WorldWideScience

Sample records for uranium-aluminum alloy fuel

  1. Measurement of enriched uranium and uranium-aluminum fuel materials with the AWCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.; Zick, J.; Ikonomou, P.

    1985-05-01

    The active well coincidence counter (AWCC) was calibrated at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) for the assay of 93%-enriched fuel materials in three categories: (1) uranium-aluminum billets, (2) uranium-aluminum fuel elements, and (3) uranium metal pieces. The AWCC was a standard instrument supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency under the International Safeguards Project Office Task A.51. Excellent agreement was obtained between the CRNL measurements and previous Los Alamos National Laboratory measurements on similar mockup fuel material. Calibration curves were obtained for each sample category. 2 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Quality verification for plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements for use in research reactors (Revision 1) - July 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Paragraph (a) (7) of 50.34, Contents of Applications: Technical Information, of 10 CFR Part 50, Licensing of Production and Utilization Facilities, requires that each applicant for a construction permit to build a production or utilization facility include in its Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) a description of the quality assurance program to be applied to the design, fabrication, construction, and testing of the structures, systems, and components of the facility. The Regulatory Guide presented describes a method acceptable to the NRC staff for establishing and executing a quality assurance program for verifying the quality of plate-type uranium-aluminum fuel elements used in research reactors

  3. Analysis of steam explosions in plate-type, uranium-aluminum fuel test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The concern over steam explosions in nuclear reactors can be traced to prompt critical nuclear excursions in aluminum-clad/fueled test reactors, as well as to explosive events in aluminum, pulp, and paper industries. The Reactor Safety Study prompted an extensive analytical and experimental effort for over a decade. This has led to significant improvements in their understanding of the steam explosion issue for commercial light water reactors. However, little progress has been made toward applying the lessons learned from this effort to the understanding and modeling of steam explosion phenomena in aluminum-clad/fueled research and test reactors. The purposes of this paper are to (a) provide a preliminary analysis of the destructive events in test reactors, based on current understandings of steam explosions; (b) provide a proposed approach for determining the likelihood of a steam explosion event under scenarios in which molten U-Al fuel drops into a water-filled cavity; and (c) present a benchmarking study conducted to estimate peak pressure pulse magnitudes

  4. Modeling and analysis of thermal-hydraulic response of uranium-aluminum reactor fuel plates under transient heatup conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Valenti, S.; Kim, S.H.; Georgevich, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the analysis performed to predict the thermal behavior of fuel miniplates under rapid transient heatup conditions. The possibility of explosive boiling was considered, and it was concluded that the heating rates are not large enough for explosive boiling to occur. However, transient boiling effects were pronounced. Because of the complexity of transient pool boiling and the unavailability of experimental data for the situations studied, an approximation was made that predicted the data very well within the uncertainties present. If pool boiling from the miniplates had been assumed to be steady during the heating pulse, the experimental data would have been greatly overestimated. This fact demonstrates the importance of considering the transient nature of heat transfer in the analysis of reactivity excursion accidents. An additional contribution of the present work is that it provided data on highly subcooled steady nulceate boiling from the cooling portion of the thermocouple traces.

  5. Vapor corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel materials in storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of vapor environments on the corrosion of aluminum spent nuclear fuel (A1 SNF) has been performed. Aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel alloys have been exposed to environments of air/water vapor/ionizing radiation and characterized for applications to degradation mode analysis for interim dry and repository storage systems. Models have been developed to allow predictions of the corrosion response under conditions of unlimited corrodant species. Threshold levels of water vapor under which corrosion does not occur have been identified through tests under conditions of limited corrodant species. Coupons of aluminum 1100, 5052, and 6061, the US equivalent of cladding alloys used to manufacture foreign research reactor fuels, and several aluminum-uranium alloys (aluminum-10, 18, and 33 wt% uranium) were exposed to various controlled vapor environments in air within the following ranges of conditions: Temperature -- 80 to 200 C; Relative Humidity -- 0 to 100% using atmospheric condensate water and using added nitric acid to simulate radiolysis effects; and Gamma Radiation -- none and 1.8 x 10 6 R/hr. The results of this work are part of the body of information needed for understanding the degradation of the A1 SNF waste form in a direct disposal system in the federal repository. It will provide the basis for data input to the ongoing performance assessment and criticality safety analyses. Additional testing of uranium-aluminum fuel materials at uranium contents typical of high enriched and low enriched fuels is being initiated to provide the data needed for the development of empirical models

  6. Fuel powder production from ductile uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.R.; Meyer, M.K.

    1998-01-01

    Metallic uranium alloys are candidate materials for use as the fuel phase in very-high-density LEU dispersion fuels. These ductile alloys cannot be converted to powder form by the processes routinely used for oxides or intermetallics. Three methods of powder production from uranium alloys have been investigated within the US-RERTR program. These processes are grinding, cryogenic milling, and hydride-dehydride. In addition, a gas atomization process was investigated using gold as a surrogate for uranium. (author)

  7. METMET fuel with Zirconium matrix alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, A.; Konovalov, I.; Totev, T.

    2008-01-01

    The novel type of WWER-1000 fuel has been designed at A.A. Bochvar Institute. Instead of WWER-1000 UO 2 pelletized fuel rod we apply dispersion type fuel element with uniformly distributed high uranium content granules of U9Mo, U5Nb5Zr, U3Si alloys metallurgically bonded between themselves and to cladding by a specially developed Zr-base matrix alloy. The fuel meat retains a controllable porosity to accommodate fuel swelling. The optimal volume ratios between the components are: 64% fuel, 18% matrix, 18% pores. Properties of novel materials as well as fuel compositions on their base have been investigated. Method of fuel elements fabrication by capillary impregnation has been developed. The primary advantages of novel fuel are high uranium content (more than 15% in comparison with the standard UO 2 pelletized fuel rod), low temperature of fuel ( * d/tU) and serviceability under transient conditions. The use of the novel fuel might lead to natural uranium saving and reduced amounts of spent fuel as well as to optimization of Nuclear Plant operation conditions and improvements of their operation reliability and safety. As a result the economic efficiency shall increase and the cost of electric power shall decrease. (authors)

  8. Low content uranium alloys for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J.

    1964-01-01

    A description is given of the structure and the properties of low content alloys containing from 0.1 to 0.5 per cent by weight of Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo or a combination of these elements. A study of the kinetics and of the mode of transformation has made it possible to choose the most satisfactory thermal treatment. An attempt has been made to prepare alloys suitable for an economical industrial development having a small α grain structure without marked preferential orientation, with very fine and stable precipitates as well as a high creep-resistance. The physical properties and the mechanical strength of these alloys are given for temperatures of 20 to 600 deg C. These alloys proved very satisfactory when irradiated in the form of normal size fuel elements. (authors) [fr

  9. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the technical specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort. (author)

  10. Status report on conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor to low enrichment fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam, R.A.; Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

    1991-01-01

    The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. The US Department of Energy is funding a program to compare reactor performance with high and low enrichment fuels. The goals of the program are: (1) to amend the SAR and the Technical Specifications of the GTRR so that LEU U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel plates can replace the current HEU U-Al alloy fuel, and (2) to optimize the LEU core such that maximum value neutron beams can be extracted for possible neutron capture therapy application. This paper presents a status report on the LEU conversion effort

  11. Chemical compatibility between cladding alloys and advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1975-05-01

    The National Advanced Fuels Program requires chemical, mechanical, and thermophysical properties data for cladding alloys. The compatibility behavior of cladding alloys with advanced fuels is critically reviewed. in carbide fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding carburization, diffusion of carbon into the cladding matrix accompanied by carbide precipitation. Carburization changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. The extent of carburization increases in sodium (versus gas) bonded fuels. The depth of carburization increases with increasing sesquicarbide (M 2 C 3 ) content of the fuel. In nitride fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding nitriding, diffusion of nitrogen into the cladding matrix accompanied by nitride precipitation. Nitriding changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. In both carbide and nitride fuel pins, fission products do not migrate appreciably to the cladding and do not appear to contribute to cladding attack. 77 references. (U.S.)

  12. U-Zr-RE Fuel Alloy with Minor Actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong Hwan; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Jeong Yong; Lee, Chan Bock [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Metallic fuels, such as the U-Pu-Zr alloys, have been considered as a nuclear fuel for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing the amount of highly radioactive spent nuclear fuels since the 1980s. Metallic fuels fit well with such a concept owing to their high thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion, compatibility with a pyro-metallurgical reprocessing scheme, and their demonstrated fabrication at engineering scale in a remote hot cell environment. To increase the productivity and efficiency of the fuel fabrication process waste streams must be minimized and fuel losses quantified and reduced to lower levels. In this study, U-Zr alloy system fuel slugs were fabricated by an injection casting method. After casting a considerable number of fuel slugs in the casting furnaces, the fuel loss in the melting chamber, the crucible, and the molds have been evaluated quantitatively.

  13. Platinum and Palladium Alloys Suitable as Fuel Cell Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention concerns electrode catalysts used in fuel cells, such as proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The invention is related to the reduction of the noble metal content and the improvement of the catalytic efficiency by low level substitution of the noble metal to provide new...... and innovative catalyst compositions in fuel cell electrodes. The novel electrode catalysts of the invention comprise a noble metal selected from Pt, Pd and mixtures thereof alloyed with a further element selected from Sc, Y and La as well as any mixtures thereof, wherein said alloy is supported on a conductive...

  14. Platinum and palladium alloys suitable as fuel cell electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns electrode catalysts used in fuel cells, such as proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The invention is related to the reduction of the noble metal content and the improvement of the catalytic efficiency by low level substitution of the noble metal to provide new...... and innovative catalyst compositions in fuel cell electrodes. The novel electrode catalysts of the invention comprise a noble metal selected from Pt and Pd alloyed with an alkaline earth metal....

  15. Platinum and palladium alloys suitable as fuel cell electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention concerns electrode catalysts used in fuel cells, such as proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The invention is related to the reduction of the noble metal content and the improvement of the catalytic5 efficiency by low level substitution of the noble metal to provide new...... and innovative catalyst compositions in fuel cell electrodes. The novel electrode catalysts of the invention comprise a noble metal selected from Pt and Pd alloyed with a lanthanide metal....

  16. Release of fission products from irradiated SRP fuels at elevated temperatures: Data report on the second stage of the SRP source term study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodley, R.E.

    1987-03-01

    The measurements of the release of fission products from irradiated Savannah River Plant (SRP) fuels at elevated temperatures reported herein extend the results of the first stage of the investigation to two additional fuel temperatures. In the first stage, two types of SRP fuels, a uranium-aluminum alloy designated MK-16 and a U 3 O 8 -aluminum cermet designated OX-2, were exposed to one of three different atmospheres, argon, air, or 80% steam-20% argon, at either of two different temperatures, 700 or 1100 0 C. In the second stage, the two fuels and three atmospheres remained the same, but the fuel temperatures, 850 and 1000 0 C, were intermediate to those previously employed. For each set of conditions, the measurements were repeated and, thus, the second stage of the study, like the first, consisted of 24 separate runs. This report presents the results of the 24 second-stage measurements

  17. Fission product induced swelling of U–Mo alloy fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We measured fuel swelling of U–Mo alloy by fission products at temperatures below 250 °C. ► We quantified the swelling portion of U–Mo by fission gas bubbles. ► We developed an empirical model as a function of fission density. - Abstract: Fuel swelling of U–Mo alloy was modeled using the measured data from samples irradiated up to a fission density of ∼7 × 10 27 fissions/m 3 at temperatures below ∼250 °C. The overall fuel swelling was measured from U–Mo foils with as-fabricated thickness of 250 μm. Volume fractions occupied by fission gas bubbles were measured and fuel swelling caused by the fission gas bubbles was quantified. The portion of fuel swelling by solid fission products including solid and liquid fission products as well as fission gas atoms not enclosed in the fission gas bubbles is estimated by subtracting the portion of fuel swelling by gas bubbles from the overall fuel swelling. Empirical correlations for overall fuel swelling, swelling by gas bubbles, and swelling by solid fission products were obtained in terms of fission density.

  18. Zirconium alloy fuel cladding resistant to PCI crack propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.F.; Foster, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element is described cladding tube comprising: concentric tubular layers of zirconium base alloys; the concentric tubular layers including an inner layer and outer layer; the outer layer metallurgically bonded to the inner layer; the outer layer composed of a first zirconium base alloy characterized by excellent resistance to corrosion caused by exposure to high temperature and pressure aqueous environments; the inner layer composed of a second zirconium base alloy consisting of: about 0.2 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.03 to 0.11 wt.% iron, less than about 0.02 wt.% chromium, up to about 350 ppm oxygen and the remainder being zirconium and incidental impurities, and the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy

  19. Molten aluminum alloy fuel fragmentation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Cassulo, J.C.; Spencer, B.W.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in which molten aluminum alloys were injected into a 1.2 m deep pool of water. The parameters varied were (i) injectant material (8001 aluminum alloy and 12.3 wt% U-87.7 wt% Al), (ii) melt superheat (O to 50 K), (iii) water temperature (313, 343 and 373 K) and (iv) size and geometry of the pour stream (5, 10 and 20 mm diameter circular and 57 mm annular). The pour stream fragmentation was dominated by surface tension with large particles (∼30 mm) being formed from varicose wave breakup of the 10-mm circular pours and from the annular flow off a 57 mm diameter tube. The fragments produced by the 5 mm circular et were smaller (∼ mm), and the 20 mm jet which underwent sinuous wave breakup produced ∼100 mm fragments. The fragments froze to form solid particles in 313 K water, and when the water was ≥343 K, the melt fragments did not freeze during their transit through 1.2 m of water

  20. Surface coating Zr or Zr alloy nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghy, R.E.; Sherman, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    A method is disclosed for preventing stress corrosion cracking or metal embrittlement of a zirconium or zirconium alloy container that is to be coated on the inside surface with a layer of a metal such as copper, a copper alloy, nickel, or iron and used for holding nuclear fuel material as a nuclear fuel element. The zirconium material is etched in an etchant solution, desmutted mechanically or ultrasonically, oxidized to form an oxide coating on the zirconium, cleaned in an aqueous alkaline cleaning solution, activated for electroless deposition of a metal layer and contacted with an electroless metal plating solution. This method provides a boundary layer of zirconium oxide between the zirconium container and the metal layer. (author)

  1. Technical ability of new MTR high-density fuel alloys regarding the whole fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, J.P.; Maugard, B.; Gay, A.

    1998-01-01

    The development of new fuel alloys could provide a good opportunity to improve drastically the fuel cycle on the neutronic performances and the reprocessing point of view. Nevertheless, those parameters can only be considered if the fuel manufacture feasibility has been previously demonstrated. As a matter of fact, a MTR work group involving French partners (CEA, CERCA, COGEMA) has been set up in order to evaluate the technical ability of new fuels considering the whole fuel cycle. In this paper CERCA is presenting the preliminary results of UMo and UNbZr fuel plate manufacture, CEA is comparing to U 3 Si 2 the neutronic performances of fuels such as UMo, UN, UNbZr, while COGEMA is dealing with the reprocessing feasibility. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel element containing strips of an alloyed Zr, Ti, and Ni getter material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Packard, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The nuclear fuel element has disposed therein an alloy having the essential components of nickel, titanium and zirconium, and the alloy reacts with water, water vapor and reactive gases at reactor ambient temperatures. The alloy is disposed in the plenum of the fuel element in the form of strips and preferably the strips are positioned inside a helical member in the plenum. The position of the alloy strips permits gases and liquids entering the plenum to contact and react with the alloy strips. (U.S.)

  3. Update on Fresh Fuel Characterization of U-Mo Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkes, D.E.; Wachs, D.M.; Keiser, D.D.; Okuniewski, M.A.; Jue, J.F.; Rice, F.J.; Prabhakaran, R.

    2009-01-01

    The need to provide more accurate property information on U-Mo fuel alloys to operators, modellers, researchers, fabricators, and government increases as success of the GTRI Reactor Convert program continues. This presentation provides an update on fresh fuel characterization activities that have occurred at the INL since the RERTR 2008 conference in Washington, D.C. The update is particularly focused on properties recently obtained and on the development progress of new measurement techniques. Furthermore, areas where useful and necessary information is still lacking is discussed. The update deals with mechanical, physical, and microstructural properties for both integrated and separate effects. Appropriate discussion of fabrication characteristics, impurities, thermodynamic response, and effects on the topic areas are provided, along with a background on the characterization techniques used and developed to obtain the information. Efforts to measure similar characteristics on irradiated fuel plates are discussed.

  4. New Fuel Alloys Seeking Optimal Solidus and Phase Behavior for High Burnup and TRU Burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariani, R.D.; Porter, D.L.; Kennedy, J.R.; Hayes, S.L.; Blackwood, V.S.; Jones, Z.S.; Olson, D.L.; Mishra, B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent modifications to fast reactor metallic fuels have been directed toward improving the melting and phase behaviors of the fuel alloy, for the purpose of ultra-high burnup and transuranic (TRU) burning. Improved melting temperatures increase the safety margin for uranium-based fast reactor fuel alloys, which is especially important for transuranic burning because the introduction of plutonium and neptunium acts to lower the alloy melting temperature. Improved phase behavior—single-phase, body-centered cubic—is desired because the phase is isotropic and the alloy properties are more predictable. An optimal alloy with both improvements was therefore sought through a comprehensive literature survey and theoretical analyses, and the creation and testing of some alloys selected by the analyses. Summarized here are those analyses, the impact of alloy modifications, and recent experimental results for selected pseudo-binary alloy systems that are hoped to accomplish the goals in a short timeframe. (author)

  5. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ''advanced reactors,'' it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ''advanced reactors'' are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970's. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing

  6. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-10-26

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

  7. Postirradiation examination of high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hofman, G.L.; Strain, R.V.

    1998-01-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles, designated RERTR-2, were inserted into the Advanced Test reactor in Idaho in August 1997. These tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels, including U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru and U-10Mo-0.05Sn: the intermetallic compounds U 2 Mo and U-10Mo-0.-5Sn; the intermetallic compounds U 2 Mo and U 3 Si 2 were also included in the fuel test matrix. These fuels are included in the experiments as microplates (76 mm x 22 mm x 1.3mm outer dimensions) with a nominal fuel volume loading of 25% and irradiated at relatively low temperature (∼100 deg C). RERTR-1 and RERTR-2 were discharged from the reactor in November 1997 and July 1998, respectively at calculated peak fuel burnups of 45 and 71 at %-U 235 Both experiments are currently under examination at the Alpha Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago. This paper presents the postirradiation examination results available to date from these experiments. (author)

  8. Irradiation testing of high-density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 'microplates'. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U10Mo-0.05Sn, U2Mo, or U 3 Si 2 . These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of approximately 40 and 80 at.% U 235 . Of particular interest are the extent of reaction of the fuel and matrix phases and the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions. (author)

  9. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  10. Study of the U3O8-Al thermite reaction and strength of reactor fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.

    1984-01-01

    Research and test reactors are presently operated with aluminum-clad fuel elements containing highly enriched uranium-aluminum alloy cores. To lower the enrichment and still maintain reactivity, the uranium content of the fuel element will need to be higher than currently achievable with alloy fuels. This will necessitate conversion to other forms such as U 3 O 8 -aluminum cermets. Above the aluminum melting point, U 3 O 8 and aluminum undergo an exothermic thermite reaction and cermet fuel cores tend to keep their original shape. Both factors could affect the course and consequences of a reactor accident, and therefore prompted an investigation of the behavior of cermet fuels at elevated temperatures. Tests were carried out using pellets and extruded tube sections with 53 wt % U 3 O 8 in aluminum. This content corresponds to a theoretical uranium density of 1.9 g/cc. Results indicate that the thermite reaction occurs at about 900 0 C in air without a violent effect. The heat of reaction was approximately 123 cal/g of U 3 O 8 -aluminum fuel. Tensile and compressive strength of the fuel tube section is low above 660 0 C. In tension, sections failed at about the aluminum melting point. In compression with 2 psi average axial stress, failure occurred at 917 0 C, while 7 psi average axial stress produced failure at 669 0 C. (author)

  11. Study of the U3O8-Al thermite reaction and strength of reactor fuel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.

    1983-01-01

    Research and test reactors are presently operated with aluminum-clad fuel elements containing highly enriched uranium-aluminum alloy cores. To lower the enrichment and still maintain reactivity, the uranium content of the fuel element will need to be higher than currently achievable with alloy fuels. This will necessitate conversion to other forms such as U 3 O 8 -aluminum cermets. Above the aluminum melting point, U 3 O 8 and aluminum undergo an exothermic thermite reaction and cermet fuel cores tend to keep their original shape. Both factors could affect the course and consequences of a reactor accident, and prompted an investigation of the behavior of cermet fuels at elevated temperatures. Tests were carried out using pellets and extruded tube-sections with 53 wt % U 3 O 8 in aluminum. This content corresponds to a theoretical uranium density of 1.9 g/cc. Results indicate that the thermite reaction occurs at about 900 0 C in air without a violent effect. The heat of reaction was approximately 123 cal/g of U 3 O 8 -aluminum fuel. Tensile and compressive strength of the fuel tube section is low above 660 0 C. In tension, sections failed at about the aluminum melting point. In compression with 2-psi average axial stress, failure occurred at 917 0 C, while 7 psi average axial stress produced failure at 669 0 C

  12. Irradiation testing of high density uranium alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Meyer, M.K.

    1997-10-01

    Two irradiation test vehicles have been designed, fabricated, and inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Irradiation of these experiments began in August 1997. These irradiation tests were designed to obtain irradiation performance information on a variety of potential new, high-density dispersion fuels. Each of the two irradiation vehicles contains 32 microplates. Each microplate is aluminum clad, having an aluminum matrix phase and containing one of the following compositions as the fuel phase: U-10Mo, U-8Mo, U-6Mo, U-4Mo, U-9Nb-3Zr, U-6Nb-4Zr, U-5Nb-3Zr, U-6Mo-1Pt, U-6Mo-0.6Ru, U-10Mo-0.05Sn, U 2 Mo, or U 3 Si 2 . These experiments will be discharged at peak fuel burnups of 40% and 80%. Of particular interest is the fission gas retention/swelling characteristics of these new fuel alloys. This paper presents the design of the irradiation vehicles and the irradiation conditions

  13. Micrographic study on distribution of fission products in high burn-up metallic alloy fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolay, S.; Basu, M.; Das, D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the important mandates in the three-stage nuclear power generation programme of India is to utilize uranium-plutonium based alloy fuels in enabling shorter doubling time for breeding of the fissile isotopes ( 239 Pu and 233 U ) to be used in thorium based driver fuel in the third stage. Reported information shows the successful performance of alloy fuel with somewhat porous matrix in achieving 10-15 atom% burnup. The porosity and microstructure of these alloys are strongly dependent on their composition and phases present. Porosity also influences the extent of fuel swelling and gas release. So to assess fuel performance and fuel integrity under high burn-up condition it is essential to have knowledge about the new phases formed and their redistribution that occurs as a result of inter-diffusion and temperature gradient. This study addresses these issues taking the base alloy U-10 wt %Zr

  14. Incorporation of Integral Fuel Burnable Absorbers Boron and Gadolinium into Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Clad Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridharan, K.; Renk, T.J.; Lahoda, E.J.; Corradini, M.L

    2004-01-01

    Long-lived fuels require the use of higher enrichments of 235U or other fissile materials. Such high levels of fissile material lead to excessive fuel activity at the beginning of life. To counteract this excessive activity, integral fuel burnable absorbers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly. The two commonly used IFBA elements are gadolinium, which is added as gadolinium-oxide to the UO2 powder, and boron, which is applied as a zirconium-diboride coating on the UO2 pellets using plasma spraying or chemical vapor deposition techniques. The incorporation of IFBA into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be very costly because of their small volume and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. Other manufacturing issues that impact cost and performance are maintaining the correct levels of dosing, the reduction in fuel melting point due to gadolinium-oxide additions, and parasitic neutron absorption at fuel's end-of-life. The goal of the proposed research is to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of boron or gadolinium into the outer surface of the fuel cladding material rather than as an additive to the fuel pellets. This paradigm shift will allow for the introduction of the IFBA in a non-nuclear regulated environment and will obviate the necessity of additional handling and processing of the fuel pellets. This could represent significant cost savings and potentially lead to greater reproducibility and control of the burnable fuel in the early stages of the reactor operation. The surface alloying is being performed using the IBEST (Ion Beam Surface Treatment) process developed at Sandia National Laboratories. IBEST involves the delivery of energetic ion beam pulses onto the surface of a material, near-surface melting, and rapid solidification. The non-equilibrium nature of such processing allows f or surface

  15. Qualification of uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel - conclusions of an international workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Languille, A.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-one participants representing 21 reactors, fuel developers, fuel fabricators, and fuel reprocessors in 11 countries discussed the requirements for qualification of U-Mo alloy fuel at a workshop held at Argonne National Laboratory on January 17-18, 2000. Consensus was reached that the qualification plans of the U.S. RERTR program and the French U-Mo fuel development program are valid. The items to be addressed during qualification are summarized in the paper. (author)

  16. Physical and welding metallurgy of Gd-enriched austenitic alloys for spent nuclear fuel applications. Part II, nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Michael, Joseph Richard; Williams, David Brian; Dupont, John Neuman; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-01-01

    The physical and welding a metallurgy of gadolinium- (Gd-) enriched Ni-based alloys has been examined using a combination of differential thermal analysis, hot ductility testing. Varestraint testing, and various microstructural characterization techniques. Three different matrix compositions were chosen that were similar to commercial Ni-Cr-Mo base alloys (UNS N06455, N06022, and N06059). A ternary Ni-Cr-Gd alloy was also examined. The Gd level of each alloy was ∼2 wt-%. All the alloys initiated solidification by formation of primary austenite and terminated solidification by a Liquid γ + Ni 5 Gd eutectic-type reaction at ∼1270 C. The solidification temperature ranges of the alloys varied from ∼100 to 130 C (depending on alloy composition). This is a substantial reduction compared to the solidification temperature range to Gd-enriched stainless steels (360 to 400 C) that terminate solidification by a peritectic reaction at ∼1060 C. The higher-temperature eutectic reaction that occurs in the Ni-based alloys is accompanied by significant improvements in hot ductility and solidification cracking resistance. The results of this research demonstrate that Gd-enriched Ni-based alloys are excellent candidate materials for nuclear criticality control in spent nuclear fuel storage applications that require production and fabrication of large amounts of material through conventional ingot metallurgy and fusion welding techniques

  17. Nuclear safety of the ten-well insert for the SRP fuel element dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, W.C.; Forstner, J.L.

    1977-06-01

    Mass limits are developed and presented for safe dissolution of fissile materials in the Ten-Well Insert, an improved device for limiting the configuration of fuel in SRP dissolvers. This insert permits high-capacity dissolution of SRP fuels, offsite fuels, and scrap fissile materials with adequate margins of nuclear safety. Limits were developed by calculating the safe (subcritical) mass per well as a function of the concentration of fissile material in the dissolver solution. Safe mass values were then selected for use as well-loading limits so as to ensure subcriticality throughout the dissolution. Well-loading limits are presented for uranium metal, uranium-aluminum alloy, U 3 O 8 -aluminum cermet, plutonium-aluminum alloy, and uranium-plutonium-aluminum alloy. With these limits, the maximum k/sub eff/ is 0.95. Nuclear safety is maintained in process operations by conforming to well-loading limits calculated from the safe mass values, conforming to dissolver-loading limits, and maintaining the concentration of fissile material in solution below 4.0 g/l. 9 figures, 14 tables

  18. Nuclear fuel element containing particles of an alloyed Zr, Ti, and Ni getter material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Levin, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The nuclear fuel element has disposed therein an alloy having the essential components of nickel, titanium and zirconium, and the alloy reacts with water, water vapor and reactive gases at reactor ambient temperatures. The alloy is disposed in the plenum of the fuel element in the form of particles in a hollow gas permeable container having a multiplicity of openings of size smaller than the size of the particles. The openings permit gases and liquids entering the plenum to contact the particles of alloy. The container is preferably held in the spring in the plenum of the fuel element. (Official Gazette)

  19. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  20. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shao, Lin [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Tsvetkov, Pavel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Kennedy, Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  1. Design of high density gamma-phase uranium alloys for LEU dispersion fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Ray, Allison E.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium alloys are candidates for the fuel phase in aluminium matrix dispersion fuels requiring high uranium loading. Certain uranium alloys have been shown to have good irradiation performance at intermediate burnup. previous studies have shown that acceptable fission gas swelling behavior and fuel-aluminium interaction is possible only if the fuel alloy can be maintained in the high temperature body-centered-cubic γ-phase during fabrication and irradiation, at temperatures at which αU is the equilibrium phase. transition metals in Groups V through VIII are known to allow metastable retention of the gamma phase below the equilibrium isotherm. These metals have varying degrees of effectiveness in stabilizing the gamma phase. Certain alloys are metastable for very long times at the relatively low fuel temperatures seen in research operation. In this paper, the existing data on the gamma stability of binary and ternary uranium alloys is analysed. The mechanism and kinetics of decomposition of the gamma phase are assessed with the help of metal alloy theory. Alloys with the highest possible uranium content, good gamma-phase stability, and good neutronic performance are identified for further metallurgical studies and irradiation tests. Results from theory will be compared with experimentally generated data. (author)

  2. Application of room temperature ionic liquids in advanced fuel cycles RIAR research concept program users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Alexander V.; Kormilitsyn, Michael V.; Savochkin, Yuri P.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Smolensky, Valeri V.; Shadrin, Alexander Yu.; Babain, Vladimir A.

    2005-01-01

    The paper reviews briefly the research program on application of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) in some processes of the nuclear fuel reprocessing, particularly in the uranium-aluminum fuel reprocessing and separation of TPEs and REEs from the PUREX process liquid waste, and approaches to implementation of this program. (author)

  3. PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-10-01

    A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

  4. Elaboration and characterisation of Pd-Cr alloys for PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souleymane, B.; Fouda-Onana, F.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    Palladium (Pd) alloys have been considered as alternative catalyst cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, particularly in liquid fuel cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ORR on various Pd-Cr alloys. Pd-Cr alloys were deposited on glassy carbon support and the electrocatalytic parameters for the ORR were determined in acid medium. The effect of the Pd-Cr alloy deposition parameters on its composition and electrocatalytic behaviour were determined. The study showed that there is a relationship between the composition of the alloy and the power of the Pd and Cr cathode. The parameters of the ORR were correlated to the alloy chemical and physical properties. EDS and XPS analysis revealed a segregation of Cr in the alloy.The variation of the work function (W) of the alloy with the alloy composition has shown a minimum value of W of 0.287 for a composition of the alloy of 70 per cent of Pd and 30 per cent of Cr. The electrochemically active surface area and the exchange current density of the ORR indicated that the mechanism of the ORR on Pd-Cr is similar to that on platinum. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Design study of fuel circulating system using Pd-alloy membrane isotope separation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamanaka, T.; Aizawa, T.; Kasahara, T.; Nishikawa, M.; Asami, N.

    1980-01-01

    Design study on the fuel circulating system (FCS) for a tokamak experimental fusion reactor (JXFR) has been carried out to establish the system concept, to plan the development program, and to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion system. The FCS consists of main vacuum system, fuel gas refiners, isotope separators, fuel feeders, and auxiliary systems. In the system design, Pd-alloy membrane permeation method is adopted for fuel refining and isotope separating. All impurities are effectively removed and hydrogen isotopes are sufficiently separated by Pd-alloy membrane. The isotope separation system consists of 1st (47 separators) and 2nd (46 separators) cascades for removing protium and separating deuterium, respectively. In the FCS, while cryogenic distillation method appears to be practicable, Pd-alloy membrane diffusion method is attractive for isotope separation and refining of fuel gas. The choice will have to be based on reliability, economic, and safety analyses

  6. Unirradiated characteristics of U-Si alloys as dispersed-phase fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1987-06-01

    To satisfy the power demands of many research reactors, a new LEU fuel with a high density and U content was needed. Any fuel must be compatible with Al and its alloys so that it may be fabricable as a dispersed-phase in Al alloy and Al matrix plate-type elements following, as nearly as possible, established commercial manufacturing techniques. U-Si and U-Si-Al alloys at or near the composition of U 3 Si were immediately attractive because of work documented by the Canadians. 8 refs., 2 figs

  7. Powder fabrication of U-Mo alloys for nuclear dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, Michelangelo; Rocha, Claudio Jose da; Mestnik Filho, Jose; Leal Neto, Ricardo Mendes

    2011-01-01

    For the last 30 years high uranium density dispersion fuels have been developed in order to accomplish the low enrichment goals of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Gamma U-Mo alloys, particularly with 7 to 10 wt% Mo, as a fuel phase dispersed in aluminum matrix, have shown good results concerning its performance under irradiation tests. That's why this fissile phase is considered to be used in the nuclear fuel of the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), currently being designed. Powder production from these ductile alloys has been attained by atomization, mechanical (machining, grinding, cryogenic milling) and chemical (hydriding-de hydriding) methods. This work is a part of the efforts presently under way at IPEN to investigate the feasibility of these methods. Results on alloy fabrication by induction melting and gamma-stabilization of U-10Mo alloys are presented. Some results on powder production and characterization are also discussed. (author)

  8. Powder fabrication of U-Mo alloys for nuclear dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durazzo, Michelangelo; Rocha, Claudio Jose da; Mestnik Filho, Jose; Leal Neto, Ricardo Mendes, E-mail: mdurazzo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    For the last 30 years high uranium density dispersion fuels have been developed in order to accomplish the low enrichment goals of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program. Gamma U-Mo alloys, particularly with 7 to 10 wt% Mo, as a fuel phase dispersed in aluminum matrix, have shown good results concerning its performance under irradiation tests. That's why this fissile phase is considered to be used in the nuclear fuel of the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), currently being designed. Powder production from these ductile alloys has been attained by atomization, mechanical (machining, grinding, cryogenic milling) and chemical (hydriding-de hydriding) methods. This work is a part of the efforts presently under way at IPEN to investigate the feasibility of these methods. Results on alloy fabrication by induction melting and gamma-stabilization of U-10Mo alloys are presented. Some results on powder production and characterization are also discussed. (author)

  9. 2nd Gen FeCrAl ODS Alloy Development For Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Massey, Caleb P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Edmondson, Philip D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Extensive research at ORNL aims at developing advanced low-Cr high strength FeCrAl alloys for accident tolerant fuel cladding. One task focuses on the fabrication of new low Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. The first Fe-12Cr-5Al+Y2O3 (+ ZrO2 or TiO2) ODS alloys exhibited excellent tensile strength up to 800 C and good oxidation resistance in steam up to 1400 C, but very limited plastic deformation at temperature ranging from room to 800 C. To improve alloy ductility, several fabrication parameters were considered. New Fe-10-12Cr-6Al gas-atomized powders containing 0.15 to 0.5wt% Zr were procured and ball milled for 10h, 20h or 40h with Y2O3. The resulting powder was then extruded at temperature ranging from 900 to 1050 C. Decreasing the ball milling time or increasing the extrusion temperature changed the alloy grain size leading to lower strength but enhanced ductility. Small variations of the Cr, Zr, O and N content did not seem to significantly impact the alloy tensile properties, and, overall, the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl alloys showed significantly better ductility than the 1st gen alloys. Tube fabrication needed for fuel cladding will require cold or warm working associated with softening heat treatments, work was therefore initiated to assess the effect of these fabrications steps on the alloy microstructure and properties. This report has been submitted as fulfillment of milestone M3FT 16OR020202091 titled, Report on 2nd Gen FeCrAl ODS Alloy Development for the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy, Advanced Fuel Campaign of the Fuel Cycle R&D program.

  10. Fission Product Release from Spent Nuclear Fuel During Melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Zino, J.F.

    1998-09-01

    The Melt-Dilute process consolidates aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel by melting the fuel assemblies and diluting the 235U content with depleted uranium to lower the enrichment. During the process, radioactive fission products whose boiling points are near the proposed 850 degrees C melting temperature can be released. This paper presents a review of fission product release data from uranium-aluminum alloy fuel developed from Severe Accident studies. In addition, scoping calculations using the ORIGEN-S computer code were made to estimate the radioactive inventories in typical research reactor fuel as a function of burnup, initial enrichment, and reactor operating history and shutdown time.Ten elements were identified from the inventory with boiling points below or near the 850 degrees C reference melting temperature. The isotopes 137Cs and 85Kr were considered most important. This review serves as basic data to the design and development of a furnace off-gas system for containment of the volatile species

  11. Alloy catalysts for fuel cell-based alcohol sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghavidel, Mohammadreza Zamanzad

    Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) are attractive from both economic and environmental standpoints for generating renewable energy and powering vehicles and portable electronic devices. There is a great interest recently in developing DEFC systems. The cost and performance of the DEFCs are mainly controlled by the Pt-base catalysts used at each electrode. In addition to energy conversion, DEFC technology is commonly employed in the fuel-cell based breath alcohol sensors (BrAS). BrAS is a device commonly used to measure blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and enforce drinking and driving laws. The BrAS is non-invasive and has a fast respond time. However, one of the most important drawback of the commercially available BrAS is the very high loading of Pt employed. One well-known and cost effective method to reduce the Pt loading is developing Pt-alloy catalysts. Recent studies have shown that Pt-transition metal alloy catalysts enhanced the electroactivity while decreasing the required loadings of the Pt catalysts. In this thesis, carbon supported Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu electrocatalysts were synthesized by different methods and the effects of heat treatment and structural modification on the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) activity, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and durability of these samples were thoroughly studied. Finally, the selected Pt-Mn and Pt-Cu samples with the highest EOR activity were examined in a prototype BrAS system and compared to the Pt/C and Pt 3Sn/C commercial electrocatalysts. Studies on the Pt-Mn catalysts produced with and without additives indicate that adding trisodium citrate (SC) to the impregnation solution improved the particle dispersion, decreased particle sizes and reduced the time required for heat treatment. Further studies show that the optimum weight ratio of SC to the metal loading in the impregnation solution was 2:1 and optimum results achieved at pH lower than 4. In addition, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses indicate

  12. Design study of fuel circulating system using Pd alloy membrane isotope separation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, T.; Yamada, T.; Aizawa, T.; Kasahara, T.; Yamanaka, T.

    1981-01-01

    It is expected that the method of permeating through Pd-alloy membrances is effective for isotope separation and the refining of fuel gas. In this paper, the design study of the Fuel Circulating System (FCS) using Pb-alloy membranes is described. The study is mainly focused on the main vacuum, fuel gas refining, isotope separating, and tritium containment systems. In the fuel gas refining system, impurities are effectively removed by using Pd-alloy membranes. For the isotope separation system, the diffusion method through Pd-alloy membranes was adopted. From the standpoint of the safety and economy, a three-stage tritium containment system was adopted to control tritium release to the environment as low as possible. The principal conclusion drawn from the design study was as follows. In the FCS, while cryogenic distillation method appears to be practicable, Pd-alloy membrane method is attractive for isotope separation and the refining of fuel gas. For a large amount of tritium inventory, handling and control technologies should be completed by the experimental evaluation and development of the components and materials used for the FCS. A three-stage containment system was adopted to control tritium release to environment as low as possible. Consideration to prevent tritium escape will be necessary for fuel gas refiners and isotope separators. (Kato, T.)

  13. Predicted irradiation behavior of U3O8-Al dispersion fuels for production reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronenberg, A.W.; Rest, J.

    1990-01-01

    Candidate fuels for the new heavy-water production reactor include uranium/aluminum alloy and U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuels. The U 3 O 8 -Al dispersion fuel would make possible higher uranium loadings and would facilitate uranium recycle. Research efforts on U 3 O 8 -Al fuel include in-pile irradiation studies and development of analytical tools to characterize the behavior of dispersion fuels at high-burnup. In this paper the irradiation performance of U 3 O 8 -Al is assessed using the mechanistic Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) code. Predictions of fuel swelling and alteration of thermal conductivity are presented and compared with experimental data. Calculational results indicate good agreement with available data where the effects of as-fabricated porosity and U 3 O 8 -Al oxygen exchange reactions are shown to exert a controlling influence on irradiation behavior. The DART code is judged to be a useful tool for assessing U 3 O 8 -Al performance over a wide range of irradiation conditions

  14. Thermal bonding of light water reactor fuel using nonalkaline liquid-metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.F.; Tulenko, J.S.; Schoessow, G.J.; Connell, R.G. Jr.; Dubecky, M.A.; Adams, T.

    1996-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. A technique is explored that extends fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a nonalkaline liquid-metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Because of the low thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high-conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap while preserving the expansion and pellet-loading capabilities. The application of liquid-bonding techniques to LWR fuel is explored to increase LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) is developed to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid-metal-bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of liquid-bonded LWR fuel. The results show that liquid-bonded boiling water reactor peak fuel temperatures are 400 F lower at beginning of life and 200 F lower at end of life compared with conventional fuel

  15. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br, E-mail: mrmartin@usp.br [Laboratorio de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco (LabRisco/POLI/USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixiera@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  16. Modification of fuel performance code to evaluate iron-based alloy behavior under LOCA scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo Ramos; Abe, Alfredo; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e

    2017-01-01

    Accident tolerant fuels (ATF) has been studied since the Fukushima Daiichi accident in the research efforts to develop new materials which under accident scenarios could maintain the fuel rod integrity for a longer period compared to the cladding and fuel system usually utilized in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The efforts have been focused on new materials applied as cladding, then iron-base alloys appear as a possible candidate. The aim of this paper is to implement modifications in a fuel performance code to evaluate the behavior of iron based alloys under Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario. For this, initially the properties related to the thermal and mechanical behavior of iron-based alloys were obtained from the literature, appropriately adapted and introduced in the fuel performance code subroutines. The adopted approach was step by step modifications, where different versions of the code were created. The assessment of the implemented modification was carried out simulating an experiment available in the open literature (IFA-650.5) related to zirconium-based alloy fuel rods submitted to LOCA conditions. The obtained results for the iron-based alloy were compared to those obtained using the regular version of the fuel performance code for zircaloy-4. The obtained results have shown that the most important properties to be changed are those from the subroutines related to the mechanical properties of the cladding. The results obtained have shown that the burst is observed at a longer time for fuel rods with iron-based alloy, indicating the potentiality of this material to be used as cladding with ATF purposes. (author)

  17. Development, preparation and characterization of uranium molybdenum alloys for dispersion fuel application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Prasad, G.J.; Hegde, P.V.; Keswani, R.; Basak, C.B.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Most of the research and test reactors worldwide have undergone core conversion from high enriched uranium base fuel to low enriched uranium base fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program, which was launched in the late 1970s to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. To realize this goal, high density uranium compounds and γ-stabilized uranium alloy powder were identified. In Metallic Fuels Division of BARC, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium base alloys. This paper describes the preparation flow sheet for different compositions of Uranium and molybdenum alloys by an innovative powder processing route with uranium and molybdenum metal powders as starting materials. The same composition of U-Mo alloys were also fabricated by conventional method i.e. ingot metallurgy route. The U-Mo alloys prepared by both the methods were then characterized by XRD for phase analysis. The photomicrographs of alloys with different compositions prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes are also included in the paper. The paper also covers the comparison of properties of the alloys prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes

  18. Development, preparation and characterization of uranium molybdenum alloys for dispersion fuel application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, V.P. [Metallic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: vedsinha@barc.gov.in; Prasad, G.J.; Hegde, P.V.; Keswani, R.; Basak, C.B.; Pal, S.; Mishra, G.P. [Metallic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-04-03

    Most of the research and test reactors worldwide have undergone core conversion from high enriched uranium base fuel to low enriched uranium base fuel under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program, which was launched in the late 1970s to reduce the risk of nuclear proliferation. To realize this goal, high density uranium compounds and {gamma}-stabilized uranium alloy powder were identified. In Metallic Fuels Division of BARC, R and D efforts are on to develop these high density uranium base alloys. This paper describes the preparation flow sheet for different compositions of Uranium and molybdenum alloys by an innovative powder processing route with uranium and molybdenum metal powders as starting materials. The same composition of U-Mo alloys were also fabricated by conventional method i.e. ingot metallurgy route. The U-Mo alloys prepared by both the methods were then characterized by XRD for phase analysis. The photomicrographs of alloys with different compositions prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes are also included in the paper. The paper also covers the comparison of properties of the alloys prepared by powder metallurgy and ingot metallurgy routes.

  19. Fission induced swelling and creep of U–Mo alloy fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cheon, J.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Robinson, A.B.; Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Tapering of U–Mo alloy fuel at the end of plates is attributed to lateral mass transfer by fission induced creep, by which fuel mass is relocated away from the fuel end region where fission product induced fuel swelling is in fact the highest. This mechanism permits U–Mo fuel to achieve high burnup by effectively relieving stresses at the fuel end region, where peak stresses are otherwise expected because peak fission product induced fuel swelling occurs there. ABAQUS FEA was employed to examine whether the observed phenomenon can be simulated using physical–mechanical data available in the literature. The simulation results obtained for several plates with different fuel fabrication and loading scheme showed that the measured data were able to be simulated with a reasonable creep rate coefficient. The obtained creep rate constant lies between values for pure uranium and MOX, and is greater than all other ceramic uranium fuels.

  20. Delayed hydride cracking of zirconium alloy fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report describes the work performed in a coordinated research project on Hydrogen and Hydride Degradation of the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Zirconium Alloys. It is the second in the series. In 2005-2009 that work was extended within a new CRP called Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloy Fuel Cladding. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of Zircaloy-4 claddings representing light water reactors (LWRs), CANDU and Atucha, and measuring the rates of delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under specified conditions. The project was overseen by a supervisory group of experts in the field who provided advice and assistance to participants as required. All of the research work undertaken as part of the CRP is described in this report, which includes details of the experimental procedures that led to a consistent set of data for LWR cladding. The participants and many of their co-workers in the laboratories involved in the CRP contributed results and material used in this report, which compiles the results, their analysis, discussions of their interpretation and conclusions and recommendations for future work. The research was coordinated by an advisor and by representatives in three laboratories in industrialized Member States. Besides the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing technique from an experienced laboratory to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to harmonize the experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and between different laboratories. From the first part of this project it was demonstrated that by following a standard set of experimental protocols, consistent results could be obtained. Thus, experimental vagaries were minimized by careful attention to detail of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples. The underlying idea for the test programme was set out at the end of the first part of the project on pressure tubes. The

  1. The status of uranium-silicon alloy fuel development for the RERTR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Thresh, H.R.; Stahl, D.

    1983-01-01

    As part of the national Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is engaged in a fuel-alloy development project. The fuel alloys are dispersed in an aluminum matrix and metallurgically roll-bonded within 6061 Al alloy. To date, 'miniplates' with up to 40 vol. fuel alloy have been successfully fabricated. Thirty-one of these plates have been or are being irradiated in the Oak Ridge Reactor (ORR). Three different fuels have been used in the ANL miniplates: U 3 Si (U + 4 wt.% Si), U 3 Si 2 (U + 7.4 wt.% Si), or ''U 3 SiAl'' (U + 3.5 wt.% Si + 1.5 wt.% Al). All three are candidates for permitting higher fuel loadings and thus lower enrichments of 235 U than would be possible with either UAl x or U 3 O 8 , the current fuels for plate-type elements. The enrichment level employed at ANL is ∼19.8%. Continuing effort involves the production of miniplates with up to ∼60 vol. % fuel, the development of a technology for full-size plate fabrication, and post-irradiation examination of miniplates already removed from the ORR. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The project concentrated on model development. Reactor physics modeling involved establishing accurate models with PC versions of COMBINE and VENTURE. Fuel performance analysis will start with METAL- LIFE. In order to justify the change of fuel to metal alloy, large benefits will have to be found; the cost benefit reported is not sufficient. The fuel pin will be annular and contact the clad; the clad thickness will force the fuel to grow toward the central hole. This report reports: design improvements, neutronic model development, COBRA modifications, reactor kinetics model development, RELAP code, and fuel performance

  3. Results from the characterisation of the Futurix-FTA metal alloy transmutation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rory Kennedy, J.; O'Holleran, Th.; Keiser, D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Idaho National Laboratory has been developing and irradiation testing a number of fuels and fuel types for actinide transmutation as part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Fuel types under consideration include both fertile (fast reactor systems) and fertile-free (accelerator-driven systems) metallic alloys. Most recently, fuel fabrication was completed and the fuel pins shipped to the fast flux Phenix reactor in Marcoule, France for irradiation testing as part of the FUTURIX-FTA experiment: an international experiment involving the USA, France, the European Commission and Japan. The metal alloy fuels for this experiment are the low-fertile U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr and the non-fertile Pu-12Am-40Zr. The fresh fuels have been fully characterised for chemical composition, phase, microstructure, thermal behaviour and fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction (FCCI). Preliminary FCCI results raised some safety concerns with respect to the formation of low melting phases and cladding degradation, which could preclude a fuel from consideration. Results from diffusion couple experiments between the non-fertile fuel Pu-12Am-40Zr and the ferritic HT9 and 422 stainless steels (SS) used in the AFC experiments in the ATR reactor (USA) compared to the austenitic AIM1 SS used in the FUTURIX-FTA experiments in the Phenix reactor (France) indicate significant inter-diffusion with the AIM1 SS. Up to about a 30-fold increase in the diffusion of iron (and accompanying Ni and Cr) into the fuel at 650 C was observed compared to the 422 SS studies. Comparable studies between the low-fertile U-29Pu-4Am-2Np-30Zr fuel alloy and the AIM1 SS show virtually no inter-diffusion. The Fe (along with small amounts of Ni and Cr) appears as small precipitates in the fuel alloy with only minor concentrations identified in the fuel alloy matrix. These results will be discussed in terms of mechanisms of the inter-diffusion and the difference in behaviour between the

  4. Impact of Zr + 2.5% Nb alloy corrosion upon operability of RBMK-1000 fuel channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovyrshin, V.; Zaritsky, N.

