompatible (that is, it is partitioned into the melt phase more strongly) than uranium. Melting of spinel peridotite cannot produce the ( 230 Th) excesses, because measured partition coefficients for pyroxenes and olivine demonstrate that uranium is more incompatible than thorium for this rock. Here I report garnet-melt partitioning data which show that for this mineral-melt pair thorium does behave more incompatibility than uranium, thus supporting the suggestion that mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) are produced by melting initiated at depths where garnet is stable. Using these data, I show that the observed ( 230 Th/ 238 U) ratios of MORB and most ocean-island basalts can be explained by slow, near-fractional melting initiated in the garnet stability field. (author)

  16. Uranium, thorium, lead, lantanoids and yttrium in some plants growing on granitic and radioactive rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yliruokanen, I [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry

    1975-01-01

    Spark source mass spectrometry with electrical detection was used for the determination of trace element contents in the ash of 172 plants comprising 21 lichens, 42 mosses, 78 dwarf shrubs and 31 trees. The highest contents found in single samples were 2800 ppm U in one moss, 20 ppm Th in one moss and one lichen, 1200 to 1000 ppm Pb in lichens and mosses and in one Calluna vulgaris, 110 to 100 ppm Y and La in some lichens and mosses and 350 ppm Ce in one moss; the mean contents were usually significantly lower. No anomalies were found in the lanthanoid distribution in these plants and the influence of uranium and lanthanoid mineralizations was detectable only in the immediate vicinity of mineralized spots.

  17. Soiled-based uranium disequilibrium and mixed uranium-thorium series radionuclide reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology has assigned the Technical Measurements Center (TMC), located at the DOE Grand Junction Colorado, Projects Office and operated by UNC Geotech (UNC), the task of supporting ongoing remedial action programs by providing both technical guidance and assistance in making the various measurements required in all phases of remedial action work. Pursuant to this task, the Technical Measurements Center prepared two sets of radionuclide reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. A total of six reference materials, two sets comprising three reference materials each, were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides using mill tailings materials, ores, and a river-bottom soil diluent. One set (disequilibrium set) contains varying amounts of uranium with nominal amounts of radium-226. The other set (mixed-nuclide set) contains varying amounts of uranium-238 and thorium-232 decay series nuclides. 14 refs., 10 tabs

  18. Uranium, thorium and rare earth elements in macrofungi: what are the genuine concentrations?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovička, Jan; Kubrová, J.; Rohovec, Jan; Řanda, Zdeněk; Dunn, C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2011), s. 837-845 ISSN 0966-0844 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600480801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516; CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ICP -MS * ENAA * REE * fungi * bioaccumulation * metals Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 2.823, year: 2011

  19. Rare earth element and uranium-thorium variations in tufa deposits from the Mono Basin, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, E. S.; Tomascak, P. B.; Hemming, N.; Hemming, S. R.; Rasbury, T.; Stine, S.; Zimmerman, S. R.

    2009-12-01

    Samples of fossil tufa deposits from several localities in the Mono Basin, eastern California, were analyzed for trace element concentrations in order to better understand changes in lake composition in the past. These deposits were formed during the last glacial cycle, mostly during deglaciation (Benson et al., 1990, PPP). Three elevations are represented by the analyses. Samples from near Highway 167 were sampled between 2063 and 2069 m asl. Samples from near Thompson Road were sampled between 2015 and 2021 m. One layered mound was sampled at 1955 m. Concentrations of the lanthanide rare earth elements (REE), in particular the heavy/light (HREE/LREE) distributions, have been shown to be sensitive to alkalinity in modern saline lakes (e.g., Johannesson et al., 1994, GRL, 21, 773-776), and the same has been suggested for U/Th (Anderson et al., 1982, Science, 216, 514-516). Holocene to near-modern tufa towers exist in shallow water and around the current shoreline (1945 m). Tufa towers above 2000 m include a characteristic morphology termed thinolite, interpreted to represent pseudomorphs after the very cold water mineral ikaite. Most lower elevation towers do not have the thinolite morphology, but some layered tufa mounds at low elevations include several layers of thinolite, such as the one sampled for this project. Analyses were made on millimeter-scale bulk samples from tufa towers. Measurements were made on sample solutions with a Varian 820MS quadrupole ICP-MS. Mono Basin tufa samples have total REE concentrations ranging from 0.029 to 0.77 times average shales. Samples have flat to moderately HREE-enriched shale-normalized patterns with limited overall variability ([La/Lu]SN of 1.8 to 9.6) but with some variability in the slope of the HREE portion of the patterns. Tufa towers sampled from three elevations have (Gd/Lu)SN of 0.40 to 1.5. The REE patterns of most samples have small positive Ce anomalies, but a minority of samples, all from the layered tufa mound, have small negative Ce anomalies. Concentrations of U and Th range from 0.5 to 12 ppm and from 0.2 to 12 ppm, respectively, with substantial variability in U/Th (0.08 to 20). Relative to modern Mono Lake water (Johannesson and Lyons, 1994, Limn. Oc., 39, 1141-1154) the tufa samples have 29 to 144000 times the total REE contents, but the water has HREE/LREE nearly twice as high as the most HREE-enriched fossil tufa. There is a general trend in which samples from higher elevation have lower average total REE, (Gd/Lu)SN and Th and higher average U and U/Th, the latter ranging from 0.52 in the locality at lowest elevation to 10.5 at the highest. In general the results show promise for the application of this approach to paleo-alkalinity, although analyses of modern precipitates as well as laboratory precipitation experiments are needed to fully address the processes.

  20. Uranium-thorium silicates, with specific reference to the species in the Witwatersrand reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, G.

    1987-01-01

    (U,Th)-silicates form two complete series of anhydrous and hydrated species with general formulae (U,Th)SiO 4 and (U,Th)SiO 4 .nH 2 O respectively. The end-members of the anhydrous series are anhydrous coffinite and thorite, and those of the hydrated series, coffinite and thorogummite. Although the silicates are relatively rare in nature, coffinite is a common ore mineral in uranium deposits of the sandstone type. In the Witwatersrand reefs, (U,Th)-silicates are extremely rare in most reefs, except for the Elsburg Reefs on the West Rand Goldfield and the Dominion Reef. In these reefs detrital uraninite has been partly or entirely transformed to (U,Th)-silicates of coffinite composition, but thorite and thorogummite of detrital origin are also found in the Dominion Reef. In leaching tests on polished sections of rock samples containing (U,Th)-silicates, a dilute sulphuric acid solution, to which ferric iron had been added, was used as the lixiviant. It appeared that the dissolution of coffinite is less rapid than that of uraninite and uraniferous leucoxene. However, the reaction of silicates of high thorium content is much slower, and was not completed during the tests

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock

  2. Chlorination separation of uranium, thorium, and radium from low-grade ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, V.S.; Perumareddi, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Low-temperature chlorination of low-grade uranium ores containing uranium in the 0.02 to 0.06% range, thorium in the 0.036 to 0.12% range, and radium in the 70 to 200 pci/g range resulted in the extraction of >90% of the constituents. The residue left after chlorination was found to be innocuous and suitable for disposal as a waste acceptable to the environment. Use of sodium chloride in the charge was useful in reducing the chlorination temperature and in the formation of nonvolatile anionic chloro complexes of the metal ions in the ore

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock.

  5. Application of gel microsphere processes to preparation of Sphere-Pac nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Notz, K.J.; Spence, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Sphere-Pac fabrication of nuclear fuels using two or more sizes of oxide or carbide spheres is ideally suited to nonproliferation-fuel cycles and remote refabrication. The sizes and compositions of spheres necessary for such fuel cycles have not been commonly prepared; therefore, modifications of sol-gel processes to meet these requirements are being developed and demonstrated

  6. Fast reactor parameter optimization taking into account changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afrin, B.A.; Rechnov, A.V.; Usynin, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation and solution of optimization problem for parameters determining the layout of the central part of sodium cooled power reactor taking into account possible changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time are performed. The losses under change of fuel composition type for two reactor modifications providing for minimum doubling time for oxide and carbide fuels respectively, are estimated

  7. Fast reactor fuel reprocessing. An Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) envisioned the introduction of Plutonium fuelled fast reactors as the intermediate stage, between Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors and Thorium-Uranium-233 based reactors for the Indian Nuclear Power Programme. This necessitated the closing of the fast reactor fuel cycle with Plutonium rich fuel. Aiming to develop a Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (FRFR) technology with low out of pile inventory, the DAE, with over four decades of operating experience in Thermal Reactor Fuel Reprocessing (TRFR), had set up at the India Gandhi Center for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, R and D facilities for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. After two decades of R and D in all the facets, a Pilot Plant for demonstrating FRFR had been set up for reprocessing the FBTR (Fast Breeder Test Reactor) spent mixed carbide fuel. Recently in this plant, mixed carbide fuel with 100 GWd/t burnup fuel with short cooling period had been successfully reprocessed for the first time in the world. All the challenging problems encountered had been successfully overcome. This experience helped in fine tuning the designs of various equipments and processes for the future plants which are under construction and design, namely, the DFRP (Demonstration Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant) and the FRP (Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant). In this paper, a comprehensive review of the experiences in reprocessing the fast reactor fuel of different burnup is presented. Also a brief account of the various developmental activities and strategies for the DFRP and FRP are given. (author)

  8. Compact nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiselev, V.V.; Churakov, Yu.A.; Danchenko, Yu.V.; Bylkin, B.K.; Tsvetkov, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Different constructions of racks for compact storage of spent fuel assemblies (FA) in ''coolin''g pools (CP) of NPPs with the BWR and PWR type reactors are described. Problems concerning nuclear and radiation safety and provision of necessary thermal conditions arising in such rack design are discussed. It is concluded that the problem of prolonged fuel storage at NPPs became Very actual for many countries because of retapdation of the rates of fuel reprocessing centers building. Application of compact storage racks is a promising solution of the problem of intermediate FA storage at NPPs. Such racks of stainless boron steel and with neutron absorbers in the from of boron carbide panels enable to increase the capacity of the present CP 2-2.6 times, and the period of FA storage in them up to 5-10 years

