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Sample records for uranium solution species

  1. Simulation of effects of redox and precipitation on diffusion of uranium solution species in backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, C.L.

    1987-12-01

    This investigation addresses the problem of prediction of the rate of migration of redox-sensitive solution species within packing and backfill materials under conditions of variable oxidation potential. Effects of changes of oxidation potential and precipitation of stable uranium compounds during diffusion of uranium from a region of high oxidation potential into a region of low oxidation potential were simulated numerically. Questions of particular interest addressed in the investigation were the existence of a moving ''redox front'' and the influence of precipitation-dissolution processes on uranium migration. The simulations showed that no expanding redox fronts existed at any simulated time up to 3.2 x 10 5 years (10 13 s). In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was not allowed, variations of oxidation potential did not affect total uranium concentrations in solution. Concentration profiles could be predicted simply by diffusion of the (constant) source concentrations. In simulations where precipitation of stable solids was allowed, uraninite and calcium uranate accumulated at the source-transport domain interface, while coffinite penetrated further into the transport domain. Total uranium concentrations in regions of precipitation were determined by solubilities of the precipitated solids, and were six to seven orders of magnitude lower than those in the simulations without precipitation, throughout the domain of transport. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Sorption of uranium anionic species from aqueous solutions on HDTMA-bentonite Jelsovy potok

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnak, A.; Viglasova, E.; Galambos, M.; Rosskopfova, O.

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite deposit Jelsovy potok in Slovakia has great potential for use as a engineering barrier in the multi-barrier system of deep geological repository. In this paper, HDTMA-modified bentonite J15m from Slovak bentonite Jelsovy potok was prepared and its sorption properties (sorption isotherms, kinetics) towards anionic uranium species was investigated. The removal of uranium anionic species from aqueous solutions (initial concentration: 10-1,000 mg/L) by J15m was studied in the absence of background electrolytes at initial pH range (pH init ) 8.5; 9.5; 10.5. The amount of the sorbed U was determined spectrophotometrically using the Arsenazo III method. The maximum uptake capacity observed was 31.35 (mg/g) at 298 K. Experimental results were analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich Dubinin-Redushkevich and Tempkin isotherm. The kinetics of adsorption of U(VI) ions was also discussed using the pseudo-first-order and the pseudo-second-order at three different temperatures. The activation energy of the sorption for J15m was calculated as 23.534 kJ·mol -1 . (authors)

  3. Sorption of uranium cationic species from aqueous solutions on Slovak bentonite Jelsovy potok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajnak, A.; Viglasova, E.; Galambos, M.; Rosskopfova, O. [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Nuclear Chemistry, 842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-04-16

    Bentonite deposit Jelsovy potok in Slovakia has great potential for use as a engineering barrier in the multi-barrier system of deep geological repository for high level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In this study, the adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of U(VI) ions on Slovak bentonite Jelsovy potok (J15) was examined. The removal of uranium cationic species from aqueous solutions (initial concentration: 10-1,000 mg/L) by J15 was studied in the absence of background electrolytes at initial pH (pH{sub init}) 2.5. The amount of the sorbed U was determined spectrophotometrically using the Arsenazo III method. The maximum uptake capacity observed was 30.15 (mg/g) at 298 K. Experimental results were analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Redushkevich isotherm. The kinetics of adsorption of U(VI) ions was also discussed using the pseudo-first-order and the pseudo-second-order at three different temperatures. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The activation energy of the sorption was calculated as 11.316 kJ.mol{sup -}1 for J15. (authors)

  4. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  5. New french uranium mineral species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Branche, G.; Chervet, J.; Guillemin, C.

    1952-01-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; β uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the α uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [fr

  6. Sorption of uranium species from aqueous solutions by Greek zeolite Metaxades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viglasova, E.; Krajnak, A.; Galambos, M.; Rosskopfova, O. [Univerzita Komenskeho, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra jadrovej chemie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2013-04-16

    Uranium is naturally-occurring radioactive element, which is commonly found in very small amounts in rocks, soils, waters, plants or animals (include human body). It is harmful both through its chemical toxicity and its radioactivity (all uranium isotopes are radioactive). Exposure to uranium increases your risk of getting a variety of cancers due to its radioactivity. In case of management of radioactive waste, the adsorption of radionuclides plays significant role. Among the natural sorbents applied to the adsorption of uranium zeolites offer a number of advantages (low cost, availability, quite high sorption capacity, good hydraulic properties, thermal stability etc.) as well as no introduction of additional pollution to the environment in the case of application as permeable reactive barriers. The main aims of this work are investigations of adsorption properties of Greek zeolite Metaxades, modelling of traditional isotherms and behaviour during kinetics process, influenced by temperature. (authors)

  7. Calibration of uranium 232 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galan, M.P.; Acena, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method for acertainning the activity by alpha spectroscopy with semiconductor detectors, of a solution of Uranium-232 is presented. It consists of the comparison with a Uranium-233 solution activity previously measured in a gridded ionization chamber of 2 π geometry. The total measurement uncertainty is about +- 0,02. (Author)

  8. Uranium recovery from phosphonitric solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunus, F.T.; Miu, I.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology for uranium and rare earth recovery applied in a semi-industrial plant processing 5 m 3 /h phosphoric acid has been extended to phosphonitric solution, resulting in the process of nitric acid attack of phosphate rock for complex fertilizer production. In this process uranium and rare earths are obtained at larger quantities due to the complete dissolution of elements involved. The method is based on a one cycle extraction-stripping process using as extractants: di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEPA) in mixture either with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) or tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in view of obtaining a synergic effect for U (VI). A mixer-settler extractor in four steps was used. Two stripping steps are involved for the elements mentioned. Before uranium stripping a scrubbing with urea was introduced to eliminate nitric acid extracted. Uranium was obtained as green cake (hydrated uranium tetrafluoride) which can be easily transformed in hexfluoride or converted to a diuranate. At the same time the radium is also eliminated leading to a non-radioactive fertilizer product. (author),. 8 refs, 4 figs

  9. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal

  10. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1982-01-19

    A process is provided for restoring an ore deposit after uranium solution mining using ammonium carbonate leaching solutions has ceased. The process involves flushing the deposit with an aqueous solution of a potassium salt during which potassium ions exchange with ammonium ions remaining in the deposit. The ammonium containing flushing solution is withdrawn from the deposit for disposal.

  11. Uranium in aqueous solutions by colorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the quantitative determination of uranium in known volumes of aqueous solutions that contain radioactive nuclides. These solutions arise from processing of irradiated nuclear fuel and from laboratory studies on irradiated uranium. The method is applicable to solutions containing a minimum of 30 μg of uranium per sample although as little as 0.5 μg can be detected but with lower precision. Highest precision is obtained with 50 to 75 μg of uranium in the test sample. Dilutions must be made at concentrations above 750 μg/ml. The method includes a discussion of photometers and photometric practice, apparatus, reagents, cell matching, preparation of standard curves, calibration by the method of internal standards, procedure, calculation, and precision

  12. Restoration of uranium solution mining deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, F.W.; Lawes, B.C.

    1981-01-01

    Ammonium carbonates are commonly used as the lixiviant for in-situ leaching of uranium ores. However this leads to the deposition of ammonium ions in the uranium ore formation and the problem of ammonia contamination of ground water which may find its way into the drinking water supply. The ammonia contamination of the ore deposit may be reduced by injecting an aqueous solution of a potassium salt (carbonate, bicarbonate, halide, sulfate, bisulfate, persulfate, or monopersulfate) into the deposit after mining has ceased

  13. Electroanalytical studies of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Zenko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kihara, Sorin

    1989-01-01

    Redox behavior of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium ions, whose oxidation states in acid solutions are between (VI) and (III), were investigated by flow-coulometry with a column electrode of glassy carbon fibers as well as ordinary voltammetry with a rotating disc electrode. Based on current-potential curves the electrode processes were elucidated taking their disproportionation and/or complexation reactions into account. The flow-coulometry, which provides rapid and quantitative electrolysis, was applied to such analytical purposes as follows; the determination of uranium and plutonium in the solution or the solid with discerning their oxidation states, the preparation of species in a desired oxidation state, even in an unstable state which cannot be prepared by ordinary procedure, and the separation of trace amount of uranium in solutions by the electrodeposition of its hydroxide

  14. Impurities in uranium process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Several uranium purification circuits are presented in tabular form together with the average major impurity levels associated with each. The more common unit operations in these circuits, namely strong- and weak-base ion-exchange, solvent extraction and the precipitation of impurities are then discussed individually. Particular attention is paid to the effect and removal of impurities in each of these four unit operations. (author)

  15. A spectroscopic study of uranium species formed in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Bhatt, Anand I.; May, Iain; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    The chlorination of uranium metal or uranium oxides in chloride melts offers an acceptable process for the head-end of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The reactions of uranium metal and ceramic uranium dioxide with chlorine and with hydrogen chloride were studied in the alkali metal chloride melts, NaCl-KCl at 973K, NaCl-CsCl between 873 and 923K and LiCl-KCl at 873K. The uranium species formed therein were characterized from their electronic absorption spectra measured in situ. The kinetic parameters of the reactions depend on melt composition, temperature and chlorinating agent used. The reaction of uranium dioxide with oxygen in the presence of alkali metal chlorides results in the formation of alkali metal uranates. A spectroscopic study, between 723 and 973K, on their formation and their solutions was undertaken in LiCl, LiCl-KCl eutectic and NaCl-CsCl eutectic melts. The dissolution of uranium dioxide in LiCl-KCl eutectic at 923K containing added aluminium trichloride in the presence of oxygen has also been investigated. In this case, the reaction leads to the formation of uranyl chloride species. (author)

  16. Thiocyanato species of uranium(IV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyson, P.L.R.

    1974-12-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study the system U +4 /ClO 4 - /NCS - /HMPA/ - Solvent. This was done by means of various physical chemical methods. Spectrophotometric and conductometric evidence indicated that the following are the important species, which exist in acetone solution: (U(ClO 4 ) 3 .3acetone) + , (U(NCS) 3 .5acetone) + , (U 2 (NCS) 9 .6acetone) - , (U(NCS) 3 .2HMPA.3acetone) + , (U(NCS) 5 .2HMPA) - , (U(ClO 4 ) 3 .3HMPA) + , (U(NCS).5HMPA) +3 , (U(NCS) 2 .4HMPA) +2 and (U(NCS) 3 .3HMPA) + . The replacement of the large ClO 4 - ion by the much smaller NCS - anion results in a change in coordination of the U +4 , from six to eight. The formation of the species (U(NCS) 5 .2HMPA) - wasalso suggested by infrared studies and solubility determinations. The effect of a polar solvent on U(NCS) 4 .4HMPA was also studied, which indicated that, on solvation in methyl cyanide, U(NCS) 4 .4HMPA loses bound HMPA molecules. The ultimate goal of this project, i.e. the determination of the successive stability constants of the uranium(IV)thiocyanato complexes in acetone, was not reached, however, due to limitations of the computer program used. A qualitative treatment revealed that the stability of (U(NCS) 3 .5acetone) + , in acetone, is of the same order of magnitude as that of Co(NCS) 3 - ; similarly the species (U 2 (NCS) 9 .6acetone) - seems to be as stable as C0(NCS) 4 =. It was also indicated that excess U +4 cannot remove all bound NCS - from Co +2 . Finally the thiocyanato complexes of U +4 , relative to those of CO +2 , seem to be more stable in methyl cyanide, a N-donor solvent, than in acetone, an O-donor solvent

  17. Uranium nanoparticle synthesis from leaching solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, Z.; Sklodowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of uranium from leaching and bioleaching solutions is of great significance for an environment protection. In comparison with conventional separation techniques, synthesis of uranium nanoparticles has a number of benefits. It has been demonstrated that the uranium nanoparticles show high catalytic activity. In the present studies a variety of synthesis systems have been used for reduction of uranium from bioleaching solution. Among various catalytical templates the hematite Fe_2O_3 nanoparticles are most interest It was presented the report on development of synthesis method to produce nano structured Fe_2O_3 particles. The efficiency of hematite nanoparticles for adsorption of uranium ions from bioleaching solutions was investigated. Bacterial leaching is alternate technique used to extract uranium from mining wastes. The bioleaching process is environment friendly and gives the extraction yield of over 90%. The bioleaching solutions were obtained from bioleaching experiments using waste materials from different places at Lower Silesia (Kowary, Grzmiaca, Kopaniec, Radoniow). Chemoautotrophic bacteria were used for bioleaching tests. The significant adsorption capacity of U(VI) onto iron oxide and hydroxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite) was observed. The sorption of U(VI) onto the hematite surface was connected with the chemical reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe"2"+ ions. The initial reaction system contained excess of Fe"2"+ ions which were used to reduce of U(VI). The reduction of U(VI) occurred at pH at the vicinity of pH=2.4. The colloid particles of hematite with UO_2 nanoparticles were obtained. The results of zeta potential measurements of hematite nanoparticles showed that at the ionic strength equals 10"-"3M NaCl, the average zeta potential was +32.4±3.5 mV at pH = 2.6. The interaction of hematite nanoparticles with the bioleaching solutions led to decrease of positive zeta potential to the value of 6.4± 2.7 mV. (author)

  18. Field evaporation test of uranium tailings solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, B.L.; Shepard, T.A.; Stewart, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    A field experiment was performed to observe the effect on evaporation rate of a uranium tailings impoundment pond water as salt concentration of the water increased. The duration of the experiment was long enough to cause maximum salt concentration of the water to be attained. The solution used in the experiment was tailings pond water from an inactive uranium tailings disposal site in the initial stages of reclamation. The solution was not neutralized. The initial pH was about 1.0 decreasing to a salt gel at the end of the test. The results of the field experiment show a gradual and slight decrease in evaporation efficiency. This resulted as salt concentrations increased and verified the practical effectiveness of evaporation as a water removal method. In addition, the physical and chemical nature of the residual salts suggest that no long-term stability problem would likely result due to their presence in the impoundment during or after reclamation

  19. Recovery of uranium from analytical waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Anitha, M.; Singh, D.K.

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion fuels are considered as advance fuel for the nuclear reactor. Liquid waste containing significant quantity of uranium gets generated during chemical characterization of dispersion fuel. The present paper highlights the effort in devising a counter current solvent extraction process based on the synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and Cyanex 923 to recover uranium from such waste solutions. A typical analytical waste solution was found to have the following composition: U 3 O 8 (∼3 g/L), Al: 0.3 g/L, V: 15 ppm, Phosphoric acid: 3M, sulphuric acid : 1M and nitric acid : 1M. The aqueous solution is composed of mixture of either 3M phosphoric acid and 1M sulphuric acid or 1M sulphuric acid and 1M nitric acid, keeping metallic concentrations in the above mentioned range. Different organic solvents were tested. Based on the higher extraction of uranium with synergistic mixture of 0.5M D2EHPA + 0.125M Cyanex 923, it was selected for further investigation in the present work

  20. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-01

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO 3 solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 μmol/m 2 ) to high (26 μmol/m 2 ) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range ≅ 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 μM). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 μmol/m 2 ). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  1. Novel precipitation technique for uranium recovery from carbonate leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujoy Biswas; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from carbonate ore leach solution was studied using novel precipitation method. The uranium from leach liquor was recovered as magnesium diuranate with NaOH in presence of trace amount of Mg 2+ . Effects of various parameters such as addition of H 2 SO 4 , MgO, MgSO 4 as well as NaOH were investigated for maximum uranium recovery. Overall uranium recovery of the process was 97 % with improved particle size (∼57 µm). Based on the experimental findings, a process flow-sheet was developed for uranium recovery from carbonate ore leach solution with a uranium concentration of <1 g/L. (author)

  2. Environmental impact of solution mining for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.

    1975-01-01

    Compared with most other mining systems, uranium solution mining has a negligible effect on such environmental factors as surface disturbance, interference with natural groundwater quality and distribution, and aerial discharge of radionuclides. The following topics are discussed: the process, personnel safety and health, tailings disposal, impact on groundwater, operating licenses and controls, legislation, and economics. It is concluded that engineered well systems and controlled input/production flow rates, combined with full recirculation systems that maintain constant fluid volumes in the mineralized formations, result in containment of leach solutions within the operating area. The very dilute leach solutions, compatible with natural groundwaters, ensure that no environmental damage results, even if a loss of control occurred. Reduction in the number of processing steps and virtual elimination of operator hazards, waste disposal and land rehabilitation costs help in reducing overall costs

  3. New french uranium mineral species; Nouvelles especes uraniferes francaises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branche, G; Chervet, J; Guillemin, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Lab. du Fort de Chatillon, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1952-07-01

    In this work, the authors study the french new uranium minerals: parsonsite and renardite, hydrated phosphates of lead and uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrated of uranium and lead uranopilite: sulphate of uranium hydrated; bayleyite: carbonate of uranium and of hydrated magnesium; {beta} uranolite: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated. For all these minerals, the authors give the crystallographic, optic characters, and the quantitative chemical analyses. On the other hand, the following species, very rare in the french lodgings, didn't permit to do quantitative analyses. These are: the lanthinite: hydrated uranate oxide; the {alpha} uranotile: silicate of uranium and of calcium hydrated; the bassetite: uranium phosphate and of hydrated iron; the hosphuranylite: hydrated uranium phosphate; the becquerelite: hydrated uranium oxide; the curite: oxide of uranium and lead hydrated. Finally, the authors present at the end of this survey a primary mineral: the brannerite, complex of uranium titanate. (author) [French] Dans ce travail, les auteurs etudient les nouveaux mineraux uraniferes francais: parsonsite et renardite, phosphates hydrates de plomb et d'uranium; kasolite: silicate hydrate d'uranium et de plomb uranopilite: sulfate d'uranium hydrate; bayleyite: carbonate d'uranium et de magnesium hydrate; {beta} uranolite: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate. Pour tous ces mineraux, les auteurs donnent les caracteres cristallographiques, optiques, et les analyses chimiques quantitatives. Par contre, les especes suivantes, tres rares dans les gites francais, n'ont pas permis d'effectuer d'analyses quantitatives. Ce sont: l'ianthinite: oxyde uraneux hydrate; l'{alpha} uranotile: silicate d'uranium et de calcium hydrate; le bassetite: phosphate d'uranium et de fer hydrate; la hosphuranylite: phosphate duranium hydrate; la becquerelite: oxyde d'uranium hydrate; la curite: oxyde d'uranium et de plomb hydrate. Enfin, les auteurs presentent a la fin de cette etude

  4. Uranium extraction from sulfuric acid solution using anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheta, M. E.; Abdel Aal, M. M.; Kandil, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Uranium is currently recovered from sulfuric acid leach liquor using anion exchange resin as Amberlite IRA 402 (CT). This technology is based on fact that, uranium exists as anionic complexes. This takes place by controlling the pH of the solution, agitation time, temperature and resin to solution ratio (R/S). In this work, batch stirrer tank used for uranium extraction from sulfate medium and after extraction, elution process was done using 1M NaCl solution. After extraction and elution process, the resin was separated from the system and uranium was determined in the solution. (Author)

  5. Determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions by potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, H.L.; McElhaney, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast method for the determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions has been adapted from the Davies-Gray volumetric method to meet the needs of Y-12. One-gram duplicate aliquots of uranium metal or uranium oxide are dissolved in 1:1 HNO 3 and concentrated H 2 SO 4 to sulfur trioxide fumes, and then diluted to 100-mL volume. Duplicate aliquots are then weighed for analysis. For uranyl nitrate samples, duplicate aliquots containing between 50 and 150 mg of U are weighed and analyzed directly. The weighed aliquot is transferred to a Berzelius beaker; 1.5 M sulfamic acid is added, followed in order by concentrated phosphoric acid, 1 M ferrous sulfate, and (after a 30-second interval) the oxidizing reagent. After a timed 3-minute waiting period, 100 mL of the 0.1% vanadyl sulfate-sulfuric acid mixture is added. The sample is then titrated past its endpoint with standard potassium dichromate, and the endpoint is determined by second derivative techniques on a mV/weight basis

  6. Developments in uranium solution mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, T.

    2001-01-01

    The last five years have seen rapid developments in uranium solution mining in Australia, with one deposit brought into production (Beverley, 1,000 tpa U 3 O 8 ) and another close to receiving development approval (Honeymoon, 500 expanding to 1,000 tpa U 3 O 8 proposed). The deposits were discovered during extensive exploration of the Frome Basin in South Australia in the early 1970s and were mothballed from 1983 to 1996 due to Government policies. Uranium mineralisation at Beverley, Honeymoon and other related prospects is hosted in unconsolidated coarse grained quartz sands which are sealed in buried palaeovalleys. Both projects have successfully trialled acid leaching methods and have confirmed high permeability and confinement of the target sands. At Beverley an ion exchange process has been adopted, whereas at Honeymoon solvent extraction has been trialled and is proposed for future production Australian production economics compare favourably with US counterparts and are likely to be within the lower quartile of world costs

  7. Precipitation behavior of uranium in multicomponent solution by oxalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Y.J.; Kim, I.S.; Lee, W.K.; Shin, H.S.; Ro, S.G.

    1996-01-01

    A study on the precipitation of uranium by oxalic acid was carried out in a multicomponent solution. The precipitation method is usually applied to the treatment of radioactive waste and the recovery of uranium from a uranium-scrap contaminated with impurities. In these cases, the problem is how to increase the precipitation yield of target element and to prevent impurities from coprecipitation. The multicomponent solution in the present experiment was prepared by dissolving U, Nd, Cs and Sr in nitric acid. The effects of concentrations of oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on the precipitation yield and purity of uranium were observed. As results of the study, the maximum precipitation yield of uranium is revealed to be about 96.5% and the relative precipitation ratio of Nd, Cs and Sr versus uranium are discussed at the condition of the maximum precipitation yield of uranium, respectively. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  8. Determination of microamounts of uranium in waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birringer, K.J.; Netzer, S.; Kuhn, E.; Groll, P.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of microamounts of uranium in presence of high amounts of fission and corrosion products is described. Uranium is separated by reversed-phase chromatography on a small column, packed with Voltalef micro and impregnated with TOPO. For the direct photometric determination uranium is eluted by TAM dissolved in ethanol/pyridine. The efficiency of the separation, using a suitable scrub-solution, was tested with solutions of simulated inactive fission and corrosion products. The reproducibility of the method, with 24 μg of uranium, is +- 2,5%. (orig.) [de

  9. Recovery of uranium from sulphate solutions containing molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, D.R.; Genik-Sas-Berezowsky, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from a sulphate solution containing dissolved uranium and molybdenum includes reacting the solution with ammonia (pH 8 to 10), the pH of the original solution must not exceed 5.5 and after the addition of ammonia the pH must not be in the vicinity of 7 for a significant time. The resultant uranium precipitate is relatively uncontaminated by molybdenum. The precipitate is then separated from the remaining solution while the pH is maintained within the stated range

  10. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor

  11. Root uptake of uranium by a higher plant model (Phaseolus vulgaris) bioavailability from soil solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, L.; Henner, P.; Camilleri, V.; Garnier-Laplace, J.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium behaviour in soils is controlled by actions and interactions between physicochemical and biological processes that also determine its bioavailability. In soil solution, uranium(+VI) aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes mainly depending on pH, carbonates, phosphates and organic matter. In a first approach to identify bioavailable species of U to plants, cultures were performed using hydroponics, to allow an easy control of the composition of the exposure media. The latter, here an artificial soil solution, was designed to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS using a database compiled from the OECD/NEA thermochemical database project and verified was used to perform the solution speciation calculations. On this theoretical basis, three domains were defined for short-duration well-defined laboratory experiments in simplified conditions: pH 4.9, 5.8 and 7 where predicted dominant species are uranyl ions, hydroxyl complexes and carbonates respectively. For these domains, biokinetics and characterization of transmembrane transport according to a classical Michaelis Menten approach were investigated. The Free Ion Model (or its derived Biotic Ligand Model) was tested to determine if U uptake is governed by the free uranyl species or if other metal complexes can be assimilated. The effect of different variables on root assimilation efficiency and phyto-toxicity was explored: presence of ligands such as phosphates or carbonates and competitive ions such as Ca 2+ at the 3 pH. According to previous experiments, uranium was principally located in roots whatever the pH and no difference in uranium uptake was evidenced between the main growth stages of the plant. Within the 3 studied chemical domains, results from short-term kinetics evidenced a linear correlation between total uranium concentration in bean roots and that in exposure media, suggesting that total uranium in soil solution could be a good predictor for

  12. Development of system on predicting uranium concentration from pregnant solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Weiping

    2004-01-01

    Uranium concentration from pregnant solution is primary index of process for in-situ leaching of uranium, and the suitable method with which to predicate this index and effective means to solve it with were continuously studied hard. SPUC-system on predicting uranium concentration based on GM model of gray system theory is developed, and the mathematical model, constitution, function and theory foundation of this system are introduced. (authors)

  13. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquène, L; Vandenhove, H; Tack, F; Van Hees, M; Wannijn, J

    2010-02-01

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C(DGT)) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO(2)(2+), uranyl carbonate complexes and UO(2)PO(4)(-). The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquene, L. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vandenhove, H., E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.b [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Tack, F. [Ghent University, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Van Hees, M.; Wannijn, J. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-02-15

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C{sub DGT}) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, uranyl carbonate complexes and UO{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}. The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants.

  15. Diffusive gradient in thin FILMS (DGT) compared with soil solution and labile uranium fraction for predicting uranium bioavailability to ryegrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquene, L.; Vandenhove, H.; Tack, F.; Van Hees, M.; Wannijn, J.

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of uranium concentration in soil solution or recovered by selective extraction as unequivocal bioavailability indices for uranium uptake by plants is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to test if the uranium concentration measured by the diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique is a relevant substitute for plant uranium availability in comparison to uranium concentration in the soil solution or uranium recovered by ammonium acetate. Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L. var. Melvina) is grown in greenhouse on a range of uranium spiked soils. The DGT-recovered uranium concentration (C DGT ) was correlated with uranium concentration in the soil solution or with uranium recovered by ammonium acetate extraction. Plant uptake was better predicted by the summed soil solution concentrations of UO 2 2+ , uranyl carbonate complexes and UO 2 PO 4 - . The DGT technique did not provide significant advantages over conventional methods to predict uranium uptake by plants.

  16. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  17. Selective Removal of Uranium from the Washing Solution of Uranium-Contaminated Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study examined selective removal methods of uranium from the waste solution by ion exchange resins or solvent extraction methods to reduce amount of the 2{sup nd} waste. Alamine-336, known as an excellent extraction reagent of uranium from the leaching solution of uranium ore, did not remove uranium from the acidic washing solution of soil. Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on ampholyte resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a washing with 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at 60 .deg. C. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. A great amount of uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil had been generated from the decommissioning of a uranium conversion plant. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods to decrease the amount of waste to be disposed of. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions.

  18. Spectrophotometric titrations: Application to the determination of some elements in uranium solutions; Les titrages spectrophotometriques: Application a la determination de quelques elements dans les solutions d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Her, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-01-01

    The aim of this work is the application of spectrophotometric titrations to the analysis of uranium-containing solutions. We have been led to examine the general principles involved in these titrations, and we give a brief outline of these principles. In the first part we deal therefore with spectrophotometric titrations from a general point of view, examining their fundamental principle, their practical execution as well as the various possibilities of the method. The advantage of the titration are examined, in particular that of lending itself simultaneous determination of two species. The possibility of applying these spectrophotometric titrations to the analysis of uranium-containing solutions is the subject of the second part of this report: the dosage of a few species in uranium (VI) solutions is described. To this second part is added an experimental appendix consisting of a description of the apparatus, as well as of the operational techniques used for certain titrations, in particular those involving solutions containing uranium. (author) [French] Le but de ce travail est l'application des titrages spectrophotometriques a l'analyse des solutions uraniferes. Nous avons ete amenes a examiner les principes generaux de ces titrages, principes qu'il nous est apparu necessaire de rappeler. Dans une premiere partie nous traiterons donc d'une facon generale des titrages spectrophotometriques, en examinant leur principe fondamental, leur mise en oeuvre ainsi que les possibilites diverses de dosage. Nous examinerons aussi les avantages de la methode de titrage, en insistant notamment sur la possibilite de faire des dosages successifs. La possibilite d'application de ces titrages spectrophotometriques a l'analyse des solutions uraniferes sera le sujet de la deuxieme partie: nous y decrivons le dosage de quelques especes, dans les solutions d'uranium (VI). A cette deuxieme partie nous joindrons une annexe experimentale comportant une description de l'appareillage que

  19. The determination of phosphorus in uranium minerals and resulting solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrement Eguiluz, J. C.; Parellada Bellod, R.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1964-01-01

    Interferences of several elements present in Spanish uranium minerals in the phosphorus determination by the spectrophotometrical method of the molibdovanada te phosphoric acid are studied. A method is described with a previous separation of these element by a cationic resin. This method is successfully applied to the phosphorus determination in acid or alkaline lixiviation solutions of uranium minerals, as well as in the evaluates of ion exchange resins used used technically for the concentration of solutions with a low uranium content. (Author) 11 refs

  20. Removal of uranium from ammonium nitrate solution by nanofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Runci; Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Radiochemistry

    2017-07-01

    Two types of nanofiltration membranes were tested to remove uranium dissolved in ammonium nitrate solution, and the influence of operating parameters as transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity and feed temperature was investigated. Experimental results showed NF270 membrane can reject more than 96% uranium and allow most (90% min) ammonium nitrate solution passed by, and with a permeate flux of 60 L/(m{sup 2}.h). Nanofiltration seems to be a promising technology for the removal of uranium and recovery of ammonium nitrate simultaneously.

  1. Method of recovering uranium from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Anion exchange resin derived from insoluble crosslinked polymers of vinyl benzyl chloride which are prepared by polymerizing vinyl benzyl chloride and a crosslinking monomer are particularly suitable in the treatment of uranium bearing leach liquors

  2. Composition and method for solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.; Watts, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    It has been found that, in the solution mining of uranium ores using ammonium carbonate solutions containing hydrogen peroxide or ozone as an oxidant, the tendency of the formation being treated to become less permeable during the leaching process can be overcome by including in the leaching solution a very small concentration of sodium silicate

  3. Contribution to the study of uranium migration and some trace elements in solution from Pocos de Caldas uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenaro, R.

    1989-01-01

    It was studied the chemical composition of ground water from four boreholes as a contribution to the hydrogeochemical studies in the Pocos de Caldas uranium mining. Methods for water analyses were selected and optimized in order to determine the main anions, specially the ones which form stable complexes with uranium ions. Fluoride and chloride were determined by potentiometry; phosphate, nitrate and silicate by spectrophotometry. Cations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry flame emission and argon plasma emission excited by continuous current arch (DCP). Uranium was determined by fluorimetry with a concentration range from 3 to 7 ppb and its distribution calculated among the different species into solution through the measures of pH, Eh, anion amounts and stability of their respective complexes. (author) [pt

  4. Process for iron separation from an organic solution containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Textoris, A.; Lyaudet, G.; Bathelier, A.

    1987-01-01

    Iron is separated from an organic solution of U and Fe in a phosphine oxide and an acid organic phosphorus compound by reaction on oxalic acid or a mixture of sulfuric and phosphoric acid or phosphoric acid. Uranium stays in the initial organic solution and iron is transferred to the aqueous phase [fr

  5. Preferential adsorption of uranium ions in aqueous solutions by polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Masako; Ichimura, Kunihiro; Fujishige, Shoei; Kato, Masao

    1981-01-01

    Amidoxime fiber and triazine fiber were prepared by chemical modification of commercially available polyacrylonitril fiber. It was found that the Amidoxime fiber is efficient to adsorb uranium ions in the artificial sea water. The efficiency of the preferential adsorption decreases by treatment the material with an acid-or an alkaline-solution. The triazine fiber adsorbs uranium ions only in aqueous solutions of such uranyl acetate, in the absence of other ions. In the artificial sea water, it adsorbs other ions instead of uranium. The preferential adsorption of uranium ions was further investigated with a series of polystyrenesulfonamides. Among the polystyrene derivatives, those having carboxyl groups, derived from imino diacetic acid (PSt-Imi), β-alanine (PSt-Ala), glycine (PSt-Gly), and sarcosine (PSt-Sar) were qualified for further discussion. However, it was found that the amount of adsorption of uranium ions by PSt-Imi decreases with increasing the volume of the artificial sea water and/or the duration of the treatment. Taking into account the facts, the preferential adsorption of uranium ions by PSt-Imi in aqueous solution was discussed in detail. (author)

  6. Uranium solution mining: comparison of New Mexico with South Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conine, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    In-situ uranium-leaching or solution-mining operations are currently underway in both south Texas and Wyoming. Mobil Oil Corporation is in the process of applying solution-mining technology, such as that developed at the O'Hern facility in south Texas, to uranium orebodies located near Crownpoint, New Mexico. The O'Hern facility uses an alkaline-leach process to bring the uranium to the surface, where it is removed from solution using ion-exchange resin and chemical precipitation. Line-drive and five-spot well field patterns are used to inject and recover the leach solutions. Although details of ore occurrence in New Mexico differ from those in south Texas, laboratory, engineering-design, and field-hydrology tests indicate that solution mining of uranium should be feasible in New Mexico. To determine the commercial feasibility, Mobil is proceeding with the construction of pilot-plant facilities for a 75-gallon-perminute (gpm) test at an orebody near Crownpoint. The pilot test will use five-spot patterns at various spacings for production of uranium-bearing leachate. Initial surface processing will be the same as that used in south Texas

  7. Method of precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Wan, Jiamin

    2013-08-20

    A method for precipitating uranium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium is presented. The method includes precipitating uranium as a uranyl vanadate through mixing an aqueous solution and/or sediment comprising uranium and/or vanadium and a solution comprising a monovalent or divalent cation to form the corresponding cation uranyl vanadate precipitate. The method also provides a pathway for extraction of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous solution and/or sediment.

  8. Recovery of uranium from uranium mine waters and copper ore leaching solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, D R; Ross, J R [Salt Lake City Metallurgy Research Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1967-06-15

    Waters pumped from uranium mines in New Mexico are processed by ion exchange to recover uranium. Production is approximately 200 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d from waters containing 5 to 15 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Recoveries range from 80 to 90%. Processing plants are described. Uranium has been found in the solutions resulting from the leaching of copper-bearing waste rock at most of the major copper mines in western United States. These solutions, which are processed on a very large scale for recovery of copper, contain 2 to 12 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Currently, uranium is not being recovered, but a potential production of up to 6000 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d is indicated. Ion exchange and solvent extraction research studies are described. (author)

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  10. Coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McTaggart, D.R.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The factors affecting successful coprecipitation of thorium and uranium peroxides from acid media were studied. Variables considered in this work were H/sup +/ concentration, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, duration of contact, and rate of feed solution addition. In all experiments, stock solutions of Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ and UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ were fed at a controlled rate into H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ solutions with constant stirring. Samples were taken as a function of time to follow the H/sup +/ concentration of the solution, uranium precipitation, thorium precipitation, precipitant weight/volume of solution, and crystalline structure and growth. The optimum conditions for maximum coprecipitation are low H/sup +/ concentration, high H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentration, and extended contact time between the solutions.

  11. Investigation of uranium molecular species using laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curreli, Davide [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering

    2017-07-12

    The goal of this project is to investigate the dynamic evolution of uranium oxide (UOx) molecular species in a rapidly cooling low-temperature plasma using a coupled experimental and modeling approach. Our purpose is to develop quantitative constraints on the UOx phase chemistry under physical conditions similar to that of a nuclear fireball at the time of debris condensation. This work is motivated by a need to better understand the factors controlling uranium chemical fractionation in post-detonation nuclear debris.

  12. Uranium removal from organic solutions of PUREX process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Occhio, L.A.; Dupetit, G.A.; Pascale, A.A.; Vicens, H.E.

    1987-01-01

    During the uranium extraction process with tributyl phosphate (TBP) in nitric medium, a bi solvated, non hydrated complex is formed, of formula UO2(NO3)2TBP, which is soluble in the diluent, a paraffin hydrocarbon. As it is known that some uranium salts, for instance the nitrate, when dissolved in organic solvents, like isopropanol, can be discharged as complex molecules at the cathode of an electrodeposition cell, it was decided to apply this technique to uranium loaded TBP solutions. From preliminary experiments resulted a practical possibility for the analytical control through the alpha measurement of electro deposits. This technique could be applied as well to the treatment of depleted organic streams carrying undesirable alpha activity, because the so treated solutions become deprived of uranium. This work presents the curves obtained working at constant voltage with uranium-loaded TBP solutions, the determination of the optimal operation voltage in these conditions, the electrodeposition yield for electro polished copper and stainless steel cathodes and the tests of reproducibility of deposits. A summary of the results obtained operating the high voltage supply at constant power is also presented. (Author)

  13. Recovery and treatment of uranium from uranium-containing solution by liquid membrane emulsion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liangshu; Zhou Yantong; Xiao Yiqun; Peng Anguo; Xiao Jingshui; Chen Wei

    2014-01-01

    The recovery and treatment of uranium from uranium-containing solution using liquid membrane emulsion (LME) technology were studied in this paper, which contained the best volume ratio of membrane materials, stirring speed during emulsion process, the conditions of extracting, such as temperature, pH, initial concentration of uranium. Moreover, the mechanism for extracting uranium was also discussed. The best experimental conditions of emulsifying were acquired. The volume fractions of P 204 and liquid paraffin are 0.1 and 0.05, the volume ratios of Span80 and sulphonated kerosene to P 204 are 0.06 and 0.79 respectively, stirring speed is controlled in 2 000 r/min, and the concentration of inner phase is 4 mol/L. The recovery rate of uranium is up to 99% through the LME extracted uranium for 0.5 h at pH 2.5 and room temperature when the initial concentration is less than 400 mg/L and the volume ratio is 5 between the uranium-containing waste water and LME. The calculation results of Gibbs free energy show that the reaction process is spontaneous. (authors)

  14. Spectrophotometric titrations: Application to the determination of some elements in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Her, M.

    1967-01-01

    The aim of this work is the application of spectrophotometric titrations to the analysis of uranium-containing solutions. We have been led to examine the general principles involved in these titrations, and we give a brief outline of these principles. In the first part we deal therefore with spectrophotometric titrations from a general point of view, examining their fundamental principle, their practical execution as well as the various possibilities of the method. The advantage of the titration are examined, in particular that of lending itself simultaneous determination of two species. The possibility of applying these spectrophotometric titrations to the analysis of uranium-containing solutions is the subject of the second part of this report: the dosage of a few species in uranium (VI) solutions is described. To this second part is added an experimental appendix consisting of a description of the apparatus, as well as of the operational techniques used for certain titrations, in particular those involving solutions containing uranium. (author) [fr

  15. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 2: soil solution uranium concentration is not a good bioavailability index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M; Wannijn, J; Wouters, K; Wang, L

    2007-01-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the influence of soil parameters on uranium uptake by ryegrass. Ryegrass was established on eighteen distinct soils, spiked with (238)U. Uranium soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) ranged from 0.0003 to 0.0340kgkg(-1). There was no significant relation between the U soil-to-plant transfer (or total U uptake or flux) and the uranium concentration in the soil solution or any other soil factor measured, nor with the U recovered following selective soil extractions. Multiple linear regression analysis resulted in a significant though complex model explaining up to 99% of variation in TF. The influence of uranium speciation on uranium uptake observed was featured: UO(2)(+2), uranyl carbonate complexes and UO(2)PO(4)(-) seem the U species being preferentially taken up by the roots and transferred to the shoots. Improved correlations were obtained when relating the uranium TF with the summed soil solution concentrations of mentioned uranium species.

  16. A discussion about maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution of U3O8 type uranium ore concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Dechang; Liu Chao

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of discussing the influence of single factor on maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution,the influence degree of some factors such as U content, H 2 O content, mass ratio of P and U was compared and analyzed. The results indicate that the relationship between U content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was direct ratio, while the U content increases by 1%, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution increases by 4.8%-5.7%. The relationship between H 2 O content and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 46.1-55.2 g/L while H 2 O content increases by 1%. The relationship between mass ratio of P and U and maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution was inverse ratio, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution decreases by 116.0-181.0 g/L while the mass ratio of P and U increase 0.1%. When U content equals 62.5% and the influence of mass ratio of P and U is no considered, the maximum uranium concentration in digestion solution equals 1 578 g/L; while mass ratio of P and U equals 0.35%, the maximum uranium concentration decreases to 716 g/L, the decreased rate is 54.6%, so the mass ratio of P and U in U 3 O 8 type uranium ore concentrate is the main controlling factor. (authors)

  17. Process for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The description is given of a method for extracting uranium from phosphoric acid solutions whereby the previously oxided acid is treated with an organic solvent constituted by a mixture of dialkylphosphoric acid and trialkylphosphine oxide in solution in a non-reactive inert solvent so as to obtain de-uraniated phosphoric acid and an organic extract constituted by the solvent containing most of the uranium. The uranium is then separated from the extract as uranyl ammonium tricarbonate by reaction with ammonia and ammonium carbonate and the extract de-uraniated at the extraction stage is recycled. The extract is treated in a re-extraction apparatus comprising not less than two stages. The extract to be treated is injected at the top of the first stage. At the bottom of the first stage, ammonia is introduced counter current as gas or as an aqueous solution whilst controlling the pH of the first stage so as to keep it to 8.0 or 8.5 and at the bottom of the last stage an ammonium carbonate aqueous solution is injected in a quantity representing 50 to 80% of the stoichiometric quantity required to neutralize the dialkylphosphoric acid contained in the solvent and transform the uranium into uranyl ammonium tricarbonate [fr

  18. Spectroscopic studies of uranium species for environmental decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Charlotte

    After the Cold War, Department of Energy began to concentrate its efforts on cleanup of former nuclear material processing facilities, especially uranium-contaminated groundwater and soil. This research aims to study uranium association to both organic and inorganic compounds found in the contaminated environment in the hopes that the information gathered can be applied to the development and optimization of cost-effective remediation techniques. Spectroscopic and electrochemical methods will be employed to examine the behavior of uranium in given conditions to further our understanding of its impact on the environment. Uranium found in groundwater and soil bind with various ligands, especially organic ligands present in the environment due to natural sources (e.g. metabolic by-products or degradation of plants and animals) or man-made sources (e.g. chelating agents used in operating or cleanup of uranium processing facilities). We selected reasonable analogs of naturally occurring matter and studied their structure, chemical and electrochemical behavior and found that the structure of uranyl complexes depends heavily on the nature of the ligand and environmental factors such as pH. Association of uranium-organic complexes with anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium sp. was studied to establish if the bacteria can effectively bioreduce uranium while going through normal bacterial activity. It was found that the nature of the organic ligand affected the bioavailability and toxicity of the uranium on the bacteria. In addition, we have found that the type of iron corrosion products and uranyl species present on the surface of corroded steel depended on various environmental factors, which subsequently affected the removal rate of uranium by a citric acid/hydrogen peroxide/deionized water cleaning process. The method was found to remove uranium from only the topmost corrosion layers and residual uranium could be found (a) deeper in the corrosion layers where it is occluded by

  19. Extraction equilibrium of uranium (VI) from phosphoric solution with HDEHP and TOPO in cyclohexane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Jianzhang; Zhou Zuming; Qin Qizong

    1988-01-01

    The extraction equilibrium of uranium(VI) from phosphoric acid solution with HDEHP and TOPO in cyclohexane has been investigated to examine the effects of extractant concentration, hydrogen ion concentration and temperature on the extraction of uranium(VI). Experimental results suggest that the composition of synergistic complex species is UO 2 (HA 2 ) 2 ·TOPO and the extraction equilibrium constant β 21 is 10 9.52 at 30 deg C. In addition, the thermodynamic functions of the extraction reaction (ΔG,ΔH,ΔS) and the infra-red spectra of synergistic complexes have also been determined

  20. Fluorimetrich determination of uranium in mineral samples and phosphoric solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupo Gonzales, I.; Cuevillas, J.; Estevez, J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an analytical technique for the determination of uranium in different cuban minerals and acid leaching liquors of phosphorites is proposed. The method used for solid samples includes their disolution and further dilution of the solution obtained. For liquid samples dilution is the only intermediate step used. A study of HNO3 concentration (pH) was made in fluorimetric measurements. The method was applied to the uranium analysis in two IAEA standard reference samples (phosphate base), in natural phosphorites and a synthetic one, in clays and phosphoric liquors. The results agree with those obtained by other methods

  1. Methods of Uranium Determination in solutions of Tributyl Phosphate and Kerosene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrement Eguiluz, J.; Palomares Delgado, F.

    1962-01-01

    A new analytical method for the determination of uranium in organic solutions of tributyl phosphate and kerosene is proposed. In this method the uranium is reextracted from the aqueous phase by reduction with cadmium in acid solution. The uranium can be determined in this solution by the usual methods. In case of very diluted solutions, a direct spectrophtometrical determination of uranium in the organic phase with dibenzoylmethane is proposed. (Author) 21 refs

  2. Intrinsic neutron source strengths in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Robba, A.A.; Seale, R.L.; Rutherford, D.A.; Butterfield, K.B.; Brunson, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron production rates for 5% enriched uranyl fluoride and 93% uranyl nitrate solutions have been measured using a high-efficiency neutron well counter. Measurements were made for both solution types as a function of sample volume. These results were extrapolated to zero sample volume to eliminate sample size effects, such as multiplication and absorption. For the 5% enriched uranyl fluoride solution, a neutron production rate of 0.0414 ± 0.0041 n/s/ml was measured; for the 93% enriched uranyl nitrate solution, a neutron production rate of 0.0232 ± 0.0023 n/s/ml was measured. The biggest uncertainty is in measuring the detector efficiency, and further work on this aspect of the experiment is planned. Calculations for the neutron production rates based on measured thick-target (alpha, n) production rates and shown alpha stopping powers are in reasonable agreement with the data for the uranyl nitrate solution, but are in poor agreement with the data for the uranyl fluoride solution. 8 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Effects of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption under saturated equilibrium conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yug-Yea; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Three contaminated bulk surface soils were used for investigating the effect of solution pH and complexing reagents on uranium and thorium desorption. At a low solution pH, the major chemical species of uranium and thorium, uranyl UO 2 +2 , thorium dihydroxide Th(OH) 2 +2 , and thorium hydroxide Th(OH) +3 , tend to form complexes with acetates in the solution phase, which increases the fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed into this phase. At a high solution pH, important uranium and thorium species such as uranyl tricarbonate complex UO 2 (CO) 33 -4 and thorium tetrahydroxide complex Th(OH) 4 tend to resist complexation with acetates. The presence of complexing reagents in solution can release radionuclides such as uranium and/or thorium from the soil to the solution by forming soluble complexes. Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ) and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) are strong complex formers that released 38% to 62% of total uranium activity and 78% to 86% of total thorium activity, respectively, from the soil samples investigated. Solutions of 0.1 molar sodium nitrate (NaNO 3 ) and 0.1 molar sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) were not effective complex formers with uranium and thorium under the experimental conditions. Fractions of uranium and thorium desorbed by 0.15g/200ml humic acid ranged from 4.62% to 6.17% and 1.59% to 7.09%, respectively. This work demonstrates the importance of a knowledge of solution chemistry in investigating the desorption of radionuclides

  4. Root uptake of uranium (6) in solution by a higher plant: speciation in hydroponic solution, bioavailability, micro-localisation and biological effects induced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroche, L.

    2005-01-01

    Uranium exists naturally in the environment, usually present in trace quantities. In soil solution and oxic conditions, uranium is present in the +VI oxidation state and forms a large number of inorganic and organic complexes. The exposure medium, an artificial soil solution, was designed in such a way as to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS was used to calculate the uranium aqueous species concentration and to define the domains of interest, each of them characterized by a limited number of dominant U species. These domains were defined as follows: pH 4.9 with uranyl ions as dominant species, pH 5.8 with hydroxyl complexes and pH 7 where carbonates play a major role. For each pH, short-duration (5 hours of exposure) well-defined laboratory experiments were carried out with Phaseolus vulgaris as plant model. The effect of competitive ions such as Ca 2+ or the presence of ligands such as phosphate or citrate on root assimilation efficiency was explored. Results have shown that uranium transfer was not affected by the presence of calcium, phosphate or citrate (but was decreased of 60% with citrate (10 μM) at pH 5.8) in our experimental conditions. Moreover, observation in Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM), equipped with an EDAX probe, have shown that uranium was associated with granules rich in phosphorus and that there were some chloroplast anomalies. Finally, the presence of uranium affects root CEC by reducing it and stimulates root elongation at low uranium concentrations (100 nM, 400 nM and 2 μM at pHs 4.9, 5.8 and 7 respectively) and inhibits it at high uranium concentrations. (author)

  5. Method of processing plutonium and uranium solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Isao; Suzuki, Toru.