    1999-01-01

    The basic components of RBMK-1000 core (fuel channels, bimetal adapters, claddings of fuel elements, etc.) are of zirconium alloys. Their corrosion is one of factors influencing upon fuel channels operability. Dynamics of channel tubes nodular corrosion development is presented by the results of in-reactor investigation at ChNPP. Radiation-induced mechanism of corrosion damage of tubes surface in contact with coolant was formulated and substantiated by data of post-reactor studies. Within the certain time period of operation corrosion of zirconium alloy of lower bimetal adapter along with removal from there of corrosion products are predominant within the whole process of reactor elements corrosion. The experimental and calculating method was proposed and substantiated to predict time duration up to loss of fuel channels leak tightness. The approaches were generalized to control state of fuel channels material to assess their operability under operation of RBMK-1000 reactors. (author)

  5. Fact reactor fuel alloys: Retrospective and prospective views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevitt, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the physical metallurgy of the EBR-II metallic fuel, U-5% Fs, and its performance in the reactor are described. An understanding of these relationships, along with the optimal matching of fuel properties to fuel-element design, have been essential in the 23 year successful utilization of the fuel. The knowledge and experience gained are being employed in the current development of a new U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel for a proposed advanced reactor (orig./MM)

  6. New Fuel Alloys Seeking Optimal Solidus and Phase Behavior for High Burnup and TRU Burning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackwood, V.S.; Jones, Z.S.; Olson, D.L.; Mishra, B.; Mariani, R.D.; Porter, D.L.; Kennedy, J.R.; Hayes, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: • Pd will bind lanthanide fission products. • 2 wt% Pd in alloy is expected to allow 20 at% Heavy Metal burnup, 4 wt% Pd possibly 30-40 at% HM burnup. • For recycled fuel with some lanthanide carryover, palladium additive will also prevent premature FCCI. • Novel uranium alloy systems suitable for burning transuranics were identified. • U-Mo-Ti-Zr and U-W-Mo irradiations may perform comparably to U-10Zr, but the real tests needed must include Pu and Np for TRU burning. – Diffusion couples with alloys and Fe or cladding; – Irradiations

  7. Fabrication of uranium alloy fuel slug for sodium-cooled fast reactor by injection casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong Hwan Kim; Hoon Song; Ki Hwan Kim; Chan Bock Lee

    2014-01-01

    Metal fuel slugs of U-Zr alloys for a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) have been fabricated using an injection casting method. However, casting alloys containing volatile radioactive constituents such as Am can cause problems in a conventional injection casting method. Therefore, in this study, several injection-casting methods were applied to evaluate the volatility of the metal-fuel elements and control the transport of volatile elements. Mn was selected as a volatile surrogate alloy since it possesses a total vapor pressure equivalent to that of minor actinide-bearing fuels for SFRs. U-10 wt% Zr and U-10 wt% Zr-5 wt% Mn metal fuels were prepared, and the casting processes were evaluated. The casting soundness of the fuel slugs was characterized by gamma-ray radiography and immersion density measurements. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of fuel slugs. Fuel losses after casting were also evaluated according to the casting conditions. (author)

  8. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  9. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, Raul B. [General Electric Global Research, Schnectady, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The objective of the GE project is to demonstrate that advanced steels such as iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys could be used as accident tolerant fuel cladding material in commercial light water reactors. The GE project does not include fuel development. Current findings support the concept that a FeCrAl alloy could be used for the cladding of commercial nuclear fuel. The use of this alloy will benefit the public since it is going to make the power generating light water reactors safer. In the Phase 1A of this cost shared project, GE (GRC + GNF) teamed with the University of Michigan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the environmental and mechanical behavior of more than eight candidate cladding materials both under normal operation conditions of commercial nuclear reactors and under accident conditions in superheated steam (loss of coolant condition). The main findings are as follows: (1) Under normal operation conditions the candidate alloys (e.g. APMT, Alloy 33) showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, shadow corrosion and to environmentally assisted cracking. APMT also showed resistance to proton irradiation up to 5 dpa. (2) Under accident conditions the selected candidate materials showed several orders of magnitude improvement in the reaction with superheated steam as compared with the current zirconium based alloys. (3) Tube fabrication feasibility studies of FeCrAl alloys are underway. The aim is to obtain a wall thickness that is below 400 µm. (4) A strategy is outlined for the regulatory path approval and for the insertion of a lead fuel assembly in a commercial reactor by 2022. (5) The GE team worked closely with INL to have four rodlets tested in the ATR. GE provided the raw stock for the alloys, the fuel for the rodlets and the cost for fabrication/welding of the rodlets. INL fabricated the rodlets and the caps and welded them to

  10. Observation on the irradiation behavior of U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Gerard L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Park, Jong-Man

    2000-01-01

    Initial results from the postirradiation examination of high-density dispersion fuel test RERTR-3 are discussed. The U-Mo alloy fuels in this test were irradiated to 40% U-235 burnup at temperature ranging from 140 0 C to 240 0 C. Temperature has a significant effect on overall swelling of the test plates. The magnitude of the swelling appears acceptable and no unstable irradiation behavior is evident. (author)

  11. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lott, Randy G.

    2003-01-01

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  12. Tube in zirconium base alloy for nuclear fuel assembly and manufacturing process of such a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Senevat, J.; Charquet, D.

    1996-01-01

    This patent concerns the description and manufacturing guidelines of a zirconium alloy tube for fuel cladding or fuel assembly guiding. The alloy contains (in weight) 0.4 to 0.6% of tin, 0.5 to 0.8% of iron, 0.35 to 0.50% of vanadium and 0.1 to 0.18% of oxygen. The carbon and silicon tenors range from 100 to 180 ppm and from 80 to 120 ppm, respectively. The alloy contains only zirconium, plus inevitable impurities, and is completely recrystallized. Corrosion resistance tests were performed on tubes made of this alloy and compared to corrosion tests performed on zircaloy 4 tubes. These tests show a better corrosion resistance and a lower corrosion kinetics for the new alloy, even in presence of lithium and iodine, and a lower hydridation rate. The mechanical resistance of this alloy is slightly lower than the one of zircaloy 4 but becomes equivalent or slightly better after two irradiation cycles. The ductility remains always equal or better than for zircaloy 4. (J.S.)

  13. Iron-based alloy and nitridation treatment for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Yang, Bing [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-09

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive component that can be used as a bipolar plate in a PEM fuel cell application is composed of an alloy substrate which has 10-30 wt. % Cr, 0.5 to 7 wt. % V, and base metal being Fe, and a continuous surface layer of chromium nitride and vanadium nitride essentially free of base metal. A oxide layer of chromium vanadium oxide can be disposed between the alloy substrate and the continuous surface nitride layer. A method to prepare the corrosion resistant electrically conductive component involves a two-step nitridization sequence by exposing the alloy to a oxygen containing gas at an elevated temperature, and subsequently exposing the alloy to an oxygen free nitrogen containing gas at an elevated temperature to yield a component where a continuous chromium nitride layer free of iron has formed at the surface.

  14. Study on a multi-component palladium alloy membrane for the fusion fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Okuno, Kenji; Nagasaki, Takanori; Noda, Kenji; Ishii, Yoshinobu; Takeshita, Hidefumi.

    1985-11-01

    A feasibility study on the material integrity with respect to the hydride formation and helium damage of the palladium alloy membrane was performed for an application of the palladium diffuser to a fusion fuel cleanup process. This study was conducted under the Japan/US Fusion Cooperation Program. Experimental works on the crystallography, hydrogen solubility and 3 He release characteristics were carried out with a multi-component palladium alloy(Pd-25Ag.Au.Ru). The excellent hydrogen permeability and mechanical properties of the membrane made of this alloy had been confirmed by authors' previous study. Based on the present study, this alloy membrane has high resistivity to the hydrogen embrittlement, and swelling and fracture due to the helium bubble formation under the practical operating conditions of the diffuser. (author)

  15. Performance testing of refractory alloy-clad fuel elements for space reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Karnesky, R.A.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Two fast reactor irradiation tests, SP-1 and SP-2, provide a unique and self-consistent data set with which to evaluate the technical feasibility of potential fuel systems for the SP-100 space reactor. Fuel pins fabricated with leading cladding candidates (Nb-1Zr, PWC-11, and Mo-13Re) and fuel forms (UN and UO 2 ) are operated at temperatures typical of those expected in the SP-100 design. The first US fast reactor irradiated, refractory alloy clad fuel pins, from the SP-1 test, reached 1 at. % burnup in EBR-II in March 1985. At that time selected pins were discharged for interim examination. These examinations confirmed the excellent performance of the Nb-1Zr clad uranium oxide and uranium nitride fuel elements, which are the baseline fuel systems for two SP-100 reactor concepts

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear fuel-containing plate structure for a nuclear reactor is described; such structure comprising a pair of malleable metallic non-fissionable matrix plates having confronting surfaces which are pressure bonded together and fully united to form a bonded surface, and elongated malleable wire-like fissionable fuel members separately confined and fully enclosed between the matrix plates along the interface to afford a high fuel density as well as structural integrity and effective retention of fission products. The plates have separate recesses formed in the confronting surfaces for closely receiving the wire-like fissionable fuel members. The wire-like fissionable fuel members are made of a maleable uranium alloy capable of being formed into elongated wire-like members and capable of withstanding pressure bonding. The wire-like fissionable fuel members are completely separated and isolated by fully united portions of the interface

  17. Development of new zirconium alloys for PWR fuel rod claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wenjin; Zhou Bangxin; Miao Zhi; Li Cong; Jiang Hongman; Yu Xiaowei; Jiang Yourong; Huang Qiang; Gou Yuan; Huang Decheng

    2001-01-01

    An advanced zirconium alloys containing Sn, Nb, Fe and Cr have been developed. The relationships between manufacturing, microstructure and corrosion performance for the new alloys have been studied. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in lithia water at 633 K and high-temperature steam at 773 K. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-of-pile corrosion performance was obtained for microstructure containing a fine and uniform distribution of β-Nb and Zr(Fe, Nb) 2 particles. Autoclave testing in LiOH solution indicated that two kinds of alloys (N18, N36) showed the lower corrosion rate than the reference Zr-4 tested, and especially, the corrosion resistance in superheated steam at 773 K was much better. Moreover, the mechanical properties were superior to Zr-4. And the hydrogen absorption data for all of alloys from corrosion reactions under various corrosion conditions showed a linear increase with the oxide thickness

  18. To alloy or not to alloy? Cr modified Pt/C cathode catalysts for PEM fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter P; Qian, Yangdong; King, Colin R; Wiltshire, Richard J K; Crabb, Eleanor M; Smart, Lesley E; Thompsett, David; Russell, Andrea E

    2008-01-01

    The cathode electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are commonly platinum and platinum based alloy nanoparticles dispersed on a carbon support. Control over the particle size and composition has, historically, been attained empirically, making systematic studies of the effects of various structural parameters difficult. The controlled surface modification methodology used in this work has enabled the controlled modification of carbon supported Pt nanoparticles by Cr so as to yield nanoalloy particles with defined compositions. Subsequent heat treatment in 5% H2 in N2 resulted in the formation of a distinct Pt3Cr alloy phase which was either restricted to the surface of the particles or present throughout the bulk of the particle structure. Measurement of the oxygen reduction activity of the catalysts was accomplished using the rotating thin film electrode method and the activities obtained were related to the structure of the nanoalloy catalyst particles, largely determined using Cr K edge and Pt L3 edge XAS.

  19. Performance of refractory alloy-clad fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, D.S.; Cox, C.M.; Millhollen, M.K.

    1984-12-01

    This paper discusses objectives and basic design of two fuel-cladding tests being conducted in support of SP-100 technology development. Two of the current space nuclear power concepts use conventional pin type designs, where a coolant removes the heat from the core and transports it to an out-of-core energy conversion system. An extensive irradiation testing program was conducted in the 1950's and 1960's to develop fuel pins for space nuclear reactors. The program emphasized refractory metal clad uranium nitride (UN), uranium carbide (UC), uranium oxide (UO 2 ), and metal matrix fuels (UCZr and BeO-UO 2 ). Based on this earlier work, studies presented here show that UN and UO 2 fuels in conjunction with several refractory metal cladding materials demonstrated high potential for meeting space reactor requirements and that UC could serve as an alternative but higher risk fuel

  20. Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 by microorganisms isolated from aircraft fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Christopher J; Perry, Thomas D; Leard, Ryan; Bearce, Ktisten; Dante, James; Mitchell, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms frequently contaminate jet fuel and cause corrosion of fuel tank metals. In the past, jet fuel contaminants included a diverse group of bacteria and fungi. The most common contaminant was the fungus Hormoconis resinae. However, the jet fuel community has been altered by changes in the composition of the fuel and is now dominated by bacterial contaminants. The purpose of this research was to determine the composition of the microbial community found in fuel tanks containing jet propellant-8 (JP-8) and to determine the potential of this community to cause corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 (AA2024). Isolates cultured from fuel tanks containing JP-8 were closely related to the genus Bacillus and the fungi Aureobasidium and Penicillium. Biocidal activity of the fuel system icing inhibitor diethylene glycol monomethyl ether is the most likely cause of the prevalence of endospore forming bacteria. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and metallographic analysis of AA2024 exposed to the fuel tank environment indicated that the isolates caused corrosion of AA2024. Despite the limited taxonomic diversity of microorganisms recovered from jet fuel, the community has the potential to corrode fuel tanks.

  1. Surface-Activated Amorphous Alloy Fuel Electrodes for Methanol Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Asahi, Kawashima; Koji, Hashimoto; The Research Institute for Iron, Steel and Other Metals; The Research Institute for Iron, Steel and Other Metals

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous alloy electrodes for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and its derivatives were obtained by the surface activation treatment consisting of electrodeposition of zinc on as-quenched amorphous alloy substrates, heating at 200-300℃ for 30 min, and subsequently leaching of zinc in an alkaline solution. The surface activation treatment provided a new method for the preparation of a large surface area on the amorphous alloys. The best result for oxidation of methanol, sodium formate an...

  2. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-01-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm 3 were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm 3 showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  3. Preliminary neutronic assessment for ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) based on iron alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo; Carluccio, Thiago; Piovezan, Pamela; Giovedi, Claudia; Martins, Marcelo R.

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011, the nuclear fuel performance under accident condition became a very important issue and currently different research and development program are in progress toward to reliability and withstand under accident condition. These initiatives are known as ATF (Accident Tolerant Fuel) R and D program, which many countries with different research institutes, fuel vendors and others are nowadays involved. Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) can be defined as enhanced fuel which can tolerate loss of active cooling system capability for a considerably longer time period and the fuel/cladding system can be maintained without significant degradation and can also improve the fuel performance during normal operations and transients, as well as design-basis accident (DBA) and beyond design-basis (BDBA) accident. Different materials have being proposed as fuel cladding candidates considering thermo-mechanical properties and lower reaction kinetic with steam and slower hydrogen production. The aim of this work is to perform a neutronic assessment for several cladding candidates based on iron alloy considering a standard PWR fuel rod (fuel pellet and dimension). The purpose of the assessment is to address different parameters that might contribute for possible neutronic reactivity gain in order to overcome the penalty due to increase of neutron absorption in the cladding materials. All the neutronic assessment is performed using MCNP, Monte Carlo code. (author)

  4. High-resolution characterization of oxidation mechanism of zirconium nuclear fuel cladding alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, J.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Grovenor, C.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Zirconium alloys are used extensively as cladding materials in modern light water reactors to separate the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel rods and the coolant water in order to prevent the escape of radioactive fission products whilst maintaining heat transfer to the coolant. With increasing demand for high burn-up in modern nuclear reactors, environmental degradation of these alloys is now the life limiting factor for fuel assemblies. As part of the MUZIC-2 collaboration studying oxidation and hydrogen pickup in Zr alloys, several high resolution analysis techniques have been used to study the microstructure of a range of commercial and developmental Zr alloys. The sample used for this investigation was prepared from a Westinghouse TM developmental alloy with composition of Zr-0.9Nb-0.01Sn-0.08Fe (wt %) in the recrystallized condition. The sample was oxidised in an autoclave at EDF Energy under simulated PWR water conditions at 360 C. degrees for 360 days. Using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), we have studied the development of the equiaxed-columnar-equiaxed grain structure, and observe that the columnar grains are both longer and show a stronger preferred texture in more corrosion-resistant alloys. Fresnel imaging revealed the existence of both parallel interconnected pores and some vertically interconnected pores along the columnar oxide grain boundaries, which become more disconnected near the metal-oxide interface. Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) provided accurate quantitative analysis of the oxygen concentration across the interface, identifying the existence of local regions of stoichiometric ZrO and Zr 3 O 2 with varying thickness. These observations will be discussed in the context of current models for oxidation in zirconium alloys. (authors)

  5. Synthesis, characterization and optimization of platinum-alloy nanoparticle catalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ratndeep

    Renewable hydrogen-fuelled proton exchange membrane (PEMFC) fuel cells have consistently demonstrated great promise as a future source of energy due to their high conversion efficiency, lower temperature of operation and lack of greenhouse emissions. One of the major impediments in the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is the insufficient catalytic reactivity and higher cost of Pt electrocatalysts which are utilized for the electroreduction of oxygen from air. This dissertation focuses primarily on a family of Pt alloy fuel cell electrocatalysts referred to as de-alloyed core-shell electrocatalysts. These materials are bimetallic or multimetallic nanoparticles, mostly supported on conductive supports which were first described in a dissertation by Dr. S. Koh earlier in 2009.1 De-alloyed Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts are formed from base metal rich binary Pt-M and ternary Pt-M1-M 2 (M, M1, M2 = Cu, Co, Ni, Fe and Cr) alloy nanoparticle precursors. The precursors are transformed and activated by electrochemical selective dissolution of the less noble metal component of the precursors (de-alloying). They have shown exceptional activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in idealized electrochemical half cell measurements, in particular rotating disk electrode experiments. However, these materials were never tested or implemented in realistic Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA) and single PEM fuel cells. The objective of this work was to implement de-alloyed Pt particle catalysts in realistic fuel cell electrode layers as well as a detailed characterization of their behavior and stability. The major challenges of MEA implementation consists of the behavior of the new nanostructured electrocatalysts inside the complex three-phase interface of polymer membrane ionomer, liquid water, metal catalyst, support, and reactant gas. Activity measurements were followed by medium and long-term durability analysis by potential cycling of the membrane

  6. Technology readiness level (TRL) assessment of cladding alloys for advanced nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reliable fuel claddings are essential for the safe, sustainable and economic operation of nuclear stations. This paper presents a worldwide TRL assessment of advanced claddings for Gen III and IV reactors following an extensive literature review. Claddings include austenitic, ferritic/martensitic (F/M), reduced activation (RA) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as well as advanced iron-based alloys (Kanthal alloys). Also assessed are alloys of zirconium, nickel (including Hastelloy R ), titanium, chromium, vanadium and refractory metals (Nb, Mo, Ta and W). Comparison is made with Cf/C and SiCf/SiC composites, MAX phase ceramics, cermets and TRISO fuel particle coatings. The results show in general that the higher the maximum operating temperature of the cladding, the lower the TRL. Advanced claddings were found to have lower TRLs than the corresponding fuel materials, and therefore may be the limiting factor in the deployment of advanced fuels and even possibly the entire reactor in the case of Gen IV. (authors)

  7. Results of post-irradiation examination of WWER fuel assembly structural components made of E110 and E635 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A.; Markov, D.; Smirnov, V.; Polenok, V.; Ivashchenko, A.; Strozhuk, A.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the main examination results on the condition of fuel rods claddings, guide tubes and spacer grids of the WWER FA made of E110 and E635 alloys operated under standard operating conditions. The paper is based on the data obtained during the examination of 28 WWER-1000 FA and 12 WWER-400 FA. E110 alloy is shown to be suitable material for the WWER fuel rod claddings under the normal operating conditions. E635 alloy is attractive to manufacturing of the skeleton components. The currently used combination (E110 as a material of fuel rods claddings and E635 - as a material of the skeleton components) is the optimal solution for the WWER fuel assembly because the advantages of the both alloys are used. (authors)

  8. Thermal Expansion Property of U-Zr Alloys and U-Zr-Ce Alloys as a Surrogate Metallic Fuel for SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, Jong Tak; Oh, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Woo, Youn Myung; Lee, Chan Bock

    2010-01-01

    Metal fuels was selected for fueling many of the first reactors in the US, including the Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I) and the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in Idaho, the FERMI-I reactor, and the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) in the UK. Metallic U.Pu.Zr alloys were the reference fuel for the US Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. An extensive database on the performance of advanced metal fuels was generated as a result of the operation of these reactors and the IFR program. In this study, the U-Zr binary alloys and U-Zr-Ce ternary alloys as surrogate metallic fuel were fabricated in lower pressure Ar environment by gravity casting. The melt temperature was approximately 1,500 .deg. C. Thermal expansion of the fuel during normal operation is related with fuel performance in a reactor. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the thermal expansion of the fuel in order to warrant a good prediction the fuel performance

  9. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  10. Corrosion of titanium and titanium alloys in spent fuel repository conditions - literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Haenninen, H.; Aaltonen, P.; Taehtinen, S.

    1985-03-01

    The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed in Finnish bedrock. The canister of spent fuel in waste repository is one barrier to the release of radionuclides. It is possible to choose a canister material with a known, measurable corrosion rate and to make it with thickness allowing corrosion to occur. The other possibility is to use a material which is nearly immune to general corrosion. In this second category there are titanium and titanium alloys which exhibit a very high degree of resistance to general corrosion. In this literature study the corrosion properties of unalloyed titanium, titanium alloyed with palladium and titanium alloyed with molybdenum and nickel are reviewed. The two titanium alloys own in addition to the excellent general corrosion properties outstanding properties against localized corrosion like pitting or crevice corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatique of titanium seem not to be a problem in the repository conditions, but the possibilities of delayed cracking caused by hydrogen should be carefully appreciated. (author)

  11. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Macdonald, Charles L. B.; Northwood, Derek O.; Gyenge, Elod L.

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20 wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH 4 -, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH 4 - oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5 mg cm -2 colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47 V at 100 mA cm -2 and 333 K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17 V.

  12. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Department of Mechanical, Auto and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Macdonald, Charles L.B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Gyenge, Elod L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1Z4)

    2006-07-14

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bonneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -}, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH{sub 4}{sup -} oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5mgcm{sup -2} colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47V at 100mAcm{sup -2} and 333K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17V. (author)

  13. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Cheng; Young-Jin Kim; Peter Chou

    2016-01-01

    In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA), similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident managem...

  14. Near-surface alloys for hydrogen fuel cell applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2006-01-01

    of CO with relatively facile H-2 activation is nearly ideal for this application. We suggest that. as nanoscale materials synthesis techniques improve, it will become feasible to reproducibly prepare NSAs with highly specified surface structures, resulting in the design and manufacture of a wide variety...... facile H-2 activation. These NSAs could, potentially, facilitate highly selective hydrogenation reactions at low temperatures. In the present work, the suitability of NSAs for use as hydrogen fuel cell anodes has been evaluated: the combination of properties, possessed by selected NSAs, of weak binding...... of such materials for use in fuel cells and in an ever. increasing range of catalytic applications. Furthermore, we introduce a new concept for NSA-defect sites, which could be responsible for the promotional catalytic effects of a second metal added. even in minute quantities, to a host metal catalyst....

  15. Long-time corrosion and high-temperature oxidation of zirconium alloys applied on NPP like fuel elements cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrtilkova, V.; Novotny, L.; Lingart, S.; Doukha, R.; Yarosh, Ya.; Kolenchik, Ya.

    2007-01-01

    Zirconium is applying in nuclear energy since 50-th of last century in capacity of material for cover production for fuel elements, reactor fuel and structural parts, and mainly due to both corrosion stability and low effective cross section for thermal neutrons capture. Impurities in doping elements form and alloy production technology has influence on mechanical and corrosion properties of finite alloy. Long-time corrosion tests for several zirconium alloys in forcing autoclave under different reaction conditions were carried out. After that process kinetics was studied, mass increase, hydrogen formation, zirconium hydride forming morphology, zirconium oxide layer thickness have been determined as well

  16. Development of ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoelzer, David T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Unocic, Kinga A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    FeCrAl alloys are prime candidates for accident-tolerant fuel cladding due to their excellent oxidation resistance up to 1400 C and good mechanical properties at intermediate temperature. Former commercial oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys such as PM2000 exhibit significantly better tensile strength than wrought FeCrAl alloys, which would alloy for the fabrication of a very thin (~250 m) ODS FeCrAl cladding and limit the neutronic penalty from the replacement of Zr-based alloys by Fe-based alloys. Several Fe-12-Cr-5Al ODS alloys where therefore fabricated by ball milling FeCrAl powders with Y2O3 and additional oxides such as TiO2 or ZrO2. The new Fe-12Cr-5Al ODS alloys showed excellent tensile strength up to 800 C but limited ductility. Good oxidation resistance in steam at 1200 and 1400 C was observed except for one ODS FeCrAl alloy containing Ti. Rolling trials were conducted at 300, 600 C and 800 C to simulate the fabrication of thin tube cladding and a plate thickness of ~0.6mm was reached before the formation of multiple edge cracks. Hardness measurements at different stages of the rolling process, before and after annealing for 1h at 1000 C, showed that a thinner plate thickness could likely be achieved by using a multi-step approach combining warm rolling and high temperature annealing. Finally, new Fe-10-12Cr-5.5-6Al-Z gas atomized powders have been purchased to fabricate the second generation of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys. The main goals are to assess the effect of O, C, N and Zr contents on the ODS FeCrAl microstructure and mechanical properties, and to optimize the fabrication process to improve the ductility of the 2nd gen ODS FeCrAl while maintaining good mechanical strength and oxidation resistance.

  17. A Prediction Study of Aluminum Alloy Oxidation of the Fuel Cladding in Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahk, Y. W.; Oh, J. Y.; Lee, B. H.; Seo, C. G.; Chae, H. T.; Yim, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel with Al cladding will be used for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). Aluminum alloy cladding experiences the oxidation layer growth on the surface during the reactor operation. The formation of oxides on the cladding affects fuel performance by increasing fuel temperature. According to the current JRTR fuel management scheme and operation strategy for 5 MW power, a fresh fuel is discharged after 900 effective full power days (EFPD) with 18 cycles of 50 days loading. For the proper prediction of the aluminum oxide thickness of fuel cladding during the long residence time, a reliable model is needed. In this work, several oxide thickness prediction models are compared with the measured data from in-pile test by RERTR program. Moreover, specific parametric studies and a preliminary prediction of the aluminum alloy oxidation using the latest model are performed for JRTR fuel

  18. Evaluations of Mo-alloy for light water reactor fuel cladding to enhance accident tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Bo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum based alloy is selected as a candidate to enhance tolerance of fuel to severe loss of coolant accidents due to its high melting temperature of ∼2600 °C and ability to maintain sufficient mechanical strength at temperatures exceeding 1200 °C. An outer layer of either a Zr-alloy or Al-containing stainless steel is designed to provide corrosion resistance under normal operation and oxidation resistance in steam exceeding 1000 °C for 24 hours under severe loss of coolant accidents. Due to its higher neutron absorption cross-sections, the Mo-alloy cladding is designed to be less than half the thickness of the current Zr-alloy cladding. A feasibility study has been undertaken to demonstrate (1 fabricability of long, thin wall Mo-alloy tubes, (2 formability of a protective outer coating, (3 weldability of Mo tube to endcaps, (4 corrosion resistance in autoclaves with simulated LWR coolant, (5 oxidation resistance to steam at 1000–1500 °C, and (6 sufficient axial and diametral strength and ductility. High purity Mo as well as Mo + La2O3 ODS alloy have been successfully fabricated into ∼2-meter long tubes for the feasibility study. Preliminary results are encouraging, and hence rodlets with Mo-alloy cladding containing fuel pellets have been under preparation for irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR in Idaho National Laboratory. Additional efforts are underway to enhance the Mo cladding mechanical properties via process optimization. Oxidation tests to temperatures up to 1500 °C, and burst and creep tests up to 1000 °C are also underway. In addition, some Mo disks in close contact with UO2 from a previous irradiation program (to >100 GWd/MTU at the Halden Reactor have been subjected to post-irradiation examination to evaluate the chemical compatibility of Mo with irradiated UO2 and fission products. This paper will provide an update on results from the feasibility study and discuss the attributes of the

  19. Improving Accident Tolerance of Nuclear Fuel with Coated Mo-alloy Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In severe loss of coolant accidents (LOCA, similar to those experienced at Fukushima Daiichi and Three Mile Island Unit 1, the zirconium alloy fuel cladding materials are rapidly heated due to nuclear decay heating and rapid exothermic oxidation of zirconium with steam. This heating causes the cladding to rapidly react with steam, lose strength, burst or collapse, and generate large quantities of hydrogen gas. Although maintaining core cooling remains the highest priority in accident management, an accident tolerant fuel (ATF design may extend coping and recovery time for operators to restore emergency power, and cooling, and achieve safe shutdown. An ATF is required to possess high resistance to steam oxidation to reduce hydrogen generation and sufficient mechanical strength to maintain fuel rod integrity and core coolability. The initiative undertaken by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI is to demonstrate the feasibility of developing an ATF cladding with capability to maintain its integrity in 1,200–1,500°C steam for at least 24 hours. This ATF cladding utilizes thin-walled Mo-alloys coated with oxidation-resistant surface layers. The basic design consists of a thin-walled Mo alloy structural tube with a metallurgically bonded, oxidation-resistant outer layer. Two options are being investigated: a commercially available iron, chromium, and aluminum alloy with excellent high temperature oxidation resistance, and a Zr alloy with demonstrated corrosion resistance. As these composite claddings will incorporate either no Zr, or thin Zr outer layers, hydrogen generation under severe LOCA conditions will be greatly reduced. Key technical challenges and uncertainties specific to Mo alloy fuel cladding include: economic core design, industrial scale fabricability, radiation embrittlement, and corrosion and oxidation resistance during normal operation, transients, and severe accidents. Progress in each aspect has been made and key results are

  20. Corrosion of aluminum-clad alloys in wet spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980's and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting processing or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced significant pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1995, but the ultimate solution is to remove the fuel from the basins and to process it to a more stable form using existing and proven technology. This report presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as other fuel storage basins within the Department of Energy production sites

  1. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Decours, J.

    1964-01-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the γ structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate γ → β transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram α + γ; β + γ the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of α pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the γ structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [fr

  2. Amorphous metallic alloys for oxygen reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Huerta, R.; Guerra-Martinez, I.; Lopez, J.S. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Mexico City (Mexico). Lab. de Electroquimica; Pierna, A.R. [Basque Country Univ., San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Solorza-Feria, O. [Inst. Politenico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) represent an important, environmentally clean energy source. This has motivated extensive research on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of novel and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for the direct four-electron transfer process to water formation. Studies have shown that amorphous alloyed compounds can be used as electrode materials in electrochemical energy conversion devices. Their use in PEMFCs can optimize the electrocatalyst loading in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, amorphous metallic PtSn, PtRu and PtRuSn alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling and used as cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulphuric acid and in a single PEM fuel cell. Two different powder morphologies were observed before and after the chemical activation in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the ORR on the amorphous catalysts were investigated. The study showed that the amorphous metallic PtSn electrocatalyst was the most active of the 3 electrodes for the cathodic reaction. Fuel cell experiments were conducted at various temperatures at 30 psi for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and at 34 psi for oxygen (O{sub 2}). MEAs made of Nafion 115 and amorphous metallic PtSn dispersed on carbon powder in a PEMFC had a power density of 156 mW per cm{sup 2} at 0.43V and 80 degrees C. 12 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  3. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500 C to 600 C) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: (1) Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion - Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment - Extrusion database on DU metal - Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys - Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys - Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals (2) Low-temperature sintering of U alloys - Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment - Sintering database on DU metal - Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys - Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR and D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the

  4. Numerical Simulations on the Laser Spot Welding of Zirconium Alloy Endplate for Nuclear Fuel Bundle Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, G.; Narayana, K. L.; Boggarapu, Nageswara Rao

    2018-03-01

    In the nuclear industry, a critical welding process is joining of an end plate to a fuel rod to form a fuel bundle. Literature on zirconium welding in such a critical operation is limited. A CFD model is developed and performed for the three-dimensional non-linear thermo-fluid analysis incorporating buoyancy and Marnangoni stress and specifying temperature dependent properties to predict weld geometry and temperature field in and around the melt pool of laser spot during welding of a zirconium alloy E110 endplate with a fuel rod. Using this method, it is possible to estimate the weld pool dimensions for the specified laser power and laser-on-time. The temperature profiles will estimate the HAZ and microstructure. The adequacy of generic nature of the model is validated with existing experimental data.

  5. Recovery of UMo alloy from UMo/Al dispersion fuel plates by dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Meng; Li Jia; Liu Jinhong; Zhu Changgui

    2011-01-01

    Methods for dissolving UMo/Al dispersion fuel plates in the compounded mixed basic aqueous (NaOH and NaNO 3 ) are studied on laboratory scale. After removing the clad and the matrix of the substandard UMo/Al dispersion fuel elements, the U loss ratios are calculated and the granularity distributions of the recovered UMo alloy powder are analyzed by the metallurgical microscope. Besides, the phase structure and the composition of the recovered UMo alloy powder are analyzed by the XRD. The results indicate that as the concentration of NaOH increases, uranium loss ratio increases; but as the concentration of NaNO 3 increases, U loss ration increases firstly and then decreases subsequently; generally, the U recovery ratios are more than 99.3%. The granularity of recovered UMo powders are very small and most parts of γ-U have been oxidated to UO 2 . Therefore, further study is required to determined whether the recovered UMo alloy could be returned to the product line. (authors)

  6. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  7. Thermal creep properties of alloy D9 stainless steel and 316 stainless steel fuel clad tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latha, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Uniaxial thermal creep rupture properties of 20% cold worked alloy D9 stainless steel (alloy D9 SS) fuel clad tubes for fast breeder reactors have been evaluated at 973 K in the stress range 125-250 MPa. The rupture lives were in the range 90-8100 h. The results are compared with the properties of 20% cold worked type 316 stainless steel (316 SS) clad tubes. Alloy D9 SS were found to have higher creep rupture strengths, lower creep rates and lower rupture ductility than 316 SS. The deformation and damage processes were related through Monkman Grant relationship and modified Monkman Grant relationship. The creep damage tolerance parameter indicates that creep fracture takes place by intergranular cavitation. Precipitation of titanium carbides in the matrix and chromium carbides on the grain boundaries, dislocation substructure and twins were observed in transmission electron microscopic investigations of alloy D9 SS. The improvement in strength is attributed to the precipitation of fine titanium carbides in the matrix which prevents the recovery and recrystallisation of the cold worked microstructure

  8. Swelling behavior detection of irradiated U-10Zr alloy fuel using indirect neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yong; Huo, He-yong; Wu, Yang [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Li, Jiangbo [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Zhou, Wei; Guo, Hai-bing [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Li, Hang, E-mail: lihang32@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Cao, Chao; Yin, Wei; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Bin; Feng, Qi-jie; Tang, Bin [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China); Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China)

    2016-11-21

    It is hopeful that fusion-fission hybrid energy system will become an effective approach to achieve long-term sustainable development of fission energy. U-10Zr alloy (which means the mass ratio of Zr is 10%) fuel is the key material of subcritical blanket for fusion-fission hybrid energy system which the irradiation performance need to be considered. Indirect neutron radiography is used to detect the irradiated U-10Zr alloy because of the high residual dose in this paper. Different burnup samples (0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 0.7%) have been tested with a special indirect neutron radiography device at CMRR (China Mianyang Research Reactor). The resolution of the device is better than 50 µm and the quantitative analysis of swelling behaviors was carried out. The results show that the swelling behaviors relate well to burnup character which can be detected accurately by indirect neutron radiography.

  9. Change of Composition in Metallic Fuel Slug of U-Zr Alloy from High-Temperature Annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; Kim, Jong Yun; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The U–Zr alloy is a candidate for fuel to be used as metallic fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Its chemical composition before and after annealing at the operational temperature of SFRs (610 .deg. C) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The original alloy surface contained uranium oxides with the U(IV) and U(VI) oxidation states, Zr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and a low amount of uranium metal. After annealing at 610 .deg. C, the alloy was composed of uranium metal, uranium carbide, uranium oxide with the U(V) valence state, zirconium metal, and amorphous carbon. Meanwhile, X-ray diffraction data indicate that the bulk composition of the alloy remained unchanged.

  10. Change of Composition in Metallic Fuel Slug of U-Zr Alloy from High-Temperature Annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Young Sang; Lee, Jeong Mook; Kim, Jong Yun; Kim, Jong Hwan; Song, Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The U–Zr alloy is a candidate for fuel to be used as metallic fuel in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Its chemical composition before and after annealing at the operational temperature of SFRs (610 .deg. C) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The original alloy surface contained uranium oxides with the U(IV) and U(VI) oxidation states, Zr 2 O 3 , and a low amount of uranium metal. After annealing at 610 .deg. C, the alloy was composed of uranium metal, uranium carbide, uranium oxide with the U(V) valence state, zirconium metal, and amorphous carbon. Meanwhile, X-ray diffraction data indicate that the bulk composition of the alloy remained unchanged

  11. The irradiation behavior of atomized U-Mo alloy fuels at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Man; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Meyer, M. K.; Hofman, G. L.; Strain, R. V.

    2001-04-01

    Post-irradiation examinations of atomized U-10Mo, U-6Mo, and U-6Mo-1.7Os dispersion fuels from the RERTR-3 experiment irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were carried out in order to investigate the fuel behavior of high uranium loading (8 gU/cc) at a high temperature (higher than 200°C). It was observed after about 40 at% BU that the U-Mo alloy fuels at a high temperature showed similar irradiation bubble morphologies compared to those at a lower temperature found in the RERTR-1 irradiation result, but there was a thick reaction layer with the aluminum matrix which was found to be greatly affected by the irradiation temperature and to a lesser degree by the fuel composition. In addition, the chemical analysis for the irradiated U-Mo fuels using the Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) method were conducted to investigate the compositional changes during the formation of the reaction product.

  12. Irradiation Performance of U-Mo Alloy Based ‘Monolithic’ Plate-Type Fuel – Design Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Robinson; G. S. Chang; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; D. M. Wachs; D. L. Porter

    2009-08-01

    A down-selection process has been applied to the U-Mo fuel alloy based monolithic plate fuel design, supported by irradiation testing of small fuel plates containing various design parameters. The irradiation testing provided data on fuel performance issues such as swelling, fuel-cladding interaction (interdiffusion), blister formation at elevated temperatures, and fuel/cladding bond quality and effectiveness. U-10Mo (wt%) was selected as the fuel alloy of choice, accepting a somewhat lower uranium density for the benefits of phase stability. U-7Mo could be used, with a barrier, where the trade-off for uranium density is critical to nuclear performance. A zirconium foil barrier between fuel and cladding was chosen to provide a predictable, well-bonded, fuel-cladding interface, allowing little or no fuel-cladding interaction. The fuel plate testing conducted to inform this selection was based on the use of U-10Mo foils fabricated by hot co-rolling with a Zr foil. The foils were subsequently bonded to Al-6061 cladding by hot isostatic pressing or friction stir bonding.

  13. Preliminary design of fusion reactor fuel cleanup system by palladium alloy membrane method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Naruse, Yuji

    1981-10-01

    A design of palladium diffuser and Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for D-T fusion reactor is proposed. Feasibility of palladium alloy membrane method is discussed based on the early studies by the authors. Operating conditions of the palladium diffuser are determined experimentally. Dimensions of the diffuser are estimated from computer simulation. FCU system is designed under the feed conditions of Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The system is composed of Pd-diffusers, catalytic oxidizer, freezer and zink beds, and has some advantages in system layout and operation. This design can readily be extended to other conditions of plasma exhaust gases. (author)

  14. Establishment of technological basis for fabrication of U-Pu-Zr ternary alloy fuel pins for irradiation tests in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Hironobu; Iwai, Takashi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Arai, Yasuo; Nakamura, Kinya; Ogata, Takanari

    2011-01-01

    A high-purity Ar gas atmosphere glove box accommodating injection casting and sodium-bonding apparatuses was newly installed in the Plutonium Fuel Research Facility of Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, in which several nitride and carbide fuel pins were fabricated for irradiation tests. The experiences led to the establishment of the technological basis of the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the first time in Japan. After the injection casting of the U-Pu-Zr alloy, the metallic fuel pins were fabricated by welding upper and lower end plugs with cladding tubes of ferritic-martensitic steel. Subsequent to the sodium bonding for filling the annular gap region between the U-Pu-Zr alloy and the cladding tube with the melted sodium, the fuel pins for irradiation tests are inspected. This paper shows the apparatuses and the technological basis for the fabrication of U-Pu-Zr alloy fuel pins for the irradiation test planned at the experimental fast test reactor Joyo. (author)

  15. Occurence and prediction of sigma phase in fuel cladding alloys for breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantatmula, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    In sodium-cooled fast reactor systems, fuel cladding materials will be exposed for several thousand hours to liquid sodium. Satisfactory performance of the materials depends in part on the sodium compatibility and phase stability of the materials. This paper mainly deals with the phase stability aspect, with particular emphasis on sigma phase formation of the cladding materials upon extended exposures to liquid sodium. A new method of predicting sigma phase formation is proposed for austenitic stainless steels and predictions are compared with the experimental results on fuel cladding materials. Excellent agreement is obtained between theory and experiment. The new method is different from the empirical methods suggested for superalloys and does not suffer from the same drawbacks. The present method uses the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram for predicting the sigma-forming tendencies and exhibits a wide range of applicability to austenitic stainless steels and heat-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

  16. Methanol electro-oxidation and direct methanol fuel cell using Pt/Rh and Pt/Ru/Rh alloy catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyung-Won; Park, In-Su; Nam, Woo-Hyun; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2004-01-01

    Pt-based binary or ternary catalysts containing Rh for use as anodes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were synthesized by borohydride reduction method combined with freeze-drying. The resulting catalysts had a specific surface area of approximately 65-75 m 2 /g. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that the catalysts were well alloyed and the average size of alloy catalysts was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The Pt/Rh (2:1) and Pt/Ru/Rh (5:4:1) alloy catalysts showed better catalytic activities for methanol electro-oxidation than Pt or Pt/Ru (1:1), respectively

  17. Study of Influence of an Annealing on Corrosion Stability of Pipes-shells for Fuel of Zr1Nb Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petel'guzov, I.A.; Rodak, A.G.; Pasenov, F.A.; Ishchenko, N.I.

    2006-01-01

    Explored influence an annealing to the kinetics of corrosion and mechanical characteristics of pipe material for shells fuel elements made from the experimental zirconium alloy Zr1Nb calcium-thermal way of production, in the comparison with the staff alloy E110 electrolytic way of production. Determined parameters of kinetics of corrosion depending on temperature and duration annealing before testing. Conducted also mechanical testing the alloys on the ring samples. Determined ranges of temperatures, within which corrosion characteristics save values, close to source, and connecting temperatures, under which is observed reduction research; investigating features

  18. Safety of some fuel cladding materials, alternative to Zr-alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hache, Georges; Clement, Bernard; Barrachin, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima accident underlined the impact of hydrogen production on LWR core melt accident behaviour. New fuel cladding and structural materials are under development by the industry. IRSN performed a bibliographic study on the behaviour of these materials during LWR core melt accidents. Method This presentation is focused on cladding oxidation by steam and more precisely on: - number of H 2 moles produced per cladding length unit at thermochemical equilibrium; - oxidation kinetics; - heat of reaction; - physic-chemical interactions between material or oxidation products and fuel. Silicon carbide (SiC) - During SiC oxidation by steam, nearly 3 times more explosive gases (CO+H 2 ) moles are produced per cladding length unit at thermochemical equilibrium than for Zr-alloys. - SiC oxidation kinetics below 1700 deg. C: According to early tests performed by NASA and ORNL, the oxidation is linear but slow, there is an effective protection by a thin vitreous SiO 2 layer; these tests underlined the importance of the steam pressure and flow rate. Recently, published MIT and ORNL tests confirm that under large break LOCA conditions (∼5 bars) and up to 1200 deg. C, SiC recession is much slower than for Zr-alloys. Tests under small break conditions (3 inches LOCA: ∼40 bars) were not performed or not published. - SiC oxidation kinetics above 1700 deg. C (melting point of SiO 2 ): Molten SiO 2 loses its protective effect; this is known in the literature as 'catastrophic oxidation by molten oxides'. There will be a cliff-edge effect. For un-inerted containments, H 2 recombiners will be saturated, leading to a risk of CO+H 2 explosion in these containments. - During SiC oxidation by steam, the heat of reaction produced per cladding length unit at thermochemical equilibrium is of the same order of magnitude as for Zr alloys. Molten SiO 2 will interact with UO 2 to form molten mixtures at temperatures well below UO 2 melting temperature. - Calculations were

  19. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémier, S., E-mail: stephan.bremier@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Inagaki, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ogata, T.; Ohta, H. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, 2-11-1 Iwado-kita, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Rondinella, V.V. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15–20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. - Highlights: • Electron Probe MicroAnalysis of a UPuZr metallic fuel alloy irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up. • Significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius, nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. • Interactions between the fuel and the cladding with occurrence of a number of intermediary layers and migration of cladding elements to the fuel. • Safe irradiation behaviour of the base alloy fuel.

  20. Development and Validation of Capabilities to Measure Thermal Properties of Layered Monolithic U-Mo Alloy Plate-Type Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the thermal-conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify functionality of equipment installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, refine procedures to operate the equipment, and validate models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures, and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  1. Welding qualification procedure for fuel rods tubes of Zr-Sn alloys by the TIG automatic process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    It is presented the requirements to be used in the Welding qualification procedure for tubes of Zr-Sn alloys, specified in the ASTM B353 regulatory guide, used in the fabrication of fuel rods PWR reactors by the automatic TIG process. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Subcritical Measurements Research Program for Fresh and Spent Materials Test Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    'A series of subcritical noise measurements were performed on fresh and spent University of Missouri Research Reactor fuel assemblies. These experimental measurements were performed for the purposes of providing benchmark quality data for validating transport theory computer codes and nuclear cross-section data used to perform criticality safety analyses for highly enriched, uranium-aluminum Material Test Reactor fuel assemblies. A mechanical test rig was designed and built to hold up to four fuel assemblies and neutron detectors in a subcritical array. The rig provided researchers with the ability to evaluate the reactivity effects of variable fuel/detector spacing, fuel rotation, and insertion of metal reflector plates into the lattice.'

  3. Development of low-Cr ODS FeCrAl alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Unocic, Kinga A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Massey, Caleb P.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2018-04-01

    Low-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys were developed as accident tolerant fuel cladding because of their excellent oxidation resistance at very high temperature, high strength and improved radiation tolerance. Fe-12Cr-5Al wt.% gas atomized powder was ball milled with Y2O3+FeO, Y2O3+ZrO2 or Y2O3+TiO2, and the resulting powders were extruded at 950 °C. The resulting fine grain structure, particularly for the Ti and Zr containing alloys, led to very high strength but limited ductility. Comparison with variants of commercial PM2000 (Fe-20Cr-5Al) highlighted the significant impact of the powder consolidation step on the alloy grain size and, therefore, on the alloy mechanical properties at T < 500 °C. These low-Cr compositions exhibited good oxidation resistance at 1400 °C in air and steam for 4 h but could not form a protective alumina scale at 1450 °C, similar to observations for fine grained PM2000 alloys. The effect of alloy grain size, Zr and Ti additions, and impurities on the alloy mechanical and oxidation behaviors are discussed.

  4. Characterisation of AGR fuel cladding alloy using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Sparry, R.P.; Wild, R.K.

    1987-08-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel used in the Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR) is contained in a ribbed can of 20wt%Cr/25wt%Ni/Nb stabilised steel. Laboratory circumstances, spall during thermal cycling. To date it has been difficult to identify active material originating from the oxidation product of the cladding alloy in the cooling circuit. In an attempt to solve this problem we have set out to characterise fully a sample of oxide from this source and work is in progress to obtain suitable oxide samples from the surface of a 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb stainless steel. In view of its high sensitivity and the ability to obtain chemical information from relatively small areas we have sought to use Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). (author)

  5. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.; Robinson, A. B.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Hanan, N.