  9. Contribution to the study of U-Ti and U-Pu-Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milet, C.A.

    1968-01-01

    After having discussed the reasons to use (U,Pu) carbides as fast reactor fuel, we examine the influence of the addition of titanium to these carbides. A preliminary study has been done on the system of U-C-Ti and some properties have been measured such as: density, thermal expansion, electrical resistivity, atmospheric corrosion and compatibility with stainless steel. The systems U-Pu-C-Ti (Pu/U + Pu equal to 15 per cent) and U-C-Ti have been found to be very similar. There exists a two phases region (U,Pu)C + TiC, an eutectic between (U,Pu)C and TiC for approximately 15 at %. The solubilities of U + Pu in TiC and of Ti in (U,Pu)C is less than 1 % at. The addition of titanium does not markedly change thermal expansion coefficients of (U,Pu)C. However the resistance to atmospheric corrosion and compatibility with stainless steel is improved. Thermal conductivity, calculated from electrical resistivity, has increased. On the other side, the density of fissile material is lowered. The combination of (U,Pu)C + TiC seems to be the most promising alloy for application as nuclear fuel. (author) [fr

  10. Chemical, mechanical, and tribological properties of pulsed-laser-deposited titanium carbide and vanadium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzanowski, J.E.; Leuchtner, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    The chemical, mechanical, and tribological properties of pulsed-laser-deposited TiC and VC films are reported in this paper. Films were deposited by ablating carbide targets using a KrF (λ = 248 nm) laser. Chemical analysis of the films by XPS revealed oxygen was the major impurity; the lowest oxygen concentration obtained in a film was 5 atom%. Oxygen was located primarily on the carbon sublattice of the TiC structure. The films were always substoichiometric, as expected, and the carbon in the films was identified primarily as carbidic carbon. Nanoindentation hardness tests gave values of 39 GPa for TiC and 26 GPa for VC. The friction coefficient for the TiC films was 0.22, while the VC film exhibited rapid material transfer from the steel ball to the substrate resulting in steel-on-steel tribological behavior

  11. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He Yuehui

    2008-01-01

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  12. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  13. Preliminary design study for a carbide LEU-nuclear thermal rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, P.F.; Kim, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear space propulsion is a requirement for the successful exploration of the solar system. It offers the possibility of having both a high specific impulse and a relatively high thrust, allowing rapid transit times with a minimum usage of fuel. This paper proposes a nuclear thermal rocket design based on heritage NERVA rockets that makes use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The Carbide LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket (C-LEU-NTR) is designed to fulfill the rocket requirements as set forth in the NASA 2009 Mars Mission Design Reference Architecture 5.0, that is provide 25,000 lbf of thrust, operate at full power condition for at least two hours, and have a specific impulse close to 900 s. The neutronics analysis was done using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron library. The thermal hydraulic calculations and size optimization were completed with a finite difference code being developed at the Center for Space Nuclear Research. (authors)

  14. Interaction of noble-metal fission products with pyrolytic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1982-01-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which act as a miniature pressure vessel and form the primary fission product barrier. Of the many fission products formed during irradiation, the noble metals are of particular interest because they interact significantly with the SiC layer and their concentrations are somewhat higher in the low-enriched uranium fuels currently under consideration. To study fission product-SiC interactions, particles of UO 2 or UC 2 are doped with fission product elements before coating and are then held in a thermal gradient up to several thousand hours. Examination of the SiC coatings by TEM-AEM after annealing shows that silver behaves differently from the palladium group

  15. Effect of Carbide Dissolution on Chlorine Induced High Temperature Corrosion of HVOF and HVAF Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCrMoNb Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, D.; Matikainen, V.; Uusitalo, M.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Highly corrosion- and wear-resistant thermally sprayed chromium carbide (Cr3C2)-based cermet coatings are nowadays a potential highly durable solution to allow traditional fluidized bed combustors (FBC) to be operated with ecological waste and biomass fuels. However, the heat input of thermal spray causes carbide dissolution in the metal binder. This results in the formation of carbon saturated metastable phases, which can affect the behavior of the materials during exposure. This study analyses the effect of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix of Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb coatings and its effect on chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. Four coatings were thermally sprayed with HVAF and HVOF techniques in order to obtain microstructures with increasing amount of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix. The coatings were heat-treated in an inert argon atmosphere to induce secondary carbide precipitation. As-sprayed and heat-treated self-standing coatings were covered with KCl, and their corrosion resistance was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ordinary high-temperature corrosion test at 550 °C for 4 and 72 h, respectively. High carbon dissolution in the metal matrix appeared to be detrimental against chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. The microstructural changes induced by the heat treatment hindered the corrosion onset in the coatings.

  16. Nuclear fuels and development of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, C.V.; Mannan, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Safe, reliable and economic operation of nuclear fission reactors, the source of nuclear power at present, requires judicious choice, careful preparation and specialised fabrication procedures for fuels and fuel element structural materials. These aspects of nuclear fuels (uranium, plutonium and their oxides and carbides), fuel element technology and structural materials (aluminium, zircaloy, stainless steel etc.) are discussed with particular reference to research and power reactors in India, e.g. the DHRUVA research reactor at BARC, Trombay, the pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) at Rajasthan and Kalpakkam, and the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam. Other reactors like the gas-cooled reactors operating in UK are also mentioned. Because of the limited uranium resources, India has opted for a three-stage nuclear power programme aimed at the ultimate utilization of her abundant thorium resources. The first phase consists of natural uranium dioxide-fuelled, heavy water-moderated and cooled PHWR. The second phase was initiated with the attainment of criticality in the FBTR at Kalpakkam. Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) utilize the plutonium and uranium by-products of phase 1. Moreover, FBR can convert thorium into fissile 233 U. They produce more fuel than is consumed - hence, the name breeders. The fuel parameters of some of the operating or proposed fast reactors in the world are compared. FBTR is unique in the choice of mixed carbides of plutonium and uranium as fuel. Factors affecting the fuel element performance and life in various reactors e.g. hydriding of zircaloys, fuel pellet-cladding interaction etc. in PHWR and void swelling; irradiation creep and helium embrittlement of fuel element structural materials in FBR are discussed along with measures to overcome some of these problems. (author). 15 refs., 9 tabs., 23 figs

  17. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  18. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  19. On the carbide formation in high-carbon stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steels containing high Cr as well as carbon contents in excess of 1.5 weight percent have been developed for applications which require high resistance erosion and environmental corrosion. Formation of carbides is one of important parameters for controlling properties of these materials especially erosion characteristics. Percent work includes the study of different type of carbides which from during the heat treatment of these materials. It has been found that precipitation of secondary carbides and the nature of matrix transformation plays an important role in determining the hardness characteristics of these materials. (author)

  20. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  1. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  2. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  3. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, W [Dounreay Experimental Reactor Establishment, Thurso, Caithness (United Kingdom); Findlay, J R [AERE, Harwell, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed.

  4. Fuel performance of DOE fuels in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In April of 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) decided to end the fuel reprocessing mission at ICPP. Fuel performance in storage received increased emphasis as the fuel now needs to be stored until final dispositioning is defined and implemented. Fuels are stored in four main areas: an original underwater storage facility, a modern underwater storage facility, and two dry fuel storage facilities. As a result of the reactor research mission of the DOE and predecessor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission, many types of nuclear fuel have been developed, used, and assigned to storage at the ICPP. Fuel clad with stainless steel, zirconium, aluminum, and graphite are represented. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels, resulting in 55 different fuel types in storage. Also included in the fuel storage inventory is canned scrap material

  5. UK experience on fuel and cladding interaction in oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batey, W.; Findlay, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    The occurrence of fuel cladding interactions in fast reactor fuels has been observed in UK irradiations over a period of years. Chemical incompatibility between fuel and clad represents a potential source of failure and has, on this account, been studied using a variety of techniques. The principal fuel of interest to the UK for fast reactor application is mixed uranium plutonium oxide clad in stainless steel and it is in this field that the majority of work has been concentrated. Some consideration has been given to carbide fuels, because of their application as an advanced fuel. This experience is described in the accompanying paper. Several complementary initiatives have been followed to investigate the interactions in oxide fuel. The principal source of experimental information is from the experimental fuel irradiation programme in the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR). Supporting information has been obtained from irradiation programmes in Materials Testing Reactors (MTR). Conditions approaching those in a fast reactor are obtained and the effects of specific variables have been examined in specifically designed experiments. Out-of-reactor experiments have been used to determine the limits of fuel and cladding compatibility and also to give indications of corrosion The observations from all experiments have been examined in the light of thermo-dynamic predictions of fuel behaviour to assess the relative significance of various observations and operating conditions. An experimental programme to control and limit the interactions in oxide fuel is being followed

  6. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity

  7. Carbon in palladium catalysts: A metastable carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriani, Nicola; Mittendorfer, Florian; Kresse, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium towards selective hydrogenation of hydrocarbons depends on the partial pressure of hydrogen. It has been suggested that the reaction proceeds selectively towards partial hydrogenation only when a carbon-rich film is present at the metal surface. On the basis of first-principles simulations, we show that carbon can dissolve into the metal because graphite formation is delayed by the large critical nucleus necessary for graphite nucleation. A bulk carbide Pd 6 C with a hexagonal 6-layer fcc-like supercell forms. The structure is characterized by core level shifts of 0.66-0.70 eV in the core states of Pd, in agreement with experimental x-ray photoemission spectra. Moreover, this phase traps bulk-dissolved hydrogen, suppressing the total hydrogenation reaction channel and fostering partial hydrogenation. (author)

  8. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  9. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  10. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 . Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  11. Boron carbide in pile behaviour Rapsodie experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.; Colin, M.