    1989-01-01

    Solutions of plutonium nitrate solutions and uranyl nitrate recovered in the solvent extraction step in reprocessing plants and nuclear fuel production plants are applied with low temperature treatment by means of freeze-drying under vacuum into residues containing nitrates, which are denitrated under heating and calcined under reduction into powders. That is, since complicate processes of heating, concentration and dinitration conducted so far for the plutonium solution and uranyl solution are replaced with one step of freeze-drying under vacuum, the process can be simplified significantly. In addition, since the treatment is applied at low temperature, occurrence of corrosion for the material of evaporation, etc. can be prevented. Further, the number of operators can be saved by dividing the operations into recovery of solidification products, supply and sintering of the solutions and vacuum sublimation. Further, since nitrates processed at a low temperature are powderized by heating dinitration, the powderization step can be simplified. The specific surface area and the grain size distribution of the powder is made appropriate and it is possible to obtain oxide powders of physical property easily to be prepared into pellets. (N.H.)

  6. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species; Chimie de l'uranium (VI) a l'interface solution/mineraux (quartz et hydroxyde d'aluminium): experiences et caracterisations spectroscopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froideval, A.

    2004-09-15

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) to high (26 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range {approx_equal} 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 {mu}M). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 {mu}mol/m{sup 2}). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  7. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors' researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors' researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs

  8. Potentiometric titration of free acid in uranium solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Kim, W. H.; Kim, J. S.; Sohn, S. C.; Eom, T. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Jeon, Y. S.; Han, S. H.

    1998-02-01

    Hydrolysis properties of metal cations and fundamental principles of the potentiometric titration of free acid in aqueous solutions containing metal cations were described. The published papers and reports for the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration of free acid were surveyed, and the applicability of these titration methods to the uranium and/or plutonium solutions were discussed. This technical report also includes the various results obtained from the authors` researches to establish the alkalimetric and acidimetric titration methods for the determination of free acid in nitric acid solutions containing uranium and/or oxalic acid, and aluminum. The procedure manuals used in chemical processes and the newly prepared manuals based on the authors` researches are appended. (author). 26 refs., 54 figs.

  9. Rirang uranium ore processing: continuous solvent extraction of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riza, F.; Nuri, H. L.; Waluya, S.; Subijanto, A.; Sarono, B.

    1998-01-01

    Separation of uranium from Rirang ore acid digestion solution by means of continuous solvent extraction using mixer-settlers has been studied and a mixture of 0.3 M D2EHPA and 0.075 M TOPO extracting agent and kerosene diluent is employed to recover and separate uranium from Th, RE, phosphate containing solution. The experiments have been conducted batch-wise and several parameters have been studied including the aqueous to organic phase ratio, A/O, the extraction and the stripping times, and the operation temperature. The optimum conditions for extraction have been found to be A/O = 2 ratio, five minute extraction time per stage at room temperature. The uranium recovery of 99.07% has been achieved at those conditions whilst U can be stripped from the organic phase by 85% H 3 PO 4 solution with an O/A = 1 for 5 minutes stripping time per stage, and in a there stage operation at room temperature yielding a 100% uranium recovery from the stripping process

  10. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  11. Study of algae's adsorption to uranium ion in water solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Yang; Qiu Yongmei; Dan Guiping; Zhang Dong; Lei Jiarong

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption efficiencies of the algae to uranium ion were determined at various pH, uranium ion concentrations, adsorption temperatures and the species of coexisted metal ions, and the effect of coexisted metal ion on the adsorption efficiency was researched. The experimental results at pH= 5-8 are as follows. 1) the adsorption capacity is a constant to be about 1.40 μg/g for the Yantai red alga and the sea spinach, and is changeable in the range of 1.03-2.23 μg/g with pH for the sea edible fungus; 2) for the algae the adsorption efficiency and adsorption capacity are related to uranium ion concentration, and the maximum adsorption efficiency and capacity is 95.8% and 65.4 μg/g, respectively; 3) the adsorption process for 24 h is not dependent on the temperature; 4) the effect of the species of coexisted metal ions on the adsorption capacity of uranium ion is various with the time during adsorption process. (authors)

  12. Highland Uranium Solution Mining Project. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Exxon Minerals Co. proposes to conduct production-scale solution mining (in situ leaching) of uranium within the existing Highland Operation area in Converse County, Wyoming. The project would result in the temporary removal of 200 acres from grazing and the actual disturbance of 50 acres. About 4500 acre-ft of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer over the 10-year life of the project. There will be no discharge of liquid effluents from the project; atmospheric effluents will be within acceptable limits. Radiation doses at the nearest ranch resulting from solution mining activities were estimated. The project proposes the production and utilization of 1 to 3 million lb of uranium resources. It will not produce any significant socioeconomic impact on the local area. Alternatives to the project were considered, and conditions for issuing the source material license are listed

  13. Bioprecipitation of uranium from alkaline waste solutions using recombinant Deinococcus radiodurans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Ballal, Anand; Apte, Shree Kumar, E-mail: aptesk@barc.gov.in

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Deinococcus radiodurans was genetically engineered to overexpress alkaline phosphatase (PhoK). • Deino-PhoK bioprecipitated U efficiently over a wide range of input U concentration. • A maximal loading of 10.7 g U/g of biomass at 10 mM input U was observed. • Radioresistance and U precipitation by Deino-PhoK remained unaffected by γ radiation. • Immobilization of Deino-PhoK facilitated easy separation of precipitated U. -- Abstract: Bioremediation of uranium (U) from alkaline waste solutions remains inadequately explored. We engineered the phoK gene (encoding a novel alkaline phosphatase, PhoK) from Sphingomonas sp. for overexpression in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. The recombinant strain thus obtained (Deino-PhoK) exhibited remarkably high alkaline phosphatase activity as evidenced by zymographic and enzyme activity assays. Deino-PhoK cells could efficiently precipitate uranium over a wide range of input U concentrations. At low uranyl concentrations (1 mM), the strain precipitated >90% of uranium within 2 h while a high loading capacity of around 10.7 g U/g of dry weight of cells was achieved at 10 mM U concentration. Uranium bioprecipitation by Deino-PhoK cells was not affected in the presence of Cs and Sr, commonly present in intermediate and low level liquid radioactive waste, or after exposure to very high doses of ionizing radiation. Transmission electron micrographs revealed the extracellular nature of bioprecipitated U, while X-ray diffraction and fluorescence analysis identified the precipitated uranyl phosphate species as chernikovite. When immobilized into calcium alginate beads, Deino-PhoK cells efficiently removed uranium, which remained trapped in beads, thus accomplishing physical separation of precipitated uranyl phosphate from solutions. The data demonstrate superior ability of Deino-PhoK, over earlier reported strains, in removal of uranium from alkaline solutions and its potential use in

  14. An automated solution enrichment system for uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.A.; Sparks, R.; Sampson, T.; Parker, J.; Horley, E.; Kelly, T.

    1993-01-01

    An automated Solution Enrichment system (SES) for analysis of Uranium and U-235 isotopes in process samples has been developed through a joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Martin Marietta Energy systems, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This device features an advanced robotics system which in conjuction with stabilized passive gamma-ray and X-ray fluorescence detectors provides for rapid, non-destructive analyses of process samples for improved special nuclear material accountability and process control

  15. Automated assay of uranium solution concentration and enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horley, E.C.; Gainer, K.; Hansen, W.J.; Kelley, T.A.; Parker, J.L.; Sampson, T.E.; Walton, G.; Jones, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    For the first time, the concentration and enrichment of uranium solutions can be measured in one step. We have developed a new instrument to automatically measure the concentration and enrichment of uranium solutions through the adaptation of a commercial robot. Two identical solution enrichment systems are being installed in the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These automated systems will reduce radiation exposure to personnel and increase the reliability and repeatability of the measurements. Each robotic system can process up to 40 batch and 8 priority samples in an unattended mode. Both passive gamma-ray and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses are performed to determine total uranium concentration and 235 U enrichment. Coded samples are read by a bar-code reader to determine measurement requirements, then assayed by either or both of the gamma-ray and XRF instruments. The robot moves the sample containers and operates all shield doors and shutters, reducing hardware complexity. If the robots is out of service, an operator can manually perform all operations

  16. Bioaccumulation of uranium and thorium from the solution containing both elements using various microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of proton, thorium and uranium on the bioaccumulation of thorium and uranium from the solution (pH 3.5) containing uranium and thorium using Streptomyces levoris cells were examined. The amount of thorium accumulated using the cells decreased by the pre-contact between the cells and the solution (pH 3.5) containing no metals, whereas that of uranium was almost unaffected by the treatment. The amount of thorium was almost unaffected by the existence of uranium. On the other hand, the amount of uranium accumulated was strongly affected by the thorium, especially thorium addition after uranium accumulation. The decrease of uranium accumulated by the addition of thorium after the accumulation of uranium was higher than that from the solution containing both elements. Therefore, the contribution of uranium-thorium exchange reaction was higher than that of competition reaction. Accordingly, proton-uranium-thorium exchange reaction was occurred in the accumulation of thorium from the solution containing thorium and uranium. The gram-positive bacteria, such as Micrococcus luteus, Arthrobacter nicotianae, Bacillus subtilis and B. megaterium, has a much higher separation factor as thorium/uranium than that of actinomycetes. These gram-positive bacterial strains can be used for the accumulation of thorium from the solution containing uranium and thorium

  17. Nitrification and in-situ uranium solution mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.; Humenick, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the potential for conversion of ammonia to nitrate as a result of uranium solution mining operations. The work included literature evaluation and laboratory experimentation in both batch and continuous systems. Results indicate that a potential for nitrification could exist for some portions of the solution mining operating cycle. However, inhibition of nitrification was observed due to high ammonia and peroxide concentrations. Nitrification of ammonia also was observed to occur due to chemical oxidation by peroxide. 28 refs

  18. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  19. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes

  20. HPAT: A nondestructive analysis technique for plutonium and uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparo, M.; Mattia, B.; Zeppa, P.; Pagliai, V.; Frazzoli, F.V.

    1989-03-01

    Two experimental approaches for the nondestructive characterization of mixed solutions of plutonium and uranium, developed at BNEA - C.R.E. Casaccia, with the goal of measuring low plutonium concentration (<50 g/l) even in presence of high uranium content, are described in the following. Both methods are referred to as HPAT (Hybrid Passive-Active Technique) since they rely on the measurement of plutonium spontaneous emission in the LX-rays energy region as well as the transmission of KX photons from the fluorescence induced by a radioisotopic source on a suitable target. Experimental campaigns for the characterization of both techniques have been carried out at EUREX Plant Laboratories (C.R.E. Saluggia) and at Plutonium Plant Laboratories (C.R.E. Casaccia). Experimental results and theoretical value of the errors are reported. (author)

  1. Root uptake of uranium (6) in solution by a higher plant: speciation in hydroponic solution, bioavailability, micro-localisation and biological effects induced; Transfert racinaire de l'uranium (6) en solution chez une plante superieure: speciation en solution hydroponique, prise en charge par la plante, microlocalisation et effets biologiques induits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laroche, L

    2005-01-15

    Uranium exists naturally in the environment, usually present in trace quantities. In soil solution and oxic conditions, uranium is present in the +VI oxidation state and forms a large number of inorganic and organic complexes. The exposure medium, an artificial soil solution, was designed in such a way as to control the uranium species in solution. The geochemical speciation code JCHESS was used to calculate the uranium aqueous species concentration and to define the domains of interest, each of them characterized by a limited number of dominant U species. These domains were defined as follows: pH 4.9 with uranyl ions as dominant species, pH 5.8 with hydroxyl complexes and pH 7 where carbonates play a major role. For each pH, short-duration (5 hours of exposure) well-defined laboratory experiments were carried out with Phaseolus vulgaris as plant model. The effect of competitive ions such as Ca{sup 2+} or the presence of ligands such as phosphate or citrate on root assimilation efficiency was explored. Results have shown that uranium transfer was not affected by the presence of calcium, phosphate or citrate (but was decreased of 60% with citrate (10 {mu}M) at pH 5.8) in our experimental conditions. Moreover, observation in Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM), equipped with an EDAX probe, have shown that uranium was associated with granules rich in phosphorus and that there were some chloroplast anomalies. Finally, the presence of uranium affects root CEC by reducing it and stimulates root elongation at low uranium concentrations (100 nM, 400 nM and 2 {mu}M at pHs 4.9, 5.8 and 7 respectively) and inhibits it at high uranium concentrations. (author)

  2. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Propp, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    Modern methods of uranium solution mining are typically accompanied by gains and losses of mass through reagent consumption by rock-forming minerals, with subsequent formation of clay minerals, gypsum, carbonates, and iron oxyhydroxides. A systematic approach to alleviate such problems involves the application of leach solutions that are in equilibrium with the host-rock minerals but in disequilibrium with the ore-forming minerals. This partial equilibrium can be approximated by solution-composition adjustments within the systems K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O and Na 2 O 3 -Al 2 O 3 SiO 2 -H 2 O. Uranium ore containing 0.15 percent U 3 O 8 from the Gulf Mineral Resources Corporation's Mariano Lake mine, the Smith Lake district of the Grants mineral belt, was collected for investigation. Presented are a theoretical evaluation of leachate data and an experimental treatment of the ore, which contained mainly K-feldspar, plagioclase feldspar, and quartz (with lesser amounts of micas, clay minerals, and organic carbonaceous material). Small-scale (less than or equal to 1 kg) column-leaching experiments were conducted to model the results of conventional leaching operations and to provide leachate solutions that could be compared with solutions calculated to be in equilibrium with the matrix minerals. Leach solutions employed include: 1) sulfuric acid, 2) sodium bicarbonate, and 3) sulfuric acid with 1.0 molal potassium chloride. The uranium concentrations in the sodium-bicarbonate leach solution and the acid-leach solution were about a gram per liter at the termination of the tests. However, the permeability of the ore in the acid leach was greatly reduced, owing to the formation of clay minerals. Uranium solubility in the leach column stabilized with the potassium-chloride solution was calculated from leachate compositions to be limited by the solubility of carnotite

  3. Determination of Ga in aqueous uranium solution by EDXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, V.; Purohit, P.J.; Goyal, Neelam; Seshagiri, T.K.; Godbole, S.V.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    A method has been developed using EDXRF technique for the determination of gallium in aqueous solution using a set of solution standards in the concentration range 20-5000 μg/ml. When this method was applied to U containing solutions, the estimated values were found to be lower due to matrix effects. Hence the method was modified in order to determine gallium in the presence of uranium using lower tube current and another set of standards with U concentration at 100 mg/ml. The method was applicable for the estimation of Ga from 50 μg/ml to 5mg/ml (i.e.0.05-5% Ga in U). Three synthetic samples were analysed by the present methods in order to evaluate the method for its reliability and reproducibility. (author)

  4. Spectrographic determination of impurities in enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Roca, M.

    1980-01-01

    A spectrographic procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Al, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, L i , Hg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Ru, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr in enriched uranyl nitrate solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels is described. After removal of uranium by either TBP or TNOA solvent extraction, the aqueous phase Is analysed by the graphite spark technique. TBP is adequate for all impurities, excepting boron and phosphorus; both of these elements can sat is factory be determined by using TNOA after the addition of mannitol to avoid boron losses. (Author) 4 refs

  5. Uranium (VI) complexing by macrocyclic or chelating ligands in aqueous solutions stability, formation kinetics, polarographic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brighli, M.

    1984-07-01

    Stability of chelates (with EDTA,N,N ethylenediamine diacetic acid EDDA nitrilotriacetic acid NTA and iminodiacetic acid) of UO 2 2+ and UO 4 species of uranium VI is studied in aqueous solution (NaClO 4 3M at 25 deg celcius). Structure in solution are proposed and discussed for mononuclear species. Only complexing kinetics (formation and acid hydrolysis) of UO 4 with EDDA and NTA are studied by spectrophotometry (other reactions are too fast). Besides UO 2 2+ complexes are formed with crown ethers I5C5 and I8C6 in aqueous solution (TEA ClO 4 M/10 at 25 deg celcius. Complexes are probably stabilized by solvation. Results are confirmed by voltametry and reduction mechanisms of UO 2 2+ and its complexes on mercury drop are proposed. 143 refs [fr

  6. Application of solution-mineral equilibrium chemistry to solution mining of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riese, A.C.; Popp, C.J.

    1979-01-01

    The tests described were undertaken to determine the extent to leach solution-rock interactions with uranium-bearing ore obtained from the Mariano Lake mine. Leach solutions of an acidic (H/sub 2/O/sub 4/-sulfuric acid) and basic (NaHCO/sub 3/-sodium bicarbonate) nature were tested, in addition to a leach solution containing potassium chloride and sulfuric acid (KCl/H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The latter solution was chosen in an attempt to equilibrate the aqueous phase with the rock-forming silicate minerals and minimize adverse effects such as clay formation, porosity loss, and lixiviant loss. 29 refs

  7. Method of removing uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from aqueous solutions discharged in hydrometallurgical uranium ore treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Kuhr, I.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    The separation of uranium and its compounds from mine wastewaters and from water solutions discharged from uranium ore hydrometallurgical treatment, and its eventual simultaneous concentration in the biomass during uranium ore technological processing are described. The solutions are replenished with nutrients necessary for the growth of microorganisms, mainly with nitrogen, carbon and phosphorus and inoculated with fungi. During submersion cultivation, uranium incorporates in the mycelium, or is bound physico-chemically to the mycelium components. Together with these components, uranium is mechanically separated, i.e., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. Organisms of the Fungi imperfecti class, mainly the Aspergillus and Penicillium genera are used for cultivation which may be continuous or semicontinuous. (B.S.)

  8. Process for recovering uranium using an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid and alkaline stripping solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, R.E.; Magdics, A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for stripping uranium for a pregnant organic extractant comprising an alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in a substantially water-immiscible organic diluent. The organic extractant contains tetravalent uranium and an alcohol or phenol modifier in a quantity sufficient to retain substantially all the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid in solution in the diluent during stripping. The process comprises adding an oxidizing agent to the organic extractant and thereby oxidizing the tetravalent uranium to the +6 state in the organic extractant, and contacting the organic extractant containing the uranium in the +6 state with a stripping solution comprising an aqueous solution of an alkali metal or ammonium carbonate or hydroxide thereby stripping uranium from the organic extractant into the stripping solution. The resulting barren organic extractant containing substantially all of the unhydrolyzed alkyl pyrophosphoric acid dissolved in the diluent is separated from the stripping solution containing the stripped uranium, the barren extractant being suitable for recycle

  9. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korgaonkar, V.

    1967-10-01

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO 3 ) 6 2- and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 4 2- in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO 3 ) 6-n n-2 and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 4-n n-2 It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO 3 . From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author) [fr

  10. Distribution of uranium and radium radionuclides in the 'solid phase-interstitial soil solution' system and their migratory properties in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The background content of the main alpha-emitting radionuclides of uranium and radium in the soils of the south-east territory of the Republic of Belarus has been established. The reserve of migratory active species of uranium and radium in the soils has been determined using the data on the content of the radionuclides in the interstitial soil solutions, which are the most important chain of geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements in ecosystems. The values of radionuclides distribution coefficients in the 'solid phase - interstitial solution of soil' system were estimated. It was shown that the migratory ability of uranium in the investigated soils is higher than that of radium. A direct correlation between the contents of organic components and uranium in the soil solution has been revealed. The used approach to the investigation of the uranium and radium behavior allows comparing their abilities to the migration in dependence of the soil medium peculiarities. (authors)

  11. Uranium and radium content in the soil solutions of the south-western part of Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolik, G.A.; Ovsyannikova, S.V.; Vojnikova, E.V.; Popenya, M.V.

    2008-01-01

    The contents of uranium and radium in the pore soil solutions, which are the main chain in the geochemical and biological migration of the chemical elements, has been determined for the first time in Belarus. The control sites have been located outside the zone of Chernobyl fallout radionuclide contamination, that allowed evaluating the current background level of uranium and radium content in the soil solutions. The data on accumulation of the radioactive elements in the pore solutions give the opportunity to estimate the reserve of the radioactive elements in the migratory active forms in the soils. In the majority of soils studied, uranium content in the pore solution is higher than radium content, that points to the higher migratory ability of uranium. The direct correlation between content of fulvic acids' components in the soil solutions and accumulation of uranium in such solutions has been established. (authors)

  12. EPR study of the production of OH radicals in aqueous solutions of uranium irradiated by ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKO DAKOVIĆ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish whether hydroxyl radicals (•OH were produced in UV-irradiated aqueous solutions of uranyl salts. The production of •OH was studied in uranyl acetate and nitrate solutions by an EPR spin trap method over a wide pH range, with variation of the uranium concentrations. The production of •OH in uranyl solutions irradiated with UV was unequivocally demonstrated for the first time using the EPR spin-trapping method. The production of •OH can be connected to speciation of uranium species in aqueous solutions, showing a complex dependence on the solution pH. When compared with the results of radiative de-excitation of excited uranyl (*UO22+ by the quenching of its fluorescence, the present results indicate that the generation of hydroxyl radicals plays a major role in the fluorescence decay of *UO22+. The role of the presence of carbonates and counter ions pertinent to environmental conditions in biological systems on the production of hydroxyl radicals was also assessed in an attempt to reveal the mechanism of *UO22+ de-excitation. Various mechanisms, including •OH production, are inferred but the main point is that the generation of •OH in uranium containing solutions must be considered when assessing uranium toxicity.

  13. Polarographic behaviour of uranium (VI) in tributyl phosphate organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.; Meklati, M.

    1984-01-01

    U(VI) determination by D.C. and differential pulse polarography was studied in the organic solutions derived from tributyl phosphate - diluent extracts (after separation from nitric acid media) along with a selected aprotic solvent (i.e.: propylene carbonate and N,N-dimethylacetamide). Miscibility of the TBP-diluent (e.g. cyclohexane, n-hexane, kerosene, n-dodecane) phase with nitric acid as supporting electrolyte, either by addition or already present in the extract was larger in DMA than in PC. In the DMA organic mixture, U(VI) exhibited a DPP peak due to a one electron step, with Esub(p)=-0.4 V (position connected with H 2 O and HNO 3 concentrations). This peak which was proportionnel to the U(VI) concentration from 5x10 -6 to 10 -3 M can be used to determinate directly hexavalent uranium in the industrial organic extraction phases TBP-diluent. (orig.)

  14. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from dilute solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, I.A.H.; Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Eichhornia crassipes approaches being a scourge in many parts of the world, choking waterways and hindering transport upon them. At the same time it is known to readily abstract heavy metal ions from water and, thus, aids in the removal of heavy metals found in such waters. This paper considers the possibility of using specific parts of the plant as an inexpensive adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated chemical and mining industry waste waters. In particular the root of the plant was found to be an excellent accumulator of heavy metal ions including uranium from solution. It is also suggested that dried roots of the plant might be placed in simple bags and used in a very low cost metal ion removal system

  15. Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This international Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the uranium content in uranyl nitrate product solutions of nuclear grade quality at concentrations above 100 g/l of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method. Uranyl nitrate is converted into uranium octoxide (U 3 O 8 ) by ignition in air to constant mass at 900 deg. C ± 10 deg. C. Calculation of the uranium content in the sample using a gravimetric conversion factor which depends on the isotopic composition of the uranium. The isotopic composition is determined by mass spectrometry

  16. Uranium Rirang ore processing: extraction of uranium from Rirang ore digestion solution with tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arief, E. R.; Zahardi; Susilaningtyas

    1998-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from Rirang ore acid digestion solution containing rare earths. A mixture of tributyl phosphate solvent and kerosene diluent is employed. Several parameters of solvent extraction have been studied included aqueous to organic phase ratio, H 2 O 2 reductor concentration and Tbp concentration in the solvent mixture, as well as the aqueous to organic phase ratio in the stripping process. The optimum conditions for the extraction step include the use of 25% H 2 O 2 (v/v), one to one aqueous to organic ratio, and 40% Tbp in kerosene. The extraction recovery for U, RE, Th, and PO 4 3 - are 99%, 4%, 70%, and 30%, respectively. The stripping step optimum conditions include the use of one to five organic to aqueous phase ratio 0.24 N HNO 3 . and the stripping recovery for U, RE, Th, and PO 4 3 - are 84%, 80%, 72%, and 83%, respectively

  17. Uranium extraction from aqueous solution using dried and pyrolyzed tea and coffee wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaynab Aly

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption of U(VI) onto dried and pyrolyzed tea and coffee wastes was investigated. The adsorption properties of the materials were characterized by measuring uranium uptake as a function of solution pH, kinetics and adsorption isotherms. pH profile of uranium adsorption where UO 2 2+ is expected to be the predominant species was measured between pH 0 and 4. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used to describe adsorption equilibria, and corresponding constants evaluated. Using the Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity of uranium by dried tea and coffee wastes was 59.5 and 34.8 mg/g, respectively at 291 K. Adsorption thermodynamic constants, ΔHdeg ΔSdeg and ΔGdeg were also calculated from adsorption data obtained at three different temperatures. Adsorption thermodynamics of uranyl ions on dried tea and coffee systems indicated spontaneous and endothermic processes. Additionally, a Lagergren pseudo-second-order kinetic model was used to fit the kinetic experimental data for both adsorbents and the constants evaluated. Dried tea and coffee wastes proved to be effective adsorbents with high capacities and significant advantage of a very low cost. (author)

  18. Evaluation of neutralization treatment processes and their use for uranium tailings solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.R.; Opitz, B.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The potential for groundwater contamination from the typically acidic mill wastes that are disposed of in tailings impoundments is of primary concern at uranium mill sites in the US. Solution-treatment processes provide a system for limiting the environmental impact from acidic seepage. Treatment of uranium tailings solutions from evaporation ponds, underdrains, and surface seeps could aid in decommissioning active sites or be used as an emergency measure to avert possible uncontrolled discharges. At present, neutralization processes appear to be best suited for treating uranium mill tailings solution because they can, at a reasonable cost, limit the solution concentration of many contaminants and thus reduce the potential for groundwater contamination. However, the effectiveness of the neutralization process depends on the reagent used as well as the chemistry of the waste stream. This article provides a description of neutralization processes, an assessment of their performance on acidic uranium tailings leachates, and recommendations for their use at US uranium mill sites

  19. The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocking, W.H.; Betteridge, J.S.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    1991-09-01

    The cathodic reduction of dioxygen on uranium oxide in dilute alkaline aqueous solutions has been investigated within the context of a program to develop a comprehensive model to predict the behaviour of used CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear fuel under disposal-vault conditions. Two different kinds of ceramic UO 2 were studied: reactor-grade CANDU fuel with normal p-type electrical conductivity and low-resistance material that exhibits n-type photoelectrochemical behaviour. The transport of electroactive species in solution was controlled by varying the rotation rate of rotating disc electrodes (RDE) and rotating ring-disc electrodes (RRDE). Steady-state polarization measurements were made using the current-interrupt method to compensate for the potential drop caused by ohmic resistance. Any release of peroxide to solution from the UO 2 (disc) surface could be monitored by oxidizing it at the Au ring of an RRDE. The existing theory for the cathodic 0 2 -reduction process as applied to RDE and RRDE experiments has been reviewed as a starting point for the interpretation of the results obtained in our work. (37 figs., 2 tabs., 170 refs.)

  20. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 1: Effect of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenhove, H.; Hees, M. van; Wouters, K.; Wannijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    Present study aims to quantify the influence of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration for 238 U spiked soils. Eighteen soils collected under pasture were selected such that they covered a wide range for those parameters hypothesised as being potentially important in determining U sorption. Maximum soil solution uranium concentrations were observed at alkaline pH, high inorganic carbon content and low cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, clay content, amorphous Fe and phosphate levels. Except for the significant correlation between the solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K d , L kg -1 ) and the organic matter content (R 2 = 0.70) and amorphous Fe content (R 2 = 0.63), there was no single soil parameter significantly explaining the soil solution uranium concentration (which varied 100-fold). Above pH = 6, log(K d ) was linearly related with pH [log(K d ) = - 1.18 pH + 10.8, R 2 = 0.65]. Multiple linear regression analysis did result in improved predictions of the soil solution uranium concentration but the model was complex. - Uranium solubility in soil can be predicted from organic matter or amorphous iron content and pH or with complex multilinear models considering several soil parameters

  1. Effect of ion concentrations on uranium absorption from sodium carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, D.E.; El Hazek, N.M.T.; Palmer, G.R.; Nichols, I.L.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various ion concentrations on uranium absorption from a sodium carbonate solution by a strong-base, anion resin was investigated in order to help assure an adequate uranium supply for future needs. The studies were conducted to improve the recovery of uranium from in situ leach solutions by ion exchange. The effects of carbonate, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate ions were examined. Relatively low (less than 5 g/l) concentrations of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate were found to be detrimental to the absorption of uranium. High (greater than 10 g/l) carbonate concentrations also adversely affected the uranium absorption. In addition, the effect of initial resin form was investigated in tests of the chloride, carbonate, and bicarbonate forms; resin form was shown to have no effect on the absorption of uranium

  2. Rapid determination of fluoride in uranyl nitrate solution obtained in conversion process of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, R.; Feldman, R.; Sahar, E.

    1976-01-01

    In uranium production the conversion of impure uranium tetrafluoride by sodium hydroxide was chosen as a current process. A rapid method for determination of fluoride in uranyl-nitrate solution was developed. The method includes precipitation of uranium as diuranate, separation by centrifugation, and subsequent determination of fluoride in supernate by titration with thorium nitrate. Fluoride can be measured over the range 0.15-2.5 gr/gr U, with accuracy of +-5%, within 15 minutes. (author)

  3. Uranium chemistry in stack solutions and leachates of phosphogypsum disposed at a coastal area in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysandrou, M; Pashalidis, I

    2008-02-01

    The effect of the matrix composition (main constituents) on the concentration and chemical behavior of uranium in phosphogypsum stack solutions and leachates has been investigated. Solid and aqueous samples were taken from three different sub-areas of a phosphogypsum stack at a coastal area in Vasilikos (Cyprus). The sub-areas are characterized whether by their acidity (e.g. "aged" and "non-aged" phosphogypsum) or by their salt content, originating from pulping water during wet stacking or (after deposition) from the adjacent sea. Measurements in stack solutions and leachates showed that phosphogypsum characteristics affect both, the concentration and the chemical behavior of uranium in solution. Uranium concentration in solutions of increased salinity is up to three orders of magnitude higher than in solutions of low salinity and this is attributed to the effect of ionic strength on the solubility of phosphogypsum. Modelling showed that uranium in stack solutions is predominantly present in the form of uranium(VI) phosphate complexes (e.g. UO(2)(H(2)PO(4))(2), UO(2)HPO(4)), whereas in leachates uranium(VI) fluoro complexes (e.g. UO(2)F(2), UO(2)F(3)(-)) are predominant in solution. The latter indicates that elution of uranium from phosphogypsum takes places most probably in the form of fluoro complexes. Both, effective elution by saline water and direct migration of uranium to the sea, where it forms very stable uranium(VI) carbonato complexes, indicate that the adjacent sea will be the final receptor of uranium released from Vasilikos phosphogypsum.

  4. Radiation Re-solution Calculation in Uranium-Silicide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Christopher; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Unal, Cetin

    2017-01-01

    The release of fission gas from nuclear fuels is of primary concern for safe operation of nuclear power plants. Although the production of fission gas atoms can be easily calculated from the fission rate in the fuel and the average yield of fission gas, the actual diffusion, behavior, and ultimate escape of fission gas from nuclear fuel depends on many other variables. As fission gas diffuses through the fuel grain, it tends to collect into intra-granular bubbles, as portrayed in Figure 1.1. These bubbles continue to grow due to absorption of single gas atoms. Simultaneously, passing fission fragments can cause collisions in the bubble that result in gas atoms being knocked back into the grain. This so called ''re-solution'' event results in a transient equilibrium of single gas atoms within the grain. As single gas atoms progress through the grain, they will eventually collect along grain boundaries, creating inter-granular bubbles. As the inter-granular bubbles grow over time, they will interconnect with other grain-face bubbles until a pathway is created to the outside of the fuel surface, at which point the highly pressurized inter-granular bubbles will expel their contents into the fuel plenum. This last process is the primary cause of fission gas release. From the simple description above, it is clear there are several parameters that ultimately affect fission gas release, including the diffusivity of single gas atoms, the absorption and knockout rate of single gas atoms in intra-granular bubbles, and the growth and interlinkage of intergranular bubbles. Of these, the knockout, or re-solution rate has an particularly important role in determining the transient concentration of single gas atoms in the grain. The re-solution rate will be explored in the following sections with regards to uranium-silicide fuels in order to support future models of fission gas bubble behavior.

  5. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Frajndlich, E.U. de.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F 6 ) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F 6 to uranium dioxide (U O 2 ) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  6. Solvent extraction of uranium from high acid leach solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadevi, G.; Sreenivas, T.; Navale, A.S.; Padmanabhan, N.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    A significant part of the total uranium reserves all over the world is contributed by refractory uranium minerals. The refractory oxides are highly stable and inert to attack by most of the commonly used acids under normal conditions of acid strength, pressure and temperature. Quantitative dissolution of uranium from such ores containing refractory uranium minerals requires drastic operating conditions during chemical leaching like high acid strength, elevated pressures and temperatures. The leach liquors produced under these conditions normally have high free acidity, which affects the downstream operations like ion exchange and solvent extraction

  7. Recent studies of uranium and plutonium chemistry in alkaline radioactive waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, William D.; Wilmarth, William R.; Hobbs, David T.; Edwards, Thomas B.

    2008-01-01

    Solubility studies of uranium and plutonium in a caustic, radioactive Savannah River Site tank waste solution revealed the existence of uranium supersaturation in the as-received sample. Comparison of the results to predictions generated from previously published models for solubility in these waste types revealed that the U model poorly predicts solubility while Pu model predictions are quite consistent with experimental observations. Separate studies using simulated Savannah River Site evaporator feed solution revealed that the known formation of sodium aluminosilicate solids in waste evaporators can promote rapid precipitation of uranium from supersaturated solutions

  8. Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Heavy Water and Uranium Process Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Davis, Eric Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-20

    This presentation includes slides on Project Goals; Heavy Water Production Monitoring: A New Challenge for the IAEA; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Large Scatter in Literature Values; Highest Precision Sound Speed Data Available: New Standard in H/D; ~400 pts of data; Noninvasive Measurements in SFAI Cell; New funding from NA241 SGTech; Uranium Solution Monitoring: Inspired by IAEA Challenge in Kazakhstan; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; Non-Invasive Acoustic-Based Monitoring of Uranium in Solutions; and finally a summary.

  9. Reverse osmosis performance of cellulose acetate membranes in the separation of uranium from dilute solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastri, V.S.; Ashbrook, A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Batch 316-type cellulose acetate membranes were characterized in terms of pure water permeability constant, solute transport parameter, and mass transfer coefficient with a reference system of aqueous sodium chloride solution. These membranes were used in the determination of reverse osmosis characteristics such as product rate and solute separation in the case of uranium sulfate solutions of different concentrations (100 to 8000 ppM) in the feed solutions. A long-term test extending over a week has been carried out with dilute uranium solutions. Reverse osmosis treatment of synthetic mine water sample showed satisfactory performance of the membranes in the separation of metal ions

  10. Recovery of uranium from alkaline ore (Tummalapalle) leach solution using novel precipitating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is recovery of uranium from such ore leach solution containing 2 O 7 at pH ∼12.5. The average particle size of the MgU 2 O 7 particles was 20 micron and overall uranium recovery was 97%. The composition of final precipitate was characterized using XRD and surface morphology was studied using SEM

  11. A study on prediction of uranium concentration in pregnant solution from in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Weiping; Zhou Quan; Yu Yunzhen; Wang Shude; Yang Yihan; Lei Qifeng

    2005-01-01

    The modeling course on prediction of uranium concentration in pregnant solution from in-situ leaching of uranium is described, a mathematical model based on grey system theory is put forward, and a set of computer application software is correspondingly developed. (authors)

  12. Removing ferric ions from concentrated acid leaching solution of an uranium ore by jarosite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Huanbi; Hu Yezang

    1997-01-01

    The author expounds the fundamental rules of removing ferric ions by jarosite and presents results of removing ferric ions from concentrated acid curing-trickle leaching solution of an uranium ore. It turns out that the method can be applied to uranium hydrometallurgical process effectively

  13. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the mass fraction of uranium in uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear grade quality containing more than 100 g/kg of uranium. Non-volatile impurities influence the accuracy of the method

  14. Uranium carbide dissolution in nitric solution: Sonication vs. silent conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virot, Matthieu; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Chave, Tony; Dacheux, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2013-01-01

    The dissolution of uranium carbide (UC) in nitric acid media is considered by means of power ultrasound (sonication) or magnetic stirring. The induction period required to initiate UC dissolution was found to be dramatically shortened when sonicating a 3 M nitric solution (Ar, 20 kHz, 18 W cm −2 , 20 °C). At higher acidity, magnetic stirring offers faster dissolution kinetics compared to sonication. Ultrasound-assisted UC dissolution is found to be passivated after ∼60% dissolution and remains incomplete whatever the acidity which is confirmed by ICP–AES, LECO and SEM–EDX analyses. In general, the kinetics of UC dissolution is linked to the in situ generation of nitrous acid in agreement with the general mechanism of UC dissolution; the nitrous acid formation is reported to be faster under ultrasound at low acidity due to the nitric acid sonolysis. The carbon balance shared between the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is strongly influenced by the applied dissolution procedure and HNO 3 concentration

  15. Uranium carbide dissolution in nitric solution: Sonication vs. silent conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virot, Matthieu; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Chave, Tony; Dacheux, Nicolas; Moisy, Philippe; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2013-10-01

    The dissolution of uranium carbide (UC) in nitric acid media is considered by means of power ultrasound (sonication) or magnetic stirring. The induction period required to initiate UC dissolution was found to be dramatically shortened when sonicating a 3 M nitric solution (Ar, 20 kHz, 18 W cm-2, 20 °C). At higher acidity, magnetic stirring offers faster dissolution kinetics compared to sonication. Ultrasound-assisted UC dissolution is found to be passivated after ∼60% dissolution and remains incomplete whatever the acidity which is confirmed by ICP-AES, LECO and SEM-EDX analyses. In general, the kinetics of UC dissolution is linked to the in situ generation of nitrous acid in agreement with the general mechanism of UC dissolution; the nitrous acid formation is reported to be faster under ultrasound at low acidity due to the nitric acid sonolysis. The carbon balance shared between the gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is strongly influenced by the applied dissolution procedure and HNO3 concentration.

  16. Accumulation of uranium in plant roots absorbed from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohi, Terumi; Haga, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Satoru; Tagai, Tokuhei

    2007-01-01

    In order to study accumulation mechanisms of uranium (U) in terrestrial plants, uptake experiments for U have been carried out by using Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). This plant is edible and known as a heavy metal accumulator, especially for cadmium (Cd). About 30 rootsstocks of Indian mustard grown hydroponically in laboratory dishes were kept in uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) nitrate solutions (initially 0.5 mmol/l) at 25degC for 24, 48 and 72 hours (h). The average U concentrations in leaves increased until 48 h up to about 0.6 mg/g and then decreased slightly. Those in roots showed similar trends, but with much higher maximum U concentrations of about 30 mg/g. Backscattered electron images under SEM of the roots showed that U was accumulated on the cell edges. EPMA elemental mapping indicated that phosphorus (P) distribution had a very strong correlation with that of U. The distribution of sulfur (S) appeared to be somewhat different form these U and P distributions. These results suggest that U can be absorbed into plant roots as uranyl (UO 2 2+ ) and might be fixed at the phospholipid rich cell membranes. This U accumulation mechanism appeared to be different from that for Cd which has a close association with S. (author)

  17. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; El-Absy, M.A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous nitrate solutions on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide (CRYMO) was studied. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemical reaction at the exchange sites. Sorption of uranium and thorium by CRYMO has been also studied as a function of metal concentrations and temperature. The sorption of both cations is found to be an endothermic process and increases markedly with temperature between 30 and 60 degree C. The sorption results have been analysed by the langmuir adsorption isotherm over the entire range of uranium and thorium concentrations investigated. 35 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  18. Study of uranium(VI) speciation in phosphoric acid solutions and of its recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartiguelongue, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    Because small amounts of uranium are present in phosphate rocks, wet phosphoric acids may contain up to 300 ppm of uranium(VI). Therefore, such acids are a cost-effective unconventional source of this metal. Its recovery is a challenge for metallurgical firms which must develop reliable and selective solvent extraction processes. Such processes need to know the chemical equilibria involved in the extraction process, the speciation of uranium and its thermodynamics in solution. These two last points have been investigated in this work. Firstly, the most probable species of uranium(VI) in phosphoric acid solutions have been selected thanks to a detailed review of the literature. Then, a thermodynamic model founded on an equation of state for electrolytes has been built according these hypotheses. It has been validated with speciation data coming from original ATR-IR spectroscopy measurements. Finally, the composition of the aqueous phosphoric acid solutions and the activity coefficients obtained have been combined with a chemical model of uranium(VI) extraction into an organic phase containing a synergistic mixture of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in order to represent the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium(VI) with H 3 PO 4 concentration. This model had been previously developed at Chimie ParisTech at a given concentration of H 3 PO 4 (i.e., 5,3 mol/L), but in the present study we have tested its validity in an extended range of phosphoric acid concentrations (i.e., 1-7 mol/L) and improved it. (author)

  19. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  1. Can we predict uranium bioavailability based on soil parameters? Part 1: effect of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhove, H; Van Hees, M; Wouters, K; Wannijn, J

    2007-01-01

    Present study aims to quantify the influence of soil parameters on soil solution uranium concentration for (238)U spiked soils. Eighteen soils collected under pasture were selected such that they covered a wide range for those parameters hypothesised as being potentially important in determining U sorption. Maximum soil solution uranium concentrations were observed at alkaline pH, high inorganic carbon content and low cation exchange capacity, organic matter content, clay content, amorphous Fe and phosphate levels. Except for the significant correlation between the solid-liquid distribution coefficients (K(d), L kg(-1)) and the organic matter content (R(2)=0.70) and amorphous Fe content (R(2)=0.63), there was no single soil parameter significantly explaining the soil solution uranium concentration (which varied 100-fold). Above pH=6, log(K(d)) was linearly related with pH [log(K(d))=-1.18 pH+10.8, R(2)=0.65]. Multiple linear regression analysis did result in improved predictions of the soil solution uranium concentration but the model was complex.

  2. On the chemical identification and visualization of uranium species in biofilms and Euglena mutabilis cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina

    2013-01-01

    For risk assessment of anthropogenic uranium contaminations in the environment a detailed knowledge of the migration and immobilization behavior is required to prevent health hazards for humans and animals caused by an uncontrolled discharge of uranium. Hence, comprehensive studies on the interactions of uranium with the environment are required. Besides the influences of the geological materials, there is a huge effect of the biosphere, especially the interactions with microorganisms and biofilms, on the properties of uranium in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe naturally occurring biofilms from real uranium contaminated areas and their influence on the uranium migration. The investigations in this study on the localization and the speciation of the uranium in the biosystems were primarily done with a coupled system of laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). Natural biofilms collected from two uranium contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD) environments, the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony, Germany) and the former Gessenheap near Ronneburg (Thuringia,Germany), were investigated in this study. The chosen samples represent typical biofilm communities living in AMD water and are exemplary for potentially occurring scenarios of contaminated mining water both in the underground and on the surface. The investigation on the interactions between uranium and Euglena mutabilis, which is a typical unicellular microorganism that can be found in acidic, uranium and other heavy metal containing waters, was another important part of this study. Bioaccumulation experiments of uranium on living Euglena mutabilis cells depending on the pH (pH 3 - 6) and on the background media in sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulfate (3.48 g/l) solution containing 0.01 mM uranium show an effective immobilization of uranium. At the acidic pH-values (pH 3 - 4) over 90 % of the added uranium was

  3. Immobilization of uranium from aqueous solutions by using natural diatomites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhambetbakr, Kh.E.; Burkitbaev, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of uranium on natural diatomite (as high abundant and low-cost material) obtained from Aktyubinsk (Kazakhstan) has been investigated. The main purpose of this work is the immobilization of uranium from liquid waste by using diatomites. The diatomites under study were subjected to treatment with various conditions. The first sample is the natural sample (D) Natural Diatomite, the second (D H CL) is purified 0,5 N HCl and the third is the Calcined Diatomite (D 9 00). The effects of concentration of uranium, contact time and type of diatomite treatment on the adsorption process were examined.

  4. Study on removing nitrate from uranium solution by ion-exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate of low concentration can interfere with adsorption of uranyl sulfate anion on anion-exchange resins because the anion-exchange resins have a stronger affinity for nitrate in uranium solution. Nitrate can be adsorbed with a high efficiency resin, then desorbed by sodium hydroxide. The nitrate concentration is about 60 g/L in eluate. The research results show that nitrate can be recovered from uranium solution with N-3 anion-exchange resin

  5. Investigation of uranium sorption from carbonate solutions by different ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasova, N.A.; Kudryavtseva, S.P.; Milyutin, V.V.; Chuveleva, Eh.A.; Firsova, L.A.; Gelis, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the uranium sorption from the reference carbonate solutions based on the ion-exchange resins varying in the rank. The PFA-300, the A-560, the AB-17x8 highly basic anionites and the ampholytes (S-930, S-922, S-957, ANKB-35) were shown to manifest the best sorption characteristics as to U. One determined the dependences of the static exchange capacity of the PFA-300, the A-560 and the S-922 resins as to the uranium on the carbonate solution pH, as well as the absorbed uranium desorption conditions [ru

  6. Effect of pH and uranium concentration on interaction of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, W.C.; Victor, D.M.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of pH and uranium concentration on the interactions of uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) with organic ligands was studied by employing dialysis and ultrafiltration techniques. The interactions of U(VI) and U(IV) with organic ligands in nitrate or chloride aqueous solution have been found to be pH-dependent. The stability constants of uranium-organic complexes decrease in the order: fulvic acid>humic acid>tannic acid for U(VI) and humic acid>tannic acid>fulvic acid for U(IV). Scatchard plots for the uranium-organic acid systems indicate two types of binding sites with a difference in stability constants of about 10 2 . Ultrafiltration of uranium-humic acid complexes indicates that U(VI) and U(IV) ions are concentrated in larger molecular size fractions (>5.1 nm) at pH less than or equal to 3 and in smaller molecular size fractions (in the range 5.1 to 3.1 nm and 2.4 to 1.9 nm) at pH greater than or equal to 5. 7 figures, 4 tables

  7. Uranium determination by spectrophotometry, in chloride solutions, using titanium (III) as reducer; Determinacao de uranio por espectrofotometria, em solucoes cloridricas, utilizando titanio (III) como redutor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, E T.R.; Bastos, M B.R.

    1986-08-01

    A simple method for determining uranium in uranium (VI) solutions with the presence of uranium (IV), iron (II), and titanium (IV) in chloridic solution is described. The method comprises in uranium (VI) reduction with titanium (III), acidity adjustment and uranium (IV) spectrophotometry in hydrochloric acid 2 M. (C.G.C.).