    2008-08-01

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  6. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: yskim@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Snelgrove, J.L.; Hanan, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-08-31

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  7. Palladium-alloy catalysts as ethanol tolerant cathodes for direct alcohol fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie; Varela, F.J.R. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Coahuila (Mexico). Unidad Saltillo

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that electroactive palladium (Pd) and Pd-alloy catalysts prepared using a sputtering technique possess a similar degree of activity as platinum (Pt) electrodes. This study demonstrated that Pd and Pd-alloys show a high degree of tolerance to ethanol during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) processes. The onset potential of the ORR process in the presence of 0.5M of ethanol decreased by only 33 mV and 18 mV on Pd and Pd-cobalt (Co) catalysts. Linear sweep voltammetry experiments showed that no peak current density caused by the electro-oxidation of ethanol was observed in the Pd-based catalysts. The selective behaviour of the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts was attributed to a slow rate of adsorption of the ethanol as well as the presence of reaction intermediates on the catalytic surface. Results suggested that the Pd and Pd-Co catalysts are suitable candidates for direct alcohol fuel cell applications. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travelli, Armando

    1988-01-01

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  9. Use of multiscale zirconium alloy deformation models in nuclear fuel behavior analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Robert, E-mail: robert.montgomery@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (United States); Tomé, Carlos, E-mail: tome@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Liu, Wenfeng, E-mail: wenfeng.liu@anatech.com [ANATECH Corporation (United States); Alankar, Alankar, E-mail: alankar.alankar@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay (India); Subramanian, Gopinath, E-mail: gopinath.subramanian@usm.edu [University of Southern Mississippi (United States); Stanek, Christopher, E-mail: stanek@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cladding mechanical behavior is a key aspect of modeling nuclear fuel behavior, especially for conditions of pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA), and loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Current approaches to fuel performance modeling rely on empirical constitutive models for cladding creep, growth and plastic deformation, which are limited to the materials and conditions for which the models were developed. To improve upon this approach, a microstructurally-based zirconium alloy mechanical deformation analysis capability is being developed within the United States Department of Energy Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). Specifically, the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal plasticity modeling approach, developed by Lebensohn and Tomé [1], has been coupled with the BISON engineering scale fuel performance code to represent the mechanistic material processes controlling the deformation behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cladding. A critical component of VPSC is the representation of the crystallographic nature (defect and dislocation movement) and orientation of the grains within the matrix material and the ability to account for the role of texture on deformation. A future goal is for VPSC to obtain information on reaction rate kinetics from atomistic calculations to inform the defect and dislocation behavior models described in VPSC. The multiscale modeling of cladding deformation mechanisms allowed by VPSC far exceed the functionality of typical semi-empirical constitutive models employed in nuclear fuel behavior codes to model irradiation growth and creep, thermal creep, or plasticity. This paper describes the implementation of an interface between VPSC and BISON and provides initial results utilizing the coupled functionality.

  10. Evaluation of colloidal Pd and Pd-alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, M.H. [General Motors R and D Technical Center, Warren, MI (United States); Gyenge, E.L. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Northwood, D.O. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering

    2010-07-01

    An evaluation was conducted to assess the use of colloidal palladium (Pd) and Pd alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell applications. A modified Bonneman method was used to investigate borohydride oxidation on supported Pd and Pd-alloy nano-electrocatalysts. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry, and single fuel cell test stations were used to determine Tafel slopes, exchange current densities, oxidation peak potentials, and fuel cell performance. The study also investigated the influence of temperature and oxidant flow and fuel flow rates on fuel cell performance. The study showed that the current density of the fuel cell increased with increases in temperature for all the investigated Pd electrocatalysts. However, the increase in current density was not as high as expected when fuel flow rates were increased. A current density of 50 mA cm{sup -2} was observed at 298 K with a Pd-Ir anode catalyst operating at a cell voltage of 0.5 V. 28 refs., 1 tab., 15 figs.

  11. Pt-Ni/WC Alloy Nanorods Arrays as ORR Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Mahbuba; Yurukcu, Mesut; Yurtsever, Fatma; Ergul, Busra; Kariuki, Nancy; Myers, Deborah J.; Karabacak, Tansel

    2017-08-24

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) among the other types of fuel cell technology are attractive power sources, especially for electric vehicle applications. While significant progress and plausible prospects of PEMFCs have been achieved, there are still some challenges related to the performance, durability, and cost that need to be overcome to make them economically viable for widespread commercialization. Our strategy is to develop thin films of high-active and stable catalyst coated on vertically aligned nanorod arrays of conductive and stable support. In this work, we fabricated tungsten carbide (WC) nanorods as support and coated them with a platinum-nickel (Pt-Ni) alloy shell denoted as Pt-Ni/WC catalysts. The Pt- Ni/WC nanorods were deposited on glassy carbon disks as well as on silicon substrates for evaluation of their electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and physical properties. Cyclic voltammetry experiments using rotating disk electrode were performed in perchloric acid (0.1 M HClO4) electrolyte at room temperature to characterize the ORR activity and stability of Pt-Ni/WC nanorods catalysts. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were utilized to study the morphology and crystallographic properties, respectively.

  12. Corrosion Behaviour of Mg Alloys in Various Basic Media: Application of Waste Encapsulation of Fuel Decanning from UNGG Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertin, David; Frizon, Fabien; Blachere, Adrien; Bart, Florence

    The dismantling of UNGG nuclear reactor generates a large volume of fuel decanning. These materials are based on Mg-Zr alloy. The dismantling strategy could be to encapsulate these wastes into an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) or geopolymer (aluminosilicate material) in a form suitable for storage. Studies have been performed on Mg or Mg-Al alloy in basic media but no data are available on Mg-Zr behaviour. The influence of representative pore solution of both OPC and geopolymer with Mg-Zr alloy has been studied on corrosion behaviour. Electrochemical methods have been used to determine the corrosion densities at room temperature. Results show that the corrosion densities of Mg-Zr alloy in OPC solution is one order of magnitude more important than in a geopolymer solution environment and the effect of an inhibiting agent has been undertaken with Mg-Zr alloy. Evaluation of corrosion hydrogen production during the encapsulation of Mg-Zr alloy in both OPC and geopolymer has also been done.

  13. Influence of processing variables and alloy chemistry on the corrosion behavior of ZIRLO nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comstock, R.J.; Sabol, G.P.; Schoenberger, G.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the thermal heat treatments used during the fabrication of ZIRLO (Zr-1Nb-1Sn-0.1Fe) fuel clad tubing and in ZIRLO alloy chemistry were explored to develop a further understanding of the relationship between processing, microstructure, and cladding corrosion performance. Heat treatment variables included intermediate tube annealing temperatures as well as a beta-phase heat treatment during the latter stages of the tube reduction schedule. Chemistry variables included deviations in niobium and tin content from the nominal composition. The effects of both heat treatment and chemistry on corrosion behavior were assessed by autoclave tests in both pure and lithiated water and high-temperature steam. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-reactor corrosion performance is obtained for microstructures containing a fine distribution of beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. Deviations from this microstructure, such as the presence of beta-zirconium phase, tend to degrade corrosion resistance. ZIRLO fuel cladding was irradiated in four commercial reactors. In all cases, the microstructure in the cladding included beta-niobium and Zr-Nb-Fe particles. ZIRLO fuel cladding processed with a late-stage beta heat treatment to further refine the second-phase particle size exhibited in-reactor corrosion behavior that was similar to reference ZIRLO cladding. Variations of the in-reactor corrosion behavior of ZIRLO were correlated to tin content, with higher oxide thickness observed in the ZIRLO cladding containing higher tin. The results of these studies indicate that optimum corrosion performance of ZIRLO is achieved by maintaining a uniform distribution of fine second-phase particles and controlled levels of tin

  14. Engineering the Activity and Stability of Pt-Alloy Cathode Fuel-Cell Electrocatalysts by Tuning the Pt-Pt Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribano, Maria Escudero; Malacrida, Paolo; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    2014-01-01

    for enhancing the cathode activity is to alloy Pt with transition metals [1-2]. However, alloys of Pt and late transition metals are typically unstable under fuel-cell conditions. Herein, we present experimental and theoretical studies showing the trends in activity and stability of novel cathode catalysts...

  15. Long term immersion test of aluminum alloy AA 6061 used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, Evelina M.; Rodriguez, Sebastian; Haddad, Roberto; Lanzani, Liliana

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the results of long term immersion tests performed in the aluminum alloy AA 6061, used for fuel cladding in MTR type reactors. The tests were performed at open circuit potential in high purity water (ρ = 18.2 MΩ.cm) and in 10 -3 M NaCl solution. Two kinds of assemblies were studied: simple sheets and artificial crevices, immersed during 6, 12 and 18 months at room temperature. In both media and both assemblies, the aluminum hydroxide phases crystalline bayerite and bohemite were identified. It was found that a kind of localized attack named alkaline attack occurs around the iron-rich intermetallics. These particles were confirmed to control the corrosion of the AA 6061 alloy in an aerated medium. Immersion times for up to 18 months did not increase the oxide growth or the alkaline attack on the AA 6061 alloy. (author)

  16. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-01-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature, time and

  17. Development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Geraldo Correa

    2014-01-01

    The autocthonal production of nuclear fuel in Brazil for test and research reactors is restricted to MTR (Material Test Reactor) fuel type dispersion plate, using U3Si2 alloy, coated and dispersed in aluminum, developed by IPEN-SP for use in IEA-R1 reactor. Moreover, the UO 2 fuel rod type for power reactors is manufactured by Rezende (RJ) with a German technology by INB under license. Currently, Brazil is performing two programs of developing reactors. Currently, Brazil is developing two reactors. One of them is the development, by CNEN, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), for testing, research and radioisotope production. The other one is the development a power reactor for naval propulsion, conducted by the Brazilian Navy. This dissertation presents the development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy (ZRY), on a laboratory scale. Due to its innovative features and properties, this fuel can be used as fuel in both test reactors, research and producing radioisotopes for power reactors as small and medium sizes. Thus, this high potential fuel can be used in domestic reactors currently under development. The development of monolithic fuel plate type is made using the technique called 'picture-frame' where a sandwich composed of a monolith alloy U-2.5Zr- 7.5Nb coupled to a frame and coated sheets of Zry is obtained. The alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb was obtained by melting in an induction furnace and then was cast into rectangular ingots of graphite, thus achieving an ingot with approximate dimensions of 170 x 50 x 60 mm. The obtained ingot was hot rolled at 850 ºC, with a 50 % reduction in thickness, in order to refine the raw structure of fusion. Samples cut from the alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, with dimensions 20 x 20 x 6 mm were placed in frames and plates Zry and joined by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) under an atmosphere of argon, obtaining a set of 10 mm thick, 45 mm wide and 100 mm long. The sandwiches were hot rolled to

  18. Alloy 33: A new material for the handling of HNO3/HF media in reprocessing of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Alloy 33, an austenitic 33Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6Cu-0.4N material shows excellent resistance to corrosion when exposed to highly oxidizing media as e.g. HNO 3 and HNO 3 /HF mixtures which are encountered in reprocessing of nuclear fuel. According to the test results available so far, resistance to corrosion in boiling azeotropic (67%) HNO 3 is about 6 and 2 times superior to AISI 304 L and 310 L. In higher concentrated nitric acid it can be considered corrosion resistant up to 95% HNO 3 at 25 C, up to 90% HNO 3 at 50 C and up to somewhat less than 85% HNO 3 at 75 C. In 20% HNO 3 /7% HF at 50 C its resistance to corrosion is superior to AISI 316 Ti and Alloy 28 by factors of about 200 and 2.4. Other media tested with different results include 12% HNO 3 with up to 3.5% HF and 0.4% HF with 32 to 67.5% HNO 3 at 90 C. Alloy 33 is easily fabricated into all product forms required for chemical plants (e.g. plate, sheet, strip, wire, tube and flanges). Components such as dished ends and tube to tube sheet weldments have been successfully fabricated facilitating the use of Alloy 33 for reprocessing of nuclear fuel

  19. Modification of structural phase state in superficial layers of fuel tubes made of Zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, N.; Kalin, B.; Pimenov, Y.; Timoshin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in developing the method for introduction of the required changes into states and properties of outer surface on fuel rod cladding made of zirconium alloys E110 and E635 through irradiation by radial Ar + ion beam with a broad energy spectrum. In particular, the paper demonstrates that ion beam treatment of the claddings surface, at the final stage of their fabrication, can upgrade substantially quality of outer tubular surface after mechanical polishing (the cleaner surface, the lower roughness, removal of technological transversal scratches). In addition, the ion beam irradiation results in higher micro-hardness of the modified layer and in better tribological parameters. Kinetic effects in growth of oxide films were studied for the tubular samples of zirconium alloys after ion-beam treatment (cleaning and polishing by radial Ar + ion beam). Also, corrosion tests of the tubular samples were carried out in water (at 350 0 C) and steam (at 350, 375 and 400 0 C) with duration up to 3000 hours. It was revealed that oxide layer consisting mainly of zirconium dioxide in monoclinic modification was formed on tubular surface after oxidation at 3500 0 C in water or steam. The oxidizing process in the pressurized steam created thicker oxide layer on tubular surface than that in the pressurized water. Experimental data were used to determine optimal conditions for ion-beam treatment of outer fuel tube surface. The tubular samples with the following geometrical parameters were investigated: length - up to 500 mm, diameter - 9,15 mm. Optimal regimes for ion-beam cleaning and polishing of the tubular samples were studied up to the process rate of 1 meter per minute. Within the frames of linear approximation, analytical relationships were derived for time dependent growth of oxide films and used to evaluate thickness of oxide film under test conditions (duration . up to 10000 hours). Thickness of oxide films can cover the range from 6

  20. Study on manufacturing technology of fuel guide tube using HANA alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyungil; Jung, Yangil; Park, Dongjun; Park, Jeongyong; Kim, Ilhyun; Choi, Byungkwon; Jeong, Yonghwan; Park, Sangyoon

    2013-04-01

    This research was focused on the study for the manufacturing technology of HANA alloys to crease the corrosion resistance of 30% as well as the to improve the strength of 10% when compared to the commercial zirconium alloys. The new manufacturing concept having higher corrosion resistance and strength than commercial alloy performance can be obtained in this research. This result was transferred to the KNF and, that will be commercialized. This research result can be summarized like this; Ο Parameter study to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Study on alloy element and heat-treatment effect - Study on texture development mechanism - Study on final annealing effect Ο Out-of-pile performance evaluation of HANA alloy tube - Corrosion performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Mechanical performance evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Recrystallization behavior evaluation of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Texture characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF - Microstructure characterization of HANA alloy manufactured at KNF Ο Manufacturing guideline setup to increase formability of HANA alloy tube - Manufacturing guideline setup to decrease surface defect - Manufacturing guideline setup to increase strength and corrosion resistance - Manufacturing guideline setup to control texture

  1. Investigation on fuel-cladding chemical interaction in metal fuel for FBR. Reaction of rare earth elements with Fe-Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Kenta; Ogata, Takanari

    2010-01-01

    Rare-earth fission product (FP) elements generated in the metal fuel interact with cladding alloy and result in the wastage of the cladding (Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)). To evaluate FCCI quantitatively, several influential factors must be considered. They are temperature, temperature gradient, time, composition of the cladding and the behavior of rare-earth FP. In this research, the temperature and time dependencies are investigated with tests in the simplified system. Fe-12wt%Cr was used as stimulant material of cladding and rare-earth alloy 13La -24Ce -12Pr -39Nd -12Sm (RE) as a rare-earth FP. A diffusion couple Fe-Cr/RE was made and annealed at 923K, 853K, 773K or 693K. The structures of reaction layers were analyzed with Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and the details of the structures were clarified. The width of the reaction layer in the Fe-Cr alloy grew in proportion to the square root of time. The reaction rate constants K=(square of the width of reaction layer / time) were evaluated. It was confirmed that the relation between K and the inverse of the temperature showed linearity above 773 K. (author)

  2. Characteristics of WWER-1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components from E635 alloy at burnups up to 72 MWd/kgU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikulin, A.; Novikov, A.; Peregud, M.; Shishov, V.; Shevyakov, A.; Volkova, I.; Novoselov, A.; Kobylyansky, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper operation experience, results of investigated E365 alloy components of Balakovo NPP Unit 1 and Kalinin NPP unit 1 fuel assemblies are presented. Appearance, shape changes and geometric size, corrosion state of guide thimbles, angles and fuel rods, corrosion of fuel claddings are studied. At the end authors concluded that: I) E635 alloy corroborated its high operation reliability as fuel claddings and WWER-1000 FA components during 6 year service to the fuel burnup of 72MWd/kgU; II) Based on the results from the post-irradiation investigations of the fuel rods and other structural elements of WWER-1000 FAA, fabricated from E635 alloy, in terms of the basic operational characteristics, their resources after the 6 year operation cycle have not been exhausted; III) The geometrical parameters, corrosion states, tensile properties of items fabricated from fuel alloy did not attain the values that would prevent their further operation: 1) the elongations of the fuel rods at the mean burnups up to 66.2 MWd/kgU do not exceed 15 mm or 4.9%; 8) the amount of the oxide coat at surface of GT and CT does not exceed 45 μm, the hydrogen content is <0.03% mass; 9) the oxide coat at the surfaces of the frame angles does not exceed 50 μm, the hydrogen content is <0.04% mass

  3. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe–Cr–Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G., E-mail: fieldkg@ornl.gov; Gussev, Maxim N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Yamamoto, Yukinori, E-mail: yamamotoy@ornl.gov; Snead, Lance L., E-mail: sneadll@ornl.gov

    2014-11-15

    Ferritic-structured Fe–Cr–Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe–(13–17.5)Cr–(3–4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  4. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  5. Electrochemical formation of a Pt/Zn alloy and its use as a catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, Aya; Li, Winton; Yang, Yanguo; Wong, Phillip C; Gyenge, Elod; Mitchell, Keith A R; Bizzotto, Dan

    2006-05-04

    The characterization of an electrochemically created Pt/Zn alloy by Auger electron spectroscopy is presented indicating the formation of the alloy, the oxidation of the alloy, and the room temperature diffusion of the Zn into the Pt regions. The Pt/Zn alloy is stable up to 1.2 V/RHE and can only be removed with the oxidation of the base Pt metal either electrochemically or in aqua regia. The Pt/Zn alloy was tested for its effectiveness toward oxygen reduction. Kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were measured using a rotating disk electrode (RDE), and a 30 mV anodic shift in the potential of ORR was found when comparing the Pt/Zn alloy to Pt. The Tafel slope was slightly smaller than that measured for the pure Pt electrode. A simple procedure for electrochemically modifying a Pt-containing gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with Zn was developed. The Zn-treated GDE was pressed with an untreated GDE anode, and the created membrane electrode assembly was tested. Fuel cell testing under two operating conditions (similar anode and cathode inlet pressures, and a larger cathode inlet pressure) indicated that the 30 mV shift observed on the RDE was also evident in the fuel cell tests. The high stability of the Pt/Zn alloy in acidic environments has a potential benefit for fuel cell applications.

  6. Development of high-strength aluminum alloys for basket in transport and storage cask for high burn-up spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeguchi, T.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Kamiwaki, Y.; Ishii, M.; Yamamoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has developed high-strength borated aluminum alloys (high-strength B-Al alloys), suitable for application to baskets in transport and storage casks for high burn-up spent fuels. Aluminum is a suitable base material for the baskets due to its low density and high thermal conductivity. The aluminum basket would reduce weight of the cask, and effectively release heat generated by spent fuels. MHI had already developed borated aluminum alloys (high-toughness B-Al alloy), and registered them as ASME Code Case ''N-673''. However, there has been a strong demand for basket materials with higher strength in the case of MSF (Mitsubishi Spent Fuel) casks for high-burn up spent fuels, since the basket is required to stand up to higher stress at higher temperature. The high-strength basket material enables the design of a compact cask under a limitation of total size and weight. MHI has developed novel high-strength B-Al alloys which meet these requirements, based on a new manufacturing process. The outline of mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of the high-strength B-Al alloys is described in this paper

  7. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  8. High temperature steam oxidation of Al3Ti-based alloys for the oxidation-resistant surface layer on Zr fuel claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong-Yong; Kim, Il-Hyun; Jung, Yang-Il; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Dong-Jun; Choi, Byung-Kwon

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility to apply Al 3 Ti-based alloys as the surface layer for improving the oxidation resistance of Zr fuel claddings under accident conditions. Two types of Al 3 Ti-based alloys with the compositions of Al–25Ti–10Cr and Al–21Ti–23Cr in atomic percent were prepared by arc-melting followed by homogenization annealing at 1423 K for 48 h. Al–25Ti–10Cr alloy showed an L1 2 quasi-single phase microstructure with a lot of needle-shaped minor phase and pores. Al–21Ti–23Cr alloy consisted of an L1 2 matrix and Cr 2 Al as the second phase. Al 3 Ti-based alloys showed an extremely low oxidation rate in a 1473 K steam for up to 7200 s when compared to Zircaloy-4. Both alloys exhibited almost the same oxidation rate in the early stage of oxidation, but Al–25Ti–10Cr showed a little lower oxidation rate after 4000 s than Al–21Ti–23Cr. The difference in the oxidation rate between two types of Al 3 Ti-based alloys was too marginal to distinguish the oxidation behavior of each alloy. The resultant oxide exhibited almost the same characteristics in both alloys even though the microstructure was explicitly distinguished from each other. The crystal structure of the oxide formed up to 2000 s was identified as Al 2 O 3 in both alloys. The oxide morphology consisted of columnar grains whose length was almost identical to the average oxide thickness. On the basis of the results obtained, it is considered that Al 3 Ti-based alloy is one of the promising candidates for the oxidation-resistant surface layer on Zr fuel claddings

  9. Fundamental Study of Electron Beam Welding of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy for Nuclear Fuel Plate Assembly (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soosung; Lee, Haein; Lee, Donbae; Park, Jongman; Lee, Yoonsang

    2013-01-01

    Certain characteristics, such as solidification cracking, porosity, HAZ (Heat-affected Zone) degradation must be considered during welding. Because of high energy density and low heat input, especially LBW and EBW processes posses the advantage of minimizing the fusing zone and HAZ and producing deeper penetration than arc welding processes. In present study, to apply for the nuclear fuel plate fabrication and assembly, a fundamental EBW experiment using AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy specimens was conducted. Furthermore, to establish the welding process, and satisfy the requirements of the weld quality, EBW apparatus using a electron welding gun and vacuum chamber was developed, and preliminary investigations for optimizing the welding parameters of the specimens using AA6061-T6 aluminum plates were also performed. In this experiment, a feasibility test was carried out by tensile tester, bead-on-plate welding and metallographic examination to comply with the aluminum welding procedure. The EB weld quality of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy for the fuel plate assembly has been also studied by the mechanical testing and microstructure examinations. This study was carried out to determine the suitable welding process and to investigate tensile strength of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy. In the present experiment, satisfactory EBW of the square butt weld specimens was developed. In comparison with the rolling directions of test specimens, the tensile strengths were no difference between the longitudinal and transverse welds. Based on this fundamental study, fabrication and assembly of the nuclear fuel plates will be provided for the future Kijang research reactor project

  10. Effects of alloys elements, impurities and microstructural factors in austenitic stainless steel to utilize in fuel rod of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, A.

    1988-08-01

    Austenitic Stainless Steel is used as cladding material of pressurized water reactor fuel rods because of its good performance. The addition of alloy elements and the control of impurities make this to happen. Fission products do not contribute to corrosion. Dimensional changes are not critical up to 1,0 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0,1 MeV) of neutronic doses. The hydrogen does not cause embrittlement in the reactor operation temperatures, and helium contributes to embrittlement if the material is warmed upon 650 0 C. (author) [pt

  11. The Testing of Fuel Rod Models with Zr1Nb Alloy Cladding in Water Vapor at Temperature of Hypothetical Accident Situation in WWER-1000 Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnorutsky, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Gritsina, V.M.; Rodak, A.G.; Belash, N.N.; Yakovlev, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    In the article happen to results of testing the fuel rod models, their welded joints, changing the mechanical characteristics of shells of models from experimental parties of pipes from Zr1Nb alloy (Zr+1 mass%Nb) at heating of models, pervaded helium before pressures, using in earned one's living fuel rods (2,2 MPa), before the temperature 770 degree C and above occurs an overblown fuels, but at temperature 820...830 degree C shells can be broken at the expense of pressure of warming gas. Swept away reduction plasticity and embrittlement shells after the heating under temperature of 900...1200 degree C and cooling before room temperature pipes-shells from Zr1Nb alloy and from the staff alloy E110

  12. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  13. Characterization of dispersed type fuel miniplates based in alloy UMo by evaluation of changes volumetrics and thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas Valero, Pablo Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The development of new technologies in the nuclear area is extremely important to achieve greater efficiency and security in the production of electrical energy in the case of power reactors and for the production of radioisotopes and neutrons in research reactors. Throughout history, uranium-based nuclear fuels evolved in parallel with the requirements of nuclear reactors, this emphasis was increased when the RERTR program was created, which restricts the use of fuels with a maximum enrichment of 20% of the isotope U 235 (fissile isotope), which makes it necessary to increase the mass of uranium to compensate the amount of fissile material to maintain a neutron flux necessary for the reactors to operate with the same power. The search for new nuclear fuels has reached the UMo alloy with which densities of 18 gU/cm 3 are achieved in type fuels and 8 gU/cm 3 in dispersed type fuels, properties under irradiation due to their cubic crystalline structure. This type of fuel, when used dispersed in an aluminum matrix, becomes thermodynamically unstable by increasing the fission temperature of the U 235 isotope, due to this, compounds of lower density are formed, which causes an increase in volume (swelling). ). This swelling is studied throughout the present work, to relate the changes of UMo-Al / 4% volume of thermally induced miniecography in thermal treatments, with the purpose of evaluating changes in the thermal conductivity of the material. In this study it was detected that the swelling in miniplates is related in some way to the reduction of thermal conductivity, it was also recorded that the volume of change is irregular increasing and decreasing its volume according to the hours of induced swelling. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the development of dispersed fuels based on the UMo alloy in order to control the variables and reduce the probability of faults and possible accidents, such as fission products, or an increase in temperature in the core

  14. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily.

  15. Eutectic reaction analysis between TRU-50%Zr alloy fuel and HT-9 cladding, and temperature prediction of eutectic reaction under steady-state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Bong Sang; Park, Won Seok

    2001-02-01

    Blanket fuel assembly for HYPER contains a bundle of pins arrayed in triangular pitch, which has hexagonal bundle structure. The reference blanket fuel pin consists of the fuel slug of TRU-50wt%Zr alloy and the cladding material of ferritic martensite steel, HT-9. Chemical interaction between fuel slug and cladding is one of the major concerns in metallic fuel rod design. The contact of metallic fuel slug and stainless steel cladding in a fuel rod forms a complex multi-component diffusion couple at elevated temperatures. The potential problem of inter-diffusion of fuel and cladding components is essentially two-fold weakening of cladding mechanical strength due to the formation of diffusion zones in the cladding, and the formation of comparatively low melting point phases in the fuel/cladding interface to develop eutectic reaction. The main components of fuel slug are composed of zirconium alloying element in plutonium matrix, including neptunium, americium and uranium additionally. Therefore basic eutectic reaction change of Pu-Fe binary system can be assessed, while it is estimated how much other elements zirconium, uranium, americium and neptunium influence on plutonium phase stability. Afterwards it is needed that eutectic reaction is verified through experimental necessarily

  16. Ni-based amorphous alloy-coating for bipolar plate of PEM fuel cell by electrochemical plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, S; Kim, S C; Inoue, A

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates were produced by electro-plating on the Cu base plates with a flow field. The power generation tests of a single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates were conducted at 353 K. It was found that the single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed excellent I-V performance as well as that with the carbon graphite bipolar plates. It was also found that the single cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed better I-V performance than that with the Ni-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates. Furthermore, the long-time operation test was conducted for 440 h with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates at the constant current density of 200 mA·cm −2 . As a result, it was found that the cell voltage gradually decreased at the beginning of the measurement before 300 h and then the voltage was kept constant after 300 h.

  17. Investigation of nano Pt and Pt-based alloys electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells and their properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunguang Suo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalysts used in micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC, such as Pt/C and Pt alloy/C, prepared by liquid-phase NaBH4 reduction method have been investigated. XC-72 (Cobalt corp. Company, U.S.A is chosen as the activated carrier for the electrocatalysts to keep the catalysts powder in the range of several nanometers. The XRD, SEM, EDX analyses indicated that the catalysts had small particle size in several nanometers, in excellent dispersed phase and the molar ratio of the precious metals was found to be optimal. The performances of the DMFCs using cathodic catalyst with Pt percentage of 30wt% and different anodic catalysts (Pt-Ru, Pt-Ru-Mo were tested. The polarization curves and power density curves of the cells were measured to determine the optimal alloy composition and condition for the electrocatalysts. The results showed that the micro direct methanol fuel cell with 30wt% Pt/C as the cathodic catalyst and n(Pt:n(Ru:n(Mo = 3:2:2 PtRuMo/C as the anodic catalyst at room temperature using 2.0mol/L methanol solution has the best performances.

  18. Low content uranium alloys for nuclear fuels; Alliages d'uranium a faible teneur pour elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A description is given of the structure and the properties of low content alloys containing from 0.1 to 0.5 per cent by weight of Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo or a combination of these elements. A study of the kinetics and of the mode of transformation has made it possible to choose the most satisfactory thermal treatment. An attempt has been made to prepare alloys suitable for an economical industrial development having a small {alpha} grain structure without marked preferential orientation, with very fine and stable precipitates as well as a high creep-resistance. The physical properties and the mechanical strength of these alloys are given for temperatures of 20 to 600 deg C. These alloys proved very satisfactory when irradiated in the form of normal size fuel elements. (authors) [French] Sont decrits la structure et les proprietes d'alliages a faible teneur, contenant de 0,1 a 0,5 pour cent en poids de Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo ou une combinaison de ces elements. L'etude des cinetiques et du mode de transformation permet de choisir le traitement thermique le plus favorable. On a cherche a mettre, au point des alliages se pretant a une mise en oeuvre industrielle economique et presentant une structure a petits grains {alpha}, sans orientation preferentielle marquee, avec des precipites tres fins et stables ainsi qu'une bonne resistance au fluage. Les proprietes physiques et la resistance mecanique de ces alliages sont decrites entre la temperature ambiante et 600 deg C. Irradies sous forme d'elements combustibles de dimensions normales, ces alliages ont montre un bon comportement. (auteurs)

  19. Carbon supported Pd-Co-Mo alloy as an alternative to Pt for oxygen reduction in direct ethanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Ch. Venkateswara [National Centre for Catalysis Research, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, TN (India); Viswanathan, B., E-mail: bvnathan@acer.iitm.ernet.i [National Centre for Catalysis Research, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036, TN (India)

    2010-03-01

    Carbon black (CDX975) supported Pd and Pd-Co-Mo alloy nanoparticles are prepared by the reduction of metal precursors with hydrazine in reverse microemulsion of water/Triton-X-100/propanol-2/cyclohexane. The as-synthesized Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 is heat treated at 973, 1073 and 1173 K to promote alloy formation. The prepared materials are characterized by powder XRD and EDX. Face-centred cubic structure of Pd is evident from XRD. The chemical composition of the respective elements in the catalysts is evaluated from the EDX analysis and observed that it is in good agreement with initial metal precursor concentrations. Oxygen reduction measurements performed by linear sweep voltammetry indicate the good catalytic activity of Pd-Co-Mo alloys compared to Pd. This is due to the suppression of (hydr)oxy species on Pd surface by the presence of alloying elements, Co and Mo. Among the investigated catalysts, heat-treated Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 at 973 K exhibited good ORR activity compared to the catalysts heat treated at 1073 and 1173 K. This is due to the small crystallite size and high surface area. Rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements indicated the comparable ORR activity of heat-treated Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 at 973 K with that of commercial Pt/C. Kinetic analysis reveals that the ORR on Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 follows the four-electron pathway leading to water. Moreover, Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 exhibited substantially higher ethanol tolerance during the ORR than Pt/C. Good dispersion of metallic nanoparticles on the carbon support is observed from HRTEM images. Single-cell direct ethanol fuel cell tests indicated the comparable performance of Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 with that of commercial Pt/C. Stability under DEFC operating conditions for 50 h indicated the good stability of Pd-Co-Mo/CDX975 compared with that of Pt/C.

  20. Low content uranium alloys for nuclear fuels; Alliages d'uranium a faible teneur pour elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, H; Laniesse, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    A description is given of the structure and the properties of low content alloys containing from 0.1 to 0.5 per cent by weight of Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo or a combination of these elements. A study of the kinetics and of the mode of transformation has made it possible to choose the most satisfactory thermal treatment. An attempt has been made to prepare alloys suitable for an economical industrial development having a small {alpha} grain structure without marked preferential orientation, with very fine and stable precipitates as well as a high creep-resistance. The physical properties and the mechanical strength of these alloys are given for temperatures of 20 to 600 deg C. These alloys proved very satisfactory when irradiated in the form of normal size fuel elements. (authors) [French] Sont decrits la structure et les proprietes d'alliages a faible teneur, contenant de 0,1 a 0,5 pour cent en poids de Al, Fe, Cr, Si, Mo ou une combinaison de ces elements. L'etude des cinetiques et du mode de transformation permet de choisir le traitement thermique le plus favorable. On a cherche a mettre, au point des alliages se pretant a une mise en oeuvre industrielle economique et presentant une structure a petits grains {alpha}, sans orientation preferentielle marquee, avec des precipites tres fins et stables ainsi qu'une bonne resistance au fluage. Les proprietes physiques et la resistance mecanique de ces alliages sont decrites entre la temperature ambiante et 600 deg C. Irradies sous forme d'elements combustibles de dimensions normales, ces alliages ont montre un bon comportement. (auteurs)

  1. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: jrest@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L.; Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than {approx}7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  2. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G. L.; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2009-04-01

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than ˜7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  3. Study of corrosion kinetics of fuel element tubes from calcium-thermal zirconium alloy Zr1Nb in water at 350 degree C and in vapour at 400 and 500 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petel'guzov, I.A.

    2002-01-01

    In the report brought results of corrosion process studies in water medium of pipe samples for fuel element shells from Zr1Nb alloy (earlier KTZ-110),made from the calcium-thermal zirconium alloys developed in the Ukraine of technology and,for the comparison,samples of pipes from the staff alloy E110, applicable in fuel elements acting reactors of type WWER. Tests were conducted under the working temperature of fuel shells in the reactor (350 degree C) in during of 14000 hours and under increased temperatures (400 degree C) within a time acordinly 4000 hours. Samples from the alloy Zr1Nb had more high contents of oxygen (before 0,12%...0,16%), than staff alloy Eh110 (0,08%O). Studies have shown sufficiently high corrosion stability of experimental alloy Zr1Nb, close to stability of alloy E110.Discovered signs of corrosion 'breakway' or 'transition' on kinetic corrosion curves of Zr1Nb alloys and E110 alloy, characterisating zircaloy type of alloy. Considered mechanism of influence of oxygen on the corrosion process of zirconium alloys with the additive a niobium

  4. Study of phase transformation of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb e U-3Zr-9Nb alloys for application in advanced nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pais, Rafael Witter Dias

    2015-01-01

    Metal fuels are relevant in the nuclear area due to the versatility of its use in the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the alloys of uranium investigated with high potential for use in nuclear power reactors, U-Zr-Nb alloys appear as an important alternative because of their superior physico-chemical and metallurgical properties. These alloys have also potential for use in nuclear testing, research and production radioisotopes of high performance nuclear reactors. Therefore, the development of these alloys is strategic since they are planned to be used in national reactors as RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) and LABGENE (Electrical Generation Core Laboratory), currently under development in Brazil. In this work it was realized a extensive study in the scope of the manufacturing, heat treatment and phase transformations of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb (m/m%) and U-3ZR-9NB (m/m%) fuel alloys. Ingots of both alloys were produced employing a specific methodology developed in this study. This methodology comprised the melting process in a vacuum induction furnace at high temperatures (1500 °C) and thermal-mechanical processing to break the as-cast structure. Samples with typical dimensions (17 x 7 x 2.5 mm) free from macrostructural defects were homogenized at 1000 °C in vacuum of 10 -5 torr for 17.5 hours with a 10°C/min cooling rate until to 820 °C and, subsequently, quenched in water. The samples, randomly selected, were subjected to isothermal treatment tests under different conditions of time and temperature. Isothermal treatments for transformation and retention phases were carried out in a special assembly designed for this work. After the tests, the samples were characterized by the usual phase characterization techniques with particular emphasis for the X-ray diffraction technique. In this way, the Rietveld refinement method was applied. In the case of uranium based alloys it is quite challenging due to the lack of data in the literature. In this work a strategy for the

  5. Synthesis and characterization of Pt-Sn-Ni alloys to application as catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, E.L. da; Correa, P.S.; Oliveira, E.L. de; Takimi, A.S.; Malfatti, C.F.; Radtke, C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) have been the focus of recent research due its application in mobile energy sources. In order to obtain the maximum efficiency from these systems, it is necessary the total ethanol oxidation, which implies in C-C bond break. Different catalysts described in literature are employed with this intent. This work consists in studying PtSnNi catalysts supported on carbon Vulcan XC72R, to application in DEFCs. Thus, it was used the impregnation/reduction method, varying the atomic proportion among Pt, Sn and Ni. The alloys were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction, Cyclic Voltammetry and Transmission Microscopy. Preliminary results show that predominant structure on the catalysts is the face centered cubic platinum and the densities currents are dependent on the platinum amount. (author)

  6. Fabrication of Highly Stable and Efficient PtCu Alloy Nanoparticles on Highly Porous Carbon for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Zhao, Dan; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif

    2016-08-17

    Boosting the durability of Pt nanoparticles by controlling the composition and morphology is extremely important for fuel cells commercialization. We deposit the Pt-Cu alloy nanoparticles over high surface area carbon in different metallic molar ratios and optimize the conditions to achieve desired material. The novel bimetallic electro-catalyst {Pt-Cu/PC-950 (15:15%)} offers exceptional electrocatalytic activity when tested for both oxygen reduction reaction and methanol oxidation reactions. A high mass activity of 0.043 mA/μgPt (based on Pt mass) is recorded for ORR. An outstanding longevity of this electro-catalyst is noticed when compared to 20 wt % Pt loaded either on PC-950 or commercial carbon. The high surface area carbon support offers enhanced activity and prevents the nanoparticles from agglomeration, migration, and dissolution as evident by TEM analysis.

  7. A Prediction Study on Oxidation of Aluminum Alloy Cladding of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al Fuel Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahk, Y.W.; Lee, B.H.; Oh, J.Y.; Park, J.H.; Yim, J.S. [Research Reactor Design and Engineering Div., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel with aluminum alloy cladding will be used for the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). Aluminum alloy cladding undergoes corrosion at slow rates under operational status. This causes thinning of the cladding walls and impairs heat transfer to the coolant. Predictions of the aluminum oxide thickness of the fuel cladding and the maximum temperature difference across the oxide film are needed for reliability evaluation based on the design criteria and limits which prohibit spallation of oxide film. In this work, several oxide thickness prediction models were compared with the measured data of in-pile test results from RERTR program. Moreover, specific parametric studies and a preliminary prediction of the aluminum alloy oxidation using the latest model were performed for JRTR fuel. According to the current JRTR fuel management scheme and operation strategy for 5 MW power, fresh fuel is discharged after 900 effective full power days (EFPD), which is too long a span to predict oxidation properly without an elaborate model. The latest model developed by Kim et al. is in good agreement with the recent in-pile test data as well as with the out-of-pile test data available in the literature, and is one of the best predictors for the oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding in various operating condition. Accordingly, this model was chosen for estimating the oxide film thickness. Through the preliminarily evaluation, water pH level is to be controlled lower than 6.2 for the conservativeness in the case of including the effect of anticipated operational occurrences and the spent fuel residence time in the storage rack after discharging. (author)

  8. Development of boronated aluminum alloy for basket of cask for nuclear spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Y.; Saida, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has been contributing to develop metal cask technologies for utilities and competent authorities in Japan, and have established transport and storage cask design ''MSF series'' which realizes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed boronated aluminum as basket material. This boronated aluminum has been developed to improve characteristics of material. To achieve this object, powder metallurgy method has been adopted for manufacturing boronated material. It is well known that this method provides excellent characteristics for the material and this boronated aluminum alloy has obtained excellent both mechanical and neutron absorbing characteristics. In addition, in order to maintain material properties for long-term use this boronated material is not strengthened by aging treatment. This paper summarizes an outline of the boronated aluminum alloy for basket assemblies by powder metallurgy. (author)

  9. Thermal diffusivity of fuel clad materials: study on D9 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seenivasan, G.; Balasubramanian, R.; Krishnaiah, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal diffusivity of D9 alloy has been measured using a laser flash method in the temperature range of 673 to 1273 K. The samples were taken in the form of 2 mm thick polished discs and some of the discs were annealed at 1073 K in high vacuum. A Nd-YAG laser of pulse width 1 msec and energy 20 J was used for heating. Lead sulphide (PbS) was used as detector. The result indicates that the thermal diffusivity increases with increasing temperature. It has been observed that the thermal diffusivity of 503 and 505 alloys are very similar and their values are very close to that of SS-304. (author)

  10. 25 years of NDE in fabrication of zirconium alloy mill products and nuclear fuel in the Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistry, R.K.; Laxminarayana, B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Failure of nuclear fuel is highly undesirable from both economic and operational aspects. Hence all the components require rigorous QC and inspection checks. NDT plays a major role in assuring the quality of the products both at final and intermediate stages. This paper gives an overall review of NDT methods employed in achieving the integrity of nuclear products. The NDE procedures followed in NFC are visual inspection, radiography, penetrant testing, eddy current testing, ultrasonic testing and helium leak testing. NFC's quality assurance programme is organised to achieve the desired objectives by carrying out in process and final inspection at all critical steps of fabrication. (author)

  11. The elastic properties of zirconium alloy fuel cladding and pressure tubing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosinger, H.E.; Northwood, D.O.

    1979-01-01

    A knowledge of the elastic properties of zirconium alloys is required in the mathematical modelling of cladding and pressure tubing performance. Until recently, little of this type of data was available, particularly at elevated temperatures. The dynamic elastic moduli of zircaloy-2, zircaloy-4, the alloys Zr-1.0 wt%Nb, Zr-2.5 wt%Nb and Marz grade zirconium have therefore been determined over the temperature range 275 to 1000 K. Young's modulus and shear modulus for all the zirconium alloys decrease with temperature and are expressed by empirical relations fitted to the data. The elastic properties are texture dependent and a detailed study has been conducted on the effect of texture on the elastic properties of Zr-1.0 wt% Nb over the temperature range 275 to 775 K. The results are compared with polycrystalline elastic constants computed from single crystal elastic constants, and the effect of texture on the dynamic elastic moduli is discussed in detail. (Auth.)

  12. Interaction of Al2O3xSiO2 alloyed uranium oxide with pyrocarbon coating of fuel particles under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Svistunov, D.E.; Chujko, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    Method of comparative data analysis for P O2 and P CO was used to consider interaction in fuel particle between pyrocarbon coating and fuel sample, alloyed with alumosilicate addition. Equations of interaction reactions for the case of hermetic and depressurized fuel particle are presented. Calculations of required xAl 2 O 3 XySiO 2 content, depending on oxide fuel burnup, were conducted. It was suggested to use silicon carbide for limitation of the upper level of CO pressure in fuel particle. Estimation of thermal stability of alumosilicates under conditions of uranium oxide burnup equals 1100 and 1500 deg C for Al/Si ratio in addition 1/1 and 4/1 respectively

  13. Analytical functions used for description of the plastic deformation process in Zirconium alloys WWER type fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedotov, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the RAPTA-5 code as applied to the analysis of the thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod cladding under designed accident conditions. The irreversible process thermodynamics methods were proposed to be used for the description of the plastic deformation process in zirconium alloys under accident conditions. Functions, which describe yielding stress dependence on plastic strain, strain rate and temperature may be successfully used in calculations. On the basis of the experiments made and the existent experimental data the dependence of yielding stress on plastic strain, strain rate, temperature and heating rate for E110 alloy was determined. In future the following research work shall be made: research of dynamic strain ageing in E635 alloy under different strain rates; research of strain rate influence on plastic strain in E635 alloy under test temperature higher than 873 K; research of deformation strengthening of E635 alloy under high temperatures; research of heating rate influence n phase transformation in E110 and E635 alloys

  14. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  15. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in water of spent fuel storage pool at RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Jordanov, G.; Dobrijevic, R.

    2004-12-01

    Study on corrosion of aluminium cladding, of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined in the framework nr the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Clad-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' since 2002. Standard racks with aluminium coupons are exposed to water in the spent fuel pools of the research reactor RA. After predetermined exposure times along with periodic monitoring of the water parameters, the coupons are examined according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. Description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures, water quality monitoring and compilation of results of visual examination of corrosion effects are present in this article. (author)

  16. Solid TRU fuels and fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Toru; Suzuki, Yasufumi

    1997-01-01

    Alloys and nitrides are candidate solid fuels for transmutation. However, the nitride fuels are preferred to the alloys because they have more favorable thermal properties which allows to apply a cold-fuel concept. The nitride fuel cycle technology is briefly presented

  17. Evaluation of colloidal Ag and Ag-alloys as anode electrocatalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Mechanical, Auto, and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor, N9B 3P4 (Canada); Gyenge, Elod L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Colombia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    In this study, colloidal silver and silver-alloys (Ag-Pt, Ag-Au, Ag-Ir, and Ag-Pd) prepared by the Boenneman technique were evaluated as anode catalysts for sodium borohydride oxidation using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), chronopotentiometry (CP) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry. The CV results show that the colloidal Ag-alloys were electrochemically active towards borohydride oxidation with oxidation potentials ranging between -0.7 and 0.4 V vs. Hg/HgO (MOE). The most negative oxidation potential was recorded on Ag-Pt. CA results show that the steady state current density was highest on Ag-Pt, followed by Ag-Ir, Ag-Au, and Ag-Pd. The lowest overpotential was recorded on Ag-Ir for a current step change of 10mAcm{sup -2}. A significant temperature effect and a small rotation speed effect were found in the rotating disc voltammetry for all the investigated colloids. The highest peak current was recorded on Ag-Au, while the most negative peak potential was recorded on Ag-Ir. (author)

  18. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raepsaet, C.; Bossis, Ph.; Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  19. Investigation of electrorefining of metallic alloy fuel onto solid Al cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassayre, L.; Malmbeck, R.; Masset, P.; Rebizant, J.; Serp, J.; Soucek, P.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2007-01-01

    This work concerned the electrorefining of UZr and UPuZr alloys on a solid aluminium cathode, in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing U 3+ , Pu 3+ , Np 3+ , Zr 2+ or Zr 4+ , Am 3+ , Nd 3+ , Y 3+ , Ce 3+ and Gd 3+ chlorides. During constant current electrolyses, the use of a cathodic cut-off potential (-1.25 V versus Ag/AgCl) allowed to selectively deposit actinides (mainly U), while lanthanides remained in the salt. The aim was to determine the maximal load achievable on a single aluminium electrode. The total exchange charge was 4300 C, which represents the deposition of 3.72 g of actinides in 4.17 g Al, yielding a composition of 44.6 wt% An in Al. It was shown that the melting of the cathode contributed to increase the total amount of actinides deposited on the aluminium

  20. Investigation of powdering ductile gamma U-10 wt%Mo alloy for dispersion fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, R.M., E-mail: lealneto@ipen.br [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Rocha, C.J. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Urano de Carvalho, E. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Science and Technology Brazilian Institute, Innovating Nuclear Reactors (Brazil); Riella, H.G. [Science and Technology Brazilian Institute, Innovating Nuclear Reactors (Brazil); Chemical Engineering Department, Santa Catarina Federal University, Florianópolis (Brazil); Durazzo, M. [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, IPEN/CNEN-SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Science and Technology Brazilian Institute, Innovating Nuclear Reactors (Brazil)

    2014-02-01

    This work forms part of the studies presently ongoing at Nuclear and Energy Research Institute – IPEN/CNEN-SP investigating the feasibility of powdering ductile U-10 wt%Mo alloy by hydriding–milling–dehydriding of the gamma phase (HMD). Hydriding was conducted at room temperature in a Sievert apparatus following heat treatment activation. Hydrided pieces were fragile enough to be hand milled to the desired particle size range. Hydrogen was removed by heating the samples under high vacuum. X-ray diffraction analysis of the hydrided material showed an amorphous-like pattern that is completely reversed following dehydriding. The hydrogen content of the hydrided samples corresponds to a trihydride, i.e. (U,Mo)H{sub 3}. SEM analysis of HMD powder particles revealed equiaxial powder particles together with some plate-like particles. A hypothesis for the amorphous hydride phase formation is suggested.