    1983-04-01

    Results concerning boron carbide irradiation experiments performed in RAPSODIE up to 10 22 .cm - 3 capture density in the temperature range 600-1100 0 lead to the following main conclusions: initial density and grain size lowering contribute to swelling decrease but density is the major parameter for swelling limitation; swelling rate can vary in a wide range (ratio 1 to 3) according to combinations of density (1.8 to 2.3) and grain size (10 to 50 μm) values; a swelling balance reveals that the most important contribution to swelling should be a high density of helium small bubbles (<400 A); helium retention increases with density and grain size and decreases with temperature elevation. A diffusion law is proposed to describe the rate of helium release

  12. Ordering effects in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.; Kottar, A.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nonstoichiometry and ordering on crystalline structure and specific electric resistance (ρ) of TiC y (0.52≤y≤0.98) is studied within the temperature range of 300-1100 K. It is shown that the titanium carbide ordering in the areas 0.52≤y≤0.55, 0.56≤y≤0.58 and 0.62≤y≤0.68 leads to formation of the Ti 2 C cubic and trigonal ordered phase and the Ti 3 C 2 rhombic ordered phase correspondingly. Availability of hysteresis on the ρ(T) dependences in the area of the disorder-order reversible equilibrium transition points out to the fact that the TiC y ↔Ti 2 C and TiC y ↔Ti 3 C 2 transformations are the first order phase transitions [ru

  13. Oxalate complexation in dissolved carbide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choppin, G.R.; Bokelund, H.; Valkiers, S.

    1983-01-01

    It has been shown that the oxalic acid produced in the dissolution of mixed uranium, plutonium carbides in nitric acid can account for the problems of incomplete uranium and plutonium extraction on the Purex process. Moreover, it was demonstrated that other identified products such as benzene polycarboxylic acids are either too insoluble or insufficiently complexing to be of concern. The stability constants for oxalate complexing of UO 2 +2 and Pu +4 ions (as UO 2 (C 2 O 4 ), Pu(C 2 O 4 ) 2+ and Pu(C 2 O 4 ) 2 , respectively) were measured in nitrate solutions of 4.0 molar ionic strength (0-4 M HNO 3 ) by extraction of these species with TBP. (orig.)

  14. Study on niobium carbide dispersed superconducting tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, H; Tachikawa, K [National Research Inst. for Metals, Tokyo (Japan); Oh' asa, M [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1977-11-01

    Niobium carbide (NbC) dispersed superconducting tapes have been fabricated by two metallurgical processes. In the first process, Ni-Nb-C alloys are directly arc melted and hot worked in air and the NbC phase is distributed in the form of fine discrete particles. In the second process, Ni-Nb and Ni-Nb-Cu alloys are arc melted, hot worked and subjected to solid-state carburization. NbC then precipitates along the grain boundaries, forming a network. The highest superconducting transition temperature attained is about 11 K. Taken together with the lattice parameter measurement, this indicates that NbC with a nearly perfect NaCl structure is formed in both processes. Measured values of the upper critical field, the critical current density and the volume fraction of the NbC phase are also discussed.

  15. Single Photon Sources in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Single photon sources in semiconductors are highly sought after as they constitute the building blocks of a diverse range of emerging technologies such as integrated quantum information processing, quantum metrology and quantum photonics. In this presentation, we show the first observation of single photon emission from deep level defects in silicon carbide (SiC). The single photon emission is photo-stable at room temperature and surprisingly bright. This represents an exciting alternative to diamond color centers since SiC possesses well-established growth and device engineering protocols. The defect is assigned to the carbon vacancy-antisite pair which gives rise to the AB photoluminescence lines. We discuss its photo-physical properties and their fabrication via electron irradiation. Preliminary measurements on 3C SiC nano-structures will also be discussed. (author)

  16. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...... lattice mismatch. Secondly, SiC material is abundant, containing no rear-earth element material as commercial phosphor. In this paper, fabrication of porous SiC is introduced, and their morphology and photoluminescence are characterized. Additionally, the carrier lifetime of the porous SiC is measured...... by time-resolved photoluminescence. The ultrashort lifetime in the order of ~70ps indicates porous SiC is very promising for the application in the ultrafast visible light communications....

  17. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... light emission property so that to take fully potential applications of this material. In this talk, two methods, i.e. doping SiC heavily by donor-acceptor pairs and making SiC porous are introduced to make light emission from SiC. By co-doping SiC with nitrogen and boron heavily, strong yellow emission...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  18. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  19. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  20. Analysis of possibilities for functional capacity for work rise of reactor fuel elements at nuclear engine regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deryavko, I.I.; Perepelkin, I.G.; Pivovarov, O.S.; Storozhenko, A.N.; Tarasov, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    The principle results of carbide fuel rods testing during series of IVG.1 reactor starts up at regime simulating nuclear engine regime of nuclear moving power unit are given. Considerable degradation of initial fuel elements status increasing from start up to start up and which could resulted fail of separate technological channels is shown. Origin case of extreme degradation of fuel elements status are insufficient thermal strength of fuel elements operation in the field brittle state of sintered carbide material, Possible ways of artificial reinforce of fuel elements of low temperature sections, increasing its thermal strength up to required level

  1. Optimization of uranium carbide fabrication by carbothermic reduction with limited oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveu, Gaelle

    2014-01-01

    Mixed carbides (U, Pu)C, are good fuel candidate for generation IV reactors because of their high fissile atoms density and excellent thermal properties for economical (more compact and efficient cores) and safety reasons (high melting margin). UC can be imagine as a surrogate material ror R and D studies on (U,Pu)C fuel behavior, because of their similar structures. The carbothermic reaction was used because it is the most studied and now consider for industrial process. However, it involves powders manipulation: in air, carbide can strongly react at room temperature and under controlled atmosphere it can absorb impurities. An inerted installation under Ar, BaGCARA, was therefore used. Process improvements were carried out, including the sintering atmosphere in order to evaluate the impact on the sample purity (about oxygen content). The original method by ion beam analysis was used to determine the surface composition (oxygen in-depth profiles in the first microns and stoichiometry). This oxygen analysis was set for the first time in carbonaceous materials. XRD analysis showed the formation of an intermediate compound during the carbothermic reaction and a better crystallization of the samples fabricated in BaGCARA. They also have a better microstructure, density, and visual appearance if compared to former samples. Vacuum sintering leads to a denser UC with fewer second phases if compared to Ar, Ar/H 2 or controlled PC atmospheres. However, it was not possible to analyze carbides without air contact which may impact their lattice parameter and lead to their deterioration. When the carbide is initially free of oxygen, it oxidizes faster, more intensely and heterogeneously. The mechanical stress induced between the grains lead to fracturing the material, to corrosion cracking and then a de-bonding of the material. A study of oxidation mechanisms would be interesting to validate and understand the evolution of the material in contact with oxygen. A study of the

  2. Fuel-coolant interaction-phenomena under prompt burst conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, H.; Young, M.F.; Reil, K.O.

    1979-01-01

    The Prompt Burst Energetics (PBE) experiments conducted at Sandia Laboratories are a series of in-pile tests with fresh uranium oxide or uranium carbide fuel pins in stagnant sodium. Fuel-coolant-interactions in PBE-9S (oxide/sodium system) and PBE-SG2 (carbide/sodium) have been analyzed with the MURTI parametric FCI code. The purpose is to gain insight into possible FCI scenarios in the experiments and sensitivity of results to input parameters. Results are in approximate agreement for the second (triggered) event in PBE-9S (32 MPa peak) and the initial interaction in PBE-SG2

  3. Accident tolerant fuel cladding development: Promise, status, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrani, Kurt A.

    2018-04-01

    The motivation for transitioning away from zirconium-based fuel cladding in light water reactors to significantly more oxidation-resistant materials, thereby enhancing safety margins during severe accidents, is laid out. A review of the development status for three accident tolerant fuel cladding technologies, namely coated zirconium-based cladding, ferritic alumina-forming alloy cladding, and silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite cladding, is offered. Technical challenges and data gaps for each of these cladding technologies are highlighted. Full development towards commercial deployment of these technologies is identified as a high priority for the nuclear industry.

  4. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  5. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  6. Structure and thermal expansion of NbC complex carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsinskaya, I.M.; Chaporova, I.N.; Cheburaeva, R.F.; Samojlov, A.I.; Logunov, A.V.; Ignatova, I.A.; Dodonova, L.P.

    1983-01-01

    Alloying dependences of the crystal lattice parameters at indoor temperature and coefficient of thermal linear exspansion within a 373-1273 K range are determined for complex NbC-base carbides by the method of mathematical expemental design. It is shown that temperature changes in the linear expansion coefficient of certain complex carbides as distinct from NbC have an anomaly (minimum) within 773-973 K caused by occurring reversible phase transformations. An increase in the coefficient of thermal linear expansion and a decrease in hardness of NbC-base tungsten-, molybdenum-, vanadium- and hafnium-alloyed carbides show a weakening of a total chemical bond in the complex carbides during alloying

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF CARBIDE AND NITRIDE CERAMICS OF INCREASED RESISTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Roman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The developments of carbide and nitrite ceramics of high solidity are presented. It is shown that development of nanotechnology led to creation of thenanostructural ceramics, the composition of which is controlled on cluster level.