  8. Effective Uranium (VI) Sorption from Alkaline Solutions Using Bi-Functionalized Silica-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; He, L.; Liu, B.; Tang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas reactor is one of generation IV reactors that can adapt the future energy market, of which the preparation of fuel elements will produce a large amount of radioactive wastewater with uranium and high-level ammonia. Sorption treatment is one of the most important method to recover uranium from wastewater. However, there are few report on uranium sorbent that can directly be applied in wastewater with ammonia. Therefore, the development of a sorbent that can recover uranium in basic environment will greatly decrease the cost of fuel element production and the risk of radioactive pollution. In this work, ammonium-phosphonate-bifunctionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been developed for effective sorption of uranium from alkaline media, which are not only advantaged in the uranium separation from liquid phase, but also with satisfactory adsorption rate, amount and reusability. The as-prepared sorbent is found to show a maximum uranium sorption capacity of 70.7 mg/g and a fast equilibrium time of 2 h at pH 9.5 under room temperature. Compared with the mono-functionalized (phosphonate alone and ammonium alone) particles, the combination of the bi-functionalized groups gives rise to an excellent ability to remove uranium from basic environment. The sorbent can be used as a promising solid phase candidate for highly-efficient removal of uranium from basic solution. (author)

  9. Occurrence forms of uranium in the production solutions in the areas of underground leaching of epigenetic uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serebrennikov, V.S.; Dorofeeva, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Redox, acid-basic features of solutions (Eh changes from + 50 to 650 mV, pH from 7.5 to 1.5) and their chemical composition are studied in the process of hydrogeochemical investigations at the areas of underground leaching (UL) of epigenetic uranium deposits. It is shown that at studied areas of UL under neutral and weakly acidic conditions up to (pH 6.0-5.8), carbonate complexes of uranyl are the prevailing form of uranium existence in the solution, and sulfate complexes prevail under more acidic conditions. A supposition is made that it is expedient to process separate ore blocks with increased carbonate contents, particularly with oxidant additions under near-neutral acid-basic conditions (pH 7.2-6.8) with the use of weakly acid pumping solutions, which act (at the expense of their interaction with carbonates of ore-containing rocks) for enrichment of working solutions with HCO 3 - and CO 3 2- ions, promoting uranium transfer into solution

  10. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  11. Luminescence properties of tetravalent uranium in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirishima, A.; Kimura, T.; Nagaishi, R.; Tochiyama, O.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence spectra of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were observed in the UV-VIS region at ambient and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The excitation spectrum indicates that the luminescence is arising from the deexcitation of a 5f electron at the 1 S 0 level and no other emissions of U 4+ in aqueous solutions were detected for other f-f transitions. All the luminescence peaks were assigned to the transitions from 1 S 0 to lower 5f levels. To estimate the luminescence lifetime, luminescence decay curves were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. At room temperature, the decay curve indicated that the lifetime was shorter than 20 ns. On the other hand, the frozen sample of U 4+ in aqueous solution at liquid nitrogen temperature showed the same emission spectrum as at room temperature and its lifetime was 149 ns in H 2 O system and 198 ns in D 2 O system. The longer lifetime at liquid nitrogen temperature made it possible to measure the spectrum of U 4+ at the concentration as low as 10 -6 M. The difference in the anion species (ClO 4 - , Cl - , SO 4 2- ) affected the structure of the emission spectrum to some extent. (orig.)

  12. Reaction of hydrogen peroxide with uranium zirconium oxide solid solution - Zirconium hinders oxidative uranium dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yuta; Takano, Masahide; Watanabe, Masayuki

    2017-12-01

    We studied oxidative dissolution of uranium and zirconium oxide [(U,Zr)O2] in aqueous H2O2 solution to estimate (U,Zr)O2 stability to interfacial reactions with H2O2. Studies on the interfacial reactions are essential for anticipating how a (U,Zr)O2-based molten fuel may chemically degrade after a severe accident. The fuel's high radioactivity induces water radiolysis and continuous H2O2 generation. Subsequent reaction of the fuel with H2O2 may oxidize the fuel surface and facilitate U dissolution. We conducted our experiments with (U,Zr)O2 powder (comprising Zr:U mole ratios of 25:75, 40:60, and 50:50) and quantitated the H2O2 reaction via dissolved U and H2O2 concentrations. Although (U,Zr)O2 reacted more quickly than UO2, the dissolution yield relative to H2O2 consumption was far less for (U,Zr)O2 compared to that of UO2. The reaction kinetics indicates that most of the H2O2 catalytically decomposed to O2 at the surface of (U,Zr)O2. We confirmed the H2O2 catalytic decomposition via O2 production (quantitative stoichiometric agreement). In addition, post-reaction Raman scattering spectra of the undissolved (U,Zr)O2 showed no additional peaks (indicating a lack of secondary phase formation). The (U,Zr)O2 matrix is much more stable than UO2 against H2O2-induced oxidative dissolution. Our findings will improve understanding on the molten fuels and provide an insight into decommissioning activities after a severe accident.

  13. Investigation into sorption of uranium fron its high-concentrated nitric acid solutions on resin AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savel'eva, V.I.; Sudarikov, B.N.; Kireeva, G.N.; Ryzhkova, V.N.; Kandaryuk, V.V.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of uranium has been studied on strongly basic anion-exchange resin from nitric acid solutions with concentration in metal 10-150 g/l in presence of sodium, calcium, and aluminium nitrates. Sorption of uranium from solutions has been performed by the static method with the aid of contacting the initial solution with airdry resin for 4 hours, resin to solution ratio being 1:12.5. It has been established that sorption of uranium increases with a rise in concentration of salting out agents in the following order: Al(NO 3 ) 3 > Ca(NO 3 ) 2 > Na(NO 3 ). It has been shown spectrophotometricatly that in solutions of nitrates and HNO 3 with a concentration 3 exceeds 6 mol/l

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  15. The separation of uranium ions by natural and modified diatomite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprynskyy, Myroslav, E-mail: sprynsky@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 7 Gagarina Str., 87-100 Torun (Poland); Kovalchuk, Iryna [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 7 Gagarina Str., 87-100 Torun (Poland); Institute of Adsorption and Problem of Endoecology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 13 General Naumov Str., 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Buszewski, Boguslaw [Department of Environmental Chemistry and Bioanalytics, Faculty of Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University, 7 Gagarina Str., 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    In this work the natural and the surfactant modified diatomite has been tested for ability to remove uranium ions from aqueous solutions. Such controlling factors of the adsorption process as initial uranium concentration, pH, contact time and ionic strength have been investigated. Effect of ionic strength of solution has been examined using the solutions of NaCl, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The pseudo-first order and the pseudo-second order models have been used to analyze the adsorption kinetic results, whereas the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms have been used to the equilibrium adsorption data. The effects of the adsorbent modification as well as uranium adsorption on the diatomite surface have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The maximum adsorption capacities of the natural and the modified diatomite towards uranium were 25.63 {mu}mol/g and 667.40 {mu}mol/g, respectively. The desorptive solutions of HCl, NaOH, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, CaCO{sub 3}, humic acid, cool and hot water have been tested to recover uranium from the adsorbent. The highest values of uranium desorption (86%) have been reached using 0.1 M HCl.

  16. The separation of uranium ions by natural and modified diatomite from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprynskyy, Myroslav; Kovalchuk, Iryna; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2010-09-15

    In this work the natural and the surfactant modified diatomite has been tested for ability to remove uranium ions from aqueous solutions. Such controlling factors of the adsorption process as initial uranium concentration, pH, contact time and ionic strength have been investigated. Effect of ionic strength of solution has been examined using the solutions of NaCl, Na(2)CO(3) and K(2)SO(4). The pseudo-first order and the pseudo-second order models have been used to analyze the adsorption kinetic results, whereas the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherms have been used to the equilibrium adsorption data. The effects of the adsorbent modification as well as uranium adsorption on the diatomite surface have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The maximum adsorption capacities of the natural and the modified diatomite towards uranium were 25.63 micromol/g and 667.40 micromol/g, respectively. The desorptive solutions of HCl, NaOH, Na(2)CO(3), K(2)SO(4), CaCO(3), humic acid, cool and hot water have been tested to recover uranium from the adsorbent. The highest values of uranium desorption (86%) have been reached using 0.1M HCl. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. recovery of enriched uranium from waste solution obtained from fuel fabrication laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, S.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    reversed-phase partition chromatography is shown to be a convenient and applicable method for the quantitative recovery of uranium (19.7% enriched with 235 U) from highly impure solution . the processing of uranium compounds for atomic energy project especially in FMPP(Egyptian fuel manufacture pilot plant) gives rise to a variety of wastes in which the uranium content is of considerable importance. the recovery of uranium from concentrated mother liquors produced from ADU (ammonium diuranate ) precipitation, as well as those due to ADU washing is studied in this work. column of poly-trifluoro-monochloro-ethilene (Kel-F) supporting tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) retains uranium .impurities are eluted with 6.5 M HCl, and the uranium is eluted with water and the recovery of uranium is better than 94%. A mathematical model was suggested to stimulate the sorption process of uranium ions (or any other ion ) by column of solvent impregnated resin containing organic extractant (the same as the previous column) . An excellent agreement was founded between the experimental results and the mathematical model

  18. Corrosion behavior of 321 stainless steel in low-acidity uranium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Junsheng; Sun Ying; Zhang Wanglin; Ding Ping; Yang Jiangrong; Wu Lunqiang

    2003-01-01

    Weighing and electrochemical methods have been used to investigate the high-temperature uniform corrosion and electrochemical corrosion behavior of lCr18Ni9Ti (321) stainless steel in uranium nitrate solution at different concentrations and pH values. The uniform corrosion results showed that the corrosion rate of 321 stainless steel was less than 0.04 g/m 2 .h, and the visible change of surface smoothness was not observed through 960 h. It was perfect corrosion-resisting in obtained conditions. The electro-chemical corrosion behavior study has been performed to investigate 321 stainless steel in uranium nitrate solutions of the dissolved and saturated oxygen. The corrosion potential and corrosion current density were obtained. Auger photoelectron spectroscopy for measurement of uranium in specimen was used to indicate that uranium is in corrosion product. The corrosion film was measured by Ar ion gun sputter, and the thickness is 10-15 nm. (authors)

  19. Spectrophotometric determination of uranium and plutonium in nitric acid solutions at their co-presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levakov, B.I.; Mishenev, V.B.; Nezgovorov, N.Yu.; Ryazanova, G.K.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The method of spectrophotometric determination of uranium (6) and plutonium (4) in nitric acid solutions is described. Uranium is determined by light absorption of the complex with arsenazo 3 in 0.05 mol/l nitric acid at λ=654 nm, plutonium - by light absorption of the complex with xylenol orange in 0.1 mol/l nitric acid at λ=540 nm. To disguise plutonium, tetravalent and certain trivalent elements DTPA is introduced into photometered solution for uranium determination. The relative root-mean square deviation of determination results does not exceed 0.03 in uranium concenration ranges 0.5-5 μg/ml, of plutonium -1-3 μg/ml

  20. Determination of uranium in aqueous solutions by HPLC post column UV/VIS detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, W.A.; Street, M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of uranium in different nitric acid concentration solutions is interest in nuclear industry where it is present in various process and waste streams. A method for the determination of uranium(VI) in nitric acid solution in described using ion chromatography and post-column derivatization with 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol (PAR). The method does not require any sample treatment for acid removal or neutralization and can be used for routine laboratory analysis. The effluent used was ammonium sulphate / sulphuric acid and PAR was present in ammonium hydroxide/acetic acid buffer. The column effluents is reacted with PAR in a reaction coil and U(VI)-PAR complex is detector at 528 nm. The lowest uranium concentration detected was 100 ppb (0.1 mg/sup -1/) and linearity of up to 8 mgl -1 concentration was verified. The standard deviation in reproducibility at uranium concentration of 0.1 mgl/sup -1/ was 0.82%. (author)

  1. Removal of Uranium from Aqueous Solutions using Ammonium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    content was determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Specroscopy (ICP-OES). The removal of uranium ... systems and may influence the surface properties of such adsorbents. .... The high silica content of the natural zeolite makes it more ..... average drop of 24.94 %) due to competition for binding sites.

  2. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, V.H.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1983-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H + liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO 3 ) 4 solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor) [pt

  3. Optimization of the recycling process of precipitation barren solution in a uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Qing; Yu Suqin; Zhao Wucheng; Han Wei; Zhang Hui; Chen Shuangxi

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline leaching process was adopted to recover uranium from ores in a uranium mine, and high concentration uranium solution, which would be later used in precipitation, was obtained after ion-exchange and elution steps. The eluting agent consisted of NaCl and NaHCO 3 . Though precipitation barren solution contained as high as 80 g/L Na 2 CO 3 , it still can not be recycled due to presence of high Cl - concentration So, both elution and precipitation processes were optimized in order to control the Cl - concentration in the precipitation barren solution to the recyclable concentration range. Because the precipitation barren solution can be recycled by optimization, the agent consumption was lowered and the discharge of waste water was reduced. (authors)

  4. Potentiometric determination of uranium in simulated Purex Process solutions by acidiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, V H; Matsuda, H T; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de

    1984-01-01

    A potentiometric methods for sequential free acidity and uranium determination in simulated Purex Process solutions is described. An oxalate solution or a mixture of fluoride-oxalate pellets were used as complexing agent for free titration. Following this first equivalent point, uranium is determined-by indirect titration of H/sup +/ liberated in the peruanate reaction. Some elements present in the standard fuel elements with a burn-up of 33.000 Mwd/t, neutron flux of 3,2 x 10/sup 13/n.cm/sup -2/.s/sup -1/ and cooling time of two years were considered as interfering elements in uranium analyses. As a substitute of Pu-IV, Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ solution was used. The method can be applied to aqueous and organic (TBP/diluent) solutions with 2% precision and 2% accuracy. (Autor).

  5. Study on the utilization of a sodium-sulfuric acid solution for the uranium minerals' leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echenique, Patricia; Fruchtenicht, Fernando; Gil, Daniel; Vigo, Daniel; Bouza, Angel; Vert, Gabriela; Becquart, Elena

    1988-01-01

    Argentine uranium minerals have been leached at bench scale with a different agent trying to reduce sulfuric acid consumption. The leaching agent was a sodium sulfate-sulfuric acid solution and the ore was from Sierra Pintada (San Rafael - Mendoza). The work was performed in stirred vessel at atmospheric pressure. The influence of different variables, pH, temperature, oxidant agent, sodium sulfate concentration and time, in the sulfuric acid consumption and the uranium yield was studied. (Author) [es

  6. Extraction of uranium from aqueous solution by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katragadda, S.; Gesser, H.D.; Chow, A.

    1997-01-01

    Phenylphosphonic acid was imbedded into the matrix of the polyurethane foam during the fabrication process of the polymer. The extraction of uranium by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam and blank polyurethane (i.e., foam without phosphonic acid functional groups) was investigated. Phosphonic acid-imbedded foam showed superior extractability of uranium from solutions with pH = 7.0 ± 1.5 over a wide range of temperatures. (author)

  7. Quantitative determination of uranium in organic solution by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyt, D.V. de; Colangelo, C.H.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray fluorescent method for the determination of uranium in tributilphosphate-kerosene-nitriacid solution has been developed. Chemical properties of the matrix elements were studied in order to select a convenient procedure to determine samples and standards on the same way. The method avoids the destruction of the organic material and has proved to be very useful for the fast control of uranium concentration. (Author) [es

  8. Preparation of uranium standard solutions for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.M.; Cate, J.L.; Pickles, W.L.

    1978-03-01

    A method has been developed for gravimetrically preparing uranium nitrate standards with an estimated mean error of 0.1% (1 sigma) and a maximum error of 0.2% (1 sigma) for the total uranium weight. Two source materials, depleted uranium dioxide powder and NBS Standard Reference Material 960 uranium metal, were used to prepare stock solutions. The NBS metal proved to be superior because of the small but inherent uncertainty in the stoichiometry of the uranium oxide. These solutions were used to prepare standards in a freeze-dried configuration suitable for x-ray fluorescence analysis. Both gravimetric and freeze-drying techniques are presented. Volumetric preparation was found to be unsatisfactory for 0.1% precision for the sample size of interest. One of the primary considerations in preparing uranium standards for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the development of a technique for dispensing a 50-μl aliquot of a standard solution with a precision of 0.1% and an accuracy of 0.1%. The method developed corrects for variation in aliquoting and for evaporation loss during weighing. Two sets, each containing 50 standards have been produced. One set has been retained by LLL and one set retained by the Savannah River project

  9. EFFECT OF CURRENT, TIME, FEED AND CATHODE TYPE ON ELECTROPLATING PROCESS OF URANIUM SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Sigit

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   EFFECT OF CURRENT, TIME, FEED AND CATHODE TYPE ON ELECTROPLATING PROCESS OF URANIUM SOLUTION. Electroplating process of uranyl nitrate and effluent process has been carried out in order to collect uranium contained therein using electrode Pt / Pt and Pt / SS at various currents and times. Material used for electrode were Pt (platinum and SS (Stainlees Steel. Feed solution of 250 mL was entered into a beaker glass equipped with Pt anode - Pt cathode or Pt anode - SS cathode, then fogged direct current from DC power supply with specific current and time so that precipitation of uranium sticking to the cathode. After the processes completed, the cathode was removed and weighed to determine weight of precipitates, while the solution was analyzed to determine the uranium concentration decreasing after and before electroplating process. The experiments showed that a relatively good time to acquire uranium deposits at the cathode was 1 hour by current 7 ampere, uranyl nitrate as feed, and Pt (platinum as cathode. In these conditions, uranium deposits attached to the cathode amounted to 74.96% of the original weight of uranium oxide in the feed or 206.5 mg weight. The use of Pt cathode for  uranyl nitrate, SS and Pt cathode for effluent process feed gave uranium specific weight at the cathode of 12.99 mg/cm2, 2.4 mg/cm2 and 5.37 mg/cm2 respectively for current 7 ampere and electroplating time 1 hour. Keywords: Electroplating, uranyl nitrate, effluent process, Pt/Pt electrode, Pt/SS electrode

  10. Model investigations for trace analysis of iodine, uranium, and technetium in saturated sodium chloride leaching solutions of stored radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegle, U.

    1989-02-01

    This paper describes the development of a time and cost saving chromatographic technique, which allows the matrix to be separated and the most important species to be analyzed in a leaching solution of vitrified radioactive waste. Uranium, iodine, and technetium were chosen for the model technique to be elaborated. In a first step, iodide and pertechnetate were separated from the matrix by the strongly basic AG 1X 8 anion exchange resin and then separated from each other by selective elution. The uranyl ions eluted with the sodium chloride matrix were separated from the excess of sodium chloride in a second step, again by adsorption to the strongly basic resin. The ion-selective electrode was found to be a suitable tool for iodide analysis. Pertechnetate was analysed by means of liquid scintillation. Uranium was determined by ICP-AES. (orig./RB) [de

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  12. Solution (in situ leach) mining of uranium: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhaida, A.J. Jr.; Kelly, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Increases in the demand for and price of uranium have made in-situ mining an attractive alternative to the open-pit and underground U mining methods. Up to 50% of the known ore-bearing sandstone in the western U.S. can be mined using the in-situ mining method. In-situ mining also offers a significant environmental advantage. Restoration of the contaminated groundwater is discussed

  13. Study on uranium adsorption ability of tannix resin from solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Thi Kim Dung; Le Quang Thai; Nguyen Lanh; Le Ngoc Thuy

    2004-01-01

    During past years, generated liquid waste from uranium ore processing has been treated by co-precipitation method in ITRRE. In this liquid waste treatment process, mixing liquid waste and lime, decantation, filtration of precipitate were implemented. The treated fluid has underlimited toxic concentration and ensures for moving into environment. Residue was dried and packed into drums as low level radioactive waste. Next to the advantages of this method such as simplest technology, cheapest cost, easy operation. Some amount of secondary radioactive waste as noncombustible materials must be stored with complicated technologies a highly cost. We have been researching a new liquid waste treatment system replaceable precipitation system. In the new process, insoluble tannin is utilized as adsorbent of uranium liquid waste. Advantage of insoluble tannin is expected to be possible to reduce its volume incineration as well as its adsorption ability. Those are the reasons why tannix resin is used this research subject. In this subject, we have studied adsorption capacity of uranium in Tannix, relation of adsorption rate and pH, the change of adsorption ability of column system, the pyrolysis curve of dried Tannix (author)

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  16. Plans and equipment for criticality measurements on plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.; Durst, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Data from critical experiments are required on the criticality of plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions to accurately establish criticality control limits for use in processing and handling of breeder type fuels. Since the fuel must be processed both safely and economically, it is necessary that criticality considerations be based on accurate experimental data. Previous experiments have been reported on plutonium-uranium solutions with Pu weight ratios extending up to some 38 wt %. No data have been presented, however, for plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions beyond this Pu weight ratio. The current research emphasis is on the procurement of criticality data for plutonium-uranium mixtures up to 60 wt % Pu that will serve as the basis for handling criticality problems subsequently encountered in the development of technology for the breeder community. Such data also will provide necessary benchmarks for data testing and analysis on integral criticality experiments for verification of the analytical techniques used in support of criticality control. Experiments are currently being performed with plutonium-uranium nitrate solutions in stainless steel cylindrical vessels and an expandable slab tank system. A schematic of the experimental systems is presented

  17. Determination of the uranium concentration in soil solutions by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, G.P.

    1980-02-01

    The fission tracks registration technique was used to determine the uranium concentration in soil solutions. The Makrofol KG, a synthetic plastic manufactured by Bayer, was used as a detector and the wet method was applied. From the calibration curves obtained, it was possible to determine uranium concentrations in soil solutions, from 90 to 320 μg U/l, with an error between 9.4% and 4.0%, respectively. The method was applied to a few soil samples from Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais in Brazil. The uranium concentrations in the sample and residues were also determined by other methods to compare the results obtained; only one sample showed deviation from the results obtained by the fission tracks method. And this discrepancy was explained in a reasonable way. It was shown that the fission tracks technique can be used with sucess for application in soil solutions. (Author) [pt

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  20. Chemical aspects of the precise and accurate determination of uranium and plutonium from nuclear fuel solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinonen, O.J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous or separate determination of uranium and plutonium has been developed. The method is based on the sorption of uranium and plutonium as their chloro complexes on Dowex 1x10 column. When separate uranium and plutonium fractions are desired, plutonium ions are reduced to Pu (III) and eluted, after which the uranium ions are eluted with dilute HCl. Simultaneous stripping of a mass ratio U/Pu approximately 1 fraction for mass spectrometric measurements is achieved by proper choice of eluant HC1 concentration. Special attention was paid to the obtaining of americium free plutonium fractions. The distribution coefficient measurements showed that at 12.5-M HCl at least 30 % of americium ions formed anionic chloro complexes. The chemical aspects of isotopic fractionation in a multiple filament thermal ionization source were also investigated. Samples of uranium were loaded as nitrates, chlorides, and sulphates and the dependence of the measured uranium isotopic ratios on the chemical form of the loading solution as well as on the filament material was studied. Likewise the dependence of the formation of uranium and its oxide ions on various chemical and instrumental conditions was investigated using tungsten and rhenium filaments. Systematic errors arising from the chemical conditions are compared with errors arising from the automatic evaluation of of spectra. (author)

  1. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  2. Study of uranium (VI) in carbonate solution by potentiometric titrations and ion-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, A.

    1968-04-01

    The present work is devoted to the fixation of uranium (VI) on the conventional anion-exchange resin Dowex 2 X 8 in carbonate and hydrogen-carbonate media. Both media were successfully used for the recuperation of uranium (VI) from very dilute solutions. Equilibrium constant of the exchange [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4+ ] S + 2 [CO 3 2- ] R ↔ [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- ] R + 2[CO 3 2- ] S is determined for carbonate concentration range 0.1 M to 0.6 M from partition curves. A markedly increase in the relative fixation of uranium results with: - increasing free carbonate concentration of the solution, - decreasing uranium concentration. A study in the same conditions of the fixation of molybdenum has made it possible to separate the latter from uranium by elution, the carbonate concentration being molar. It is suggested a possibility of separation on a larger scale, based upon molybdenum displacement by uranium in hydrogen-carbonate medium. (author) [fr

  3. Uranium removal from acidic aqueous solutions by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarri, S.; Misaelides, P.; Papanikolaou, M.; Zamboulis, D.

    2009-01-01

    The sorption of uranium from acidic aqueous solutions (pH 4.5, C init = 10 to 1000 mg U/L) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa was investigated using a batch technique. The U-sorption onto Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Debaryomyces hansenii followed a Langmuir, while that onto Kluyveromyces marxianus and Candida colliculosa a Freundlich isotherm. The results demonstrated that all investigated biomasses could effectively remove uranium from acidic aqueous solutions. From all sorbents, Saccharomyces cerevisiae appeared to be the most effective with a maximum sorption capacity of 127.7 mg U/g dry biomass. (author)

  4. Obtaining uranium and/or vanadium values from solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojkovic, M

    1982-04-22

    A process for the recovery of at least one of uranium and vanadium from an aqueous liquor is claimed. It comprises: (a) treating the liquor with a low molecular weight completely water-miscible solvent selected from the group consisting of methanol, iso-propyl alcohol or acetone to form at least two phases; (b) separating the phases; (c) recovering the solvent from the first phase as the azeotropic solvent/water mixture by simple, non-fractional distillation and recycling the mixture to step (a); and (d) recovering metal values from a second one of the phases.

  5. Calibration of X-ray densitometers for the determination of uranium and plutonium concentrations in reprocessing input and product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottmar, H.; Eberle, H.; Michel-Piper, I.; Kuhn, E.; Johnson, E.

    1985-11-01

    In June 1985 a calibration exercise has been carried out, which included the calibration of the KfK K-Edge Densitometer for uranium assay in the uranium product solutions from reprocessing, and the calibration of the Hybrid K-Edge/K-XRF Instrument for the determination of total uranium and plutonium in reprocessing input solutions. The calibration measuremnts performed with the two X-ray densitometers are described and analyzed, and calibration constants are evaluated from the obtained results. (orig.)

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  7. Separation of uranium, molibdenum and vanadium in sulphuric solutions by extraction with alamine 336

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floh, B.

    1976-01-01

    Alamine 336 - varsol - sulphuric acid-water system used for uranium, molibdenum and vanadium extraction, from sulphuric leaching and an appropriate plan for fractioning those elements are investigated. The behavior of cited elements in pure solutions followed by interaction that occurs in both bynary and tertiary systems are studied. Distribution coefficient is regarded for measuring such effects [pt

  8. Decontamination and decommissioning of laboratory solutions enriched uranium (IR-01 b)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Arocas, P. P.; Sama Colao, J.; Garcia Diaz, A.; Torre Rodriguez, J.; Martinez, A.; Argiles, E.; Garrido Delgado, C.

    2010-01-01

    Completed actions decontamination and decommissioning of the Laboratory of Enriched Uranium Solutions, attached to the Radioactivity lR-0l CIEMAT, was carried out final radiological control of the laboratory. From the documentation generated proceeded to request modification of the IR-01 installation by closing its laboratory IR-01 b.

  9. Uranium solution mining cost estimating technique: means for rapid comparative analysis of deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Twelve graphs provide a technique for determining relative cost ranges for uranium solution mining projects. The use of the technique can provide a consistent framework for rapid comparative analysis of various properties of mining situations. The technique is also useful to determine the sensitivities of cost figures to incremental changes in mining factors or deposit characteristics

  10. Interpretation of criticality experiments on homogeneous solutions of plutonium and uranium; Interpretation des experiences de criticite sur des solutions homogenes de plutonium et d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ithurralde, M F; Kremser, J; Leclerc, J; Lombard, Ch; Moreau, J; Robin, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Criticality experiments on solutions of fissionable materials have been carried out in tanks of various geometries (cylinder, isolated annular cylinder, interacting annular cylinders); the reflexion conditions have also been varied (without reflection, semi-reflection and total reflexion by water). The range of the studied concentrations is rather large (18,8 to 104 gms/liter). The interpretation of these experiments has been undertaken in order to resolve the problems of the industrial use of homogeneous plutonium and uranium solutions. Several methods the fields of application of which are different have been used: diffusion method, transport method and Monte-Carlo method. (authors) [French] Des experiences critiques sur des solutions de matieres fissiles ont ete faites dans des cuves de diverses geometries (cylindre, cylindre annulaire isole, cylindre annulaire en interaction), les conditions de reflexion ont ete egalement variees (sans reflexion, semi reflexion et reflexion totale par l'eau). La gamme des concentrations etudiees est assez etendue (18,8 a 104 g/l ). L'interpretation de ces experiences a ete entreprise dans le but de pouvoir resoudre les problemes poses par l'emploi industriel de solutions homogenes de plutonium et d'uranium, plusieurs methodes dont les domaines d'application sont differents ont ete employees: methode de diffusion, methode de transport, methode de Monte-Carlo. (auteurs)

  11. Thermal expansion studies on uranium-neodymium mixed oxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneerselvam, G.; Venkata Krishnan, R.; Antony, M.P.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium-Neodymium mixed oxides solid solutions (U 1-y Nd y ) O 2 (y=0.2-0.95) were prepared by combustion synthesis using citric acid as fuel. Structural characterization and computation of lattice parameter was carried out from room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. Single-phase fluorite structure was observed up to y=0.80. For solid solutions with y>0.80 additional Nd 2 O 3 lines were visible

  12. Measurement and control in solution mining of copper and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, D.H.; Huff, R.V.; Sonstelie, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    The solution mining of deep-lying mineral deposits requires an integration of oilfield and extractive mineral technology. Although instrumentation is available to measure parameters relating to the oilfield components such as permeability, porosity and flow-logging, only limited services exist for monitoring leaching performance. This paper discusses the history of copper leaching, the need for solution mining development, and solution mining process descriptions. It discusses measurement requirements for deposit evaluation and the injection and production wellfields. It is concluded with a listing of desirable but unavailable instrumentation for further development of this technology

  13. stripping of uranium from DEHPA/TOPO solvent by ammonium carbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorfan, S.; Shino, O.; Wahood, A.; Dahdouh, A.

    2002-01-01

    Uranium is recovered from phosphoric acid by the DEHPA/TOPO process. In this process uranium is stripped from the loaded DEHPA/TOPO solvent in the second cycle by an ammonium carbonate solution. This paper studied stripping of uranium from 0.3 Mol DEHPA/0.075 Mol TOPO in kerosene by different ammonium carbonate solutions. The ammonium carbonate solutions tested were either made locally from ammonia and carbon dioxide gases or commercial and laboratory grades available on the market. A comparison was made between these carbonate solutions in terms of purity, stripping efficiency and phase separation. Both stripping and phase separation were carried out under different conditions of phase ratio and concentrations. The results obtained showed that ammonium carbonate prepared from direct synthesis of ammonia and carbon dioxide gases had a high purity and gave the same stripping yield as the laboratory grade. The phase separation was also slightly improved using a pure synthesized ammonium carbonate solution. the phase separation was found to be best at concentration of 0.5 Mol/L ammonium carbonate solution and at a phase A/O of 1/1 and a temperature of 50 degree centigrade. It was possible to obtain >99% yield by operating 2 stripping stages counter currently under these conditions. (authors)

  14. Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium solutions generated in Atalante by R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrave, H.; Beretti, C.; Bros, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Atalante complex operated by the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (Cea) consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. In order to produce mixed oxide powder containing uranium, plutonium and minor actinides and to deal with increasing flows in the facility, a new shielded line will be built and is expected to be operational by 2012. Its main functions will be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure co-conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. (authors)

  15. Neptunium separation in trace levels from uranium solutions by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotrim, M.B.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1994-01-01

    Neptunium and uranium behavior in extraction chromatograph system, aiming the separation of micro quantities of neptunium from uranyl solutions is described. Tri-n-octylamine (TOA), Tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as stationary phase, alumine, Voltalef UF-300 as support material were verified. The impregnation conditions as well as the best stationary phase/support material ratio were established. TBP/alumine, TBP/Voltalef and TOA/alumine system were selected to uranium and neptunium separation studies. (author) . 12 refs., 03 tabs., 03 figs

  16. Constant current coulometric method for the determination of uranium in active process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitnis, R.T.; Talnikar, S.G.; Paranjape, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of uranium in the range of 2.5-5 mg by constant current coulometry is described. The procedure is based on the modified version of the DAVIES - GRAY method, wherein uranium, after the reduction step, is oxidized by adding a known amount of potassium dichromate, and the excess of dichromate is determined by titration with Fe 2+ solution. Fe 2+ ions needed for the titration are generated in situ with 100% current efficiency by electrolytic reduction of Fe 3+ . The method is found to be accurate with a coefficient of variation better than 0.2%. (author)

  17. Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium solutions generated in Atalante by R and D activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrave, H.; Beretti, C.; Bros, P. [CEA Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Atalante complex operated by the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (Cea) consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. In order to produce mixed oxide powder containing uranium, plutonium and minor actinides and to deal with increasing flows in the facility, a new shielded line will be built and is expected to be operational by 2012. Its main functions will be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure co-conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. (authors)

  18. Electrochemical preparation of uranium and plutonium measuring probes for alpha spectroscopy from organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, W.; Beutmann, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method for preparation of uranium and plutonium measuring probes for α-spectrometry is described. The method is based on electrodeposition from isopropanol and especially from ethanol and methanol solution. It was shown that a definite additions of a little amount of water lead to an increase of the deposition rate. It is possible to reach a 100% deposition in ethanol after an electrolysis time of 3 minutes for uranium and 30 minutes for plutonium with voltages of 150-200 V. (author)

  19. Methods of Uranium Determination in solutions of Tributyl Phosphate and Kerosene; Metodos de determinacion de uranio en soluciones de fosfato de tributilo y queroseno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrement Eguiluz, J; Palomares Delgado, F

    1962-07-01

    A new analytical method for the determination of uranium in organic solutions of tributyl phosphate and kerosene is proposed. In this method the uranium is reectracted from the aqueous phase by reduction with cadmium in acid solution. The uranium can be determined in this solution by the usual methods. In case of very diluted solutions, a direct spectrophtometrical determination of uranium in the organic phase with dibenzoylmethane is proposed. (Author) 21 refs.

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  1. Determination of humic acid in alkali leaching solution of uranium by spectophotrometry-COD method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yu; An Wei; Chen Shusen

    2014-01-01

    It is one of the main causes of extraction emulsification or resin toxicosis during alkali leaching process in uranium metallurgy which organic matters including humic acid exist in lixiviums. In order to study the effect of humic acid in uranium metallurgy, a method for determination of content of humic acid in aqueous solution need to be established. Spectrophotometry is a simple and convenient method in humic acid analysis. However, accuracy of spectrophotometry can be reduced greatly because of interference of uranium and other elements in the humic acid solutions. Although chemical oxygen demand (COD) method is a common analysis way of organic matters in aqueous solutions, the concentration of humic acid cannot be directly measured. In this paper, COD method is related with spectrophotometry to avoid the interference of uranium and ensure the accurate analysis of humic acid. The results showed that the detection limit of the method was 1.78 mg/L and the recovery rate was 101.2%. (authors)

  2. Removal of Uranium from Aqueous Solution by Alginate Beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of uranium (VI by calcium alginate beads was examined by batch experiments. The effects of environmental conditions on U (VI adsorption were studied, including contact time, pH, initial concentration of U (VI, and temperature. The alginate beads were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that hydroxyl and alkoxy groups are present at the surface of the beads. The experimental results showed that the adsorption of U (VI by alginate beads was strongly dependent on pH, the adsorption increased at pH 3∼7, then decreased at pH 7∼9. The adsorption reached equilibrium within 2 minutes. The adsorption kinetics of U (VI onto alginate beads can be described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Redlich-Peterson model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 237.15 mg/g. The sorption process is spontaneous and has an exothermic reaction.

  3. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by aliginate beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jing; Wang, Jian Long [Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology, INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Jiang, Yizhou [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xian (China)

    2017-04-15

    The adsorption of uranium (VI) by calcium alginate beads was examined by batch experiments. The effects of environmental conditions on U (VI) adsorption were studied, including contact time, pH, initial concentration of U (VI), and temperature. The alginate beads were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicated that hydroxyl and alkoxy groups are present at the surface of the beads. The experimental results showed that the adsorption of U (VI) by alginate beads was strongly dependent on pH, the adsorption increased at pH 3∼7, then decreased at pH 7∼9. The adsorption reached equilibrium within 2 minutes. The adsorption kinetics of U (VI) onto alginate beads can be described by a pseudo first-order kinetic model. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the Redlich-Peterson model, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 237.15 mg/g. The sorption process is spontaneous and has an exothermic reaction.

  4. Predictive geochemical modeling of uranium and other contaminants in laboratory columns in relatively oxidizing, carbonate-rich solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longmire, P.; Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.

    1994-01-01

    Carbonate heap leaching of uranium-contaminated soils and sediments represents a viable, cost-effective remediation technology. Column experiments have been conducted using 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 M Na 2 CO 3 /NaHCO 3 solutions for leaching uranium from soils located adjacent to an incinerator at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Results from column experiments and geochemical modeling are used to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of heap leaching. Leach efficiencies of up to 72 wt.% of total uranium in CaO-agglomerated soil result from dissolution of uranium (U(VI)-dominated) minerals, formation of the soluble complex UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- , and uranium desorption from clay minerals, ferric hydroxides, and humic acids. Parameters that control the extent of uranium extraction include pH, Eh, temperature, carbonate concentration, lixiviant-flow rate, pore-solution chemistry, solid phases, and soil texture

  5. XPS characterization of the anodic oxide film formed on uranium metal in sodium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiaoguo; Wang Xiaolin; Guo Huanjun; Wang Qingfu; Zhao Zhengping; Zhong Yongqiang

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to examine the anodic oxide film formed on uranium metal in 0.8 mol/L NaOH solution. The U4f 7/2 fitting spectra suggests that the anodic oxide film is composed of uranium trioxide and a small amount of UO 2+x . Under UHV condition, the U4f peak shifts to the lower binding energy, while a gradual increase in the intensity of U5f peak and the broad of U4f peak are also observed. All of these changes are due to reduction of uranium trioxide in the anodic oxide film. XPS quantitative analysis confirms the occurrence of reduction reaction

  6. Solubility Limits of Dibutyl Phosphoric Acid in Uranium Solutions at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, M.C.; Pierce, R.A.; Ray, R.J.

    1998-06-01

    The Savannah River Site has enriched uranium (EU) solution which has been stored for almost 10 years since being purified in the second uranium cycle of the H area solvent extraction process. The concentrations in solution are 6 g/L U and about 0.1 M nitric acid. Residual tributylphosphate in the solutions has slowly hydrolyzed to form dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP) at concentrations averaging 50 mg/L. Uranium is known to form compounds with DBP which have limited solubility. The potential to form uranium-DBP solids raises a nuclear criticality safety issue. SRTC tests have shown that U-DBP solids will precipitate at concentrations potentially attainable during storage of enriched uranium solutions. Evaporation of the existing EUS solution without additional acidification could result in the precipitation of U-DBP solids if DBP concentration in the resulting solution exceeds 110 ppm at ambient temperature. The same potential exists for evaporation of unwashed 1CU solutions. The most important variables of interest for present plant operations are HNO 3 and DBP concentrations. Temperature is also an important variable controlling precipitation. The data obtained in these tests can be used to set operating and safety limits for the plant. It is recommended that the data for 0 degrees C with 0.5 M HNO 3 be used for setting the limits. The limit would be 80 mg/L which is 3 standard deviations below the average of 86 observed in the tests. The data shows that super-saturation can occur when the DBP concentration is as much as 50 percent above the solubility limit. However, super-saturation cannot be relied on for maintaining nuclear criticality safety. The analytical method for determining DBP concentration in U solutions was improved so that analyses for a solution are accurate to within 10 percent. However, the overall uncertainty of results for periodic samples of the existing EUS solutions was only reduced slightly. Thus, sampling appears to be the largest portion

  7. Applications of Qualitative Microanalysis to the Determination of Secondary Species Associated with Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrinier, H.

    1959-02-01

    Microanalytical techniques are described which allow rapid determinations of secondary species associated with uranium. They consist in exposing the constituent elements of the ores by means of characteristic microchemical reactions. Because of their rapidity and the small amount of apparatus needed, these techniques can be used either in the field or in the laboratory. (author) [fr

  8. Potentiality of uranium biosorption from nitric acid solutions using shrimp shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.H.; El Sheikh, E.M.; Morsy, A.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Biosorption has gained important credibility during recent years because of its good performance and low cost. This work is concerned with studying the potentiality of the chitin component of the shrimp shells for uranium biosorption from nitric acid liquid solutions. The structural characteristics of the working chitin have been determined via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity of biomass was investigated experimentally. The influence of contact time, pH, metal ion concentration, solution volume to mass ratio and temperature were evaluated and the results were fitted using adsorption isotherm models. The kinetic of uranium biosorption was also investigated as well as biosorption thermodynamic. - Graphical abstract: Physicochemical process of biosorption is known to be promising technique due to the ease of operation and comparable low cost of biosorbant application. Chitin flakes extracted from shrimp shells show potentiality in uranium adsorption reached 7.48 mg uranium at the following conditions: 60 min contact time, pH 3.66, 50:1 V/m ration and at room temperature. The theoretical sorption capacity was 25.31 mg g −1 , according to Langmuir isotherm model. The rate of sorption follows pseudo second-order. The nature of biosorption process is spontaneous and exothermic. - Highlights: • This study shows the potentially for shrimp shell beads for uranium adsorption. • The max. biosorption was achieved at pH 3.6, contact time 60 min, S/L ratio 1:50. • Uranium sorption follows Langmuir isotherm with theoretical capacity of 25.31 g/kg. • The nature of sorption process of the sorbents is spontaneous and exothermic. • The rate of sorption follows pseudo second-order

  9. Determination of trace amounts of uranium in a reprocessing plant by solution spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauchien, P.; Cauchetier, Ph.

    1983-01-01

    To establish inventory tables accurately and satisfy safeguards requirements - and also to ensure satisfactory operation of a reprocessing plant - it is essential to determine the uranium content of numerous solutions where the uranium is present only in trace quantities. For this purpose a method is proposed which relies on the fluorescence of uranyl solutions exposed to ultra-violet radiation. After a brief theoretical summary, the parameters which influence the measurements most strongly are enumerated: medium, temperature, nature of the matrix, and choice of wavelength of the incident radiation. It is then apparent that the measurement must be performed by internal calibration (using the proportional addition method) and that it is useful to obtain a fluorescence spectrum which enables us to verify the presence of uranium. The applications of this method at the La Hague plant are described, where it has been used since October 1981 by shift teams, notably to check the following points: the attack acid (before receiving the fuel), the foot of the first-cycle column, the carbonated solvent washing solution and the solutions of the effluent treatment unit. It is in fact used throughout the plant, even for checking uranium in PuO 2 oxide. The method makes it possible to avoid organic reagents such as pyridine and, in many cases, cumbersome effluent-generating separations. Determinations are possible - to give one example - by simple dilution in the fission-product concentrates and in plutonium solutions where the Pu/U ratio is as great as 1000/1. In pure solutions the detection limit with the equipment used at present is a few μg per litre in the measuring tank. In general, the accuracy is a few per cent. (author)

  10. The immiscible aqueous solutions of alkyl phosphates. Study for the purpose of uranium extraction from phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauborgne, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    Systems of immiscible aqueous solutions composed by a phase rich in mineral salt and by another phase almost totally containing an organic salt, have been studied for years, with quaternary ammonium salts with an organic cation. The objective of this research is to study systems symmetric to the previous ones, i.e. with organic anions such as alkyl phosphates, and then to try to understand mechanisms of extraction of metals in these environments. Based on properties of immiscible aqueous solutions, an original three-phase process of liquid-liquid extraction has been developed, and is used to separate uranium in phosphoric acids with better performance than the existing industrial processes [fr

  11. Evaluation of adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Wagner Clayton; Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Ortiz, Nilce; Fungaro, Denise Alves, E-mail: wcorrea@ipen.br, E-mail: snguilhen@ipen.br, E-mail: notriz@ipen.br, E-mail: dfungaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Uranium is present in the environment as a result of leaching from natural deposits and activities associated with nuclear fuel, copper mining, uranium mining, milling industry, etc. For the purpose of protecting ecosystem stability and public health, it is crucial to eliminate uranium from aqueous solutions before they are discharged into the environment. Various technologies have been used for removing U(VI) ions from aqueous systems. Among these methods, adsorption has been applied in wastewater because of simple operation procedure and high removal efficiency. Brazil is the largest producer of charcoal in the world, with nearly half of the woody biomass harvested for energy in Brazil being transformed into charcoal. Biochar exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent because of favorable physical/chemical surface characteristics. The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption potential of biochar materials prepared from pyrolysis of Bamboo (CBM), Eucalyptus (CEM) and Macauba (CMA) nuts for the removal of uranium from solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out by a batch technique. Equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed by shaking a known amount of biochar material with 100 mL of U(VI) solution in Erlenmeyer flasks in a shaker at 120 rpm and room temperature (25 deg C) for 24 h. The adsorbent was separated by centrifugation from the solution. The U(VI) concentration remaining in the supernatant solution was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH and bioadsorbent dose on adsorption were investigated. The highest uranium adsorption capacity were obtained at pH 3.0 and 16 g/L biomass dosage for CMA, pH 3.0 and 12 g/L biomass dosage for CBM and pH 2.0 and 10 g/L biomass dosage for CEM. The results demonstrated that the biomass derived char can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of uranium from wastewater. (author)

  12. Evaluation of adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Wagner Clayton; Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Ortiz, Nilce; Fungaro, Denise Alves

    2015-01-01

    Uranium is present in the environment as a result of leaching from natural deposits and activities associated with nuclear fuel, copper mining, uranium mining, milling industry, etc. For the purpose of protecting ecosystem stability and public health, it is crucial to eliminate uranium from aqueous solutions before they are discharged into the environment. Various technologies have been used for removing U(VI) ions from aqueous systems. Among these methods, adsorption has been applied in wastewater because of simple operation procedure and high removal efficiency. Brazil is the largest producer of charcoal in the world, with nearly half of the woody biomass harvested for energy in Brazil being transformed into charcoal. Biochar exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent because of favorable physical/chemical surface characteristics. The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption potential of biochar materials prepared from pyrolysis of Bamboo (CBM), Eucalyptus (CEM) and Macauba (CMA) nuts for the removal of uranium from solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out by a batch technique. Equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed by shaking a known amount of biochar material with 100 mL of U(VI) solution in Erlenmeyer flasks in a shaker at 120 rpm and room temperature (25 deg C) for 24 h. The adsorbent was separated by centrifugation from the solution. The U(VI) concentration remaining in the supernatant solution was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH and bioadsorbent dose on adsorption were investigated. The highest uranium adsorption capacity were obtained at pH 3.0 and 16 g/L biomass dosage for CMA, pH 3.0 and 12 g/L biomass dosage for CBM and pH 2.0 and 10 g/L biomass dosage for CEM. The results demonstrated that the biomass derived char can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of uranium from wastewater. (author)

  13. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 2. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with cerium(IV) and ISO 7097-1 uses a titration with potassium dichromate

  14. Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids - Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This first edition of ISO 7097-1 together with ISO 7097-2:2004 cancels and replaces ISO 7097:1983, which has been technically revised, and ISO 9989:1996. ISO 7097 consists of the following parts, under the general title Nuclear fuel technology - Determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids: Part 1: Iron(II) reduction/potassium dichromate oxidation titrimetric method; Part 2: Iron(II) reduction/cerium(IV) oxidation titrimetric method. This part 1. of ISO 7097 describes procedures for the determination of uranium in solutions, uranium hexafluoride and solids. The procedures described in the two independent parts of this International Standard are similar: this part uses a titration with potassium dichromate and ISO 7097-2 uses a titration with cerium(IV)

  15. Critical experiments for large scale enriched uranium solution handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.; Forehand, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have performed 17 critical experiments with a concentrated aqueous uranyl nitrate solution contained in an annular cylindrical tank, with annular cylindrical absorbers of stainless steel and/or polyethylene inside. k/sub eff/ calculated by KENO IV, employing 16-group Hansen-Roach cross sections, average 0.977. There is a variation of the calculational bias among the separate experiments, but it is too small to allow assigning it to specific components of the equipment. They are now performing critical experiments with a more concentrated uranyl nitrate solution in pairs of very squat cylindrical tanks with disc shaped absorbers and reflectors of carbon steel, stainless steel, nitronic-50, plain and borated polyethylene. These experiments are in support of upgrading fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

  16. Extraction of plutonium and uranium from oxalate bearing solutions using phosphonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, A.G.; Mapara, P.M.; Swarup, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on the solvent extraction of plutonium and uranium from solutions containing oxalic and nitric acids using a phosphonic acid extractant (PC88A) was made to explore the possibility of recovering Pu from these solutions. Batch experiments on the extraction of Pu(IV) and U(VI) under different parameters were carried out using PC88A in dodecane. The results indicated that Pu could be extracted quantitatively by PC88A from these solutions. A good separation of Pu from U could be achieved at higher temperatures. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs

  17. Uranium-thorium silicates, with specific reference to the species in the Witwatersrand reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smits, G.