  1. Interaction between uranium oxide alloyed with Al2O3·SiO2 and pyrocarbon coating during irradiation of micro fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Khromov, Y.F.; Svistunov, D.E.; Chuiko, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the interaction between uranium oxide and carbon was previously studied in the presence of Al 2 O 3 ·SiO 2 , SiC, and UC 1.86 ; in this case, the quantity of the reacting substances does not have any effect on the attainment of the equilibrium state. Based on the obtained results, it is interesting to study the characteristic features of the interaction between the alloyed UO x cores (kernels) with the PyC-coating under the conditions involving irradiation of the micro fuel elements with thermal neutrons and the formation of solid fission products. The data concerning the characteristics of a micro fuel element (the weight of the core, its composition, etc.) are useful for carrying out a quantitative evaluation of the additives required for fixing the alkali-earth fission products by obtaining stable compounds of aluminosilicates with Ba, Sr, Rb, and Cs at different levels of depletion (burnup) of the oxide fuel. An analysis of the interaction processes in such a complex system as the irradiated alloyed uranium oxide fuel located in a micro fuel element is carried out by comparing the chemical potential of oxygen (RT ln P O 2 ) for the competing constituents of the system

  2. Mechanical behaviour and failure of fuel cladding zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants under accidental RIA-type situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, D.T.

    2009-01-01

    In French Nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs), most of structural parts of the fuel assembly consist of zirconium alloy tubes and plates. Optimizing the management of fuel in nuclear power plants led to the increase in the duration of fuel cycles and power. The use of high fuel burnups requires drastic changes in the rules for reactor design in the nuclear safety. The evaluation of nuclear reactors in accident situations is based on reference accident scenarios. One of these hypothetical accidents, examined in this study, is the 'Reactivity Initiated Accident'. In order to assess the structural integrity of these parts it is necessary to characterize both the plastic flow and fracture behaviour of the materials at various stages of the life cycle, (i.e. at increasing levels of hydriding, irradiation, oxidation or thermal mechanical loading). The purpose of this work is to provide experimental data and to develop a model of the thermo-mechanical behaviour and to propose a design analysis method in the case of non-irradiated clads, in RIA-type situations. Mechanical tests were conducted on Cold-Worked-Stress-Relieved and on Recrystallized Zircaloy-4 sheets using various kinds of samples including smooth and notched tensile specimens and small punch tests. Temperature was set to 25, 250 and 600 C with hydrogen contents between 0 and 1000 ppm. The model is based on a simplified description of a Zircaloy polycrystal in which scalar isotropic ductile damage including void nucleation and growth is added. The model is also physically based to easily transfer parameters determined for one material state to another (e.g. transfer between sheet and tube or between different levels of irradiation). The model was implemented in the Finite Element software Zebulon using either an explicit or an implicit time integration scheme. Uniaxial tension tests were used to tune the model parameters for both materials, considering various values of temperature and hydrogen levels

  3. Transient deformational properties of high temperature alloys used in solid oxide fuel cell stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kwok, Kawai; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2017-01-01

    Stresses and probability of failure during operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is affected by the deformational properties of the different components of the SOFC stack. Though the overall stress relaxes with time during steady state operation, large stresses would normally appear through...... to describe the high temperature inelastic deformational behaviors of Crofer 22 APU used for metallic interconnects in SOFC stacks.......Stresses and probability of failure during operation of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is affected by the deformational properties of the different components of the SOFC stack. Though the overall stress relaxes with time during steady state operation, large stresses would normally appear through...... transients in operation including temporary shut downs. These stresses are highly affected by the transient creep behavior of metallic components in the SOFC stack. This study investigates whether a variation of the so-called Chaboche's unified power law together with isotropic hardening can represent...

  4. ZPR-3 Assembly 6F : A spherical assembly of highly enriched uranium, depleted uranium, aluminum and steel with an average {sup 235}U enrichment of 47 atom %.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; McKnight, R. D; Schaefer, R. W.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-09-30

    Over a period of 30 years, more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited for nuclear data validation and to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. A number of the Argonne ZPR/ZPPR critical assemblies have been evaluated as ICSBEP and IRPhEP benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. ZPR-3 Assembly 6 consisted of six phases, A through F. In each phase a critical configuration was constructed to simulate a very simple shape such as a slab, cylinder or sphere that could be analyzed with the limited analytical tools available in the 1950s. In each case the configuration consisted of a core region of metal plates surrounded by a thick depleted uranium metal reflector. The average compositions of the core configurations were essentially identical in phases A - F. ZPR-3

  5. Development of Enriched Borated Aluminum Alloy for Basket Material of Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikio Sakai; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Hiroaki Fujiwara; Akira Sakai

    2002-01-01

    Concrete cask system is focused as the candidate one for spent fuel dry storage facilities from economic potential in Japan. Concrete cask consists of a concrete storage cask and a steel canister. A canister containing nuclear spent fuel is shipped by a transportation cask from a nuclear power plant to an interim storage facility. The canister is transferred from the transportation cask to a storage cask by a transfer cask in the storage facility. IHI has developed a concrete cask horizontal transfer system. This transfer system indicates that a canister is transferred to a storage cask horizontally. This transfer system has a merit against canister drop accident in transfer operation, i.e. spent fuel assemblies can be kept safe during the transfer operation. There are guide rails inside of the concrete cask, and the canister is installed into the storage cask with sliding on the rails. To develop the horizontal transfer system, IHI carried out a heat load test and numerical analyses by CFD. Heat load experiment was carried out by using a full-scale prototype canister, storage cask and transfer vessel. The decay heat was simulated by an electric heater installed in the canister. Assuming high burn-up spent fuel storage, heat generation was set between 20.0 kW and 25.0 kW. This experiment was focused on the concrete temperature distribution. We confirmed that the maximum concrete temperature in transfer operation period was lower than 40 deg. C (Heat generation 22.5 kW). Moreover we confirmed the maximum concrete temperature passed 24 hours with horizontal orientation was below 90 deg. C (Heat generation 22.5 kW). We analyzed the thermal performance of the concrete cask with horizontal transfer condition and normal storage condition. Thermal analyses for horizontal transfer operation were carried out based on the experimental conditions. The tendency of the analytical results was in good agreement with experimental results. The purpose of vertical thermal analysis

  6. Investigation of electrorefining of metallic alloy fuel onto solid Al cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassayre, L. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Malmbeck, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: rikard.malmbeck@cec.eu.int; Masset, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Rebizant, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Serp, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Soucek, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    This work concerned the electrorefining of UZr and UPuZr alloys on a solid aluminium cathode, in the LiCl-KCl eutectic melt containing U{sup 3+}, Pu{sup 3+}, Np{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 2+} or Zr{sup 4+}, Am{sup 3+}, Nd{sup 3+}, Y{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+} chlorides. During constant current electrolyses, the use of a cathodic cut-off potential (-1.25 V versus Ag/AgCl) allowed to selectively deposit actinides (mainly U), while lanthanides remained in the salt. The aim was to determine the maximal load achievable on a single aluminium electrode. The total exchange charge was 4300 C, which represents the deposition of 3.72 g of actinides in 4.17 g Al, yielding a composition of 44.6 wt% An in Al. It was shown that the melting of the cathode contributed to increase the total amount of actinides deposited on the aluminium.

  7. Mathematic modeling of reactor fuel radiation creep at example of uranium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The model of a radiation creep is explained within the framework of the mechanism of gliding and climbing dislocations based on the conception of a dislocation as not ideal sink for point radiation defects (PRD). The offered model is efficient for installed concentration PRD, considerably exceeding thermally steady state concentration. The gliding of dislocation are describing as due to moving dislocation kinks in Peierl's relief. The climbing of dislocation are describing as due to moving dislocation jogs. The mathematical model for the computer program simulating the offered model of radiation creep is developed. The complex of the computer programs simulating the radiation creep is developed. The computer simulation researches are conducted and the outcomes of a research of a kinetics of a flexible sliding and climbing dislocation interacting to obstacles of a various type (spherical centre of extension, dislocation prismatic loop and their spatially random distributions) for various installed concentration PRD, external loadings and temperatures are represented. The curves of installed rate of a radiation creep from temperature for uranium and its alloys with small additions of molybdenum (from 0,9 to 1,3 %) are obtained

  8. Effect of surface treatment on the interfacial contact resistance and corrosion resistance of Fe–Ni–Cr alloy as a bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Meijun; Zhang, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    The bipolar plate is an important component of the PEMFC (polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell) because it supplies the pathway of electron flow between each unit cell. Fe–Ni–Cr alloy is considered as a good candidate material for bipolar plate, but it is limited to use as a bipolar plate due to its high ICR (interfacial contact resistance) and corrosion problem. In order to explore a cost-effective method on surface modification, various chemical and electrochemical treatments are performed on Fe–Ni–Cr alloy to acquire the effect of the surface modification on the ICR and corrosion behavior. The ICR and corrosion resistance of Fe–Ni–Cr alloy can be effectively controlled by the chemical treatment of immersion in the mixed acid solution with 10 vol% HNO 3 , 2 vol% HCl and 1 vol% HF for 10 min at 65 °C and then was placed in 30 vol% HNO 3 solution for 5 min. The chemical treatment is more effective on reducing ICR and improving corrosion resistance than that of electrochemical methods (be carried out in the 2 mol/L H 2 SO 4 solution with the electrical potential from −0.4 V to 0.6 V) for Fe–Ni–Cr alloy as a bipolar plate for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. - Highlights: • The procedure of the surface treatments on Fe–Ni–Cr alloy as bipolar plate was described in detail. • Effects of various surface treatments on the interfacial contact resistivity and corrosion behavior were discussed. • The mechanism of the surface modification was particularly analyzed

  9. Microstructural evolution of a uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloy for nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, A.J.; Clarke, K.D.; McCabe, R.J.; Necker, C.T.; Papin, P.A.; Field, R.D.; Kelly, A.M.; Tucker, T.J.; Forsyth, R.T.; Dickerson, P.O.; Foley, J.C.; Swenson, H.; Aikin, R.M.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (LEU-10wt.%Mo) is of interest for the fabrication of monolithic fuels to replace highly-enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion fuels in high performance research and test reactors around the world. In this work, depleted uranium-10 wt.%Mo (DU-10wt.%Mo) is used to simulate the solidification and microstructural evolution of LEU-10wt.%Mo. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and complementary electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) reveal significant microsegregation present in the metastable γ-phase after solidification. Homogenization is performed at 800 and 1000 °C for times ranging from 1 to 32 h to explore the time–temperature combinations that will reduce the extent of microsegregation, as regions of higher and lower Mo content may influence local mechanical properties and provide preferred regions for γ-phase decomposition. We show for the first time that EBSD can be used to qualitatively assess microstructural evolution in DU-10wt.%Mo after homogenization treatments. Complementary EPMA is used to quantitatively confirm this finding. Homogenization at 1000 °C for 2–4 h may the regions that contain 8 wt.% Mo or lower, whereas homogenization at 1000 °C for longer than 8 h effectively saturates Mo chemical homogeneity, but results in substantial grain growth. The appropriate homogenization time will depend upon additional microstructural considerations, such as grain growth and intended subsequent processing. Higher carbon LEU-10wt.%Mo generally contains more inclusions within the grains and at grain boundaries after solidification. The effect of these inclusions on microstructural evolution (e.g. grain growth) during homogenization and as potential γ-phase decomposition nucleation sites is unclear, but likely requires additional study.

  10. Microstructural evolution of a uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum alloy for nuclear reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, A.J., E-mail: aclarke@lanl.gov; Clarke, K.D.; McCabe, R.J.; Necker, C.T.; Papin, P.A.; Field, R.D.; Kelly, A.M.; Tucker, T.J.; Forsyth, R.T.; Dickerson, P.O.; Foley, J.C.; Swenson, H.; Aikin, R.M.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    2015-10-15

    Low-enriched uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (LEU-10wt.%Mo) is of interest for the fabrication of monolithic fuels to replace highly-enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion fuels in high performance research and test reactors around the world. In this work, depleted uranium-10 wt.%Mo (DU-10wt.%Mo) is used to simulate the solidification and microstructural evolution of LEU-10wt.%Mo. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and complementary electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) reveal significant microsegregation present in the metastable γ-phase after solidification. Homogenization is performed at 800 and 1000 °C for times ranging from 1 to 32 h to explore the time–temperature combinations that will reduce the extent of microsegregation, as regions of higher and lower Mo content may influence local mechanical properties and provide preferred regions for γ-phase decomposition. We show for the first time that EBSD can be used to qualitatively assess microstructural evolution in DU-10wt.%Mo after homogenization treatments. Complementary EPMA is used to quantitatively confirm this finding. Homogenization at 1000 °C for 2–4 h may the regions that contain 8 wt.% Mo or lower, whereas homogenization at 1000 °C for longer than 8 h effectively saturates Mo chemical homogeneity, but results in substantial grain growth. The appropriate homogenization time will depend upon additional microstructural considerations, such as grain growth and intended subsequent processing. Higher carbon LEU-10wt.%Mo generally contains more inclusions within the grains and at grain boundaries after solidification. The effect of these inclusions on microstructural evolution (e.g. grain growth) during homogenization and as potential γ-phase decomposition nucleation sites is unclear, but likely requires additional study.

  11. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells.......In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells....

  12. Stress-corrosion cracking properties of candidate fuel cladding alloys for the Canadian SCWR: a summary of literature data and recent test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, W.; Zeng, Y., E-mail: Wenyue@NRcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Luo, J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Novotny, R. [JRC-European Commission, Patten (Netherlands); Li, J.; Amirkhiz, B.S., E-mail: Jian.li@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Matchim, M.; Collier, J.; Yang, L., E-mail: lin.yang@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Cracking of fuel claddings is a serious concern when selecting candidate alloys for the development of a next-generation reactor. Whether the cracking is due to an environment-metal interaction such as stress-corrosion, or a pure metallurgical process such as localized plastic deformation along grain boundaries, the final impact is the same: cracking of the cladding can lead to fuel failure. In the course of a review of potential candidate alloys in preparation for further assessment under conditions relevant to the Canadian SCWR concept, relevant cracking studies reported for five short-listed alloys (namely 310S, 347H, 800H, 625 and 214) in the open literature were examined, and the key findings are provided in this paper. Discussions are also made of the recent SCC data from capsule tests and slow-strain rate tests (SSRT) in supercritical water. The data suggest that there is a threshold strain level below which SCC is not developed during SSRT tests. The practical implication of this finding is also discussed. (author)

  13. Rudimentary simple, single step fabrication of nano-flakes like AgCd alloy electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandary, Nimai; Basu, Suddhasatwa; Ingole, Pravin P.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, for the first time, we report rudimentary simple, single step fabrication of an electro-catalyst based on AgCd alloy nanoparticles with flakes like geometry which shows highly efficient activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). A simple potentiostatic deposition method has been employed for co-depositing AgCd alloy nanostructures with flakes like shapes along with dendrites on the surface of carbon fibre paper. The chemico-physical properties of the catalyst are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). Electro-catalytic activity of AgCd alloy based electro-catalyst towards ORR is studied in alkaline medium by cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) technique. Electrochemical in-situ FTIR measurements are also performed to identify the species generated during ORR process. Based on the results from electro-catalysis experiment, it is concluded that nano-alloyed AgCd electrodeposited on carbon paper shows excellent activity for ORR, following four electron pathways with H_2O_2 yield less than 15%. The combination of low cost of Ag and Cd, fast and facile method of its fabrication and higher activity towards ORR makes the AgCd electro-catalyst an attractive catalyst of choice for alkaline fuel cell.

  14. Carbon-Supported Pd and PdFe Alloy Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Rivera Gavidia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs are electrochemical devices that efficiently produce electricity and are characterized by a large flexibility for portable applications and high energy density. Methanol crossover is one of the main obstacles for DMFC commercialization, forcing the search for highly electro-active and methanol tolerant cathodes. In the present work, carbon-supported Pd and PdFe catalysts were synthesized using a sodium borohydride reduction method and physico-chemically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray techniques such as photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, diffraction (XRD and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. The catalysts were investigated as DMFC cathodes operating at different methanol concentrations (up to 10 M and temperatures (60 °C and 90 °C. The cell based on PdFe/C cathode presented the best performance, achieving a maximum power density of 37.5 mW·cm−2 at 90 °C with 10 M methanol, higher than supported Pd and Pt commercial catalysts, demonstrating that Fe addition yields structural changes to Pd crystal lattice that reduce the crossover effects in DMFC operation.

  15. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    -destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpaNRT. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  16. Development of Ultra-Low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Branko N. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Weidner, John [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The goal of this project is to synthesize a low cost PEM fuel cell cathode catalyst and support with optimized average mass activity, stability of mass activity, initial high current density performance under H2/air (power density), and catalyst and support stability able to meet 2017 DOE targets for electrocatalysts for transportation applications. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst was synthesized according to a novel methodology developed at USC through: (i) surface modification, (ii) metal catalyzed pyrolysis and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess meal used to dope the support. Pt* stands for suppressed platinum catalyst synthesized with Co doped platinum. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization, inclusion of cobalt in the bulk and formation of non-metallic active sites on the carbon surface. Catalytic activity of the support shows an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass transfer regions and 2.5% H2O2 production. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst durability under 0.6-1.0 V potential cycling and support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling was evaluated. The results indicated excellent catalyst and support performance under simulated start-up/shut down operating conditions (1.0 – 1.5 V, 5000 cycles) which satisfy DOE 2017 catalyst and support durability and activity. The 30% Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed high initial mass activity of 0.34 A/mgPGM at 0.9 ViR-free and loss of mass activity of 45% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The catalyst performance under H2-air fuel cell operating conditions showed only 24 mV (iR-free) loss at 0.8 A/cm2 with an ECSA loss of 42% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling showed mass activity loss of 50% and potential loss of 8 mV (iR-free) at 1.5 A/cm2. The ECSA loss was 22% after 5,000 cycles. Furthermore, the Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed an

  17. Determination of trace impurities in uranium-transition metal alloy fuels by ICP-MS using extended common analyte internal standardization (ECAIS) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S.B.; Nagar, B.K.; Saxena, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed for the determination of eight trace impurities viz, Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn and Ni in three different uranium-transition metal alloy fuels (U-Me; Me = Ti, Zr and Mo) employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The well known common analyte internal standardization (CAIS) chemometric technique was modified and then employed to minimize and account for the matrix effect on analyte intensity. Standard addition of analytes to the pure synthetic U-Me sample solutions and subsequently their ≥ 94% recovery by the ICP-MS measurement validates the proposed methodology. One real sample of each of these alloys was analyzed by the developed analytical methodology and the %RSD observed was in the range of 5-8%. The method detection limits were found to be within 4-10 μg L -1 . (author)

  18. Development of Self-Healing Zirconium-Silicide Coatings for Improved Performance Zirconium-Alloy Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Mariani, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Company; Lahoda, Ed [Westinghouse Electric Company

    2018-03-31

    Given the long-term goal of developing such coatings for use with nuclear reactor fuel cladding, this work describes results of oxidation and corrosion behavior of bulk zirconium-silicide and fabrication of zirconium-silicide coatings on zirconium-alloy test flats, tube configurations, and SiC test flats. In addition, boiling heat transfer of these modified surfaces (including ZrSi2 coating) during clad quenching experiments is discussed in detail. Oxidation of bulk ZrSi2 was found to be negligible compared to Zircaloy-4 (a common Zr-alloy cladding material) and mechanical integrity of ZrSi2 was superior to that of bulk Zr2Si at high temperatures in ambient air. Very interesting and unique multi-nanolayered composite of ZrO2 and SiO2 were observed. Physical model for the oxidation has been proposed wherein Zr–Si–O mixture undergoes a spinodal phase decomposition into ZrO2 and SiO2, which is manifested as a nanoscale assembly of alternating layer of the two oxides. Steam corrosion at high pressure (10.3 MPa) led to weight loss of ZrSi2 and produced oxide scale with depletion of silicon, possibly attributed to volatile silicon hydroxide, gaseous silicon monoxide, and a solubility of silicon dioxide in water. Only Zircon phase (ZrSiO4) formed during oxidation of ZrSi2 at 1400°C in air, and allowed for immobilization silicon species in oxide scale in the aqueous environments. Zirconium-silicide coatings (on zirconium-alloy substrates) investigated in this study were deposited primarily using magnetron sputter deposition method and slurry method, although powder spray deposition processes cold spray and thermal spray methods were also investigated. The optimized ZrSi2 sputtered coating exhibited a highly protective nature at elevated temperatures in ambient air by mitigating oxygen permeation to the underlying zirconium alloy substrate. The high oxidation resistance of the coating has been shown to be due to nanocrystalline SiO2 and ZrSiO4 phases in the amorphous

  19. The use of slightly alloyed uranium as fuel: its influence on the dissolution and other stages of treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faugeras, P.; Leroy, P.; Lheureux, C.

    1959-01-01

    This report deals chiefly with the treatment of binary alloys (UAI, UMo, UZr, UCr, USi) with a low concentration of the additional element (≤2 per cent). The investigation was pursued with a view to the continued utilisation, with a minimum of modification, of the existing plants for treatment of non-alloyed irradiated uranium. In the first part, the usual process for the treatment of irradiated uranium by solvent extraction is briefly recalled. The second part is devoted to a study of the selective dissolution of the canning around certain of these alloys. The third part gives the behaviour of these different alloys at various phases of the usual treatment: a) dissolution; b) extractions; c) final treatment of fission products; d) final purification of plutonium. To conclude, possible alloys are classed as a function of their repercussions on the normal treatment. (author) [fr

  20. Hydrogen Sulphide Corrosion of Carbon and Stainless Steel Alloys Immersed in Mixtures of Renewable Fuel Sources and Tested Under Co-processing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely András

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with modern regulations and directives, the use of renewable biomass materials as precursors for the production of fuels for transportation purposes is to be strictly followed. Even though, there are problems related to processing, storage and handling in wide range of subsequent uses, since there must be a limit to the ratio of biofuels mixed with mineral raw materials. As a key factor with regards to these biomass sources pose a great risk of causing multiple forms of corrosion both to metallic and non-metallic structural materials. To assess the degree of corrosion risk to a variety of engineering alloys like low-carbon and stainless steels widely used as structural metals, this work is dedicated to investigating corrosion rates of economically reasonable engineering steel alloys in mixtures of raw gas oil and renewable biomass fuel sources under typical co-processing conditions. To model a desulphurising refining process, corrosion tests were carried out with raw mineral gasoline and its mixture with used cooking oil and animal waste lard in relative quantities of 10% (g/g. Co-processing was simulated by batch-reactor laboratory experiments. Experiments were performed at temperatures between 200 and 300ºC and a pressure in the gas phase of 90 bar containing 2% (m3/m3 hydrogen sulphide. The time span of individual tests were varied between 1 and 21 days so that we can conclude about changes in the reaction rates against time exposure of and extrapolate for longer periods of exposure. Initial and integral corrosion rates were defined by a weight loss method on standard size of coupons of all sorts of steel alloys. Corrosion rates of carbon steels indicated a linear increase with temperature and little variation with composition of the biomass fuel sources. Apparent activation energies over the first 24-hour period remained moderate, varying between 35.5 and 50.3 kJ mol−1. Scales developed on carbon steels at higher

  1. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element for nuclear reactors is proposed which has a higher corrosion resisting quality in reactor operations. The zirconium alloy coating around the fuel element (uranium or plutonium compound) has on its inside a protection layer of metal which is metallurgically bound to the substance of the coating. As materials are namned: Alluminium, copper, niobium, stainless steel, and iron. This protective metallic layer has another inner layer, also metallurgically bound to its surface, which consists usually of a zirconium alloy. (UWI) [de

  2. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuyama, Tadashi; Mukai, Hideyuki.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the bending of a fuel rod caused by the difference in the elongation between a joined fuel rod and a standard fuel rod thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: A joined fuel rod is in a thread engagement at its lower end plug thereof with a lower plate, while passed through at its upper end plug into an upper tie plate and secured with a nut. Further, a standard fuel rod is engaged at its upper end plug and lower end plug with the upper tie plate and the lower tie plate respectively. Expansion springs are mounted to the upper end plugs of these bonded fuel rods and the standard fuel rods for preventing this lifting. Each of the fuel rods comprises a plurality of sintered pellets of nuclear fuel materials laminated in a zircaloy fuel can. The content of the alloy ingredient in the fuel can of the bonded fuel rod is made greater than that of the alloy ingredient of the standard fuel rod. this can increase the elongation for the bonded fuel rod, and the spring of the standard fuel rod is tightly bonded to prevent the bending. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. Applications Ni59Nb40Pt(1-x) Xx (X= Sn,Sby and Ru) amorphous alloy as anodes for direct methanol (DMFC) fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Pierna, A

    2005-01-01

    The search of new anode materials of amorphous nature for methanol fuel cells is one of the aims of this work.The main problem that fuel cells present is related to the catalytic material and its distribution in a suitable matrix.Amorphous alloys are particularly attractive materials as catalyst supports because of their high conductivity, high corrosion resistance in sulphuric acid, as well as the possibility of a good distribution of the electrocatalytic particles, mainly platinum and platinum-tin, on a conducting matrix.The electrooxidation of methanol, in percloric acid medium, has been used as probe to evaluate the performance of metallic amorphous electrodes, with compositions Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 1 , Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Sn0.4, Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Sb 0 .4 and Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Ru 0 .4.The electrocatalytic activity of the alloyed ribbons of compositions (x = 0.6, 1% at. in platinum) is improved considerably, so much for the change in their composition, as for the roughness degree that the catalytic surfaces present. The increase of the tolerance to adsorbed species, and better resistance to the poisoning of their catalytic centers, can be observed by means of voltammetric experiments at different activation times with HF 48%. The electrooxidation of methanol in the amorphous alloy of composition Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 1 , is influenced by the nature of the used electrolyte, presenting smaller values of current density in solutions 1M H 2 SO 4 than in 1M of HClO 4 .This behavior is not observed in the alloy Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Sn 0 .4, Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Sb 0 .4 and Ni 5 9Nb 4 0Pt 0 .6Ru 0 .4which does not present a poisoning of the catalytic centers depending on the used electrolyte.Adding tin to the alloys showed the existence of a synergetic effect in the methanol electrooxidation process, attaining to a descent of 20 mV vs Ag/AgCl in the onset potential, and about 200 mV in the maximun peak potential

  4. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  5. Experiments for evaluation of corrosion to develop storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-alloy clad spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Murphy, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    The technical bases for specification of limits to environmental exposure conditions to avoid excessive degradation are being developed for storage criteria for dry storage of highly-enriched, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels owned by the US Department of Energy. Corrosion of the aluminum cladding is a limiting degradation mechanism (occurs at lowest temperature) for aluminum exposed to an environment containing water vapor. Attendant radiation fields of the fuels can lead to production of nitric acid in the presence of air and water vapor and would exacerbate the corrosion of aluminum by lowering the pH of the water solution. Laboratory-scale specimens are being exposed to various conditions inside an autoclave facility to measure the corrosion of the fuel matrix and cladding materials through weight change measurements and metallurgical analysis. In addition, electrochemical corrosion tests are being performed to supplement the autoclave testing by measuring differences in the general corrosion and pitting corrosion behavior of the aluminum cladding alloys and the aluminum-uranium fuel materials in water solutions

  6. HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

    2005-03-11

    This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered

  7. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  8. Zr-alloys, the nuclear material for water reactor fuel. A survey and update with focus on fuel for pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidinger, H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is intended to provide a solid overview on the development of the requirements and the respective answers found as far as water cooled fuel rods and assemblies are concerned. It shall be a help as well for designers and manufacturers as also for users of this fuel, because only a broad and consistent knowledge on all aspects of the application of this material in nuclear fuel can guarantee a successful operation under the still increasing requirements in water cooled reactor cores

  9. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  10. Corrosion of high temperature resisting alloys exposed to heavy fuel ash; Corrosion de aleaciones resistentes a altas temperaturas expuestas a ceniza de combustoleo pesado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong Moreno, Adriana del Carmen

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the performed research was to study the degradation process by high temperature corrosion of alloys exposed to heavy fuel oil ashes through a comparative experimental evaluation of its performance that allowed to establish the mechanisms involved in the phenomenon. The experimentation carried out involved the determination of the resistance to the corrosion of 14 alloys of different type (low and medium alloy steels, ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, nickel base alloys and a FeCrAl alloy of type ODS) exposed to high temperatures (580 Celsius degrees - 900 Celsius degrees) in 15 ash deposits with different corrosive potential, which were collected in the high temperature zone of boilers of thermoelectric power stations. The later studies to the corrosion tests consisted of the analysis by sweeping electron microscopy supported by microanalysis of the corroded probes, with the purpose of determining the effect of Na, V and S on the corrosivity of the ash deposits and the effect of the main alloying elements on the corrosion resistance of the alloys. Such effects are widely documented to support the proposed mechanisms of degradation that are occurring. The global analysis of the generated results has allowed to propose a model to explain the global mechanism of corrosion of alloys exposed to the high temperatures of ash deposits. The proposed model, complements the processed one by Wilson, widely accepted for fused vanadates, as far as on one hand, it considers the effect of the sodium sulfate presence (in addition to the vanadium compounds) in the deposits, and on the other hand, it extends it to temperatures higher than the point of fusion of constituent vanadium compounds of the deposits. Both aspects involve considering the roll that the process of diffusion of species has on the degradation and the capacity of protection of the alloy. The research performed allowed to confirm what the Wilson model had established for deposits with high

  11. Reactivity management and burn-up management on JRR-3 silicide-fuel-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Tomoaki; Araki, Masaaki; Izumo, Hironobu; Kinase, Masami; Torii, Yoshiya; Murayama, Yoji

    2007-08-01

    On the conversion from uranium-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum-dispersion-type fuel (silicide fuel), uranium density was increased from 2.2 to 4.8 g/cm 3 with keeping uranium-235 enrichment of 20%. So, burnable absorbers (cadmium wire) were introduced for decreasing excess reactivity caused by the increasing of uranium density. The burnable absorbers influence reactivity during reactor operation. So, the burning of the burnable absorbers was studied and the influence on reactor operation was made cleared. Furthermore, necessary excess reactivity on beginning of operation cycle and the time limit for restart after unplanned reactor shutdown was calculated. On the conversion, limit of fuel burn-up was increased from 50% to 60%. And the fuel exchange procedure was changed from the six-batch dispersion procedure to the fuel burn-up management procedure. The previous estimation of fuel burn-up was required for the planning of fuel exchange, so that the estimation was carried out by means of past operation data. Finally, a new fuel exchange procedure was proposed for effective use of fuel elements. On the procedure, burn-up of spent fuel was defined for each loading position. The average length of fuel's staying in the core can be increased by two percent on the procedure. (author)

  12. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  13. EELS and electron diffraction studies on possible bonaccordite crystals in pressurized water reactor fuel CRUD and in oxide films of alloy 600 material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiaxin [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoping (Sweden); Lindberg, Fredrik [Swerea KIMAB AB, Kista (Sweden); Wells, Daniel [Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte (United States); Bengysson, Bernt [Ringhals AB, Ringhalsverket, Varobacka (Sweden)

    2017-06-15

    Experimental verification of boron species in fuel CRUD (Chalk River Unidentified Deposit) would provide essential and important information about the root cause of CRUD-induced power shifts (CIPS). To date, only bonaccordite and elemental boron were reported to exist in fuel CRUD in CIPS-troubled pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores and lithium tetraborate to exist in simulated PWR fuel CRUD from some autoclave tests. We have reevaluated previous analysis of similar threadlike crystals along with examining some similar threadlike crystals from CRUD samples collected from a PWR cycle that had no indications of CIPS. These threadlike crystals have a typical [Ni]/[Fe] atomic ratio of ⁓2 and similar crystal morphology as the one (bonaccordite) reported previously. In addition to electron diffraction study, we have applied electron energy loss spectroscopy to determine boron content in such a crystal and found a good agreement with that of bonaccordite. Surprisingly, such crystals seem to appear also on corroded surfaces of Alloy 600 that was exposed to simulated PWR primary water with a dissolved hydrogen level of 5 mL H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, but absent when exposed under 75 mL H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O condition. It remains to be verified as to what extent and in which chemical environment this phase would be formed in PWR primary systems.

  14. Development of new zirconium based alloys for burn-up extension of light water reactor fuels, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Takeshi; Matsuo, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Steam corrosion tests and tensile were conducted to investigate the effects of alloying elements such as Sn, Nb, Fe, Cr, Mo and V, and the mechanical properties of Nb-containing Zr-base alloys. The corrosion resistance of Zr-base alloys in comparison to Zr'y-4 was significantly improved by the reduction of the Sn content by 0.5 wt% and by a small addition of Nb (about 0.05 to 0.2 wt%). However, the decrease in solute Sn atoms degraded mechanical properties. The increase of the total content of Fe and Cr from 0.3 to 0.7 wt% improved the mechanical properties without affecting the corrosion resistance. The decrease of the Fe/Cr ratio from 6.0 to 0.5 increased the corrosion resistance. Small addition of Mo and/or V resulted in a further improvement of mechanical properties. Based on these experiments, three Nb-containing Zr-base alloys with equivalent mechanical properties and superior corrosion resistance to Zr'y-4 were developed. (author)

  15. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  17. Research on high-temperature compression and creep behavior of porous Cu–Ni–Cr alloy for molten carbonate fuel cell anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li W.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porosity on high temperature compression and creep behavior of porous Cu alloy for the new molten carbonate fuel cell anodes was examined. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate and analyze the details of the microstructure and surface deformation. Compression creep tests were utilized to evaluate the mechanical properties of the alloy at 650 °C. The compression strength, elastic modulus, and yield stress all increased with the decrease in porosity. Under the same creep stress, the materials with higher porosity exhibited inferior creep resistance and higher steadystate creep rate. The creep behavior has been classified in terms of two stages. The first stage relates to grain rearrangement which results from the destruction of large pores by the applied load. In the second stage, small pores are collapsed by a subsequent sintering process under the load. The main deformation mechanism consists in that several deformation bands generate sequentially under the perpendicular loading, and in these deformation bands the pores are deformed by flattering and collapsing sequentially. On the other hand, the shape of a pore has a severe influence on the creep resistance of the material, i.e. every increase of pore size corresponds to a decrease in creep resistance.

  18. Nano-composite of PtRu alloy electrocatalyst and electronically conducting polymer for use as the anode in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jongho Choi; Kyungwon Park; Hyekyung Lee; Youngmin Kim; Jaesuk Lee; Yungeun Sung [Kwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju (Korea)

    2003-08-15

    Nano-composites comprised of PtRu alloy nanoparticles and an electronically conducting polymer for the anode electrode in direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were prepared. Two conducting polymers of poly(N-vinyl carbazole) and poly(9-(4-vinyl-phenyl)carbazole) were used for the nano-composite electrodes. Structural analyses were carried out using Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, AC impedance spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrocatalytic activities were investigated by voltammetry and chronoamperometry in a 2 M CH{sub 3}OH/{sub 0.5} M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution and the data compared with a carbon-supported PtRu electrode. XRD patterns indicated good alloy formation and nano-composite formation was confirmed by TEM. Electrochemical measurements and DMFC unit-cell tests indicate that the nano-composites could be useful in a DMFC, but its performance would be slightly lower than that of a carbon-supported electrode. The interfacial property between the PtRu-polymer nano-composite anode and the polymer electrolyte was good, as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. For better performance in a DMFC, a higher electric conductivity of the polymer and a lower catalyst loss are needed in nano-composite electrodes. (Author)

  19. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of fuel/matrix interaction layers in highly-irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al and Al-Si alloy matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, Dennis D. Jr; Jue, Jan Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adom B.; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Meyer, Mitch [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2014-04-15

    In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifically, samples from irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al-2Si and AA4043 (-4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U-7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission gas bubbles. Additionally, solid fission product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U-7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with Al-Si matrices.

  20. Super ODS steel R and D for fuel cladding of next generation nuclear systems. 2) Effect of minor alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, S.; Hashimoto, N.; Ukai, S.; Kimura, A.; Inoue, Masaki; Kaito, Takeji; Fujisawa, T.; Okuda, T.; Abe, F.

    2009-01-01

    For development of advanced ferritic ODS steels including high concentration of Cr and Al, the effect of minor alloying elements on fine dispersion of oxide particle was investigated. Microstructural analysis for Fe-16Cr-4Al-mY 2 O 3 -nZr or mHf due to TEM indicated that 0.3Zr or 0.6Hf are the optimum concentration. The mechanism of nano-sized oxide formation was also discussed. (author)

  1. Characterization of hydrogenation behavior on Mo-modified Zr-Nb alloys as nuclear fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.L.; Shibukawa, S.; Abe, H.; Satoh, Y.; Matsukawa, Y.; Kido, T.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Mo in Zr-Nb alloys are investigated in terms of their mechanical properties associated with microstructure, as well as their behavior under hydrogen environment. Zr-Nb-Mo alloys were fabricated by arc melting and subsequently cold rolling and annealing below the eutectoid temperature. Hydrogen was absorbed in a furnace under argon and hydrogen gas flow environment at high temperature. X-Ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction, and tensile test were jointly utilized to carry out detailed microstructural characterization and mechanical properties. Results showed that fcc-δ-ZrH 1.66 was formed in all hydrogen-absorbed alloys, and the amount of hydride enhanced with increasing of hydrogen content. In addition, it was clear that δ-ZrH 1.66 was precipitated both in grain boundary and interior, and preferential precipitation was observed on the habit planes of (0001) and {101-bar7}. Moreover, the strengthening effect by Mo addition was observed. The ductility loss by hydrogen absorption was found from fracture surface observation. Large area cleavage facets were found in Mo-free specimen, and less cleavage facets was observed in Mo-containing specimen, showing an appropriate addition of Mo can increase the tolerance to hydrogen embrittlement. (author)

  2. Irradiation performance of uranium-molybdenum alloy dispersion fuels; Desempenho sob irradiacao de elementos combustiveis do tipo U-Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Cirila Tacconi de

    2005-07-01

    The U-Mo-Al dispersion fuels of Material Test Reactors (MTR) are analyzed in terms of their irradiation performance. The irradiation performance aspects are associated to the neutronic and thermal hydraulics aspects to propose a new core configuration to the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP using U-Mo-Al fuels. Core configurations using U-10Mo-Al fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 8 gU/cm{sup 3} were analyzed with the computational programs Citation and MTRCR-IEA R1. Core configurations for fuels with uranium densities variable from 3 to 5 gU/cm{sup 3} showed to be adequate to use in IEA-R1 reactor e should present a stable in reactor performance even at high burn-up. (author)

  3. Properties of low content uranium-molybdenum alloys which may be used as nuclear fuels; Proprietes des alliages uranium-molybdene de faibles teneurs utilisables comme materiaux combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Decours, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Metallurgical properties are given in this report of uranium-molybdenum alloys containing 0,5 to 3 per cent of molybdenum. Since some of these alloys are used in EDF power reactors are given: briefly the operating conditions imposed on nuclear fuels: maximum temperature, temperature gradient and external pressure. In the first part are considered the structural properties of the alloys correlation with the phase transformation kinetics; a description is given of the effects of certain physico-metallurgical factors on the morphology and the crystalline structure of the materials: - solidification conditions and the heredity of the {gamma} structure, - cooling rate at the transformation points, - whether or not the intermediate {gamma} {yields} {beta} transformation is suppressed In the second part we show how a knowledge of the phase transformation processes has made it possible to define the optimum preparation conditions for these materials in the form of fuel tubes intended for the EDF reactors: casting conditions, controlled cooling treatments, weldability. In the third part we study the thermal, stability during the long duration high temperature treatments and the cycles in the two zones of the diagram {alpha} + {gamma}; {beta} + {gamma} the effects of the morphology (in particular the two types of {alpha} pseudo-grains observed) and of the cooling rate during the transformation point transitions are described. In the fourth part are discussed the mechanical properties: resistance to a tractive force, resistance to creep, resilience. These properties can also be affected by the {gamma} structure heredity and by the cooling rate to which the alloy has been subjected. In conclusion we discuss the reasons which led to the choice of some of these alloys for the first EDF reactors in particular the advantages of their high creep resistance between 450 and 600 deg C for use in the form of tubes subjected to an external pressure. (authors) [French] Dans ce rapport

  4. Combinatorial investigation of Pt-Ru-Sn alloys as an anode electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Young Hwan [Department of New Energy.Resource Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, Sangji University, 124, Sangjidae-gil, Wonju-si, Gangwon-Do 220-702 (Korea); Shul, Yong Gun [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 134, Shinchon-Dong, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea)

    2010-10-15

    Low-temperature direct alcohol fuel cells fed with different kinds of alcohol (methanol, ethanol and 2-propanol) have been investigated by employing ternary electrocatalysts (Pt-Ru-Sn) as anode catalysts. Combinatorial chemistry has been applied to screen the 66-PtRuSn-anode arrays at the same time to reduce cost, time, and effort when we select the optimum composition of electrocatalysts for DAFCs (Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells). PtRuSn (80:20:0) showed the lowest onset potential for methanol electro-oxidation, PtRuSn (50:0:50) for ethanol, and PtRuSn (20:70:10) for 2-propanol in CV results respectively, and single cell performance test indicated that Ru is more suitable for direct methanol fuel cell system, Sn for direct ethanol fuel cell system, and 2-propanol could be applied as fuel with low platinum composition anode electrocatalyst. The single cell performance results and electrochemical results (CV) were well matched with the combinatorial electrochemical results. As a result, we could verify the availability of combinatorial chemistry by comparing the results of each extreme electrocatalysts compositions as follows: PtRuSn (80:20:0) for methanol, PtRuSn (50:0:50) for ethanol and PtRuSn (20:70:10) for 2-propanol. (author)

  5. Evaluation of Conditions for Hydrogen Induced Degradation of Zirconium Alloys during Fuel Operation and Storage. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011-2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    This publication reports on the work carried out in 2011–2015 in the coordinated research project (CRP) on the evaluation of conditions for hydrogen induced degradation of zirconium alloys during fuel operation and storage. The CRP was carried out to evaluate the threshold condition for delayed hydride cracking (KIH) in pressurized water reactors and zircaloy-4 and E635M fuel claddings, with application to in-pile operation and spent fuel storage. The project consisted of adding hydrogen to samples of cladding and measuring K IH by one of four methods. The CRP was the third in the series, of which the results of the first two were published in IAEA-TECDOC-1410 and IAEA-TECDOC-1649, in 2004 and 2010, respectively. This publication includes all of the research work performed in the framework of the CRP, including details of the experimental procedures that led to a set of data for tested materials. The research was conducted by representatives from 13 laboratories from all over the world. In addition to the basic goal to transfer the technology of the testing techniques from experienced laboratories to those unfamiliar with the methods, the CRP was set up to develop experimental procedures to produce consistent sets of data, both within a single laboratory and among different laboratories. The material condition and temperature history were prescribed, and laboratories chose one or two of four methods of loading that were recommended in an attempt to develop standard sets of experimental protocols so that consistent results could be obtained. Experimental discrepancies were minimized through careful attention to details of microstructure, temperature history and stress state in the samples, with the main variation being the mode of loading

  6. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, E T; Diaz, N J [Department of Nuclear Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Kniedler, G S [Reactor Analysis Group, TVA, Chattanooga, TN (United States)

    1983-09-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of

  7. Neutronic calculations for the conversion of the University of Florida Training Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.; Diaz, N.J.; Kniedler, G.S.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) is located on the University of Florida campus in Gainesville, Florida. The reactor is the Argonaut type, heterogeneous in design and currently fueled with 93% enriched, uranium-aluminum alloy MTR plate-type fuel. Investigations are being performed to examine te feasibility of replacing the highly-enriched fuel of the current UFTR with 4.8% enriched, cylindrical pin SPERT fuel. The SPERT fuel is stainless steel clad and contains uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) pellets. On a broad spectrum, training reactor conversion from high enrichment uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fueled facilities has been a continuing concern in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and significant work has been done in this area by the Argonne RERTR Program. The International Atomic Energy Agency cites three reasons for reactor conversion to low-enriched uranium. The main reason is the desire to reduce the proliferation potential of research reactor fuels. The second is to increase the assurance of continued fuel availability in the face of probable restrictions on the supply of highly-enriched uranium. The third reason is the possible reduction in requirements for physical security measures during fabrication, transportation, storage and use. This same IAEA report points out that the three reasons stated for the conversion of the fuel of research reactors are interrelated and cannot be considered individually. The concerns of the Nuclear Engineering Sciences Department at the University of Florida relating to the HEU fuel of the UFTR coincide with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The primary reason for going to low-enriched pin-type fuel is the concern with proliferation provoked by the highly-enriched plate fuel which has led to tighter security of nuclear facilities such as the UFTR. A second reason for changing to the pin-type fuel is because of difficulties that are being encountered in the supply of the

  8. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  9. Development of a high density fuel based on uranium-molybdenum alloys with high compatibility in high temperatures; Desenvolvimento de um combustivel de alta densidade a base das ligas uranio-molibdenio com alta compatibilidade em altas temperaturas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fabio Branco Vaz de

    2008-07-01

    This work has as its objective the development of a high density and low enriched nuclear fuel based on the gamma-UMo alloys, for utilization where it is necessary satisfactory behavior in high temperatures, considering its utilization as dispersion. For its accomplishment, it was started from the analysis of the RERTR ('Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors') results and some theoretical works involving the fabrication of gamma-uranium metastable alloys. A ternary addition is proposed, supported by the properties of binary and ternary uranium alloys studied, having the objectives of the gamma stability enhancement and an ease to its powder fabrication. Alloys of uranium-molybdenum were prepared with 5 to 10% Mo addition, and 1 and 3% of ternary, over a gamma U7Mo binary base alloy. In all the steps of its preparation, the alloys were characterized with the traditional techniques, to the determination of its mechanical and structural properties. To provide a process for the alloys powder obtention, its behavior under hydrogen atmosphere were studied, in thermo analyser-thermo gravimeter equipment. Temperatures varied from the ambient up to 1000 deg C, and times from 15 minutes to 16 hours. The results validation were made in a semi-pilot scale, where 10 to 50 g of powders of some of the alloys studied were prepared, under static hydrogen atmosphere. Compatibility studies were conducted by the exposure of the alloys under oxygen and aluminum, to the verification of possible reactions by means of differential thermal analysis. The alloys were exposed to a constant heat up to 1000 deg C, and their performances were evaluated in terms of their reaction resistance. On the basis of the results, it was observed that ternary additions increases the temperatures of the reaction with aluminum and oxidation, in comparison with the gamma UMo binaries. A set of conditions to the hydration of the alloys were defined, more restrictive in terms of temperature

  10. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Sulistyo, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix

  11. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    , Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO 2 ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO 2 fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The nature of spent nuclear

  12. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    irradiation, Bubbles and precipitates, Modeling fuel behavior); Modeling defects and fission products in UO{sub 2} ceramic by ab initio computation (Ab initio computation, Point defects in uranium dioxide, Fission products in uranium dioxide, The indispensable coupling of modeling and experiment); Cladding and assembly materials (What is the purpose of cladding?, Zirconium alloys, Claddings: required to exhibit good mechanical strength, Mechanical behavior of irradiated Zr alloys, Claddings: required to prove corrosion resistant); Pellet-cladding interaction (The phenomena involved in pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), Experimental simulation of PCI and the lessons to be drawn from it, The requirement for an experimental basis, Numerical simulation of PCI, Towards a lifting of PCI-related operating constraints); Advanced UO{sub 2} and MOX ceramics (Chromium oxide-doped UO{sub 2} fuel, Novel MOX microstructures); Mechanical behavior of fuel assemblies (Assembly mechanical behavior in normal operating conditions, Assembly mechanical behavior in accident situations, Fuel in a loss of primary coolant accident (LOCA)); Introduction to LOCA-type accident transients (Overview of thermal-hydraulic and fuel-related aspects, Incidence of LOCA transients on the thermal-metallurgical-mechanical behavior of zirconium-base alloy cladding); Fuel in a reactivity insertion accident (RIA) (Safety criteria); Fuel in a severe accident (The VERCORS analytical program, The Phebus-FP global tests, Control of severe accidents in the EPR reactor); In-core fuel management (Relationships between cycle length, maximum burnup, and batch fraction Enrichment and burnable poisons, The impact of the nature of the fuel used, and its evolution, on the major parameters of core physics, and management Prospects for future trends in core management); Fuel cycle material balances (In-core evolution of materials, Decay heat and potential radiotoxicity, Plutonium management); Long-term behavior of spent fuel (The

  13. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  14. Role of Chloride in the Corrosion and Fracture Behavior of Micro-Alloyed Steel in E80 Simulated Fuel Grade Ethanol Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufunmilayo O. Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro-alloyed steel (MAS material normally used in the production of auto parts has been immersed in an E80 simulated fuel grade ethanol (SFGE environment and its degradation mechanism in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl was evaluated. Corrosion behavior was determined through mass loss tests and electrochemical measurements with respect to a reference test in the absence of NaCl. Fracture behavior was determined via J-integral tests with three-point bend specimens at an ambient temperature of 27 °C. The mass loss of MAS increased in E80 with NaCl up to a concentration of 32 mg/L; beyond that threshold, the effect of increasing chloride was insignificant. MAS did not demonstrate distinct passivation behavior, as well as pitting potential with anodic polarization, in the range of the ethanol-chloride ratio. Chloride caused pitting in MAS. The fracture resistance of MAS reduced in E80 with increasing chloride. Crack tip blunting decreased with increasing chloride, thus accounting for the reduction in fracture toughness.