  8. Medium temperature reaction between lanthanide and actinide carbides and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, G.; Lorenzelli, R.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    Hydrogen is fixed reversibly by the lanthanide and actinide mono carbides in the range 25 - 400 C, as for pure corresponding metals. Hydrogen goes into the carbides lattice through carbon vacancies and the total fixed amount is approximately equal to two hydrogen atoms per initial vacancy. Final products c.n thus be considered as carbo-hydrides of general formula M(C 1-x , H 2x ). The primitive CFC, NaCl type, structure remains unchanged but expands strongly in the case of actinide carbides. With lanthanide carbides, hydrogenation induces a phase transformation with reappearance of the metal structure (HCP). Hydrogen decomposition pressures of all the studied carbo-hydrides are greater than those of the corresponding di-hydrides. (authors) [fr

  9. Iron Carbides and Nitrides: Ancient Materials with Novel Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhantong; Zhang, Peng; Lei, Xiang; Wang, Xiaobai; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Hua

    2018-02-07

    Iron carbides and nitrides have aroused great interest in researchers, due to their excellent magnetic properties, good machinability and the particular catalytic activity. Based on these advantages, iron carbides and nitrides can be applied in various areas such as magnetic materials, biomedical, photo- and electrocatalysis. In contrast to their simple elemental composition, the synthesis of iron carbides and nitrides still has great challenges, particularly at the nanoscale, but it is usually beneficial to improve performance in corresponding applications. In this review, we introduce the investigations about iron carbides and nitrides, concerning their structure, synthesis strategy and various applications from magnetism to the catalysis. Furthermore, the future prospects are also discussed briefly. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synthesis of carbon fibre-reinforced, silicon carbide composites by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbon fibre (Cf) reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites which are ... eral applications, such as automotive brakes, high-efficiency engine systems, ... The PIP method is based on the use of organo metallic pre-ceramic precursors.

  11. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  12. Spheroidization of transition metal carbides in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Solov'ev, P.V.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma process of preparation of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbide spherical powders with the main particle size 40-80 μm is considered. Spheroidization degree, granulometric and phase composition of the product are investigated

  13. Stochastic Distribution of Wear of Carbide Tools during Machining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... The stochastic point model was used to determine the rate of wear distribution of the carbide tool ... Keywords: cutting speed, feed rate, machining time, tool life, reliability, wear.

  14. Study of aging and ordering processes in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbuzov, M.P.; Khaenko, B.V.; Kachkovskaya, Eh.T.

    1977-01-01

    Aging and ordering processes in titanium carbide were investigated on monocrystals (fragments of alloys) with the aid of roentgenographic method. The sequence of phase transformations during aging was ascertained,and a monoclinic structure of the carbon atoms ordering is suggested. The microhardness of titanium carbide was studied as a function of the heat treatment of alloys and the main factors (ordering and dislocation structure) which govern the difference in the microhardness of hardened and aged (annealed) specimens were determined

  15. Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    Simulations of Proton Implantation in Silicon Carbide (SiC) Jonathan P. McCandless, Hailong Chen, Philip X.-L. Feng Electrical Engineering, Case...of implanting protons (hydrogen ions, H+) into SiC thin layers on silicon (Si) substrate, and explore the ion implantation conditions that are...relevant to experimental radiation of SiC layers. Keywords: silicon carbide (SiC); radiation effects; ion implantation ; proton; stopping and range of

  16. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  17. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  18. A novel plastification agent for cemented carbides extrusion molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng Zhou; Bai-Yun Huang

    2001-01-01

    A type of novel plastification agent for plasticizing powder extrusion molding of cemented carbides has been developed. By optimizing their formulation and fabrication method, the novel plastification agent, with excellent properties and uniform distribution characters, were manufactured. The thermal debinding mechanism has been studied, the extruding rheological characteristics and debinding behaviors have been investigated. Using the newly developed plastification agent, the cemented carbides extrusion rods, with diameter up to 25 mm, have been manufactured. (author)

  19. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L

    2009-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  20. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  1. Overview of fuel conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, A.E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The conversion of solid fuels to cleaner-burning and more user-friendly solid liquid or gaseous fuels spans many technologies. In this paper, the authors consider coal, residual oil, oil shale, tar sends tires, municipal oil waste and biomass as feedstocks and examine the processes which can be used in the production of synthetic fuels for the transportation sector. The products of mechanical processing to potentially usable fuels include coal slurries, micronized coal, solvent refined coal, vegetable oil and powdered biomall. The thermochemical and biochemical processes considered include high temperature carbide production, liquefaction, gasification, pyrolysis, hydrolysis-fermentation and anaerobic digestion. The products include syngas, synthetic natural gas, methanol, ethanol and other hydrocarbon oxygenates synthetic gasoline and diesel and jet engine oils. The authors discuss technical and economic aspects of synthetic fuel production giving particular attention and literature references to technologies not discussed in the five chapters which follow. Finally the authors discuss economic energy, and environmental aspects of synthetic fuels and their relationship to the price of imported oil

  2. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  3. The growth mechanism of grain boundary carbide in Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Peng, Jianchao

    2013-01-01

    The growth mechanism of grain boundary M 23 C 6 carbides in nickel base Alloy 690 after aging at 715 °C was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary carbides have coherent orientation relationship with only one side of the matrix. The incoherent phase interface between M 23 C 6 and matrix was curved, and did not lie on any specific crystal plane. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from the matrix phase directly at the incoherent interface. The flat coherent phase interface generally lies on low index crystal planes, such as (011) and (111) planes. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from a transition phase found at curved coherent phase interface. The transition phase has a complex hexagonal crystal structure, and has coherent orientation relationship with matrix and M 23 C 6 : (111) matrix //(0001) transition //(111) carbide , ¯ > matrix // ¯ 10> transition // ¯ > carbide . The crystal lattice constants of transition phase are c transition =√(3)×a matrix and a transition =√(6)/2×a matrix . Based on the experimental results, the growth mechanism of M 23 C 6 and the formation mechanism of transition phase are discussed. - Highlights: • A transition phase was observed at the coherent interfaces of M 23 C 6 and matrix. • The transition phase has hexagonal structure, and is coherent with matrix and M 23 C 6 . • The M 23 C 6 transforms from the matrix directly at the incoherent phase interface

  4. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, H.A.; Jacobson, J.

    1964-01-01

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B 4 C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author) [fr

  5. In-pile tests of HTGR fuel particles and fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Kolesov, V.S.; Deryugin, A.I.

    1985-01-01

    Main types of in-pile tests for specimen tightness control at the initial step, research of fuel particle radiation stability and also study of fission product release from fuel elements during irradiation are described in this paper. Schemes and main characteristics of devices used for these tests are also given. Principal results of fission gas product release measurements satisfying HTGR demands are illustrated on the example of fuel elements, manufactured by powder metallurgy methods and having TRISO fuel particles on high temperature pyrocarbon and silicon carbide base. (author)

  6. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  7. Fast reactor fuel design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, J.F.W.; Chamberlain, A.; Holmes, J.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    Fuel design parameters for oxide and carbide fast reactor fuels are reviewed in the context of minimising the total uranium demands for a combined thermal and fast reactor system. The major physical phenomena conditioning fast reactor fuel design, with a target of high burn-up, good breeding and reliable operation, are characterised. These include neutron induced void swelling, irradiation creep, pin failure modes, sub-assembly structural behaviour, behaviour of defect fuel, behaviour of alternative fuel forms. The salient considerations in the commercial scale fabrication and reprocessing of the fuels are reviewed, leading to the delineation of possible routes for the manufacture and reprocessing of Commercial Reactor fuel. From the desiderata and restraints arising from Surveys, Performance and Manufacture, the problems posed to the Designer are considered, and a narrow range of design alternatives is proposed. The paper concludes with a consideration of the development areas and the conceptual problems for fast reactors associated with those areas

  8. Evolution of Particle Bed Reactor Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Russell R.; Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    To realize the potential performance advantages inherent in a particle bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) applications, high performance particle fuel is required. This fuel must operate safely and without failure at high temperature in high pressure, flowing hydrogen propellant. The mixed mean outlet temperature of the propellant is an important characteristic of PBR performance. This temperature is also a critical parameter for fuel particle design because it dictates the required maximum fuel operating temperature. In this paper, the evolution in PBR fuel form to achieve higher operating temperatures is discussed and the potential thermal performance of the different fuel types is evaluated. It is shown that the optimum fuel type for operation under the demanding conditions in a PBR is a coated, solid carbide particle.

  9. A study on the basic CVD process technology for TRISO coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, D. J.; Cheon, J. H.; Keum, I. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2006-03-01

    Hydrogen energy has many advantages and is suitable as alternative energy of fossil fuel. The study of nuclear hydrogen production has performed at present. For nuclear hydrogen production, it is needed the study of VHTR(Very High Temperature Reactor) and TRISO(TRI-iSOtropic) coated fuel. TRISO coated fuel particle deposited by FBCVD(Fludized Bed CVD) method is composed of three isotropic layers: Inner Pyrolytic Carbon (IPyC), Silicon Carbide (SiC), Outer Pyrolytic Carbon (OPyC) layers. Silicon carbide was chemically vapor deposed on graphite substrate using methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. The effect of deposition temperature and input gas ratios ( α=Q H2 /Q MTS =P H2 /P MTS ) was investigated in order to find out characteristics of silicon carbide layer. From results of those, SiC-TRISO coating deposition was conducted and achieved. Zirconium carbide layer as an advanced material of silicon carbide layer has studied. In order to find out basic properties and characteristics, studies have conducted using various methods. Zirconium carbide is chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl 4 ) and using methan(CH 4 ) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere. Many experiments were conducted on graphite substrate about many deposition conditions such as ZrCl 4 heating temperatures and variables of H2 and CH 4 flow rate. but carbon graphite was deposited. For deposition of zirconium carbide, several different methods were approached. so zirconium carbide deposed on ZrO 2 substrate. In this experiments. source subliming type and equipment are no problems. But deposition of zirconium carbide will be continuously studied on graphite substrate approaching views of experimental way and equipment structure