    1987-01-01

    (U,Th)-silicates form two complete series of anhydrous and hydrated species with general formulae (U,Th)SiO 4 and (U,Th)SiO 4 .nH 2 O respectively. The end-members of the anhydrous series are anhydrous coffinite and thorite, and those of the hydrated series, coffinite and thorogummite. Although the silicates are relatively rare in nature, coffinite is a common ore mineral in uranium deposits of the sandstone type. In the Witwatersrand reefs, (U,Th)-silicates are extremely rare in most reefs, except for the Elsburg Reefs on the West Rand Goldfield and the Dominion Reef. In these reefs detrital uraninite has been partly or entirely transformed to (U,Th)-silicates of coffinite composition, but thorite and thorogummite of detrital origin are also found in the Dominion Reef. In leaching tests on polished sections of rock samples containing (U,Th)-silicates, a dilute sulphuric acid solution, to which ferric iron had been added, was used as the lixiviant. It appeared that the dissolution of coffinite is less rapid than that of uraninite and uraniferous leucoxene. However, the reaction of silicates of high thorium content is much slower, and was not completed during the tests

  18. Application of bacterial leaching technology to deep solution-mining conditions for uranium extraction. Final report, September 1, 1978-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brierley, J.A.; Brierley, C.L.; Torma, A.E.

    1982-03-01

    Microorganisms were evaluated for use in recovery of uranium under conditions of in-situ solution mining. The cultures tested were Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the faculative-thermophilic TH3 strain, and two Sulfolobus species. Growth of the organisms occurred in the presence of 0.34 to 5.0 mM uranyl ion with higher concentrations being inhibitory. Uranium ore from the Anaconda Minerals Co. Jackpile mine was not readily leachable by microorganisms. To support bacterial activity the ore was supplemented with pyrite or ferrous iron. The ore possessed some toxic properties. T. ferrooxidans was able to assist in leaching of uranium from the ore at a hydrostatic pressure of 10.3 MPa

  19. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  20. Potentiality of uranium biosorption from nitric acid solutions using shrimp shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S H; El Sheikh, E M; Morsy, A M A

    2014-08-01

    Biosorption has gained important credibility during recent years because of its good performance and low cost. This work is concerned with studying the potentiality of the chitin component of the shrimp shells for uranium biosorption from nitric acid liquid solutions. The structural characteristics of the working chitin have been determined via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The surface morphology was examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity of biomass was investigated experimentally. The influence of contact time, pH, metal ion concentration, solution volume to mass ratio and temperature were evaluated and the results were fitted using adsorption isotherm models. The kinetic of uranium biosorption was also investigated as well as biosorption thermodynamic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Recovery of thorium along with uranium 233 from Thorex waste solution employing Chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priya, S.; Reghuram, D.; Kumaraguru, K.; Vijayan, K.; Jambunathan, U.

    2003-01-01

    The low level waste solution, generated from Thorex process during the processing of U 233 , contains thorium along with traces of Th 228 and U 233 . Chitosan, a natural bio-polymer derived from Chitin, was earlier used to recover the uranium and americium. The studies were extended to find out its thorium sorption characteristics. Chitosan exhibited very good absorption of thorium (350 mg/g). Chitosan was equilibrated directly with the low level waste solution at different pH after adjusting its pH, for 60 minutes with a Chitosan to aqueous ratio of 1:100 and the raffinates were filtered and analysed. The results showed more than 99% of thorium and U 233 could be recovered by Chitosan between pH 4 and 5. Loaded thorium and uranium could be eluted from the Chitosan by 1M HNO 3 quantitatively. (author)

  2. Uranium mobility across annual growth rings in three deciduous tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Kelly C; Widom, Elisabeth; Spitz, Henry B; Wiles, Gregory C; Glover, Sam E

    2018-02-01

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra), slippery elm (Ulmus rubra), and white ash (Fraxinus americana) trees were evaluated as potential archives of past uranium (U) contamination. Like other metals, U mobility in annual growth rings of trees is dependent on the tree species. Uranium concentrations and isotopic compositions (masses 234, 235, 236, and 238) were analyzed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry to test the efficacy of using tree rings to retroactively monitor U pollution from the FFMPC, a U purification facility operating from 1951 to 1989. This study found non-natural U (depleted U and detectable 236 U) in growth rings of all three tree species that pre-dated the start of operations at FFMPC and compositional trends that did not correspond with known contamination events. Therefore, the annual growth rings of these tree species cannot be used to reliably monitor the chronology of U contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment of wastewater for removal of soluble uranium species at Cameco's Port Hope Conversion Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumont, H.; Tairova, G.; Kwong, A.K.; Smith, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Ion exchange (IX) resin processes have been used for many years in the uranium mining industry for the recovery of uranium from both acid and alkaline leach solutions. More recently, IX processes have been shown to be an effective approach to control the uranium levels in non-process waters, such as mine water, public drinking water supply and well water. Bench scale and mini-pilot plant tests were conducted at the Cameco's Port Hope Conversion Facility to demonstrate the economic and technical viability of an IX process as an uranium remediation treatment for trace amounts of uranium in non-process laundry water. In the mini-pilot plant study, waste laundry water containing between 10 mg U/L and 200 mg U/L was treated at a rate ranging from 120 L/h to 240 L/h, using a typical 'merry-go-round' fixed-bed ion exchange system with three ion exchange columns. Each column contained 14 L of strongly basic Purolite A300 resin type II. The results indicated that the breakthrough limit, set at 0.1 mg U/L was obtained after a minimum of 1,200 equivalent bed volumes, while saturation was obtained at 3,300 equivalent bed volumes. Recovery parameters are discussed along with feed and effluent stream quality and modifications to the upstream operation. (author)

  4. Extraction and selective stripping of uranium and molybdenum in sulfate solution using amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sialino, E.; Mignot, C.; Michel, P.; Vial, J.

    1977-01-01

    The uranium solutions issued from leaching of AKOUTA ores and containing lot of molybdenum are purified using solvent extraction. During the first test run precipitation of complexes such as amine phosphomolybdate was observed. It was pointed out that the precipitation could be prevented if the molybdenum is oxidized in the feed prior to solvent extraction. Informations on the basic studies carried out to ensure the reliability of the process are given in the complete paper

  5. Recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions from the South Chuquicamata mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, N.; Soto, R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions containing between 10 and 18 ppm U 3 O 8 . The study, which covers a laboratory stage and a pilot plant stage, has shown the technical feasibility of producing yellow cake with U 3 O 8 contents of between 13 and 20% by direct precipitation of eluates which, when purified in the laboratory, have contained up to some 85% U 3 O 8 . (author)

  6. Non-invasive acoustic-based monitoring of uranium in solution and H/D ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of demonstrating the ability to quantify U or H/D ratios in solution. Furthermore, a successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended uranium mass measurements for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  7. Multisensor system for determination of iron(II), iron(III) and uranium(VI) in complex solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.V.; Seleznev, B.L.; Rudnitskaya, A.M.; Vlasov, Yu.G.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is the development and analytical evaluation of a multisensor system for determination of low content of iron(II), iron(III) and uranium(VI) in complex aqueous media. Sensor array included sensors on the basis of chalcogenide vitreous materials with redox and ionic cross-sensitivities, crystalline silver sulphide electrode, noble metal electrodes Pt, Au, Ag and redox sensor on the basis of oxide glass. Potentiometric measurements have been taken in a conventional electrochemical cell vs. a standard Ag/AgCl reference electrode. All measurements have been taken at room temperature. Calibration solutions contained UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 in concentration range 10 -6 -1,610 -5 mol/L, K 3 Fe(CN) 6 and K 4 Fe(CN) 6 or FeSO 4 (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 and FeCl 3 , with the ratio of Fe(II)/Fe(III) concentration from 100:1 to 1:100, the total concentration of Fe was 10 -4 and 10 -5 mol/L. All solutions have been made on the background electrolyte of calcium and magnesium chlorides and sulphates with the fixed content of 5-27 mmol/L of each component which is a typical one for groundwater or mining water. Sensor potentials have been processed by a back-propagation artificial neural net. Average error of determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) is about 20 %, of uranium(VI) - 40 %. It was found that sensitivity of the sensor array to iron and uranium is irrespective of the chemical form of these species

  8. Experimental critical parameters of enriched uranium solution in annular tank geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    A total of 61 critical configurations are reported for experiments involving various combinations of annular tanks into which enriched uranium solution was pumped. These experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory. The uranyl nitrate solution contained about 370 g of uranium per liter, but this concentration varied a little over the duration of the studies. The uranium was enriched to about 93% [sup 235]U. All tanks were typical of sizes commonly found in nuclear production plants. They were about 2 m tall and ranged in diameter from 0.6 m to 1.5 m. Annular thicknesses and conditions of neutron reflection, moderation, and absorption were such that criticality would be achieved with these dimensions. Only 13 of the entire set of 74 experiments proved to be subcritical when tanks were completely filled with solution. Single tanks of several radial thicknesses were studied as well as small line arrays (1 x 2 and 1 x 3) of annular tanks. Many systems were reflected on four sides and the bottom by concrete, but none were reflected from above. Many experiments also contained materials within and outside the annular regions that contained strong neutron absorbers. One program had such a thick external moderator/absorber combination that no reflector was used at all.

  9. Experimental critical parameters of enriched uranium solution in annular tank geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    A total of 61 critical configurations are reported for experiments involving various combinations of annular tanks into which enriched uranium solution was pumped. These experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant's Critical Mass Laboratory. The uranyl nitrate solution contained about 370 g of uranium per liter, but this concentration varied a little over the duration of the studies. The uranium was enriched to about 93% [sup 235]U. All tanks were typical of sizes commonly found in nuclear production plants. They were about 2 m tall and ranged in diameter from 0.6 m to 1.5 m. Annular thicknesses and conditions of neutron reflection, moderation, and absorption were such that criticality would be achieved with these dimensions. Only 13 of the entire set of 74 experiments proved to be subcritical when tanks were completely filled with solution. Single tanks of several radial thicknesses were studied as well as small line arrays (1 x 2 and 1 x 3) of annular tanks. Many systems were reflected on four sides and the bottom by concrete, but none were reflected from above. Many experiments also contained materials within and outside the annular regions that contained strong neutron absorbers. One program had such a thick external moderator/absorber combination that no reflector was used at all

  10. Global Modeling of Uranium Molecular Species Formation Using Laser-Ablated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreli, Davide; Finko, Mikhail; Azer, Magdi; Armstrong, Mike; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Rose, Timothy; Stavrou, Elissaios; Weisz, David; Zaug, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    Uranium is chemically fractionated from other refractory elements in post-detonation nuclear debris but the mechanism is poorly understood. Fractionation alters the chemistry of the nuclear debris so that it no longer reflects the chemistry of the source weapon. The conditions of a condensing fireball can be simulated by a low-temperature plasma formed by vaporizing a uranium sample via laser heating. We have developed a global plasma kinetic model in order to model the chemical evolution of U/UOx species within an ablated plasma plume. The model allows to track the time evolution of the density and energy of an uranium plasma plume moving through an oxygen atmosphere of given fugacity, as well as other relevant quantities such as average electron and gas temperature. Comparison of model predictions with absorption spectroscopy of uranium-ablated plasmas provide preliminary insights on the key chemical species and evolution pathways involved during the fractionation process. This project was sponsored by the DoD, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Grant HDTRA1-16-1-0020. This work was performed in part under the auspices of the U.S. DoE by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Neptunium separation in trace levels from uranium solutions by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figols, M.E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Neptunium and uranium behavior in extraction chromatography system, aiming the separation of microquantities of neptunium from uranyl nitrate solutions is described. Tri-n-octylamina (TOA), tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP), thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) as stationary phase, alumina, Voltalef-UF-300, silica as support material were verified. The impregnation conditions as well as the best stationary phase/support material ratio were established. TBP/alumina, TBP/Voltalef and TOA/alumina system were selected to uranium and neptunium separation studies. In the system using TBP as extractant agent uranium and neptunium separation was reached by selective elution after the retention of both elements on the column. U-Np separation by selective retention of Np was possible with TOA system. The capacity of the column was the 66.6 mg U/mL and 191.6mg U/mL for the TBP/alumina and TBP/Voltalef systems, respectively. An application of extraction chromatography system in the final phase of irradiated uranium treatment process is proposed. (author)

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  14. The prediction of concentration profiles for a NIMCIX column absorbing uranium from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.S.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure is proposed for the prediction of concentration profiles for a countercurrent ion-exchange absorption column, use being made of equilibrium and kinetic data derived from small-scale batch tests. A comparison is presented between the predictions and the measured performance of a column (2,5 m in diameter) absorbing uranium from solution. The method is shown to be adequate for design purposes provided that the data used are from tests in which the solution and resin conditions approximate those for which the plant is being designed [af

  15. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process

  16. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-02-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  17. Oxidative destruction of ammonia for restoration of uranium solution mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humenick, M.J.; Garwacka, K.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory experimental research project was conducted to evaluate the use of chlorine for the oxidative destruction of residual ammonia that may remain in ground water after in-situ uranium solution mining operations. The work tested the idea of injecting high strength calcium hypochlorite solution into the mining zone to convert ammonia to nitrogen gas as a final cleanup process for ammonia removal from the ground water system. This paper details ammonia removal efficiency as a function of chlorine dose, reactant, and product material balances, and how the concept may be used as a final ground water restoration process.

  18. Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2008-01-01

    Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

  19. Potentiometric titration of uranium reduced by chromic salts in chloridic solutions; Titulacao potenciometrica de uranio reduzido por sais cromosos em solucoes cloridricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho, C M.C.; Bastos, E T.R.

    1986-06-01

    The utilization of chromic salts for reducing the uranium (VI) from chloridic solutions, for potentiometric dosage is described. This method is used in the range of 0,002 to 1,0 M of uranium. (C.G.C.).

  20. Numeric databases on the kinetics of transient species in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helman, W.P.; Hug, G.L.; Carmichael, Ian; Ross, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    A description is given of data compilations on the kinetics of transient species in solution. In particular information is available for the reactions of radicals in aqueous solution and for excited states such as singlet molecular oxygen and those of metal complexes in solution. Methods for compilation and use of the information in computer-readable form are also described. Emphasis is placed on making the database available for online searching. (author)

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  3. Analysis and exploitation of bacterial population from natural uranium-rich soils: selection of a model specie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondani, L.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that soils play a key role in controlling the mobility of toxic metals and this property is greatly influenced by indigenous bacterial communities. This study has been conducted on radioactive and controls soils, collected in natural uraniferous areas (Limousin). A physico-chemical and mineralogical analysis of soils samples was carried out.The structure of bacterial communities was estimated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). The community structure is remarkably more stable in the uranium-rich soils than in the control ones, indicating that uranium exerts a high selection from the soils was constructed and screened for uranium resistance in order to study bacteria-uranium interactions. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that a phylo-genetically diverse set of uranium-resistant species ware able to chelate uranium at the cell surface. (author) [fr

  4. Adsorption of uranium ions by crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemal Oezeroglu; Niluefer Metin

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the crosslinked polyester resin containing acrylic acid functional groups was used for the adsorption of uranium ions from aqueous solutions. For this purpose, the crosslinked polyester resin of unsaturated polyester in styrene monomer (Polipol 353, Poliya) and acrylic acid as weight percentage at 80 and 20%, respectively was synthesized by using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKp, Butanox M60, Azo Nobel)-cobalt octoate initiator system. The adsorption of uranium ions on the sample (0.05 g copolymer and 5 mL of U(VI) solution were mixed) of the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid was carried out in a batch reactor. The effects of adsorption parameters of the contact time, temperature, pH of solution and initial uranium(VI) concentration for U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid were investigated. The adsorption data obtained from experimental results depending on the initial U(VI) concentration were analyzed by the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity and free energy change were determined by using D-R isotherm. The obtained experimental adsorption data depending on temperature were evaluated to calculate the thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy (ΔH o ), entropy (ΔS o ) and free energy change (ΔG o ) for the U(VI) adsorption on the crosslinked polyester resin functionalized with acrylic acid from aqueous solutions. The obtained adsorption data depending on contact time were analyzed by using adsorption models such as the modified Freundlich, Elovich, pseudo-first order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. (author)

  5. Critical parameters in the dump and heap leaching of gold, silver, copper and uranium: permeability, solution delivery and solution recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastra, M.K.; Chase, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    Critical to successful dump and heap leaching for gold, silver, copper and uranium are factors such as permeability, solution delivery to the ore, and solution recovery. This paper deals with possible techniques for successful accomplishment of these three factors. New developments as well as older techniques are discussed, together with rationals for use of some techniques in reference to others. The authors hope to present a checklist so that the ideal application to individual mine situations can be achieved. This involves a discussion of the merits of each different method and the situations for most logical application. It is hoped that such discussion will broaden the geographic areas where dump and heap leaching can be applied to include greater winter cold and tropical regions of large amounts of rainfall.

  6. Critical parameters in the dump and heap leaching of gold, silver, copper and uranium: permeability, solution delivery and solution recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lastra, M.K.; Chase, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Critical to successful dump and heap leaching for gold, silver, copper and uranium are factors such as permeability, solution delivery to the ore, and solution recovery. This paper deals with possible techniques for successful accomplishment of these three factors. New developments as well as older techniques are discussed, together with rationals for use of some techniques in reference to others. The authors hope to present a checklist so that the ideal application to individual mine situations can be achieved. This involves a discussion of the merits of each different method and the situations for most logical application. It is hoped that such discussion will broaden the geographic areas where dump and heap leaching can be applied to include greater winter cold and tropical regions of large amounts of rainfall

  7. Experiments for separation and purification of Mo-99 from uranium solution with fission products as tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, Gabriela Elena; Matei, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc, T 1/2 = 6 hours), one of the most utilised radioisotopes in nuclear medicine, is generated through the beta decay of 99 Mo (T 1/2 = 66 hours) and which will decay through isomer transition to 99 Tc ( T 1/2 = 2.10 5 years) through the emission of a gamma radiation with the energy of 0.140 MeV. The work presents the phases of the process of Mo separation and purification at a tracer level. The tests performed in the laboratory have established the optimum conditions for the separation and purification of Molybdenum. To establish the separation and purification parameters, a synthetic solution which contains the elements which result following the irradiation of a low enriched Uranium foil weighing 10 g (∼20 % 235 U). To mark this solution, about 13 mg of UO 2 10% 235 U was irradiated for 2000 s, at a flux of about 7x10 12 n/cm 2 s. This amount of UO 2 will be added to the above-mentioned solution after dissolution. The method for separating the Molybdenum from irradiated Uranium solution is one of selective precipitation of Mo with α-benzoin-oxyme (α- BO). To purify the Molybdenum solution, two purification columns were utilised. Their role was to absorb the impurities remained in the mass of the precipitate. They and the Molybdenum have passed into the solution simultaneously, allowing the Molybdenum to pass. These columns are: the column with active charcoal (AC)+ active charcoal covered with silver (AgAC); active charcoal column (AC)+active charcoal covered with silver (AgAC)+hydrated zirconium oxide (HZO). Although all the phases of the process are performed with high yields, the final yields of recovery of Mo from U solutions are higher than 80%. (authors)

  8. Absorption spectra and cyclic voltammograms of uranium species in molten lithium molybdate-sodium molybdate eutectic at 550 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, T.; Fukushima, M.; Myochin, M.; Uehara, A.; Fujii, T.; Yamana, H.; Sato, N.

    2011-01-01

    Absorption spectra of uranium species dissolved in molten lithium molybdate.sodium molybdate eutectic of 0.51Li 2 MoO 4 -0.49Na 2 MoO 4 mixture at 550 C were measured by UV/Vis/NIR spectrophotometry, and their redox reactions were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. We found that the major ions of uranium species dissolved in the melt were uranyl penta-valent. After purging dry oxygen gas into the melt, pentavalent species were oxidized to the uranyl hexa-valent. In the cyclic voltammetry of the melt without uranium species, it was confirmed that the lithium-sodium molybdenum oxide compounds were deposited on the working electrode at the negative potential and the lithium molybdenum oxide compounds were deposited on the counter electrode at positive potential. When UO 2 was dissolved into the melt, the reductive reaction of the uranium species was observed at the reductive potential of the pure melt. This suggests that the uranium species dissolved in the melts could be recovered as mixed uranium-molybdenum oxides by electrolysis. (orig.)

  9. Study of uranium (VI) in carbonate solution by potentiometric titrations and ion-exchange; Etude des solutions d'uranium (VI) en milieu carbonate par titrages potentiometriques et echange d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billon, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-04-01

    The present work is devoted to the fixation of uranium (VI) on the conventional anion-exchange resin Dowex 2 X 8 in carbonate and hydrogen-carbonate media. Both media were successfully used for the recuperation of uranium (VI) from very dilute solutions. Equilibrium constant of the exchange [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4+}]{sub S} + 2 [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub R} {r_reversible} [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}]{sub R} + 2[CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub S} is determined for carbonate concentration range 0.1 M to 0.6 M from partition curves. A markedly increase in the relative fixation of uranium results with: - increasing free carbonate concentration of the solution, - decreasing uranium concentration. A study in the same conditions of the fixation of molybdenum has made it possible to separate the latter from uranium by elution, the carbonate concentration being molar. It is suggested a possibility of separation on a larger scale, based upon molybdenum displacement by uranium in hydrogen-carbonate medium. (author) [French] Le present travail precise la fixation de l'uranium (VI) sur la resine echangeuse d'anions Dowex 2 X 8, en milieu carbonate et hydrogeno-carbonate. Nous en avons deduit que ces deux milieux sont egalement favorables a la recuperation de l'uranium a partir de solutions tres diluees. La constante d'equilibre de la reaction d'echange [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4+}]{sub S} + 2 [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub R} {r_reversible} [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}]{sub R} + 2[CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub S} a ete determinee pour le milieu carbonate 0.1 M a 0.6 M, a partir deb courbes de partage. La fixation relative de l'uranium augmente considerablement lorsque: - la concentration du carbonate libre (respectivement hydrogenocarbonate) diminue, - la concentration de l'uranium en solution diminue. Le comportement du molybdene a ete etudie en vue de la separation uranium-molybdene. L'ion fixe sur la resine est l'ion molybdate MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. La separation est

  10. Fixation and separation of the elements thorium and uranium using anion exchange resins in nitrate solution; Fixation et separation des elements thorium et uranium par les resines echangeuses d'anions en milieu nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korgaonkar, V. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-01

    The exchange of thorium and uranium between a strong base anion resin and a mixed water + ethanol solvent containing nitrate ions is studied. It is assumed that in the resin the thorium and uranium are fixed in the form of the complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} in solution these elements are present in the form of complexes having the general formula: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} It has been possible to deduce a law for the changes in the partition functions of thorium and uranium as a function of the concentrations of the various species in solution and of the complexing ion NO{sub 3}. From this has been deduced the optimum operational conditions for separating a mixture of these two elements. Finally, in these conditions, the influence of a few interfering ions has been studied: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. The method proposed can be used either as a preparation, or for the dosage of thorium by a quantitative separation. (author) [French] On etudie l'echange du thorium et de l'uranium entre une resine anion base forte et un solvant mixte eau + ethanol charge en ions nitrates. On a suppose que, dans la resine, le thorium et l'uranium sont fixes sous forme de complexes Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 2-} et UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}{sup 2-} en solution, ces elements sont engages dans des complexes de formule generale: Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 6-n}{sup n-2} and UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4-n}{sup n-2} On a pu degager une loi de variation des coefficients de partage du thorium et de l'uranium en fonction des concentrations des diverses especes en solution et de l'anion complexant NO{sub 3}{sup -}. On en a deduit les conditions operatoires optimales necessaires pour separer les deux elements a partir de leurs melanges. Enfin, dans ces conditions, on a etudie l'influence de quelques elements genants: Ba, Bi, Ce, La, Mo, Pb, Zr. La methode preconisee peut etre

  11. Uranium adsorption by non-treated and chemically modified cactus fibres in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melpomeni Prodromou; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption efficiency of Opuntia ficus indica fibres regarding the removal of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] from aqueous solutions has been investigated prior and after the chemical treatment (e.g. phosphorylation and MnO 2 -coating) of the biomass. The separation/removal efficiency has been studied as a function of pH, uranium concentration, adsorbent mass, ionic strength, temperature and contact time. Evaluation of the experimental data shows that biosorption is strongly pH-depended and that the MnO 2 -coated product presents the highest adsorption capacity followed by the phosphorylated and non-treated material. Experiments with varying ionic strength/salinity don't show any significant effect on the adsorption efficiency, indicating the formation of inner-sphere surface complexes. The adsorption reactions are in all cases exothermic and relatively fast, particularly regarding the adsorption on the MnO 2 -coated product. The results of the present study indicate that adsorption of uranium from waters is very effective by cactus fibres and particularly the modified treated fibres. The increased adsorption efficiency of the cactus fibres is attributed to their primary and secondary fibrillar structure, which result in a relative relative high specific surface available for sorption. (author)

  12. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution by PAMAM dendron functionalized styrene divinylbenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Singha Deb, Ashish Kumar; Sivasubramanian, K. [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India); Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Radiological Safety and Environmental Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► A new chelating resin PAMAMG{sub 3} -SDB has been synthesized for uranium adsorption. ► The maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 130.25 mg g{sup −1} at pH 5.5. ► Adsorption capacity increases linearly with increasing dendron generation. ► The adsorbed uranium shall be easily desorbed by simply adjusting the pH < 3. ► Quantitative adsorption of uranium was observed even at high ionic strength. -- Abstract: A new polymeric chelating resin was prepared by growing third generation poly(amido)amine (PAMAMG{sub 3}) dendron on the surface of styrene divinylbenzene (SDB) and characterized by FTIR, TGA and SEM. The ideal branching of dendron in the chelating resin was determined from potentiometric titration. Adsorption of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution using PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB chelating resin was studied in a series of batch experiments. Effect of contact time, pH, ionic strength, adsorbent dose, initial U(VI) concentration, dendron generation and temperature on adsorption of U(VI) were investigated. Kinetic experiments showed that U(VI) adsorption on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB followed pseudo-second-order kinetics model appropriately and equilibrium data agreed well with the Langmuir isotherm model. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°) were evaluated from temperature dependent adsorption data and the uranium adsorption on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The sticking probability value (5.303 × 10{sup −9}), kinetic and isotherm data reveal the chemisorption of uranium on PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB and adsorption capacity of the chelating resin was estimated to be 130.25 mg g{sup −1} at 298 K. About 99% of adsorbed U(VI) can be desorbed from PAMAMG{sub 3}-SDB by a simple acid treatment suggesting that the chelating resin is reusable.

  13. Adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhi-bin Zhang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan; Xiao-hong Cao; Yun-hai Liu; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; Ping Liang; East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou; China University of Geosciences, Wuhan

    2013-01-01

    The ability of biochar produced by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) has been explored for the removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions. The micro-morphology and structure of HTC were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH, initial concentration, contact time, ionic strength and temperature on adsorption were investigated. The HTC showed the highest uranium sorption capacity at initial pH of 6.0 and contact time of 50 min. Adsorption kinetics was better described by the pseudo-second-order model and adsorption process could be well defined by the Langmuir isotherm. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔGdeg(298 K), ΔHdeg and ΔSdeg were determined to be -14.4, 36.1 kJ mol -1 and 169.7 J mol -1 K -1 , respectively, which demonstrated the sorption process of HTC towards U(VI) was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The adsorbed HTC could be effectively regenerated by 0.05 mol/L HCl solution for the removal and recovery of U(VI). Complete removal (99.9 %) of U(VI) from 1.0 L industry wastewater containing 15.0 mg U(VI) ions was possible with 2.0 g HTC. (author)

  14. Determination of contents of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate in solutions for alkaline leading of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radil, V.

    1988-01-01

    The new analytical method is based on the determination of the molar ratio carbonate - hydrogen carbonate using the measured concentration of hydrogen ions, the determination of the dissociation constant of carbonic acid for different values of ionic strength. The concentration of hydrogen ions was measured with a Metrohm 632 pH meter with the use of a combined glass electrode. The content of total carbonate carbon was determined coulometrically and the uranium content was determined by extraction with tributyl phosphate and by spectrometry of the complex of uranyl ions with Arsenazo III. Model solutions were used for the experiments which contained a high concentration of sulfate ions, thiosulfate ions, uranium and various proportions of carbonate and hydrogen carbonate. The composition of the individual samples of the extraction solutions are tabulated. The calibration was made of the glass combined electrode at different ionic strength, the values determined of dissociation constants of carbonic acid for different ionic strength. The mathematical procedure is described for the calculation of molar concentrations of carbonate and hudrogen carbonate and the results are presented of the analysis of model solutions. (E.S.). 5 tabs., 1 fig., 5 refs

  15. A new immobilized biomass technical adsorbent for uranium recovery from bioleach solutions in the mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsezos, Marios; Noh, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    A new type of metal adsorbent has been developed using inactive microbial biomass as the raw material. The adsorbent can be made to a desirable particle size. The particles have good mechanical strength and resistance to compression and consequently can be used in a packed bed resulting in a low pressure drop. The new biosorbents have been shown to maintain well the biosorptive properties of the immobilized biomass used for their production. We have tested successfully the new biosorbents for the recovery of uranium from actual bioleach solutions. (author)

  16. Non destructive testing of uranium in solution using a portable optical fiber photometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisde, Gilbert; Guillot, Philippe; Monier, Jean; Perez, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The portable instrument, called TELEPHOT 3 N, has be following main characteristics: - regulated light source, - optical fibers used as a light vector, - an optical probe fitted with a mirror immersed in the solution, - optical system with interference filters to balance the three measurement channels, - analog and digital absorbance measurement electronic, - associated microcomputer for automatic data acquisition and processing. The parameters and computer programs were determined by a series of measurements taken on reference solutions covering the target ranges. A mathematical model showing uranium complexes in solution leads to the solution of second degree equation. A first degree equation is sufficient for low acidities. This unit -hardware and programs- has been qualified on different uranyl nitrate solutions subject to nuclear materials control. The small minimum quantities of product required, about 25 ml, and the short response time of around 1 minute, wake at a highly practical instrument for check measurements during inspection proceedings. Similar remote measurements is planned during inspection for the glove box control of plutonium solutions. This spectrophotometry technique can be adapted for the process control of industrial solutions [fr

  17. Influent of Carbonization of Sol Solution at the External Gelation Process on the Quality of Uranium Oxide Kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damunir; Sukarsono

    2007-01-01

    The influent of carbonization of sol solution at the external gelation process on the quality of uranium oxide kernel was done. Variables observed are the influent of carbon, temperature and time of reduction process of U 3 O 8 kernel resulted from carbonization of sol solution. First of all, uranyl nitrate was reacted with 1 M NH 4 OH solution, producing the colloid of UO 3 . Then by mixing and heating up to the temperature of 60-80 °C, the colloid solution was reacted with PVA, mono sorbitol oleate and paraffin producing of uranium-PVA sol. Then sol solution was carbonized with carbon black of mol ratio of carbon to uranium =2.32-6.62, produce of carbide gel. Gel then washed, dried and calcined at 800 °C for 4 hours to produce of U 3 O 8 kernel containing carbon. Then the kernel was reduced by H 2 gas in the medium of N 2 gas at 500-800 °C, 50 mmHg pressure for 3 hours. The process was repeated at 700 °C, 50 mmHg pressure for 1-4 hours. The characterization of chemical properties of the gel grains and uranium oxide kernel using FTIR covering the analysis of absorption band of infra red spectrum of UO 3 , C-OH, NH 3 , C-C, C-H and OH functional group. The physical properties of uranium oxide covering specific surface area, void volume, mean diameter using surface area meter Nova-1000 and as N 2 gas an absorbent. And O/U ratio of uranium dioxide kernel by gravimetry method. The result of experiment showed that carbonization of sol solution at the external gelation process give influencing the quality of uranium oxide kernel. (author)

  18. Uranium extremophily is an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for extremely thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arpan; Wheaton, Garrett H.; Blum, Paul H.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoacidophilic archaea are found in heavy metal-rich environments, and, in some cases, these microorganisms are causative agents of metal mobilization through cellular processes related to their bioenergetics. Given the nature of their habitats, these microorganisms must deal with the potentially toxic effect of heavy metals. Here, we show that two thermoacidophilic Metallosphaera species with nearly identical (99.99%) genomes differed significantly in their sensitivity and reactivity to uranium (U). Metallosphaera prunae, isolated from a smoldering heap on a uranium mine in Thüringen, Germany, could be viewed as a “spontaneous mutant” of Metallosphaera sedula, an isolate from Pisciarelli Solfatara near Naples. Metallosphaera prunae tolerated triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) and soluble uranium [U(VI)] to a much greater extent than M. sedula. Within 15 min following exposure to “U(VI) shock,” M. sedula, and not M. prunae, exhibited transcriptomic features associated with severe stress response. Furthermore, within 15 min post-U(VI) shock, M. prunae, and not M. sedula, showed evidence of substantial degradation of cellular RNA, suggesting that transcriptional and translational processes were aborted as a dynamic mechanism for resisting U toxicity; by 60 min post-U(VI) shock, RNA integrity in M. prunae recovered, and known modes for heavy metal resistance were activated. In addition, M. sedula rapidly oxidized solid U3O8 to soluble U(VI) for bioenergetic purposes, a chemolithoautotrophic feature not previously reported. M. prunae, however, did not solubilize solid U3O8 to any significant extent, thereby not exacerbating U(VI) toxicity. These results point to uranium extremophily as an adaptive, rather than intrinsic, feature for Metallosphaera species, driven by environmental factors. PMID:23010932

  19. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO 3 , to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH) 2 , neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO 3 neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH) 2 to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH) 2 as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO 4 are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies

  20. Solid phase extraction of uranium and thorium on octadecyl bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.

    2013-01-01

    A simple and reliable method for rapid extraction and determination of uranium and thorium using octadecyl-bonded silica modified with Cyanex 302 is presented. Extraction efficiency and the influence of various parameters such as aqueous phase pH, flow rate of sample solution and amount of extractant has been investigated. The study showed that the extraction of uranium and thorium increase with increasing pH value and was found to be quantitative at pH 6; and the retention of ions was not affected significantly by the flow rate of sample solution. The extraction percent were found to be 89.55 and 86.27 % for uranium and thorium, respectively. The maximal capacity of the cartridges modified by 30 mg of Cyanex 302 was found to be 20 mg of uranium and thorium. The method was successfully applied to the extraction and determination of uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions. The percentage recovery of uranium and thorium in a number of natural as well as seawater samples of Iran were also investigated and found to be in the range of 85-95%. (author)

  1. Development of a technique for the on line determination of uranium in solution by gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sarabjit; Ramaswami, A.; Gill, Jatinder Singh

    2005-02-01

    A technique based on gamma ray spectrometry has been developed for the continuous monitoring of uranium in the solution form. Simulated container and support system was designed and fabricated for the development of an efficiency calibration curve and to find the detection limit for the estimation of uranium using 185.7 keV ( 235 U) gamma ray. The system was calibrated for its counting efficiency using HPGe detector system, in a standard source mount to detector geometry. The sensitivity of the detection system and counting time for low-level estimation of uranium has also been established. The detection limit of the monitor is ∼10 mg of uranium per litre of the solution. In order to correct for the density variation of the solution experiment was carried to study the variation of count rate of 185.7 ke V gamma ray of 235 U as a function of the density of the solution. This report gives the details of the development of a continuous monitor for the determination of uranium in the solution streams. (author)

  2. Screening of plant species as ground cover on uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venu Babu, P.; Eapen, S.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of construction of dams or holding areas for uranium mill tailings is relatively new in India and to date there is only one such facility being maintained by Uranium Corporation of India Limited (UCIL) at Jaduguda in Jharkhand. Due to the residual nature of radionuclides, chiefly uranium and its daughter products, special emphasis is given to the engineering aspects of the mill tailings ponds so as to ensure safety to general public for at least 200 years. Once a mill tailings pond reaches to its full capacity, creation of barrier layers over the mill tailings to prevent seepage of rain water and also erosion of mill tailings due to wind and water are advocated and a number of procedures are followed worldwide. Taking the extraordinary period of public safety to be assured, providing soil covers along with contouring and appropriate slopes over which vegetation is grown is gaining popularity. The vegetation not only reduces the impact of rain water hitting the soil cover, thereby reducing the soil erosion, but also lowers the moisture in the soil cover by extensive evapotranspiration, ensuring long term hydrological separation of the mill tailings underneath. Based on set criteria, applicable to the field scenario of mill tailings, a screening experiment was conducted under pot culture conditions to evaluate the survival and growth of different plant species. The plants after germination and hardening were transplanted into beakers containing mill tailings and periodical measurements on appropriate morphological characteristics such as plant height, length of twiners, number of tillers and number of leaves were recorded and evaluated. Of the twenty species tested in mill tailings, significant differences were noticed in the vigour of growth and several plant species could indeed establish well completing their life cycle including flowering and seed setting. Further, several leguminous species could also produce root nodules. It appears that the

  3. Biosorption behaviors of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution by sunflower straw and insights of binding mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Ai; Xuegang Luo; Xiaoyan Lin; Sizhao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Uranium (VI)-containing water has been recognized as a potential longer-term radiological health hazard. In this work, the sorptive potential of sunflower straw for U (VI) from aqueous solution was investigated in detail, including the effect of initial solution pH, adsorbent dosage, temperature, contact time and initial U (VI) concentration. A dose of 2.0 g L -1 of sunflower straw in an initial U (VI) concentration of 20 mg L -1 with an initial pH of 5.0 and a contact time of 10 h resulted in the maximum U (VI) uptake (about 6.96 mg g -1 ) at 298 K. The isotherm adsorption data was modeled best by the nonlinear Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The equilibrium sorption capacity of sunflower straw was observed to be approximately seven times higher than that of coconut-shell activated carbon as 251.52 and 32.37 mg g -1 under optimal conditions, respectively. The positive enthalpy and negative free energy suggested the endothermic and spontaneous nature of sorption, respectively. The kinetic data conformed successfully to the pseudo-second-order equation. Furthermore, energy dispersive X-ray, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that U (VI) adsorption onto sunflower straw was predominantly controlled by ion exchange as well as complexation mechanism. The study revealed that sunflower straw could be exploited for uranium remediation of aqueous streams as a promising adsorbent. (author)

  4. Preliminary results from uranium/americium affinity studies under experimental conditions for cesium removal from NPP ''Kozloduy'' simulated wastes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikiforova, A.; Kinova, L.; Peneva, C.; Taskaeva, I.; Petrova, P.

    2005-01-01

    We use the approach described by Westinghouse Savannah River Company using ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP) to remove elevated concentrations of radioactive cesium to facilitate handling waste samples from NPP K ozloduy . Preliminary series of tests were carried out to determine the exact conditions for sufficient cesium removal from five simulated waste solutions with concentrations of compounds, whose complexing power complicates any subsequent processing. Simulated wastes solutions contain high concentrations of nitrates, borates, H 2 C 2 O 4 , ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and Citric acid, according to the composition of the real waste from the NPP. On this basis a laboratory treatment protocol was created. This experiment is a preparation for the analysis of real waste samples. In this sense the results are preliminary. Unwanted removal of non-cesium radioactive species from simulated waste solutions was studied with gamma spectrometry with the aim to find a compromise between on the one hand the AMP effectiveness and on the other hand unwanted affinity to AMP of Uranium and Americium. Success for the treatment protocol is defined by proving minimal uptake of U and Am, while at the same time demonstrating good removal effectiveness through the use of AMP. Uptake of U and Am were determined as influenced by oxidizing agents at nitric acid concentrations, proposed by Savannah River National laboratory. It was found that AMP does not significantly remove U and Am when concentration of oxidizing agents is more than 0.1M for simulated waste solutions and for contact times inherent in laboratory treatment protocol. Uranium and Americium affinity under experimental conditions for cesium removal were evaluated from gamma spectrometric data. Results are given for the model experiment and an approach for the real waste analysis is chosen. Under our experimental conditions simulated wastes solutions showed minimal affinity to AMP when U and Am are most probably in

  5. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Benesova, Dagmar [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Environment Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology, Technicka 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Dvorakova, Marcela [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Vanek, Tomas, E-mail: vanek@ueb.cas.cz [Laboratory of Plant Biotechnologies, Joint Laboratory of Institute of Experimental Botany AS CR, v.v.i. and Crop Research Institute, v.v.i., Rozvojova 263, 162 05 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2011-06-15

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC{sub 50} value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC{sub 50} = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: > The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. > Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. > Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. > The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  6. Uranium uptake by hydroponically cultivated crop plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soudek, Petr; Petrova, Sarka; Benesova, Dagmar; Dvorakova, Marcela; Vanek, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Hydroponicaly cultivated plants were grown on medium containing uranium. The appropriate concentrations of uranium for the experiments were selected on the basis of a standard ecotoxicity test. The most sensitive plant species was determined to be Lactuca sativa with an EC 50 value about 0.1 mM. Cucumis sativa represented the most resistant plant to uranium (EC 50 = 0.71 mM). Therefore, we used the uranium in a concentration range from 0.1 to 1 mM. Twenty different plant species were tested in hydroponic solution supplemented by 0.1 mM or 0.5 mM uranium concentration. The uranium accumulation of these plants varied from 0.16 mg/g DW to 0.011 mg/g DW. The highest uranium uptake was determined for Zea mays and the lowest for Arabidopsis thaliana. The amount of accumulated uranium was strongly influenced by uranium concentration in the cultivation medium. Autoradiography showed that uranium is mainly localized in the root system of the plants tested. Additional experiments demonstrated the possibility of influencing the uranium uptake from the cultivation medium by amendments. Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba up to 2.8 times or 1.9 times, respectively. Phosphate deficiency increased uranium uptake up to 4.5 times or 3.9 times, respectively, by Brassica oleracea and S. alba. In the case of deficiency of iron or presence of cadmium ions we did not find any increase in uranium accumulation. - Highlights: → The uranium accumulation in twenty different plant species varied from 0.160 to 0.011 mg/g DW. → Uranium is mainly localized in the root system. → Tartaric acid was able to increase uranium uptake by Brassica oleracea and Sinapis alba. → The phosphates deficiency increase the uranium uptake.

  7. Uranium sorption from aqueous solutions by activated biochar fibres investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukia Hadjittofi; Ioannis Pashalidis

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of activated biochar fibres obtained from Opuntia ficus indica regarding the sorption of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) from aqueous solutions has been investigated by batch experiments, as a function of various physicochemical parameters, and FTIR spectroscopy prior and after U(VI) sorption. The experimental results show that the activated biochar fibres possess extraordinary sorption capacity for U(VI) even in acidic solutions (q max = 210 g kg -1 ), which is attributed to the formation of inner-sphere complexes with the surface carboxylic moieties, available in high density on the lamellar structures of the bio-sorbent. The adsorption process is described by a two-step exothermic reaction. (author)

  8. Advances on reverse strike co-precipitation method of uranium-plutonium mixed solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menghini, Jorge E.; Marchi, Daniel E.; Orosco, Edgardo H.; Greco, Luis

    2000-01-01

    The reverse strike coprecipitation of uranium-plutonium mixed solutions, is an alternative way to obtain MOX fuel pellets. Previous tests, carried out in the Alpha Laboratory, included a stabilization step for transforming 100 % of plutonium into Pu +4 . Therefore, the plutonium precipitated as Pu(OH) 4 . In this second step, the stabilization process was suppressed. In this way, besides Pu(OH) 4 , a part of the precipitated is composed of a mixed salt: AD(U,Pu). Then, a homogeneous solid solution is formed in the early steps of the process. The powders showed higher tap density, better performance during the pressing and lower sinterability than the powders obtained in previous tests. The advantageous and disadvantageous effects of the stabilization step are analyzed in this paper. (author)

  9. Separation of uranium from (Th,U)O2 solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotti, P.; Jha, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from mixed oxides of thorium and uranium by a pyrometallurgical process in which the oxides are mixed with a molten chloride salt containing thorium tetrachloride and thorium metal which reduces the uranium oxide to uranium metal which can then be recovered from the molten salt. The process is particularly useful for the recovery of uranium from generally insoluble high-density sol-gel thoria-urania nuclear reactor fuel pellets. 7 claims

  10. Simultaneous determination of nitric acid and uranium concentrations in aqueous solution from measurements of electrical conductivity, density, and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants handle aqueous solutions of nitric acid and uranium in large quantities. Automatic control of process operations requires reliable measurements of these solutes concentration, but this is difficult to directly measure. Physical properties such as solution density and electrical conductivity vary with solute concentration and temperature. Conductivity, density and temperature can be measured accurately with relatively simple and inexpensive devices. These properties can be used to determine solute concentrations will good correlations. This paper provides the appropriate correlations for solutions containing 2 to 6 Molar (M) nitric acid and 0 to 300 g/L uranium metal at temperatures from 25--90 degrees C. The equations are most accurate below 5 M nitric acid, due to a broad maximum in the conductivity curve at 6 M. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  11. Simultaneous determination of uranium and plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, using ID-TIMS. IRP-11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Raju; Sasi Bhushan, K.; Govindan, R.; Alamelu, D.; Khodade, P.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    A simple sample preparation and simultaneous analysis method to determine uranium and plutonium from dissolver solution, employing the technique of Isotope Dilution Mass spectrometry has been demonstrated. The method used, co-elusion of Uranium and Plutonium from anion exchanger column after initial elution of major part of uranium in 1:5 HNO 3 in order to reduce the initial U/Pu ratio from 1000 to about 100-200 in the co-eluted fraction. Due to the availability of variable multi-collector system, different Faraday cups were adjusted to collect the different ion intensities corresponding to the different masses, during the simultaneous analysis of Uranium and Plutonium, loaded on Re double filament assembly. 233 U and PR grade Plutonium were used as spikes to determine Uranium and Plutonium from dissolver solution of irradiated fuel from research reactor. The possibility of getting the isotopic composition of uranium from the simultaneous analysis of co-eluted purified fraction of U and Pu from spiked aliquots is also explained. (author)

  12. Reduction of uranium(IV) and its mixtures with an olefin or an alkyne in tetrahydrofuran solutions by solvated electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koulkes-Pujo, A.M.; Le Marechal, J.F.; Le Motais, B.; Folcher, G.

    1985-01-01

    The reduction of UCl 4 and its mixtures with different olefins (stilbene, St, diphenylethylene, DPE, acenaphtylene, Ac or with diphenylacetylene (DPA) was studied by pulse radiolysis of tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions. U(III) was formed by U(IV) reaction either with the solvated electrons created by THF radiolysis or with the transitory anions St - and DPA - . In the latter case, the reaction proceeds via a first step leading to [St-U(IV)] - or [DPA-U(IV)] - . In the case of DPE - the first species, [DPE-U(IV)] - , does not lead to U(III) but is destroyed by THF(H) + giving DPE(H). and U(IV). Ac - does not react with U(IV). A mechanistic scheme of this electron attachment is discussed as well as its implication in catalytic hydrogenation of olefins in LiAlH 4 -UCl 4 solutions. It is concluded that the catalytic effect observed is rather the result of a hydride transfer from a uranium transient compound to the alkenes. 22 references, 8 figures, 1 table

  13. Improved accountability method for measuring enriched uranium in H-Canyon dissolver solution at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Satkowski, J.; Mahannah, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), accountability measurement of enriched uranium dissolved in H-Canyon is performed using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In the IDMS analytical method, a known quantity of uranium 233 is added to the sample solution containing enriched uranium and fission products. The resulting uranium mixture must first be purified using a separation technique in the shielded analytical(''hot'') cells to lower radioactivity levels by removing fission products. Following this purification, the sample is analyzed by mass spectrometry to determine the total uranium content and isotopic abundance. The magnitude of the response of each uranium isotope in the sample solution and the response of the U 233 spike is measured. By ratioing these responses, relative to the known quantity of the U 233 spike, the uranium content can be determined. A hexane solvent extraction technique, used for years at SRS to remove fission products prior to the mass spectrometry analysis of uranium, has several problems. The hexone method is tedious, requires additional sample clean-up after the purified sample is removed from the shielded cells and requires the use of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-listed hazardous materials (hexone and chromium compounds). A new high speed separation method that enables a rapid removal of fission products in a shielded cells environment has been developed by the SRS Central Laboratory to replace the hexone method. The new high speed column extraction chromatography technique employs applied vacuum and columns containing tri (2-ethyl-hexyl) phosphate (TEHP) solvent coated on a small particle inert support (SM-7 Bio Beads). The new separation is rapid, user friendly, eliminates the use of the RCA-listed hazardous chemicals and reduces the amount of solid waste generated by the separation method. 2 tabs. 4 figs

  14. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes

  15. The role of solutions and uranium geochemistry in the geological formations of Jabal Abou-Rejmain-Northern Palmyrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubeli, Y.; Aissa, M.; Al-Hilall, M.