  15. Graphitized nanodiamond supporting PtNi alloy as stable anodic and cathodic electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yongjiao; Zang, Jianbing; Dong, Liang; Pan, Hong; Yuan, Yungang; Wang, Yanhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The graphitized nanodiamond (GND) showed a higher oxidation-resistance than XC-72. • The PtNi/GND electrocatalytic exhibited greater stability than PtNi/XC-72. • The PtNi/GND had a better catalytic activity for MOR and ORR than Pt/GND. -- Abstract: Surface graphitized nanodiamond (GND) with a diamond core covered by a graphitic carbon shell was prepared by annealing ND at the temperature of 1300 °C in a vacuum of 10 −3 Pa. PtNi electrocatalysts were prepared by a microwave heating polyol method using the prepared GND as a support. The composition and morphology of the PtNi electrocatalysts supported on GND (PtNi/GND) were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectra. The results showed that nano-scaled PtNi alloy particles with an atomic ratio of approximately 1:1 were uniformly deposited on the GND through co-reduction process. The electrocatalytic activities of the PtNi/GND electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and linear sweep voltammetry. The PtNi/GND exhibited better electrocatalytic activities than the Pt/GND either for MOR and ORR. In comparison with traditional carbon support Vulcan XC-72, GND showed higher oxidation-resistance, and consequently led to greater stability for the PtNi/GND than PtNi/XC-72

  16. Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Performance of Multi-Component Nanoporous PtRuCuW Alloy for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We have prepared a multi-component nanoporous PtRuCuW (np-PtRuCuW electrocatalyst via a combined chemical dealloying and mechanical alloying process. The X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and electrochemical measurements have been applied to characterize the microstructure and electrocatalytic activities of the np-PtRuCuW. The np-PtRuCuW catalyst has a unique three-dimensional bi-continuous ligament structure and the length scale is 2.0 ± 0.3 nm. The np-PtRuCuW catalyst shows a relatively high level of activity normalized to mass (467.1 mA mgPt−1 and electrochemically active surface area (1.8 mA cm−2 compared to the state-of-the-art commercial PtC and PtRu catalyst at anode. Although the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuW 0.47 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode, SCE is more positive than PtRu, there is a 200 mV negative shift compared to PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE. In addition, the half-wave potential and specific activity towards oxygen reduction of np-PtRuCuW are 0.877 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE and 0.26 mA cm−2, indicating a great enhancement towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC.

  17. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.N.; Levin, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element has disposed therein an alloy having the essential components of nickel, titanium and zirconium, and the alloy reacts with water, water vapor and reactive gases at reactor ambient temperatures. The alloy is disposed in the plenum of the fuel element in the form of particles in a hollow gas permeable container having a multiplicity of openings of size smallr than the size of the particles. The container is preferably held in the spring in the plenum of the fuel element. (E.C.B.)

  18. A novel high performance composite anode with in situ growth of Fe-Ni alloy nanoparticles for intermediate solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jingcheng; Yu, Yan; Yin, Yi-Mei; Zhou, Ning; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A composite anode with endogenous Fe-Ni alloy nanoparticles has been prepared. • The redox reversibility of the anode has been confirmed by XRD. • The E_a of H_2 oxidation at the anode is much smaller than that at Ni-YSZ anode. • A ScSZ supported cell achieves MPD of 0.71 Wcm"−"2 and R_p of 0.16 Ω cm"2 at 800 °C. • The single cell shows stable output during 105 h testing at 800 °C 0.7 V in wet H_2". - Abstract: A redox reversible composite anode with Fe-Ni alloy nanoparticles in situ growth on SrLaFeO_4-type and LaFeO_3-type oxide substrates has been prepared for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (IT-SOFC) by reducing perovskite precursor La_0_._4Sr_0_._6Fe_0_._7_5Ni_0_._1Nb_0_._1_5O_3_-_δ (LSFNNb) in wet H_2 at 900 °C for 1 h. The anode has shown an excellent electrochemical catalytic activity for oxidation of hydrogen with much smaller E_a (25.1 ∼ 68.9 kJ mol"−"1) than the value (>160 kJ mol"−"1) at Ni-YSZ anode. A scandium stabilized zirconia (ScSZ) electrolyte supported SOFC with the anode achieves maximum power densities of 0.71, 0.52, 0.35, and 0.21 W cm"−"2 at 800, 750, 700 and 650 °C, respectively in wet H_2 (3% H_2O), and the corresponding R_p of 0.16, 0.21, 0.35, and 0.60 Ω cm"2 under OCV. Moreover, the single cell shows stable power output during ∼105 h operation at 800 °C under 0.7 V in wet H_2 after a initial degradation, indicating that R-LSFNNb is an excellent candidate as anode of IT-SOFC.

  19. Design of a full scale model fuel assembly for full power production reactor flow excursion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, C.A.; Blake, J.E.; Rush, G.C.

    1990-01-01

    A novel full scale production reactor fuel assembly model was designed and built to study thermal-hydraulic effects of postulated Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear reactor accidents. The electrically heated model was constructed to simulate the unique annular concentric tube geometry of fuel assemblies in SRS nuclear production reactors. Several major design challenges were overcome in order to produce the prototypic geometry and thermal-hydraulic conditions. The two concentric heater tubes (total power over 6 MW and maximum heat flux of 3.5 MW/m 2 ) (1.1E+6 BTU/(ft 2 hr)) were designed to closely simulate the thermal characteristics of SRS uranium-aluminum nuclear fuel. The paper discusses the design of the model fuel assembly, which met requirements of maintaining prototypic geometric and hydraulic characteristics, and approximate thermal similarity. The model had a cosine axial power profile and the electrical resistance was compatible with the existing power supply. The model fuel assembly was equipped with a set of instruments useful for code analysis, and durable enough to survive a number of LOCA transients. These instruments were sufficiently responsive to record the response of the fuel assembly to the imposed transient

  20. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK-CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bremaecker, Anne, E-mail: adbremae@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie-Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), NMS, Mol (Belgium)

    2012-09-15

    and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non-destructive tests (ultrasonic and eddy currents) were also developed. In-pile creep in argon and in liquid sodium was deeply studied on pressurized segments irradiated up to 75 dpa{sub NRT}. Finally two fuel assemblies cladded with such ODS alloys were irradiated in Phenix to the max dose of 90 dpa. Creep deformation and swelling were limited but the irradiation-induced embrittlement became acute. The programme was stopped shortly after the Chernobyl disaster, before the embrittlement problem was solved.

  1. Metallic uranium as fuel for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a first overview of the use of metallic uranium and its alloys as an option for fuel for rapid reactors. Aspects are discussed concerning uranium alloys which present high solubility in the gamma phase. (author)

  2. Corrosion-Resistant Ti- xNb- xZr Alloys for Nitric Acid Applications in Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivasagam, Geetha; Anbarasan, V.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the development, microstructure, and corrosion behavior of two new alloys such as Ti-4Nb-4Zr and Ti-2Nb-2Zr in boiling nitric acid environment. The corrosion test was carried out in the liquid, vapor, and condensate phases of 11.5 M nitric acid, and the potentiodynamic anodic polarization studies were performed at room temperature for both alloys. The samples subjected to three-phase corrosion testing were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX). As Ti-2Nb-2Zr alloy exhibited inferior corrosion behavior in comparison to Ti-4Nb-4Zr in all three phases, weldability and heat treatment studies were carried out only on Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy. The weldability of the new alloy was evaluated using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes, and the welded specimen was thereafter tested for its corrosion behavior in all three phases. The results of the present investigation revealed that the newly developed near alpha Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy possessed superior corrosion resistance in all three phases and excellent weldability compared to conventional alloys used for nitric acid application in spent nuclear reprocessing plants. Further, the corrosion resistance of the beta heat-treated Ti-4Nb-4Zr alloy was superior when compared to the sample heat treated in the alpha + beta phase.

  3. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  4. Fuel and fuel cycles with high burnup for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernushev, V.; Sokolov, F.

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses the status and trends in development of nuclear fuel and fuel cycles for WWER reactors. Parameters and main stages of implementation of new fuel cycles will be presented. At present, these new fuel cycles are offered to NPPs. Development of new fuel and fuel cycles based on the following principles: profiling fuel enrichment in a cross section of fuel assemblies; increase of average fuel enrichment in fuel assemblies; use of refuelling schemes with lower neutron leakage ('in-in-out'); use of integrated fuel gadolinium-based burnable absorber (for a five-year fuel cycle); increase of fuel burnup in fuel assemblies; improving the neutron balance by using structural materials with low neutron absorption; use of zirconium alloy claddings which are highly resistant to irradiation and corrosion. The paper also presents the results of fuel operation. (author)

  5. Microstructural characterization of an irradiated RERTR-6 U-7Mo/AA4043 alloy dispersion fuel plate specimen blister-tested to a final temperature of 500 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian; Miller, Brandon D.; Robinson, Adam B.; Madden, James W.; Ross Finlay, M.; Moore, Glenn; Medvedev, Pavel; Meyer, Mitch

    2017-05-01

    The Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, in the past called the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is developing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for application in research and test reactors. U-Mo alloy dispersion fuel is one type being developed. Blister testing has been performed on different fuel plate samples to determine the margin to failure for fuel plates irradiated to different fission densities. Microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy on a sample taken from a U-7Mo/AA4043 matrix dispersion fuel plate irradiated in the RERTR-6 experiment that was blister-tested up to a final temperature of 500 °C. The results indicated that two types of grain/cell boundaries were observed in the U-7Mo fuel particles, one with a relatively low Mo content and fission gas bubbles and a second type enriched in Si, due to interdiffusion from the Si-containing matrix, with little evidence of fission gas bubbles. With respect to the behavior of the major fission gas Xe, a significant amount of the Xe was still observed within the U-7Mo fuel particle, along with microns into the AA4043 matrix. For the fuel/matrix interaction layers that form during fabrication and then grow during irradiation, they change from the as-irradiated amorphous structure to one that is crystalline after blister testing. In the AA4043 matrix, the original Si-rich precipitates, which are typically observed in as-irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel, get consumed due to interdiffusion with the U-7Mo fuel particles during the blister test. Finally, the fission gas bubbles that were originally around 3 nm in diameter and resided on a fission gas superlattice (FGS) in the intragranular regions of as-irradiated U-7Mo fuel grew in size (up to ∼20 nm diameter) during blister testing and, in many areas, are no longer organized as a superlattice.

  6. Microstructural characterization of an irradiated RERTR-6 U-7Mo/AA4043 alloy dispersion fuel plate specimen blister-tested to a final temperature of 500 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, Dennis D., E-mail: dennis.keiser@inl.gov [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6146 (United States); Jue, Jan-Fong; Gan, Jian; Miller, Brandon D.; Robinson, Adam B.; Madden, James W. [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6146 (United States); Ross Finlay, M. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Moore, Glenn; Medvedev, Pavel; Meyer, Mitch [Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division, Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6146 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The Material Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program, in the past called the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is developing low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels for application in research and test reactors. U–Mo alloy dispersion fuel is one type being developed. Blister testing has been performed on different fuel plate samples to determine the margin to failure for fuel plates irradiated to different fission densities. Microstructural characterization was performed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy on a sample taken from a U-7Mo/AA4043 matrix dispersion fuel plate irradiated in the RERTR-6 experiment that was blister-tested up to a final temperature of 500 °C. The results indicated that two types of grain/cell boundaries were observed in the U-7Mo fuel particles, one with a relatively low Mo content and fission gas bubbles and a second type enriched in Si, due to interdiffusion from the Si-containing matrix, with little evidence of fission gas bubbles. With respect to the behavior of the major fission gas Xe, a significant amount of the Xe was still observed within the U-7Mo fuel particle, along with microns into the AA4043 matrix. For the fuel/matrix interaction layers that form during fabrication and then grow during irradiation, they change from the as-irradiated amorphous structure to one that is crystalline after blister testing. In the AA4043 matrix, the original Si-rich precipitates, which are typically observed in as-irradiated U-Mo dispersion fuel, get consumed due to interdiffusion with the U-7Mo fuel particles during the blister test. Finally, the fission gas bubbles that were originally around 3 nm in diameter and resided on a fission gas superlattice (FGS) in the intragranular regions of as-irradiated U-7Mo fuel grew in size (up to ∼20 nm diameter) during blister testing and, in many areas, are no longer organized as a superlattice.

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the corrosion rate and suppress the increase of radioactive corrosion products in reactor water of nuclear fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors having spacer springs made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloys. Constitution: Spacer rings made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloy are incorporated and used as fuel assemblies after applying treatment of dipping and maintaining at high temperature water followed by heating in steams. Since this can remove the nickel leaching into reactor water at the initial stage, Co-58 as the radioactive corrosion products in the reactor water can be reduced, and the operation at in-service inspection or repairement can be facilitated to improve the working efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The dipping time is desirably more than 10 hours and more desirably more than 30 hours. (Horiuchi, T. )

  8. Phase distribution studies in metallic alloy SIMFUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolay, S.; Basu, M.; Kaity, S.; Das, D.

    2014-01-01

    Utilization of U-Pu based alloy fuel in the three stage nuclear power generation program in India is one of the important mandate due to shorter doubling time for breeding of the fissile isotopes ( 239 Pu and 233 U) to be used in Th based driver fuel in the 3rd stage. Reported information shows successful performance of fuel with porous alloy matrix in achieving 10-15 atom % burn-up. The porosity and microstructure of this alloy are strongly dependent on the composition and phases of the fission products incorporated in the matrix. The porosity influences the extent of fuel swelling and fission gas release, which affects the performance and integrity of the fuel. This study addresses to these issues taking the base alloy U-10wt% Zr

  9. Cu₂O template synthesis of high-performance PtCu alloy yolk-shell cube catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sheng-Hua; He, Xu-Jun; Ding, Liang-Xin; Pan, Zheng-Wei; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Wu, Mingmei; Li, Gao-Ren

    2014-10-21

    Novel PtCu alloy yolk-shell cubes were fabricated via the disproportionation and displacement reactions in Cu2O yolk-shell cubes, and they exhibit significantly improved catalytic activity and durability for methanol electrooxidation.

  10. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogard, J.H.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element is disclosed for use in power producing nuclear reactors, comprising a plurality of axially aligned ceramic cylindrical fuel bodies of the sintered type, and a cladding tube of metal or metal alloys, wherein said cladding tube on its cylindrical inner surface is provided with a plurality of slightly protruding spacing elements distributed over said inner surface

  11. Fuel particle coating data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Wagner, P.; Wahman, L.A.; White, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Development of coating on nuclear fuel particles for the High-Temperature Fuels Technology program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory included process studies for low-density porous and high-density isotropic carbon coats, and for ZrC and ''alloy'' C/ZrC coats. This report documents the data generated by these studies

  12. In situ XAFS studies of the oxygen reduction reaction on carbon supported platinum and platinum nickel nano-scale alloys as cathode catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingying

    Platinum based bimetallic alloys have been investigated by conducting Pt L3 and Ni K edge in situ XAFS measurements on carbon supported Pt and PtNi(1:1) nanoscale catalysts under a wide range of operating potentials. We observed that (1) the Pt-Pt bond distance in PtNi alloys is shorter than that of Pt, and the bond distance between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is longer for PtNi. (2) Pt has a tendency to stay on the surface while Ni is mostly underneath the surface. (3) While a change in oxidation of pure Pt was clearly observed at different potentials, the Pt in the PtNi alloy remained nearly oxygen-free at all potentials, but an accompanying oxidation change of Ni was observed instead. (4) PtNi has higher open circuit voltage than Pt/C. These results indicate that the chemisorption energy between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is reduced in PtNi alloys, which prevents the poison of oxygen adsorbate and hence improves the reactivity. In addition, the strain and ligand effects in PtNi nanoparticle alloys were studied by FEW calculations using experimental data as a guide to understand the factors causing the reduction of chemisorptions energy of Pt. Our calculation indicates that Pt d-band is broader and lower in energy when the bond distance between Pt is shorter, resulting in weaker chemisorption energy between Pt and absorbed oxygen atom on top, and vice verse. Meanwhile, the investigation of ligand effect shows two trends in modifying Pt's properties within alloyed transition metals. The strain effect dominates in PtNi bimetallic system, corresponding to weaker chemisorptions energy and lower white intensity of Pt L3 edge, which is in consistent with our experimental results. The implications of these results afford a good guideline in understanding the reactivity enhancement mechanism and in the context of alloy catalysts design.

  13. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Universidade de São Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  14. High density fuels using dispersion and monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br, E-mail: alfredo@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-07-01

    Fuel plates used in high-performance research reactors need to be converted to low-enrichment uranium fuel; the fuel option based on a monolithic formulation requires alloys to contain 6 - 10 wt% Mo. In this case, the fuel plates are composed of the metallic alloy U-10Mo surrounded by a thin zirconium layer encapsulated in aluminum cladding. This study reviewed the physical properties of monolithic forms. The constraints produced during the manufacturing process were analyzed and compared to those of dispersed fuel. The bonding process used for dispersion fuels differs from the techniques applied to foil bonding used for pure alloys. The quality of monolithic plates depends on the fabrication method, which usually involves hot isostatic pressing and the thermal annealing effect of residual stress, which degrades the uranium cubic phase. The preservation of the metastable phase has considerable influence on fuel performance. The physical properties of the foil fuel under irradiation are superior to those of aluminum-dispersed fuels. The fuel meat, using zirconium as the diffusion barrier, prevents the interaction layer from becoming excessively thick. The problem with dispersed fuel is breakaway swelling with a medium fission rate. It has been observed that the fuel dispersed in aluminum was minimized in monolithic forms. The pure alloys exhibited a suitable response from a rate at least twice as much as the fission rate of dispersions. The foils can support fissile material concentration combined with a reduced swelling rate. (author)

  15. Development of metallic fuel fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Yak; Lee, Myung Ho and others

    1999-03-01

    With the vacuum melting and casting of the U-10wt%Zr alloy which is metallic fuel for liquid metal fast breeder reactor, we studied the microstructure of the alloy and the parameters of the melting and casting for the fuel rods. Internal defects of the U-10wt%Zr fuel by gravity casting, were inspected by non-destructive test. U-10wt%Zr alloy has been prepared for the thermal stability test in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure with relation to swelling under irradiation condition. (author)

  16. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J., E-mail: zinklesj@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms.

  17. Accident tolerant fuels for LWRs: A perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Terrani, K.A.; Gehin, J.C.; Ott, L.J.; Snead, L.L.

    2014-01-01

    The motivation for exploring the potential development of accident tolerant fuels in light water reactors to replace existing Zr alloy clad monolithic (U, Pu) oxide fuel is outlined. The evaluation includes a brief review of core degradation processes under design-basis and beyond-design-basis transient conditions. Three general strategies for accident tolerant fuels are being explored: modification of current state-of-the-art zirconium alloy cladding to further improve oxidation resistance (including use of coatings), replacement of Zr alloy cladding with an alternative oxidation-resistant high-performance cladding, and replacement of the monolithic ceramic oxide fuel with alternative fuel forms

  18. Three dimensional PtRh alloy porous nanostructures: tuning the atomic composition and controlling the morphology for the application of direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuan [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Janyasupab, Metini; Liu, Chung-Chiun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Liu, Chen-Wei [Institute of Material Sciences and Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 320 (China); Li, Xinxin [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Xu, Jiaqiang [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2012-09-11

    A strategy for the synthesis of PtRh alloy 3D porous nanostructures by controlled aggregation of nanoparticles in oleylamine is presented. The atomic ratio between the two components (Pt and Rh) is tuned by varying the concentration of precursor salts accommodating the oxidation of methanol. The morphology of PtRh alloy nanostructure is controlled by elevating the temperature of the reaction system to 240 C. The prepared 3D porous nanostructures provide a high degree of electrochemical activity and good durability toward the methanol oxidation reaction compared to those of the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK) and PtRh nanoparticles. Therefore, the 3D alloy porous nanostructures provide a good opportunity to explore their catalytic properties for methanol oxidation. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Kimichika.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the size of the reactor core upper mechanisms and the reactor container, as well as decrease the nuclear power plant construction costs in reactors using liquid metals as the coolants. Constitution: Isotope capturing devices comprising a plurality of pipes are disposed to the gas plenum portion of a nuclear fuel rod main body at the most downstream end in the flowing direction of the coolants. Each of the capturing devices is made of nickel, nickel alloys, stainless steel applied with nickel plating on the surface, nickel alloys applied with nickel plating on the surface or the like. Thus, radioactive nuclides incorporated in the coolants are surely captured by the capturing devices disposed at the most downstream end of the nuclear fuel main body as the coolants flow along the nuclear fuel main body. Accordingly, since discharging of radioactive nuclides to the intermediate fuel exchange system can be prevented, the maintenance or reparing work for the system can be facilitated. (Moriyama, K.)

  20. Fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The efficient utilisation of nuclear fuel requires manufacturing facilities capable of making advanced fuel types, with appropriate quality control. Once made, the use of such fuels requires a proper understanding of their behaviour in the reactor environment, so that safe operation for the design life can be achieved. The International Atomic Energy Agency supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection. The IAEA supports the development fuel modelling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions. It provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation. The IAEA supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, it provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO 2 , MOX and zirconium alloys. It further offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology

  1. Electrocatalysis on bimetallic and alloy surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, M.T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Bimetallic surfaces and alloys are well known to have unique catalytic properties for many important chemical transformations [1]. In electrocatalysis, bimetallic and alloy catalysts have been a particularly active area of research in relation to low-temperature fuel cells [2]. On the anode side,

  2. Lead and lead-based alloys as waste matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arustamov, A.E.; Ojovan, M.I.; Kachalov, M.B.

    1999-01-01

    Metals and alloys with relatively low melting temperatures such as lead and lead-based alloys are considered in Russia as prospective matrices for encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel in containers in preparation for final disposal in underground repositories. Now lead and lead-based alloys are being used for conditioning spent sealed radioactive sources at radioactive waste disposal facilities

  3. Study of phase transformation of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb e U-3Zr-9Nb alloys for application in advanced nuclear fuel; Estudo das transformacoes de fases nas ligas U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb e U-3Zr-9Nb para aplicacao em combustivel nuclear avancado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pais, Rafael Witter Dias

    2015-07-01

    Metal fuels are relevant in the nuclear area due to the versatility of its use in the nuclear fuel cycle. Among the alloys of uranium investigated with high potential for use in nuclear power reactors, U-Zr-Nb alloys appear as an important alternative because of their superior physico-chemical and metallurgical properties. These alloys have also potential for use in nuclear testing, research and production radioisotopes of high performance nuclear reactors. Therefore, the development of these alloys is strategic since they are planned to be used in national reactors as RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) and LABGENE (Electrical Generation Core Laboratory), currently under development in Brazil. In this work it was realized a extensive study in the scope of the manufacturing, heat treatment and phase transformations of U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb (m/m%) and U-3ZR-9NB (m/m%) fuel alloys. Ingots of both alloys were produced employing a specific methodology developed in this study. This methodology comprised the melting process in a vacuum induction furnace at high temperatures (1500 °C) and thermal-mechanical processing to break the as-cast structure. Samples with typical dimensions (17 x 7 x 2.5 mm) free from macrostructural defects were homogenized at 1000 °C in vacuum of 10{sup -5} torr for 17.5 hours with a 10°C/min cooling rate until to 820 °C and, subsequently, quenched in water. The samples, randomly selected, were subjected to isothermal treatment tests under different conditions of time and temperature. Isothermal treatments for transformation and retention phases were carried out in a special assembly designed for this work. After the tests, the samples were characterized by the usual phase characterization techniques with particular emphasis for the X-ray diffraction technique. In this way, the Rietveld refinement method was applied. In the case of uranium based alloys it is quite challenging due to the lack of data in the literature. In this work a strategy for the

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Pt-Sn-Ni alloys to application as catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells; Sintese e caracterizacao de ligas de Pt-Sn-Ni para aplicacao como caztalisadores em celulas a combustivel do tipo DEFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, E.L. da; Correa, P.S.; Oliveira, E.L. de; Takimi, A.S.; Malfatti, C.F., E-mail: celia.malfatti@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (LAPEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Pesquisa em Corrosao; Radtke, C. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (IQ/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) have been the focus of recent research due its application in mobile energy sources. In order to obtain the maximum efficiency from these systems, it is necessary the total ethanol oxidation, which implies in C-C bond break. Different catalysts described in literature are employed with this intent. This work consists in studying PtSnNi catalysts supported on carbon Vulcan XC72R, to application in DEFCs. Thus, it was used the impregnation/reduction method, varying the atomic proportion among Pt, Sn and Ni. The alloys were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction, Cyclic Voltammetry and Transmission Microscopy. Preliminary results show that predominant structure on the catalysts is the face centered cubic platinum and the densities currents are dependent on the platinum amount. (author)

  5. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  6. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  7. Nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Hiroshi.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress iodine release thereby prevent stress corrosion cracks in fuel cans by dispersing ferrous oxide at the outer periphery of sintered uranium dioxide pellets filled and sealed within zirconium alloy fuel cans of fuel elements. Constitution: Sintered uranium dioxide pellets to be filled and sealed within a zirconium alloy fuel can are prepared either by mixing ferric oxide powder in uranium dioxide powder, sintering and then reducing at low temperature or by mixing iron powder in uranium dioxide powder, sintering and then oxidizing at low temperature. In this way, ferrous oxide is dispersed on the outer periphery of the sintered uranium dioxide pellets to convert corrosive fission products iodine into iron iodide, whereby the iodine release is suppressed and the stress corrosion cracks can be prevented in the fuel can. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Fuel assembly and fuel cladding tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsumi, Shinro; Ito, Ken-ichi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cladding tube is a zirconium liner tube formed by lining a pure zirconium layer on the inner side of a zirconium alloy tube. The fuel cladding tube is formed by extrusion molding of a composite billet formed by inserting a pure zirconium billet into a zirconium alloy billet. Accordingly, the pure zirconium layer and the zirconium alloy tube are strongly joined by metal bond. The fuel cladding tube has an external oxide film on the outer surface of the zirconium alloy tube and an internal oxide film on the inner side of the pure zirconium layer. The external oxide film has a thickness preferably of about 1μm. The internal oxide film has a thickness of not more than 10μm, preferably, from 1 to 5μm. With such a constitution, flaws to be formed on both inner and outer surfaces of the cladding tube upon assembling a fuel assembly can be reduced thereby enabling to reduce the amount of hydrogen absorbed to the cladding tube. (I.N.)

  9. Micro-structural study and Rietveld analysis of fast reactor fuels: U–Mo fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, S.; Choudhuri, G.; Banerjee, J.; Agarwal, Renu; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun

    2015-01-01

    U–Mo alloys are the candidate fuels for both research reactors and fast breeder reactors. In-reactor performance of the fuel depends on the microstructural stability and thermal properties of the fuel. To improve the fuel performance, alloying elements viz. Zr, Mo, Nb, Ti and fissium are added in the fuel. The first reactor fuels are normally prepared by injection casting. The objective of this work is to compare microstructure, phase-fields and hardness of as-cast four different U–Mo alloy (2, 5, 10 and 33 at.% Mo) fuels with the equilibrium microstructure of the alloys. Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer and optical microscope have been used to characterize the morphology of the as-cast and annealed alloys. The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. A comparison of metallographic and Rietveld analysis of as-cast (dendritic microstructure) and annealed U-33 at.% Mo alloy, corresponding to intermetallic compound, has been reported here for the first time. This study will provide in depth understanding of microstructural and phase evolution of U–Mo alloys as fast reactor fuel. - Highlights: • U–Mo alloys in as-cast as well as in annealed conditions have been studied using Optical Microscope, SEM, XRD. • The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. • The dendritic microstructure of γ-(U,Mo) and B.C.C. ‘Mo’ phase of 33 at.% U–Mo alloy have been analysed. • Rietveld analysis has been done to optimize lattice parameters and calculate phase fractions in annealed alloys. • The Vickers microhardness of U_2Mo phase shows lower hardness than two phase microstructures in annealed alloys.

  10. Micro-structural study and Rietveld analysis of fast reactor fuels: U–Mo fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S., E-mail: sibasis@barc.gov.in [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Choudhuri, G. [Atomic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Banerjee, J. [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Agarwal, Renu [Product Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India); Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun [Radiometallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2015-12-15

    U–Mo alloys are the candidate fuels for both research reactors and fast breeder reactors. In-reactor performance of the fuel depends on the microstructural stability and thermal properties of the fuel. To improve the fuel performance, alloying elements viz. Zr, Mo, Nb, Ti and fissium are added in the fuel. The first reactor fuels are normally prepared by injection casting. The objective of this work is to compare microstructure, phase-fields and hardness of as-cast four different U–Mo alloy (2, 5, 10 and 33 at.% Mo) fuels with the equilibrium microstructure of the alloys. Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer and optical microscope have been used to characterize the morphology of the as-cast and annealed alloys. The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. A comparison of metallographic and Rietveld analysis of as-cast (dendritic microstructure) and annealed U-33 at.% Mo alloy, corresponding to intermetallic compound, has been reported here for the first time. This study will provide in depth understanding of microstructural and phase evolution of U–Mo alloys as fast reactor fuel. - Highlights: • U–Mo alloys in as-cast as well as in annealed conditions have been studied using Optical Microscope, SEM, XRD. • The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. • The dendritic microstructure of γ-(U,Mo) and B.C.C. ‘Mo’ phase of 33 at.% U–Mo alloy have been analysed. • Rietveld analysis has been done to optimize lattice parameters and calculate phase fractions in annealed alloys. • The Vickers microhardness of U{sub 2}Mo phase shows lower hardness than two phase microstructures in annealed alloys.

  11. Reactor fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Mitsuhiro; Mori, Kazuma.

    1990-01-01

    In a high burnup degree reactor core, a problem of fuel can corrosion caused by coolants occurs due to long stay in a reactor. Then, the use of fuel cladding tubes with improved corrosion resistance is now undertaken and use of corrosion resistant alloys is attempted. However, since the conventional TIG welding melts the entire portion, the welded portion does not remain only in the corrosive resistant alloy but it forms new alloys of the corrosion resistant alloy and zircaloy as the matrix material or inter-metallic compounds, which degrades the corrosion resistance. In the present invention, a cladding tube comprising a dual layer structure using a corrosion resistant alloy only for a required thickness and an end plug made of the same material as the corrosion resistant alloy are welded at the junction portion by using resistance welding. Then, they are joined under welding by the heat generated to the junction surfaces between both of them, to provide corrosion resistant alloys substantially at the outside of the welded portion as well. Accordingly, the corrosion resistance is not degradated. (T.M.)

  12. Zirconium alloy barrier having improved corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, R.B.; Rosenbaum, H.S.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor has a composite cladding container having a substrate and a dilute zirconium alloy liner bonded to the inside surface of the substrate. The dilute zirconium alloy liner forms about 1 to about 20 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of zirconium and a metal selected from the group consisting of iron, chromium, iron plus chromium, and copper. The dilute zirconium alloy liner shields the substrate from impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material and protects the substrate from stress corrosion and stress cracking. The dilute zirconium alloy liner displays greater corrosion resistance, especially to oxidation by hot water or steam than unalloyed zirconium. The substrate material is selected from conventional cladding materials, and preferably is a zirconium alloy. (author)

  13. Recent metal fuel safety tests in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Lo, R.K.; Robinson, W.R.; Palm, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In-reactor safety tests have been performed on metal-alloy reactor fuel to study its response to transient-overpower conditions, in particular, the margin to cladding breach and the axial self-extrusion of fuel within intact cladding. Uranium-fissium EBR-II driver fuel elements of several burnups were tested, some to cladding breach and others to incipient breach. Transient fuel motions were monitored, and time and location of breach were measured. The test results and computations of fuel extrusion and cladding failure in metal-alloy fuel are described

  14. Fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hajime; Ueda, Makoto

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a structure capable of measuring, in a non-destructive manner, the releasing amount of nuclear gaseous fission products from spent fuels easily and at a high accuracy. Constitution: In order to confirm the integrity and the design feasibility of a nuclear fuel rod, it is important to accurately determine the amount of gaseous nuclear fission products released from nuclear pellets. In a structure where a plurality of fuel pellets are charged in a fuel cladding tube and retained by an inconel spring, a hollow and no-sealed type spacer tube made of zirconium or the alloy thereof, for example, not containing iron, cobalt, nickel or manganese is formed between the spring and the upper end plug. In the fuel rod of such a structure, by disposing a gamma ray collimator and a gamma ray detector on the extension of the spacer pipe, the gamma rays from the gaseous nuclear fission products accumulated in the spacer pipe can be detected while avoiding the interference with the induction radioactivity from inconel. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Nonswelling alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  16. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  17. Micro-structural study and Rietveld analysis of fast reactor fuels: U-Mo fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Choudhuri, G.; Banerjee, J.; Agarwal, Renu; Khan, K. B.; Kumar, Arun

    2015-12-01

    U-Mo alloys are the candidate fuels for both research reactors and fast breeder reactors. In-reactor performance of the fuel depends on the microstructural stability and thermal properties of the fuel. To improve the fuel performance, alloying elements viz. Zr, Mo, Nb, Ti and fissium are added in the fuel. The first reactor fuels are normally prepared by injection casting. The objective of this work is to compare microstructure, phase-fields and hardness of as-cast four different U-Mo alloy (2, 5, 10 and 33 at.% Mo) fuels with the equilibrium microstructure of the alloys. Scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer and optical microscope have been used to characterize the morphology of the as-cast and annealed alloys. The monoclinic α'' phase in as-cast U-10 at.% Mo alloy has been characterized through Rietveld analysis. A comparison of metallographic and Rietveld analysis of as-cast (dendritic microstructure) and annealed U-33 at.% Mo alloy, corresponding to intermetallic compound, has been reported here for the first time. This study will provide in depth understanding of microstructural and phase evolution of U-Mo alloys as fast reactor fuel.

  18. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor; Etude des mecanismes et des cinetiques de corrosion aqueuse de l'alliage d'aluminium AlFeNi utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire de reacteurs experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-15

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  19. Improved nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed and has a metal liner disposed between the cladding and the nuclear fuel material and a high lubricity material in the form of a coating disposed between the liner and the cladding. The liner preferably has a thickness greater than the longest fission product recoil distance and is composed of a low neutron capture cross-section material. The liner is preferably composed of zirconium, an alloy of zirconium, niobium or an alloy of niobium. The liner serves as a preferential reaction site for volatile impurities and fission products and protects the cladding from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The high lubricity material acts as an interface between the liner and the cladding and reduces localized stresses on the cladding due to fuel expansion and cracking of the fuel

  20. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...... thermoelastic coefficients and age hardenable low expansion alloys....

  1. Development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao do combustivel nuclear tipo placa monolitico da liga U-2,5Zr-7,5Nb revestido em zircaloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Geraldo Correa

    2014-06-01

    The autocthonal production of nuclear fuel in Brazil for test and research reactors is restricted to MTR (Material Test Reactor) fuel type dispersion plate, using U3Si2 alloy, coated and dispersed in aluminum, developed by IPEN-SP for use in IEA-R1 reactor. Moreover, the UO{sub 2} fuel rod type for power reactors is manufactured by Rezende (RJ) with a German technology by INB under license. Currently, Brazil is performing two programs of developing reactors. Currently, Brazil is developing two reactors. One of them is the development, by CNEN, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), for testing, research and radioisotope production. The other one is the development a power reactor for naval propulsion, conducted by the Brazilian Navy. This dissertation presents the development and characterization of monolithic fuel miniplate alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, coated in zircaloy (ZRY), on a laboratory scale. Due to its innovative features and properties, this fuel can be used as fuel in both test reactors, research and producing radioisotopes for power reactors as small and medium sizes. Thus, this high potential fuel can be used in domestic reactors currently under development. The development of monolithic fuel plate type is made using the technique called 'picture-frame' where a sandwich composed of a monolith alloy U-2.5Zr- 7.5Nb coupled to a frame and coated sheets of Zry is obtained. The alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb was obtained by melting in an induction furnace and then was cast into rectangular ingots of graphite, thus achieving an ingot with approximate dimensions of 170 x 50 x 60 mm. The obtained ingot was hot rolled at 850 ºC, with a 50 % reduction in thickness, in order to refine the raw structure of fusion. Samples cut from the alloy U-2.5Zr-7.5Nb, with dimensions 20 x 20 x 6 mm were placed in frames and plates Zry and joined by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) under an atmosphere of argon, obtaining a set of 10 mm thick, 45 mm wide and 100 mm long. The sandwiches were

  2. Fabrication of MEA based on optimum amount of Co in PdxCo/C alloy nanoparticles as a new cathode for oxygen reduction reaction in passive direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharibi, Hussein; Golmohammadi, Farhad; Kheirmand, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The optimal amount of Pd/Co in the catalyst layer reduces the polarization resistance in comparison with Pd alone. ► The Pd/Co in catalyst layer increases the Pd utilization in the ORR. ► The DMFC test results indicate that the MEA prepared from Pd 3 Co/C cathode exhibits best performance. -- Abstract: Carbon supported Pd and Pd x Co alloy electrocatalysts of different Pd x Co atomic ratios (x = 1, 2, 3 and 10) were prepared by the impregnation synthesis method at room temperature without heat treatment by ethylene glycol (EG) reduction. As prepared Pd x Co bimetallic nanoparticles show a single-phase face-centered-cubic (fcc) disordered structure. The performance of these electrodes in the ORR was measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), chronoamperometry (CA), inductive coupled plasma (ICP), X-ray diffraction (XRD); scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray (SEM–EDX) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). For synthesized Pd x Co/C electrocatalysts, the highest catalytic activity for the ORR, was found for a Pd:Co atomic ratio of 3:1 in acid media at the presence and absence of methanol with optimal Pd–Pd bond distance (0.2729 nm). Since the Pd x Co/C alloy electrocatalysts are inactive for the adsorption and oxidation of methanol, it can act as a methanol-tolerant ORR catalyst in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). A membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) has been prepared by employing of the Pd 3 Co/C as a cathode for passive direct methanol fuel cell and characterized by polarization curves and impedance diagrams. The DMFC test results indicate that the MEA prepared from Pd 3 Co/C cathode exhibits better performance compared to the MEA prepared from Pt/C (Electrochem) and an in-house Pd/C catalyst synthesized, in terms of maximum power density and minimum charge transfer resistance

  3. Quantification of the distribution of hydrogen by nuclear microprobe at the Laboratory Pierre Sue in the width of zirconium alloy fuel clad of PWR reactors; Quantification de la repartition de l'hydrogene a la microsonde nucleaire du Laboratoire Pierre Sue dans l'epaisseur de tubes de gainage du combustible des REP en alliage de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raepsaet, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/LPS-CNRS) UMR9956, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Bossis, Ph. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMULM2E), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hamon, D.; Bechade, J.L.; Brachet, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMALA2M), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    Among the analysis techniques by ions beams, the micro ERDA (Elastic Detection Analysis) is an interesting technique which allows the quantitative distribution of the hydrogen in materials. In particular, this analysis has been used for hydride zirconium alloys, with the nuclear microprobe of the Laboratory Pierre Sue. This probe allows the characterization of radioactive materials. The technique principles are recalled and then two examples are provided to illustrate the fuel clad behavior in PWR reactors. (A.L.B.)

  4. Non-destructive Residual Stress Analysis Around The Weld-Joint of Fuel Cladding Materials of ZrNbMoGe Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikin

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available The residual stress measurements around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy have been carried out by using X-ray diffraction technique in PTBIN-BATAN. The research was performed to investigate the structure of a cladding material with high temperature corrosion resistance and good weldability. The equivalent composition of the specimens (in %wt. was 97.5%Zr1%Nb1%Mo½%Ge. Welding was carried out by using TIG (tungsten inert gas technique that completed butt-joint with a current 20 amperes. Three region tests were taken in specimen while diffraction scanning, While diffraction scanning, tests were performed on three regions, i.e., the weldcore, the heat-affected zone (HAZ and the base metal. The reference region was determined at the base metal to be compared with other regions of the specimen, in obtaining refinement structure parameters. Base metal, HAZ and weldcore were diffracted by X-ray, and lattice strain changes were calculated by using Rietveld analysis program. The results show that while the quantity of minor phases tend to increase in the direction from the base metal to the HAZ and to the weldcore, the quantity of the ZrGe phase in the HAZ is less than the quantity of the ZrMo2 phase due to tGe element evaporation. The residual stress behavior in the material shows that minor phases, i.e., Zr3Ge and ZrMo2, are more dominant than the Zr matrix. The Zr3Ge and ZrMo2 experienced sharp straining, while the Zr phase was weak-lined from HAZ to weldcore. The hydrostatic residual stress ( in around weld-joint of ZrNbMoGe alloy is compressive stress which has minimum value at about -2.73 GPa in weldcore region

  5. Metallic fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walters, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Metallic fuels are capable of achieving high burnup as a result of design modifications instituted in the late 1960's. The gap between the fuel slug and the cladding is fixed such that by the time the fuel swells to the cladding the fission gas bubbles interconnect and release the fission gas to an appropriately sized plenum volume. Interconnected porosity thus provides room for the fuel to deform from further swelling rather than stress the cladding. In addition, the interconnected porosity allows the fuel pin to be tolerant to transient events because as stresses are generated during a transient event the fuel flows rather than applying significant stress to the cladding. Until 1969 a number of metallic fuel alloys were under development in the US. At that time the metallic fuel development program in the US was discontinued in favor of ceramic fuels. However, development had proceeded to the point where it was clear that the zirconium addition to uranium-plutonium fuel would yield a ternary fuel with an adequately high solidus temperature and good compatibility with austenitic stainless steel cladding. Furthermore, several U-Pu-Zr fuel pins had achieved about 6 at.% bu by the late 1960's, without failure, and thus the prospect for high burnup was promising

  6. Fuel assemblies for PWR type reactors: fuel rods, fuel plates. CEA work presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafosse, Jacques.

    1976-01-01

    French work on PWR type reactors is reported: basic knowledge on Zr and its alloys and on uranium oxide; experience gained on other programs (fast neutron and heavy water reactors); zircaloy-2 or zircaloy-4 clad UO 2 fuel rods; fuel plates consisting of zircaloy-2 clad UO 2 squares of thickness varying between 2 and 4mm [fr

  7. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. A heat conducting fission product retaining metal liner of a refractory metal is incorporated in the fuel element between the cladding and the nuclear fuel to inhibit mechanical interaction between the nuclear fuel and the cladding, to isolate fission products and nuclear fuel impurities from contacting the cladding, and to improve the axial thermal peaking gradient along the length of the fuel rod. The metal liner can be in the form of a tube or hollow cylindrical column, a foil of single or multiple layers in the shape of a hollow cylindrical column, or a coating on the internal surface of the cladding. Preferred refractory metal materials are molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, niobium and alloys of the foregoing metals

  8. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Rowland, T.C.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. A heat conducting, fission product retaining metal liner of a refractory metal is incorporated in the fuel element between the cladding and the nuclear fuel to inhibit mechanical interaction between the nuclear fuel and the cladding, to isolate fission products and nuclear fuel impurities from contacting the cladding and to improve the axial thermal peaking gradient along the length of the fuel rod. The metal liner can be in the form of a tube or hollow cylindrical column, a foil of single or multiple layers in the shape of a hollow cylindrical column, or a coating on the internal surface of the cladding. Preferred refractory metal materials are molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, niobium and alloys of the foregoing metals

  9. Fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Ken-etsu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the pressure loss of coolants by fuel assembly spacers. Constitution: Spacers for supporting a fuel assembly are attached by means of a plurality of wires to an outer frame. The outer frame is made of shape memory alloy such that the wires are caused to slacken at normal temperature and the slacking of the wires is eliminated in excess of the transition temperature. Since the wires slacken at the normal temperature, fuel rods can be inserted easily. After the insertion of the fuel rods, when the entire portion or the outer frame is heated by water or gas at a predetermined temperature, the outer frame resumes its previously memorized shape to tighten the wires and, accordingly, the fuel rods can be supported firmly. In this way, since the fuel rods are inserted in the slacken state of the wires and, after the assembling, the outer frame resumes its memorized shape, the assembling work can be conducted efficiently. (Kamimura, M.)

  10. Annex 5 - Fabrication of U-Al alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobnjak, Dj.; Lazarevic, Dj.; Mihajlovic, A.

    1961-01-01

    Alloy U-Al with low content of aluminium is often used for fabrication of fuel elements because it is stable under moderate neutron flux density. Additionally this type of alloys show much better characteristics than pure uranium under reactor operating conditions (temperature, mechanical load, corrosion effect of water). This report contains the analysis of the phase diagram of U-Al alloy with low content of aluminium, applied procedure for alloying and casting with detailed description of equipment. Characteristics of the obtained alloy are described and conclusions about the experiment and procedure are presented [sr

  11. Physicochemical analysis of interaction of oxide fuel with pyrocarbon coatings of fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium pressure of (CO+Kr,Xe) gases inside fuel particle with oxide kern depending on design features of fuel particle, on temperature. on (O/U) initial composition and fuel burnup is calculated using the suggested model. Analysis of possibility for gas pressure reduction by means of uranium carbide alloying of kern and degree increase of solid fission product retention (Cs for example) during alumosilicate alloying of uranium oxide is conducted

  12. Method for forming nuclear fuel containers of a composite construction and the product thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B.-C.; Rosenbaum, H.S.; Armijo, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    An improved method of producing a composite nuclear fuel container is described which comprises a casing or fuel sheath of zirconium or its alloy with a lining cladding of deposited copper superimposed over the inside surface of the zirconium or alloy and a layer of oxide of the zirconium or alloy formed on the inside surface of the casing or sheath. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear fuel cladding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahigashi, Shigeo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To largely improve the durability and the safety of fuel cladding material. Constitution: Diffusion preventive layers, e.g., aluminum or the like are covered on both sides of a zirconium alloy base layer of thin material, and corrosion resistant layers, e.g., copper or the like are covered thereon. This thin plate material is intimately wound in a circularly tubular shape in a plurality of layers to form a fuel cladding tube. With such construction, corrosion of the tube due to fuel and impurity can be prevented by the corrosion resistant layers, and the diffusion of the corrosion resistant material to the zirconium alloy can be prevented by the diffusion preventive layers. Since a plurality of layers are cladded, even if the corrosion resistant layers are damaged or cracked due to stress corrosion, only one layer is damaged or cracked, but the other layers are not affected. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Low Loss Advanced Metallic Fuel Casting Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kihwan; Ko, Youngmo; Kim, Jonghwan; Song, Hoon; Lee Chanbock

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of fuel slug casting, loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and the fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycles streams in the fabrication process. Recycle streams include fuel slug reworks, returned scraps, and fuel casting heels, which are a special concern in the counter gravity injection casting process because of the large masses involved. Large recycle and waste streams result in lowering the productivity and the economic efficiency of fuel production. To increase efficiency the fuel losses in the furnace chamber, crucible, and the mold, after casting a considerable amount of fuel alloy in the casting furnace, will be quantitatively evaluated. After evaluation the losses will be identified and minimized. It is expected that this study will contribute to the minimization of fuel losses and the wastes streams in the fabrication process of the fuel slugs. Also through this study the technical readiness level of the metallic fuel fabrication process will be further enhanced. In this study, U-Zr alloy system fuel slugs were fabricated by a gravity casting method. Metallic fuel slugs were successfully fabricated with 19 slugs/batch with diameter of 5mm and length of 300mm. Fuel losses was quantitatively evaluated in casting process for the fuel slugs. Fuel losses of the fuel slugs were so low, 0.1∼1.0%. Injection casting experiments have been performed to reduce the fuel loss and improve the casting method. U-Zr fuel slug having φ5.4-L250mm was soundly fabricated with 0.1% in fuel loss. The fuel losses could be minimized to 0.1%, which showed that casting technology of fuel slugs can be a feasible approach to reach the goal of the fuel losses of 0.1% or less in commercial scale

  15. Superconducting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    Reference is made to superconductors having high critical currents. The superconductor described comprises an alloy consisting of a matrix of a Type II superconductor which is a homogeneous mixture of 50 to 95 at.% Pb and 5 to 40 at.%Bi and/or 10 to 50 at.%In. Dispersed in the matrix is a material to provide pinning centres comprising from 0.01% to 20% by volume of the alloy; this material is a stable discontinuous phase of discrete crystalline particles of Cu, Mn, Te, Se, Ni, Ca, Cr, Ce, Ge or La, either in the form of the element or a compound with a component of the matrix. These particles should have an average diameter of not more than 2μ. A method for making this alloy is described. (U.K.)