  10. Characterisation of TRISO fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez H, E.; Yang, D.

    2012-10-01

    The TRISO (tri structural isotropic) coated fuel particle is a key component contributing to the inherent safety of the High Temperature Reactor. A uranium kernel is coated with three layers of pyrolytic carbon and one of silicon carbide. The purpose of these coatings is to work as a miniature fission product containment vessel capable of enclosing all important radio nuclei under normal and off-normal reactor operating conditions. Due to the importance of these coatings, is of great interest to establish characterisation techniques capable of providing a detailed description of their microstructure and physical properties. Here we describe the use of Raman spectroscopy and two modulator generalised ellipsometry to study the anisotropy and thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon coatings, as well as the stoichiometry of the silicon carbide coatings and fibres. (Author)

  11. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  12. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Song; Li, Hejun; Zhang, Yulei; Ren, Jincui; Qiang, Xinfa; Zhang, Shouyang

    2014-01-01

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm −1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  13. Precision Surface Grinding of Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Konneh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is well known for its excellent material properties, high durability, high wear resistance, light weight and extreme hardness. Among the engineering applications of this material, it is an excellent candidate for optic mirrors used in an Airbone Laser (ABL device. However, the low fracture toughness and extreme brittleness characteristics of SiC are predominant factors for its poor machinability. This paper presents surface grinding of SiC using diamond cup wheels to assess the performance of diamond grits with respect to the roughness produced on the machined surfaces and also the morphology of the ground work-piece. Resin bonded diamond cup wheels of grit sizes 46 µm, 76 µm and 107 µm; depth of cut of 10 µm, 20 µm and 30 µm; and feed rate of 2 mm/min, 12 mm/min and 22 mm/min were used during this machining investigation. It has been observed that the 76 grit performs better in terms of low surface roughness value and morphology.

  14. Lattice location of impurities in silicon Carbide

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2085259; Correia Martins, João Guilherme

    The presence and behaviour of transition metals (TMs) in SiC has been a concern since the start of producing device-grade wafers of this wide band gap semiconductor. They are unintentionally introduced during silicon carbide (SiC) production, crystal growth and device manufacturing, which makes them difficult contaminants to avoid. Once in SiC they easily form deep levels, either when in the isolated form or when forming complexes with other defects. On the other hand, using intentional TM doping, it is possible to change the electrical, optical and magnetic properties of SiC. TMs such as chromium, manganese or iron have been considered as possible candidates for magnetic dopants in SiC, if located on silicon lattice sites. All these issues can be explored by investigating the lattice site of implanted TMs. This thesis addresses the lattice location and thermal stability of the implanted TM radioactive probes 56Mn, 59Fe, 65Ni and 111Ag in both cubic 3C- and hexagonal 6H SiC polytypes by means of emission cha...

  15. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  16. The etching behaviour of silicon carbide compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jepps, N.W.; Page, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    A series of microstructural investigations has been undertaken in order to explore the reliability of particular etches in revealing microstructural detail in silicon carbide compacts. A series of specimens has been etched and examined following complete prior microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometry techniques. In particular, the sensitivity of both a molten salt (KOH/KNO 3 ) etch and a commonly-used oxidizing electrolytic 'colour' etch to crystal purity, crystallographic orientation and polytypic structure has been established. The molten salt etch was found to be sensitive to grain boundaries and stacking disorder while the electrolytic etch was found to be primarily sensitive to local purity and crystallographic orientation. Neither etch appeared intrinsically polytype sensitive. Specifically, for the 'colour' etch, the p- or n-type character of impure regions appears critical in controlling etching behaviour; p-type impurities inhibiting, and n-type impurities enhancing, oxidation. The need to interpret etching behaviour in a manner consistent with the results obtained by a variety of other microstructural techniques will be emphasized. (author)

  17. Auger electron spectroscopy studies of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, H.H.; Nelson, G.C.; Wallace, W.O.

    1986-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy has been used to probe the electronic structure of ion bombardment (IB) cleaned surfaces of B 9 C and B 4 C samples. The shapes of the B-KVV and C-KVV Auger lines were found to be relatively insensitive to the bulk stoichiometry of the samples. This indicates that the local chemical environments surrounding B and C atoms, respectively, on the surfaces of the IB cleaned samples do not change appreciably in going from B 9 C to B 4 C. Fracturing the sample in situ is a way of producing a clean representative internal surface to compare with the IB surfaces. Microbeam techniques have been used to study a fracture surface of the B 9 C material with greater spatial resolution than in our studies of IB surfaces. The B 9 C fracture surface was not homogeneous and contained both C-rich and B-rich regions. The C-KVV line for the C-rich regions was graphitic in shape. Much of the C-rich regions was found by IB to be less than 100 nm in thickness. The C-KVV line from the B-rich regions was carbidic and did not differ appreciably in shape from those recorded for the IB cleaned surfaces

  18. Graphene ribbon growth on structured silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoehr, Alexander; Link, Stefan; Starke, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany); Baringhaus, Jens; Aprojanz, Johannes; Tegenkamp, Christoph [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Leibniz Universitaet Hannover (Germany); Niu, Yuran [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); present address: School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Zakharov, Alexei A. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University (Sweden); Chen, Chaoyu; Avila, Jose; Asensio, Maria C. [Synchrotron SOLEIL and Universite Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2017-11-15

    Structured Silicon Carbide was proposed to be an ideal template for the production of arrays of edge specific graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), which could be used as a base material for graphene transistors. We prepared periodic arrays of nanoscaled stripe-mesas on SiC surfaces using electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Subsequent epitaxial graphene growth by annealing is differentiated between the basal-plane mesas and the faceting stripe walls as monitored by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Microscopic low energy electron diffraction (μ-LEED) revealed that the graphene ribbons on the facetted mesa side walls grow in epitaxial relation to the basal-plane graphene with an armchair orientation at the facet edges. The π-band system of the ribbons exhibits linear bands with a Dirac like shape corresponding to monolayer graphene as identified by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Encapsulating of high-level radioactive waste with use of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that high-level radioactive waste (HLW) constitute a real danger to biosphere, especially that their part, which contains transuranium and long-lived radionuclides resulting during reprocessing of nuclear fuel industrial and power reactors. Such waste contains approximately 99 % of long-lived fission products and transplutonium elements. At present, the concept of multi barrier protection of biosphere from radioactive waste is generally acknowledged. The main barriers are the physicochemical form of waste and enclosing strata of geological formation at places of waste-disposal. Applied methods of solidification of HLW with preparation of phosphatic and borosilicate glasses do not guarantee in full measure safety of places of waste-disposal of solidified waste in geological formations during thousand years. One promising way to improve HLW handling safety is placing of radionuclides in mineral-like matrixes similar to natural materials. The other possible way to increase safety of HLW disposal places is suggested for research by experts of Russian research institutes, for example, in the proposal for the Project of ISTC and considered in the present report, is to introduce an additional barrier on a radionuclides migration path by coating of HLW particles. Unique protective properties of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide such as low coefficients of diffusion of gaseous and solid fission products and high chemical and radiation stability [1] attract attention to these materials for coating of solidified HLW. The objective of the Project is the development of method of HLW encapsulating with use of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings. To gain this end main direction of researches, including analysis of various encapsulation processes of fractionated HLW, and expected results are presented. Realization of the Project will allow to prove experimentally the efficiency of the proposed approach in the solution of the problem of HLW conditioning and ecological

  20. Design Report for a 19-pin carbide test-bundle in a ring-subassembly of the test zone of KNK II/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefner, H.E.

    1982-03-01

    This report describes a 19-rod carbide test bundle in an annular oxide ring element placed at the position 201 of the test zone in the second core of KNK II as well as its behavior during the period of operation. The selected fuel rod concept includes low pellet density and a relatively large gap width as well as helium bonding between fuel and cladding. Characteristic design and operation data are: rod diameter 8.5 mm, pellet diameter 7.0 mm, maximum nominal linear rating 800 W/cm, maximum nominal burnup 70 MWd/kgHM. This report exclusively deals with the carbide test bundle and its individual components; it describes methods, criteria and results concerning the design. The annular carrier element with its head and foot is treated in a separate report. The loadability of the test bundle and its individual components is demonstrated by generally valid standards for strength criteria [de

  1. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, J.M.; Tobar, M.J.; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A.

    2009-01-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed

  2. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain); Tobar, M.J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)], E-mail: cote@udc.es; Alvarez, J.C.; Lamas, J.; Yanez, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial II, Universidade da Coruna, Mendizabal s/n, Ferrol E-15403 (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  3. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to fabricate UC spheroids which are filled into moulds made of refractory material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are double-coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature 1200-1400 0 C, a record layer of pyrolytic material (e.g. Si c) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The method is described more closely by means of an example. (GSC) [de

  4. Process for producing uranium carbide spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shennan, J.V.; Ford, L.H.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with a method to produce UC spheroids which are filled into molded bodies of fire-proof material for fuel elements. The UC fuel particles are doubly coated: a first thin layer of pyrolytic carbon is coated at low temperature (1,200-1,400 0 C), a second layer of fire-proof material (e.g. SiC) is coated at a higher temperature (above 1,500 0 C) which holds back the fission products. The process is explained in more detail using an example. (GSCH) [de

  5. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Ziqiang; Chen Weixing; Zheng Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Corrosion behavior of porous Cr 3 C 2 in various SCW conditions was investigated. ► Cr 3 C 2 is stable in SCW at temperature below 420–430 °C. ► Cracks and disintegration were observed at elevated testing temperatures. ► Degradation of Cr 3 C 2 is related to the intermediate product CrOOH. - Abstract: The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3 C 2 ) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25–30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  6. Optical characterisation of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.M.