    1999-09-01

    The equivalent concentration of potassium, uranium, thorium and total radioactivity of various geological outcrops, along the major wadis of the southern and northern flanks of Jabal Abou-Rejmain, were determined. The radiometric anomalies found to be closely related to either phosphate beds of Companion age, or to spots of yellow secondary uranium minerals precipitated on very soft gray marly limestone rocks of Maestrichtian age. The present work indicates that phosphat deposition in the northern palmy rides seems to be widely distributed in the northern Patmyrides more than it was known earlier. The occurrences of secondary uranium mineralization coincide with the presence of evaporates, such as gypsum, which indicates that the precipitation occurs out of uranium enriched solution which were subjected to aridity and evaporation. The soft marly limestone rocks contains the highest percentage of clay fraction. This fraction is responsible for razing and absorbing the solutions, which were leached out of the Companion facies leading to precipitation of uranium minerals on the surface, as well as, within the pores of the rocks. However, transportation of these solutions, in the study area, seems not to extent for a long distance. (author

  16. Rapid removal of uranium from aqueous solutions using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 composite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fang-Li; Qin, Zhi; Bai, Jing; Rong, Wei-Dong; Fan, Fu-You; Tian, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Rapid removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles as the novel adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial pH, amount of adsorbent, shaking time and initial U(VI) concentrations on uranium sorption efficiency as well as the desorbing of U(VI). The sorption of uranium on Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was pH-dependent, and the optimal pH was 6.0. In kinetics studies, the sorption equilibrium can be reached within 180 min, and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order model, and the equilibrium sorption capacities calculated by the model were almost the same as those determined by experiments. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with the uranium sorption equilibrium data for the concentration range of 20-200 mg/L. The maximum uranium sorption capacity onto magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was estimated to be about 52 mg/g at 25 °C. The highest values of uranium desorption (98%) was achieved using 0.01 M HCl as the desorbing agent. Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles showed a good selectivity for uranium from aqueous solution with other interfering cation ions. Present study suggested that magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles can be used as a potential adsorbent for sorption uranium and also provided a simple, fast separation method for removal of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions onto activated carbon developed from grinded used tire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgacem, Ahmed; Rebiai, Rachid; Hadoun, Hocine; Khemaissia, Sihem; Belmedani, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, activated carbon was prepared from waste tire by KOH chemical activation. The pore properties including the BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and average pore diameter were characterized. BET surface area of the activated carbon was determined as 558 m(2)/g. The adsorption of uranium ions from the aqueous solution using this activated carbon has been investigated. Various physico-chemical parameters such as pH, initial metal ion concentration, and adsorbent dosage level and equilibrium contact time were studied by a batch method. The optimum pH for adsorption was found to be 3. The removal efficiency has also been determined for the adsorption system as a function of initial concentration. The experimental results were fitted to Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. A comparison of best-fitting was performed using the coefficient of correlation and the Langmuir isotherm was found to well represent the measured sorption data. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir equation, the saturated monolayer sorption capacity of uranium ions onto waste tire activated carbon was 158.73 mg/g. The thermodynamic equilibrium constant and the Gibbs free energy were determined and results indicated the spontaneous nature of the adsorption process. Kinetics data were best described by pseudo-second-order model.

  18. Highly Efficient Interception and Precipitation of Uranium(VI) from Aqueous Solution by Iron-Electrocoagulation Combined with Cooperative Chelation by Organic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhun, Bao; Wang, Xuegang; Liao, PingPing; Wang, Guanghui; Wang, Lizhang; Guo, Yadan; Zhang, Weimin

    2017-12-19

    A new strategy combining iron-electrocoagulation and organic ligands (OGLs) cooperative chelation was proposed to screen and precipitate low concentrations (0-18.52 μmol/L) of uranium contaminant in aqueous solution. We hypothesized that OGLs with amino, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups hydrophobically/hydrophilically would realize precuring of uranyl ion at pH electrocoagulation would achieve faster and more efficient uranium precipitation. Experimentally, the strategy demonstrated highly efficient uranium(VI) precipitation efficiency, especially with hydrophilic macromolecular OGLs. The uranium removal efficiency at optimized experimental condition reached 99.65%. The decrease of zeta potential and the lattice enwrapping between U-OGLs chelates and flocculation precursor were ascribed to the enhanced uranium precipitation activity. Uranium was precipitated as oxides of U(VI) or higher valences that were easily captured in aggregated micelles under low operation current potential. The actual uranium tailing wastewater was treated, and a satisfied uranium removal efficiency of 99.02% was discovered. After elution of the precipitated flocs, a concentrated uranium solution (up to 106.52 μmol/L) with very few other metallic impurities was obtained. Therefore, the proposed strategy could remove uranium and concentrate it concurrently. This work could provide new insights into the purification and recovery of uranium from aqueous solutions in a cost-effective and environmentally friendly process.

  19. Current extraction and separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths elements from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    A new process based on solvent extraction has been developed for separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from monazite leach solution using organophosphorous extractants. The Thorium cake coming from monazite source was dissolved in HNO 3 medium in presence of trace amount of HF for feed preparation. The separation of U(VI) was carried out by liquid-liquid extraction using tris-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid (TEHP) in dodecane leaving thorium and rare earths elements in the raffinate. The thorium from raffinate was selectively extracted using 1M tri iso amyl phosphate (TiAP) in dodecane in organic phase leaving all rare earths elements in aqueous solution. The uranium and thorium from organic medium was quantitatively stripped using 0.05 M HNO 3 counter current mode. Results indicate the quantitative separation of uranium, thorium and rare earths from thorium cake (monazite source) using organophosphorous extractant in counter current mode

  20. Engineering solutions to the long-term stabilization and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, D.R.; Lommler, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Engineering solutions to the safe and environmentally protective disposal and isolation of uranium mill tailings in the US include many factors. Cover design, materials selection, civil engineering, erosive forces, and cost effectiveness are only a few of those factors described in this paper. The systems approach to the engineering solutions employed in the US is described, with emphasis on the standards prescribed for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. Stabilization and isolation of the tailings from humans and the environment are the primary goals of the US uranium mill tailings control standards. The performance of cover designs with respect to water infiltration, radon exhalation, geotechnical stability, erosion protection, human and animal intrusion prevention, and longevity are addressed. The need for and frequency of surveillance efforts to ensure continued disposal system performance are also assessed

  1. Simultaneous removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solution using TiO_2 photoelectrochemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huichao He; Meirong Zong; Faqin Dong; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Pengpan Yang; Gaili Ke; Mingxue Liu; Xiaoqin Nie; Wei Ren; Liang Bian; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang

    2017-01-01

    U(VI)-containing wastewater has potential radiation hazard to the environment, but contains valuable uranium resource. Based on the reduction of U(VI) and the difference in solubility between U(VI) and U(IV), here we construct a TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell to remove U(VI) and recover uranium from aqueous solution. By irradiating TiO_2 photoanode at E = 0.45 V versus SCE, U(VI) can be simultaneously removed from aqueous solution and recovered as solid uranium compounds on a FTO glass cathode. Since ethanol can act as hole scavenger to protect the formed U(IV) and provide CO_2"−"· as reductant, ethanol adding improved the U(VI) reduction efficiency of TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell. (author)

  2. Investigation of the uranium-molybdenum diffusion in body centered {gamma} solid solutions; Etude de la diffusion uranium-molybdene dans la solution solide {gamma} cubique centree

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adda, Y; Mairy, C; Bouchet, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Philibert, J [IRSID, 78 - Saint-Germain-en-Laye (France)

    1958-07-01

    The body centered {gamma} phase uranium-molybdenum intermetallic diffusion has been studied by different technical methods: micrography, electronic microanalyser, microhardness. The values of several numbers of penetration coefficients are given, and their physical significations has been discussed. The diffusion coefficients, the frequency factor and activation energies has been determined for each concentration. After determination of the Kirkendall effect in this system, we calculated the intrinsic diffusion coefficient of uranium and molybdenum. (author) [French] La dilution intermetallique uranium-molybdene, en phase {gamma} cubique centree, a ete etudiee au moyen de differentes techniques: micrographie, microsonde electronique, microdurete. Les valeurs d'un certain nombre de coefficients de penetration sont donnees et leur signification physique discutee. Les coefficients de diffusion, les facteurs de frequence et les energies d'activation ont ete determines pour chaque concentration. Apres avoir mis en evidence un effet Kirkendall dans ce systeme, on a calcule les coefficients de diffusion intrinseques de l'uranium et du molybdene. (auteur)

  3. Potentiometric titration in a low volume of solution for rapid assay of uranium. Application to quantitative electro-reduction of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, P.; Ananthanarayanan, R.; Murali, N.; Mallika, C.; Falix Lawrence; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2012-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive PC based potentiometric titration technique for the assay of uranium using low volumes of sample aliquot (25-100 μL) along with all reagents (total volume of solution being less than 2.5 mL) is presented. The technique involves modification of the well known Davies and Gray Method recommended for assay of uranium(VI) in nuclear materials by introducing an innovative potentiometric titration device with a mini cell developed in-house. After appropriate chemical conditioning the titration is completed within a couple of minutes with display of online titration plot showing the progress of titration. The first derivative plot generated immediately after titration provides information of end point. The main advantage of using this technique is to carry out titration with minimum volumes of sample and reagents generating minimum volume of wastes after titration. The validity of the technique was evaluated using standard certified samples. This technique was applied for assay of uranium in a typical sample collected from fuel reprocessing laboratory. Further, the present technique was deployed in investigating the optimum conditions for efficient in situ production of U(IV). The precision in the estimation of uranium is highly satisfactory (RSD less than 1.0%). (author)

  4. Radiation-induced defects in clay minerals, markers of the mobility of the uranium in solution in the unconformity-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morichon, E.

    2008-10-01

    This study presents the works driven on three groups of clay minerals (kaolins, illite, sudoite (di-tri-octahedral chlorites)) characteristics of the alteration halos surrounding unconformity-type uranium deposits, in order to reveal uranium paleo-circulations in the intra-cratonic meso-Proterozoic basins (1,2 - 1,6 Ga). Thanks to Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR), we were able to highlight the persistence of structural defects in kaolin-group minerals contemporaneous of the basin diagenesis, and demonstrate the existence of relatively stable defects in illites and sudoites contemporaneous of the uranium deposits setting. Thus, the main defect in illite (Ai centre) and the main defect in sudoite (As centre) are characterized by their g components such as, respectively, gt = 2,003 et g// = 2,051 for illite and gt = 2,008 et g// = 2,051 for sudoite. As the main defect in kaolins (kaolinite/dickite), the main defects in illite and sudoite are perpendicularly oriented according to the (ab) plane, on the tetrahedral Si-O bound. However, their thermal stabilities seem different. The observation of samples from different zones (background, anomal or mineralized) of the Athabasca basin (Canada) allowed to identify a parallel evolution between actual defects concentration measured in the different clay minerals and the proximity of the mineralisation zones. Consequently, clays minerals can be considered as potential plotters of zones where uranium-rich solutions have circulated. (author)

  5. Solution species of 239Pu [V] in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, D.; Serne, R.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Information regarding the oxidation states of Pu in environmental samples is needed for estimating its migration through the geologic media. Thermodynamic data were used to develop stability fields for different Pu species. The data indicate that in the Eh-pH range of natural aqueous environments, the dominant species of Pu is likely to be Pu[V] in relatively oxidizing environments and Pu[III] in reducing environments. Because of the lack of methods of determining Pu[V] in environmental samples containing trace concentrations of Pu, Pu[V] has not been previously identified in these samples. Plutonium [VI] is generally assumed to be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments. However, a combination of solvent extraction and spectrophotometric techniques used in this study show that solutions (> 10 -5 4 M Pu) in equilibrium with 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide contain Pu[V], which is in agreement with the thermodynamic predictions. Although this method could not be used conclusively with the remaining solutions ( -5 4 M Pu) contacting 239 Pu[IV] hydroxide and 239 PuO 2 , the solvent extraction and Eh-pH results are similar for all the samples suggesting the strong possibility that all samples contain Pu[V]. Thus the possibility, ignored in the past, that Pu[V] may be the dominant species in relatively oxidizing environments should be considered

  6. Sulphate analysis in uranium leach iron(III) chloride solutions by inductively coupled argon plasma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nirdosh, I.; Lakhani, S.; Yunus, M.Z.M.

    1993-01-01

    Inductively coupled Argon Plasma Spectrometry is used for the indirect determination of sulphate in iron(III) chloride leach solution of Elliot Lake uranium ores via addition of a known amount of barium ions and analyzing for excess of barium. The ore contains ∼ 7 wt% pyrite, FeS 2 , as the major mineral which oxidizes to generate sulphate during leaching with Fe(III). The effects of pH, the concentrations of Fe(III) and chloride ions and for presence of ethanol in the test samples on the accuracy of analysis are studied. It is found that unlike the Rhodizonate method, removal of iron(III) from or addition of ethanol to the test sample prior to analysis are not required. Linear calibration curves are obtained. (author)

  7. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified

  8. Extraction of Uranium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Conjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Joanna S.; Sheaff, Chrystal N.; Yoon, Byunghoon; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wai, Chien M.

    2009-01-01

    Uranyl ions (UO2)2+ in aqueous nitric acid solutions can be extracted into supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) via an imidazolium-based ionic liquid using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent. The transfer of uranium from the ionic liquid to the supercritical fluid phase was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy using a high-pressure fiberoptic cell. The form of the uranyl complex extracted into the supercritical CO2 phase was found to be UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2. The extraction results were confirmed by UV/Vis spectroscopy and by neutron activation analysis. This technique could potentially be used to extract other actinides for applications in the field of nuclear waste management.

  9. Graphic and algebraic solutions of the discordant lead-uranium age problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieff, L.R.; Stern, T.W.

    1961-01-01

    Uranium-bearing minerals that give lead-uranium and lead-lead ages that are essentially in agreement, i.e. concordant, generally are considered to have had a relatively simple geologic history and to have been unaltered since their deposition. The concordant ages obtained on such materials are, therefore, assumed to approach closely the actual age of the minerals. Many uranium-bearing samples, particularly uranium ores, give the following discordant age sequences; Pb206 U238 generation of radiogenic lead. The evaluation of discordant lead isotope age data may be separated into two operations. The first operation, with which this paper is concerned, is mechanical in nature and involves the calculation of the different possible concordant ages corresponding to the various processes assumed to have produced the discordant ages. The second operation is more difficult to define and requires, in part, some personal judgement. It includes a synthesis of the possible concordant age solutions with other independent geologic and isotopic evidence. The concordant age ultimately chosen as most acceptable should be consistent not only with the known events in the geologic history of the area, the age relations of the enclosing rocks, and the mineralogic and paragenetic evidence, but also with other independent age measurements and the isotopic data obtained on the lead in related or associated non-radioactive minerals. The calculation of the possible concordant ages from discordant age data has been greatly simplified by Wetherill's graphical method of plotting the mole ratios of radiogenic Pb206 U238 ( N206 N238) vs. radiogenic Pb207 U235 ( N207 N235) after correcting for the contaminating common Pb206 and Pb207. The linear relationships noted in this graphical procedure have been extended to plots of the mole ratios of total Pb206 U238 ( tN206 N238) vs. total Pb207 U235 ( tN207 N235). This modification permits the calculation of concordant ages for unaltered samples using

  10. The determination of total cyanide in solutions containing uranium and gold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomons, M.; Dixon, K.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives the results of a limited investigation of three distillation procedures and their variants for the separation of cyanide. The spectrophotometric measurement, which follows the distillation, uses either a mixture of pyridine and pyrazolone, or a mixture of pyridine and barbituric acid. It was found that the method published in the South Africa Government Gazette in 1969 gives quantitative recoveries from potassium cyanide solutions but not in the presence of gold. The ligand-displacement method did not give quantitative recoveries in the presence of gold, except when zinc was added to the distilland, and it then failed to give a quantitative recovery of cyanide from ferrocyanide. These two methods were therefore rejected as unsuitable for the determination of cyanide in solutions containing small amounts of uranium and gold. The procedure of the American Public Health Association (APHA) was found to give quantitative recoveries in the presence of gold, uranium, thiocyanate, and ferrocyanide when cuprous chloride, or cuprous chloride with magnesium chloride, are added to the distilland. The spectrophotometric measurement using a mixture of pyridine and barbituric acid is preferred. The calibration range of the method is 0,5 to 6μg of cyanide, and the limit of determination is 0,04μg/cm 3 . (The relative standard deviation of the method is 0,05.) The distillation time in the APHA method is approximately two and a half hours; with 3 distillation trains, up to 9 distillations can be made per day, plus a further 2 hours for the spectrophotometric determination. The preferred laboratory method is detailed in an appendix

  11. Validation of the ABBN/CONSYST constants system. Part 2: Validation through the critical experiments on cores with uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T.T.; Manturov, G.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Rozhikhin, E.V.; Semenov, M.Yu.; Tsiboulia, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Results of calculations of critical assemblies with the cores of uranium solutions for the considered series of the experiments are presented in this paper. The conclusions about acceptability of the ABBN-93.1 cross sections for the calculations of such systems are made. (author)

  12. Cementation feasibility of a uranium-thorium based solution by physical and mechanical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpentiero, R.; Luce, A.; Troiani, F.

    2002-01-01

    By reprocessing Elk River nuclear fuel, at the ENEA ITREC Plant (South of Italy), about 3 m 3 of Uranium-Thorium based solution were produced. Previously considered an intermediate product to be further treated to recover U and Th, it is now being considered a waste, due to considerable content of fission products and to phasing out of the Italian nuclear industry. Together with other treatment options, a conditioning process in cement matrix is being evaluated, supported by some chemical, physical and mechanical tests on samples prepared with simulated waste. The main components selected to simulate the real solution were thorium nitrate (at two different concentrations), ferrous nitrate and nitric acid. This solution has been neutralized with sodium carbonate (at two different concentration) and cemented by means of a properly defined formulation. Pozzolanic blend cement, at different water to cement ratio, with and without a silica type additive, has been investigated. Cubic samples were subjected to compression tests and repeated freeze-thaw cycles followed by compression tests. Cylindrical samples were subjected to a leach test (according. to the tn ANSI/ANS-16.1 standard). The obtained results are above the minimum acceptance values established by the Italian authority. The evaluated properties are the first important elements to estimate the long term-instability of conditioned radioactive waste. Meanwhile a preliminary theoretical study has been done to evaluate the gas evolution from the matrix due to radiolysis effect. The reached conclusions encourage the development of further analysis to implement a cementation facility. (Author)

  13. Adsorption of uranium(VI) from sulphate solutions using Amberlite IRA-402 resin: Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solgy, Mostafa; Taghizadeh, Majid; Ghoddocynejad, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions by an anion exchange resin. • The effects of pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage were investigated. • The adsorption equilibrium is well described by the Freundlich isotherm model. • The adsorption kinetics can be predicted by the pseudo second-order model. • The adsorption is a physical, spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: In the present study, adsorption of uranium from sulphate solutions was evaluated using Amberlite IRA-402 resin. The variation of adsorption process was investigated in batch sorption mode. The parameters studied were pH, contact time and adsorbent dosage. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used in order to present a mathematical description of the equilibrium data at three different temperatures (25 °C, 35 °C and 45 °C). The final results confirmed that the equilibrium data tend to follow Freundlich isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Amberlite IRA-402 for uranium(VI) was evaluated to be 213 mg/g for the Langmuir model at 25 °C. The adsorption of uranium on the mentioned anion exchange resin was found to follow the pseudo-second order kinetic model, indicating that chemical adsorption was the rate limiting-step. The values of thermodynamic parameters proved that adsorption process of uranium onto Amberlite IRA-402 resin could be considered endothermic (ΔH > 0) and spontaneous (ΔG < 0)

  14. Deactivation and treatment of mine wastewaters and of aqueous solutions discharged in uranium ore treatment and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, R.; Prochazka, H.; Fuska, J.; Nemec, P.; Katzer, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description is presented of decontamination and purification of mine wastewaters and water solutions discharged from uranium ore treatment and processing and of the simultaneous removal and concentration of uranium-radium daughters, mainly of 226 Ra and 210 Pb. These elements are incorporated in the mycelium of microorganisms, such as those of the Fungi imperfecti class or are sorbed on the mycelium surface. The mycelia are then mechanically separated from the decontaminated solution, e.g., by filtration, centrifugation or sedimentation. The mycelium may be cultivated in the purified solutions to which nutrients are added, such as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in concentrations necessary for the growth of the microorganisms used. The mycelium may be added to the purified solution either in the native or in the dried state. (B.S.)

  15. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  16. Critical experiments on an enriched uranium solution system containing periodically distributed strong thermal neutron absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of 62 critical and critical approach experiments were performed to evaluate a possible novel means of storing large volumes of fissile solution in a critically safe configuration. This study is intended to increase safety and economy through use of such a system in commercial plants which handle fissionable materials in liquid form. The fissile solution's concentration may equal or slightly exceed the minimum-critical-volume concentration; and experiments were performed for high-enriched uranium solution. Results should be generally applicable in a wide variety of plant situations. The method is called the 'Poisoned Tube Tank' because strong neutron absorbers (neutron poisons) are placed inside periodically spaced stainless steel tubes which separate absorber material from solution, keeping the former free of contamination. Eight absorbers are investigated. Both square and triangular pitched lattice patterns are studied. Ancillary topics which closely model typical plant situations are also reported. They include the effect of removing small bundles of absorbers as might occur during inspections in a production plant. Not taking the tank out of service for these inspections would be an economic advantage. Another ancillary topic studies the effect of the presence of a significant volume of unpoisoned solution close to the Poisoned Tube Tank on the critical height. A summary of the experimental findings is that boron compounds were excellent absorbers, as expected. This was true for granular materials such as Gerstley Borate and Borax; but it was also true for the flexible solid composed of boron carbide and rubber, even though only thin sheets were used. Experiments with small bundles of absorbers intentionally removed reveal that quite reasonable tanks could be constructed that would allow a few tubes at a time to be removed from the tank for inspection without removing the tank from production service

  17. Determination of uranium and plutonium in high active solutions by extractive spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, R.V.; Damodaran, K.; Santosh Kumar, G.; Ravi, T.N.

    2000-01-01

    Plutonium and uranium was extracted from nitric acid into trioctyl phosphine oxide in xylene. The TOPO layer was analysed by spectrophotometry. Thoron was used as the chromogenic agent for plutonium. Pyridyl azoresorcinol was used as chromogenic agent for uranium. The molar absorption coefficient for uranium and plutonium was found to be 19000 and 19264 liter/mole-cm, respectively. The correlation coefficient for plutonium and uranium was found to be 0.9994. The relative standard deviation for the determination of plutonium and uranium was found to be 0.96% and 1.4%, respectively. (author)

  18. Behavior of uranium during the formation of granitic magma by anatexis (I). Influence of redox conditions and the presence of chloride on the solubility of uranium in the hydrothermal solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoru Nakashima; Toshimichi Iiyama, J.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of uranium is examined experimentally in the course of partial fusion of natural or synthetic granitic rocks. Uranium is definitely soluble in the associated hydrothermal solutions containing chloride under oxidizing conditions, but it is not soluble in the same fluids under reducing conditions [fr

  19. Study of uranium (VI) in carbonate solution by potentiometric titrations and ion-exchange; Etude des solutions d'uranium (VI) en milieu carbonate par titrages potentiometriques et echange d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billon, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-04-01

    The present work is devoted to the fixation of uranium (VI) on the conventional anion-exchange resin Dowex 2 X 8 in carbonate and hydrogen-carbonate media. Both media were successfully used for the recuperation of uranium (VI) from very dilute solutions. Equilibrium constant of the exchange [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4+}]{sub S} + 2 [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub R} {r_reversible} [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}]{sub R} + 2[CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub S} is determined for carbonate concentration range 0.1 M to 0.6 M from partition curves. A markedly increase in the relative fixation of uranium results with: - increasing free carbonate concentration of the solution, - decreasing uranium concentration. A study in the same conditions of the fixation of molybdenum has made it possible to separate the latter from uranium by elution, the carbonate concentration being molar. It is suggested a possibility of separation on a larger scale, based upon molybdenum displacement by uranium in hydrogen-carbonate medium. (author) [French] Le present travail precise la fixation de l'uranium (VI) sur la resine echangeuse d'anions Dowex 2 X 8, en milieu carbonate et hydrogeno-carbonate. Nous en avons deduit que ces deux milieux sont egalement favorables a la recuperation de l'uranium a partir de solutions tres diluees. La constante d'equilibre de la reaction d'echange [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4+}]{sub S} + 2 [CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub R} {r_reversible} [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-}]{sub R} + 2[CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}]{sub S} a ete determinee pour le milieu carbonate 0.1 M a 0.6 M, a partir deb courbes de partage. La fixation relative de l'uranium augmente considerablement lorsque: - la concentration du carbonate libre (respectivement hydrogenocarbonate) diminue, - la concentration de l'uranium en solution diminue. Le comportement du molybdene a ete etudie en vue de la separation uranium-molybdene. L'ion fixe sur la resine est l

  20. Study of an X-ray fluorescence thin film method for the determination of uranium in low activity solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    The application of the X-ray fluorescence thin film technique to the uranium determination in nitric solutions for a concentration range from 1 g/l to 100 g/l and activity levels under 5 mCi/ml is studied. The most suited excitation and measurement conditions are also studied and the uranium matrix effect correction, which is performed through the double dilution, α U U interaction coefficient calculation and internal standard methods, is discussed. The specimen preparation is satisfactorily accomplished by using P.V.C. filters fixed on aluminium supports. (Author) 18 refs

  1. Precipitation of uranium oxide by reduction in alkaline solution; Precipitation d'oxyde d'uranium par reduction en milieu alcalin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pottier, P; Claus, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In the first part of the report the authors study the reaction mechanism for this reduction which makes it possible to precipitate a hydrated uranium oxide from alkaline uranyl carbonate solutions. The research into the effects of different variables on numerous cycles are then summarized. Optical, X-ray and thermogravimetric examinations then make it possible to predict the properties of this oxide. In the second part the authors carry out calculations for the continuous operation of single cells and cells in series. These calculations give the data required for the construction of 2 cells having capacities of 0.3 and 10 litres. Results obtained from the continuous operation of this latter cell lead to certain conclusions concerning the applicability of this method to the hydrometallurgy of uranium. (authors) [French] Dans une premiere partie, les auteurs etudient le mecanisme de reaction de cette reduction qui permet la precipitation d'un oxyde d'uranium hydrate dans les solutions d'uranyle-carbonates alcalins. Les etudes de diverses variables sur de nombreux cycles sont ensuite resumees. Puis des examens optiques, aux rayons X et par thermogravimetrie, permettent de proposer une hypothese sur les proprietes de l'oxyde obtenu. Dans la deuxieme partie, les auteurs developpent un calcul prevoyant la marche continue de cellules uniques et en cascades. De ces calculs on tire les elements permettant la realisation de deux cellules de 0,3 et 10 litres. Des resultats de marche continue sur cette derniere cellule, on peut conclure a l'applicabilite de cette methode a l'hydrometallurgie de l'uranium. (auteurs)

  2. Isotopic equilibria between sulphur solute species at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Sulphur solute species in ore solutions and geothermal discharges include HSO 4 - , SO 4 2- , H 2 S, and HS - , as well as the ion-paired species, NaHS 0 , NaHSO 4 - and Na 2 SO 4 0 . Observed sulphate-sulphide fractionation factors and the rates of attainment of isotopic equilibrium are likely to depend on the nature of the sulphur species actually taking part in these isotopic equilibria. Preliminary experiments in alkaline solution (pH 10.1 at 20 0 C) were carried out in a gold cell. No significant isotope fractionation was observed between the SO 4 2- and HS - in 29 days at 200 0 C, 63days at 300 0 C, or 90 days at 250 0 C. However, similar experiments at 350 0 C in sealed gold capsules at room temperature pH 8.5 showed slow exchange(t( 1 / 2 ) was calculated to be 510 days for the SO 4 2- -HS - exchange reaction using the theoretical fractionation of 20.2 0 / 00 ). The addition of NaCl appeared to have no affect on the exchange. However, pH strongly controls the reaction rate, and exchange probably involves H 2 S and the HSO 4 - ion. Additional preliminary experiments were conducted with a fivefold increase in the sulphur concentration; a decrease in t( 1 / 2 ) to 142 days resulted. Some inter-relationship between sulphur concentration and exchange rate thus exists. The important controlling parameters of isotope exchange (temperature, pH, and ΣS) can be seen to have influenced exchange in natural systems.(auth.)

  3. Analysis methods and performance of an automated system for measuring both concentration and enrichment of uranium in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, T.A.; Parker, J.L.; Sampson, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    For the 1992 INNM meeting, the authors reported on the general characteristics of an automated system--then under development--for measuring both the concentration and enrichment of uranium in solutions. That paper emphasized the automated control capability, the measurement sequences, and safety features of the system. In this paper, the authors report in detail on the measurement methods, the analysis algorithms, and the performance of the delivered system. The uranium concentration is measured by a transmission-corrected X-ray fluorescence method. Cobalt-57 is the fluorescing source and a combined 153 Gd and 57 Co source is used for the transmission measurements. Corrections are made for both the absorption of the exciting 57 Co gamma rays and the excited uranium X-rays. The 235 U concentration is measured by a transmission-corrected method, which employs the 185.7-keV gamma ray of 235 U and a transmission source of 75 Se to make corrections for the self-absorption of the 235 U gamma rays in the solution samples. Both measurements employ high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and use the same 50ml sample contained in a custom-molded, flat-bottomed, polypropylene bottle. Both measurements are intended for uranium solutions with concentrations ≥0.1 g U/l, although at higher enrichments the passive measurement will be even more sensitive

  4. Removing uranium (VI) from aqueous solution with insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fande; Yuan, Guodong; Larson, Steven L; Ballard, John H; Waggoner, Charles A; Arslan, Zikri; Han, Fengxiang X

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of uranium (U) and depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated wastes from anthropogenic activities is an important environmental problem. Insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite (L-HA) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for immobilizing U in the environment. The effect of initial pH, contact time, U concentration, and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA was assessed. The U(VI) adsorption was pH-dependent and achieved equilibrium in 2 h. It could be well described with pseudo-second-order model, indicating that U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA involved chemisorption. The U(VI) adsorption mass increased with increasing temperature with maximum adsorption capacities of 91, 112 and 120 mg g -1 at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The adsorption reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. We explored the processes of U(VI) desorption from the L-HA-U complex through batch desorption experiments in 1 mM NaNO 3 and in artificial seawater. The desorption process could be well described by pseudo-first-order model and reached equilibrium in 3 h. L-HA possessed a high propensity to adsorb U(VI). Once adsorbed, the release of U(VI) from L-HA-U complex was minimal in both 1 mM NaNO 3 and artificial seawater (0.06% and 0.40%, respectively). Being abundant, inexpensive, and safe, L-HA has good potential for use as a U adsorbent from aqueous solution or immobilizing U in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, F E; McGrath, S [Montana Coll. of Mineral Science and Technology, Butte (USA)

    1985-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with seedlings of Artemisia tridentata subsp. tridentata (big sagebrush) to test the effect of the phosphate speciation of uranium in solution on its uptake by big sagebrush. No single complex could be identified as being preferentially taken up by the plant, but the varying aqueous phosphate concentrations did affect uranium uptake by the plants at the higher uranium concentrations in solution. The data also substantiate the tendency for uranium to behave as an essential element in this plant species. The implications for the use of Artemisia tridentata as a biogeochemical uranium indicator are discussed.

  6. Evaluation of the toxic effect on zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to uranium mill tailings leaching solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Geng; Nan Hu; Ji-Fang Zheng; Cheng-Lei Wang; Xin Chen; Jia Yu; De-Xin Ding

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential ecological danger and toxic effect of uranium mill tailings leaching solution (UMTLS) on aquatic animals. UMTLS was identified to contain two radioactive elements, nine heavy metal elements, and five non-metallic materials. The acute toxicity test indicated that the 1, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h LC 50 values of UMTLS to the zebrafish were 12.1, 7.1, 4.4, 3.8, 3.4, and 2.9%, respectively. In sub-lethal toxicity tests, superoxide dismutase, catalase, Na + -K + -ATPase activities, and malondialdehyde content were respectively determined and analyzed in the zebrafish gill, gonad, muscle, and liver after exposed to four different concentration levels of UMTLS for 7 and 14 days, respectively. The result showed that the most sensitivity of the antioxidant system in zebrafish tissues in UMTLS was gill, and then decreased in gonad, muscle and liver respectively. Na + -K + -ATPase activity in the liver and gonad may be considered as a reference biomarker of UMTLS stress. The data in this study may be valuable that the toxicity of such as the leaching solution of potentially hazardous material was compared with that of each constituent. (author)

  7. Application of microwaves in the denitration of nitric solutions of uranium and/or plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada, C.A.; Adelfang, P.

    1990-01-01

    A method for the conversion of nitric solutions of uranium and/or plutonium that would be an alternative more economic and operatively simpler than the conventional processes is the direct denitration by means of microwaves and vacuum application. This conversion method has the following technical advantages: a) the process is simple, which allows a stable operation; b) neither the addition of chemical reagents nor the dilution of the starting solution are required, thereby the volume of residual liquids is small as compared with other processes; c) one fraction of the evaporation residues is nitric acid which can be reused. The development (on laboratory scale) of this conversion process was initiated. In this first stage, a description of the employed equipment is presented. An example of one of the evaporation and denitration batches and obtained products are fully described. The operative experience leads to deduce that the equipment is satisfactory, due to the following characteristics: 1) it permits an easy manipulation within the glove boxes; 2) the projections, coming out from the reactor, are retained completely; 3) the microwaves oven and the vacuum pump are effectively protected from the corrosive vapors. It is concluded that the employed experimental device is adequate to obtain the necessary materials for the reduction, pressing and sinterability studies. This equipment is adopted for the integral development of sintered pellets fabrication process. (Author) [es

  8. Dissolution study of thorium-uranium oxides in aqueous triflic acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulemela, E.; Bergeron, A.; Stoddard, T. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories - CNL, 286 Plant Rd., Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    The dissolution of sintered mixed oxides of thorium with uranium in various concentrations of trifluoromethanesulfonic (triflic) acid solutions was investigated under reflux conditions to evaluate the suitability of the method. Various fragment sizes (1.00 mm < x < 7.30 mm) of sintered (Th,U)O{sub 2} and simulated high-burnup nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) were almost completely dissolved in a few hours, which implies that triflic acid could be used as an alternative to the common dissolution method, involving nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The influence of acid concentration, composition of the solids, and reaction time on the dissolution yield of Th and U ions was studied using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The dissolution rate was found to depend upon the triflic acid concentration and size of the solid fragments, with near complete dissolution for the smallest fragments occurring in boiling 87% w/w triflic acid. The formation of Th and U ions in solution appears to occur at the same rate as the triflic acid simultaneously reacts with the constituent oxides as evidenced by the results of a constant U/Th concentration ratio with the progress of the dissolution. (authors)

  9. Use of open-cell resilient polyurethane foam loaded with crown ether for the preconcentration of uranium from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Mesalam, M.M.; El-Naggar, I.M.; Abdel-Hai, M.S.; El-Shahawi, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The preconcentration of uranium from aqueous solutions on open-cell resilient polyurethane foams (PUF) impregnated with crown ether as an organic extractant in different conditions was investigated. The data showed that 50 minutes is a sufficient time to attain equilibrium with a maximum extraction percentage for uranium ion on polyurethane foams loaded with crown ether. Also the extraction percentage of uranium is increased markedly with increasing the pH values up to pH ∼ 6 and displayed the lowest extraction at 8 > pH > 6. The different isotherms of uranium sorption have shown that the sorption followed a Freundlich isotherm. Column studies have been carried out in order to extend these studies to the plant scale. From the data of column sorption and breakthrough curves, the height equivalent of theoretical plates (HETP), and breakthrough capacity which affect the efficiency of the column have been calculated and found to be 1.03 mm/plate, 64 ± 5 and 58.3 mg uranium/gram polyurethane foam impregnated with crown ether, respectively. (author)

  10. Effect of depositional environment and sources of pollution on uranium concentration in sediment, coral, algae and seagrass species from the Gulf of Aqaba (Red Sea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Hilal, A.H.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were determined in sediment samples, four hard and two soft corals, one seagrass and four species of algae collected from phosphate-polluted sites in the northern reef area of the Gulf of Aqaba. High uranium concentrations were found in all samples examined from a phosphate-polluted site near a phosphate loading berth compared to the unpolluted ones. Uranium levels, U/Ca ratios, concentration and discrimination factors were also high compared to those reported from other regions of the world. The effects of the exported raw phosphate powder as the main source of pollution and depositional environment on the concentration of uranium in the examined species are discussed. (Author)

  11. Applications of Qualitative Microanalysis to the Determination of Secondary Species Associated with Uranium; Application de la microanalyse qualitative a la determination des especes secondaires d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrinier, H

    1959-02-01

    Microanalytical techniques are described which allow rapid determinations of secondary species associated with uranium. They consist in exposing the constituent elements of the ores by means of characteristic microchemical reactions. Because of their rapidity and the small amount of apparatus needed, these techniques can be used either in the field or in the laboratory. (author) [French] Les techniques de microanalyse decrites dans cet ouvrage permettent la determination rapide des especes secondaires d'uranium. Elles consistent a mettre en evidence les elements constitutifs des mineraux par des reactions microchimiques caracteristiques. En raison de leur rapidite et du peu de materiel qu'elles necessitent, ces techniques peuvent etre utilisees aussi bien sur le terrain qu'au laboratoire. (auteur)

  12. Method for determining microamounts of uranium in solutions from copper ores, by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometry with arsenazo III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, B.

    1972-01-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for determining small amounts of uranium in aqueous solutions from copper ores. Uranium is quantitatively separated in a single extraction by a solution of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in benzene, using ethylendiaminetetracetic acid and sodium fluoride as complexing agents, for improving the selectivity of the procedure. An aliquot of the extract is diluted with a hydrocolloidal solution of arsenazo III. Optical density is measured at 650 nm. (Author) 3 refs

  13. Efficient removal of uranium from aqueous solution by zero-valent iron nanoparticle and its graphene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zi-Jie; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Li-Yong; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Mei, Lei; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Ju-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zhen-Tai; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Uranium removal by ZVI-nps: independent of pH, the presence of CO 3 2− , humic acid, or mimic groundwater constituents. • Rapid removal kinetics and sorption capacity of ZVI-nps is 8173 mg U/g. • Two reaction mechanisms: sufficient Fe 0 → reductive precipitation as U 3 O 7 ; insufficient Fe 0 → hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI). • Fe/graphene composites: improved kinetics and higher U(VI) reduction ratio. - Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVI-np) and its graphene composites were prepared and applied in the removal of uranium under anoxic conditions. It was found that solutions containing 24 ppm U(VI) could be completely cleaned up by ZVI-nps, regardless of the presence of NaHCO 3 , humic acid, mimic groundwater constituents or the change of solution pH from 5 to 9, manifesting the promising potential of this reactive material in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater. In the measurement of maximum sorption capacity, removal efficiency of uranium kept at 100% until C 0 (U) = 643 ppm, and the saturation sorption of 8173 mg U/g ZVI-nps was achieved at C 0 (U) = 714 ppm. In addition, reaction mechanisms were clarified based on the results of SEM, XRD, XANES, and chemical leaching in (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 solution. Partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) as U 3 O 7 was prevalent when sufficient iron was available; nevertheless, hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI) on surface would be predominant as iron got insufficient, characterized by releases of Fe 2+ ions. The dissolution of Fe 0 cores was assigned to be the driving force of continuous formation of U(VI) (hydr)oxide. The incorporation of graphene supporting matrix was found to facilitate faster removal rate and higher U(VI) reduction ratio, thus benefitting the long-term immobilization of uranium in geochemical environment

  14. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venault, L.

    1998-01-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO 2 in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species N 2 H 5 + , NH 2 SO 3 H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO 2 , preventing the reduction of H 2 O 2 by HNO 2 . The mechanisms of HNO 2 formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H 2 O 2 formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H 2 O 2 or HNO 2 in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV)→ U(IV) or Pu(III) → Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV)→ Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects induced on the reaction medium, and reveals the potential for using ultrasound to cause

  15. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  16. Contribution to the study of mechanisms of oxidation of uranium (IV) in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaille, Patrick

    1977-01-01

    In the first part, the author reports a bibliographical study which aims at briefly describing the main parameters which govern redox kinetics between metallic ions in solution: acidity, complexing reaction by anions, solvent effects. The author also highlights existing contradictions and shortcomings in the interpretation of experimental results as well as in current theories, and highlights characteristics proper to uranium (IV). The author then describes results obtained for kinetics of Ce(IV)-U(IV) systems: effects of acidity, of sulphate, search for other anionic and cationic catalysts, influence of fluoride, inhibition by DMSO). Some of these results (influence of fluoride and DMSO) are compared with those obtained with the Ce(IV)-Fe(II) system. A more detailed study of the solvent role has been performed for the U(IV)-Fe(III) system in a mixed water-ethylene glycol medium and in pure glycol. The next part addresses the modifications of flow stopped spectrophotometry to solve problems of corrosion and bad temperature regulation. The author presents analog (kinetics) and digital (complexing equilibrium) calculation methods, and the development of colour indicators of temperature [fr

  17. Electrochemical mechanism of uranium mononitride dissolution in aqueous solutions of nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, Boris G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2017-09-01

    It was shown that the dissolution of UN with metallic conduction follows an electrochemical mechanism when it proceeds in contact with an electrically conductive medium (HNO{sub 3} solution). According to this mechanism, the oxidation of UN (at the anode) passes an electron into the UN matrix, which is a conductor, and can then reduce nitric acid in a parallel reaction a short distance away at another exposed surface of the UN (at the cathode). As a result, the reduction of HNO{sub 3} affords NO and NO{sub 2}, while oxidation of uranium mononitride affords NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O. The occurrence of these two separate processes accounts for the composition and yields of the products formed from UN and HNO{sub 3} as well as for the nitrogen isotope distribution between them when UN and HNO{sub 3} were labeled with {sup 14} N or {sup 15}N. A mathematical equation describing the dependence of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O yields on HNO{sub 3} concentration was derived. It was also shown that the calculated value of standard electromotive force of the galvanic pair formed on the UN surface during its dissolution in HNO{sub 3} is high enough to initiate and support the electrochemical mechanism of its dissolution in nitric acid.

  18. Uranium dissolution in hyper-alkaline TMA-OH solutions: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cachoir, C.; Salah, S.; Mennecart, T.; Lemmens, K. [Belgian Research Nuclear Centre - SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2016-07-01

    Leaching experiments were performed with depleted UO{sub 2} powders in tetramethylammonium solutions (TMA-OH) at pH 13.5 and 12.5, and at different UO{sub 2} surface area to volume of solution (SA/V) ratio's to determine the solubility and the dissolution kinetics of UO{sub 2} at high pH in absence of cations dominating cementitious waters (Ca, Na, K). The solubility of UO{sub 2} increased from pH 12.5 to 13.5 and by increasing the SA/V ratio up to 100 m{sup -1}. However, no known U secondary-phases were predicted by geochemical calculations to control the measured U-concentrations. We interpreted the UO{sub 2} dissolution process as a 2-step process. For all experiments, we observe a fast initial rate, hydroxo promoted and likely surface controlled. Afterwards the rate is apparently negative at low SA/V over time while it is positive at higher SA/V ratio's. The former is interpreted to be related to a sorption process, while the latter reveals a continuous residual dissolution process. No solubility enhancing effect of U-colloids was observed in the TMA-OH media. However, there is much less uranium colloid formation in TMA-OH tests with low Ca (Na, K) concentration than in previous tests with higher Ca (Na, K) concentrations. This suggests that the colloid formation is promoted by alkali and/or alkali-earth elements.

  19. Assessment of trace ground-water contaminants release from south Texas in-situ uranium solution-mining sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidwell, J.R.; Humenick, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The future of uranium solution mining in south Texas depends heavily on the industry's ability to restore production zone ground water to acceptable standards. This study investigated the extent of trace contaminant solubilization during mining and subsequent restoration attempts, first through a literature search centered on uranium control mechanisms, and then by laboratory experiments simulating the mining process. The literature search indicated the complexity of the situation. The number of possible interactions between indigenous elements and materials pointed on the site specificity of the problem. The column studies evaluated three different production area ores. Uranium, molybdenum, arsenic, vanadium, and selenium were analyzed in column effluents. After simulated mining operations were completed, uranium was found to be the most persistent trace element. However, subsequent ground water flushing of the columns could restore in-situ water to EPA recommended drinking water concentrations. Limited data indicated that ground water flowing through mined areas may solubilize molybdenum present in down gradient areas adjacent to the production zone due to increased oxidation potential of ground water if adequate restoration procedures are not followed.

  20. Evaluation of DGT techniques for measuring inorganic uranium species in natural waters: Interferences, deployment time and speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Geraldine S.C. [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Mills, Graham A. [School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, St Michael' s Building, White Swan Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 2DT (United Kingdom); Teasdale, Peter R. [Environmental Futures Centre, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Queensland 4222 (Australia); Burnett, Jonathan L.; Amos, Sean [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Fones, Gary R., E-mail: gary.fones@port.ac.uk [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 3QL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-20

    Graphical abstract: In situ field deployment of DGT devices - manganese dioxide ( Black-Small-Square ) best suited for sea water monitoring (a) up to 7 days and Metsorb ( Black-Small-Square ) best suited for fresh water monitoring (b) of inorganic uranium species up to 7 days. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adsorbents Chelex-100, Metsorb and MnO{sub 2} were investigated for use with DGT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All three adsorbents performed well in low ionic strength solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnO{sub 2} resin was found to be the most suitable for marine deployments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DGT is able to measure isotopic ratios of U down to concentrations of 0.1 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DGT underestimated U concentrations by at least 50% if the DBL was not taken into account. - Abstract: Three adsorbents (Chelex-100, manganese dioxide [MnO{sub 2}] and Metsorb), used as binding layers with the diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) technique, were evaluated for the measurement of inorganic uranium species in synthetic and natural waters. Uranium (U) was found to be quantitatively accumulated in solution (10-100 {mu}g L{sup -1}) by all three adsorbents (uptake efficiencies of 80-99%) with elution efficiencies of 80% (Chelex-100), 84% (MnO{sub 2}) and 83% (Metsorb). Consistent uptake occurred over pH (5-9), with only MnO{sub 2} affected by pH < 5, and ionic strength (0.001-1 mol L{sup -1} NaNO{sub 3}) ranges typical of natural waters, including seawater. DGT validation experiments (5 days) gave linear mass uptake over time (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.97) for all three adsorbents in low ionic strength solution (0.01 M NaNO{sub 3}). Validation experiments in artificial sea water gave linear mass uptake for Metsorb (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.9954) up to 12 h and MnO{sub 2} (R{sup 2} {>=} 0.9259) up to 24 h. Chelex-100 demonstrated no linear mass uptake in artificial sea water after 8 h. Possible interferences were investigated with

  1. The determination of phosphorus in uranium minerals and resulting solutions; Determinacion de fosforo en minerales de uranio y soluciones procedentes de su beneficio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrement Eguiluz, J C; Rarellada Bellod, R; Fernandez Cellini, R

    1964-07-01

    Interferences of several elements present in Spanish uranium minerals in the phosphorus determination by the spectrophotometrical method of the molibdovanada te phosphoric acid are studied. A method is described with a previous separation of these element by a cationic resin. This method is successfully applied to the phosphorus determination in acid or alkaline lixiviation solutions of uranium minerals, as well as in the evaluates of ion exchange resins used used technically for the concentration of solutions with a low uranium content. (Author) 11 refs.