  16. Electron microscopy of nuclear zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versaci, R.A.; Ipohorski, Miguel

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy observations of the microstructure of zirconium alloys used in fuel sheaths of nuclear power reactors are reported. Specimens were observed after different thermal and mechanical treatment, similar to those actually used during fabrication of the sheaths. Electron micrographs and electron diffraction patterns of second phase particles present in zircaloy-2 and zircaloy-4 were also obtained, as well as some characteristic parameters. Images of oxides and hydrides most commonly present in zirconium alloys are also shown. Finally, the structure of a Zr-2,5Nb alloy used in CANDU reactors pressure tubes, is observed by electron microscopy. (Author) [es

  17. Plasticity of nano-reinforced alloys for the claddings fuels of the fourth generation reactors: experimental and modeling approaches of the effect of microstructural parameters for the models alloys behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dade, Mickael

    2015-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are known for their good resistance both to high temperature creep and to swelling under irradiation. They are considered as potential materials for fuel cladding for the next generation of nuclear reactors (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor). These materials, usually processed by hot extrusion, exhibit a complex microstructure (crystallographic and grain texture, nanometer precipitation, high dislocation density, poly-dispersed grain size), making it a real challenge to establish the microstructure/properties relationships. This thesis has aimed at characterizing and modeling the effect of the different components of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of ferritic Fe-14Cr ODS steels, as well as to improve the understanding of their deformation mechanisms. For this purpose, model materials have been elaborated by hot isostatic pressing and characterized, where the different microstructural parameters have been varied in a controlled manner. Their microstructure have been determined using a set of advanced characterization techniques (SEM-EBSD, TEM, SAXS, EPMA,..). These different materials have been tensile tested over a wide temperature range and creep tested at 650 and 700 C. The results have evidenced the effect of the size and fraction of oxide particles, of the grain size and of the presence of Ti, and have made it possible to model the mechanical behavior. In-situ tensile tests in the SEM, as well as strain field measurements during high temperature testing, have evidenced a transition between a jerky movement of dislocations at low temperature and the high temperature mechanisms, whether intra-granular (dynamic strain ageing, continuous dislocation movement) or inter-granular. At high temperature, severe damage is observed at the grain boundaries. (author) [fr

  18. Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms: experiment and theory Level 4 Milestone M4FT-14LA0804024 Fuel Cycle Research & Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Taylor, Christopher D. [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Fontana Corrosion Center; Kim, Eunja [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Goff, George Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kolman, David Gary [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This document meets Level 4 Milestone: Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms - experiment and theory. A multiphysics model is introduces that will provide the framework for the quantitative prediction of corrosion rates of metallic waste forms incorporating the fission product Tc. The model requires a knowledge of the properties of not only the metallic waste form, but also the passive oxide films that will be generated on the waste form, and the chemistry of the metal/oxide and oxide/environment interfaces. in collaboration with experimental work, the focus of this work is on obtaining these properties from fundamental atomistic models. herein we describe the overall multiphysics model, which is based on MacDonald's point-defect model for passivity. We then present the results of detailed electronic-structure calculations for the determination of the compatibility and properties of Tc when incorporated into intermetallic oxide phases. This work is relevant to the formation of multi-component oxides on metal surfaces that will incorporate Tc, and provide a kinetic barrier to corrosion (i.e. the release of Tc to the environment). Atomistic models that build upon the electronic structure calculations are then described using the modified embedded atom method to simulate metallic dissolution, and Buckingham potentials to perform classical molecular dynamics and statics simulations of the technetium (and, later, iron-technetium) oxide phases. Electrochemical methods were then applied to provide some benchmark information of the corrosion and electrochemical properties of Technetium metal. The results indicate that published information on Tc passivity is not complete and that further investigation is warranted.

  19. Aqueous corrosion study on U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Titas; Venkatesan, V.; Kumar, Pradeep; Khan, K.B.; Kumar, Arun

    2009-01-01

    In low power or research reactor, U-Zr alloy is a potential candidate for dispersion fuel. Moreover, Zirconium has a low thermal-neutron cross section and uranium alloyed with Zr has excellent corrosion resistance and dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In the present study aqueous corrosion behavior of U-Zr alloy samples was studied in autoclave at 200 deg C temperature. Corrosion rate was determined from weight loss with time. (author)

  20. LEU fuel powder technology at Babcock and Wilcox (USA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogacik, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper traces BandW involvement in HEU fuel manufacturing to the current work directed at LEU reactor technology. Past work at BandW in areas such as alloying, fuel handling and core manufacturing has been of significant benefit to the current LEU fuel processing requirements. Recent investigations and process developments for production of LEU aluminide and silicide fuels are discussed. Techniques for alloying by vacuum are melting, followed by comminution methods after alloying, are presented for both the LEU aluminide and silicide fuel powders. Powder processing discussions include compacting techniques used by BandW for these alloys. This overview of BandW's LEU i nvolvement provides details of specific modifications and process developments in powdered fuels. Product attributes such as powder chemistry, size, and other physical properties of each LEU fuel are presented. (author)

  1. Silicon Alloying On Aluminium Based Alloy Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryanto

    2002-01-01

    Silicon alloying on surface of aluminium based alloy was carried out using electron beam. This is performed in order to enhance tribological properties of the alloy. Silicon is considered most important alloying element in aluminium alloy, particularly for tribological components. Prior to silicon alloying. aluminium substrate were painted with binder and silicon powder and dried in a furnace. Silicon alloying were carried out in a vacuum chamber. The Silicon alloyed materials were assessed using some techniques. The results show that silicon alloying formed a composite metal-non metal system in which silicon particles are dispersed in the alloyed layer. Silicon content in the alloyed layer is about 40% while in other place is only 10.5 %. The hardness of layer changes significantly. The wear properties of the alloying alloys increase. Silicon surface alloying also reduced the coefficient of friction for sliding against a hardened steel counter face, which could otherwise be higher because of the strong adhesion of aluminium to steel. The hardness of the silicon surface alloyed material dropped when it underwent a heating cycle similar to the ion coating process. Hence, silicon alloying is not a suitable choice for use as an intermediate layer for duplex treatment

  2. Proceedings of the Conference on Refractory Alloying Elements in Superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Some papers about the use of refractory metals in superalloys are presented. Mechanical properties, thermodynamics properties, use for nuclear fuels and corrosion resistance of those alloys are studied. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Nuclear design of APSARA reload-2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, M.; Veeraraghavan, N.

    1978-01-01

    In view of the satisfactory operating performance of initial and reload-1 fuel designs of Apsara reactor, it was felt desirable to adopt a basically similar design for reload-2 fuel, i.e. the fuel assembly should consist of equally spaced parallel fuel plates in which highly enriched uranium, alloyed with aluminium, is employed as fuel. However, because of fabricational constraints, certain modifications were necessary and were incorporated in the proposed reload design to cater to the multiple needs of operational requirements, improved fuel utilization and inherent reactor safety. The salient features of the nuclear design of reload-2 fuel for the Apsara reactor are discussed. (author)

  4. Research and development of thorium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Jun.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear properties of thorium are summarized and present status of research and development of the use of thorium as nuclear fuel is reviewed. Thorium may be used for nuclear fuel in forms of metal, oxide, carbide and nitride independently, alloy with uranium or plutonium or mixture of the compound. Their use in reactors is described. The reprocessing of the spent oxide fuel in thorium fuel cycle is called the thorex process and similar to the purex process. A concept of a molten salt fuel reactor and chemical processing of the molten salt fuel are explained. The required future research on thorium fuel cycle is commented briefly. (T.H.)

  5. Thermodynamic Database for Zirconium Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerlerud Perez, Rosa

    2003-05-01

    For many decades zirconium alloys have been commonly used in the nuclear power industry as fuel cladding material. Besides their good corrosion resistance and acceptable mechanical properties the main reason of using these alloys is the low neutron absorption. Zirconium alloys are exposed to a very severe environment during the nuclear fission process and there is a demand for better design of this material. To meet this requirement a thermodynamic database is developed to support material designers. In this thesis some aspects about the development of a thermodynamic database for zirconium alloys are presented. A thermodynamic database represents an important facility in applying thermodynamic equilibrium calculations for a given material providing: 1) relevant information about the thermodynamic properties of the alloys e.g. enthalpies, activities, heat capacity, and 2) significant information for the manufacturing process e.g. heat treatment temperature. The basic information in the database is first the unary data, i.e. pure elements; those are taken from the compilation of the Scientific Group Thermodata Europe (SGTE) and then the binary and ternary systems. All phases present in those binary and ternary systems are described by means of the Gibbs energy dependence on composition and temperature. Many of those binary systems have been taken from published or unpublished works and others have been assessed in the present work. All the calculations have been made using Thermo C alc software and the representation of the Gibbs energy obtained by applying Calphad technique

  6. Carbon Alloys-Multi-functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Eiichi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)], E-mail: yasuda.e.aa.@m.titech.ac.jp; Enami, Takashi; Hoteida, Nobuyuki [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Lanticse-Diaz, L.J. [University of the Philippines (Philippines); Tanabe, Yasuhiro [Nagoya University (Japan); Akatsu, Takashi [MSL, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Last decade after our proposal of the 'Carbon Alloys' concept, many different kinds of Carbon Alloys, such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, graphene sheet with magnetism, semi-conducting BCN compounds, graphite intercalation compounds, exfoliated carbon fiber, etc. have been found and developed. To extend the concept further, it is important to make it into intelligent materials by incorporating multiple functions. One example of the multi-functionalization is the development of homo-atomic Carbon Alloys from glassy carbon (GC) that exhibits high electrical conductivity and low gas permeability after treatment at critical conditions. Glassy carbon underwent metamorphosis to graphite spheres at HIP condition, and improved resistance to oxidation after alloying with Ta. The other one is shape utilization of the nano-sized carbon by understanding the effect of its large surfaces or interfaces in nanotechnology treatment. Recently carbon nanofiber was produced by polymer blend technology (PB) which was proposed by Prof. A. Oya during the Carbon Alloy project and progressed into intelligent carbon nanofiber (CNF) materials. CNF is combined into the polymer composites which is a candidate material for the bipolar separator in fuel cell. The superior properties, i.e., high electrical conductivity, high modulus, high strength, etc., of the CNF is being utilized in the preparation of this polymer composite.

  7. MODELLING OF NUCLEAR FUEL CLADDING TUBES CORROSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Cech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes materials made of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding fabrication. It is focused on corrosion problems their theoretical description and modeling in nuclear engineering.

  8. Spent-fuel-stabilizer screening studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynhoff, N.; Girault, S.E.; Fish, R.L.

    1980-11-01

    A broad range of potential stabilizer materials was identified and screened for packaging spent fuel assemblies for underground storage. The screening took into consideration the thermal gradient, stress, differential thermal expansion, nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, cost, and availability. Recommended stabilizer materials for further testing include silica, quartz, mullite, zircon, bentonite, graphite, gases, lead, Zn alloys, Cu alloys, etc

  9. A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials

  10. Fuel performance in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-11-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy (DOE). A variety of different types of fuels have been stored there since the 1950's prior to reprocessing for uranium recovery. In April of 1992, the DOE decided to end fuel reprocessing, changing the mission at ICPP. Fuel integrity in storage is now viewed as long term until final disposition is defined and implemented. Thus, the condition of fuel and storage equipment is being closely monitored and evaluated to ensure continued safe storage. There are four main areas of fuel storage at ICPP: an original underwater storage facility (CPP-603), a modern underwater storage facility (CPP-666), and two dry fuel storage facilities. The fuels in storage are from the US Navy, DOE (and its predecessors the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission), and other research programs. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels. In the underwater storage basins, fuels are clad with stainless steel, zirconium, and aluminum. Also included in the basin inventory is canned scrap material. The dry fuel storage contains primarily graphite and aluminum type fuels. A total of 55 different fuel types are currently stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The corrosion resistance of the barrier material is of primary concern in evaluating the integrity of the fuel in long term water storage. The barrier material is either the fuel cladding (if not canned) or the can material

  11. Phase transformations on Zr-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Sergio Norifumi

    1980-01-01

    This research intended the laboratory scale experimental development of Zr-Nb alloys with adequate characteristics for use as fuel element cladding or for the making of irradiation capsules. Zr-Nb alloys with different Nb contents were melted and the resulting material was characterised. The following metallurgical aspects were considered: preparation of Zr-Nb alloys with various Nb contents; heat and thermomechanical treatments; microstructural characterization; mechanical properties; oxidation properties. The influence of the heat treatment and thermomechanical treatment, on the out-of-pile mechanical and oxidation properties of the Zr-Nb alloys were studied. It was found that the alloy microhardness increases with the Nb content and/or with the thermomechanical treatment. Mechanical properties such as yield and ultimate tensile strength as well as elongation were determined by means of compression tests. The results showed that the alloy yield stress increases with the Nb content and with the thermomechanical treatment, while its elongation decreases. Thermogravimetric analysis determined the alloy oxidation kinetics, in the 400 - 800 deg C interval, at 1 atm. oxygen pressure. The results showed that the alloy oxidation rate increases with the temperature and Nb content. It was also observed that the oxidation rate increases considerably for temperatures higher than 600 deg C.(author)

  12. Improved capability of U-ZrH fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietzen, A J [General Atomic Company, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1983-08-01

    This paper provides a brief background on TRIGA fuels and a summary of the development of U-ZrH fuels utilizing higher uranium loadings in the alloy. Most of the development work was reported two years ago; however, in this paper some emphasis will be placed upon applications that General Atomic Company is now making with these higher alloy fuels. They are referred to as higher uranium content alloys because their development was not really LEU development; the TRIGA fuel has used low enrichment since its inception.

  13. Inert matrix fuel in dispersion type fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savchenko, A.M. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: sav@bochvar.ru; Vatulin, A.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Morozov, A.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sirotin, V.L. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dobrikova, I.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulakov, G.V. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ershov, S.A. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kostomarov, V.P. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stelyuk, Y.I. [A.A. Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM) 123060, P.O. Box 369, Rogova Street, 5A, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-30

    The advantages of using inert matrix fuel (IMF) as a dispersion fuel in an aluminium alloy matrix are considered, in particular, low temperatures in the fuel centre, achievable high burn-ups, serviceability in transients and an environmentally friendly process of fuel rod fabrication. Two main versions of IMF are under development at A.A. Bochvar Institute, i.e. heterogeneous or isolated distribution of plutonium. The out-of-pile results on IMF loaded with uranium dioxide as plutonium simulator are presented. Fuel elements with uranium dioxide composition fabricated at A.A. Bochvar Institute are currently under MIR tests (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad). The fuel elements reached a burn-up of 88 MW d kg{sup -1} (equivalent to the burn up of the standard uranium dioxide pelletized fuel) without loss of leak-tightness of the cladding. The feasibility of fabricating IMF of these particular types with plutonium dioxide is considered with a view to in-pile irradiation.

  14. Inert matrix fuel in dispersion type fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, A. M.; Vatulin, A. V.; Morozov, A. V.; Sirotin, V. L.; Dobrikova, I. V.; Kulakov, G. V.; Ershov, S. A.; Kostomarov, V. P.; Stelyuk, Y. I.

    2006-06-01

    The advantages of using inert matrix fuel (IMF) as a dispersion fuel in an aluminium alloy matrix are considered, in particular, low temperatures in the fuel centre, achievable high burn-ups, serviceability in transients and an environmentally friendly process of fuel rod fabrication. Two main versions of IMF are under development at A.A. Bochvar Institute, i.e. heterogeneous or isolated distribution of plutonium. The out-of-pile results on IMF loaded with uranium dioxide as plutonium simulator are presented. Fuel elements with uranium dioxide composition fabricated at A.A. Bochvar Institute are currently under MIR tests (RIAR, Dimitrovgrad). The fuel elements reached a burn-up of 88 MW d kg-1 (equivalent to the burn up of the standard uranium dioxide pelletized fuel) without loss of leak-tightness of the cladding. The feasibility of fabricating IMF of these particular types with plutonium dioxide is considered with a view to in-pile irradiation.

  15. Advanced LMFBR fuel cladding susceptability to stress corrosion due to reprocessing impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henslee, S.P.

    1987-03-01

    The potential degradation of LMFBR fuel cladding alloys by chlorides, when used in metallic fuel systems, was evaluated. The alloys tested were D-9 and HT-9 stainless steels, austenitic and ferritic alloys respectively. These two alloys were tested in parallel with and their performance compared to the austenitic stainless steel Type 316. All alloys were tested for 7400 hours in a stress rupture environment with chloride exposure at either 550/degree/C 650/degree/C. None of the alloys tested were found to exhibit any degradation in time-to-rupture by the presence of chlorides under the conditions imposed during testing. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Dimensional, microstructural and compositional stability of metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, A.A.; Dayananda, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The projects undertaken were to address two areas of concern for metal-fueled fast reactors: metallurgical compatibility of fuel and its fission products with the stainless steel cladding, and effects of porosity development in the fuel on fuel/cladding interactions and on sodium penetration in fuel. The following studies are reported on extensively in appendices: hot isostatic pressing of U-10Zr by coupled boundary diffusion/power law creep cavitation, liquid Na intrusion into porous U-10Zr fuel alloy by differential capillarity, interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel and selected Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, interdiffusion between U-Zr fuel vs selected cladding steels, and interdiffusion of Ce in Fe-base alloys with Ni or Cr

  17. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  18. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel systems for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Examples are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  19. Experience with oxide fuel for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    This paper focuses on the use and potential of oxide fuel system for the LMFBR. The flawless performance of mixed oxide (UO 2 -PuO 2 ) fuel in FFTF to 100,000 MWd/MTM is reviewed and means for achieving 200,000 MWd/MTM are presented. This includes using non-swelling alloys for cladding and ducts to overcome the limitations caused by swelling of the current alloys. Exampled are provided of the inherently safe characteristics of oxide fuel including a large negative Doppler coefficient, its dispersive nature under hypothetical accident scenarios, and the low energy molten fuel-coolant interaction. Developments in fuel fabrication and reprocessing that stress safety and reduced personnel exposure are presented. Lastly, the flexibility to design for maximum fuel supply (high breeding gain) or minimum fuel cost (long lifetime) is shown

  20. Mechanical and irradiation properties of zirconium alloys irradiated in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Hyun; Eom, Kyong Bo; Kim, Jae Ik; Suh, Jung Min; Jeon, Kyeong Lak

    2011-01-01

    These experimental studies are carried out to build a database for analyzing fuel performance in nuclear power plants. In particular, this study focuses on the mechanical and irradiation properties of three kinds of zirconium alloy (Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) irradiated in the HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor), one of the leading multipurpose research reactors in the world. Yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were measured to determine the mechanical properties before and after irradiation, while irradiation growth was measured for the irradiation properties. The samples for irradiation testing are classified by texture. For the irradiation condition, all samples were wrapped into the capsule (07M-13N) and irradiated in the HANARO for about 100 days (E > 1.0 MeV, 1.1 10 21 n/cm 2 ). These tests and results indicate that the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys are similar whether unirradiated or irradiated. Alloy B has shown the highest yield strength and tensile strength properties compared to other alloys in irradiated condition. Even though each of the zirconium alloys has a different alloying content, this content does not seem to affect the mechanical properties under an unirradiated condition and low fluence. And all the alloys have shown the tendency to increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Transverse specimens of each of the zirconium alloys have a slightly lower irradiation growth tendency than longitudinal specimens. However, for clear analysis of texture effects, further testing under higher irradiation conditions is needed

  1. Fuel Exhaling Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor Bhat, Zahid; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Kottaichamy, Alagar Raja; Shafi, Shahid Pottachola; Varhade, Swapnil; Gautam, Manu; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2018-01-18

    State-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) anodically inhale H 2 fuel and cathodically expel water molecules. We show an unprecedented fuel cell concept exhibiting cathodic fuel exhalation capability of anodically inhaled fuel, driven by the neutralization energy on decoupling the direct acid-base chemistry. The fuel exhaling fuel cell delivered a peak power density of 70 mW/cm 2 at a peak current density of 160 mA/cm 2 with a cathodic H 2 output of ∼80 mL in 1 h. We illustrate that the energy benefits from the same fuel stream can at least be doubled by directing it through proposed neutralization electrochemical cell prior to PEMFC in a tandem configuration.

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, E. D.

    1984-10-16

    An array of rods is assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurized water reactor, the rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets and containing helium. The helium gas pressure is selected for each rod so that it differs substantially from the helium gas pressure in its closest neighbors. In a preferred arrangement the rods are arranged in a square lattice and the helium gas pressure alternates between a relatively high value and a relatively low value so that each rod has as its closest neighbors up to four rods containing helium gas at the other pressure value.

  4. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Yasushi; Hirukawa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi.

    1994-01-01

    A bundle of fuel rods is divided into four fuel rod group regions of small fuel rod bundles by a cross-shaped partitioning structure consisting of paired plate-like structures which connect two opposing surfaces of a channel box. A water removing material with less neutron absorption (for example, Zr or a Zr alloy) or a solid moderator is inserted and secured to a portion of a non-boiling water region interposed between the paired plate-like structure. It has a structure that light water flows to the region in the plate-like structure. The volume, density or composition of the water removing material is controlled depending on the composition of the fuels, to change the moderating characteristics of neutrons in the non-boiling water region. This can easily moderate the difference of nuclear characteristics between each of fuel assemblies using fuel materials of different fuel compositions. Further, the reactivity control effect of the burnable poisons can be enhanced without worsening fuel economy or linear power density. (I.N.)

  5. High corrosion-resistant fuel spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Toshimi; Takase, Iwao; Ikeda, Shinzo; Masaoka, Isao; Nakajima, Junjiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To enable manufacturing BWR fuel spacers by prior-art production process, using a zirconium-base alloy having very excellent corrosion resistance. Method: A highly improved nodular-resistant, corrosion-resistant zirconium alloy is devised by adding a slight amount of niobium, titanium and vanadium to zircaloy, of which fuel spacers are produced. That is, there can be obtained an alloy having much more excellent nodular resistance than conventional zircaloy, and free from a large change in plasticity, workability, and weldability, by adding to zirconium about 1.5 % of tin, about 0.15 % of iron, about 0.05 % of chromium, about 0.05 % of nickel, and 0.05 to 0.5 % of at least one or two kinds of niobium, titanium and vanadium. Using this zirconium-base alloy can manufacture fuel spacers by the same manufacturing process, thus improving economy and reliability. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Influence of impurities and ion surface alloying on the corrosion resistance of E110 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Volkov, N. V.; Valikov, R. A.; Novikov, V. V.; Markelov, V. A.; Pimenov, Yu. V.

    2013-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of zirconium alloys depends on their structural-phase state, the type of core coolant and operating factors. The formation of a protective oxide film on the zirconium alloys is sensitive to the content of impurity atoms present in the charge base of alloys and accumulating in them in the manufacture of products. The impurity composition of the initial zirconium is determined by the method of its manufacture and generally remains unchanged in the products, deter-mining their properties, including their corrosion resistance. An increased content of impurities (C, N, Al, Mo, Fe) both individually and in their combination negatively affects the corrosion resistance of zirconium and its alloys. One of the potentially effective methods to increase the protective properties of oxide films on zirconium alloys is a surface alloying using the regime of mixing the atoms of a film, preliminarily coated on the surface, and the atoms of a target. This method makes it possible to form a given structural-phase state in the thin surface layer with unique physicochemical properties and thus to in-crease the corrosion resistance and wear resistance of fuel claddings. In this context, the object of investigation was samples of cladding tubes from alloy E110 with various content of impurity elements (nitrogen, aluminum, and carbon) with the aim to reduce the negative influence of impurities on the corrosion resistance by changing the structural-phase state of the surface layer of fuel claddings and fuel assembly components with alloying in the regime of ion mixing of atoms

  7. Translating VDM to Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausdahl, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    specifications. However, to take advantage of the automated analysis of Alloy, the model-oriented VDM specifications must be translated into a constraint-based Alloy specifications. We describe how a sub- set of VDM can be translated into Alloy and how assertions can be expressed in VDM and checked by the Alloy...

  8. FFTF metal fuel pin sodium bond quality verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.; Dittmer, J.O.

    1988-12-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Series III driver fuel design consists of U-10Zr fuel slugs contained in a ferritic alloy cladding. A liquid metal, sodium bond between the fuel and cladding is required to prevent unacceptable temperatures during operation. Excessive voiding or porosity in the sodium thermal bond could result in localized fuel melting during irradiation. It is therefore imperative that bond quality be verified during fabrication of these metal fuel pins prior to irradiation. This document discusses this verification

  9. Precipitation Behavior of Magnesium Alloys Containing Neodymium and Yttrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Ellen L. S.

    Magnesium is the lightest of the structural metals and has great potential for reducing the weight of transportation systems, which in turn reduces harmful emissions and improves fuel economy. Due to the inherent softness of Mg, other elements are typically added in order to form a fine distribution of precipitates during aging, which improves the strength by acting as barriers to moving dislocations. Mg-RE alloys are unique among other Mg alloys because they form precipitates that lie parallel to the prismatic planes of the Mg matrix, which is an ideal orientation to hinder dislocation slip. However, RE elements are expensive and impractical for many commercial applications, motivating the rapid design of alternative alloy compositions with comparable mechanical properties. Yet in order to design new alloys reproducing some of the beneficial properties of Mg-RE alloys, we must first fully understand precipitation in these systems. Therefore, the main objectives of this thesis are to identify the roles of specific RE elements (Nd and Y) on precipitation and to relate the precipitate microstructure to the alloy strength. The alloys investigated in this thesis are the Mg-Nd, Mg-Y, and Mg-Y-Nd systems, which contain the main alloying elements of commercial WE series alloys (Y and Nd). In all three alloy systems, a sequence of metastable phases forms upon aging. Precipitate composition, atomic structure, morphology, and spatial distribution are strongly controlled by the elastic strain energy originating from the misfitting coherent precipitates. The dominating role that strain energy plays in these alloy systems gives rise to very unique microstructures. The evolution of the hardness and precipitate microstructure with aging revealed that metastable phases are the primary strengthening phases of these alloys, and interact with dislocations by shearing. Our understanding of precipitation mechanisms and commonalities among the Mg-RE alloys provide future avenues to

  10. Fuel performance of DOE fuels in water storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, A.P.; Scott, J.G.; Shelton-Davis, C.V.; McDannel, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In April of 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) decided to end the fuel reprocessing mission at ICPP. Fuel performance in storage received increased emphasis as the fuel now needs to be stored until final dispositioning is defined and implemented. Fuels are stored in four main areas: an original underwater storage facility, a modern underwater storage facility, and two dry fuel storage facilities. As a result of the reactor research mission of the DOE and predecessor agencies, the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Atomic Energy Commission, many types of nuclear fuel have been developed, used, and assigned to storage at the ICPP. Fuel clad with stainless steel, zirconium, aluminum, and graphite are represented. Fuel matrices include uranium oxide, hydride, carbide, metal, and alloy fuels, resulting in 55 different fuel types in storage. Also included in the fuel storage inventory is canned scrap material

  11. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    The composite of metals and alloys used in the fabrication of 238 Pu cardiac pacemaker fuel capsules resists the effects of high temperatures, high mechanical forces, and chemical corrosives and provides more than adequate protection to the fuel pellet even from deliberate attempts to dissolve the cladding in inorganic acids. This does not imply that opening a pacemaker fuel capsule by inorganic acids is impossible but that it would not be a wise choice

  12. FCRD Transmutation Fuels Handbook 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Transmutation of minor actinides such as Np, Am, and Cm in spent nuclear fuel is of international interest because of its potential for reducing the long-term health and safety hazards caused by the radioactivity of the spent fuel. One important approach to transmutation (currently being pursued by the DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Advanced Fuels Campaign) involves incorporating the minor actinides into U-Pu-Zr alloys, which can be used as fuel in fast reactors. It is, therefore, important to understand the properties of U-Pu-Zr alloys, both with and without minor actinide additions. In addition to requiring extensive safety precautions, alloys containing U and Pu are difficult to study for numerous reasons, including their complex phase transformations, characteristically sluggish phase-transformation kinetics, tendency to produce experimental results that vary depending on the histories of individual samples, and sensitivity to contaminants such as oxygen in concentrations below a hundred parts per million. Many of the experimental measurements were made before 1980, and the level of documentation for experimental methods and results varies widely. It is, therefore, not surprising that little is known with certainty about U-Pu-Zr alloys, and that general acceptance of results sometimes indicates that there is only a single measurement for a particular property. This handbook summarizes currently available information about U, Pu, Zr, and alloys of two or three of these elements. It contains information about phase diagrams and related information (including phases and phase transformations); heat capacity, entropy, and enthalpy; thermal expansion; and thermal conductivity and diffusivity. In addition to presenting information about materials properties, it attempts to provide information about how well the property is known and how much variation exists between measurements. Although the handbook includes some references to publications about modeling

  13. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  14. Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, L.F.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option

  15. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Hideyuki

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent bending of fuel rods caused by the difference of irradiation growth between coupling fuel rods and standards fuel rods thereby maintain the fuel rod integrity. Constitution: The f value for a fuel can (the ratio of pole of zirconium crystals in the entire crystals along the axial direction of the fuel can) of a coupling fuel rod secured by upper and lower tie plates is made smaller than the f value for the fuel can of a standard fuel rod not secured by the upper and the lower tie plates. This can make the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the coupling fuel rod greater than the irradiation growth of the fuel can of the standard fuel rod and, accordingly, since the elongation of the standard fuel rod can always by made greater, bending of the standard fuel rod can be prevented. (Yoshihara, M.)

  16. Elastic Modulus Measurement of ORNL ATF FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Zachary T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Elastic modulus and Poisson’s ratio for a number of wrought FeCrAl alloys, intended for accident tolerant fuel cladding application, are determined via resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy. The results are reported as a function of temperature from room temperature to 850°C. The wrought alloys were in the fully annealed and unirradiated state. The elastic modulus for the wrought FeCrAl alloys is at least twice that of Zr-based alloys over the temperature range of this study. The Poisson’s ratio of the alloys was 0.28 on average and increased very slightly with increasing temperature.

  17. Some recent trends in the use of zirconium alloys for nuclear service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balaramamoorthy, K.

    1992-01-01

    Without any exception nuclear power reactors particularly the water cooled ones, operating in the World use natural or slightly enriched uranium oxide fuel pellets with zirconium alloy cladding. While the zirconium alloys have proven to be successful in their designed usage, a desire for longer lifetimes of core components and increased duty cycle puts more demand on materials performance. This demand has led to more in depth studies of phenomena associated with zirconium alloy corrosion mechanism, fine tuning of the zirconium alloy composition, development of fabrication techniques and to the evaluation of newer zirconium alloys for critical applications. (author). 5 refs., 32 figs

  18. High density dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel development campaign that results in an aluminum plate-type fuel of unlimited LEU burnup capability with an uranium loading of 9 grams per cm 3 of meat should be considered an unqualified success. The current worldwide approved and accepted highest loading is 4.8 g cm -3 with U 3 Si 2 as fuel. High-density uranium compounds offer no real density advantage over U 3 Si 2 and have less desirable fabrication and performance characteristics as well. Of the higher-density compounds, U 3 Si has approximately a 30% higher uranium density but the density of the U 6 X compounds would yield the factor 1.5 needed to achieve 9 g cm -3 uranium loading. Unfortunately, irradiation tests proved these peritectic compounds have poor swelling behavior. It is for this reason that the authors are turning to uranium alloys. The reason pure uranium was not seriously considered as a dispersion fuel is mainly due to its high rate of growth and swelling at low temperatures. This problem was solved at least for relatively low burnup application in non-dispersion fuel elements with small additions of Si, Fe, and Al. This so called adjusted uranium has nearly the same density as pure α-uranium and it seems prudent to reconsider this alloy as a dispersant. Further modifications of uranium metal to achieve higher burnup swelling stability involve stabilization of the cubic γ phase at low temperatures where normally α phase exists. Several low neutron capture cross section elements such as Zr, Nb, Ti and Mo accomplish this in various degrees. The challenge is to produce a suitable form of fuel powder and develop a plate fabrication procedure, as well as obtain high burnup capability through irradiation testing

  19. Improved nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The invention is of a nuclear fuel element which comprises a central core of a body of nuclear fuel material selected from the group consisting of compounds of uranium, plutonium, thorium and mixtures thereof, and an elongated composite cladding container comprising a zirconium alloy tube containing constituents other than zirconium in an amount greater than about 5000 parts per million by weight and an undeformed metal barrier of moderate purity zirconium bonded to the inside surface of the alloy tube. The container encloses the core so as to leave a gap between the container and the core during use in a nuclear reactor. The metal barrier is of moderate purity zirconium with an impurity level on a weight basis of at least 1000ppm and less than 5000ppm. Impurity levels of specific elements are given. Variations of the invention are also specified. The composite cladding reduces chemical interaction, minimizes localized stress and strain corrosion and reduces the likelihood of a splitting failure in the zirconium alloy tube. Other benefits are claimed. (U.K.)

  20. Dilatometric studies on uranium-zirconium-fissium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Aparna; Kulkarni, S.G.; Kulkarni, R.V.; Kaity, Santu

    2012-01-01

    The knowledge of thermophysical properties of U-Zr alloys are important for modelling fuel behaviour in nuclear reactor. Fissium is an alloy that approximates the equilibrium concentration of the metallic fission product elements left by metallurgical reprocessing. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) data is needed to calculate stresses occurring in fuel and cladding with change in temperature. Coefficient of thermal expansion can be utilized to determine the change of alloy density as a function of temperature. In the present investigation, thermophysical properties like coefficient of thermal expansion and density were determined using dilatometer for U-20wt.%Zr-5wt.%Fs alloy prepared by arc melting process. The microstructural investigation was carried out using scanning electron microscope

  1. Establishment of Experimental Apparatus and Mechanical Test for SFR Metallic Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, Chong Tak; Oh, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Mo; Kim, Ki Hwan; Woo, Yoon Myung; Lee, Chan Bock

    2010-12-01

    U-Zr binary alloys and U-Zr-Ce ternary alloys as SFR surrogate metallic fuels were fabricated by a casting process. Tensile tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of the fuels. As a results, the mechanical properties such as yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation were measured. In this report, these experimental results are presented

  2. Refining U-Zr-Nb alloys by remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, B.M.; Kniess, C.T.; Riella, H.G.; Ferraz, W.B.

    2011-01-01

    The high density U-Zr-Nb and U-Nb uranium-based alloys can be employed as nuclear fuel in a PWR reactor due to their high density and nuclear properties. These alloys can stabilize the gamma phase, however, according to TTT diagrams, at the working temperature of a PWR reactor, all gamma phase transforms to α'' phase in a few hours. To avoid this kind of transformation during the nuclear reactor operation, the U-Zr-Nb alloy and U-Nn are used in α'' phase. The stability of α'' phase depends on the alloy composition and cooling rate. The alloy homogenization has to be very effective to eliminate precipitates rich in Zr and Nb to avoid changes in the alloying elements contents in the matrix. The homogenization was obtained by remelting the alloy and keeping it in the liquid state for enough time to promote floating of the precipitates (usually carbides, less dense) and leaving the matrix free of precipitates. However, this floating by density difference may result in segregation between the alloying elements (Nb and Zr, at the top) and uranium (at the bottom). The homogenized alloys were characterized in terms of metallographic techniques, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, EDS and X-ray diffraction. In this paper, it is shown that the contents of Zr and Nb at the bottom and at the top of the matrix are constant. (author)

  3. Refining U-Zr-Nb alloys by remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, B.M.; Kniess, C.T.; Riella, H.G., E-mail: bmaguiar@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferraz, W.B. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The high density U-Zr-Nb and U-Nb uranium-based alloys can be employed as nuclear fuel in a PWR reactor due to their high density and nuclear properties. These alloys can stabilize the gamma phase, however, according to TTT diagrams, at the working temperature of a PWR reactor, all gamma phase transforms to {alpha}'' phase in a few hours. To avoid this kind of transformation during the nuclear reactor operation, the U-Zr-Nb alloy and U-Nn are used in {alpha}'' phase. The stability of {alpha}'' phase depends on the alloy composition and cooling rate. The alloy homogenization has to be very effective to eliminate precipitates rich in Zr and Nb to avoid changes in the alloying elements contents in the matrix. The homogenization was obtained by remelting the alloy and keeping it in the liquid state for enough time to promote floating of the precipitates (usually carbides, less dense) and leaving the matrix free of precipitates. However, this floating by density difference may result in segregation between the alloying elements (Nb and Zr, at the top) and uranium (at the bottom). The homogenized alloys were characterized in terms of metallographic techniques, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, EDS and X-ray diffraction. In this paper, it is shown that the contents of Zr and Nb at the bottom and at the top of the matrix are constant. (author)

  4. Alloy Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL’s Alloy Fabrication Facility in Albany, OR, researchers conduct DOE research projects to produce new alloys suited to a variety of applications, from gas...

  5. Controlled Thermal Expansion Alloys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There has always been a need for controlled thermal expansion alloys suitable for mounting optics and detectors in spacecraft applications.  These alloys help...

  6. Irradiation Stability of Uranium Alloys at High Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Postirradiation examinations were begun of a series of unrestrained dilute uranium alloy specimens irradiated to exposures up to 13,000 MWD/T in NaK-containing stainless steel capsules. This test, part of a program of development of uranium metal fuels for desalination and power reactors sponsored by the Division of Reactor Development and Technology, has the objective of defining the temperature and exposure limits of swelling resistance of the alloyed uranium. This paper discusses those test results

  7. Alloys and composites of polybenzoxazines properties and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rimdusit, Sarawut; Tiptipakorn, Sunan

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the unique and fascinating properties of alloys and composites from novel commercialized thermosetting resins based on polybenzoxazines. Their outstanding properties such as processability, thermal, mechanical, electrical properties as well as ballistic impact properties of polybenzoxazine alloys and composites make them attractive for various applications in electronic packaging encapsulation, light weight ballistic armour composites and bipolar plate in fuel cells.

  8. Aspects regarding the lifetime of a fuel channel in a CANDU nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calinescu, A.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of factors influencing upon the time life of a fuel channel of CANDU reactors built in Romania. Fuel channels are made of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy. Means and methodology to detect cracking of fuel channels are described, as well as improvements to increase life time of Cernavoda NPP fuel channels and national programme in this area. (author)

  9. Fabrication of preliminary fuel rods for SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Ki; Oh, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Mo; Woo, Youn Myung; Kim, Ki Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Metal fuels was selected for fueling many of the first reactors in the US, including the Experimental Breeder Reactor-I (EBR-I) and the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) in Idaho, the FERMI-I reactor, and the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) in the UK. Metallic U.Pu.Zr alloys were the reference fuel for the US Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program. Metallic fuel has advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant and inherent passive safety. U-Zr-Pu alloy fuels have been used for SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor) related to the closed fuel cycle for managing minor actinides and reducing a high radioactivity levels since the 1980s. Fabrication technology of metallic fuel for SFR has been in development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. For the final goal of SFR fuel rod fabrication with good performance, recently, three preliminary fuel rods were fabricated. In this paper, the preliminary fuel rods were fabricated, and then the inspection for QC(quality control) of the fuel rods was performed

  10. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittel, J.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Frost, B.R.T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Mustelier, J.P. (COGEMA, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)); Bagley, K.Q. (AEA Reactor Services, Risley (United Kingdom)); Crittenden, G.C. (AEA Reactor Services, Dounreay (United Kingdom)); Dievoet, J. van (Belgonucleaire, Brussels (Belgium))

    1993-09-01

    The first fast breeder eactors, constructed in the 1945-1960 time period, used metallic fuels composed of uranium, plutonium, or their alloys. They were chosen because most existing reactor operating experience had been obtained on metallic fuels and because they provided the highest breeding ratios. Difficulties in obtaining adequate dimensional stability in metallic fuel elements under conditions of high fuel burnup led in the 1960s to the virtual worldwide choice of ceramic fuels. Although ceramic fuels provide lower breeding performance, this objective is no longer an important consideration in most national programs. Mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide became the ceramic fuel that has received the widest use. The more advanced ceramic fuels, mixed uranium and plutonium carbides and nitrides, continue under development. More recently, metal fuel elements of improved design have joined ceramic fuels in achieving goal burnups of 15 to 20 percent. Low-swelling fuel cladding alloys have also been continuously developed to deal with the unexpected problem of void formation in stainless steels subjected to fast neutron irradiation, a phenomenon first observed in the 1960s. (orig.)

  11. The analysis of fuel constituent redistribution for ternary metallic fuel slug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byoung Oon; Lee, Dong Uk; Kim, Young Kyun; Chang, Jin Wook; Lee, Ki Bok; Kim, Young Il

    2004-02-01

    U-TRU-Zr metallic alloy is being considered as the fuel slug for the proliferation resistance core of KALIMER. The radial fuel constituent migration is a general phenomenon in the metallic alloys. This phenomenon may affect the in-reactor performance of metallic fuel rods, influencing such factors as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, power generation rate, phase boundaries and eutectic melting of the fuel slug. Thus, constituent redistribution modeling is essential when developing a metallic fuel performance code. The constituent migration model adopted in this report was based on the Ishida's model and Hofman's theory. A subroutine program has been made and installed into the MACSIS code to simulate constituent redistribution. The radial profile of Zr redistribution was calculated for the ternary metallic fuel, and compared with the measured data.

  12. Pt -based anode catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Bibian; Sanchez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Javier

    2007-01-01

    In this work it is studied the electro-catalytic behavior of pure platinum and platinum-based alloys with Ru, Sn, Ir, and Os supported on carbon to the ethanol electro-oxidation in aims to develop anodic catalysts for direct ethanol fuel cells, additionally, porous electrodes and membrane electrode assemblies were built for proton exchange membrane fuel cells in which the electrodes were tested. Catalysts characterization was made by cyclic voltammetry whereas the fuel cells behavior tests were made by current-potential polarization curves. in general, all alloys show a lower on-set reaction potential and a higher catalytic activity than pure platinum. However, in the high over potential zone, pure platinum has higher catalytic activity than the alloys. In agreement with these results, the alloys studied here could be useful in fuel cells operating on moderated and low current

  13. Development of Metallic Fuels for Actinide Transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Steven Lowe [Idaho National Laboratory; Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Laboratory; Benson, Michael Timothy [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory; Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    Research and development activities on metallic fuels are focused on their potential use for actinide transmutation in future sodium fast reactors. As part of this application, there is also a need for a near zero-loss fabrication process and a desire to demonstrate a multifold increase in burnup potential. The incorporation of Am and Np into the traditional U-20Pu-10Zr metallic fuel alloy was demonstrated in the US during the Integral Fast Reactor Program of the 1980’s and early 1990’s. However, the conventional counter gravity injection casting method performed under vacuum, previously used to fabricate these metallic fuel alloys, was not optimized for mitigating loss of the volatile Am constituent in the casting charge; as a result, approximately 40% of the Am casting charge failed to be incorporated into the as-cast fuel alloys. Fabrication development efforts of the past few years have pursued an optimized bottom-pour casting method to increase utilization of the melted charge to near 100%, and a differential pressure casting approach, performed under an argon overpressure, has been demonstrated to result in essentially no loss of Am due to volatilization during fabrication. In short, a path toward zero-loss fabrication of metallic fuels including minor actinides has been shown to be feasible. Irradiation testing of advanced metallic fuel alloys in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been underway since 2003. Testing in the ATR is performed inside of cadmium-shrouded positions to remove >99% of the thermal flux incident on the test fuels, resulting in an epi-thermal driven fuel test that is free from gross flux depression and producing an essentially prototypic radial temperature profile inside the fuel rodlets. To date, three irradiation test series (AFC-1,2,3) have been completed. Over 20 different metallic fuel alloys have been tested to burnups as high as 30% with constituent compositions of Pu up to 30%, Am up to 12%, Np up to 10%, and Zr between 10

  14. ABB PWR fuel design for high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, S.; Jourdain, P.; Limback, M.; Garde, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion, hydriding and irradiation induced growth of a based materials are important factors for the high burnup performance of PWR fuel. ABB has developed a number of Zr based alloys to meet the need for fuel that enables operation to elevated burnups. The materials include composition and processing optimised Zircaloy 4 (OPTIN TM ) and Zircaloy 2 (Zircaloy 2P), as well as advanced Zr based alloys with chemical compositions outside the composition specified for Zircaloy. The advanced alloys are either used as Duplex or as single component claddings. The Duplex claddings have an inner component of Zircaloy and an outer layer of Zr with small additions of alloying elements. ABB has furthermore improved the dimensional stability of the fuel assembly by developing stiffer and more bow resistant guide tubes while debris related fuel failures have been eliminated from ABB fuel by introducing the Guardian TM grid. Intermediate flow mixers that improve the thermal hydraulic performance and the dimensional stability of the fuel has also been developed within ABB. (author)

  15. Steam Initiated Surface Modification of Aluminium Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Din, Rameez Ud

    The extensive demand of aluminium alloys in various industries such as in transportationis mainly due to the high strength to weight ratio, which could be translated into fuel economy and efficiency. Corrosion protection of aluminium alloys is an important aspect for all applications which includes...... the use of aluminium alloys in the painted form requiring a conversion coating to improve the adhesion. Chromate based conversion coating processes are extremely good for these purposes, however the carcinogenic and toxic nature of hexavalent chromium led to the search for more benign and eco......, crystalline nano-particles, role of steam-based treatment on adhesion of industrially applied powder coating, and investigations of a failed painted aluminium window profile due to defects in the extruded profile. Chapters 13 and 14 describe the overall discussion, conclusions and future work based...

  16. Electronic structure of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references

  17. Metallic Fuels Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, Dawn E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Burkes, Douglas E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randall S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frank, Steven M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hartmann, Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hyde, Timothy A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keiser, Jr., Dennis D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kennedy, J. Rory [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Maddison, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mariani, Robert D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Middlemas, Scott C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Holleran, Thomas P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sencer, Bulent H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Squires, Leah N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-08-07

    This is not a typical External Report--It is a Handbook. No Abstract is involved. This includes both Parts 1 and 2. The Metallic Fuels Handbook summarizes currently available information about phases and phase diagrams, heat capacity, thermal expansion, and thermal conductivity of elements and alloys in the U-Pu-Zr-Np-Am-La-Ce-Pr-Nd system. Although many sections are reviews and updates of material in previous versions of the Handbook [1, 2], this revision is the first to include alloys with four or more elements. In addition to presenting information about materials properties, the handbook attempts to provide information about how well each property is known and how much variation exists between measurements. Although it includes some results from models, its primary focus is experimental data.

  18. Electrocatalysts for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, M. A.; Fernandez V, S. M.; Vargas G, J. R.

    2008-01-01

    It was investigated the oxygen reduction reaction (fundamental reaction in fuel cells) on electrocatalysts of Pt, Co, Ni and their alloys CoNi, PtCo, PtNi, PtCoNi in H 2 SO 4 0.5 M and KOH 0.5 M as electrolyte. The electrocatalysts were synthesized using mechanical alloying processes and chemical vapor deposition. The electrocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray spectroscopy. The evaluation was performed using electrocatalytic technique of rotating disk electrode and kinetic parameters were determined for each electro catalyst. We report the performance of all synthesized electrocatalysts in acid and alkaline means. (Author)

  19. Corrosion performance of Al-Si-Cu hypereutectic alloys in a synthetic condensed automotive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilta de Oliveira Santos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation the corrosion resistance of four Al-Si hypereutectic alloys in a solution typical of condensate from automotive fuel combustion products, and referred to here as synthetic condensed automotive solution, has been studied. Three commercial alloys that are used for cylinder liners, and a laboratory made alloy, were studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and measurements were taken after increasing times of immersion in this solution. Comparison of the electrochemical response of the four alloys in the corrosive solution was carried out. Although the mechanisms by which the four alloys corroded were similar, the results indicated differences in corrosion resistances of these alloys, and these differences could be related to their microstructures. The laboratory prepared alloy showed increased susceptibility to pitting corrosion compared to the commercial alloys. The surfaces of the alloys were examined, before and after the corrosion test, by scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicated preferential attack of the aluminium matrix phase in all the alloys. The alloy with higher copper content and prepared by spray forming was more susceptible to pitting compared to the other alloys. The EIS response at low frequencies indicated a diffusion-controlled process, probably that of oxygen to the alloy interface.

  20. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys

  1. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys. (DLC)

  2. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloys in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Baek, B. J.; Park, S. Y. and others

    1999-08-01

    The overview of corrosion and hydriding behaviors of Zr-based alloy under the conditions of the in-reactor service and in the absence of irradiation is introduced in this report. The metallurgical characteristics of Zr-based alloys and the thermo-mechanical treatments on the microstructures and the textures in the manufacturing process for fuel cladding are also introduced. The factors affecting the corrosion of Zr alloy in reactor are summarized. And the corrosion mechanism and hydrogen up-take are discussed based on the laboratory and in-reactor results. The phenomenological observations of zirconium alloy corrosion in reactors are summarized and the models of in-reactor corrosion are exclusively discussed. Finally, the effects of irradiation on the corrosion process in Zr alloy were investigated mainly based on the literature data. (author). 538 refs., 26 tabs., 105 figs

  3. Effect of Silicon in U-10Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautz, Elizabeth J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kovarik, Libor [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    This document details a method for evaluating the effect of silicon impurity content on U-10Mo alloys. Silicon concentration in U-10Mo alloys has been shown to impact the following: volume fraction of precipitate phases, effective density of the final alloy, and 235-U enrichment in the gamma-UMo matrix. This report presents a model for calculating these quantities as a function of Silicon concentration, which along with fuel foil characterization data, will serve as a reference for quality control of the U-10Mo final alloy Si content. Additionally, detailed characterization using scanning electron microscope imaging, transmission electron microscope diffraction, and atom probe tomography showed that Silicon impurities present in U-10Mo alloys form a Si-rich precipitate phase.