    1998-09-01

    The varied properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC) are helping to launch the material into many new applications, particularly in the field of novel semiconductor devices. In this work, the cubic form of SiC is of interest as a basis for developing integrated optical components. Here, the formation of a suitable SiO 2 buried cladding layer has been achieved by high dose oxygen ion implantation. This layer is necessary for the optical confinement of propagating light, and hence optical waveguide fabrication. Results have shown that optical propagation losses of the order of 20 dB/cm are obtainable. Much of this loss can be attributed to mode leakage and volume scattering. Mode leakage is a function of the effective oxide thickness, and volume scattering related to the surface layer damage. These parameters have been shown to be controllable and so suggests that further reduction in the waveguide loss is feasible. Analysis of the layer growth mechanism by RBS, XTEM and XPS proves that SiO 2 is formed, and that the extent, of formation depends on implant dose and temperature. The excess carbon generated is believed to exit the oxide layer by a number of varying mechanisms. The result of this appears to be a number of stable Si-C-O intermediaries that, form regions to either depth extreme of the SiO 2 layer. Early furnace tests suggest a need to anneal at, temperatures approaching the melting point of the silicon substrate, and that the quality of the virgin material is crucial in controlling the resulting oxide growth. (author)

  7. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gendt, D.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  8. Carbide process picked for Chinese polyethylene plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-01-01

    Union Carbide (Danbury, CT) is set to sign up its eighth polyethylene (PE) license in China. The company has been selected to supply its Unipol technology to Jilin Chemical Industrial Corp. (JCIC) for a 100,000-m.t./year linear low-density PE (LLDPE) plant at Jilin. The plant will form part of a $2-billion petrochemical complex, based on a 300,000-m.t./year ethylene unit awarded to a consortium made up of Samsung Engineering (Seoul) and Linde. A 10,000-m.t./year butene-1 unit will also be built. Toyo Engineering, Snamprogetti, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and Linde are competing for the contract to supply the LLDPE plant. The signing is expected this spring. Two contenders are vying to supply an 80,000-m.t./year phenol plant for JCIC. They are Mitsui Engineering, offering the Mitsui Petrochemical process, and Chisso, with UOP technology. Four Unipol process PE plants are under construction in China and three are in operation. At Guangzhou, Toyo Engineering is building a 100,000-m.t./year plant, due onstream in 1995, while Snamprogetti is to finish construction of two plants in the same year at Zhonguyan (120,000 m.t./year) and at Maoming (140,000 m.t./year). The Daquing Design Institute is responsible for the engineering of a 60,000-m.t./year Unipol process PE plant, expected onstream early in 1995. Existing Unipol process PE plants are located in Qilu (60,000 m.t./year LLDPE and 120,000 m.t./year HDPE) and at Taching (60,000 m.t./year HDPE)

  9. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blotcky, A J; Arsenault, L J [General Medical Research, Veterans Administration Hospital, Omaha (United States)

    1974-07-01

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  10. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenault, L.J.

    1974-01-01

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  11. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO 2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  12. Fuel element for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linning, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement of the fuel element for a fast nuclear reactor described in patent 15 89 010 is proposed which should avoid possible damage due to swelling of the fuel. While the fuel element according to patent 15 89 010 is made in the form of a tube, here a further metal jacket is inserted in the centre of the fuel rod and the intermediate layer (ceramic uranium compound) is provided on both sides, so that the nuclear fuel is situated in the centre of the annular construction. Ceramic uranium or plutonium compounds (preferably carbide) form the fuel zone in the form of circular pellets, which are surrounded by annular gaps, so that gaseous fission products can escape. (UWI) [de

  13. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse ... lar carbides, precipitating at random boundaries, were more likely to ... 23-8-N nitronic steel is basically austenitic stainless steel.

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    tions, they concluded that either reaction sintering or liquid phase .... α-6H silicon carbide single crystal by three different laboratories ... silicon carbide particles by the overall reaction .... layer displacement is likely to occur in such a manner as.

  15. Development, Fabrication and Characterization of Fuels for Indian Fast Reactor Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Development of Fast Reactor fuels in India started in early Seventies. The successful development of Mixed Carbide fuels for FBTR and MOX fuel for PFBR have given confidence in manufacture of fuels for Fast Reactors. Effort is being put to develop high Breeding Ratio Metallic fuel (binary/ternary). Few fuel pins have been fabricated and is under test irradiation. However, this is only a beginning and complete fuel cycle activities are under development. Metal fuelled Fast Reactors will provide high growth rate in Indian Fast Reactor programme

  16. Thermochemical equilibrium in a kernel of a UN TRISO coated fuel particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Min; Jo, C. K.; Lim, H. S.; Cho, M. S.; Lee, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    A coated fuel particle (CFP) with a uranium mononitride (UN) kernel has been recently considered as an advanced fuel option, such as in fully ceramic micro encapsulated (FCM) replacement fuel for light water reactors (LWRs). In FCM fuel, a large number of tri isotropic coated fuel particles (TRISOs) are embedded in a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix. Thermochemical equilibrium calculations can predict the chemical behaviors of a kernel in a TRISO of FCM fuel during irradiation. They give information on the kind and quantity of gases generated in a kernel during irradiation. This study treats the quantitative analysis of thermochemical equilibrium in a UN TRISO of FCM LWR fuel using HSC software

  17. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  18. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide...... alcohols is obtained at a K/Mo molar ratio of 0.21 over the active carbon supported Mo2C (20wt%)....

  19. Development of Gradient Cemented Carbides Through ICME Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Peng, Yingbiao; Zhang, Weibin; Chen, Weimin; Zhou, Peng; Xie, Wen; Cheng, Kaiming; Zhang, Lijun; Wen, Guanghua; Wang, Shequan

    An integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) including CALPHAD method is a powerful tool for materials process optimization and alloy design. The quality of CALPHAD-type calculations is strongly dependent on the quality of the thermodynamic and diffusivity databases. The development of a thermodynamic database, CSUTDCC1, and a diffusivity database, CSUDDCC1, for cemented carbides is described. Several gradient cemented carbides sintered under vacuum and various partial pressures of N2 have been studied via experiment and simulation. The microstructure and concentration profile of the gradient zones have been investigated via SEM and EPMA. Examples of ICME applications in design and manufacture for different kinds of cemented carbides are shown using the databases and comparing where possible against experimental data, thereby validating its accuracy.

  20. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  1. Synthesis of carbides of refractory metals in salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyushchenko, N.G.; Anfinogenov, A.I.; Chebykin, V.V.; Chernov, Ya.B.; Shurov, N.I.; Ryaposov, Yu.A.; Dobrynin, A.I.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Chub, A.V.

    2003-01-01

    The ion-electron melts, obtained through dissolving the alkali and alkali-earth metals in the molten chlorides above the chloride melting temperature, were used for manufacturing the high-melting metal carbides as the transport melt. The lithium, calcium and magnesium chlorides and the mixture of the lithium chloride with the potassium or calcium chloride were used from the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The metallic lithium, calcium, magnesium or the calcium-magnesium mixtures were used as the alkali or alkali-earth metals. The carbon black or sugar was used as carbon. It is shown, that lithium, magnesium or calcium in the molten salts transfer the carbon on the niobium, tantalum, titanium, forming the carbides of the above metals. The high-melting metal carbides are obtained both from the metal pure powders and from the oxides and chlorides [ru

  2. Fission-product SiC reaction in HTGR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, F.

    1981-01-01

    The primary barrier to release of fission product from any of the fuel types into the primary circuit of the HTGR are the coatings on the fuel particles. Both pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coatings are very effective in retaining fission gases under normal operating conditions. One of the possible performance limitations which has been observed in irradiation tests of TRISO fuel is chemical interaction of the SiC layer with fission products. This reaction reduces the thickness of the SiC layer in TRISO particles and can lead to release of fission products from the particles if the SiC layer is completely penetrated. The experimental section of this report describes the results of work at General Atomic concerning the reaction of fission products with silicon carbide. The discussion section describes data obtained by various laboratories and includes (1) a description of the fission products which have been found to react with SiC; (2) a description of the kinetics of silicon carbide thinning caused by fission product reaction during out-of-pile thermal gradient heating and the application of these kinetics to in-pile irradiation; and (3) a comparison of silicon carbide thinning in LEU and HEU fuels

  3. Loading ion exchange resins with uranium for HTGR fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Greene, C.W.

    1976-12-01

    Uranium-loaded ion exchange beads provide an excellent starting material in the production of uranium carbide microspheres for nuclear fuel applications. Both strong-acid (sulfonate) and weak-acid (carboxylate) resins can be fully loaded with uranium from a uranyl nitrate solution utilizing either a batch method or a continuous column technique

  4. Carbides crystalline structure of AISI M2 high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, M.M.; Galego, E.; Rossi, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the crystallographic structure of the extracted carbides of AISI M2 steel spray formed The structure determination of these carbides. The structure determination of these carbides is a very hard work. Since these structures were formed by atom migration it is not possible to reproduce them by a controlled process with a determined chemical composition. The solution of this problem is to obtain the carbide by chemical extraction from the steel. (Author)

  5. Dilatometry Analysis of Dissolution of Cr-Rich Carbides in Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuliang; Volkova, Olena; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of Cr-rich carbides formed in the martensitic constituent of a 13 pct Cr stainless steel was studied by dilatometry and correlative electron channeling contrast examinations. The dissolution of carbides subsequent to the martensite reversion to austenite was associated with a net volume expansion which in turn increased the dilatometry-based apparent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEa) during continuous heating. The effects of carbides fraction and size on the CTEa variations during carbides dissolution are discussed.

  6. Plastic deformation of particles of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchik, A.E.; Neshpor, V.S.; Savel' ev, G.A.; Ordan' yan, S.S.

    1976-12-01

    A study is made of the influence of stoichiometry on the characteristics of microplastic deformation in powders of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding. The carbide powders were produced by direct synthesis from the pure materials: metallic titanium and zirconium and acetylene black. As to the nature of their elastic deformation, zirconium and titanium carbides can be considered elastic-isotropic materials. During vibration grinding, the primary fracture planes are the (110) planes. Carbides of nonstoichiometric composition are more brittle.