  2. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  3. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  4. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  5. Kinetics and equilibrium modeling of uranium(VI) sorption by bituminous shale from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortaboy, Sinem; Atun, Gülten

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Oil shales are sedimentary rocks containing a polymeric matter in a mineral matrix. • Sorption potential of bituminous shale (BS) for uranium recovery was investigated. • U(VI) sorption increased with decreasing pH and increasing temperature. • Kinetic data were analyzed based on single and two resistance diffusion models. • The results fit well to the McKay equation assuming film and intraparticle diffusion. - Abstract: Sorption of U(VI) onto a bituminous shale (BS) from a nuclear power plant project site in Black Sea region was investigated for potential risk assessment when it releases into the environment with contaminated ground and surface water. The sorption characteristics of the BS for U(VI) recovery were evaluated as a function of contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, pH and temperature. Kinetic results fit better with pseudo-second-order model rather than pseudo-first-order. The possibility of diffusion process was analyzed based on Weber–Morris intra-particle diffusion model. The McKay equation assuming film- and intraparticle diffusion better predicted the data than the Vermeulen approximation presuming surface diffusion. Equilibrium sorption data were modeled according to the Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R) and Freundlich isotherm equations. Sorption capacity increased from 0.10 to 0.15 mmol g −1 in 298–318 K temperature range. FT-IR analysis and pH dependent sorption studies conducted in hydroxide and carbonate media revealed that U(VI) species were sorbed in uranyl and its hydroxo forms on the BS. Desorption studies showed that U(VI) leaching with Black Sea water was negligible from the loaded BS. The activation parameters (E a , ΔH ∗ and ΔG ∗ ) estimated from diffusion coefficients indicated the presence of an energy barrier in the sorption system. However, thermodynamic functions derived from sorption equilibrium constants showed that overall sorption process was spontaneous in nature

  6. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  7. The recovery of 99Mo from solutions of irradiated Uranium using a column with nanoparticles of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, G. E.; Petre, M.; Lazar, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Molyibdenum-99 (T½ = 66.02 h) decays by beta emission to 99 Tcm (T½ = 6.02 h). The latter nuclide is used in many nuclear medicine applications. The 99 Mo is produced from irradiated high (HEU) or low (LEU) enriched uranium. In this work a sensitive and selective method for recovering Mo from uranium solution, using a column with titanium dioxide nanoparticles, is developed. The titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method using titanium tetra-chloride as starting material and urea as a reacting medium. A 40 ml uranium solution containing 450 g/L uranyl nitrate, 1 M HNO 3 , and 4 mg Mo was loaded on a column containing 6 g of TiO 2 sorbent at 75°C. After loading, the column was washed with 1 M HNO 3 and H 2 O. Mo was stripped from the column with 0.1 M NaOH at 25°C. The ICP-MS results indicate that 80-95% of the initial mass of Mo was loaded on the column, and 90-94% of this quantity was recovered in the strip fraction. (authors)

  8. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  9. Sorption of Uranium Ions from Their Aqueous Solution by Resins Containing Nanomagnetite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud O. Abd El-Magied

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic amine resins composed of nanomagnetite (Fe3O4 core and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA/N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA shell were prepared by suspension polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate with N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of nanomagnetite particles and immobilized with different amine ligands. These resins showed good magnetic properties and could be easily retrieved from their suspensions using an external magnetic field. Adsorption behaviors of uranium ions on the prepared resins were studied. Maximum sorption capacities of uranium ions on R-1 and R-2 were found to be 92 and 158 mg/g. Uranium was extracted successfully from three granite samples collected from Gabal Gattar pluton, North Eastern Desert, Egypt. The studied resins showed good durability and regeneration using HNO3.

  10. Reactivity of the uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) and the plutonium (Pu(III)/Pu(IV)) in nitric aqueous solution under ultrasound; De l'influence des ultrasons sur la reactivite de l'uranium (U(IV)/U(VI)) et du plutonium (PU(III)/PU(IV)) en solution aqueuse nitrique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venault, L

    1998-07-01

    To minimize the volumes of solid waste and industrial effluents generated at the end of cycle, particularly in the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing industry, research is currently under way on so-called innovative processes, designed to induce chemical reactions without adding reagent to the media. Among these processes, the use of ultrasound can prove advantageous, and the purpose of this study is to assess accurately the potential for its application. In the present context, this work shows that the transmission of an ultrasonic wave in aqueous nitric acid solution leads to: the accumulation of nitrous acid in solution, until a steady-sate concentration is reached; the removal of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide in the gas stream. The initial kinetics of the formation of HNO{sub 2} in solution was quantified as a function of the nitric acid concentration and the ultrasound intensity. It was also shown than an excess of nitrous acid in nitric solution decomposes under the effect of ultrasound. It is also possible to accumulate hydrogen peroxide in solution during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions in the presence of a chemical species (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}{sup +}, NH{sub 2}SO{sub 3}H...) which reacts rapidly with HNO{sub 2}, preventing the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HNO{sub 2}. The mechanisms of HNO{sub 2} formation and decomposition, and the mechanism of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation during the ultrasonic irradiation of aqueous nitric acid solutions, are presented. Control of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or HNO{sub 2} in a nitric acid medium under the effect of an ultrasonic wave can be exploited to control redox reactions of uranium and plutonium ions, particularly with respect to the oxidation of U and Pu (U(IV){yields} U(IV) or Pu(III) {yields} Pu(IV)) and the reduction of Pu (Pu(IV){yields} Pu(III). The redox behavior of uranium and plutonium ions in aqueous nitric solution subject to an ultrasonic flux is interpreted in term of effects

  11. Species of organic matter and their role in the formation of statiform uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goleva, P.K.; Uspenskij, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of investigation of organic mather (OM) from stratiform uranium ore manifestation in sedimentary Upper Proterozoic rocks of large trough with caledonian folded base are given. Role of OM in concentration of uranium-ore formations of two ore-bearing horizons, presented by rocks of facies of large lakes (''lacustrine'') and continental deltas (''alluvial'') was clarified. Characteristics of OM of rocks of ''lacustrine'' and ''alliivial'' facies, OM types, chemical composition of OM of ''alluvial'' horizon rocks, om spectrograms and diffractograms are presented. It was established that OM of ''lacustrine'' and ''alluvial'' ore-bearing horizons are presented by different morphological and genetic types, which played different roles in t.he process of uranium ore-formation. Faneiy dispersed OM, related to the category of oxidized lower kerites is present in ''lacustrine'' horizon. Ore uranium-arsenide nuneral association substitutes OM of early generation. The latest OM generation is related to epigenetic thread veinlet of dolomite and barite. In ''alluvial'' horizon OM is present in the form of carbonized vegetative residues+ ciosely assocaating with sulfides of different metals, and is presented by high-moiecular carbocyctnc hydroxy compouds. Uranium of carbonized vegetative residues is in finely dispersed state; the form of its fixation was not established. It is proposed that the major part of uranium was sorbed by OM during sedimentogenesis

  12. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  13. Final environmental statement related to the Wyoming Mineral Corporation Irigaray uranium solution mining project (Johnson County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Irigaray project consists of solution mining (in situ leaching) operations involving uranium ore deposits in Johnson County, Wyoming. Solution mining activities will include a processing facility with an annual production of 500,000 lb of U 3 O 8 from up to 50 acres of well fields through the initial license authorization. The Irigaray project has an estimated lifetime of up to 10 to 20 years with known ore deposits and the current level of solution mining technology. The site is mostly used as grazing land for cattle and sheep. Initiation of the Irigaray project would result in the temporary removal from grazing and the disturbance of approximately 60 acres during operation as proposed by the staff. All disturbed surface areas will be reclaimed and returned to their original use. Approximately 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer. 43 figs, 52 tables

  14. Separation of uranium and rare earth elements from Rirang ore leach solution by two-step precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sradjono; Erni Rifandriyah, A.; Zahardi

    1995-01-01

    Separation of uranium and rare-earth elements from Rirang ore leach solution was carried out through a two-step precipitation. Several condition affecting the separation processes were examined including solution pH, reagent concentration, and reaction prepitation time. Optimum conditions for the first and second precipitation steps include adjustment of precipitation pH to 1.3 and 2.3, respectively by the addition of 7.3% of NH 4 OH solution and allowing 60 minutes precipitation/reaction time. Based on the conditions, about 6% of Th, 3% of U, 0.9% of PO 4 3- , and none of RE were recovered in the first precipitation step meanwhile, about 99% of RE, 55% of U, 76% of PO 4 3- , and of the Th were recovered in the second step. (author). 3 refs. 4 tabs. 4 figs

  15. Modelling uranium solubilities in aqueous solutions: Validation of a thermodynamic data base for the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomenech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental solubilities of U 4+ and UO 2 2+ that are reported in the literature have been collected. Data on oxides, hydroxides and carbonates have been selected for this work. They include results both at 25 degrees C and at higher temperatures. The literature data have been compared with calculated uranium solubilities obtained with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs and an uranium thermodynamic data base selected for the Swedish nuclear waste management program. This verification/validiation exercise has shown that more experimental data is needed to determine the chemical composition of anionic uranyl hydroxo complexes as well as their equilibrium constants of formation. There is also a need for more solubility data on well characterised alkaline or alkaline-earth uranates. For the uranyl carbonate system, the calculated results agree reasonably well with the experimental literature values, which span over a wide range of pH, (CO 3 2- ) T , CO 2 (g)-pressure, and T. The experimental solubility of UO 2 (s) agrees also well with the EQ3/6 calculations for pH greater than 6. However, in more acidic solutions the experimental solubilities are higher than the calculated values. This is due to the formation of polynuclear hydroxo complexes of uranium, which are not well characterised, and are not included in the thermodynamic data base used in this study. (authors)

  16. Spectrographic determination of impurities in enriched uranium solutions; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en soluciones de uranio enriquecido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, C; Roca, M

    1980-07-01

    A spectrographic procedure for the determination of trace amounts of Al, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, L i , Hg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Ru, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn, and Zr in enriched uranyl nitrate solutions from the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels is described. After removal of uranium by either TBP or TNOA solvent extraction, the aqueous phase Is analysed by the graphite spark technique. TBP is adequate for all impurities, excepting boron and phosphorus; both of these elements can sat is factory be determined by using TNOA after the addition of mannitol to avoid boron losses. (Author) 4 refs.

  17. Equilibrium and extraction mechanism from monomeric and polimeric species of zirconium in solution. part. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, H.L.P. de.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of extraction and the equilibrium of chemical species from Zirconium solutions was studied. The multiple extraction method was used to show the species envolved in the extraction process and qualitative informations was obtained about the equilibrium between extractable species (monomers) and non-extractable species (polymers) in the aqueous phase. (M.J.C.) [pt

  18. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denison, F.H.

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  19. Spatially resolved analyses of uranium species using a coupled system made up of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, S.; Grossmann, K.; Arnold, T.

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescent properties of uranium when excited by UV light are used increasingly for spectroscope analyses of uranium species within watery samples. Here, alongside the fluorescent properties of the hexavalent oxidation phases, the tetra and pentavalent oxidation phases also play an increasingly important role. The detection of fluorescent emission spectrums on solid and biological samples using (time-resolved) laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS or LIFS respectively) has, however, the disadvantage that no statements regarding the spatial localisation of the uranium can be made. However, particularly in complex, biological samples, such statements on the localisation of the uranium enrichment in the sample are desired, in order to e.g. be able to distinguish between intra and extra-cellular uranium bonds. The fluorescent properties of uranium (VI) compounds and minerals can also be used to detect their localisation within complex samples. So the application of fluorescent microscopic methods represents one possibility to localise and visualise uranium precipitates and enrichments in biological samples, such as biofilms or cells. The confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) is especially well suited to this purpose. Coupling confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) makes it possible to localise and visualise fluorescent signals spatially and three-dimensionally, while at the same time being able to detect spatially resolved, fluorescent-spectroscopic data. This technology is characterised by relatively low detection limits from up to 1.10 -6 M for uranium (VI) compounds within the confocal volume. (orig.)

  20. Influence of a productive solution of uranium on some biochemical parameters of blood of an organism at experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svambaev, Z.A.; Svambaev, E.A.; Sultanbekov, G.A; Tusupbekova, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    In the work authors inform results on studying influence of a productive solution of uranium on some biochemical parameters of blood of an organism at experimental animals. It is established that all samples of a productive solution of uranium possesses high toxicity and causes destruction of experimental animals with infringement of a picture of blood. Experiments on influence on biochemical and hematology defined parameters of blood on chickens - broilers and on which female quails from daily age raised on cellular batteries in communities on 50 heads in conditions adequate to the requirement. Fed in plenty with the dry forages prepared according to 'Recommendations on the normalized feeding an agricultural bird' (1996), recipes 5-2; 6-1. To chickens in plenty allowed water from auto drinking bowls. Conditions of a micro climate corresponded to hygienic requirements. At carrying out of experiences studied the following parameters: preservation of a livestock, the reason of a withdrawal, weight of a body - weekly up to the end of experience, consumption of a forage, an expense of a forage for 1 kg of a gain have established weight of a body the methods standard in poultry farming. After application of a productive solution took blood from under wings of a vein and in blood have established maintenance of hemoglobin, quantity of red cells, leukocytes and a leukocyte of the formula, the maintenance of calcium and phosphorus. An application of a productive solution for experimental birds for the fifth day has caused clinical symptoms of a poisoning and destruction in groups. At the survived birds in blood it has been established changes biochemical and hematology. Week age chickens of skilled group lagged behind in growth development in comparison with control group on 30 % and at the end of the skilled period skilled have lagged behind in growth and development on 62 %. Among a livestock of chickens of skilled group of a case was more on 53 % on comparisons with the

  1. Distribution of iron during full loading of amberlite IRC-72 resin with uranium from nitrate solutions at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, J.H.; Greene, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    The integrity of resin-based fuel kernels used in the fabrication of fuel elements for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor will depend, in part, on the concentration of iron incorporated in the resin particles during their loading with uranium. Consequently, assessment of chemical specifications for iron as an impurity in uranyl nitrate solution should be based on its distribution during the resin loading operation. For this purpose, the behavior of iron, as an impurity in uranyl nitrate solutions, was investigated under equilibrium conditions at 30 0 C during full loading of Amberlite IRC-72 cation exchange reaction were derived from calculations based on complex coordination of ferric ion with the resin over the nitrate ion concentration range of approx. 0.5 to 2 N

  2. Restoration of groundwater after solution mining at the Highland Uranium Project, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J. [Waste Technology Group, British Nuclear Fuels PLC, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Huffman, L. [Power Resources Inc., Highland Uranium Mine, Glenrock, Wyoming (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Highland Project, located in Converse County, Wyoming, has had a successful 11 year history of in-situ leach mining of Tertiary roll-front uranium deposits. The uranium ore is oxidized and solubilized by circulating native groundwater, containing additional dissolved O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, within confined fluvial aquifers at depths of 200 - 250 m. The changing chemistry of this groundwater during leaching is discussed, as are the various treatment techniques that have been used to restore this fluid at the end of mining. Examples are provided which demonstrate the varying effectiveness of each technique for the reduction of elevated concentrations of different groundwater parameters. The complications arising from the proximity of the earliest wellfields to abandoned, conventional mine workings, as well as unexpected side effects from each restoration method, have combined to make an interesting case history from this long established mining operation. (author)

  3. Effect of solution composition on determination of uranium (6) microquantities by laser-induced luminescence method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskaya, G.I.; Zakharova, G.V.; Chibisova, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of cation and anion composition of natural waters (sea water, ground water, etc.) on the uranium (6) determination in the form of uranyl complexes with Na 2 O3SiO 2 using the laser-induced luminescence method with the determination limit 2x10 -11 g/ml, has been studied. The dependence of the luminescence intensity of uranyl polysilicate complexes on the inorganic ion concentration has been measured. The measurement results permitted to determine the maximum permissible concentrations (MAC) of ions, the values of which are presented. The results reproducibility is characterized by a relative standard deveation within 0.01-0.05. It follows from the data analysis that the MPC of impurities vary from 10 -8 to 10 -2 g/ml. The MPCs of uranium as determined in the form of polysilicate complexes, are shown to be close to the values obtained during uranium determination in the form of complexes with fluoran for the CO 3 2- , Ni, Cu ions and they are by an order higher for the Na, K, Cl - , SO 4 2- , HPO 4 2- , Mn ions

  4. Preliminary evaluation of uranium deposits. A geostatistical study of drilling density in Wyoming solution fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandefur, R.L.; Grant, D.C.

    1976-01-01

    Studies of a roll-front uranium deposit in Shirley Basin Wyoming indicate that preliminary evaluation of the reserve potential of an ore body is possible with less drilling than currently practiced in industry. Estimating ore reserves from sparse drilling is difficult because most reserve calculation techniques do not give the accuracy of the estimate. A study of several deposits with a variety of drilling densities shows that geostatistics consistently provides a method of assessing the accuracy of an ore reserve estimate. Geostatistics provides the geologist with an additional descriptive technique - one which is valuable in the economic assessment of a uranium deposit. Closely spaced drilling on past properties provides both geological and geometric insight into the occurrence of uranium in roll-front type deposits. Just as the geological insight assists in locating new ore bodies and siting preferential drill locations, the geometric insight can be applied mathematically to evaluate the accuracy of a new ore reserve estimate. By expressing the geometry in numerical terms, geostatistics extracts important geological characteristics and uses this information to aid in describing the unknown characteristics of a property. (author)

  5. Carbonate heap leach of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turney, W.R.; Mason, C.F.V.; Longmire, P.

    1994-01-01

    A new approach to removal of uranium from soils based on existing heap leach mining technologies proved highly effective for remediation of soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) near Cincinnati, Ohio. In laboratory tests, remediation of uranium-contaminated soils by heap leaching with carbonate salt solutions was demonstrated in column experiments. An understanding of the chemical processes that occur during carbonate leach of uranium from soils may lead to enhancement of uranium removal. Carbonate leaching requires the use of an integrated and closed circuit process, wherein the leach solutions are recycled and the reagents are reused, resulting in a minimum secondary waste stream. Carbonate salt leach solution has two important roles. Primarily, the formation of highly soluble anionic carbonate uranyl species, including uranyl dicarbonate (UO 2 CO 32 = ) and uranyl tricarbonate (UO 2 CO 33 4- ), allows for high concentration of uranium in a leachate solution. Secondly, carbonate salts are nearly selective for dissolution of uranium from uranium contaminated soils. Other advantages of the carbonate leaching process include (1) the high solubility, (2) the selectivity, (3) the purity of the solution produced, (4) the relative ease with which a uranium product can be precipitated directly from the leachate solution, and (5) the relatively non-corrosive and safe handling characteristics of carbonate solutions. Experiments conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated the effectiveness of carbonate leach. Efficiencies of uranium removal from the soils have been as high as 92 percent. Higher molar strength carbonate solutions (∼0.5M) proved more effective than lower molar strength solutions (∼ 0.1M). Uranium removal is also a function of lixiviant loading rate. Furthermore, agglomeration of the soils with cement resulted in less effective uranium removal

  6. Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Marsh, Terence L.

    2010-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remedi...

  7. Cyclopentadienyl uranium, neptunium and plutonium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plews, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis presents the preparation and characterisation of a number of mono, bis and tris(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of uranium(IV), neptunium(IV) and plutonium(IV). The work of previous studies on mono(cyclopentadienyl) thorium and uranium complexes has been extended, and a range of isostructural neptunium species isolated. Their mode of formation and stability in tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile solutions was investigated. (author)

  8. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF 6 and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  9. Recovery and removal of uranium by using plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akira; Sakaguchi, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    The uranium-adsorbing abilities of seven plant wastes were investigated. High abilities to adsorb uranium from non-saline water containing 10 mg dm -3 of uranium were observed with a number of plant wastes tested. However, with seawater supplemented with 10 mg dm -3 of uranium, similar results were found only with chestnut residues. When the plant wastes were immobilized with formaldehyde, their ability to adsorb uranium was increased. Uranium and copper ions were more readily adsorbed by all plant wastes tested than other metal ions from a solution containing a mixture of seven different heavy metals. The selective adsorption of heavy metal ions differs with different species of plant wastes. The immobilization of peanut inner skin, orange peel and grapefruit peel increased the selectivity for uranium. (author)

  10. Study and application of new chelating resin to recovery uranium from in-situ leach solution with high content saline chloride ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Qiu Yueshuang; Feng Yu; Deng Huidong; Zhao Chaoya

    2014-01-01

    Research on the adsorption and elution property of D814 chelating resin was carried out aiming at the difficult separation of uranium from high content saline chloride ion in situ leach liquor and the adsorption mechanism is also discussed. Influence factors such as contact time, pH value, Ca"2"+, Mg"2"+ and Cl"- concentration etc. to the resin adsorption were studied. Experimental results show that adsorption rate is lowly which need 6h to arrive at the adsorption equilibrium. The resin adsorption uranium pH in the solution is from l.33 to 9. When total salinity is over 20 g/L, calcium ion, and magnesium ion is about 3 g/L, there are no big influence on resin adsorption capacity. The resin has good chloride ion resistance. When chloride ion is over 60 g/L, it is no influence on resin adsorption uranium. Column experiment results indicate that ratio of saturation volume to break-through point volume is l.82, resin saturation uranium capacity is 40.5 mg. U/_g_(_∓_)_R. When elution volume bed number is 23, the eluted solution uranium concentration is below 80 mg/L. The elution rate of the uranium is 96.2%. (authors)

  11. Dynamic nuclear-polarization studies of paramagnetic species in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glad, W.E.

    1982-07-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) was used to measure the electron spin lattice relaxation times, T 1 , of transition metal ions in aqueous solution. Saturation which is induced in the electron spin system is transferred to the solvent proton spins by dipole-dipole interactions. The change in the polarization of the proton spins is much larger than it is in the electron spins. The change in proton polarization is easily measured by proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). In one experimental arrangement the sample solution was continuously flowed through a microwave cavity to the NMR coil. The NMR was observed with a continuous wave NMR spectrometer. In a second arrangement the whole sample tube was moved from within the microwave cavity to the NMR coil in less than 40 ms by a blast of compressed air. The NMR was then observed with a pulse-Fourier-transform spectrometer. With the second arrangement a mean-square microwave magnetic field at the sample of more than 10 G 2 is obtainable with 14 W of microwave power. Measurements of DNP at 9 GHz were made on aqueous solutions of VO 2+ , Mn 2+ , Cr(CN) 6 3- , Cu 2+ and Cu(ethylenediamine) 2 (H 2 0) 2 2+ ions from 3 to 60 0 C. It was also possible to observe DNP on resolved proton resonances from mixed water-acetonitrile solutions of VO 2+ and Cr(CN) 6 3- ions

  12. Final Environmental Impact Statement to construct and operate the Crownpoint Uranium Solution Mining Project, Crownpoint, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of issuing a combined source and 11e(2) byproduct material license and minerals operating leases for Federal and Indian lands to Hydro Resources, Inc. (HRI). This action would authorize HRI to conduct in-situ leach uranium mining in McKinley County, New Mexico. Such mining would involve drilling wells to access the ore bodies, then recirculating groundwater with added oxygen to mobilize uranium found in the ore. Uranium would then be removed from the solution using ion exchange technology in processing plants located at three separate sites. As proposed by HRI, a central plant would provide drying and packaging equipment for the entire project. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed action was prepared by an interagency review group comprising staff from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Land Management, and published in October 1994. After evaluating the environmental impacts of the proposed action in the DEIS, the reviewing agencies concluded that the appropriate action was to issue the requested license and proposed leases authorizing HRI to proceed with the project. This FEIS reevaluates the proposed licensing action on the basis of written and oral comments received on the DEIS and on additional information obtained in 1995 and 1996. The FEIS describes and evaluates (1) the purpose of and need for the proposed action, (2) alternatives to the proposed action, (3) the environmental resources that could be affected by the proposed action and alternatives, (4) the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, and (5) the economic costs and benefits associated with the proposed action. Based on this assessment, the FEIS makes recommendations concerning the requested license and proposed leases

  13. Liquid-liquid extraction of uranium from nitric acid solution using di-n-butylsulfoxide in petroleum ether as extractant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.H.; Shahida, S. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Muzaffarabad (Pakistan); Ali, A. [Nuclear Chemistry Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-07-01

    A simple, efficient and economical liquid-liquid extraction method has been developed for quantitative extraction of uranium from 2 M HNO{sub 3} using di-n-butyl sulfoxide in petroleum ether. The dependence of the partition reaction of U(VI) on the concentration of HNO{sub 3}, extractant and temperature was studied. The reaction was found to be inversely dependent upon the temperature and the values for related thermodynamics functions ({delta}H, {delta}S, {delta}G) for extraction equilibrium were determined to be -33.6 kJ/mol, -1.29 kJ/mol/degree and -0.11 kJ/mol/degree, respectively. The effect of Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as salting-out agent and diverse ions on the extraction was examined. The salting-out agent slightly enhanced the extraction. All cations studied have showed negligible effect on the extraction, whereas phosphate and fluoride interfered seriously. Among others, oxalate, citrate and sulphide ions affect the extraction to a lesser extent. Uranium was successfully extracted from a synthetic mixture of Ti{sup +4}, Zr{sup +4}, Hf{sup +4} and Th{sup +4} using EDTA as masking agent. Among strippants, deionized water was found most suitable, and the recovery of uranium was noted to be {>=} 96%. The stoichiometric composition of the extracted species was found to be UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} . 2DBSO. The extraction mechanism is discussed on the basis of the results obtained. The extractant has high loading as well as recycling capacity without any degradation. The method was also applied to the Standard Reference Material (NBL-49) and the measured value was found to be in agreement with the reported value within {+-}2% deviation. (orig.)

  14. NF ISO 7097-1. Nuclear fuel technology - Uranium dosimetry in solutions, in uranium hexafluoride and in solids - Part 1: reduction with iron (II) / oxidation with potassium bi-chromate / titration method; NF ISO 7097-1. Technologie du combustible nucleaire. Dosage de l'uranium dans des solutions, l'hexafluorure d'uranium et des solides. Partie 1: reduction par fer (II) / oxydation par bichromate de potassium / methode par titrage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This standard document describes the mode of operation of three different methods for the quantitative dosimetry of uranium in solutions, in UF{sub 6} and in solids: reduction by iron (II), oxidation by potassium bi-chromate and titration. (J.S.)

  15. Mobilisation and immobilisation of uranium-DOC-species in three waste dumps in the district of Schlema/Alberoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupsch, H.

    1998-01-01

    The modelling of geochemical processes needs the detailed and comprehensive knowledge of all chemical interactions which are able to exist in the flow path of waste dumps, soils and aquifer. This includes the adsorption, displacement and transport of heavy metal species of fulvic and humic acids which represent the main amount of DOC in the liquid / solid system of flow path. Comparative measurements of DOC concentrations in the input and output flow at the three waste dumps in the district Schlema / Alberoda have indicated that DOC is produced and / or supplied within of waste dumps. The speciation of heavy metal compounds of fulvic and humic acids was realized by means of two methods (sequential chromatographic analysis SCA; ions focussed electrophoresis IFE). Between 5 and 20% of uranium in the flow path exist in the form of fulvic and humic acids species in which the bond of uranium is permanently. Their distribution coefficients are strongly correlated with the pH values of the several geochemical systems. (orig.) [de

  16. Hazelnut shell activated carbon. A potential adsorbent material for the decontamination of uranium(VI) from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mijia Zhu; Hankui Chai; Jun Yao; China University of Geosciences; Yunpeng Chen; Zhengji Yi

    2016-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to study the ability of hazelnut shell activated carbon (HSAC) to remove uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The effects of various operational parameters, such as contact time (0-200 min), pH (2.0-7.0), initial U(VI) concentration (20-240 mg/L) and adsorbent dosage (4.0-50 g/L) were examined. Results showed that the adsorption process was rapid within the first 100 min and then achieved equilibrium at 140 min. The kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order rate equation, and the adsorption process was well fit with the Langmuir model. HSAC exhibited good uranium adsorption capacity (16.3 mg/g) at pH 6.0, 140 min contact time and 8.0 g/L adsorbent dosage. Furthermore, the regeneration efficiency was 96.3 % over five cycles under the optimum operational conditions. These properties revealed that HSAC can be a suitable adsorbent for the fast and convenient removal of U(VI) from contaminated water. (author)

  17. Matrix product solution of an inhomogeneous multi-species TASEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Chikashi; Mallick, Kirone

    2013-03-01

    We study a multi-species exclusion process with inhomogeneous hopping rates and find a matrix product representation for the stationary state of this model. The matrices belong to the tensor algebra of the fundamental quadratic algebra associated with the exclusion process. We show that our matrix product representation is equivalent to a graphical construction proposed by Ayyer and Linusson (2012 arXiv:1206.0316), which generalizes an earlier probabilistic construction due to Ferrari and Martin (2007 Ann. Prob. 35 807).

  18. Bois-Noirs ore. Recovery of uranium of solutions from acid treatment. Results of industrial tests at the Gueugnon plant; Minerai des Bois-Noirs. Recuperation de l'uranium des solutions d'attaques acides. Resultats des essais industriels effectues a l'usine de Gueugnon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bris, J

    1959-04-01

    Industrial-scale tests are reported of the efficiency of two recovery processes for the separation of uranium from sulfuric acid pickling solutions used on ore from Bois-Noirs, at the Gueugnon works. The final stage of each process is sodium uranate. The earlier part of the report deals with tests of the separation of uranium from foreign metals by fractional precipitation. The second part deals with the separation of uranium from these metals by carbonation of the solutions. (author) [French] Le present rapport concerne les essais industriels de deux procedes de recuperation de l'uranium de solutions d'attaque sulfurique du minerai des Bois-Noirs a l'usine de Gueugnon. Le stade final pour ces deux procedes etant l'uranate de sodium, une premiere partie est consacree aux essais de separation de l'uranium des metaux etrangers par precipitation fractionnee; une deuxieme partie est consacree aux essais de separation de l'uranium des metaux etrangers par carbonatation des solutions d'attaque du minerai. (auteur)

  19. Competitive biosorption of thorium and uranium by Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, A.; Tsuruta, T.

    2004-01-01

    Eighteen species of bacteria were screened for abilities to adsorb thorium and uranium. High adsorption capacity was observed for thorium by Arthrobacter nicotianae and Micrococcus luteus, and for uranium by Arthrobacter nicotianae. The adsorption of both thorium and uranium by Micrococcus luteus cells was rapid, was affected by the solution pH, and obeyed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm for binary systems in a competitive manner taking the ionic charge of the metal ion into account. The thorium selectivity in the competitive adsorption is assumed to be caused by the faster adsorption and the slower desorption rates of thorium than those of uranium. (author)

  20. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Calmoi, Rodica; Melniciuc-Puica, Nicoleta

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  1. Rare-earth elements and uranium in high-temperature solutions from East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vent field (130N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michard, A.; Albarede, F.; Michard, G.; Minster, J.F.; Charlou, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The mobility of rare-earth elements (REE) and U during hydrothermal alteration of the basalts at spreading centres has long been a matter of concern because of its bearing on the evolution and recycling of the oceanic crust. Previous approaches to this problem have been indirect, through studies on altered dredged basalts or ophiolites. Sampling of hydrothermal vent waters from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) at 13 0 N is reported. It provides the first direct evidence of REE-enriched solutions which, however, leave the budget of these elements in the crust and the ocean rather unmodified. In constrast, uranium, like magnesium, is quantitatively taken up from the seawater during the hydrothermal process. (author)

  2. Sorption and preconcentration of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions using multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zolfonoun, Ehsan; Yousefi, Seyed Reza [NFCRS, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    The presented study investigates application of MWCNTs-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocomposite as an adsorbent for solid phase extraction and preconcentration of uranium and thorium prior to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry determination. The magnetic MWCNTs with adsorbed analytes can be easily separated from the aqueous solution by using an external magnet without additional centrifugation or filtration of the sample. Due to the high surface area of MWCNTs, satisfactory concentration factor and extraction recovery can be achieved with only 10 mg nanocomposite in 5 min. The effects of pH, sorbent amount, eluent type, chelating reagent concentration, sample volume and time on the recovery of the analytes were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits for U(VI) and Th(IV) were 0.44 and 0.27 μg L{sup -1}, respectively.

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of uranium(III) by aqueous acidic solutions of iodine and bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adegite, A.; Egboh, H.; Ojo, J.F.; Olieh, R.

    1977-01-01

    The rates of oxidation of U 3+ by I 2 and Br 2 in aqueous acidic solutions have been investigated. The rate equations for iodine and bromine are shown, together with the corresponding activation parameters. An excellent correlation has been obtained between the rates of uranium(III) reduction of some oxidants, including iodine and bromine, and the free energies of these reactions. Since these other non-halogen reactions go via the outer-sphere mechanism, it is concluded that at least the first step in the two-step oxidation of U 3+ by Br 2 , I 2 , or [I 3 ] - is outer sphere. The homonuclear exchange rate constant ksub(ex) for U 3+ + U 4+ is deduced to be 1.66 +- 0.16 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 . (author)

  4. Selective separation of uranium from nuclear waste solution by bis (2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic) acid in ionic liquid and molecular diluents: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Manpreet; Sengupta, Arijit; Murali, M.S.; Adya, V.C.; Kadam, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquid has been world-wide considered as the potential 'green' alternatives to the molecular diluents. A comparative study was carried out for studying selective separation of uranium from radioactive waste solution using Bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic) acid in molecular diluent (xylene) and ionic liquid (C 8 mimNTf 2 ). For ionic liquid based system, the extraction kinetics was found to be slower compared to the molecular diluents. This was attributed to the higher viscosity of ionic liquid. In ionic liquid the extraction occurs with the predominance of 'ion exchange' mechanism through (UO 2 (NO 3 ). 2L) + species, while for xylene based system 'solvation' mechanism predominates at higher feed acidity. The extraction process in ionic liquid was found to be thermodynamically more favoured than in xylene. The nature of the extracted species was found to be different in ionic liquid and xylene as obtained from difference in luminescence emission profiles and lifetime of the extracted complex. Ionic liquid based system was found to be radiolytically more stable than the molecular diluents based solvent system. Na 2 CO 3 solution was found to back extract the uranyl ion almost quantitatively (99.9 %) from the loaded organic phase but overall stripping from ionic liquid phase is comparatively poorer than that of xylene phase. The processing of Simulated High Level Waste (SHLW) of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) or Research Reactor (RR) origin revealed that bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl phosphinic) acid can effectively be used for the preferential extraction of U with better selectivity for ionic liquid phase. But the ion exchange mechanism is one of the disadvantages for its plant scale application. (author)

  5. Purification and concentration of uranium-bearing solutions at the plants of the Societe industrielle des minerais de l'Ouest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollerin, G.

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the various processes for purification of uranium-bearing solutions used at the plants of the Societe industrielle des minerais de l'Ouest (SIMO) from their commissioning up to the present time, together with the purification circuit adopted at the two plants at present operating in Niger. (author)

  6. Possibilities of uranium recovering as by product of copper lixiviation solution in Salobo 3-Alfa-Carajas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohn, H.; Ferraioli, R.N.M.

    1983-05-01

    Geochemical and geophysics regional surveys performed by Nuclebras in 'Carajas, Para' State, show several favourable areas for uranium prospecting, including the 'Salobo 3-Alfa' copper mine. Some studies for increasing the Knowledge of uranium quantity and proportion and for accompanying the pilot plant installation, aiming the uranium extraction during the cycel of ore treatment in 'Salobo 3-Alfa' mine are described [pt

  7. Recovery of uranium from different acidic solutions by di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) and TOPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.L.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2004-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of uranium with DNPPA in combination with TOPO has been established from different acidic media. The extraction order of uranium from these media has been found as perchlorate>nitrate>chloride>sulphate>phosphate. Based on these results extraction of uranium from samples of leach liquors generated in the plant has been carried out and >99% recovery was obtained

  8. Assessment and evaluation of speciation tools for the study of uranium (6) circulating biological species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scapolan, St.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is the development of tools allowing the study of uranium VI speciation in inorganic and organic environments, and in particular in the blood environment. The characterization of the different complexed forms of the uranyl ion has been improved by combining two techniques: the time resolution laser spectro-fluorimetry (TRLS) and the capillary electrophoresis (CE). CE is a developing separative analytical technique with a strong resolution. Therefore, the following studies have been carried out: the analysis of the speciation of hydroxo complexes of the uranyl ion by indirect UV detection, with the qualitative identification of the (UO 2 ) 2 (OH) 2 2+ and (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + complexes; the application of the iso-electrical focussing mode in order to show the uranium-transferrin complexing; the evaluation of the electrophoretic mobility of UO 2 2+ and the interactions with the phosphate, hydroxo-isobutyric acid (HIBA) and citrate ligands; and the study of the U(VI)-blood serum system with the separation of the different seric proteins and the influence of U(VI) on electrophoretic profiles. two points are important to consider in the development of the system: the coupling with an on-line detector (mass spectrometer, counter, laser) and the surface grafting of the capillaries used. The TRLS is a system used in geology, in the Purex process chemistry, in medical and environmental control, and in nuclear wastes management. After having analyzed the influence of different ligands (citrate, phosphate, carbonate, transferrin) in the fluorescence spectra of uranium (VI), the complexing conditional constant (K) of the U(VI)-transferrin system has been evaluated for the first time using a mathematical model and the titration. A study performed on blood plasma has permitted to show a U(VI)-phosphates complexing and finally, three phosphate complexes UO 2 H 2 PO 4 + , UO 2 HPO 4 and UO 2 PO 4 + have been characterized both spectrally and temporarily. (J.S.)

  9. The source of groundwater and solutes to Many Devils Wash at a former uranium mill site in Shiprock, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andrew J.; Ranalli, Anthony J.; Austin, Stephen A.; Lawlis, Bryan R.

    2016-04-21

    The Shiprock Disposal Site is the location of the former Navajo Mill (Mill), a uranium ore-processing facility, located on a terrace overlooking the San Juan River in the town of Shiprock, New Mexico. Following the closure of the Mill, all tailings and associated materials were encapsulated in a disposal cell built on top of the former Mill and tailings piles. The milling operations, conducted at the site from 1954 to 1968, created radioactive tailings and process-related wastes that are now found in the groundwater. Elevated concentrations of constituents of concern—ammonium, manganese, nitrate, selenium, strontium, sulfate, and uranium—have also been measured in groundwater seeps in the nearby Many Devils Wash arroyo, leading to the inference that these constituents originated from the Mill. These constituents have also been reported in groundwater that is associated with Mancos Shale, the bedrock that underlies the site. The objective of this report is to increase understanding of the source of water and solutes to the groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash and to establish the background concentrations for groundwater that is in contact with the Mancos Shale at the site. This report presents evidence on three working hypotheses: (1) the water and solutes in Many Devils Wash originated from the operations at the former Mill, (2) groundwater in deep aquifers is upwelling under artesian pressure to recharge the shallow groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash, and (3) the groundwater beneath Many Devils Wash originates as precipitation that infiltrates into the shallow aquifer system and discharges to Many Devils Wash in a series of springs on the east side of the wash. The solute concentrations in the shallow groundwater of Many Devils Wash would result from the interaction of the water and the Mancos Shale if the source of water was upwelling from deep aquifers or precipitation.In order to compare the groundwater from various wells to groundwater that has been

  10. Binding capacity and root penetration of seven species selected for revegetation of uranium tailings at Jaduguda in Jharkhand, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Lal; Soni, Prafulla [Ecology and Environment Division, Forest Research Institute, Dehradun (India)

    2010-08-25

    Uranium from ores mined at the three mines - Jaduguda, Bhatin and Narwapahar (Jharkhand) - is processed in the mill and the waste emerges as tailings. The recorded radioactivity level in these tailings is very low, but to avoid any long-term effect of these tailings on the atmosphere, humans, cattle as well as native flora and fauna, the tailings are covered with 30 cm layer of soil. This reduces the gamma radiation and radon emission levels. However, to consolidate the soil covering the tailings on a sustainable basis, the area needs to be revegetated by plant species having shallow root systems, good conservation value and low canopy cover. Another important criterion for selection of species is that they should not have any ethnobotanical relevance to the surrounding villages. Considering these criteria, seven native plant species of forestry origin, viz. Colebrookea oppositifolia, Dodonaea viscosa, Furcraea foetida, Imperata cylindrica, Jatropha gossypifolia, Pogostemon benghalense and Saccharum spontaneum have been selected for experimental trials. We describe here the strategies adopted for consolidation of radioactivity in tailings, revegetation practices used and the ecological role of the selected species in consolidating the tailings. (author)

  11. Binding capacity and root penetration of seven species selected for revegetation of uranium tailings at Jaduguda in Jharkhand, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lal; Soni, Prafulla

    2010-01-01

    Uranium from ores mined at the three mines - Jaduguda, Bhatin and Narwapahar (Jharkhand) - is processed in the mill and the waste emerges as tailings. The recorded radioactivity level in these tailings is very low, but to avoid any long-term effect of these tailings on the atmosphere, humans, cattle as well as native flora and fauna, the tailings are covered with 30 cm layer of soil. This reduces the gamma radiation and radon emission levels. However, to consolidate the soil covering the tailings on a sustainable basis, the area needs to be revegetated by plant species having shallow root systems, good conservation value and low canopy cover. Another important criterion for selection of species is that they should not have any ethnobotanical relevance to the surrounding villages. Considering these criteria, seven native plant species of forestry origin, viz. Colebrookea oppositifolia, Dodonaea viscosa, Furcraea foetida, Imperata cylindrica, Jatropha gossypifolia, Pogostemon benghalense and Saccharum spontaneum have been selected for experimental trials. We describe here the strategies adopted for consolidation of radioactivity in tailings, revegetation practices used and the ecological role of the selected species in consolidating the tailings. (author)

  12. Uptake of uranium from sea water by microalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaguchi, Takashi; Horikoshi, Takao; Nakajima, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The uptake of uranium from aqueous systems especially from sea water by various microalgae was investigated. The freshwater microalgae, Chlorella regularis, Scenedesmus bijuga, Scenedesmus chloreloides, Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlamydomonas angulosa, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, accumulated relatively large amounts of uranium from the solution containing uranium only. The concentration factors of the above mentioned algae were: Chlorella regularis 3930, Chlamydomonas 2330 - 3400, Scenedesmus 803 - 1920. The uptake of uranium from sea water by Chlorella regularis was inhibited markedly by the co-existence of carbonate ions. Chlorella cells could take up a great quantity of uranium from decarbonated sea water. The uptake of uranium was affected by the pH of sea water, and the amount of uranium absorbed was maximum at pH 5. The experiment was carried out to screen marine microalgae which have the ability to accumulate a large amount of uranium from sea water. The uptake of uranium from sea water by marine microalgae of different species turned out to be in the following decreasing order: Synechococcus > Chlamydomonas >> Chlorella > Dunaliella > Platymonas > Calothrix > Porphyridium. The amount of uranium absorbed differed markedly with different species of marine microalgae. (author)

  13. Reduction of neptunium(V) and uranium(VI) in bicarbonate solutions by iron(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogolev, A.V.; Zakharova, E.V.; Rodygina, N.I.; Fedoseev, A.M.; Shilov, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of Np(VI) and Fe(II) compounds in bicarbonate solutions is investigated. Interaction of Np(V) with Fe(II) in the presence of phthalate-ions is studied briefly. Fe(II) compounds reduce Np(V) compounds in saturated with Ar or CO 2 solutions with any bicarbonate-ion concentrations. Chemical reaction kinetics is studied. Reduction of U(VI) by Fe(II) compounds takes place in the case of diluted bicarbonate solutions. UO 2 and FeOOH are products of reaction at raised temperatures [ru

  14. An analytic solution for the enrichment of uranium hexafluoride in long countercurrent centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetz, E.

    1977-01-01

    The paper describes an analytic solution for the enrichment and the separative power of long countercurrent centrifuges. Equations to derive optimal operation parameters like feed and feed input height are derived and solved. (orig.) [de

  15. The effect of pore diameter in the arrangement of chelating species grafted onto silica surfaces with application to uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlot, A.; Cuer, F.; Grandjean, A.

    2017-01-01

    A series of five silica supports with different pore diameters were functionalized in two steps by post-grafting, producing three types of material: (1) initial supports with pores smaller than 4 nm are heterogeneously functionalized because of steric effects; (2) when the pores range from 5 to 20 nm in diameter, a homogeneous organic monolayer is grafted onto the silica skeleton; and (3) when the pores are larger than 30 nm, an organic multilayer covalently linked to the surface is obtained. These hybrid materials were then used to extract uranium from a sulphuric solution. Our results show that the efficiency, capacity and selectivity of the extraction can be controlled through the effect the initial pore size has on the organic structures that form therein. After regeneration moreover, these materials can be reused with the same efficiency. (authors)

  16. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  17. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  18. Laser enhanced reductions of uranium(VI) ion in aqueous phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.Y.; Harada, M.; Tomiyasu, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Takashima, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of U(VI) ions with inorganic anions (I - , Br - , Cl - , NCS - ) and organic compounds (1-hexene, cyclohexene, pyridine) in phosphoric acid were studied for the purpose of finding an efficient method of adjusting the oxidation states of uranium ions in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The formation of U(IV) was observed in the photoreactions with I - , Br - and NCS - , but not with Cl - . The yield of U(VI) increased in the order, Br - - - . This order was the same as the quenching rate constants of the excited U(VI) ions with these anions, and the reverse of their standard redox potentials. The rates of the formation of U(IV) in the presence of Br - were measured spectrophotometrically. It was found that the rate equation was first order in both [U(VI)] and [Br - ]. The results were reasonably interpreted by a series of reaction processes involving U(V) and Br radical. With organic molecules, 1-hexene, cyclohexene, and pyridine, the formation of U(IV) were observed. The yield of U(IV) increased in the order pyridine < 1-hexene < cyclohexene. This order is the reverse of their vertical ionization potentials, suggesting an electron transfer mechanism between these organic molecules and excited U(VI). (author)

  19. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  20. Iodine uptake by spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) plants grown in solution culture: effects of iodine species and solution concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y-G; Huang, Y-Z; Hu, Y; Liu, Y-X

    2003-04-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of iodine species and solution concentrations on iodine uptake by spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Five iodine concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 and 100 microM) for iodate (IO(3)(-)) and iodide (I(-)) were used. Results show that higher concentrations of I(-) (> or =10 microM) had some detrimental effect on plant growth, while IO(3)(-) had little effect on the biomass production of spinach plants. Increases in iodine concentration in the growth solution significantly enhanced I concentrations in plant tissues. The detrimental effect of I(-) on plant growth was probably due to the excessively high accumulation of I in plant tissues. The solution-to-spinach leaf transfer factors (TF(leaf), fresh weight basis) for plants treated with iodide were between 14.2 and 20.7 at different solution concentrations of iodide; TF(leaf) for plants treated with iodate decreased gradually from 23.7 to 2.2 with increasing solution concentrations of iodate. The distribution coefficients (DCs) of I between leaves and roots were constantly higher for plants treated with iodate than those treated with iodide. DCs for plants treated with iodide increased with increasing solution concentrations of iodide, while DCs for plants treated with iodate (around 5.5) were similar across the range of solution concentrations of iodate used in this experiment. The implications of iodine accumulation in leafy vegetables in human iodine nutrition are also discussed. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Interactions of uranium (VI) with biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-01-01

    In this study a detailed investigation was made of natural biofilms from two uranium-contaminated sites, namely the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony) and the ground surface of the former Grassenhalde tailing heap in Thuringia. A predominance of uranyl sulphate (UO 2 SO 4 ), a highly mobile, solute uranium species, was found in the mine waters of both sites. In this study an investigation was made of the capacity of Euglena mutabilis cells for bioaccumulation of uranium in a pH range of 3 to 6 using living cells and sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulphate (3.48 g/l) as background media. At acidic pH values in the range from 3 to 4 it was possible to remove more than 90% of the original uranium content from the test solution regardless of the medium being used. The speciation of the uranium accumulated in the Euglena cells was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). It was found that a new uranium species of low variability forms on the cells independent of the background medium, state of life of the cells and pH value. By comparing the data from the LIFS measurements with reference values it was possible to narrow down the identity of the uranium species to one bonded to (organo) phosphate and/or carboxylic functional groups. Using time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy it was possible to demonstrate carboxylic bonding of uranium to dead cells. However it was not possible to exclude (organo) complexation with this method. An investigation of the specific location of the uranium on or in the cells using combined CLSM/LIFS technology yielded first indications of intracellular accumulation of uranium in the living cells. Supplementary TEM/EDX measurements confirmed the intracellular uptake, showing it to occur in round to oval cell organelles which are thought to be vacuoles or vacuole-like vesicles. It was not possible to detect uranium on dead cells using these methods. This points to passive, homogeneously distributed biosorption of

  2. Formation mechanism of uranium minerals at sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shengfu; Zhang Yun

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the behavior and existence form of uranium in different geochemical environments, existence form of uranium and uranium minerals species, this paper expounds the formation mechanism of main commercial uranium mineral--pitchblende: (1) uranium is a valence-changeable element. It is reactivated and migrates in oxidized environment, and is reduced and precipitated in reducing environment; (2) [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- , [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 ] 2- coming from oxidized environment react with reductants such as organic matter, sulfide and low-valence iron at the redox front to form simple uranium oxide--pitchblende; (3)the adsorption of uranium by organic matter and clay minerals accelerates the reduction and the concentration of uranium. Therefore, it is considered, that the reduction of SO 4 2- by organic matter to form H 2 S, and the reduction of UO 2 2+ by H 2 S are the main reasons for the formation of pitchblende. This reaction is extensively and universally available in neutral and weakly alkaline carbonate solution. The existense of reductants such as H 2 S is the basic factor leading to the decrease of Eh in environments and the oversaturation of UO 2 2+ at the redox front in groundwater, thus accelerating the adsorption and the precipitation of uranium

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Groundwater prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits: the merits of mineral-solution equilibria versus single element tracer methods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatham, J.R.; Wanty, R.B.; Langmuir, D.