  4. Development of MTR fuel plate with U-Al dispersion core constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, Jose Carlos

    1979-01-01

    This work is a contribution to the development of fuel plates for Research Nuclear Reaction Materials Test Reactors. The plates have the core constituted by dispersions of metallic uranium in aluminum. The main topics of this work are: 1) The preparation of uranium powder with particle sizes in the 53-105μm diameter range; 2) The mixture and cold-pressing of uranium and aluminum powders for different uranium concentrations; 3) The behavior of the dispersions in the roll milling conditions; 4) Blister, radiographic, metallographic and irradiation tests for quality control of the plates. The irradiation test was performed in the IEA-R1 swimming-pool reactor using a prototype with a dispersion of aluminum and natural uranium (45 w/o ), reaching an integrated neutron flux of 8.663 X 10 18 n/cm 2 , no visual changes being noticed after the completion of the experiment. The behavior of the uranium-aluminum reaction for dispersions with 45% w/o uranium also studied. X-ray diffraction experiments showed the formation of UAl 2 UAl 3 and UAl 4 , while energy dispersive analysis of X-rays(EDAX) demonstrated that the diffusion of aluminum in uranium is the mechanism responsible for that reaction. The activation energy for the U-Al reaction was determined by dilatometric experiments yielding 20.2 kcal/mol.The aluminum-uranium reaction reaches an end when extended to 96 h at 600 deg C, namely, when all the uranium is found in the UAl 4 composition. (author)

  5. Characterization of IFR metal fuel fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabor, J.D.; Purviance, R.T.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Spencer, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The integral fast reactor (IFR) employs a reactor design that has inherent safety features. An important safety advantage is derived from its pool configuration, which facilitates passive decay heat removal and isolates the core from accidents that might occur elsewhere in the plant. The metal-alloy fuel has superior heat transfer properties compared to oxide fuels. While the IFR design has these inherent safety features, a complete analysis of reactor safety requires assessment of the consequences of the melting of the uranium alloy fuel in the core and the contact of molten core materials with sodium. A series of eight tests was conducted in which the fragmentation and interaction behavior of kilogram quantities of uranium-zirconium alloy in sodium was studied

  6. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium and its alloys - a literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Haemaelaeinen, H.

    1986-05-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement data of titanium and its alloys is reviewed. Especially the results obtained in spent nuclear fuel repository conditions with commercially pure titanium and TiCode-12 alloy are examined. The results show that the mechanical properties of titanium are not much affected by hydrogen when tested by smooth specimens. Much greater effects can be expected with notched fracture mechanics specimens. However, only limeted data is available. Hydrogen distribution in titanium is affected by stress, alloy composition and temperature gradients. In order to model the hydrogen-induced crack growth in titanium much more mechanistic work is needed especially to understand the behaviour of hydrogen in crack tip stress field. (author)

  7. Nuclear fuel element and container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grubb, W.T.; King, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    The invention is based on the discovery that a substantial reduction in metal embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking from fuel pellet-cladding interaction can be achieved by the use of a copper layer or liner in proximity to the nuclear fuel, and an intermediate zirconium oxide barrier layer between the copper layer and the zirconium cladding substrate. The intermediate zirconia layer is a good copper diffusion barrier; also, if the zirconium cladding surface is modified prior to oxidation, copper can be deposited by electroless plating. A nuclear fuel element is described which comprises a central core of fuel material and an elongated container using the system outlined above. The method for making the container is again described. It comprises roughening or etching the surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container, oxidizing the resulting container, activating the oxidized surface to allow for the metallic coating of such surfaces by electroless deposition and further coating the activated-oxidized surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container with copper, iron or nickel or an alloy thereof. (U.K.)

  8. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  9. Fact sheet on fuel manufacturing and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section (NFCMS) supports Member States to improve in-pile fuel performance and management of materials; and to develop advanced fuel technologies for ensuring reliability and economic efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle, provides assistance to Member States to support fuel-manufacturing capability, including quality assurance techniques, optimization of manufacturing parameters and radiation protection, supports the development fuel modeling expertise in Member States, covering both normal operation and postulated and severe accident conditions, provides information and support for the operation of Nuclear Power Plant to ensure that the environment and water chemistry is appropriate for fuel operation, supports fuel failure investigations, including equipment for failed fuel detection and for post-irradiation examination and inspection, as well as fuel repair, provides information and support research into the basic properties of fuel materials, including UO2, MOX, (Th, Pu)O2, (Th, U233)O2 fuels and zirconium alloy cladding and fuel assembly components and offers guidance on the relationship with back-end requirement (interim storage, transport, reprocessing, disposal), fuel utilization and management, MOX fuels, alternative fuels and advanced fuel technology and materials, economic and other aspects of nuclear fuel use (e.g. environmental impact). Recently NFCMS provided support to a Member State manufacturing Gadolinia doped fuel and provided in-mast sipping equipment to a Nuclear Power Plant to allow the determination of fuel failure. Member States interested in fuel performance and manufacture should contact the Technical Cooperation Department of the Agency and Member States interested in knowing more about the Agency's programme on source management should contact: C. Ganguly, Section Head, V. Inozemtsev, J. Killeen

  10. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H. [and others

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out.

  11. Development of advanced LWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2000-04-01

    This report describes the results from evaluating the preliminary Zr-based alloys to develop the advanced Zr-based alloys for the nuclear fuel claddings, which should have good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties at high burn-up over 70,000MWD/MTU. It also includes the results from the basic studies for optimizing the processes which are involved in the development of the advanced Zr-based alloys. Ten(10) kinds of candidates for the alloys of which performance is over that of the existing Zircaloy-4 or ZIRLO alloy were selected out of the preliminary alloys of 150 kinds which were newly designed and repeatedly manufactured and evaluated to find out the promising alloys. First of all, the corrosion tests on the preliminary alloys were carried out to evaluate their performance in both pure water and LiOH solution at 360 deg C and in steam at 400 deg C. The tensile tests were performed on the alloys which proved to be good in the corrosion resistance. The creep behaviors were tested at 400 deg C for 10 days with the application of constant load on the samples which showed good performance in the corrosion resistance and tensile properties. The effect of the final heat treatment and A-parameters as well as Sn or Nb on the corrosion resistance, tensile properties, hardness, microstructures of the alloys was evaluated for some alloys interested. The other basic researches on the oxides, electrochemical properties, corrosion mechanism, and the establishment of the phase diagrams of some alloys were also carried out

  12. Status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibilashvili, Yu.K.; Reshetnikov, F.G.; Ioltukhovsky, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The paper presents current status and development of RBMK fuel rods and reactor materials. With regard to fuel rod cladding the following issues have been discussed: corrosion, tensile properties, welding technology and testing of an alternative cladding alloy with a composition of Zr-Nb-Sn-Fe. Erbium doped fuel has been suggested for safety improvement. Also analysis of fuel reliability is presented in the paper. (author)

  13. Fuel cells for electricity generation from carbonaceous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K; Formanski, V; Roes, J [Gerhard-Mercator- Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Duisburg, Fachbereich Maschinenbau/Fachgebiet Energietechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Heinzel, A [Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Fuel cells, which are electrochemical systems converting chemical energy directly into electrical energy with water and heat as by-products, are of interest as a means of generating electricity which is environmentally friendly, clean and highly efficient. They are classified according to the electrolyte used. The main types of cell in order of operating temperature are described. These are: alkaline fuel cells, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC); the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC); the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC); the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Applications depend on the type of cell and may range from power generation on a large scale to mobile application in cars or portable systems. One of the most promising options is the PEM-fuel cell stack where there has been significant improvement in power density in recent years. The production from carbonaceous fuels and purification of the cell fuel, hydrogen, is considered. Of the purification methods available, hydrogen separation by means of palladium alloy membranes seems particular effective in reducing CO concentrations to the low levels required for PEM cells. (UK)

  14. An XRD technique for quantitative phase analysis of Al-U-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.B.; Kulkarni, N.K.; Jain, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    In several nuclear research reactors all over the world, Al-U alloy is used as fuel. To stabilise less brittle phase UAl 3 in Al-U alloy, a small amount of Zr (1 to 3 wt% ) is added. A rapid, non destructive and simple x-ray diffraction technique has been developed for quantitative phase analysis Al-U-Zr alloy system containing UAl 4 , UAl 3 and Al. (author)

  15. Physical Modeling of Plastic Working Conditions for Rods of 7xxx Series Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyja H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuing high level of demand for lightweight structural materials is the reason for the ever-growing interest in aluminum alloys. The main areas of application for aluminum alloys products are the aerospace and automotive industries. Production of profiles and structural elements from lightweight alloys gives possibility to reduce the curb weight of construction, which directly translates into among other reduction of fuel consumption and lower amount of generated exhaust gas.

  16. Correlative Microscopy of Alpha Prime Precipitation in Neutron-Irradiated Fe-Cr-Al Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Samuel A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Fe-Cr-Al alloys are currently being considered for accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding applications due to their superior high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance compared to Zr-based alloys. This work represents the current state-of-the-art on both techniques for analysis of α' precipitate microstructures and the processes and mechanisms governing its formation in neutron-irradiated Fe-Cr-Al alloys.

  17. High strength alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  18. Uranium alloys for using in fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C.; Pires, O.S.

    1988-08-01

    The U-Zr and U-Ti alloys are studied, given emphasis to the high solute solubility in gamma phase of uranium, which is suitable for using as metal fuel in fast breeder reactors. The alloys were prepared in electron beam furnaces and submitted to X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, microhardness, optical metallography, and chemical analysis. The obtained values are good agreements with the literature data. The study shows that the U-Zr presents better characteristics than the U-Ti for using as fuel in fast breeder reactors. (M.C.K.) [pt

  19. Development of Amorphous Filler Alloys for the Joining of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jai Young; Kim, Dong Myong; Kang, Yoon Sun; Jung, Jae Han; Yu, Ji Sang; Kim, Hae Yeol; Lee, Ho [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    In the case of advanced CANDU fuel being useful in future, the fabrication processes for soundness insurance of a improved nuclear fuel bundle must be developed at the same time because it have three times combustibility as existing fuel. In particular, as the improved nuclear fuel bundle in which a coated layer thickness is thinner than existing that, firmity of a joint part is very important. Therefore, we need to develop a joint technique using new solder which can settle a potential problem in current joining method. As the Zr-Be alloy system is composed with the elements having high neutron permeability, they are suitable for joint of nuclear fuel pack. The various compositions Zr-Be binary metallic glass alloys were applicable to the joining the nuclear fuel bundles. The thickness of joint layer using the Zr{sub 1}-{sub x}Be{sub x} amorphous ribbon as a solder is thinner than that using physical vapor deposited Be. Among the Zr{sub 1}-{sub x}Be{sub x} amorphous binary alloys, Zr{sub 0}.7Be-0.3 binary alloy is the most appropriate for joint of nuclear fuel bundle because its joint layer is smooth and thin due to low degree of Be diffusion. In the case of the Zr{sub (}0.7-y)Ti{sub y}Be{sub 0}.3 and Zr{sub (}0.7-y)Nb{sub y}Be{sub 0}3 ternary amorphous alloys, the crystallization temperature(T{sub x}) and activation energy(E{sub x}) increase as the contents of Nb and Ti increase respectively. In the aspect of thermal stability, the ternary amorphous alloys are superior than Zr-Be binary amorphous alloys and Zr-Ti-Be amorphous alloy is superior than Zr-Nb-Be amorphous alloy. 12 refs., 5 tabs., 25 figs. (author)

  20. Alternative Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  1. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.T.; Thompson, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of protecting the cladding of a nuclear fuel element from internal attack and a nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor are disclosed. The nuclear fuel element has disposed therein an additive of a barium-containing material and the barium-containing material collects reactive gases through chemical reaction or adsorption at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to fuel element plenum temperatures. The additive is located in the plenum of the fuel element and preferably in the form of particles in a hollow container having a multiplicity of gas permeable openings in one portion of the container with the openings being of a size smaller than the size of the particles. The openings permit gases and liquids entering the plenum to contact the particles. The additive is comprised of elemental barium or a barium alloy containing one or more metals in addition to barium such as aluminum, zirconium, nickel, titanium and combinations thereof. 6 claims, 3 drawing figures

  2. Biocompatibility of dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braemer, W. [Heraeus Kulzer GmbH and Co. KG, Hanau (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    Modern dental alloys have been used for 50 years to produce prosthetic dental restorations. Generally, the crowns and frames of a prosthesis are prepared in dental alloys, and then veneered by feldspar ceramics or composites. In use, the alloys are exposed to the corrosive influence of saliva and bacteria. Metallic dental materials can be classified as precious and non-precious alloys. Precious alloys consist of gold, platinum, and small amounts of non-precious components such as copper, tin, or zinc. The non-precious alloys are based on either nickel or cobalt, alloyed with chrome, molybdenum, manganese, etc. Titanium is used as Grade 2 quality for dental purposes. As well as the dental casting alloys, high purity electroplated gold (99.8 wt.-%) is used in dental technology. This review discusses the corrosion behavior of metallic dental materials with saliva in ''in vitro'' tests and the influence of alloy components on bacteria (Lactobacillus casei and Streptococcus mutans). The test results show that alloys with high gold content, cobalt-based alloys, titanium, and electroplated gold are suitable for use as dental materials. (orig.)

  3. BISON Fuel Performance Analysis of IFA-796 Rod 3 & 4 and Investigation of the Impact of Fuel Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sweet, Ryan T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    In order to improve the accident tolerance of light water reactor (LWR) fuel, alternative cladding materials have been proposed to replace the currently used zirconium (Zr)-based alloys. Of these materials, there is a particular focus on iron-chromiumaluminum (FeCrAl) alloys because they exhibit slower oxidation kinetics in high-temperature steam than Zr-alloys. This should decrease the energy release due to oxidation and slow cladding consumption in the presence of high temperature steam. These alloys should also exhibit increased “coping time” in the event of an accident scenario by improving the mechanical performance at high temperatures, allowing greater flexibility to achieve core cooling. As a continuation of the development of these alloys, in-reactor irradiation testing of FeCrAl cladded fuel rods has started. In order to provide insight on the possible behavior of these fuel rods as they undergo irradiation in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor, engineering analysis has been performed using FeCrAl material models implemented into the BISON fuel performance code. This milestone report provides an update on the ongoing development of modeling capability to predict FeCrAl cladding fuel performance and to provide an early look at the possible behavior of planned in-reactor FeCrAl cladding experiments. In particular, this report consists of two separate analyses. The first analysis consists of fuel performance simulations of IFA-796 rod 4 and two segments of rod 3. These simulations utilize previously implemented material models for the C35M FeCrAl alloy and UO2 to provide a bounding behavior analysis corresponding to variation of the initial fuel cladding gap thickness within the fuel rod. The second analysis is an assessment of the fuel and cladding stress states after modification of the fuel creep model that is currently implemented in the BISON fuel performance code. Effects from modifying the fuel creep model were identified for the BISON simulations

  4. Method for electrodeposition of nickel--chromium alloys and coating of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromatt, R.W.; Lundquist, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    High-quality electrodeposits of nickel-chromium binary alloys in which the percentage of chromium is controlled can be obtained by the addition of a complexing agent such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic disodium salt to the plating solution. The nickel-chromium alloys were found to provide an excellent hydrogen barrier for the protection of uranium fuel elements. (U.S.)

  5. The influence of modification on the thermophysical properties of magnesium wrought alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moldovan, P.; Popescu, G.; Miculescu, M.; Bojin, D.; Dimitriu, S.; Sillekens, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium is the lightest engineering metal and has a great potential due to its raw material large natural reverse and interesting properties. Magnesium alloys are attracting increasing attention for industry for weight reduction and high fuel efficiency. Magnesium alloys are attractive

  6. Carbonate fuel cell anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donado, Rafael A.; Hrdina, Kenneth E.; Remick, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A molten alkali metal carbonates fuel cell porous anode of lithium ferrite and a metal or metal alloy of nickel, cobalt, nickel/iron, cobalt/iron, nickel/iron/aluminum, cobalt/iron/aluminum and mixtures thereof wherein the total iron content including ferrite and iron of the composite is about 25 to about 80 percent, based upon the total anode, provided aluminum when present is less than about 5 weight percent of the anode. A process for production of the lithium ferrite containing anode by slipcasting.

  7. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  10. Transmutation Fuel Fabrication-Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grover, Blair Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-12-01

    ABSTRACT Nearly all of the metallic fuel that has been irradiated and characterized by the Advanced Fuel Campaign, and its earlier predecessors, has been arc cast. Arc casting is a very flexible method of casting lab scale quantities of materials. Although the method offers flexibility, it is an operator dependent process. Small changes in parameter space or alloy composition may affect how the material is cast. This report provides a historical insight in how the casting process has been modified over the history of the advanced fuels campaign as well as the physical parameters of the fuels cast in fiscal year 2016.

  11. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat.

  12. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2007-01-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat

  13. Development of microstructure in thermomechanical processing of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Zirconium based alloys are used for the manufacture of fuel tubes pressure tubes calandria tubes and other components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRS). In single or two phase zirconium alloy system a variety of microstructure can be generated by suitable heat treatments by the process of equilibrium and non equilibrium phase transformations Microstructure can also be modified by alloying with α and β stabilizers. The microstructure in Zr alloys could be single hexagonal phase (α alloys) two phase bcc and hexagonal (α + β alloys) phase, single metastable martensitic microstructure and β with ω phase. The microstructural and micro textural evolution during thermo mechanical treatments depends strongly on such initial microstructure. Hot extrusion is a significant bulk deformation step which decides the initial microstructure of the alloy. It is carried out at elevated temperature i e above the recrystallization temperature, which enable imposition of large strains in single step. This deformation causes a significant change in the microstructure of the material and depends on extrusion process parameters such as temperature, strain rate (Ram speed), reduction ratio etc. In the present paper development of microstructures, microtexture and texture have been examined. An attempt is also made to optimise the hot working parameters for different Zirconium alloys with help of these studies. (author)

  14. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  15. Fuel and nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunier, C.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is studied in detail, the best choice and why in relation with the type of reactor, the properties of the fuel cans, the choice of fuel materials. An important part is granted to the fuel assembly of PWR type reactor and the performances of nuclear fuels are tackled. The different subjects for research and development are discussed and this article ends with the particular situation of mixed oxide fuels ( materials, behavior, efficiency). (N.C.)

  16. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  17. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  18. Stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    An electrometallurgical treatment process has been developed by Argonne National Laboratory to convert various types of spent nuclear fuels into stable storage forms and waste forms for repository disposal. The first application of this process will be to treat spent fuel alloys from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II. Three distinct product streams emanate from the electrorefining process: (1) refined uranium; (2) fission products and actinides extracted from the electrolyte salt that are processed into a mineral waste form; and (3) metallic wastes left behind at the completion of the electrorefining step. The third product stream (i.e., the metal waste stream) is the subject of this paper. The metal waste stream contains components of the chopped spent fuel that are unaffected by the electrorefining process because of their electrochemically ''noble'' nature; this includes the cladding hulls, noble metal fission products (NMFP), and, in specific cases, zirconium from metal fuel alloys. The selected method for the consolidation and stabilization of the metal waste stream is melting and casting into a uniform, corrosion-resistant alloy. The waste form casting process will be carried out in a controlled-atmosphere furnace at high temperatures with a molten salt flux. Spent fuels with both stainless steel and Zircaloy cladding are being evaluated for treatment; thus, stainless steel-rich and Zircaloy-rich waste forms are being developed. Although the primary disposition option for the actinides is the mineral waste form, the concept of incorporating the TRU-bearing product into the metal waste form has enough potential to warrant investigation

  19. Solubility of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Maltsev, Dmitry S.; Yamschikov, Leonid F.; Osipenko, Alexander G.; Kormilitsyn, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels (SNF) employing molten salts and liquid metals as working media is considered as a possible alternative to the existing liquid extraction (PUREX) processes. Liquid salts and metals allow reprocessing highly irradiated high burn-up fuels with short cooling times, including the fuels of fast neutron reactors. Pyrochemical technology opens a way to practical realization of short closed fuel cycle. Liquid low-melting metals are immiscible with molten salts and can be effectively used for separation (or selective extraction) of SNF components dissolved in fused salts. Binary or ternary alloys of eutectic compositions can be employed to lower the melting point of the metallic phase. However, the information on SNF components behaviour and properties in ternary liquid metal alloys is very scarce

  20. Thermal compatibility of U-2wt.%Mo and U-10wt.%Mo fuel prepared by centrifugal atomization for high density research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Ki Hwan; Lee Don Bae; Kim Chang Kyu; Kuk Il Hyun; Hofman, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Research on the intermetallic compounds of uranium was revived in 1978 with the decision by the international research reactor community to develop proliferation-resistant fuels. The reduction of 93% 235 U (HEU) to 20% 235 U (LEU) necessitates the use of higher U-loading fuels to accommodate the addition 238 U in the LEU fuels. While the vast majority of reactors can be satisfied with U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel, several high performance reactors require high loadings of up to 8-9 g U cm -3 . Consequently, in the renewed fuel development program of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, attention has shifted to high density uranium alloys. Early irradiation experiments with uranium alloys showed promise of acceptable irradiation behavior, if these alloys can be maintained in their cubic γ-U crystal structure. It has been reported that high density atomized U-Mo powders prepared by rapid cooling have metastable isotropic γ-U phase saturated with molybdenum, and good γ-U phase stability, especially in U-10wt.%Mo alloy fuel. If the alloy has good thermal compatibility with aluminium, and this metastable gamma phase can be maintained during irradiation, U-Mo alloy would be a prime candidate for dispersion fuel for research reactors. In this paper, U-2w.%Mo and U-10w.%Mo alloy powder which have high density (above 15 g-U/cm 3 ), are prepared by centrifugal atomization. The U-Mo alloy fuel meats are made into rods extruding the atomized powders. The characteristics related to the thermal compatibility of U-2w.%Mo and U-10w.%Mo alloy fuel meat at 400 o C for time up to 2000 hours are examined. (author)

  1. Study of fuel element characteristic of SM and SMP (SM-PRIMA) fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinov, A.V.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; Makhin, V.M.; Tuchnin, L.M.; Tsykanov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the techniques and results of reactor tests and post-reactor investigations of the SM reactor fuel elements and fuel elements developed in the process of designing the specialized PRIMA test reactor with the SM reactor fuel elements used as a prototype and which are referred to as the SMP fuel elements. The behavior of fuel elements under normal operating conditions and under deviation from normal operating conditions was studied to verify the calculation techniques, to check the calculation results during preparation of the SM reactor safety substantiation report and to estimate the possibility of using such fuel elements in other projects. During tests of fuel rods under deviation from normal operating conditions their advantages were shown over fuel elements, the components of which were produced using the Al-based alloys. (author)

  2. Grid spacers for use in a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwako, Akira.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain spacers capable of reducing the pressure loss by enlarging coolant flow channels when the fuel temperature is high, while capable of reliably maintaining the fuel pins with no vibrations when the fuel temperature is low. Constitution: This invention concerns grid spacers for constituting fuel assemblies for use in water cooled reactors. Memory shape alloys are disposed at least a portion of a spacer element that takes such a shape as urging the pin when the fuel temperature is low, while enlarging the coolant flow channel to reduce the pressure loss when the fuel temperature is high. (Ikeda, J.)

  3. Modelling Accident Tolerant Fuel Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Laboratory; Gamble, Kyle Allan Lawrence [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-05-01

    The catastrophic events that occurred at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in 2011 have led to widespread interest in research of alternative fuels and claddings that are proposed to be accident tolerant. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program has funded an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) High Impact Problem (HIP). The ATF HIP is a three-year project to perform research on two accident tolerant concepts. The final outcome of the ATF HIP will be an in-depth report to the DOE Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) giving a recommendation on whether either of the two concepts should be included in their lead test assembly scheduled for placement into a commercial reactor in 2022. The two ATF concepts under investigation in the HIP are uranium silicide fuel and iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloy cladding. Utilizing the expertise of three national laboratory participants (Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory), a comprehensive multiscale approach to modeling is being used that includes atomistic modeling, molecular dynamics, rate theory, phase-field, and fuel performance simulations. Model development and fuel performance analysis are critical since a full suite of experimental studies will not be complete before AFC must prioritize concepts for focused development. In this paper, we present simulations of the two proposed accident tolerance fuel systems: U3Si2 fuel with Zircaloy-4 cladding, and UO2 fuel with FeCrAl cladding. Sensitivity analyses are completed using Sandia National Laboratories’ Dakota software to determine which input parameters (e.g., fuel specific heat) have the greatest influence on the output metrics of interest (e.g., fuel centerline temperature). We also outline the multiscale modelling approach being employed. Considerable additional work is required prior to preparing the recommendation report for the Advanced

  4. Analysis of UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel under transient using fuel performance code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: alfredo@ctmsp.mar.mil.br, E-mail: rafael.orm@gmail.com, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@ctmsp.mar.mil.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Naval e Oceânica

    2017-11-01

    Recent research has appointed the need to replace the classic fuel concept, used in light water reactors. Uranium dioxide has a weak point due to the low thermal conductivity, that produce high temperatures on the fuel. The ceramic composite fuel formed of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), with the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO), presents high thermal conductivity compared with UO{sub 2}. The oxidation of zirconium generates hydrogen gas that can create a detonation condition. One of the preferred options are the ferritic alloys formed of iron-chromium and aluminum (FeCrAl), that should avoid the hydrogen release due to oxidation. In general, the FeCrAl alloys containing 10 - 20Cr, 3 - 5Al, and 0 - 0.12Y in weight percent. The FeCrAl alloys should exhibit a slow oxidation kinetics due to chemical composition. Resistance to oxidation in the presence of steam is improved as a function of the content of chromium and aluminum. In this way, the thermal and mechanical properties of the UO{sub 2}-BeO-10%vol, composite fuel were coupled with FeCrAl alloys and added to the fuel codes. In this work, we examine the fuel rod behavior of UO{sub 2}-10%vol-BeO/FeCrAl, including a simulated transient of reactivity. The fuels behavior shown reduced temperature with UO{sub 2}-BeO/Zr, UO{sub 2}-BeO/FeCrAl also were compared with UO{sub 2}/Zr system. The case reactivity initiated accident analyzed, reproducing the fuel rod called VA-1 using UO{sub 2}/Zr alloys and compared with UO{sub 2}-BeO/FeCrAl. (author)

  5. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  6. Fuel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allardice, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The technical and economic viability of the fast breeder reactor as an electricity generating system depends not only upon the reactor performance but also on a capability to recycle plutonium efficiently, reliably and economically through the reactor and fuel cycle facilities. Thus the fuel cycle is an integral and essential part of the system. Fuel cycle research and development has focused on demonstrating that the challenging technical requirements of processing plutonium fuel could be met and that the sometimes conflicting requirements of the fuel developer, fuel fabricator and fuel reprocessor could be reconciled. Pilot plant operation and development and design studies have established both the technical and economic feasibility of the fuel cycle but scope for further improvement exists through process intensification and flowsheet optimization. These objectives and the increasing processing demands made by the continuing improvement to fuel design and irradiation performance provide an incentive for continuing fuel cycle development work. (author)

  7. Irradiation performance of U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M. K.; Gan, J.; Jue, J. F.; Keiser, D. D.; Perez, E.; Robinson, A.; Wachs, D. M.; Woolstenhulme, N. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont (United States)

    2014-04-15

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. U-Mo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  8. IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. MEYER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

  9. Analysis of hafnium in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Isao; Sakai, Fumiaki; Ohuchi, Yoshifusa; Nakamura, Hisashi

    1977-01-01

    It is required to analyse alloying components and impurity elements in the acceptance analysis of zirconium alloys as the material for fuel cladding tubes and pressure tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Because of extreme similarity in chemical properties between zirconium and hafnium, about 100 ppm of hafnium is usually contained in zirconium alloys. Zircaloy-2 alloy and 2.5% Nb-zirconium with the addition of hafnium had been prepared as in-house standard samples for rapid analysis. Study was made on fluorescent X-ray analysis and emission spectral analysis to establish the analytical method. By using these in-house standard samples, acceptance analysis was successfully carried out for the fuel cladding tubes for advanced thermal reactors. Sulfuric acid solution was prepared from JAERI-Z 1, 2 and 3, the standard sample for zircaloy-2 prepared by the Analytical Committee on Nuclear Fuel and Reactor Materials, JAERI, and zirconium oxide (Hf 1 ppm/Zr). Standard Hf solution was added to the sulfuric acid solution step by step, to make up a series of the standard oxide samples by the precipitation process. By the use of these standard samples, the development of the analytical method and joint analysis were made by the three-member analytical technique research group including PNC. The analytical precision for the fluorescent X-ray analysis was improved by attaching a metallic yttrium filter to the window of an X-ray tube so as to suppress the effect due to zirconium matrix. The variation factor of the joint analysis was about 10% to show good agreement, and the indication value was determined. (Kobatake, H.)

  10. Modelling of zirconium alloys corrosion in LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kritskij, V.G.; Berezina, I.G.; Kritskij, A.V.; Stjagkin, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical parameters, that exerted effect on Zr+1%Nb alloy corrosion and deserved consideration during reactor operation, were defined and a model was developed to describe the influence of physical and chemical parameters on zirconium alloys corrosion in nuclear power plants. The model is based on the correlation between the zirconium oxide solubility in high-temperature water under the influence of the chemical parameters and the measured values of fuel cladding corrosion under LWR conditions. The intensity of fuel cladding corrosion in the primary circuits depends on the coolant water quality, growth of iron oxide deposits and vaporization portion. Mathematically, the oxidation rate can be expressed as a sum of heat and radiation components. The temperature dependence on the oxidation rate can be described by the Arrenius equation. The radiation component of Zr uniform corrosion equation is a function of several factors such as neutron fluency, the temperature the metallurgical composition and et. We assume that the main factor is the changing of water chemistry and the H 2 O 2 concentration play the determinative role. Probably, the influence of H 2 O 2 is based on the formation of unstable compound ZrO 3 ·nH 2 O and Zr(OH) 4 with high solubility. The validity of the used formulae was confirmed by corrosion measurements on WWER and RBMK fuel cladding. The model can be applied for calculating the reliability of nuclear fuel operation. (author)

  11. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  12. Gamma stability and powder formation of UMo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, F.B.V.; Andrade, D.A.; Angelo, G.; Belchior Junior, A.; Torres, W.M.; Umbehaun, P.E., E-mail: wmtorres@ipen.br, E-mail: umbehaun@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Angelo, E., E-mail: eangelo@mackenzie.br [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Grupo de Simulacao Numerica (GSN)

    2015-07-01

    A study of the hydrogen embrittlement as well as a research on the relation between gamma decomposition and powder formation of uranium molybdenum alloys were previously presented. In this study a comparison regarding the hypo-eutectoid and hyper-eutectoid molybdenum additions is presented. Gamma uranium molybdenum alloys have been considered as the fuel phase in plate type fuel elements for material and test reactors (MTR). Regarding their usage as a dispersion phase in aluminum matrix, it is necessary to convert the as cast structure into powder, and one of the techniques considered for this purpose is the hydration-dehydration (HDH). This paper shows that, under specific conditions of heating and cooling, γ-UMo fragmentation may occur with non-reactive or reactive mechanisms. Following the production of the alloys by induction melting, samples of the alloys were thermally treated under a constant flow of hydrogen. It was observed that, even without a massive hydration-dehydration process, the alloys fragmented under specific conditions of thermal treatment, during the thermal shock phase of the experiments. Also, there is a relation between absorption and the rate of gamma decomposition or the gamma phase stability of the alloy and this phenomenon can be related to the eutectoid transformation temperature. This study was carried out to search for a new method for the production of powders and for the evaluation of important physical parameter such as the eutectoid transformation temperature, as an alternative to the existing ones. (author)

  13. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element for use in the core of a nuclear reactor is disclosed which has a composite cladding having a substrate, a metal barrier metallurgically bonded to the inside surface of the substrate and an inner layer metallurgically bonded to the inside surface of the metal barrier. In this composite cladding, the inner layer and the metal barrier shield the substrate from any impurities or fission products from the nuclear fuel material held within the composite cladding. The metal barrier forms about 1 to about 4 percent of the thickness of the cladding and is comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of niobium, aluminum, copper, nickel, stainless steel, and iron. The inner layer and then the metal barrier serve as reaction sites for volatile impurities and fission products and protect the substrate from contact and reaction with such impurities and fission products. The substrate and the inner layer of the composite cladding are selected from conventional cladding materials and preferably are a zirconium alloy. Also in a preferred embodiment the substrate and the inner layer are comprised of the same material, preferably a zirconium alloy. 19 claims, 2 figures

  14. Advances in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagle, S.R.; Wood, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    As described above, new developments in the aerospace market are focusing on higher temperature alloys for jet engine components and higher strength/toughness alloys for airframe applications. Conventional alloys for engines have reached their maximum useful temperature of about 1000 F (540 C) because of oxidation resistance requirements. IMI 834 and Ti-1100 advanced alloys show some improvement, however, the major improvement appears to be in gamma titanium aluminides which could extend the maximum usage temperature to about 1500 F (815 C). This puts titanium alloys in a competitive position to replace nickel-base superalloys. Advanced airframe alloys such as Ti-6-22-22S, Beta C TM , Ti-15-333 and Ti-10-2-3 with higher strength than conventional Ti-6-4 are being utilized in significantly greater quantities, both in military and commercial applications. These alloys offer improved strength with little or no sacrifice in toughness and improved formability, in some cases. Advanced industrial alloys are being developed for improved corrosion resistance in more reducing and higher temperature environments such as those encountered in sour gas wells. Efforts are focused on small precious metal additions to optimize corrosion performance for specific applications at a modest increase in cost. As these applications develop, the usage of titanium alloys for industrial markets should steadily increase to approach that for aerospace applications. (orig.)

  15. Fuel performance update at Japanese BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Abe, Moriyasu

    2008-01-01

    Fuel Performance of Japanese BWRs has shown excellency with a very low fuel failure rate over the past couple of decades. In order to eliminate debris-fretting failures, which is considered as a dominant cause, efforts have been made to work out strict FME program and introduce lower tie plate with debris filters. Regarding a measure to detect failures without delay, an online off-gas monitor is installed, and there occurred no significant secondary failures leading to unnecessary plant shutdowns thanks to the monitor. Current standard fuel designs are 9x9 lattice configuration with the design maximum burnup set at 55 GWd/t and the bundle average discharge burnup at 45 GWd/t. Satisfactory performance of many fuels has gained so far to the burnup level. However recent data show an increase in hydrogen pickup of fuel claddings and spacers in the region of high burnup or high irradiation period, and this is one of the issues that should be addressed to maintain and improve fuel reliability for the reasons that hydrogen concentration may affect ductility of zirconium alloy. Furthermore, a recent study showed abnormally high hydrogen concentration in fuel cladding. Comprehensive root cause analyses were made, which include a poolside measurement for a number of high burnup fuels and development of new technique for tenacious crud removal, with the result that it is confirmed that a unique combination of cladding material, irradiation period and environment caused the phenomenon and it is not expected to occur again. New iron enhanced zirconium alloys, which have been investigated in for a long time, are expected to have greater resistance to hydrogen pickup, and introduction of the alloys is considered as the future materials. Regarding extensive inspections of fuel assemblies and channel boxes at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, no abnormality due to Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake was observed for all plants. This paper deals with the current fuel performance at Japanese

  16. hydrogel membrane as electrolyte for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) employing a poly (vinyl alcohol) hydrogel membrane electrolyte (PHME) is reported. The DBFC employs an AB5 Misch metal alloy as anode and a goldplated stainless steel mesh as cathode in conjunction with aqueous alkaline solution of sodium borohydride as fuel and aqueous ...

  17. Durability and degradation of HT9 based alloy waste forms with variable Ni and Cr content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-31

    Short-term electrochemical and long-term hybrid electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on alloy waste forms in reference aqueous solutions that bound postulated repository conditions. The alloy waste forms investigated represent candidate formulations that can be produced with advanced electrochemical treatment of used nuclear fuel. The studies helped to better understand the alloy waste form durability with differing concentrations of nickel and chromium, species that can be added to alloy waste forms to potentially increase their durability and decrease radionuclide release into the environment.

  18. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  19. Corrosion of aluminum alloys in simulated dry storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 150 degrees C) corrosion of aluminum alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels in a closed or sealed system. A dependency on alloy type, temperature and initial humidity was determined for 1100, 5052 and 6061 aluminum alloys. Results after 4500 hours of environmental testing show that for a closed system, corrosion tends to follow a power law with the rate decreasing with increasing exposure. As corrosion takes place, two phenomena occur: (1) a hydrated layer builds up to resist corrosion, and (2) moisture is depleted from the system and the humidity slowly decreases with time. At a critical level of relative humidity, corrosion reactions stop, and no additional corrosion occurs if the system remains closed. The results form the basis for the development of an acceptance criteria for the dry storage of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuels

  20. Phases in U-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domagala, R.F.

    1986-09-01

    The binary (two component) U-Si system contains a total of seven ''compounds.'' The most U-rich compounds are of interest to the RERTR community because they are now being employed as fuels in research and test reactors. The nomenclature used in describing these fuels and the metallurgical significance of the notations recorded may have different meanings to people from different technical backgrounds. This paper is a succinct exploration of the principles of phase equilibria and the realities of commerical fabrication as applied to U-Si alloys. It is an attempt to record in referenceable and retrievable form information of value to the continued development, application and understanding of silicide fuels

  1. Extended storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This document is the final report on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel and Storage Facility Components during Long Term Storage (BEFAST-II, 1986-1991). It contains the results on wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries who participated in the co-ordinated research programme. Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to arise and accumulate. Many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology with the construction of additional away-from-reactor storage pools. However, dry storage is increasingly used with most participants considering dry storage concepts for the longer term. Depending on the cladding type options of dry storage in air or inert gas are proposed. Dry storage is becoming widely used as a supplement to wet storage for zirconium alloy clad oxide fuels. Storage periods as long as under wet conditions appear to be feasible. Dry storage will also continue to be used for Al clad and Magnox type fuel. Enhancement of wet storage capacity will remain an important activity. Rod consolidation to increase wet storage capacity will continue in the UK and is being evaluated for LWR fuel in the USA, and may start in some other countries. High density storage racks have been successfully introduced in many existing pools and are planned for future facilities. For extremely long wet storage (≥50 years), there is a need to continue work on fuel integrity investigations and LWR fuel performance modelling. it might be that pool component performance in some cases could be more limiting than the FA storage performance. It is desirable to make concerted efforts in the field of corrosion monitoring and prediction of fuel cladding and poll component behaviour in order to maintain good experience of wet storage. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Fuel behaviour in the case of severe accidents and potential ATF designs. Fuel Behavior in Severe Accidents and Potential Accident Tolerance Fuel Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Bo

    2013-01-01

    This presentation reviews the conditions of fuel rods under severe loss of coolant conditions, approaches that may increase coping time for plant operators to recover, requirements of advanced fuel cladding to increase tolerance in accident conditions, potential candidate alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding and a novel design of molybdenum (Mo) -based fuel cladding. The current Zr-alloy fuel cladding will lose all its mechanical strength at 750-800 deg. C, and will react rapidly with high-pressure steam, producing significant hydrogen and exothermic heat at 700-1000 deg. C. The metallurgical properties of Zr make it unlikely that modifications of the Zr-alloy will improve the behaviour of Zr-alloys at temperatures relevant to severe accidents. The Mo-based fuel cladding is designed to (1) maintain fuel rod integrity, and reduce the release rate of hydrogen and exothermic heat in accident conditions at 1200-1500 deg. C. The EPRI research has thus far completed the design concepts, demonstration of feasibility of producing very thin wall (0.2 mm) Mo tubes. The feasibility of depositing a protective coating using various techniques has also been demonstrated. Demonstration of forming composite Mo-based cladding via mechanical reduction has been planned

  3. Development of advanced spent fuel management process. The fabrication and oxidation behavior of simulated metallized spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Shin, Y.J.; You, G.S.; Joo, J.S.; Min, D.K.; Chun, Y.B.; Lee, E.P.; Seo, H.S.; Ahn, S.B

    1999-03-01

    The simulated metallized spent fuel ingots were fabricated and evaluated the oxidation rates and the activation energies under several temperature conditions to develop an advanced spent fuel management process. It was also checked the alloying characteristics of the some elements with metal uranium. (Author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 36 figs.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide as sustainable fuel: electrocatalysts for production with a solar cell and decomposition with a fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Fukunishi, Yurie; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2010-10-21

    Hydrogen peroxide was electrochemically produced by reducing oxygen in an aqueous solution with [Co(TCPP)] as a catalyst and photovoltaic solar cell operating at 0.5 V. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced is utilized as a fuel for a one-compartment fuel cell with Ag-Pb alloy nanoparticles as the cathode.

  5. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  6. Plutonium, nuclear fuel; Le plutonium, combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay

    1960-07-01

    A review of the physical properties of metallic plutonium, its preparation, and the alloys which it forms with the main nuclear metals. Appreciation of its future as a nuclear fuel. (author) [French] Apercu sur les proprietes physiques du plutonium metallique, sa preparation, ses alliages avec les principaux metaux nucleaires. Consideration sur son avenir en tant que combustible nucleaire. (auteur)

  7. The outcome of the working visits by the experts to the fuel provider enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mironov, Y.; Molchanov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The working visits by the international experts to the fabrication plants of nuclear fuels and the zirconium alloy component facility took part in the framework of the „Zero failure level“ project. The purpose of these working visits was to determine whether there are any cause-effect relationships between the production of nuclear fuel and the fuel failures as well as to identify the trends and reasons for such failures. As an outcome of the analysis of the production processes at the fabrication plants of the nuclear fuel and the zirconium alloys component facility, the system root causes affecting the failures of the nuclear fuel were not identified

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1970-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a fuel assembly in which a fuel rod bundle is easily detachable by rotating a fuel rod fastener rotatably mounted to the upper surface of an upper tie-plate supporting a fuel bundle therebelow. A locking portion at the leading end of each fuel rod protrudes through the upper tie-plate and is engaged with or separated from the tie-plate by the rotation of the fastener. The removal of a desired fuel rod can therefore be remotely accomplished without the necessity of handling pawls, locking washers and nuts. (Owens, K.J.)

  9. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D Hondt, P.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development programme on nuclear fuel at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN is described. The objective of this programme is to enhance the quantitative prediction of the operational limits of nuclear fuel and to assess the behaviour of fuel under incidental and accidental conditions. Progress is described in different domains including the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel, thermal conductivity, basic physical phenomena, post-irradiation examination for fuel performance assessment, and conceptual studies of incidental and accidental fuel experiments

  10. Corrosion and protection of spent Al-clad research reactor fuel during extended wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of spent research reactor fuel elements with different fuel meats, geometries and 235 U enrichments are presently stored under water in basins throughout the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminum (Al) or its alloy and are susceptible to corrosion. This paper presents an overview of the influence of Al alloy composition, galvanic effects (Al alloy/stainless steel), crevice effects, water parameters and synergism between these parameters as well as settled solids on the corrosion of typical Al alloys used as fuel element cladding. Pitting is the main form of corrosion and is affected by water conductivity, chloride ion content, formation of galvanic couples with rack supports and settled solid particles. The extent to which these parameters influence Al corrosion varies. This paper also presents potential conversion coatings to protect the spent fuel cladding. (author)

  11. Simple process to fabricate nitride alloy powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Keon Sik; Rhee, Young Woo; Oh, Jang-Soo; Kim, Jong Hun; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Uranium mono-nitride (UN) is considered as a fuel material [1] for accident-tolerant fuel to compensate for the loss of fissile fuel material caused by adopting a thickened cladding such as SiC composites. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. Among them, a direct nitriding process of metal is more attractive because it has advantages in the mass production of high-purity powders and the reusing of expensive 15 N 2 gas. However, since metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots, it has a drawback in the fabrication of fine powders. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has a centrifugal atomisation technique to fabricate uranium and uranium alloy powders. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate nitride fuel powders directly from uranium metal alloy powders. Spherical powder and flake of uranium metal alloys were fabricated using a centrifugal atomisation method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating the metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. The phase and morphology evolutions of powders were investigated during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also part of the present work. KAERI has developed the centrifugal rotating disk atomisation process to fabricate spherical uranium metal alloy powders which are used as advanced fuel materials for research reactors. The rotating disk atomisation system involves the tasks of melting, atomising, and collecting. A nozzle in the bottom of melting crucible introduces melt at the center of a spinning disk. The centrifugal force carries the melt to the edge of the disk and throws the melt off the edge. Size and shape of droplets can be controlled by changing the nozzle size, the disk diameter and disk speed independently or simultaneously. By adjusting the processing parameters of the centrifugal atomiser, a spherical and flake shape

  12. Alloy development for high burnup cladding (PWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, R. [Kraftwerk Union AG, Mulheim (Germany); Jeong, Y.H.; Baek, K.H.; Kim, S.J.; Choi, B.K.; Kim, J.M. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    An overview on current alloy development for high burnup PWR fuel cladding is given. It is mainly based on literature data. First, the reasons for an increase of the current mean discharge burnup from 35 MWd / kg(U) to 70 MWd / kg(U) are outlined. From the material data, it is shown that a batch average burnup of 60-70 MWd / kg(U), as aimed by many fuel vendors, can not be achieved with stand (=ASTM-) Zry-4 cladding tubes without violating accepted design criteria. Specifically criteria which limit maximum oxide scale thickness and maximum hydrogen content, and to a less degree, maximum creep and growth rate, can not be achieved. The development potential of standard Zry-4 is shown. Even when taking advantage of this potential, it is shown that an 'improved' Zry-4 is reaching its limits when it achieves the target burnup. The behavior of some Zr alloys outside the ASTM range is shown, and the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 alloy groups (ZrSn+transition metals, ZrNb, ZrSnNb+transition metals) which are currently considered to have the development potential for high burnup cladding materials are depicted. Finally, conclusions are drawn. (author). 14 refs., 11 tabs., 82 figs.

  13. FCRD Advanced Reactor (Transmutation) Fuels Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, Dawn Elizabeth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Transmutation of minor actinides such as Np, Am, and Cm in spent nuclear fuel is of international interest because of its potential for reducing the long-term health and safety hazards caused by the radioactivity of the spent fuel. One important approach to transmutation (currently being pursued by the DOE Fuel Cycle Research & Development Advanced Fuels Campaign) involves incorporating the minor actinides into U-Pu-Zr alloys, which can be used as fuel in fast reactors. U-Pu-Zr alloys are well suited for electrolytic refining, which leads to incorporation rare-earth fission products such as La, Ce, Pr, and Nd. It is, therefore, important to understand not only the properties of U-Pu-Zr alloys but also those of U-Pu-Zr alloys with concentrations of minor actinides (Np, Am) and rare-earth elements (La, Ce, Pr, and Nd) similar to those in reprocessed fuel. In addition to requiring extensive safety precautions, alloys containing U, Pu, and minor actinides (Np and Am) are difficult to study for numerous reasons, including their complex phase transformations, characteristically sluggish phasetransformation kinetics, tendency to produce experimental results that vary depending on the histories of individual samples, rapid oxidation, and sensitivity to contaminants such as oxygen in concentrations below a hundred parts per million. Although less toxic, rare-earth elements such as La, Ce, Pr, and Nd are also difficult to study for similar reasons. Many of the experimental measurements were made before 1980, and the level of documentation for experimental methods and results varies widely. It is, therefore, not surprising that little is known with certainty about U-Pu-Zr alloys, particularly those that also contain minor actinides and rare-earth elements. General acceptance of results commonly indicates that there is only a single measurement for a particular property. This handbook summarizes currently available information about U, Pu, Zr, Np, Am, La, Ce, Pr, and Nd and

  14. Stability Study of the RERTR Fuel Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Gan; Dennis Keiser; Brandon Miller; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    The irradiation stability of the interaction phases at the interface of fuel and Al alloy matrix as well as the stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice is believed to be very important to the U-Mo fuel performance. In this paper the recent result from TEM characterization of Kr ion irradiated U-10Mo-5Zr alloy will be discussed. The focus will be on the phase stability of Mo2-Zr, a dominated second phase developed at the interface of U-10Mo and the Zr barrier in a monolithic fuel plate from fuel fabrication. The Kr ion irradiations were conducted at a temperature of 200 degrees C to an ion fluence of 2.0E+16 ions/cm2. To investigate the thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice, a key microstructural feature in both irradiated dispersion U-7Mo fuel and monolithic U-10Mo fuel, a FIB-TEM sample of the irradiated U-10Mo fuel (3.53E+21 fission/cm3) was used for a TEM in-situ heating experiment. The preliminary result showed extraordinary thermal stability of the fission gas bubble superlattice. The implication of the TEM observation from these two experiments on the fuel microstructural evolution under irradiation will be discussed.