  7. Device for reprocessing nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Mamoru.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To readily discharge a nuclear fuel by burning the nuclear fuel as it is without a pulverizing step and removing the graphite and other coated fuel particles. Constitution: An oxygen supply pipe is connected to the lower portion of a discharge chamber having an inlet for the fuel, and an exhaust pipe is connected to the upper portion of the chamber. The fuel mounted on a metallic gripping member made of metallic material is inserted from the inlet, the gripping member is connected through a conductor to a voltage supply unit, oxygen is then supplied through the oxygen supply tube to the discharge chamber, the voltage supply unit is subsequently operated, and discharge takes place among the fuels. Thus, high heat is generated by the discharge, the graphite carbon of the fuel is burnt, silicon carbide is destroyed and decomposed, the isolated nuclear fuel particles are discharged from the exhaust port, and the combustion gas and small embers are exhausted from the exhaust tube. Accordingly, radioactive dusts are not so much generated as when using a mechanical pulverizing means, and prescribed objective can be achieved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Nonmetal effect on ordering structures in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Ehm, V.T.; Savenko, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of oxygen and nitrogen atoms on formation of intermediate, cubic and trigonal ordering structures in the titanium carbide is studied through the roentgenography and neutron radiography methods. Metal atoms in the TiC 0.545 O 0.08 , TiC 0.545 N 0.09 samples under study are shifted from ideal positions in the direction from vacancies to metalloid atoms. In the intermediate cubic phase the values of the titanium atoms free parameter in both samples are identical, but they differ from analogous values in the titanium carbide

  9. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  10. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manley, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 1600 0 C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  11. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L; Orozco, E; Garibay-Febles, V; Bucio-Galindo, L; Mendoza Leon, H; Castillo-Ocampo, P; Montoya, A

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 μm in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 μm in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process

  12. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  13. Enhanced optical performance of electrochemically etched porous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naderi, N; Hashim, M R; Saron, K M A; Rouhi, J

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (PSC) was successfully synthesized via electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using various current densities. The cyclic voltammograms of SiC dissolution show that illumination is required for the accumulation of carriers at the surface, followed by surface oxidation and dissolution of the solid. The morphological and optical characterizations of PSC were reported. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrated that the current density can be considered an important etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC; hence, it can be used to optimize the optical properties of the porous samples. (paper)

  14. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together ...

  15. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  16. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures...

  17. Recovery of pure slaked lime from carbide sludge: Case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adaobi

    Carbide sludge is the by-product of reaction between calcium carbide and water in the production of ... soluble in water. The optimum percentage yield was 78.2% at a ratio of 1:1000(w/v) of sludge to water held for 24 h at room temperature. Key words: Carbide, recovery, ..... calcium carbonate and other calcium products.

  18. Borides and vitreous compounds sintered as high-energy fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, J.M.; Abenojar, J.; Martinez, M.A.; Velasco, F.; Criado, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    Boron was chosen as fuel in view of its excellent thermodynamic values for combustion, as compared to traditional fuels. The problem of the boron in combustion is the formation of a surface layer of oxide, which delays the ignition process, reducing the performance of the rocket engine. This paper presents a high-energy fuel for rocket engines. It is composed of sintered boron (borides and carbides and vitreous compounds) with a reducing chemical agent. Borides and boron carbide were prepared since the combustion heat of the latter is similar to that of the amorphous boron (in: K.K. Kuo (Ed.), Boron-Based Solid Propellant and Solid Fuel, Vol. 427, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 1993). Several chemical reducing elements were used, such as aluminum, magnesium, and coke. As the raw material for boron, different compounds were used: amorphous boron, boric acid and boron oxide

  19. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  20. Toxicology of thorium cycle nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the biological hazards associated with uranium-thorium breeder fuels and fuel recycle process solutions. Initial studies emphasize the metabolism and long-term biological effects of inhaled 233 U- 232 U nitrate and oxide fuel materials and of 231 Pa, a major, long-lived, radioactive waste product. 1 figure, 3 tables

  1. Pyrotechnic Smoke Compositions Containing Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which were then evaluated both visually and by...fuel to produce thick clouds of white smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which...Transmittance-based measurements may be used to quantify the effectiveness of screening smokes. The Beer -Lambert law is used to define the figures of merit

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of thermal plasma process of composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide production from zircon concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Z.G.; Stefanovic, P.Lj.; Pavlovic; Pavlovic, Z.N.; Zivkovic, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Improved zirconium ceramics and composites have been invented in an effort to obtain better resistance to ablation at high temperature. These ceramics are suitable for use as thermal protection materials on the exterior surfaces of spacecraft, and in laboratory and industrial environments that include flows of hot oxidizing gases. Results of thermodynamic consideration of the process for composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide ultrafine powder production from ZrSiO 4 in argon thermal plasma and propane-butane gas as reactive quenching reagents are presented in the paper. (author)

  3. Combined Photoemission Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Study of a Mixture of (Oxy)carbides as Potential Innovative Supports and Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Laura; Valero-Vidal, Carlos; Agnoli, Stefano; Sezen, Hikmet; Rüdiger, Celine; Kunze-Liebhäuser, Julia; Granozzi, Gaetano

    2016-08-03

    Active and stable non-noble metal materials, able to substitute Pt as catalyst or to reduce the Pt amount, are vitally important for the extended commercialization of energy conversion technologies, such as fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here, we report a fundamental study of nonstoichiometric tungsten carbide (WxC) and its interaction with titanium oxycarbide (TiOxCy) under electrochemical working conditions. In particular, the electrochemical activity and stability of the WxC/TiOxCy system toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction (EOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are investigated. The chemical changes caused by the applied potential are established by combining photoemission spectroscopy and electrochemistry. WxC is not active toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction at room temperature but it is highly stable under these conditions thanks to the formation of a passive thin film on the surface, consisting mainly of WO2 and W2O5, which prevents the full oxidation of WxC. In addition, WxC is able to adsorb ethanol, forming ethoxy groups on the surface, which constitutes the first step for the ethanol oxidation. The interaction between WxC and TiOxCy plays an important role in the electrochemical stability of WxC since specific orientations of the substrate are able to stabilize WxC and prevent its corrosion. The beneficial interaction with the substrate and the specific surface chemistry makes tungsten carbide a good electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells. However, WxC is active toward the HER and chemically stable under hydrogen reduction conditions, since no changes in the chemical composition or dissolution of the film are observed. This makes tungsten carbide a good candidate as electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for the electrochemical production of hydrogen.

  4. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  5. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  6. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides......Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...

  7. Nuclear fuel concept for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Schoessow, G.

    1996-01-01

    In a previous paper, the author presented his rationale for the fuel cycle for the 21st century. This cycle, driven by both environmental and economic factors, required that the fuel should be able to operate in a range from 90 000 MWd/tonne of heavy metal and above. Such an operation would require the development of a cladding material that would not undergo waterside corrosion at these ultrahigh burnups. The University of Florida is proposing a new fuel arrangement that the authors feel meets the demands of high burnup and provides a safer fuel assembly. It is believed that the liquid-metal bond concept combined with a silicon carbide composite cladding and the collapsible fission gas plenum offers outstanding potential for ultrahigh burnup fuels while providing a potentially ultrasafe reactor operation. Efforts at various facilities are under way to determine the radiation stability of silicon carbide fuel and to fabricate SiC materials that will provide the radiation stability needed. Other parameters offer strong incentives to successfully develop silicon carbide as a cladding material

  8. Durability testing of medium speed diesel engine components designed for operating on coal/water slurry fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, R. E.; Giammarise, A. W.; Johnson, R. N.

    1994-01-01

    Over 200 operating cylinder hours were run on critical wearing engine parts. The main components tested included cylinder liners, piston rings, and fuel injector nozzles for coal/water slurry fueled operation. The liners had no visible indication of scoring nor major wear steps found on their tungsten carbide coating. While the tungsten carbide coating on the rings showed good wear resistance, some visual evidence suggests adhesive wear mode was present. Tungsten carbide coated rings running against tungsten carbide coated liners in GE 7FDL engines exhibit wear rates which suggest an approximate 500 to 750 hour life. Injector nozzle orifice materials evaluated were diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, and thermally stabilized diamond. Based upon a total of 500 cylinder hours of engine operation (including single-cylinder combustion tests), diamond compact was determined to be the preferred orifice material.

  9. Critical Issues for Particle-Bed Reactor Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Robert S.; Husser, Dewayne L.; Jensen, Russell R.; Kerr, John M.

    1994-07-01

    Particle-Bed Reactors (PBRs) potentially offer performance advantages for nuclear thermal propulsion, including very high power densities, thrust-to-weight ratios, and specific impulses. A key factor in achieving all of these is the development of a very-high-temperature fuel. The critical issues for all such PBR fuels are uranium loading, thermomechanical and thermochemical stability, compatibility with contacting materials, fission product retention, manufacturability, and operational tolerance for particle failures. Each issue is discussed with respect to its importance to PBR operation, its status among current fuels, and additional development needs. Mixed-carbide-based fuels are recommended for further development to support high-performance PBRs.