    1981-02-01

    Groundwaters from aquifers in two different sandstone-type uranium mining districts in Texas and Wyoming were collected and chemically analyzed. The data were used to compare the merits of using the computed saturation state of the groundwater with respect to uranium minerals, to that of single-element tracers in the groundwater for geochemical prospecting. Chemical properties of the Texas waters were influenced locally by preferred groundwater flow within buried fluvial channel deposits; upward leakage of brines along growth faults into the aquifer; and the establishment of a redox interface (Eh = 0 volts) within the aquifer. Chemical characteristics of aquifer waters in Wyoming changed gradually downdip, reflecting regional homogeneity in groundwater flow and a more gradual downdip reduction of Eh values than in Texas. The most reliable indicator of reduced uranium ore in both study sites was the saturation state of groundwater with respect to uraninite or coffinite. For both minerals, this saturation state increased from 15 to 20 log units as reduced ore deposits were approached over distances of 3 to 4.5 km in both sites. Tyuyamunite and carnotite approached or exceeded saturation in some oxidized waters of the Texas site reflecting possible occurrences of these minerals. The radiogenic elements Ta and Rn were excellent indicators of ore directly within the deposits, where anomalous values were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude above background. Helium also increased near the ore, although anomalies were generally displaced in the direction of groundwater flow. Uranium and uranium isotope values did not individually pinpoint ore, but may be used together to classify groundwater samples in terms of their position relative to uranium mineralization

  4. Separation of uranium from aqueous solutions using calix[6]arenes in liquid-liquid extraction as well as solid phase extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmeide, K.; Geipel, G.; Bernhard, G.

    2004-11-01

    The suitability of different calyx[n] arene types for uranyl extraction from liquid solutions was examined by means of liquid-liquid extraction using aqueous phases and organic solvents of varying compositions. It was found that COOH-derivatised calyx[6] arenes have good extraction properties and can even be used in the acid pH range. The use of calixarene-modified fleeces for the separation of uranyl from aqueous phases was examined in batch experiments with pH and uranyl concentration as variables and in the presence or absence of competing ions. The results showed that calixarene-modified fleeces can be used for uranium separation starting from pH 4. At pH 5, up to a maximum of 7.6 x 10 -7 mol uranium can be bound per 1 g of calixarene-modified fleece. The separation of uranyl from synthetic pit waters was examined as a means of testing the separation capacity of calixarene-modified fleeces in environmentally sensitive waters. Studies on the reversibility of uranium bonding to calixarene-treated polyester fleeces have shown that under environmentally realistic conditions (neutral pH range) the uranium is firmly bound to the calixarene-modified fleeces and cannot be mobilised. By contrast, in acidic environments calixarene-modified fleeces are capable of near-complete regeneration. Such regenerated textile filter materials can then be used for further uranium separation cycles [de

  5. Determination of uranium (IV) in cloride solutions of enrichment columns by spectrometry with flow injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, M.B.R.

    1988-01-01

    The utilization of Flow Injection Analysis for the U (IV) spectrophotometric determination in chloride solutions is described. The method has been shown reproducible in the range of concentrations and conditions employed with a standard deviation of about 0,3. (C.G.C.) [pt

  6. Uranium(VI) speciation: modelling, uncertainty and relevance to bioavailability models. Application to uranium uptake by the gills of a freshwater bivalve; Speciation de l'uranium(6), modelisation, incertitude et implication pour les modeles de biodisponibilite. Application a l'accumulation dans les branchies d'un bivalve d'eau douce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, F.H

    2004-07-01

    The effects of varying solution composition on the interactions between uranium(VI) and excised gills of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been investigated in well defined solution media. A significant reduction in the uptake of uranium was observed on increasing the concentrations of the uranium complexing ligands citrate and carbonate. Saturation kinetics as a function of uranium concentration at a pH value of 5.0 were observed, indicating that the uptake of uranium is a facilitated process, probably involving one or several trans-membrane transport systems. A relatively small change in the uptake of uranium was found as a function of pH (factor of ca. 2), despite the extremely large changes to the solution speciation of uranium within the range of pH investigated (5.0 - 7.5). A comprehensive review of the thermodynamic data relevant to the solution composition domain employed for this study was performed. Estimates of the uncertainties for the formation constants of aqueous uranium(VI) species were integrated into a thermodynamic database. A computer program was written to predict the equilibrium distribution of uranium(VI) in simple aqueous systems, using thermodynamic parameter mean-values. The program was extended to perform Monte Carlo and Quasi Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses, incorporating the thermodynamic database uncertainty estimates, to quantitatively predict the uncertainties inherent in predicting the solution speciation of uranium. The use of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling as a tool for interpreting the bioavailability of uranium(VI) was investigated. Observed uranium(VI) uptake behaviour was interpreted as a function of the predicted changes to the solution speciation of uranium. Different steady-state or pre-equilibrium approaches to modelling uranium uptake were tested. Alternative modelling approaches were also tested, considering the potential changes to membrane transport system activity or sorption characteristics on

  7. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  8. Separation of uranium by biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volesky, B.; Tsezos, M.

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to metal ion separation processes and more particularly to processes of extraction of specific ions of or containing heavy metals from waste liquids by means of biosorption. The invention is based upon the discovery that the biomass produced as the result of the growth of a certain carefully selected microbial genus, namely species of the genus Rhizopus, such as Rhizopus arihizus, has an outstanding ability for selective adsorption of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solution or suspension

  9. Electrochemistry of uranium in sodium chloroaluminate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'olieslager, W.; Meuris, F.; Heerman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of uranium was studied in basic, NaCl-saturated NaAlCl 4 melts at 175 deg C. Solutions of UO 3 exhibit two oxidation/reduction waves (cyclic voltammetry). Analysis of the peak currents (cyclic voltammetry), the limiting currents (pulse polarography) and the non-linear log i-t curves (anodic controlled potential coulometry) leads to the conclusion that uranium(IV) in the basic chloroaluminate melt exists as two different species in slow equilibrium with one another, of which only one species can be oxidized to U(VI). (author) 16 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  10. Process for plutonium rextraction in aqueous solution from an organic solvent, especially for uranium plutonium partition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, M.; Gillet, B.; Pasquiou, J.Y.

    1989-01-01

    The organic solvent containing plutonium is contacted with an aqueous solution of a uranous salt, for instance uranous nitrate, and a hydroxylamine salt, for instance the nitrate. In these conditions uranous nitrate is a reducing agent of Pu III and hydroxylamine nitrate stabilizes Pu III and U IV in the aqueous phase. Performances are similar to these of the U IV-hydrazine nitrate without interference of hydrazine nitrate degradation products [fr

  11. Thermodynamics of uranium and nitric acid extraction from aqueous solution of TBP/diluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Freitas, R.F. de.

    1982-06-01

    A thermodynamically consistent procedure for predicting distribution equilibria for uranyl nitrate and nitric acid between an aqueous solution and 30 vol % tributyl phosphate (TBP) in a hydrocarbon diluent is studied. Experimental work is developed in order to obtain equilibrium data for the system uranyl nitrate, nitric acid, water and 30 vol % TBP in n-dodecane, at 25 0 C and 40 0 C. The theoretical equilibrium data, obtained with the aid of a computer, are compared with the experimental results. (Author) [pt

  12. Influence of phosphates when uranium in solutions obtained by attacking Forez with sulfuric acid is precipitated by the action of lime; Influence des phosphates, lors de la precipitation par la chaux, de l'uranium contenu dans les solutions d'attaque sulfurique du Forez

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brebec, G

    1959-03-01

    Influence of phosphates when uranium in solutions obtained by attacking Forez with sulfuric acid is precipitated by the action of lime was studied. Most of the phosphates were eliminated in the form of ferric phosphates without noticeable losses of uranium: for this it is only necessary to add sufficient ferric sulfate to the solution to be treated so that [Po{sub 4}{sup 3-}]/[Fe{sup 3+}] {approx} 0,4. In these conditions, the preparation of a calcium concentrate rich in uranium takes place in two stages. The first is neutralization at pH 2,7 to 2,8 with elimination of phosphates, sulfates and iron; the second is precipitation of the concentrate at pH 6,5. (author) [French] Nous avons reussi a eliminer la majeure partie des phosphates sous forme de phosphates ferriques, sans pertes sensibles d'uranium. Pour cela, il suffit d'ajouter a la solution a traiter, du sulfate ferrique en quantite telle que: (Po{sub 4}{sup 3-}]/[Fe{sup 3+}] {approx} 0,4. Dans ces conditions, la preparation du concentre calcique, riche en uranium, s'effectue normalement en deux temps: 1) preneutralisation a pH 2,7-2,8: elimination des sulfates, phosphates et fer; 2) precipitation du concentre a pH 6,5. (auteur)

  13. Uranium resource technology, Seminar 3, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This conference proceedings contains 20 papers and 1 panel discussion on uranium mining and ore treatment, taking into account the environmental issues surrounding uranium supply. Topics discussed include: the US uranium resource base, the technology and economics of uranium recovery from phosphate resources, trends in preleash materials handling of sandstone uranium ores, groundwater restoration after in-situ uranium leaching, mitigation of the environmental impacts of open pit and underground uranium mining, remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites, environmental laws governing in-situ solution mining of uranium, and the economics of in-situ solution mining. 16 papers are indexed separately

  14. Chlorite alteration in aqueous solutions and uranium removal by altered chlorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eungyeong; Ahn, Hyangsig [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Ho Young, E-mail: hyjo@korea.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji-Hun; Koh, Yong-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Chlorite alteration and the U removal capacity of altered chlorite were investigated. • Initial pH affected more chlorite dissolution than ionic strength. • Chlorite dissolution at pH{sub o} = 3–8 was inversely proportional to the U removal capacity. • Chlorite dissolution at pH{sub o} = 10 was proportional to the U removal capacity. • The formation of Fe-containing secondary minerals affected the U removal capacity. - Abstract: Chlorite alteration and the U removal capacity of altered chlorite were investigated. Batch kinetic dissolution tests using clinochlore CCa-2 were conducted for 60 days in aqueous solutions of various pHs and ionic strengths. Batch sorption tests using these altered chlorite samples were conducted for 48 h with natural groundwater containing 3.06 × 10{sup −6} M U. Chlorite dissolution was influenced more by pH{sub o} than by the ionic strength of the solution. TEM analysis revealed Fe(oxy)hydroxide aggregates in the solid residue from the batch dissolution test with 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} solution at pH{sub o} = 10. The U removal capacity of the reacted chlorite samples at pH{sub o} = 6–10 was higher than that of the reacted chlorite samples at pH{sub o} = 3. The degree of dissolution of chlorite samples reacted at pH{sub o} = 3–8 was inversely proportional to the U removal capacity, but that of chlorite samples reacted at pH{sub o} = 10 was proportional to the U removal capacity. The positive correlation between the U removal capacity and degree of chlorite dissolution at pH{sub o} = 10 might be due to the formation of Fe-containing secondary minerals and changes in the reactive sites.

  15. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by a low cost and high-efficient adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun-Hai [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Wang, You-Qun [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Zhang, Zhi-Bin, E-mail: zhangnjut@163.com [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Cao, Xiao-Hong; Nie, Wen-Bin; Li, Qin [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Hua, Rong [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang, 330013 (China); Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, 344000 (China)

    2013-05-15

    In this study, a low-cost and high-efficient carbonaceous adsorbent (HTC-COOH) with carboxylic groups was developed for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution compared with the pristine hydrothermal carbon (HTC). The structure and chemical properties of resultant adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and acid–base titration. The key factors (solution pH, contact time, initial U(VI) concentrations and temperature) affected the adsorption of U(VI) on adsorbents were investigated using batch experiments. The adsorption of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH was pH-dependent, and increased with temperature and initial ion concentration. The adsorption equilibrium of U(VI) on adsorbents was well defined by the Langmuir isothermal equation, and the monolayer adsorption capacity of HTC-COOH was found to be 205.8 mg/g. The kinetics of adsorption was very in accordance with the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH were endothermic and spontaneous in nature according to the thermodynamics of adsorption. Furthermore, HTC-COOH could selectively adsorption of U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mg{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 2+}). From the results of the experiments, it is found that the HTC-COOH is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from polluted water.

  16. Removal of uranium from aqueous solution by a low cost and high-efficient adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-Hai; Wang, You-Qun; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Cao, Xiao-Hong; Nie, Wen-Bin; Li, Qin; Hua, Rong

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a low-cost and high-efficient carbonaceous adsorbent (HTC-COOH) with carboxylic groups was developed for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution compared with the pristine hydrothermal carbon (HTC). The structure and chemical properties of resultant adsorbents were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), N2 adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and acid-base titration. The key factors (solution pH, contact time, initial U(VI) concentrations and temperature) affected the adsorption of U(VI) on adsorbents were investigated using batch experiments. The adsorption of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH was pH-dependent, and increased with temperature and initial ion concentration. The adsorption equilibrium of U(VI) on adsorbents was well defined by the Langmuir isothermal equation, and the monolayer adsorption capacity of HTC-COOH was found to be 205.8 mg/g. The kinetics of adsorption was very in accordance with the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption processes of U(VI) on HTC and HTC-COOH were endothermic and spontaneous in nature according to the thermodynamics of adsorption. Furthermore, HTC-COOH could selectively adsorption of U(VI) in aqueous solution containing co-existing ions (Mg2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+). From the results of the experiments, it is found that the HTC-COOH is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of U(VI) from polluted water.

  17. Study on heavy metal absorption capability of chlamidomonas reinhardtii in solution containing uranium and lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thuy Binh

    2003-01-01

    The mutant strain chlamydomonas reinhardtii No.4 obtained by C 5+ ion beam irradiation could be grown in simple mineral salt medium with initial pH range of 3.5-7.5 with continued illumination of 12,000 lux under aeration. The study demonstrated that the mutant strain C.reinhardtii had a good growth in mineral salt medium containing U 6+ (concentration about 0.015 mg/ml) and Pb 2+ (concentration about 65% and Pb 2+ about 60% from solution was estimated by analyzing dried cell. (NTB)

  18. Titration of uranium trace amounts in waters environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larabi-Gruet, N.; Ithurbide, A.; Poulesquen, A.; Beaucaire, C.; Peulon, S.; Chausse, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of studies concerning the uranium migration in soils and rocks, it seems necessary to quantify the uranium(VI) dissolved in solution. In the environmental conditions, the uranium(VI) is present at trace amounts. The most adapted method to this study and easy to carry out is the Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry. By addition of a compound (ligand) with a reducing and strong complexing power, the uranium(VI) present in solution is reduced into a U(VI)-ligand complex. This specie is then oxidized and adsorbed on the mercury droplet where an electrolytic pre-concentration of the element to determine the quantity of is carried out. At last, a cathodic re-dissolution of the specie adsorbed in the U(IV)-ligand complex is carried out. The chosen analytical method is the differential impulsional voltammetry. With this method, it is possible to quantify low electro-active species quantities (sensitivity ∼25 ppt (10 -10 mol.L -1 ) for the uranium). This titration method in solution has been optimized, at first, in a non complexing medium. Then, the uranium in solution has been titrated in media whose composition has been progressively complexed (additions of CO 3 2- , SO 4 2- , Cl - ..) for being at last representative of the environmental interstitial waters. At last, this study has been carried out too by ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) in order to compare the analysis sensitivity of these two detection methods. (O.M.)

  19. Synthesis and characterization of new biopolymeric microcapsules containing DEHPA-TOPO extractants for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outokesh, Mohammad; Tayyebi, Ahmad; Khanchi, Alireza; Grayeli, Fatemeh; Bagheri, Ghodrat

    2011-01-01

    A novel microcapsule adsorbent for separation of uranium from phosphoric acid solutions was developed by immobilizing the di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid-trioctyl phosphine oxide extractants in the polymeric matrix of calcium alginate. Physical characterization of the microcapsules was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric techniques. Equilibrium experiments revealed that both ion exchange and solvent extraction mechanisms were involved in the adsorption of [Formula: see text] ions, but the latter prevailed in a wider range of acid concentration. According to the results of kinetics study, at low acidity level, the rate controlling step was slow chemical reaction of [Formula: see text] ions with the microdroplets of extractant, whereas it changed to intraparticle diffusion at higher acid concentration. The study also attempted identification of the diffusion paths of the ions within the microcapsules, and the mechanism of change of mass transfer rate during the uptake process. The prepared microcapsules preserved their entire capacity after three cycles of adsorption, and their breakthrough behaviour was well fitted by a new formula derived from shrinking core model.

  20. Speciation of uranium with respect to hydrogeological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    Until 1991, eastern Germany has been third largest uranium producer in the world. After the cease of uranium production, larger areas remained contaminated by uranium mining debris, mill-tailings and mining areas. Since 1991 these areas are in the process of remediation by intervention. In Germany, legal stipulations require the prognosis of the likely mid-term impact of an intervention. The benefit of a planned remediation procedure must be evident against the Zero option (doing nothing) and alternative actions. Thermodynamic data of geochemically relevant reactions for uranium under conditions of natural aqueous solution serve as important input data into geochemical reactive transport codes. Especially hydrolysis and carbonato complexation of hexavalent uranium influence the geochemical behaviour of uranium. The first part of the report report summarizes the fundamental chemical facts on mineralogy, electronic structure, UV-Vis and emission spectroscopy of hexavalent uranium. A second part reports in depth the experimental and numerical procedures to study the hydrolytic and carbonate complexation behaviour of hexavalent uranium. The evaluation of single component spectra of the relevant uranium species is discussed. Spectral curves are quantitatively deconcoluted into single components. In all cases the associated uncertainties are given. Thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and carbonato species derived from these experiments are compared to existing data in the literature. (orig.)

  1. Lichens and mosses as monitors of industrial activity associated with uranium mining in Northern Ontario, Canada. Pt. 1. Field procedures, chemical analysis and inter-species comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boileau, L J.R.; Beckett, P J; Lavoie, P; Richardson, D H.S. [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry); Nieboer, E [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1982-07-01

    A modified X-ray fluorescence spectrometry technique allowed the detection of uranium in cryptograms with a detection limit of 0.5 to 1 ..mu..g U g/sup -1/ of plant material. The levels of five elements (Ti, Fe, Ni, Pb and U) in 109 lichen and 98 moss samples collected around two uranium mining communities in northeastern Ontario, Canada, are reported. Similar metal accumulation tendencies were observed for the pair of lichens, Cladonia rangiferina and C. mitis, and for the moss pair, Pleurozium schreberi and Dicranum spp. This interchangeability, combined with favourable availability, made the above species the most useful biological monitors. Inter-elemental content comparisons employing Pearson's linear correlation statistic indicated a strong positive association among the pairs iron/titanium, and uranium/lead. Somewhat weaker positive correlations were observed in the individual comparisons of uranium levels with iron, or titanium, or nickel content. The associations between elements in mosses and lichens were in excellent agreement with the grouping based on the composition of the local uranium ores and tailings.

  2. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  3. On the chemical identification and visualization of uranium species in biofilms and Euglena mutabilis cells; Zur chemischen Identifizierung und Visualisierung von Uran-Spezies in Biofilmen und Euglena mutabilis Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, Sina

    2013-11-14

    For risk assessment of anthropogenic uranium contaminations in the environment a detailed knowledge of the migration and immobilization behavior is required to prevent health hazards for humans and animals caused by an uncontrolled discharge of uranium. Hence, comprehensive studies on the interactions of uranium with the environment are required. Besides the influences of the geological materials, there is a huge effect of the biosphere, especially the interactions with microorganisms and biofilms, on the properties of uranium in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate and to describe naturally occurring biofilms from real uranium contaminated areas and their influence on the uranium migration. The investigations in this study on the localization and the speciation of the uranium in the biosystems were primarily done with a coupled system of laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). Natural biofilms collected from two uranium contaminated acid mine drainage (AMD) environments, the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony, Germany) and the former Gessenheap near Ronneburg (Thuringia,Germany), were investigated in this study. The chosen samples represent typical biofilm communities living in AMD water and are exemplary for potentially occurring scenarios of contaminated mining water both in the underground and on the surface. The investigation on the interactions between uranium and Euglena mutabilis, which is a typical unicellular microorganism that can be found in acidic, uranium and other heavy metal containing waters, was another important part of this study. Bioaccumulation experiments of uranium on living Euglena mutabilis cells depending on the pH (pH 3 - 6) and on the background media in sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulfate (3.48 g/l) solution containing 0.01 mM uranium show an effective immobilization of uranium. At the acidic pH-values (pH 3 - 4) over 90 % of the added uranium was

  4. Periodic solutions for a two-species nonautonomous competition system with diffusion and impulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lingzhen; Chen Lansun; Shi Peilin

    2007-01-01

    By re-estimating the upper bound of ∫ 0 ω e u i (t) dt (i=1,2), we generalize a result about the existence of a positive periodic solution for a two-species nonautonomous patchy competition system with time delay. Based on that system, we consider the impulsive harvesting and stocking, and establish a two-species nonautonomous competition Lotka-Volterra system with diffusion and impulsive effects. With the continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, we obtain the existence of a positive periodic solution for such a system. At last, two examples are given to demonstrate our results

  5. Uranium speciation in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, A.; Bernhard, G.; Geipel, G.; Reich, T.; Rossberg, A.; Nitsche, H.

    2003-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the nature of uranium complexes formed after the uptake by plants is an essential prerequisite to describe the migration behavior of uranium in the environment. This study focuses on the determination of uranium speciation after uptake of uranium by lupine plants. For the first time, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the chemical speciation of uranium in plants. Differences were detected between the uranium speciation in the initial solution (hydroponic solution and pore water of soil) and inside the lupine plants. The oxidation state of uranium did not change and remained hexavalent after it was taken up by the lupine plants. The chemical speciation of uranium was identical in the roots, shoot axis, and leaves and was independent of the uranium speciation in the uptake solution. The results indicate that the uranium is predominantly bound as uranyl(VI) phosphate to the phosphoryl groups. Dandelions and lamb's lettuce showed uranium speciation identical to lupine plants. (orig.)

  6. Polarographic behaviour and determination of uranium(VI) in alcoholic solutions from organic extraction phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.; Taibi, K.

    1996-01-01

    The determination of U(VI) in organic extraction phases: hydrocarbon-diethyl-2-hexyl phosphoric acid-trioctylphosphine oxide and hydrocarbon-tri-n-octylamine, diluted by an alcohol has been studied by direct current polarography, as well as by differential pulse polarography (DPP). In order to optimise the analytical procedure, miscibility and conductivity studies of the mixtures hydrocarbon-alcohol (ethanol, n- and isopropanol and n- and isobutanol) were made after addition of sulphuric acid as a supporting electrolyte. In the solutions of sulphuric acid in the alcohol-extractant-hydrocarbon phases, U(VI) gives rise to well defined polarograms. Its electroreduction involves a single electron step in all cases. The DPP peak height is proportional to the U(VI) concentration between 2x10 -6 and 2x10 -3 M, and the 3σ detection limit is ca. 10 -6 M

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Misaelides, P.

    2008-01-01

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric P CO 2 ), using 12 C-RBS and Laser μ-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO 2 -hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick (μm-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godelitsas, A. [Faculty of Geology and Geoenvironment, University of Athens, 15784 Zographou, Athens (Greece)], E-mail: agodel@geol.uoa.gr; Kokkoris, M. [School of Applied Mathematics and Physics, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zographou, Athens (Greece); Chatzitheodoridis, E. [School of Mining and Metallurgical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Zographou, Athens (Greece); Misaelides, P. [Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-05-15

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric P{sub CO{sub 2}}), using {sup 12}C-RBS and Laser {mu}-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO{sub 2}-hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick ({mu}m-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of Greek dolomitic marble surface interacted with uranium and thorium in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godelitsas, A.; Kokkoris, M.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.; Misaelides, P.

    2008-05-01

    The surface of a typical Greek (Thassian) dolomitic marble was studied after interaction with U- and Th-containing aqueous solutions (1000 mg/L, free-drift experiments for 1 week at atmospheric PCO2), using 12C-RBS and Laser μ-Raman spectroscopy. Powder-XRD and SEM-EDS were also applied to investigate the phases deposited on the surface of the interacted samples. The obtained results indicated a considerable removal of U from the aqueous medium mainly due to massive surface precipitation of amorphous UO2-hydroxide phases forming a relatively thick (μm-sized) coating on the carbonate substrate. The interaction of Th with dolomitic marble surface is also intense leading to a formation of an amorphous Th-hydroxide layer of similar thickness but of significantly lower elemental atomic proportion.

  10. Measurement test on creep strain rate of uranium-zirconium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takanari; Akabori, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1996-11-01

    In order to measure creep strain rate of a small specimen of U-Zr solid solution, authors proposed an estimation method which was based upon the stress relaxation after compression. It was applied to measurement test on creep strain rate of the U-10wt%Zr specimen in the temperature range of 757 to 911degC. It may be concluded that the proposed method is valid, provided that the strain is within the appropriate range and that sufficient amount of the load decrement is observed. The obtained creep rate of U-10wt%Zr alloy indicated significantly smaller value, compared to the experimental data for pure U metal and evaluated data for U-Pu-Zr alloy. However, more careful measurement is desired in future since the present data are thought to be influenced by the precipitations included in the specimen. (author)

  11. Molybdenum recovery from aqueous residual solutions resulted in uranium ores processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoica, L.; Jitaru, I.; Razvan, A.; Georgescu, D.; Petrescu, S.; Filip, D.

    1998-01-01

    The paper represents a comparative study regarding the Mo(VI) separation from residual aqueous systems, applying two methods adsorption of Mo(VI) on ferric hydroxide support followed by the flotation of insoluble species in dissolved air flotation variant (DAF); Mo (VI) adsorption on activated carbon. The Mo(VI) ions separation by dissolved air flotation followed the main factors which influence the separation yield such as: the adsorbent nature, pH, the nature and the collector concentration, initial Mo(VI) concentration and the Mo(VI)-adsorbent support-collector interaction The Mo(VI) adsorption on activated carbon was made following the influence of different factors such as: pH, initial Mo(VI), concentration, contact time and specific inflow. (orig.)

  12. Recovery of uranium by a reverse osmosis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, J.G.; Stana, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for concentrating and recovering uranium material from an aqueous solution, comprises passing a feed solution containing uranium through at least one reverse osmosis membrane system to concentrate the uranium, and then flushing the concentrated uranium solution with water in a reverse osmosis membrane system to further concentrate the uranium

  13. Bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenic species in solution culture and soil system: implications to remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolan, Nanthi; Mahimairaja, Santiago; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Seshadri, Balaji; Thangarajan, Ramya

    2015-06-01

    In this work, bioavailability and ecotoxicity of arsenite (As(III)) and arsenate (As(V)) species were compared between solution culture and soil system. Firstly, the adsorption of As(III) and As(V) was compared using a number of non-allophanic and allophanic soils. Secondly, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were examined using germination, phytoavailability, earthworm, and soil microbial activity tests. Both As-spiked soils and As-contaminated sheep dip soils were used to test bioavailability and ecotoxicity. The sheep dip soil which contained predominantly As(V) species was subject to flooding to reduce As(V) to As(III) and then used along with the control treatment soil to compare the bioavailability between As species. Adsorption of As(V) was much higher than that of As(III), and the difference in adsorption between these two species was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. In the solution culture, there was no significant difference in bioavailability and ecotoxicity, as measured by germination and phytoavailability tests, between these two As species. Whereas in the As-spiked soils, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity were higher for As(III) than As(V), and the difference was more pronounced in the allophanic than non-allophanic soils. Bioavailability of As increased with the flooding of the sheep dip soils which may be attributed to the reduction of As(V) to As(III) species. The results in this study have demonstrated that while in solution, the bioavailability and ecotoxicity do not vary between As(III) and As(V), in soils, the latter species is less bioavailable than the former species because As(V) is more strongly retained than As(III). Since the bioavailability and ecotoxicity of As depend on the nature of As species present in the environment, risk-based remediation approach should aim at controlling the dynamics of As transformation.

  14. Wetland and Sensitive Species Survey Report for Y-12: Proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffen, N.; Peterson, M.; Reasor, S.; Pounds, L.; Byrd, G.; Wiest, M. C.; Hill, C. C.

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the results of an environmental survey conducted at sites associated with the proposed Uranium Processing Facility (UPF) at the Y-12 National Security Complex in September-October 2009. The survey was conducted in order to evaluate potential impacts of the overall project. This project includes the construction of a haul road, concrete batch plant, wet soil storage area and dry soil storage area. The environmental surveys were conducted by natural resource experts at ORNL who routinely assess the significance of various project activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Natural resource staff assistance on this project included the collection of environmental information that can aid in project location decisions that minimize impacts to sensitive resource such as significant wildlife populations, rare plants and wetlands. Natural resources work was conducted in various habitats, corresponding to the proposed areas of impact. Thc credentials/qualifications of the researchers are contained in Appendix A. The proposed haul road traverses a number of different habitats including a power-line right-of-way. wetlands, streams, forest and mowed areas. It extends from what is known as the New Salvage Yard on the west to the Polaris Parking Lot on the east. This haul road is meant to connect the proposed concrete batch plant to the UPF building site. The proposed site of the concrete batch plant itself is a highly disturbed fenced area. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 1. The proposed Wet Soils Disposal Area is located on the north side of Bear Creek Road at the former Control Burn Study Area. This is a second growth arce containing thick vegetation, and extensive dead and down woody material. This area of the project is shown in Fig. 2. Thc dry soils storage area is proposed for what is currently known as the West Borrow Area. This site is located on the west side of Reeves Road south of Bear Creek Road. The site is an early successional

  15. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnapriya, K.C.; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2.6 H 2 O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO 2 2+ to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO 2 2+ ) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO 2 2+ , the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO 2 2+ with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 ·6H 2 O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO 2 (s), both of which exist as UO 2 2+ in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and without NaCl affected the extent of chemical interaction but was not consistent with the

  16. Separation of uranium(V I) from binary solution mixtures with thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) by foaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakir, K.; Aziz, M.; Benyamin, K.

    1992-01-01

    Foam separation has been investigated for the removal of uranium(V I), thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) from dilute aqueous solutions at pH values ranging from about I to about II. Sodium laurel sulphate (Na L S) and acetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), being a strong anionic and a strong cationic surfactants, were used as collectors. The results indicate that Na L S can efficiently remove thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) and cerium(III) but not uranium(V I). CTAB, on the other hand, can successfully float only uranium(V I) and zirconium(IV). These differences in flotation properties of the different cations could be used to establish methods for the separation of uranium(V I) from binary mixtures with thorium(IV), zirconium(IV) or cerium(III). The results are discussed in terms of the hydrolytic behaviour of the tested cations and properties of used collectors.2 fig., 1 tab

  17. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  18. Sonochemical precipitation of amorphous uranium phosphates from trialkyl phosphate solutions and their thermal conversion to UP2O7

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doroshenko, I.; Žurková, J.; Moravec, Z.; Bezdička, Petr; Pinkas, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, SEP (2015), s. 157-162 ISSN 1350-4177 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Uranium * Phosphates * Sonochemistry * Nuclear waste * Trimethyl phosphate * Triethyl phosphate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.556, year: 2015

  19. An investigation to compare the performance of methods for the determination of free acid in highly concentrated solutions of plutonium and uranium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossley, D.

    1980-08-01

    An investigation has been carried out to compare the performance of the direct titration method and the indirect mass balance method, for the determination of free acid in highly concentrated solutions of uranium nitrate and plutonium nitrate. The direct titration of free acid with alkali is carried out in a fluoride medium to avoid interference from the hydrolysis of uranium or plutonium, while free acid concentration by the mass balance method is obtained by calculation from the metal concentration, metal valency state, and total nitrate concentration in a sample. The Gran plot end-point prediction technique has been used extensively in the investigation to gain information concerning the hydrolysis of uranium and plutonium in fluoride media and in other complexing media. The use of the Gran plot technique has improved the detection of the end-point of the free acid titration which gives an improvement in the precision of the determination. The experimental results obtained show that there is good agreement between the two methods for the determination of free acidity, and that the precision of the direct titration method in a fluoride medium using the Gran plot technique to detect the end-point is 0.75% (coefficient of variation), for a typical separation plant plutonium nitrate solution. The performance of alternative complexing agents in the direct titration method has been studied and is discussed. (author)

  20. Non-destructive assay system for uranium and plutonium in reprocessing input solutions. Hybrid K-edge/XRF Densitometer. JASPAS JC-11 final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surugaya, N.; Abe, K.; Kurosawa, A.; Ikeda, H.; Kuno, Y.

    1997-05-01

    As a part of JASPAS programme, a non-radioactive assay system for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in input dissolver solutions of a spent fuel reprocessing plant, called Hybrid K-edge/XRF Densitometer, has been developed at the Tokai Reprocessing plant (TRP) since 1991. The instrument is the one of the hybrid type combined K-edge densitometry (KED) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The KED is used to determine the uranium concentration and the XRF is used to determine the U/Pu ratio. These results give the plutonium concentration in consequence. It is considered that the instrument has the capability of timely on-site verification for input accountancy. The instrument had been installed in the analytical hot cell at the TRP and the experiments comparing with Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) method have been carried out. As the results of measurements for the actual input solutions in the acceptance and performance tests, it was typically confirmed that the precision for determining uranium concentration by the KED was within 0.2%, whereas the XRF for plutonium performed within 0.7%. This final report summarizes the design information and performance data so as to end the JASPAS programme. (author)

  1. Multisensor system for determination of iron(II), iron(III), uranium(VI) and uranium(IV) in complex solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legin, A.V.; Seleznev, B.L.; Rudnitskaya, A.M.; Vlasov, Yu.G.; Tverdokhlebov, S.V.; Mack, B.; Abraham, A.; Arnold, T.; Baraniak, L.; Nitsche, H.

    1999-01-01

    Development and analytical evaluation of a multisensor system based on the principles of 'electronic tongue' for the determination of low contents of uranium(VI), uranium(IV), iron(II) and iron(III) in complex aqueous media have been carried out. A set of 29 different chemical sensors on the basis of all- solid-state crystalline and vitreous materials with enhanced electronic conductivity and redox and ionic cross-sensitivity have been incorporated into the sensor array. Multidimensional data have been processed by pattern recognition methods such as artificial neural networks and partial least squares. It has been demonstrated that Fe(II) and Fe(III) contents in the range from 10 -7 to 10 -4 mol L -1 of total iron concentration can be determined with the average precision of about 25 %. U(VI) and U(IV) contents can been determined with the average precision of 10-40% depending on the concentration. The developed multisensor system can be applied in future for the analysis of mining and borehole waters as well other contaminated natural media, including on-site measurements. (author)

  2. Synthesis of C14/Fe3O4@SiO2 and Its Performance in Removing Uranium (VI from Aqueous Solutions and Real Wastewater Using Benzamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Akbari Jonoosh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uranium separation and removal are important from environmental, public health, and strategic veiwpoints. Scientits have put great efforts to develop technologies for uranium removal and regeneration because of its important applications and beneficial uses. In this study, efforts have been made to synthesize a modified form of Fe3O4@SiO2 and benzamide uranium complexes that can be exploited to remove and adsorb uranium onto an adsorbent that can be recycled. In the first step, Fe3O4@SiO2 was synthesized and later modified with trimethoxysilane. The adsorbent was subsequently characterized by SEM and FTIR.  In a second step, experiments were performed to determine optimum stirring speed, contact time, ion strength, and adsorbent reusability. Finally, the performance of the adsorbent was tested in samples of real wastewater. SEM and FTIR analyses confirmed the satisfactory synthesis and modification of Fe3O4@SiO2 Nps. Statistical analyses revealed that although contact time, ion strength, and stirring speed were effective in adsorbent performance, they only led to a removal enhancement of 5% and a decrease of only 17% with increasing RPM to 250 and the enhancement of ion strength to 1.5M. The highest U(VI removal efficiency in the synthetic solution was found to be 97%, which reduced to 49% in real wastewater samples. It was concluded that the nano-composite C14/SiO2_Fe3O4 adsorbent with its magnetic core and resistant surface not only offers the possibility for easy separation of urnaium from solutions but is also reusable and is only slightly affected by changes in stirring speed or ion strength. It, therefore, has a good capability for use as a U(VI adsorbent in wastewater treatment.

  3. Simultaneous reduction and adsorption for immobilization of uranium from aqueous solution by nano-flake Fe-SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingjun, E-mail: kongl_jun@163.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of radioactive contamination control and resources, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Zhu, Yuting; Wang, Min; Li, Zhixuan; Tan, Zhicong; Xu, Ruibin; Tang, Hongmei; Chang, Xiangyang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of radioactive contamination control and resources, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Chen, Diyun, E-mail: cdy@gzhu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of radioactive contamination control and resources, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Uranium containing radioactive wastewater is seriously hazardous to the natural environment if it is being discharged directly. Herein, nano-flake like Fe loaded sludge carbon (Fe-SC) is synthesized by carbothermal process from Fe-rich sludge waste and applied in the immobilization of uranium in aqueous. Batch isotherm and kinetic adsorption experiments are adopted to investigate the adsorption behavior of Fe-SC to uranium in aqueous. XPS analyses were conducted to evaluate the immobilized mechanism. It was found that the carbonized temperature played significant role in the characteristics and immobilization ability of the resulted Fe-SC. The Fe-SC-800 carbonized at 800 °C takes more advantageous ability in immobilization of uranium from aqueous than the commercial available AC and powder zero valent iron. The adsorption behavior could be fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm adsorption model and pseudo-second order model. The equilibrium adsorption amount and rate for Fe-SC-800 is high to 148.99 mg g{sup -1} and 0.015 g mg{sup -1} min{sup -1}, respectively. Both reductive precipitation and physical adsorption are the main mechanisms of immobilization of uranium from aqueous by Fe-SC-800.

  4. Solution XAS Analysis for Exploring the Active Species in Homogeneous Vanadium Complex Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kotohiro; Mitsudome, Takato; Tsutsumi, Ken; Yamazoe, Seiji

    2018-06-01

    Selected examples in V K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis of a series of vanadium complexes containing imido ligands (possessing metal-nitrogen double bond) in toluene solution have been introduced, and their pre-edge and the edge were affected by their structures and nature of ligands. Selected results in exploring the oxidation states of the active species in ethylene dimerization/polymerization using homogeneous vanadium catalysts [consisting of (imido)vanadium(V) complexes and Al cocatalysts] by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses have been introduced. It has been demonstrated that the method should provide more clear information concerning the active species in situ, especially by combination with the other methods (NMR and ESR spectra, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and reaction chemistry), and should be powerful tool for study of catalysis mechanism as well as for the structural analysis in solution.

  5. Kinetics of reaction between O 2 and Mn(II) species in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research is to assess critically the experimental rate data for O 2 oxidation of dissolved Mn(II) species at 25°C and to interpret the rates in terms of the solution species of Mn(II) in natural waters. A species kinetic rate expression for parallel paths expresses the total rate of Mn(II) oxidation as Σk i a ij, where k i is the rate constant of species i and a ij is the species concentration fraction in solution j. Among the species considered in the rate expression are Mn(II) hydrolysis products, carbonate complexes, ammonia complexes, and halide and sulfate complexes, in addition to the free aqueous ion. Experiments in three different laboratory buffers and in seawater yield an apparent rate constant for Mn(II) disappearance, k app,j ranging from 8.6 × 10 -5 to 2.5 × 10 -2 (M -1s -1), between pH 8.03 and 9.30, respectively. Observed values of k app exceed predictions based on Marcus outer-sphere electron transfer theory by more than four orders of magnitude, lending strong support to the proposal that Mn(II) + O 2 electron transfer follows an inner-sphere path. A multiple linear regression analysis fit of the observed rates to the species kinetic rate expression yields the following oxidation rate constants (M -1s -1) for the most reactive species: MnOH +, 1.66 × 10 -2; Mn(OH) 2, 2.09 × 10 1; and Mn(CO 3) 22-, 8.13 × 10 -2. The species kinetic rate expression accounts for the influence of pH and carbonate on oxidation rates of Mn(II), through complex formation and acid-base equilibria of both reactive and unreactive species. At pH ˜8, the greater fraction of the total rate is carried by MnOH +. At pH greater than ˜8.4, the species Mn(OH) 2 and Mn(CO 3) 22- make the greater contributions to the total rate.

  6. Extrapolation studies on desorption of thorium and uranium at different solution compositions on contaminated soil sediments (Malaysia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Hakimi Sakuma

    2000-01-01

    By means of batch desorption experiments, the thorium and uranium desorption properties of contaminated soil sediments are investigated as a function of the effect of cations present in the groundwater. A phenomenological correlation between the desorption coefficient and the concentration of Ca and Mg in the water is determined. Kd Thorium -0.15849 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 5.06715 ± 0.09106; Kd Uranium = -0.11984 ± 0.03237 log (Ca + Mg) + 2.99909 ± 0.09105. By these models the sorption/desorption behaviour of soils can be predicted phenomenologically as function of the groundwater composition. (author)

  7. Exact Solution of Fractional Diffusion Model with Source Term used in Study of Concentration of Fission Product in Uranium Dioxide Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao; Cao Jianzhu; Sun Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    The exact solution of fractional diffusion model with a location-independent source term used in the study of the concentration of fission product in spherical uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) particle is built. The adsorption effect of the fission product on the surface of the UO 2 particle and the delayed decay effect are also considered. The solution is given in terms of Mittag-Leffler function with finite Hankel integral transformation and Laplace transformation. At last, the reduced forms of the solution under some special physical conditions, which is used in nuclear engineering, are obtained and corresponding remarks are given to provide significant exact results to the concentration analysis of nuclear fission products in nuclear reactor. (nuclear physics)

  8. The design of a continuous ion-exchange pilot plant for the recovery of uranium from partially clarified solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloete, F.L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design is given for a pilot plant to recover uranium from partially clarified slime pulp by continuous ion exchange. Process and plant-design methods are indicated briefly, and an outline is given of experimental work that should be undertaken before the start-up of the pilot plant

  9. Study of the behavior of AX-55 resin when used for recovering uranium from solutions formed by attacking low grade minerals with sulfuric acid; Etude du comportement de la resine ax-55 pour la recuperation de l'uranium des solutions d'attaque sulfurique de mineraux a faible teneur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parly, B; Pottier, P; Rigaud, A

    1959-03-01

    Uranium is recuperated on the anionic resin ACFI AX-55 from solution formed by attacking a Vendean mineral with sulfuric acid. This solution contains 373 mg of uranium acid 15,4 g of SO{sub 4} per litre. The pH is 1,5. The object of the text is on the one hand to study the behaviour of the resin AX,-55 during several absorption and desorption cycles and on the other hand to see whether this resin can be used industrially. The following conclusions are: 1) at the flow rate of 6,6 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}.h which was employed the resin AX-55 can be used industrially; 2) Its principal advantage is to furnish an concentrated elutriation liquor containing: 15,84 g/1 of U; 3) It has the disadvantage of having a low capacity (approximately 60 per cent of that of Deacidit 'FF'). (author) [French] On recupere sur la resine anionique ACFI AX-55 l'uranium d'une solution d'attaque sulfurique d'un minerai de Vendee. Cette solution contient 373 mg d'uranium et 15,4 g de SO{sub 4} par litre. Son pH est 1,5. Le but de l'essai est, d'une part d'etudier le comportement de la resine AX 55 au cours de plusieurs cycles, d'autre part de verifier que son utilisation est possible industriellement. Les conclusions sont les suivantes: 1) au debit de 6,6 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}.h utilise, la resine AX 55 peut etre utilisee industriellement; 2) son principal avantage est de fournir une liqueur d'elution concentree: 15,84 g/1 en U; 3) son inconvenient est sa capacite faible (environ 60 pour cent de celle de la Deacidit 'FF'). (auteur)

  10. International cooperation in the solution to trade-related invasive species risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrings, Charles; Burgiel, Stas; Lonsdale, Mark; Mooney, Harold; Williamson, Mark

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the factors behind the growth of invasive species as a global problem, and the scope for international cooperation and coordination in addressing that problem. This is limited by the terms of the various international agreements governing trade, health, and biodiversity. The default strategy in most cases has two parts: border protection and the control of or adaptation to introduced species that have escaped detection at the border. Most invasive species policy involves unilateral national defensive action as opposed to coordinated international action. We argue that an important part of the solution to the problem lies in global coordination and cooperation in the management of both pathways and sanitary and phytosanitary risks at all scales. More particularly, because invasive species are an externality of trade, transport, and travel that involve public goods, they require collective regulation of international markets that goes beyond that admitted under the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures. We argue that it is important to bring that agreement into conformity with the International Health Regulations (IHR), and to develop an international mechanism to generate and disseminate information on invasive species risks and their impacts.

  11. Solution of the spatial neutral model yields new bounds on the Amazonian species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shem-Tov, Yahav; Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2017-02-01

    Neutral models, in which individual agents with equal fitness undergo a birth-death-mutation process, are very popular in population genetics and community ecology. Usually these models are applied to populations and communities with spatial structure, but the analytic results presented so far are limited to well-mixed or mainland-island scenarios. Here we combine analytic results and numerics to obtain an approximate solution for the species abundance distribution and the species richness for the neutral model on continuous landscape. We show how the regional diversity increases when the recruitment length decreases and the spatial segregation of species grows. Our results are supported by extensive numerical simulations and allow one to probe the numerically inaccessible regime of large-scale systems with extremely small mutation/speciation rates. Model predictions are compared with the findings of recent large-scale surveys of tropical trees across the Amazon basin, yielding new bounds for the species richness (between 13100 and 15000) and the number of singleton species (between 455 and 690).

  12. 197 Au Mössbauer study of the gold species adsorbed on carbon from cyanide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongolo, K.; Bahr, A.; Friedl, J.; Wagner, F. E.

    1990-04-01

    The gold species present on activated carbon after adsorption from solutions of Au(CN)2 - have been studied by197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy as a function of the pH value of the solution, the loading of the carbon, the coadsorption of polyvalent cations, and the treatment of the samples after adsorption. The gold was found to be adsorbed mainly as Au(CN)2 -. Coadsorbed polyvalent cations (Ca²+, Gd³+) have no influence on the Mössbauer parameters of the adsorbed gold complex. After adsorption from acidic solutions (pH ≲ 4), one finds a substantial amount of adsorbed gold with Mössbauer parameters similar to those of crystalline AuCN. Presumably, this gold is bound in Aux(CN)x+1 oligomers which form during drying. An additional product with Mössbauer parameters close to those of KAu(CN)2Cl2 was observed on dried samples after adsorption at pH 1. A minor gold species with an uncommonly small electric quadrupole splitting was found on wet carbons but disappeared on drying.