  15. An innovative fuel design concept for improved light water reactor performance and safety. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulenko, J.S.; Connell, R.G.

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. The purpose of this research was to explore a technique for extending fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a non-alkaline liquid metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Due to the thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding, and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap, while preserving the expansion and pellet loading capabilities. The resultant lower fuel temperature directly impacts fuel performance limit margins and also core transient performance. The application of liquid bonding techniques to LWR fuel was explored for the purposes of increasing LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) has been developed under the program to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid metal bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of Liquid Metal Bonded LWR fuel

  16. Effect of alloying Mo on mechanical strength and corrosion resistance of Zr-1% Sn-1% Nb-1% Fe alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugondo

    2011-01-01

    It had been done research on Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy. The ingot was prepared by means of electrical electrode technique. The chemical analysis was identified by XRF, the metallography examination was perform by an optical microscope, the hardness test was done by Vickers microhardness, and the corrosion test was done in autoclave. The objective of this research were making Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy with Mo concentration; comparing effect of Mo concentration to metal characteristics of Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe which covered microstructure; composition homogeneity, mechanical strength; and corrosion resistance in steam, and determining the optimal Mo concentration in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)% Mo alloy for nuclear fuel cladding which had corrosion resistance and high hardness. The results were as follow: The alloying Mo refined grains at concentration in between 0,1%-0,3% and the concentration more than that could coarsened grains. The hardness of the Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was controlled either by the flaw or the dislocation, the intersection of the harder alloying element, the solid solution of the alloying element and the second phase formation of ZrMo 2 . The corrosion rate of the Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was controlled by the second phase of ZrMo 2 . The 0.3% Mo concentration in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was the best for second phase formation. The Mo concentration in between 0,3-0,5% in Zr-1%Sn-1%Nb-1%Fe-(x)%Mo alloy was good for the second phase formation and the solid solution. (author)

  17. Effect of Mo content on thermal and mechanical properties of Mo–Ru–Rh–Pd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahira, Yusuke; Ohishi, Yuji; Kurosaki, Ken; Muta, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Komamine, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiki; Ochi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Metallic inclusions are precipitated in irradiated oxide fuels. The composition of the phases varies with the burnup and the conditions such as temperature gradients and oxygen potential of the fuel. In the present work, Mo x/(0.7+x) (Ru 0.5 Rh 0.1 Pd 0.1 ) (0.7)/(0.7+x) (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, and 0.25) alloys were prepared by arc melting, followed by annealing in a high vacuum. The thermal and mechanical properties of the alloys such as elastic moduli, Debye temperature, micro-Vickers hardness, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity have been evaluated to elucidate the effect of Mo content on these physical properties of the alloys. The alloys with lower Mo contents show higher thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the alloy with x = 0 is almost twice of that of the alloy with x = 0.25. The thermal conductivities of the alloys are dominated by electronic contribution, which has been evaluated using the Wiedemann–Franz–Lorenz relation from the electrical resistivity data. It is confirmed that the variation of the Mo contents of the alloys considerably affects the mechanical and thermal properties of the alloys

  18. PCI resistant light water reactor fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, J.P.; Sabol, G.P.

    1988-01-01

    A tubular nuclear fuel element cladding tube is described, the fuel element cladding tube forming the entire fuel element cladding and consisting of: a single continuous wall, the single continuous wall consisting of a single alloy selected from the group consisting of zirconium base alloys, A, B, C, D, and E; the single continuous wall characterized by a cold worked and stress relieved microstructure throughout; wherein the zirconium base alloy A contains 0.2 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.03 - 0.11 w/o sum of Fe and Cr, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy B contains 0.1 - 0.6 w/oo Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy C contains 1.2 - 1.7 w/o Sn, 0.04 - 0.24 w/o Fe, 0.05 - 0.15 w/o Cr, section 0.08 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; the zirconium base alloy D contains 0.15 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.15 - 0.5 w/o Fe, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities; and the zirconium base alloy E contains 0.4 - 0.6 w/o Sn, 0.1 - 0.3 w/o Fe, 0.03 - 0.07 w/o Ni, section 600 ppm O, and section 1500 ppm total impurities

  19. Method of processing spent fuel cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ouchi, Atsuhiro; Imahashi, Hiromichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the residual activity of spent fuel cladding tubes in a short period of time and enable safety storage with simple storage equipments. Constitution: Spent fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys discharged from a nuclear fuel reprocessing step are exposed to a grain boundary embrittling atmosphere to cause grain boundary destruction. This causes grain boundary fractures to the zirconium crystal grains as the matrix of nuclear fuels and then precipitation products precipitated to the grain boundary fractures are removed. The zirconium constituting the nuclear fuel cladding tube and other ingredient elements contained in the precipitation products are separated in this removing step and they are separately stored respectively. As a result, zirconium constituting most part of the composition of the spent nuclear fuel cladding tubes can be stored safely at a low activity level. (Takahashi, M.)

  20. Reprocessing of MTR fuel at Dounreay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hough, N.

    1997-01-01

    UKAEA at Dounreay has been reprocessing MTR fuel for over 30 years. During that time considerable experience has been gained in the reprocessing of traditional HEU alloy fuel and more recently with dispersed fuel. Latterly a reprocessing route for silicide fuel has been demonstrated. Reprocessing of the fuel results in a recycled uranium product of either high or low enrichment and a liquid waste stream which is suitable for conditioning in a stable form for disposal. A plant to provide this conditioning, the Dounreay Cementation Plant is currently undergoing active commissioning. This paper details the plant at Dounreay involved in the reprocessing of MTR fuel and the treatment and conditioning of the liquid stream. (author)

  1. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of some Molybdenum based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Pratik Kumar [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The advent of Ni based superalloys revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry. These materials are capable of operating in extremely harsh environments, comprising of temperatures around 1050 C, under oxidative conditions. Demands for increased fuel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under oxidative conditions at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that melt in the 1250 - 1450 C, resulting in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research directions have been skewed towards exploring and developing newer alloy systems. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. Techniques for rapid thermodynamic assessments were developed and applied to two different systems - Mo-Si alloys with transition metal substitutions (and this forms the first part of the thesis) and Ni-Al alloys with added components for providing high temperature strength and ductility. A hierarchical approach towards alloy design indicated the Mo-Ni-Al system as a prospective candidate for high temperature applications. Investigations on microstructures and oxidation behavior, under both isothermal and cyclic conditions, of these alloys constitute the second part of this thesis. It was seen that refractory metal systems show a marked microstructure dependence of oxidation.

  2. Development of metallic fuel fabrication - A study on the interdiffusion behavior between ternary metallic fuel and cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Soo; Seol, Kyung Won; Shon, In Jin [Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    To study a new ternary metallic fuel for liquid metal reactor, various U-Zr-X alloys have been made by induction melting. The specimens were prepared for thermal stability tests at 630 deg. C upto 5000 hours in order to estimate the decomposition of the lamellar structure. Interdiffusion studies were carried out at 700 deg. C for 200 hours for the diffusion couples assembled with U-Zr-X ternary fuel versus austenitic stainless steel D9 and martensitic stainless steel HT9, respectively, to investigate the fuel-cladding compatibility. The ternary alloy, especially U-Zr-Mo and U-Zr-Nb alloys showed relatively good thermal stability as long as 5000hrs at 630 deg. C. From the composition profiles of the interdiffusion study, Fe penetrated deeper to the fuel side than other cladding elements such as Ni and Cr, whereas U did to the cladding side of fuel elements in the fuel/D9 couples. On the contrary, the reaction layers of Fuel/HT9 couple were thinner than that of Fuel/D9 couples and were less affected by cladding element, which was believed to be due to Zr rich layer between the fuel-cladding interface. HT9 is considered to be superior to D9 and a favorable choice as a cladding material in terms of fuel-cladding compatibility. 21 refs., 24 figs., 7 tabs. (Author)

  3. Interdiffusion between U-Mo alloys and Al or Al alloys at 340 deg. C. Irradiation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortis, A.M.; Mirandou, M.; Ortiz, M.; Balart, S.; Denis, A.; Moglioni, A.; Cabot, P.

    2005-01-01

    Out of reactor interdiffusion experiments between U-Mo alloys and Al alloys made close to fuel operation temperature are needed to validate the results obtained above 500 deg. C. A study of interdiffusion between U-Mo and Al or Al alloys, out and in reactor, has been initiated. The objective is to characterize the interdiffusion layer around 250 deg. C and study the influence of neutron irradiation. Irradiation experiments will be performed in the Argentine RA3 reactor and chemical diffusion couples will be fabricated by Friction Stir Welding (FSW) technique. In this work out-of-pile diffusion experiments performed at 340 deg. C are presented. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) was used to fabricate some of the samples. One of the results is the presence of Si, in the interaction layer, coming from the Al alloy. This is promising in the sense that the absence of Al rich phases may also be expected at low temperature. (author)

  4. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  5. High temperature niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcik, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys are currently being used in various high temperature applications such as rocket propulsion, turbine engines and lighting systems. This paper presents an overview of the various commercial niobium alloys, including basic manufacturing processes, properties and applications. Current activities for new applications include powder metallurgy, coating development and fabrication of advanced porous structures for lithium cooled heat pipes

  6. Shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA), when deformed, have the ability of returning, in certain circumstances, to their initial shape. Deformations related to this phenomenon are for polycrystals 1-8% and up to 15% for monocrystals. The deformation energy is in the range of 10 6 - 10 7 J/m 3 . The deformation is caused by martensitic transformation in the material. Shape memory alloys exhibit one directional or two directional shape memory effect as well as pseudoelastic effect. Shape change is activated by temperature change, which limits working frequency of SMA to 10 2 Hz. Other group of alloys exhibit magnetic shape memory effect. In these alloys martensitic transformation is triggered by magnetic field, thus their working frequency can be higher. Composites containing shape memory alloys can also be used as shape memory materials (applied in vibration damping devices). Another group of composite materials is called heterostructures, in which SMA alloys are incorporated in a form of thin layers The heterostructures can be used as microactuators in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Basic SMA comprise: Ni-Ti, Cu (Cu-Zn,Cu-Al, Cu-Sn) and Fe (Fe-Mn, Fe-Cr-Ni) alloys. Shape memory alloys find applications in such areas: automatics, safety and medical devices and many domestic appliances. Currently the most important appears to be research on magnetic shape memory materials and high temperature SMA. Vital from application point of view are composite materials especially those containing several intelligent materials. (author)

  7. Thermofluency in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco M, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented about the theoretical and experimental results obtained at present in thermofluency under radiation in zirconium alloys. The phenomenon of thermofluency is presented in a general form, underlining the thermofluency at high temperature because this phenomenon is similar to the thermofluency under radiation, which ocurrs in zirconium alloys into the operating reactor. (author)

  8. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  9. Electrocatalytic Alloys for CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingfu; Johnson, Noah J J; Huang, Aoxue; Berlinguette, Curtis P

    2018-01-10

    Electrochemically reducing CO 2 using renewable energy is a contemporary global challenge that will only be met with electrocatalysts capable of efficiently converting CO 2 into fuels and chemicals with high selectivity. Although many different metals and morphologies have been tested for CO 2 electrocatalysis over the last several decades, relatively limited attention has been committed to the study of alloys for this application. Alloying is a promising method to tailor the geometric and electric environments of active sites. The parameter space for discovering new alloys for CO 2 electrocatalysis is particularly large because of the myriad products that can be formed during CO 2 reduction. In this Minireview, mixed-metal electrocatalyst compositions that have been evaluated for CO 2 reduction are summarized. A distillation of the structure-property relationships gleaned from this survey are intended to help in the construction of guidelines for discovering new classes of alloys for the CO 2 reduction reaction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Reproduction of the RA reactor fuel element fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    This document includes the following nine reports: Final report on task 08/12 - testing the Ra reactor fuel element; design concept for fabrication of RA reactor fuel element; investigation of the microstructure of the Ra reactor fuel element; Final report on task 08/13 producing binary alloys with Al, Mo, Zr, Nb and B additions; fabrication of U-Al alloy; final report on tasks 08/14 and 08/16; final report on task 08/32 diffusion bond between the fuel and the cladding of the Ra reactor fuel element; Final report on task 08/33, fabrication of the RA reactor fuel element cladding; and final report on task 08/36, diffusion of solid state metals [sr

  11. Pre-Licensing Evaluation of Legacy SFR Metallic Fuel Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yacout, A. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-09-16

    The US sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) metallic fuel performance data that are of interest to advanced fast reactors applications, can be attributed mostly to the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program between 1984 and 1994. Metallic fuel data collected prior to the IFR program were associated with types of fuel that are not of interest to future advanced reactors deployment (e.g., previous U-Fissium alloy fuel). The IFR fuels data were collected from irradiation of U-Zr based fuel alloy, with and without Pu additions, and clad in different types of steels, including HT9, D9, and 316 stainless-steel. Different types of data were generated during the program, and were based on the requirements associated with the DOE Advanced Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor (ALMR) program.

  12. Manufacture of fuel and fuel channels and their performance in Indian PHWRs'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad is conglomeration of chemical, metallurgical and mechanical plants, processing uranium and zirconium in two separate streams and culminating in the fuel assembly plant. Apart from manufacturing fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), NFC is also engaged in the manufacture of reactor core structurals for these reactors. NFC has carried our several technological developments over the years and implemented them for the manufacture of fuel, calandria tubes and pressure tubes for PHWRs. Keeping in pace with the Nuclear Power Programme envisaged by the Department of Atomic Energy, NFC had augmented its production capacities in all these areas. The paper highlights several actions initiated in the areas of fuel design, fuel manufacturing, manufacturing of zirconium alloy core structurals, fuel clad tubes and components and their performance in Indian PHWRs. (author)

  13. Manufacture of fuel and fuel channels and their performance in Indian PHWRS - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalidas, R.

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) at Hyderabad is a conglomeration of chemical, metallurgical and mechanical plants, processing uranium and zirconium in two separate streams and culminating in the fuel assembly plant. Apart from manufacturing fuel for Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs), NFC is also engaged in the manufacture of reactor core structurals for these reactors. NFC has carried out several technological developments over the years and implemented them for the manufacture of fuel, calandria tubes and pressure tubes for PHWRs. Keeping in pace with the Nuclear Power Programme envisaged by the Department of Atomic Energy, NFC had augmented its production capacities in all these areas. The paper highlights several actions initiated in the areas of fuel design, fuel manufacturing, manufacturing of zirconium alloy core structurals, fuel clad tubes and components and their performance in Indian PHWRs. (author)

  14. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  15. Neutron-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portnoi, K.I.; Arabei, L.B.; Gryaznov, G.M.; Levi, L.I.; Lunin, G.L.; Kozhukhov, V.M.; Markov, J.M.; Fedotov, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for the production of an alloy consiting of 1 to 20% In, 0.5 to 15% Sm, and from 3 to 18% Hf, the balance being Ni. Such alloys show a good absorption capacity for thermal and intermediate neutrons, good neutron capture efficiency, and good corrosion resistance, and find application in nuclear reactor automatic control and safety systems. The Hf provides for the maintenance of a reasonably high order of neutron capture efficiency throughout the lifetime of a reactor. The alloys are formed in a vacuum furnace operating with an inert gas atmosphere at 280 to 300 mm.Hg. They have a corrosion resistance from 3 to 3.5 times that of the Ag-based alloys commonly employed, and a neutron capture efficiency about twice that of the Ag alloys. Castability and structural strength are good. (U.K.)

  16. Metal waste forms from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Park, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium alloys are being developed for the disposal of radioactive metal isotopes isolated using an electrometallurgical treatment technique to treat spent nuclear fuel. The nominal waste forms are stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium alloy and zirconium-8 wt% stainless steel alloy. These alloys are generated in yttria crucibles by melting the starting materials at 1,600 C under an argon atmosphere. This paper discusses the microstructures, corrosion and mechanical test results, and thermophysical properties of the metal waste form alloys

  17. Corrosion behaviour of E110- and E635- type zirconium alloys under PWR irradiation simulating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markelov, V.A.; Novikov, V.V.; Kon'kov, V.F.; Tselishchev, A.V.; Dologov, A.B.; Zmitko, M.; Maserik, V.; Kocik, J.

    2008-01-01

    As structural materials for VVER 1000 fuel rod claddings and FA components use is made of zirconium alloys E110 (Zr 1Nb) and E635 (Zr 1.2Sn 1Nb 0.35Fe) that meet the design parameters of operation. Nonetheless, the work is in progress to perfect those alloys to reach higher corrosion and shape change resistance. At VNIINM updated E110M and E635M alloys have been developed on E110 and E635 bases. To assess the corrosion behaviour of the updated alloys in comparison to the base alloys their cladding samples were tested in RVS 3 loop of LWR 15 reactor (NRI, Rez) in PWR water chemistry with coolant surface and volume boiling. The data are presented on the influence effected by in pile irradiation for up to 324 days on oxide coat thickness and microstructure of fuel claddings produced from the four tested alloys. It has been revealed that E110 alloy its updated version E110M and E635M alloy compared to E635 have higher corrosion resistances. The paper discusses th+e results on the in pile corrosion of cladding samples from the alloys under study in comparison to the results acquired for similar samples tested in LWR 15 inactive channel and under autoclave conditions. Using methods of TEM, EDX analyses of extraction replicas dislocation structure and phase composition changes were studied in samples of all four alloy claddings LWR 15 reactor irradiated to the material damage dose of 1.5 dpa. The interrelation is discussed between irradiation effected strengthening and corrosion of fuel claddings made of E110 and E635 type zirconium alloys and the evolution of their structure and phase states

  18. Fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    Description of the operation of power plants and the respective procurement of fuel to fulfil the needs of the grid. The operation of the plants shall be optimised with respect to the fuel cost. (orig./RW) [de

  19. Fuel gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    This paper gives a brief presentation of the context, perspectives of production, specificities, and the conditions required for the development of NGV (Natural Gas for Vehicle) and LPG-f (Liquefied Petroleum Gas fuel) alternative fuels. After an historical presentation of 80 years of LPG evolution in vehicle fuels, a first part describes the economical and environmental advantages of gaseous alternative fuels (cleaner combustion, longer engines life, reduced noise pollution, greater natural gas reserves, lower political-economical petroleum dependence..). The second part gives a comparative cost and environmental evaluation between the available alternative fuels: bio-fuels, electric power and fuel gases, taking into account the processes and constraints involved in the production of these fuels. (J.S.)

  20. Fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, N.J.

    1983-05-01

    AECL publications, from the open literature, on fuels and fuel cycles used in CANDU reactors are listed in this bibliography. The accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date periodically

  1. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The nuclear fuel is one of the key component of a nuclear reactor. Inside it, the fission reactions of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium, take place. It is located in the core of the reactor, but also in the core of the whole nuclear system. Its design and properties influence the behaviour, the efficiency and the safety of the reactor. Even if it represents a weak share of the generated electricity cost, its proper use represents an important economic stake. Important improvements remain to be made to increase its residence time inside the reactor, to supply more energy, and to improve its robustness. Beyond the economical and safety considerations, strategical questions have to find an answer, like the use of plutonium, the management of resources and the management of nuclear wastes and real technological challenges have to be taken up. This monograph summarizes the existing knowledge about the nuclear fuel, its behaviour inside the reactor, its limits of use, and its R and D tracks. It illustrates also the researches in progress and presents some key results obtained recently. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - The fuel of water-cooled reactors: aspect, fabrication, behaviour of UO 2 and MOX fuels inside the reactor, behaviour in loss of tightness situation, microscopic morphology of fuel ceramics and evolution under irradiation - migration and localisation of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices, modeling of fuels behaviour - modeling of defects and fission products in the UO 2 ceramics by ab initio calculations, cladding and assembly materials, pellet-cladding interaction, advanced UO 2 and MOX ceramics, mechanical behaviour of the fuel assembly, fuel during a loss of coolant accident, fuel during a reactivity accident, fuel during a serious accident, fuel management inside reactor cores, fuel cycle materials balance, long-term behaviour of the spent fuel, fuel of boiling water reactors; 3 - the fuel of liquid metal fast reactors: fast neutrons radiation

  2. Fission product release from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnden-Gillis, A M.C. [Queen` s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Increasing radiation fields at several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with highly enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel have begun to interfere with the daily operation of these reactors. To investigate this phenomenon, samples of reactor container water and gas from the headspace were obtained at four SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facilities and examined by gamma ray spectroscopy methods. These radiation fields are due to the circulation of fission products within the reactor container vessel. The most likely source of the fission product release is an area of uranium-bearing material exposed to the coolant at the end weld line which originated at the time of fuel fabrication. The results of this study are compared with observations from an underwater visual examination of one core and the metallographic examination of archived fuel elements. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  3. Fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel pellet for insertion into a cladding tube in order to form a fuel element or a fuel rod. The fuel pellet has got a belt-like projection around its essentially cylindrical lateral circumferential surface. The upper and lower edges in vertical direction of this belt-like projection are wave-shaped. The projection is made of the same material as the bulk pellet. Both are made in one piece. (orig.) [de

  4. DENSITY-FUNCTIONAL STUDY OF U-Mo AND U-Zr ALLOYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landa, A; Soderlind, P; Turchi, P A

    2010-11-01

    Density-functional theory previously used to describe phase equilibria in U-Zr alloys [A. Landa, P. Soederlind, P.E.A. Turchi, J. Alloys Comp. 478 (2009) 103-110] is extended to investigate the ground-state properties of U-Mo solid solutions. We discuss how the heat of formation in both alloys correlates with the charge transfer between the alloy components, and how the specific behavior of the density of states in the vicinity of the Fermi level promotes the stabilization of the U{sub 2}Mo compound. Our calculations prove that, due to the existence of a single {gamma}-phase over the typical fuel operation temperatures, {gamma}-U-Mo alloys should indeed have much lower constituent redistribution than {gamma}-U-Zr alloys for which binodal decomposition causes a high degree of constituent redistribution.

  5. Oxidation behavior of U-2wt%Nb, Ti, and Ni alloys in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, J. S.; Yoo, K. S.; Jo, I. J.; Gug, D. H.; Su, H. S.; Lee, E. P.; Bang, K. S.; Kim, H. D.

    2003-01-01

    For the long term storage safety study of the metallic spent fuel, U-Nb, U-Ti, U-Ni, U-Zr, and U-Hf simulated metallic uranium alloys, known as corrosion resistant alloys, were fabricated and oxidized in oxygen gas at 200 .deg. C-300 .deg. C. Simulated metallic uranium alloys were more corrosion resistant than pure uranium metal, and corrosion resistance increases Nb, Ni, Ti in that order. The oxidation rates of uranium alloys determined and activation energy was calculated for each alloy. The matrix microstructure of the test specimens were analyzed using OM, SEM, and EPMA. It was concluded that Nb was the best acceptable alloying elements for reducing corrosion of uranium metal considered to suitable as candidate

  6. Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  7. Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    A new fuel can with a loose bottom and head is described. The fuel bar is attached to the loose bottom and head with two grid poles keeping the distance between bottom and head. A bow-shaped handle is attached to the head so that the fuel bar can be lifted from the can

  8. Alloying principles for magnesium base heat resisting alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drits, M.E.; Rokhlin, L.L.; Oreshkina, A.A.; Nikitina, N.I.

    1982-01-01

    Some binary systems of magnesium-base alloys in which solid solutions are formed, are considered for prospecting heat resistant alloys. It is shown that elements having essential solubility in solid magnesium strongly decreasing with temperature should be used for alloying maqnesium base alloys with high strength properties at increased temperatures. The strengthening phases in these alloys should comprise essential quantity of magnesium and be rather refractory

  9. Physical metallurgy of titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collings, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    Researches in electric, magnetic, thermophysical properties of titanium alloys in the wide range of temperatures (from helium upto elevated one), as well as stability of phases in alloys of different types are generalized. Fundamental description of physical properties of binary model alloys is given. Acoustic emission, shape memory and Bauschinger effects, pseudoelasticity, aging and other aspects of physical metallurgy of titanium alloys are considered

  10. Performance of U-Pu-Zr fuel cast into zirconium molds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, D.C.; Lahm, C.E.; Tsai, H.

    1992-01-01

    Current fabrication techniques for the integral fast reactor (IFR) fuel utilize injection casting into quartz molds after reprocessing in the IFR fuel cycle facility. The quartz molds are destroyed during the fuel demolding process, and the quartz residue must therefore be treated as contaminated waste. Alternatively, if the fuel can be cast into molds that remain as part of the fuel slugs (i.e., if the fuel can be left inside the molds for irradiation), then the quartz mold contribution to the waste stream can be eliminated. This possibility is being addresssed in an ongoing effort to evaluate the irradiation performance of fuel cast into zirconium sheaths rather than quartz molds. Zirconium was chosen as the sheath material because it is the component of the U-Pu-Zr fuel alloy that raises the alloy solidus temperatures and provides resistance to fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI)

  11. The development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraday, M A; Belanger, L; Grolway, C M [AECL, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Foo, M T [CRNL, Combustion Engineering Superheater Ltd., Moncton, NB (Canada)

    1983-08-01

    As part of the world wide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt% U alloy and Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt% U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behaviour of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behaviour in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of A-37 wt% U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used. (author)

  12. Nuclear fuel operation at Balakovo NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation addressed the positive experience of the TVS-2M assemblies implementation at Balakovo NPP in 18 month fuel cycles, at uprated power (104%) and the usage of the axial profiled Gd-rods in order to minimize the power peaking factors and linear heat rate in the upper part in some of the fuel rods. The results of the test operation of fuel rods with different claddings, made by E110M, E125 and E635M alloys at Balakovo NPP were also provided. The recently observed problem with the “white crust” on the cladding surfaces was also discussed

  13. LPG fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagnas, F.X.; Jeuland, N.; Fouquet, J.P.; Lauraire, S.; Coroller, P.

    2005-01-01

    LPG fuel has become frequently used through a distribution network with 2 000 service stations over the French territory. LPG fuel ranks number 3 world-wide given that it can be used on individual vehicles, professional fleets, or public transport. What is the environmental benefit of LPG fuel? What is the technology used for these engines? What is the current regulation? Government commitment and dedication on support to promote LPG fuel? Car makers projects? Actions to favour the use of LPG fuel? This article gathers 5 presentations about this topic given at the gas conference

  14. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-06-15

    facilities. - 3. Advances in Water Reactor Fuel Technology: Advances in fuel, rod, spacer grids, and assembly design; fuel processing and manufacturing; cladding and structural alloy development; MOX fuel design and manufacturing; advances in fuel pellet development; fuel design for improved thermal hydraulics, mechanical, and corrosion-resistant behavior; irradiation experience in test reactors. - 4. Concepts for Transportation and Interim Storage of Spent Fuels and Conditioned Waste (Shared with Global 2009): Industrial experience and ongoing developments. - 5. Innovative Fuel Design and Core Management: Future development and trends in fuel for the next thirty years; Goals and perspectives for nuclear fuel; Long term improvement in fissile material management; Use of composite material; Innovative microstructure and material under development; Future core management.

  15. Proceedings of the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting - WRFPM / Top Fuel 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    Reactor Fuel Technology: Advances in fuel, rod, spacer grids, and assembly design; fuel processing and manufacturing; cladding and structural alloy development; MOX fuel design and manufacturing; advances in fuel pellet development; fuel design for improved thermal hydraulics, mechanical, and corrosion-resistant behavior; irradiation experience in test reactors. - 4. Concepts for Transportation and Interim Storage of Spent Fuels and Conditioned Waste (Shared with Global 2009): Industrial experience and ongoing developments. - 5. Innovative Fuel Design and Core Management: Future development and trends in fuel for the next thirty years; Goals and perspectives for nuclear fuel; Long term improvement in fissile material management; Use of composite material; Innovative microstructure and material under development; Future core management

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    For improving the economy of a BWR type reactor by making the operation cycle longer, the fuel enrichment degree has to be increased further. However, this makes the subcriticality shallower in the upper portion of the reactor core, to bring about a possibility that the reactor shutdown becomes impossible. In the present invention, a portion of fuel rod is constituted as partial length fuel rods (P-fuel rods) in which the entire stack length in the effective portion is made shorter by reducing the concentration of fissionable materials in the axial portion. A plurality of moderator rods are disposed at least on one diagonal line of a fuel assembly and P-fuel rods are arranged at a position put between the moderator rods. This makes it possible to reactor shutdown and makes the axial power distribution satisfactory even if the fuel enrichment degree is increased. (T.M.)

  17. Fuel Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, A.

    1982-09-01

    FRAGEMA has developed most types of inspection equipments to work on irradiated fuel assemblies and on single fuel rods during reactor outages with an efficiency compatible with the utilities operating priorities. In order to illustrate this statement, two specific examples of inspection equipments are shortly described: the on-site removable fuel rod assembly examination stand, and the fuel assembly multiple examination device. FRAGEMA has developed techniques for the identifiction of the leaking fuel rods in the fuel assembly and the tooling necessary to perform the replacement of the faulted element. These examples of methods, techniques and equipments described and the experience accumulated through their use allow FRAGEMA to qualify for offering the supply of the corresponding software, hardware or both whenever an accurate understanding of the fuel behaviour is necessary and whenever direct intervention on the assembly and associated components is necessary due to safety, operating or economical reasons

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi; Hirano, Yasushi.

    1998-01-01

    A one-half or more of entire fuel rods in a fuel assembly comprises MOX fuel rods containing less than 1wt% of burnable poisons, and at least a portion of the burnable poisons comprises gadolinium. Then, surplus reactivity at an initial stage of operation cycle is controlled to eliminate burnable poisons remained unburnt at a final stage, as well as increase thermal reactivity. In addition, the content of fission plutonium is determined to greater than the content of uranium 235, and fuel rods at corner portions are made not to incorporate burnable poisons. Fuel rods not containing burnable poisons are disposed at positions in adjacent with fuel rods facing to a water rod at one or two directions. Local power at radial center of the fuel assembly is increased to flatten the distortion of radial power distribution. (N.H.)

  19. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwano, Yoshihiko.

    1993-01-01

    Microfine cracks having a depth of less than 10% of a pipe thickness are disposed radially from a central axis each at an interval of less than 100 micron over the entire inner circumferential surface of a zirconium alloy fuel cladding tube. For manufacturing such a nuclear fuel element, the inside of the cladding tube is at first filled with an electrolyte solution of potassium chloride. Then, electrolysis is conducted using the cladding tube as an anode and the electrolyte solution as a cathode, and the inner surface of the cladding tube with a zirconium dioxide layer having a predetermined thickness. Subsequently, the cladding tube is laid on a smooth steel plate and lightly compressed by other smooth steel plate to form microfine cracks in the zirconium dioxide layer on the inner surface of the cladding tube. Such a compressing operation is continuously applied to the cladding tube while rotating the cladding tube. This can inhibit progress of cracks on the inner surface of the cladding tube, thereby enabling to prevent failure of the cladding tube even if a pellet/cladding tube mechanical interaction is applied. Accordingly, reliability of the nuclear fuel elements is improved. (I.N.)

  20. Fuel performance of rod-type research reactor fuel using a centrifugally atomized U-Mo powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2009-01-01

    A low enriched uranium nuclear fuel for research reactors has been developed in order to replace a highly enriched uranium fuel according to the non-proliferation policy under the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program. In KAERI, a rod-type U 3 Si dispersion fuel has been developed for a localization of the HANARO fuel and a U 3 Si/Al dispersion fuel of 3.15 gU/cc has been used at HANARO as a driver fuel since 2005. Although uranium silicide dispersion fuels such as U 3 Si 2 /Al and U 3 Si/Al are being used widely, high uranium density dispersion fuels (8-9 g/cm 3 ) are required for some high performance research reactors. U-Mo alloys have been considered as one of the most promising uranium alloys for a dispersion fuel due to their good irradiation performance. An international qualification program on U-Mo fuel to replace a uranium silicide dispersion fuel with a U-Mo dispersion fuel has been carried out

  1. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface, and intergranular corrosion does not take place. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 4-20 the potentials of uranium

  2. Improving performance with accident tolerant-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel S.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Giovedi, Claudia; Universidade de São Paulo

    2017-01-01

    After the Fukushima reactor accident, efforts to improve risk management in nuclear operations have included the intensification of research on accident-tolerant fuels (ATFs). In this investigation, the physical properties of recently developed ATFs were compared with those of the current standard fuel, UO 2 - Zr. The goals for innovative fuel design include a rigorous characterization of the thermal, mechanical, and chemical considerations. The intentions are to lengthen the burnup cycle, raise the power density, and improve safety. Fuels must have a high uranium density - above that supported by UO 2 - and possess a coating that exhibits better oxidation resistance than Zircaloys. ATFs such as U 3 Si 2 , UN, and UC contain a higher uranium density and thermal conductivity than UO 2 , providing significant benefits. The ideal combination of fuel and cladding must increase performance in a loss-of-coolant accident. However, U 3 Si 2 , UN, and UC have a disadvantage; their respective swelling rates are higher than that of UO 2 . These ATFs also have thermal conductivities approximately four times higher than that of UO 2 . A study was conducted investigating the hydrogen generated by the oxidation of zirconium alloys in contact with steam using cladding options such as Fe-Cr-Al and silicon carbide. It was confirmed that ferritic alloys offer a better response under severe conditions, because of their mechanical properties as creep rate. The findings of this study indicate that advanced fuels should replace UO 2 - Zr as the fuel system of choice. (author)

  3. Present status of JMTR spent fuel shipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Masataka; Watanabe, Masao; Yokokawa, Makoto; Sato, Hiroshi; Ito, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been consistently making the enrichment reduction of reactor fuels in cooperation with RERTR Program and FRR SNF Acceptance Program both conducted along with the U.S. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Policy and JMTR, 50 MW test reactor in Oarai Research Establishment, has achieved core conversion, from its initial 93% enriched UAl alloy to 45% enriched uranium-aluminide fuel, and then to the current 19.8% enriched uranium-silicide fuel. In order to return all of JMTR spent fuels, to be discharged from the reactor by May 12, 2006, to the U.S.A. by May 12, 2009, JAERI is planning the transportation schedule based on one shipment per year. The sixth shipment of spent fuels to U.S. was carried out as scheduled this year, where the total number of fuels shipped amounts to 651 elements. All of the UAl alloy elements have so far been shipped and now shipments of 45% enriched uranium-aluminide type fuels are in progress. Thus far the JMTR SFs have been transported on schedule. From 2003 onward are scheduled more then 850 elements to be shipped. In this paper, we describe our activities on the transportation in general and the schedule for the SFs shipments. (author)

  4. Technetium and technetium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijdo, W.L.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature survey on technetium and technetium alloys. The literature has been searched through 1993. The survey was focused on technetium and (binary cubic) technetium alloys, but other important information on technetium has not been omitted from this survey. This report has been written with the aim to collect more information about phase systems which could be of importance in the transmutation process by neutrons of technetium. With the information presented in this report, it should be possible to select a suitable technetium alloy for further investigation regarding to the transmutation process. (orig.)

  5. Laves intermetallics in stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Laves intermetallics have a significant effect on properties of metal waste forms being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These waste forms are stainless steel-zirconium alloys that will contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel by electrometallurgical treatment. The baseline waste form composition for stainless steel-clad fuels is stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr). This article presents results of neutron diffraction measurements, heat-treatment studies and mechanical testing on SS-15Zr alloys. The Laves intermetallics in these alloys, labeled Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x , have both C36 and C15 crystal structures. A fraction of these intermetallics transform into (Fe,Cr,Ni) 23 Zr 6 during high-temperature annealing; the authors have proposed a mechanism for this transformation. The SS-15Zr alloys show virtually no elongation in uniaxial tension, but exhibit good strength and ductility in compression tests. This article also presents neutron diffraction and microstructural data for a stainless steel-42 wt.% zirconium (SS-42Zr) alloy

  6. Development of alternative materials for BWR fuel springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruma, Y.; Osato, T.; Yamazaki, K.

    2002-01-01

    Major sources of radioactivity introduced into reactor water of BWR were estimated fuel crud and in-core materials (especially, fuel springs). Fuel springs are used for fixation of fuel cladding tubes with spacer grid. Those are small parts (total length is only within 25 mm) and so many numbers are loaded simultaneously and then total surfaces area are calculated up to about 200 m 2 . Fuel springs are located under high radiation field and high oxidative environment. Conventional fuel spring is made of alloy-X750 which is one of nickel-based alloy and is reported to show relatively higher corrosion release rate. 58 Co and 60 Co will be released directly into reactor water from intensely radio-activated fuel springs surface and increase radioactivity concentrations in primary coolant. Corrosion release control from fuel springs is an important technical item and a development of alternative material instead of alloy-X750 for fuel spring is a key subject to achieve ultra low man-rem exposure BWR plant. In present work, alloy-X718 which started usage for PWR fuel springs and stainless steel type 316L which has many mechanical property data are picked up for alternative materials and compared their corrosion behaviors with conventional material. Corrosion experiment was conducted under vapor-water two phases flow which is simulated fuel cladding surface boiling condition. After exposure, corrosion film formed under corrosion test was analyzed in detail and corrosion film amount and corrosion release amount are estimated among three materials. (authors)

  7. Cladding failure margins for metallic fuel in the integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Fenske, G.R.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    The reference fuel for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a ternary U-Pu-Zr alloy with a low swelling austenitic or ferritic stainless steel cladding. It is known that low melting point eutectics may form in such metallic fuel-cladding systems which could contribute to cladding failure under accident conditions. This paper will present recent measurements of cladding eutectic penetration rates for the ternary IFR alloy and will compare these results with earlier eutectic penetration data for other fuel and cladding materials. A method for calculating failure of metallic fuel pins is developed by combining cladding deformation equations with a large strain analysis where the hoop stress is calculated using the instantaneous wall thickness as determined from correlations of the eutectic penetration-rate data. This method is applied to analyze the results of in-reactor and out-of-reactor fuel pin failure tests on uranium-fissium alloy EBR-II Mark-II driver fuel

  8. Development of metallic fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Ho; Lee, Chong Tak; Yang, Yeoung Seok; Kim, Ki Hwan; Hwang, Sung Chan; Joo, Keun Sik; Ann, Hyun Suk; Chang, Sae Jung.

    1997-09-01

    Through the control of melting and casting parameters, the sound and homogenous U-10wt.%Zr alloy could be fabricated. The yield and segregation of Zr elements were 85% and ±0.1wt.%, and the density of the alloy was about 16.6 g/cm 3 . The major phase were α-U and δ-UZr 2 . The microstructure showed the laminar structure with fiber morphology which was arranged alternatively with uranium and Zr-rich phase. This alloy will be used for KALIMER fuel material through developing the fabrication technology and the characteristics analysis. And electrorefining study was performed to separate uranium from uranium-neodymium and uranium-zirconium alloy by their different free energy for chloride formation. The liquid cadmium phase becomes the anode of the electrorefining cell. Uranium is electrolytically transported through a molten salt electrolyte to a low carbon steel cathode. The electrolyte is composed of KCl-LiCl eutectic and some UCl 3 , which are installed in the salt to facilitate the electrotransport of uranium. In pyrochemical process the reaction condition of chlorination and the maintenance its purity in preparing UCl 4 by chlorination of UO 2 is strongly dependent on the reaction temperature and time. (author).52 refs., 40 tabs., 129 figs

  9. Microstructural evolution and thermophysical property evaluation of Th-U alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Santanu; Kaity, Santu; Bannerjee, Joydipto; Kumar, Raj; Roy, S.B.; Chaudhari, G.P.; Daniel, B.S.S.

    2015-01-01

    Thorium-uranium alloy fuel has not received much research attention mainly because of easy availability of uranium and military incentive offered by U-Pu cycle. Moreover, (i) lack of a consistent systematic effort to develop the alloys and define the limitations of these fuels, (ii) dearth of initiatives to define its microstructures that can result from composition and fabrication variables are prime reasons for this system not having witnessed much developmental research endeavour. Hence, it seems prudent to explore few compositions selected from thorium-uranium phase diagram keeping two primary objectives in view viz. (i) establishing its microstructural features and to study the variations in those, if any, brought about by processing variables etc. and (ii) to assess few thermal properties relevant to fuel applications. This experimental work aims at addressing gap in research on thorium-uranium alloys. Selected compositions of thorium-uranium alloy have been taken for microstructural study and evaluation of thermophysical properties. Based on the microstructural features and thermophysical property evaluation it is seen that high thorium Th-U alloys have appreciable thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion coefficient. It can reasonably be concluded that high thorium Th-U alloy can be used for possible nuclear fuel application in reactors provided other factors (e.g. reactor physics, post irradiation examinations etc.) are also seen to be favourable. (author)

  10. Phase transformation of metastable cubic γ-phase in U-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, V.P.; Hegde, P.V.; Prasad, G.J.; Dey, G.K.; Kamath, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade considerable efforts have been put by many fuel designers to develop low enriched uranium (LEU 235 ) base U-Mo alloy as a potential fuel for core conversion of existing research and test reactors which are running on high enriched uranium (HEU > 85%U 235 ) fuel and also for the upcoming new reactors. U-Mo alloy with minimum 8 wt% molybdenum shows excellent metastability with cubic γ-phase in cast condition. However, it is important to characterize the decomposition behaviour of metastable cubic γ-uranium in its equilibrium products for in reactor fuel performance point of view. The present paper describes the phase transformation behaviour of cubic γ-uranium phase in U-Mo alloys with three different molybdenum compositions (i.e. 8 wt%, 9 wt% and 10 wt%). U-Mo alloys were prepared in an induction melting furnace and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) method for phase determination. Microstructures were developed for samples in as cast condition. The alloys were hot rolled in cubic γ-phase to break the cast structure and then they were aged at 500 o C for 68 h and 240 h, so that metastable cubic γ-uranium will undergo eutectoid decomposition to form equilibrium phases of orthorhombic α-uranium and body centered tetragonal U 2 Mo intermetallic compound. U-Mo alloy samples with different ageing history were then characterized by XRD for phase and development of microstructure.

  11. Materials for innovative lead alloy cooled nuclear systems: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Georg; Weisenburger, Alfons; Fetzer, Renate; Heinzel, Annette; Jianu, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues for all future innovative nuclear systems including Gen IV reactors are materials. The selection of the structural materials determines the design which has to consider the properties and the availability of the materials. Beside general requirements for material properties that are common for all fast reactor types specific issues arise from coolant compatibility. The high solubility of steel alloying elements in liquid Pb-alloys at reactor relevant temperatures is clearly detrimental. Therefore, all steels that are considered as structural materials have to be protected by dissolution barriers. The most common barriers for steels under consideration are oxide scales that form in situ during operation. However, increasing the temperature above 500 deg. C will result either in dissolution attack or in enhanced oxidation. For higher temperatures additional barriers like alumina forming surface alloys are discussed and investigated. Mechanical loads like creep stress and fretting will act on the steels. These mechanical loads will interact with the coolant and can increase the negative effects. For a LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) Demonstrator and MYHRRA (ADS) austenitic steels (316L) are selected for most in core components. The 15-15Ti is the choice for the fuel cladding of MYHRRA and a Pb cooled demonstrator. For an industrial LFR (Lead Fast Reactor) the ferritic martensitic steel T91 was selected as fuel clad material due to its improved irradiation resistance. T91 is in both designs the material to be used for the heat exchanger. Surface alloying with alumina forming alloys is considered to assure material functionality at higher temperatures and is therefore selected for fuel cladding of the ELFR and the heat exchanger tubes. This presentation will give an overview on the selected materials for innovative Pb alloy cooled nuclear systems considering, beside pure compatibility, the influence of mechanical interaction like creep and

  12. Hydrogen permeation in FeCrAl alloys for LWR cladding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Terrani, Kurt A.; Wirth, Brian D.; Snead, Lance L.

    2015-06-01

    FeCrAl, an advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloy class, is a highly prevalent candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel cladding material. Compared with traditional zirconium alloy fuel cladding, increased tritium permeation through FeCrAl fuel cladding to the primary coolant is expected, raising potential safety concerns. In this study, the hydrogen permeability of several FeCrAl alloys was obtained using a static permeation test station, which was calibrated and validated using 304 stainless steel. The high hydrogen permeability of FeCrAl alloys leads to concerns with respect to potentially significant tritium release when used for fuel cladding in LWRs. The total tritium inventory inside the primary coolant of a light water reactor was quantified by applying a 1-dimensional steady state tritium diffusion model to demonstrate the dependence of tritium inventory on fuel cladding type. Furthermore, potential mitigation strategies for tritium release from FeCrAl fuel cladding were discussed and indicate the potential for application of an alumina layer on the inner clad surface to serve as a tritium barrier. More effort is required to develop a robust, economical mitigation strategy for tritium permeation in reactors using FeCrAl clad fuel assemblies.

  13. Bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys for reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Jayaraj, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in materials engineering have generated complex alloys that retain a glassy state in bulk form (bulk metallic glasses or BMGs) via ingot casting. High corrosion resistance is expected for BMGs (amorphous) as they are free from defects associated with the crystalline state such as grain boundaries, dislocations and stacking faults. Compared with conventional alloys containing one or two principal elements, the recently developed HEAs are usually composed of five or more elements with equimolar or near equimolar elemental fractions, which forms single solid solution phase. These HEAs exhibit excellent microstructural stability with better mechanical, wear and corrosion resistance properties as they are essentially single phase. Reprocessing of spent fuel from the fast breeder reactor involves the use of high concentration of (11.5 M) nitric acid under boiling conditions for the dissolution of the fuel. Conventional AISI type 304LSS and nitric acid grade 304L stainless steel would undergo inter-granular corrosion under these conditions and cannot be used for the fabrication of dissolver vessel. Currently titanium is used and zirconium alloys are proposed for future dissolver applications. Thus searching for newer materials with higher corrosion resistance suggests metallic glasses and HEAs for critical components of the dissolver application. Several Zr-based glassy alloys with different microstructural states and Ni-Nb based glassy alloys and TiZrHfNbTa HEA were cast and characterized for microstructure and corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. From these studies, factors such as the corrosive environment (nitric acid, chloride and fluoride), and the presence of passivating elements in the alloy were emphasized for better corrosion resistance of BMGs and HEA. Attempts were also made to prepare coatings of Zr-and Ni-based glassy alloys on 304LSS by laser based deposition technique and their corrosion properties were evaluated. (author)

  14. Positrons in amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Pierre.

    1981-07-01

    Positron annihilation techniques give interesting informations about ''empty spaces'' in amorphous alloys. The results of an extensive research work on the properties of either pre-existing or irradiation induced ''empty spaces'' in four amorphous alloys are presented. The pre-existing empty spaces appear to be small vacancy-like defects. The irradiation induced defects are ''close pairs'' with widely distributed configurations. There is a strong interaction between vacancy like and interstitial like components. A model is proposed, which explains the radiation resistance mechanism of the amorphous alloys. An extensive joint research work to study four amorphous alloys, Fe 80 B 20 ,Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , Pd 80 Si 20 , is summarized

  15. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  16. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  17. Development of corrosion resistant materials for an electrolytic reduction process of a spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong-Hyeon Lee; Soo-Haeng Cho; Jeong-Gook Oh; Eung-Ho Kim

    2008-01-01

    New alloys were designed and prepared to improve their corrosion resistance in an electrolytic reduction environment for a spent oxide fuel on the basis of a thermodynamical assessment. A considerable solubility of Si was confirmed in the Ni alloys and their corrosion resistance was drastically increased with the addition of Si. It was confirmed that a protective oxide layer was formed during a corrosion test due to a reaction among the alloying elements such as Cr, Al and Si. (authors)

  18. Characteristics of mechanical alloying of Zn-Al-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Y.H.; Hong Kong Polytechnic; Perez Hernandez, A.; Lee, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Three pure elemental powder mixtures of Zn-22%Al-18%Cu, Zn-5%Al-11%Cu, and Zn-27%Al-3%Cu (in wt.%) were mechanically alloyed by steel-ball milling processing. The mechanical alloying characteristics were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. It was explored that mechanical alloying started with the formation of phases from pure elemental powders, and this was followed by mechanical milling-induced phase transformation. During mechanical alloying, phases stable at the higher temperatures formed at the near room temperature of milling. Nano-structure Zn-Al-based alloys were produced by mechanical alloying. (orig.)

  19. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5 wt. % Fs) are presented. (The symbol 'Fs' designates fissium, a 'pseudo-element' which, in reality, is an alloy whose composition is representative of fission products that remain in reprocessed fuel). The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations with the measurements shows quantitative agreement in both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content. (orig.)

  20. Refractory alloy component fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to describe joining procedures, primarily welding techniques, which were developed to construct reliable refractory alloy components and systems for advanced space power systems. Two systems, the Nb-1Zr Brayton Cycle Heat Receiver and the T-111 Alloy Potassium Boiler Development Program, are used to illustrate typical systems and components. Particular emphasis is given to specific problems which were eliminated during the development efforts. Finally, some thoughts on application of more recent joining technology are presented. 78 figures