  10. Behavior of tungsten carbide in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 213-220 ISSN 1335-8987 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water stabilized plasma * tungsten carbide * tungsten hemicarbide * decarburization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  12. Helium generation and diffusion in graphite and some carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Hosmer, D.W.; Condit, R.H.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cross section for the generation of helium in neutron irradiated carbon was found to be 654 mb at 14.4 MeV and 744 mb at 14.9 MeV. Extrapolating to 14.1 MeV (the fusion reactor spectrum) gives 615 mb. The diffusion of helium in dense polycrystalline graphite and in pyrographite was measured and found to be D = 7.2 x 10 -7 m 2 s -1 exp (-80 kJ/RT). It is assumed that diffusion is primarily in the basal plane direction in crystals of the graphite. In polycrystalline graphite the path length is a factor of √2 longer than the measured distance due to the random orientation mismatch between successive grains. Isochronal anneals (measured helium release as the specimen is steadily heated) were run and maximum release rates were found at 200 0 C in polycrystalline graphite, 1000 0 C in pyrographite, 1350 0 C in boron carbide, and 1350 0 and 2400 0 C (two peaks) in silicon carbide. It is concluded that in these candidates for curtain materials in fusion reactors the helium releases can probably occur without bubble formation in graphites, may occur in boron carbide, but will probably cause bubble formation in silicon carbide. 7 figures

  13. Hollow microspheres with a tungsten carbide kernel for PEMFC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arbigny, Julien Bernard; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J; Rozière, Jacques

    2011-07-28

    Tungsten carbide microspheres comprising an outer shell and a compact kernel prepared by a simple hydrothermal method exhibit very high surface area promoting a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, and an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) stability compared to the usual Pt/C electrocatalysts used for PEMFC application.

  14. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross...

  15. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbücher, C. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hildebrandt, E.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Alff, L. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institute of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Szot, K. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); University of Silesia, A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Breuer, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Waser, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Institute of Electronic Materials (IWE 2), 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-06-20

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO{sub 2−x}) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfC{sub x}) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfC{sub x} surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO{sub 2} thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfC{sub x} was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  16. RICE-HUSK ASH-CARBIDE-WASTE STABILIZATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper present results of the laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of carbide waste and rice husk ash stabilized reclaimed asphalt pavement waste with a ... of 5.7 % and resistance to loss in strength of 84.1 %, hence the recommendation of the mixture for use as sub-base material in flexible pavement construction.

  17. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    carbide ceramics. A K MUKHOPADHYAY. Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700 032, India. Abstract. Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz.

  18. Thermionic emission of cermets made of refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonow, G.W.; Bogomol, I.W.; Ochremtschuk, L.N.; Podtschernjajewa, I.A.; Fomenko, W.S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance to thermal variations of refractory carbides having good behavior for thermionic emission, they have been combined with transition metals d. Thermionic emission was studied with cermets in compact samples. Following systems were examined: TiC-Nb, TiC-Mo, TiC-W, ZrC-Nb, ZrC-Mo, ZrC-W, WC-Mo with compositions of: 75% M 1 C-25% M 2 , 50%M 1 C-50%M 2 , 25%M 1 C-75%M 2 . When following the variation of electron emission energy phi versus the composition, it appears that in the range of mixed crystals (M 1 M 2 )C, phi decreases and the resistance to thermal variations of these phases is higher than that of individual carbides. The study of obtained cermets shows that their resistance to thermal variations is largely superior to the one of starting carbides; TiC and ZrC carbides, combined with molybdenum and tungsten support the highest number of thermic cycles

  19. Electron microscopy of boron carbide before and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.; Athanassiadis, T.

    1984-06-01

    The microstructure of boron carbide has been studied by electron microscopy and related to the composition of the material. After electron irradiations in an usual transmission electron microscope and in a high voltage electron microscope at different temperatures and fluxes no change of these microstructures have been observed but a sputtering of the surface of the samples, which has been studied quantitatively [fr

  20. Ultrafast nonlinear response of silicon carbide to intense THz fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Kaltenecker, Korbinian J.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate ultrafast nonlinear absorption induced by strong, single-cycle THz fields in bulk, lightly doped 4H silicon carbide. A combination of Zener tunneling and intraband transitions makes the effect as at least as fast as the excitation pulse. The sub-picosecond recovery time makes...

  1. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric ...

  2. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  3. Stabilization of Ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use as pavement material. Atterberg's limits test, California bearing ratio (CBR) and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were conducted on the natural laterite and the treated soil specimens. The plasticity ...

  4. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  5. Mechanistic evaluation of the effect of calcium carbide waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcium Carbide Waste (CCW) was used as an alternative to traditional Portland cement mineral filler in hot mix asphalt concrete to rid its disposal problem. Its effect on mechanical properties of hot mix asphalt was assessed using the Marshall method of mix design. Using the optimum bitumen content determined from ...

  6. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...

  7. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  8. Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by HFCVD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanowire has been fabricated by hot filament chemical vapour .... −5. Torr by mechanical and dif- fusion vacuum pumps, then high purity H2 gas was fed into it. ... to standard PDF card numbers of 01-074-2307 and 01-.

  9. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  10. Pyrolytic electrochemical process for the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambilla, G.; Sartorelli, A.

    1980-01-01

    The reprocessing is aimed at synthetic UO 2 -PuO 2 mixed oxides, UC-PuC mixed carbides and at oxides and carbides of U, Pu and Th from fast nuclear reactors. The nuclear fuel is dissolved in a salt melting bath. The conversion of the Pu(SO 4 ) 2 is done thermally and that of UO 2 is done electrolytically. The molten salts are returned to the input of the process and the fission products and the molten salts are conditioned. (DG) [de

  11. A Swiss contribution to a secure LMFBR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolet, M.; Bischoff, K.; Hausmann, W.; Stofer, B.

    1978-12-01

    Since 1967, EIR has been using the sphere-pac fuel concept, which takes advantage of the wet route fabrication of (U,Pu) carbide-microspheres using an internal gelation method, followed by carbothermic reduction of the precipitated metal-oxides. Some of the promises of the wet process are a shorter fabrication route than for pellet manufacture, no dust problems, reduced fire hazard for carbides, and last but not least the improvement of Pu safeguards. The method is particularly suitable for direct coupling to a reprocessing plant, where coprocessing of both U and Pu and spiked solutions will be possible. (Auth.)

  12. Apparatus to simulate nuclear heating in advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrona, B.J.; Galvin, T.M.; Johanson, E.

    1976-10-01

    A direct-electrical-heating apparatus has been built to simulate in-reactor temperature gradients and heating conditions in both the mixed nitrides and carbides of uranium and plutonium. The apparatus has the capability for the investigation and direct observation of fuel-behavior phenomena that should significantly enlarge the data base on mixed carbides and nitrides at temperatures near and above their melting points. In addition to heating UC, results of prooftests showed that the apparatus has the capability to heat graphite, 30 vol % ZrC in graphite, B 4 C control-rod pellets, and stainless steel

  13. Effect of ultra high temperature ceramics as fuel cladding materials on the nuclear reactor performance by SERPENT Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkut, Turgay; Kara, Ayhan; Korkut, Hatun [Sinop Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Energy Engineering

    2016-12-15

    Ultra High Temperature Ceramics (UHTCs) have low density and high melting point. So they are useful materials in the nuclear industry especially reactor core design. Three UHTCs (silicon carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide) were evaluated as the nuclear fuel cladding materials. The SERPENT Monte Carlo code was used to model CANDU, PWR, and VVER type reactor core and to calculate burnup parameters. Some changes were observed at the same burnup and neutronic parameters (keff, neutron flux, absorption rate, and fission rate, depletion of U-238, U-238, Xe-135, Sm-149) with the use of these UHTCs. Results were compared to conventional cladding material zircalloy.

  14. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC-- Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-01

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO 2 as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO 2 -based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined

  15. Alternative fuels for the French fast breeder reactors programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, H.; Bernard, H.; Mansard, B.

    1989-01-01

    French fast breeder reactors use mixed oxide as reference fuel. A great deal of experience has been gained in the behaviour and manufacture of oxide fuel, which has proved to be the most suitable fuel for future commercial breeder reactors. However, France is maintaining long-term alternative fuels programme, in order to be in a position to satisfy eventually new future reactor design and operational requirements. Initially, the CEA in France developed a carbide-based, sodium-bonded fuel designed for a high specific power. The new objective of the alternative fuels programme is to define a fuel which could replace the oxide without requiring any significant changes to the operating conditions, fuel cycle processes or facilities. The current program concentrates on a nitride-based, helium-bonded fuel, bearing in mind the carbide solution. The paper describes the main characteristics required, the manufacturing process as developed, the inspection methods, and the results obtained. Present indications are that the industrial manufacture of mixed nitride is feasible and that production costs for nitride and oxide fuels would be not significantly different. (author) 8 refs., 2 figs

  16. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  17. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomskii, V.

    1998-01-01

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  18. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1988-01-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B 4 C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B/sub 11/C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B 4 C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C→C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B/sub 13/C 2 , subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B/sub 11/C→B/sub 12/. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B 4 C,B/sub 13/C 2 ,B/sub 14/C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides

  19. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  20. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)); Bagley, K.Q. (AEA Reactor Services, Risley (United Kingdom)); Crittenden, G.C. (AEA Reactor Services, Dounreay (United Kingdom)); Dievoet, J. van (Belgonucleaire, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-09-01

    The first fast breeder eactors, constructed in the 1945-1960 time period, used metallic fuels composed of uranium, plutonium, or their alloys. They were chosen because most existing reactor operating experience had been obtained on metallic fuels and because they provided the highest breeding ratios. Difficulties in obtaining adequate dimensional stability in metallic fuel elements under conditions of high fuel burnup led in the 1960s to the virtual worldwide choice of ceramic fuels. Although ceramic fuels provide lower breeding performance, this objective is no longer an important consideration in most national programs. Mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide became the ceramic fuel that has received the widest use. The more advanced ceramic fuels, mixed uranium and plutonium carbides and nitrides, continue under development. More recently, metal fuel elements of improved design have joined ceramic fuels in achieving goal burnups of 15 to 20 percent. Low-swelling fuel cladding alloys have also been continuously developed to deal with the unexpected problem of void formation in stainless steels subjected to fast neutron irradiation, a phenomenon first observed in the 1960s. (orig.)