  13. Titrimetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florence, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Titrimetric methods are almost invariably used for the high precision assay of uranium compounds, because gravimetric methods are nonselective, and not as reliable. Although precipitation titrations have been used, for example with cupferron and ferrocyanide, and chelate titrations with EDTA and oxine give reasonable results, in practice only redox titrations find routine use. With all redox titration methods for uranium a precision of 01 to 02 percent can be achieved, and precisions as high as 0.003 percent have been claimed for the more refined techniques. There are two types of redox titrations for uranium in common use. The first involves the direct titration of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) with a standard solution of a strong reductant, such as chromous chloride or titanous chloride, and the second requires a preliminary reduction of uranium to the (IV) or (III) state, followed by titration back to the (VI) state with a standard oxidant. Both types of redox titrations are discussed. 4 figs

  14. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  15. Competitive biosorption of thorium and uranium by actinomycetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akira; Tsuruta, Takehiko

    2002-01-01

    The competitive biosorption of thorium and uranium by actinomycetes was examined. Of the actinomycetes tested, Streptomyces levoris showed the highest ability to sorb both thorium and uranium from aqueous systems. Thorium sorption was not affected by co-existed uranium, while uranium sorption was strongly hindered by co-existed thorium. The amounts of both thorium and uranium sorbed by Streptomyces levoris cells increased with an increase of the solution pH. Although the equilibrium isotherm of uranium biosorption is in similar manner as that of thorium biosorption, uranium was sorbed much faster than thorium. Biosorption isotherm of each metal ion could be well fitted by Langmuir isotherm taking the ionic charge of metal ions into account. The Langmuir isotherm for binary system did not explain completely the competitive biosorption of thorium and uranium by Streptomyces levoris. However, the results suggested that the ion species of both metals in the cells should be Th(OH) 2 2+ and UO 2 2+ , respectively. (author)

  16. Irradiated uranium reprocessing; Prerada ozracenog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorijaza visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products.

  17. Preparation of Uranium Dioxide by Electrochemical Reduction in Ammonium Carbonate Solutions and Subsequent Precipitation; Preparation de bioxyde d'uranium par reduction electrochimique dans des solutions de carbonate d'ammonium et precipitation; Prigotovlenie dvuokisi urana metodom ehlektrokhimicheskogo vosstanovleniya v rastvore karbonata ammoniya s posleduyushchim osazhdeniem; Preparacion de dioxido de uranio por reduccion electroquimica en soluciones de carbonato amonico u precipitacion subsiguiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravdic, V.; Branica, M.; Pucar, Z. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1963-11-15

    Experiments in a small scale electrolysis cell on cathodic reduction of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) show the possibility of an efficient way to obtain uranium (IV) in carbonate solutions. From this solution uranium (IV) hydrous oxide precipitates by merely raising the temperature. To obtain larger quantities of material needed for technological testing, a scale-up of the process was attempted. An electrolysis cell of hard PVC (polyvinylchloride) was constructed with a mercury pool cathode of approximately 2.5 dm{sup 2} and platinum anodes. The catholyte was separated from the anolyte by cationexchange membranes. The catholyte was circulated between two 50-1 reservoirs and streamed toward the vigorously stirred mercury cathode. The working potential of mercury was controlled against an Ag/AgCl/KC1 (sat.) reference electrode, the potential being held constant at -1.5 V. The current efficiency is approximately 90%; the power consumed for the reduction process is about 0.8 kWh/kg of uranium dioxide. After the electrolysis was completed the precipitation was initiated only by heating the deeply green clear solution up to 70 deg. C in a separate all-glass vessel of 60-1 volume. From 50, 1 of the catholyte solution 1 kg of a centrifuged product (containing about 20% of water) was obtained. The coulometric analysis of the oxygen-uranium ratio always gave results in the range of 2.04 to 2.09. By the procedure described uranium (IV) hydrous oxide is selectively precipitated, and the oxygen-uranium ratio in the precipitate was found to be independent of the degree of completion of the reduction. The product was identified as the alpha phase of uranium dioxide by the X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments in sintering and characterization of uranium dioxide thus obtained for the ceramic nuclear fuel requirements are under way. (author) [French] Des experiences faites dans une petite cellule d'electrolyse sur la reduction cathodique d'uranium (VI) en uranium (IV) montrent qu

  18. Potentiometric determination of the 'formal' hydrolysis ratio of aluminium species in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Agathe C.; Shafran, Kirill L.; Perry, Carole C.

    2008-01-01

    The 'formal' hydrolysis ratio (h = C(OH - ) added /C(Al) total ) of hydrolysed aluminium-ions is an important parameter required for the exhaustive and quantitative speciation-fractionation of aluminium in aqueous solutions. This paper describes a potentiometric method for determination of the formal hydrolysis ratio based on an automated alkaline titration procedure. The method uses the point of precipitation of aluminium hydroxide as a reference (h = 3.0) in order to calculate the initial formal hydrolysis ratio of hydrolysed aluminium-ion solutions. Several solutions of pure hydrolytic species including aluminium monomers (AlCl 3 ), Al 13 polynuclear cluster ([Al 13 O 4 (OH) 24 (H 2 O) 12 ] 7+ ), Al 30 polynuclear cluster ([Al 30 O 8 (OH) 56 (H 2 O) 26 ] 18+ ) and a suspension of nanoparticulate aluminium hydroxide have been used as 'reference standards' to validate the proposed potentiometric method. Other important variables in the potentiometric determination of the hydrolysis ratio have also been optimised including the concentration of aluminium and the type and strength of alkali (Trizma-base, NH 3 , NaHCO 3 , Na 2 CO 3 and KOH). The results of the potentiometric analysis have been cross-verified by quantitative 27 Al solution nuclear magnetic resonance ( 27 Al NMR) measurements. The 'formal' hydrolysis ratio of a commercial basic aluminium chloride has been measured as an example of a practical application of the developed technique

  19. On magnetic properties of thorium and uranium borides and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chachkhiani, Z.B.; Chachkhiani, L.G.; Chechernikov, V.I.; Slovyanskikh, V.K.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of magnetic susceptibility on temperature of UB 4 compound and Usub(1-x)Thsub(x)Bsub(4) alloy system in the 140-1300 K temperature range is investigated. It has been found that paramagnetic susceptibility does not obeys the Curie-Weiss law. The interpretation of experimental results is performed on the basis of Stoner model of collectivized electrons which permits also to explain the magnetic properites of other thorium and uranium borides

  20. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriko Asanuma; Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada; Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda

    2008-01-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF 4 or NaF adsorbing UF 6 are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF 4 was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na 3 UO 2 F 5 . Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  1. Fundamental study on decontamination of wastes contaminated by uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids - dissolution and electrochemistry of uranium in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noriko Asanuma [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Yusuke Ohhashi; Yukio Wada [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Masayuki Harada; Yasuhisa Ikeda [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Treatment method for wastes contaminated uranium fluorides by using ionic liquids as media of pyrochemical process instead of alkali metal chloride molten salts was proposed. In this method, uranium fluorides such as UF{sub 4} or NaF adsorbing UF{sub 6} are dissolved in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMICl) and dissolved uranium species are recovered as deposits by electrochemical reduction. Under the atmospheric condition, UF{sub 4} was completely dissolved in BMICl at 100 deg. C. UV-vis absorption spectra of the sample solution indicated that main species of uranium are U(VI) and a part of uranium exists as U(IV). Chemical form of uranium in the NaF adsorbents is Na{sub 3}UO{sub 2}F{sub 5}. Therefore, it was immediately dissolved to BMICl. However, complete dissolution was not achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of the solutions prepared by dissolution experiments was performed. Redox properties of uranium species in each sample were irreversible. It was assigned to reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). As a result of preliminary bulk electrolysis, it was expected that reduction products are deposited on the carbon cathode. (authors)

  2. Evaluation of a titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for measuring inorganic uranium species in fresh and marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchins, Colin M.; Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved uranium (U) in freshwater is reported. The new method utilises a previously described binding phase, Metsorb (a titanium dioxide based adsorbent). This binding phase was evaluated and compared to the well-established...

  3. Inverse break-through investigation on uranium isotope separation in the system Fe(III) water-glycerine solution-U(IV) cathionic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murgulescu, Sanda; Calusaru, A.

    1977-01-01

    When a solution containing ferric ions passes on cationic resin in U(IV) form, the substitution of uranium by iron is preceded by oxydation of U(IV) to U(VI). During the contact of U(VI) in solution with U(IV) in resin, an exchange reaction occurs, in which 235 U is slightly concentrated in solution and 238 U in resin phase. Since increase of temperature accelerates the exchange reaction, the apparent thermodynamic values of the exchange reaction were calculated, by taking into account the variation of the apparent equilibrium constant as a function of the reciprocal value of the temperature. The corresponding thermodynamic values in both pure aqueous and water-glycerine solution are: ΔH 0 =6.45 cal.mol -1 and ΔS 0 =21.6x10 -3 cal. 0 K -1 . The use of glycerine containing solutions offers the important advantage to increase the stability versus hydrolysis of the ferric ions even at higher temperature

  4. Accumulation of thorium and uranium by microbes. The effect of pH, concentration of metals, and time course on the accumulation of both elements using streptomyces levoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takehiko

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of thorium and uranium by various microorganisms from a solution containing both metals at pH 3.5 was examined. Among the tested species, a high accumulation ability for thorium was exhibited by strains of gram-positive bacteria, such as Arthrobacter nicotianae, Bacillus megaterium, B. subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Streptomyces levoris. Though uranium was accumulated in small amounts by most of microorganisms. A. nicotianae, S. flavoviridis, and S. levoris had relatively high uranium accumulation abilities. In these high performance thorium- and uranium-accumulating microorganisms, S. levoris, which accumulated the largest amount of uranium from the solution containing only uranium at pH 3.5, accumulated about 300 μmol thorium and 133 μmol uranium per gram dry weight of microbial cells from a solution containing both thorium and uranium at pH 3.5. The amount and time course of the thorium accumulation were almost unaffected by the co-existing uranium, while those of uranium were strongly affected by the co-existing thorium. The effects of pH, the thorium and uranium concentrations, and time course on both metal accumulations were also evaluated by numerical formulas. (author)

  5. Measure solutions for non-local interaction PDEs with two species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francesco, Marco Di [Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Fagioli, Simone [DISIM—Department of Information Engineering, Computer Science and Mathematics, University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio 1 (Coppito) 67100 L' Aquila (AQ) (Italy)

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a systematic existence and uniqueness theory of weak measure solutions for systems of non-local interaction PDEs with two species, which are the PDE counterpart of systems of deterministic interacting particles with two species. The main motivations behind those models arise in cell biology, pedestrian movements, and opinion formation. In case of symmetrizable systems (i.e. with cross-interaction potentials one multiple of the other), we provide a complete existence and uniqueness theory within (a suitable generalization of) the Wasserstein gradient flow theory in Ambrosio et al (2008 Gradient Flows in Metric Spaces and in the Space of Probability Measures (Lectures in Mathematics ETH Zürich) 2nd edn (Basel: Birkhäuser)) and Carrillo et al (2011 Duke Math. J. 156 229–71), which allows the consideration of interaction potentials with a discontinuous gradient at the origin. In the general case of non-symmetrizable systems, we provide an existence result for measure solutions which uses a semi-implicit version of the Jordan–Kinderlehrer–Otto (JKO) scheme (Jordan et al 1998 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 29 1–17), which holds in a reasonable non-smooth setting for the interaction potentials. Uniqueness in the non-symmetrizable case is proven for C{sup 2} potentials using a variant of the method of characteristics. (paper)

  6. Measure solutions for non-local interaction PDEs with two species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francesco, Marco Di; Fagioli, Simone

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic existence and uniqueness theory of weak measure solutions for systems of non-local interaction PDEs with two species, which are the PDE counterpart of systems of deterministic interacting particles with two species. The main motivations behind those models arise in cell biology, pedestrian movements, and opinion formation. In case of symmetrizable systems (i.e. with cross-interaction potentials one multiple of the other), we provide a complete existence and uniqueness theory within (a suitable generalization of) the Wasserstein gradient flow theory in Ambrosio et al (2008 Gradient Flows in Metric Spaces and in the Space of Probability Measures (Lectures in Mathematics ETH Zürich) 2nd edn (Basel: Birkhäuser)) and Carrillo et al (2011 Duke Math. J. 156 229–71), which allows the consideration of interaction potentials with a discontinuous gradient at the origin. In the general case of non-symmetrizable systems, we provide an existence result for measure solutions which uses a semi-implicit version of the Jordan–Kinderlehrer–Otto (JKO) scheme (Jordan et al 1998 SIAM J. Math. Anal. 29 1–17), which holds in a reasonable non-smooth setting for the interaction potentials. Uniqueness in the non-symmetrizable case is proven for C 2 potentials using a variant of the method of characteristics. (paper)

  7. Significant Association between Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Uranium-Reducing Microbial Communities as Revealed by a Combined Massively Parallel Sequencing-Indicator Species Approach▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K.; Jardine, Philip M.; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 μM and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared. PMID:20729318

  8. Significant association between sulfate-reducing bacteria and uranium-reducing microbial communities as revealed by a combined massively parallel sequencing-indicator species approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Erick; Wu, Wei-Min; Leigh, Mary Beth; Carley, Jack; Carroll, Sue; Gentry, Terry; Luo, Jian; Watson, David; Gu, Baohua; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Kitanidis, Peter K; Jardine, Philip M; Zhou, Jizhong; Criddle, Craig S; Marsh, Terence L; Tiedje, James M

    2010-10-01

    Massively parallel sequencing has provided a more affordable and high-throughput method to study microbial communities, although it has mostly been used in an exploratory fashion. We combined pyrosequencing with a strict indicator species statistical analysis to test if bacteria specifically responded to ethanol injection that successfully promoted dissimilatory uranium(VI) reduction in the subsurface of a uranium contamination plume at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center in Tennessee. Remediation was achieved with a hydraulic flow control consisting of an inner loop, where ethanol was injected, and an outer loop for flow-field protection. This strategy reduced uranium concentrations in groundwater to levels below 0.126 μM and created geochemical gradients in electron donors from the inner-loop injection well toward the outer loop and downgradient flow path. Our analysis with 15 sediment samples from the entire test area found significant indicator species that showed a high degree of adaptation to the three different hydrochemical-created conditions. Castellaniella and Rhodanobacter characterized areas with low pH, heavy metals, and low bioactivity, while sulfate-, Fe(III)-, and U(VI)-reducing bacteria (Desulfovibrio, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfosporosinus) were indicators of areas where U(VI) reduction occurred. The abundance of these bacteria, as well as the Fe(III) and U(VI) reducer Geobacter, correlated with the hydraulic connectivity to the substrate injection site, suggesting that the selected populations were a direct response to electron donor addition by the groundwater flow path. A false-discovery-rate approach was implemented to discard false-positive results by chance, given the large amount of data compared.

  9. An approach using centrifugation for the extraction of the soil solution and its usefulness in studies of radionuclide speciation in soils - Approach using centrifugation for extraction of soil solution and its study for uranium speciation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Adriana S. [CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, 70040-020, Brasilia, Brazil, Proc.BEX 1958/13-5 (Brazil); Lozano, J.C.; Prieto, C. [Universidad de Salamanca, 37008, Salamanca (Spain); Blanco Rodriguez, P.; Vera Tome, F. [Universidad de Extremadura, 06006, Badajoz (Spain)

    2014-07-01

    The centrifugation technique is tested as a methodology for extraction of soil solution, for further characterization, in order to elucidate its contribution to the speciation of radionuclides, particularly uranium, in radioactively contaminated soils, as well as the determination of its availability for vegetation. Centrifugation of a previously saturated soil core provides the soil solution with a specific origin inside the soil sample. In such way that the different soil solution origin, associate to the effective pressure applied to the soil core, will reflect different distribution coefficients which affect the radionuclide availability definition. Speciation of radionuclides in the soil solution can be also conditioned by this water origin. The development of this methodology relating to technical challenges faces materials suitable for the centrifugation process, both in terms of mechanical properties and chemical inertness. This paper reports the preparation of ceramic pellets of perlite produced with the intention of replacing glass pellets, used inserts in support to soils coupled with centrifuges. The characterization of porosity and the test of its chemical inertness and mechanical strength to the centrifugation process have been performed. Porosity characterization is required to control the saturation gradient, which conditions the flow of water from the soil. Its mechanical adequacy was tested by subjecting the pellets to the centrifugation process and assessing its integrity end. Chemical inertia was measured by placing the tablets in aqueous solutions of known composition and then evaluating the presence or absence of elements in this solution, after on time of contact between them. (authors)

  10. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  11. Electrolytic recovery of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurr, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for extracting uranium oxide from a solution of one or more uranium compounds, e.g. leach liquors, comprising subjecting the solution to electrolysis utilizing a high current density, e.g. 500 to 4000 amp/m 2 , whereby uranium oxide is formed at the cathode and is recovered. The method is particularly suited to a continuous process using a rotating cathode cell. (author)

  12. Contribution to the characterization of the ideality deviation of concentrated solutions of electrolytes: application to the case plutonium and uranium (IV) nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrin, N.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a base of binary data referring to the plutonium and uranium nitrates (IV) activity coefficients, which will permit to take account the medium effects in the process of liquid-liquid extraction set in action during the reprocessing of irradiated combustibles in a more scrupulous way. The first chapter sticks to establish the problematic of acquisition of actinides binary data at an oxidation state (IV) linked to two characteristics of this type of electrolyte its radioactive properties and its chemical properties. Its chemical properties bring us to define the fictitious binary data and to use an approach based on the thermodynamic concept of simple solutions, on the measurements of water activity of ternary or quaternary mixtures of the actinide, in nitric acid medium and on the binary data of nitric acid. The second chapter intended to propose reliable binary data concerning nitric acid. The validation of acquisition of fictitious binary data method suggested is undertaken. The electrolyte test is the thorium nitrate (IV). The very encouraging results has determined the carrying out of this work of research in that way. The third chapter is based on the experimental acquisition of uranium and plutonium nitrates (IV) binary data. It emphasises the importance given to the preparation of the studied mixtures which characteristics, very high actinide concentrations and low acidities, make them atypical solutions and without any referenced equivalents. The last chapter describes the exploitation which was made of the established binary data. The characteristic parameters of Pu(NO 3 ) 4 and U(NO 3 ) 4 of Pitzer model and of the specific interaction theory has been appraised. Then the application of' the concept of simple solutions to the calculation of the density or quaternary mixtures like Pu(NO 3 ) 4 / UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 /HNO 3 / H 2 O was proposed. (author)

  13. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  14. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  15. A simple and fast determination of microgram thorium in organic solution containing several hundreds times amount of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Duanzhi; Cao Benhong; Yang Jinfeng

    1991-01-01

    Using spectrophotometric method, microgram thorium in 30% TBP-kerosene system containing large amount of uranium was successfully determined after one-step back-extraction with hydrochloric acid. The recovery of thorium is more than 98%, and the separation factor α U/Th is over 1 x 10 3 . Being reliable, simple and fast, the recommended method has been used in the research on spent fuel reprocessing and is expected applicable to other neutral phosphate extraction systems such as TOPO and DMHMP

  16. Solution of environmental protection problems and complex utilization of raw materials during mining and processing of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.G.; Savva, P.P.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the complex of measures taken in Priargunsky industrial mine-chemical association and directed to environment protection, complex utilization of raw materials during mining and processing of uranium ores. These measures include: 1) reduction of toxic chemical agent effluents into atmosphere due to introduction of new methods and gas cleaning systems; 2) rational use of water resources owing to application of circulating water supply systems, waste waters treatment and effective control of the state of water consumption by industrial enterprises; 3) utilization of gangue and industrial solid wastes

  17. Mise en solution et précipitation de l'uranium et du thorium dans les conditions de moyenne et haute température (résumé Solution and Precipitation of Uranium and Thorium under Average and High-Temperature (Summary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les études tant analytiques qu'expérimentales réalisées au cours des vingt dernières années ont bien montré le rôle joué par les complexes d'uranylcarbonates dans le transport de l'uranium en milieu hydrothermal oxydant ou faiblement réducteur. Les travaux expérimentaux actuels sur la mobilité de U et Th, à haute température et haute pression, montrent la très grande différence de solubilité entre UO2 et ThO2, comme l'influence des ions complexants et celles de fO2 et aH+. Ces résultats expérimentaux sont comparés aux données recueillies sur les leucogranites et les granites calcoalcalins (France et divers gisements ou anomalies en uranium (Québec, Rössing, Madagascar, etc.. Dans la catazone U et Th précipitent sous forme de solutions solides d'uranothorianite dans les milieux déficitaires en silice, et sous forme d'uranothorite dans les granites et les syénites La précipitation d'uraninite non thorifère dans les leucogranites français s'explique d'abord par la faible concentration en thorium des solutions aqueuses durant la phase deutérique. Au cours du métamorphisme progressif on peut observer un retard dans la mobilisation de l'uranium en conditions relativement oxydantes, quand U est associé à Ti et OH. Dans le domaine mésozonal la brannérite stabilise l'uranium en présence de titane jusqu'à l'anatexie. Au-delà elle se dissocie en donnant de l'uraninite non thorifère et du rutile. Both analytic and experimental research done over the Iast twenty years has revealed the role played by uranylcarbonate complexes in the transfer of uranium in an oxidant or slightly reducing hydrothermal medium. Recent experimental research on the mobility of U and Th, at high temperature and high pressure, shows the great difference in solubility between UO2 and ThO2, like the influence of complexing ions and of fO2 and aH+. These experimental findings are compared to data gathered on leucogranites and colcoalkaline granites

  18. Sorption of Uranium(VI) and Thorium(IV) ions from aqueous solutions by nano particle of ion exchanger SnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the extensive use of nuclear energy and its replacement for fossil fuels in recent decades, the radioactive waste production has increased enormously. The vast majority of the radioactive wastes products, are in the liquid form and consequently their treatment is of great importance. In this paper, tin oxide with nano-structure has been synthesized as an absorbent by the homogenous sedimentation method in the presence of urea, so as to adsorb uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) ions. The results obtained from the XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/ desorption analyses on the tin oxide sample showed the cassiterite structure with an average particle size of 30 nanometer and a specific surface area of 27.5 m 2 /g. The distribution coefficients of uranium and thorium were studied by means of batch method. The effects of different variables such as pH and time of contact between the exchanger and solution were investigated and the optimum conditions for sorption of these ions were determined.

  19. Particulate, colloidal, and solution phase associations of plutonium, americium, and uranium in surface and groundwater at the Rocky Flats Plant, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnish, R.A.; McKnight, D.M.; Ranville, J.F.; Stephens, V.C.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1993-01-01

    With the cessation of plutonium processing at the D.O.E.-administered Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, CO, the focus of activities at the facility has switched to contaminant assessment and potential remediation strategies. In this context the authors began a study in 1991 to determine the potential for colloid-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu, Am, and in surface- and groundwater at this site. Using the technique of tangential flow ultrafiltration, the authors isolated particles from four size fractions at one groundwater well and two surface water seeps to determine the distribution of Pu, Am, and U among particulate, colloidal, and dissolved aqueous phases. Analysis of particle isolates and filtrate fractions showed significant associations of Am and Pu with colloidal and particulate size particles; uranium isotopes were associated mainly with low molecular weight organic species. The results indicate a potential for colloidal-facilitated transport of the actinides Pu and Am and a significant contribution by low molecular weight natural organic matter to uranium transport

  20. The existence of periodic solutions of the n-species Lotka-Volterra competition systems with impulsive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Zhen E-mail: jinzhn@263.net; Ma Zhien; Maoan Han

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of positive periodic solutions of periodic n-species Lotka-Volterra competition systems with impulses. By using the method coincidence degree theorem, a set of easily verifiable sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of at least one strictly positive periodic solutions. Some known results are improved and generalized.

  1. The existence of periodic solutions of the n-species Lotka-Volterra competition systems with impulsive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Zhen; Ma Zhien; Maoan Han

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we study the existence of positive periodic solutions of periodic n-species Lotka-Volterra competition systems with impulses. By using the method coincidence degree theorem, a set of easily verifiable sufficient conditions are obtained for the existence of at least one strictly positive periodic solutions. Some known results are improved and generalized

  2. Recovery of uranium from uranium bearing black shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amrita; Yadav, Manoj; Singh, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Black shale is the unconventional resource of uranium. Recovery of uranium from black shale has been carried out by the following steps: i) size reduction, ii) leaching of uranium in the aqueous medium, iii) fluoride ion removal, iv) solvent extraction of uranium from the aqueous leach solution, v) scrubbing of the loaded solvent after extraction to remove impurities as much as possible and vi) stripping of uranium from the loaded organic into the aqueous phase. Leaching of black shale has been carried out in hydrochloric acid. Free acidity of the leach solution has been determined by potentiometric titration method. Removal of fluoride ions has been done using sodium chloride. Solvent extraction has been carried out by both tributyl phosphate and alamine-336 as extractants. Scrubbing has been tried with oxalic acid and sulphuric acid. Stripping with sodium carbonate solution has been carried out. Overall recovery of uranium is 95%. (author)

  3. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglizaud, N.

    2006-12-01

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS 2 ). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH ≥ 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 , an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. ≥ -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 ± 0.8) x 10 -7 mol L -1 of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage (≥ 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 ) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10 7 L mol -1 . Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the saturation concentration allows the observation of

  4. Atmospheric plasma generates oxygen atoms as oxidizing species in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hefny, Mohamed Mokhtar; Pattyn, Cedric; Benedikt, Jan; Lukes, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A remote microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet ( µ APPJ) with He, He/H 2 O, He/O 2 , and He/O 2 /H 2 O gas mixtures was used to study the transport of reactive species from the gas phase into the liquid and the following aqueous phase chemistry. The effects induced by the µ APPJ in water were quantitatively studied using phenol as a chemical probe and by measuring H 2 O 2 concentration and pH values. These results were combined with the analysis of the absolute densities of the reactive species and the modeling of convective/diffusion transport and recombination reactions in the effluent of the plasma jet. Additionally, modified plasma jets were used to show that the role of emitted photons in aqueous chemistry is negligible for these plasma sources. The fastest phenol degradation was measured for the He/O 2 plasma, followed by He/H 2 O, He/O 2 /H 2 O, and He plasmas. The modeled quantitative flux of O atoms into the liquid in the He/O 2 plasma case was highly comparable with the phenol degradation rate and showed a very high transfer efficiency of reactive species from the plasma into the liquid, where more than half of the O atoms leaving the jet nozzle entered the liquid. The results indicate that the high oxidative effect of He/O 2 plasma was primarily due to solvated O atoms, whereas OH radicals dominated the oxidative effects induced in water by plasmas with other gas mixtures. These findings help to understand, in a quantitative way, the complex interaction of cold atmospheric plasmas with aqueous solutions and will allow a better understanding of the interaction of these plasmas with water or buffered solutions containing biological macromolecules, microorganisms, or even eukaryotic cells. Additionally, the µ APPJ He/O 2 plasma source seems to be an ideal tool for the generation of O atoms in aqueous solutions for any future studies of their reactivity. (paper)

  5. Comparative studies for determining U-235/U-238 relation in solutions of natural and depleted uranium using gamma spectrometry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassorla F, V.; Valle M, L.; Pena V, L.

    1988-01-01

    Two experimental methods were developed for determining U-235/U-238 ratio in uranium solutions. The isotopic was measured by high resolution ratio gamma-ray spectrometry (G.S.) and neutron activation analysis (N.A.A.). The precision obtained was similar for both methods, but better sensitivity was obtained by N.A.A. The accuracy in both cases was stablished by comparison with samples previously analyzed by mass spectrometry, the results were satisfactory for both techniques. Studies involving the influence of the nitric acid concentration on the isotopic ratio measurement, also were done. In addition, computer programs for faster data reduction were developped, in the case of N.A.A. (author)

  6. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  7. Uranium deposit research, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzicka, V.; LeCheminant, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Research on uranium deposits in Canada, conducted as a prerequisite for assessment of the Estimated Additional Resources of uranium, revealed that (a) the uranium-gold association in rudites of the Huronian Supergroup preferably occurs in the carbon layers; (b) chloritized ore at the Panel mine, Elliot Lake, Ontario, occurs locally in tectonically disturbed areas in the vicinity of diabase dykes; (c) mineralization in the Black Sturgeon Lake area, Ontario, formed from solutions in structural and lithological traps; (d) the Cigar Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, has two phases of mineralization: monomineralic and polymetallic; (e) mineralization of the JEB (Canoxy Ltd.) deposit is similar to that at McClean Lake; (f) the uranium-carbon assemblage was identified in the Claude deposit, Carswell Structure; and (g) the Otish Mountains area, Quebec, should be considered as a significant uranium-polymetallic metallogenic province

  8. Uranium mines of Tajikistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razykov, Z.A; Gusakov, E.G.; Marushenko, A.A.; Botov, A.Yu.; Yunusov, M.M.

    2002-12-01

    The book describes location laws, the main properties of geological structure and industrial perspectives for known uranium mines of the Republic of Tajikistan. Used methods of industrial processing of uranium mines are described. The results of investigations of technological properties of main types of uranium ores and methods of industrial processing of some of them are shown. Main properties of uranium are shortly described as well as problems, connected with it, which arise during exploitation, mining and processing of uranium ores. The main methods of solution of these problems are shown. The book has interest for specialists of mining, geological, chemical, and technological fields as well as for students of appropriate universities. This book will be interested for usual reader, too, if they are interested in mineral resources of their country [ru

  9. Geochemical and sedimentologic problems of uranium deposits of Texas Gulf Coastal Plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Exploration targets for sedimentary uranium ore bodies in the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain include: (1) favorable source rocks for uranium, (2) favorable conditions for uranium leached and transported out of the source rocks, and (3) favorable geologic characteristics of the host rocks for the accumulation of uranium of economic importance. However, data available from known deposits point out more questions of research than answers. Mobility and accumulation of uranium of economic importance in host rocks are controlled by at least three factors - physical, chemical-mineralogic, and hydrologic - that interact dynamically. Physical factors include the nature (viscosity) of the transporting fluid, the permeability of host rock with respect to transporting solution in terms of medium rate, potential differentials, and temperature of the uranium-bearing solution in the macroenvironment. Chemical-mineralogic factors include the ionic strength of solution, chemical activities of species in the solution, chemical activities of pore water in host rocks, surface activity and surface energy of mineral constituents in host rocks, solubilities of ore and gangue minerals, pH, and Eh in the microenvironment. Hydrologic factors include fluctuation of the depth of the oxidation-reduction interfaces in the paleoaquifer host rocks, and their subsequent modification by present hydrologic factors. Geochemical mechanisms that are likely to have been in operation for uranium accumulation are precipitation, adsorption, and/or complexing. 4 figures

  10. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  11. Effect of porosity and surface chemistry on the adsorption-desorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rice straw-based biochars modified with different chemical regents were used as an adsorbent for uranium(VI). Effect of pyrolysis temperature and nature of modifying agent's as well as surface chemistry, surface charge, and pore structure on U(VI) removal was investigated. Amount and nature of the surface groups has, in general, more influence than its porosity on U(VI) adsorption. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH of 5.5. Rice straw derived biochars had comparable U(VI) adsorption as compared to other adsorbents. The U(VI) removal was 90 % from groundwater. NaHCO 3 was found to be the most efficient desorbent eluent for U(VI). (author)

  12. Analytical techniques for in-line/on-line monitoring of uranium and plutonium in process solutions : a brief literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marathe, S.G.; Sood, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    In-line/on-line monitoring of various parameters such as uranium-plutonium-fission product concentration, acidity, density etc. plays an important role in quickly understanding the efficiency of processes in a reprocessing plant. Efforts in studying and installation of such analytical instruments are going on since more than three decades with adaptation of newer methods and technologies. A review on the developement of in-line analytical instrumentation was carried out in this laboratory about two decades ago. This report presents a very short literature survey of the work in the last two decades. The report includes an outline of principles of the main techniques employed in the in-line/on-line monitoring. (author). 77 refs., 6 tabs

  13. Studies on entrained DNPPA separation by charcoal adsorption from aqueous solutions generated during uranium recovery from strong phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2010-01-01

    During the separation of metal ions by solvent extraction technique in hydrometallurgical operations, organic solvents either get entrained or dissolved in various types of aqueous streams, which need to be separated out to prevent environmental pollution and solvent loss. Generally entrained solvents are separated on plant scale by parallel plate separators or by froth floatation cells, while the dissolved solvents are recovered either by organic diluent wash or by charcoal adsorption. A novel process has been developed to recover uranium from merchant grade phosphoric acid (MGA) employing synergistic mixture of DNPPA (di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid ) and TOPO (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) dissolved in petrofin. After recovery of uranium, MGA has to be returned to the host company for the production of fertilizer. This MGA has to be free from any contamination due to DNPPA and TOPO. Separation of DNPPA and TOPO from MGA by diluent wash method has been reported. There is no information available in literature for the separation of DNPPA and TOPO from such aqueous streams by carbon adsorption. The present investigation describes the methodology based on charcoal adsorption study (batch and continuous column operation) to separate DNPPA from MGA. Three different types of charcoal namely coconut shell based, coal based and pelletized charcoal were evaluated for DNPPA separation from MGA containing 100 mg/L DNPPA. It was found that the % DNPPA adsorptions in single contact (0.5g C/50 ml) were 57, 34 and 10 in coconut shell, coal based and pelletised charcoal respectively. Based on the results, the coconut shell based charcoal was selected for further study. Adsorption of DNPPA by coconut shell based charcoal was investigated by carrying out the experiments with 50 ml MGA containing 770 mg/L DNPPA by adding 1 to 7 g charcoal respectively in separate beakers

  14. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  15. Anion analysis in uranium more concentrates by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badaut, V.

    2009-01-01

    In the present exploratory study, the applicability of anionic impurities or attributing nuclear material to a certain chemical process or origin has been investigated. Anions (e.g., nitrate, sulphate, fluoride, chloride) originate from acids or salt solutions that are used for processing of solutions containing uranium or plutonium. The study focuses on uranium ore concentrates ('yellow cakes') originating from different mines. Uranium is mined from different types of ore body and depending on the type of rock, different chemical processes for leaching, dissolving and precipitating the uranium need to be applied. Consequently, the anionic patterns observed in he products of these processes (the 'ore concentrates') are different. The concentrations of different anionic species were measured by ion chromatography using conductivity detection. The results show clear differences of anion concentrations and patterns between samples from different uranium mines. Besides this, differences between sampling campaigns n a same mine were also observed indicating that the uranium ore is not homogeneous in a mine. These within-mine variations, however, were smaller than the between-mine variations. (author)

  16. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested

  17. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was

  18. Spectroscopy and DFT studies of uranyl carbonate, rutherfordine, UO2CO3: a model for uranium transport, carbon dioxide sequestration, and seawater species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnyk, N.; Perry, D. L.; Massuyeau, F.; Faulques, E.

    2017-12-01

    Several optical microprobe experiments of the anhydrous uranium carbonate—rutherfordine—are presented in this work and compared to periodic density functional theory results. Rutherfordine is the simplest uranyl carbonate and constitutes an ideal model system for the study of the rich uranium carbonate family relevant for environmental sustainability. Micro-Raman, micro-reflectance, and micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies have been carried out in situ on native, micrometer-sized crystals. The sensitivity of these techniques is sufficient to analyze minute amounts of samples in natural environments without using x-ray analysis. In addition, very intense micro-PL and micro-reflectance spectra that were not reported before add new results on the ground and excited states of this mineral. The optical gap value determined experimentally is found at about 2.6-2.8 eV. Optimized geometry, band structure, and phonon spectra have been calculated. The main vibrational lines are identified and predicted by this theoretical study. This work is pertinent for optical spectroscopy, for identification of uranyl species in various environmental settings, and for nuclear forensic analysis.

  19. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  20. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  1. Uranium ore processing minimizing reagent losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaogiang, Chen; Moret, J.; Lyaudet, G.

    1989-01-01

    The uranium ore is treated by sodium carbonates and the solution is divided in two parts: a production solution which is decarbonated by an acid before uranium precipitation with sodium hydroxide and a recycling solution directly treated by sodium hydroxide for precipitation of about 85% of uranium and total transformation of sodium bicarbonate into sodium carbonate, the quantity of sodium hydroxide used on the recycling solution brings sodium ions required for attack of the ore [fr

  2. Oxidation-extraction of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawes, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    The invention involves an improvement to the reductive stripping process for recovering uranium values from wet-process phosphoric acid solution, where uranium in the solution is oxidized to uranium (VI) oxidation state and then extracted from the solution by contact with a water immiscible organic solvent, by adding sufficient oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, to obtain greater than 90 percent conversion of the uranium to the uranium (VI) oxidation state to the phosphoric acid solution and simultaneously extracting the uranium (VI)

  3. Use of magnesium-aluminium and zinc-aluminium hydroxycompounds as adsorbents of uranium ions in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Toshio

    1981-01-01

    It was found that precipitates formed by adding NaOH solution to the mixed solutions of MgSO 4 and Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 with Mg/Al molar ratios of 2 to 4 and to the mixed solution of ZnSO 4 and Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 with Zn/Al molar ratio of 2, respectively, can be used as efficient adsorbents of [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- ions in aqueous alkaline carbonate solutions. The ideal structural formulas of the precipitates formed from the mixed Mg-Al solution with Mg/Al ratio of 2.0 and the mixed Zn-Al solution with Zn/Al ratio of 2.0 were estimated to be [Mg 4 Al 2 (OH) 12 ] 2+ [SO 4 .3H 2 O] 2- and [Zn 4 Al 2 (OH) 12 ] 2+ [SO 4 .3H 2 O] 2- , respectively. It has been shown that 0.1 g of the Mg-Al and Zn-Al double hydroxysulphate powders (particle size 70 - 170 μ uptake >97% of the U(VI) ions from 50 ml of an aqueous alkaline carbonate solution containing 100 ppm of U(VI) within 2 h at room temperature. The rates of adsorption of [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- ions for the Mg-Al and Zn-Al double hydroxysulphate powders were both about 2 times that for the hydrous Ti(IV) oxide powders. Five weight percent sodium bicarbonate solution was found to be effective for the desorption of [UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- ions from the double hydroxysulphate powders. Adsorption capacity of the double hydroxysulphates was discussed in relation to their structure. (author)

  4. A modelling exercise on the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of uranium(VI) in the inorganic speciation of natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vercouter, Thomas; Reiller, Pascal E.; Ansoborlo, Eric; Février, Laureline; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Lomenech, Claire; Philippini, Violaine

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The U(VI) speciation in natural waters has been modelled through a modelling exercise. • The results evidence the importance of alkaline earth U(VI) carbonate complexes. • Possible solubility-controlling phases were reported and discussed. • The differences were related to the choice and reliability of thermodynamic data. • Databases need to be improved for reliable U(VI) speciation calculations. - Abstract: Predictive modelling of uranium speciation in natural waters can be achieved using equilibrium thermodynamic data and adequate speciation software. The reliability of such calculations is highly dependent on the equilibrium reactions that are considered as entry data, and the values chosen for the equilibrium constants. The working group “Speciation” of the CETAMA (Analytical methods establishment committee of the French Atomic Energy commission, CEA) has organized a modelling exercise, including four participants, in order to compare modellers’ selections of data and test thermodynamic data bases regarding the calculation of U(VI) inorganic speciation. Six different compositions of model waters were chosen so that to check the importance of ternary alkaline earth carbonate species of U(VI) on the aqueous speciation, and the possible uranium solid phases as solubility-limiting phases. The comparison of the results from the participants suggests (i) that it would be highly valuable for end-users to review thermodynamic constants of ternary carbonate species of U(VI) in a consistent way and implement them in available speciation data bases, and (ii) stresses the necessary care when using data bases to avoid biases and possible erroneous calculations

  5. Alecto 1 - criticality experiment on a solution of plutonium and of uranium 235. Experimental results and calculations on tank number 2 ({phi} 300 mm); Alecto 1 - experience de criticite sur une solution de plutonium et d'uranium enrichi a 90 pour cent. Resultats experimentaux et calculs concernant la cuve no. 2 ({phi} = 300 mm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruna, J G; Brunet, J P; Clouet D' Orval, Ch; Kremser, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Experiments on plutonium and 90 pour cent enriched uranium solutions have been made in the Alecto reactor with a tank of external diameter 300 mm. Various geometries Lave been tested, for variable concentrations of fissionable salts. The critical mass was studied as a function of the concentration in various reflector conditions (water, concrete, wood) and the experimental values were compared with calculated values. The effects of cadmium as a reflector and of the stainless steel tank were also studied. Lastly were carried out measurements of {beta}/{tau}, ratio of the effective fraction of delayed neutrons to the average lifetime of the neutrons in the reactor. (authors) [French] Des experiences sur des solutions de plutonium et d'uranium enrichi a 90 pour cent ont ete effectuees dans le reacteur Alecto, avec une cuve de diametre exterieur 300 mm. Diverses configurations geometriques ont ete realisees, pour des concentrations variables du sel fissile. On a etudie la masse critique en fonction de la concentration, dans plusieurs conditions de reflexion (eau, beton, bois), et on a compare les resultats experimentaux aux valeurs donnees par le calcul. On a egalement etudie l'influence du cadmium comme reflecteur et celle de la cuve d'acier inoxydable. Enfin on a effectue des mesures de {beta}/{tau}, rapport de la proportion effective des neutrons retardes au temps de vie moyen des neutrons dans la pile. (auteurs)

  6. Recovery of uranium from lignites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium in raw lignite is associated with the organic matter and is readily soluble in acid (and carbonate) solutions. However, beneficiation techniques were not successful for concentrating the uranium or removing part of the reagent-consuming materials. Once the lignite was heated, the uranium became much less soluble in both acid and carbonate solutions, and complete removal of carbon was required to convert it back to a soluble form. Proper burning improves acid-leaching efficiency; that is, it reduces the reagent consumption and concentrates the uranium, thereby reducing plant size for comparable uranium throughput, and it eliminates organic fouling of leach liquors. Restrictions are necessary during burning to prevent the uranium from becoming refractory. The most encouraging results were obtained by flash-burning lignite at 1200 to 1300 0 C and utilizing the released SO 2 to supplement the acid requirement. The major acid consumers were aluminum and iron

  7. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous solutions by a selective impregnated resin containing carminic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Hosseini-Bandegharaei, Ahmad; Hosseini, Seyyed-Hossein; Kharghani, Keivan; Zarei, Hossein; Rastegar, Ayoob

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The objective of the study is to investigate the potential application of a selective EIR for sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. • The effects of several physiochemical parameters were investigated. • The sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms were used to explain the sorption mechanism. • The thermodynamic studies showed the feasibility of sorption process. • The EIR beads showed a great potential for effective removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions. - Abstract: In this work, the removal of uranium and thorium ions from aqueous solutions was studied by solid–liquid extraction using an advantageous extractant-impregnated resin (EIR) prepared by loading carminic acid (CA) onto Amberlite XAD-16 resin beads. Batch sorption experiments using CA/XAD-16 beads for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions were carried out as a function of several parameters, like equilibration time, metal ion concentration, etc. The equilibrium data obtained from the sorption experiments were adjusted to the Langmuir isotherm model and the calculated maximum sorption capacities in terms of monolayer sorption were in agreement with those obtained from the experiments. The experimental data on the sorption behavior of both metal ions onto the EIR beads fitted well in both Bangham and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models, indicating that the intra-particle diffusion is the rate-controlling step. The thermodynamic studies at different temperatures revealed the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of the sorption process for both uranium and thorium ions

  8. Uranium mobility during interaction of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite with alkaline carbonate solution: T = 120° C, P = 210 kg/cm2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    Well-characterized samples of rhyolitic obsidian, perlite and felsite from a single lava flow are leached of U by alkaline oxidizing solutions under open-system conditions. Pressure, temperature, flow rate and solution composition are held constant in order to evaluate the relative importance of differences in surface area and crystallinity. Under the experimental conditions U removal from crushed glassy samples proceeds by a mechanism of glass dissolution in which U and silica are dissolved in approximately equal weight fractions. The rate of U removal from crushed glassy samples increases with decreasing average grain size (surface area). Initial rapid loss of a small component (≈ 2.5%) of the total U from crushed felsite. followed by much slower U loss, reflects variable rates of attack of numerous uranium sites. The fractions of U removed during the experiment ranged from 3.2% (felsite) to 27% (perlite). An empirical method for evaluating the relative rate of U loss from contemporaneous volcanic rocks is presented which incorporates leaching results and rock permeability data.

  9. In situ characterization of uranium and americium oxide solid solution formation for CRMP process: first combination of in situ XRD and XANES measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caisso, Marie; Picart, Sébastien; Belin, Renaud C; Lebreton, Florent; Martin, Philippe M; Dardenne, Kathy; Rothe, Jörg; Neuville, Daniel R; Delahaye, Thibaud; Ayral, André

    2015-04-14

    Transmutation of americium in heterogeneous mode through the use of U1-xAmxO2±δ ceramic pellets, also known as Americium Bearing Blankets (AmBB), has become a major research axis. Nevertheless, in order to consider future large-scale deployment, the processes involved in AmBB fabrication have to minimize fine particle dissemination, due to the presence of americium, which considerably increases the risk of contamination. New synthesis routes avoiding the use of pulverulent precursors are thus currently under development, such as the Calcined Resin Microsphere Pelletization (CRMP) process. It is based on the use of weak-acid resin (WAR) microspheres as precursors, loaded with actinide cations. After two specific calcinations under controlled atmospheres, resin microspheres are converted into oxide microspheres composed of a monophasic U1-xAmxO2±δ phase. Understanding the different mechanisms during thermal conversion, that lead to the release of organic matter and the formation of a solid solution, appear essential. By combining in situ techniques such as XRD and XAS, it has become possible to identify the key temperatures for oxide formation, and the corresponding oxidation states taken by uranium and americium during mineralization. This paper thus presents the first results on the mineralization of (U,Am) loaded resin microspheres into a solid solution, through in situ XAS analysis correlated with HT-XRD.

  10. Carbonate-H₂O₂ leaching for sequestering uranium from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Liao, Weisheng; Wai, Chien M; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, Christopher J; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2014-07-28

    Uranium adsorbed on amidoxime-based polyethylene fiber in simulated seawater can be quantitatively eluted at room temperature using 1 M Na2CO3 containing 0.1 M H2O2. This efficient elution process is probably due to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl-peroxo-carbonato complex in the carbonate solution. After washing with water, the sorbent can be reused with minimal loss of uranium loading capacity. Possible existence of this stable uranyl species in ocean water is also discussed.

  11. Vein-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, R.A.; Holland, H.D.; Petersen, U.

    1975-01-01

    A critical review is presented of published data bearing on the mineralogy, paragenesis, geochemistry, and origin of veiw-type uranium deposits. Its aim is to serve as a starting point for new research and as a basis for the development of new exploration strategies. During the formation of both vein and sandstone types of deposits uranium seems to have been dissolved by and transported in rather oxidized solutions, and deposited where these solutions encountered reducing agents such as carbon, sulfides, ferrous minerals and hydrocarbons. Granitic rocks abnormally enriched in uranium have apparently been the most common source for uranium in vein-type deposits. Oxidizing solutions have been derived either from the surface or from depth. Surface solutions saturated with atmospheric oxygen have frequently passed through red bed or clean sandstone conduits on their way to and from uranium source rocks. Deep solutions of non-surface origin have apparently become sufficiently oxidizing by passage through and equilibration with red beds. The common association of clean sandstones or red beds with uranium-rich granites in the vicinity of vein-type uranium deposits is probably not fortuitous, and areas where these rock types are found together are considered particularly favorable targets for uranium exploration

  12. Speciation of bioaccumulated uranium(VI) by Euglena mutabilis cells obtained by laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, Sina; Bernhard, Gert [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Radiochemistry; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Arnold, Thuro [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2014-07-01

    The ability of Euglena mutabilis cells - a unicellular protozoan with a flexible pellicle, which is typically found in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments - to bioaccumulate uranium under acid conditions was studied in batch sorption experiments at pH 3 and 4 using Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaClO{sub 4} as background media. It was found that axenic cultures of Euglena mutabilis Schmitz were able to bioaccumulate in 5 days 94.9 to 99.2% of uranium from a 1 x 10{sup -5} mol/L uranium solution in perchlorate medium and 95.1 to 95.9% in sodium sulfate medium, respectively. The speciation of uranium in solution and uranium bioaccumulated by Euglena mutabilis cells, were studied by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). The LIFS investigations showed that the uranium speciation in the NaClO{sub 4} systems was dominated by free uranyl(VI) species and that the UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4} species was dominating in the Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} medium. Fluorescence spectra of the bioaccumulated uranium revealed that aqueous uranium binds to carboxylic and/or (organo)phosphate groups located on the euglenid pellicle or inside the Euglena mutabilis cells. Reduced uranium immobilization rates of 0.93-1.43 mg uranium per g Euglena mutabilis biomass were observed in similar experiments, using sterile filtrated AMD waters containing, 4.4 x 10{sup -5} mol/L uranium. These lower rates were attributed to competition with other cations for available sorption sites. Additional LIFS measurements, however, showed that the speciation of the bioaccumulated uranium by the Euglena mutabilis cells was found to be identical with the uranium speciation found in the bioaccumulation experiments carried out in Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaClO{sub 4} media. The results indicate that Euglena mutabilis has the potential to immobilize aqueous uranium under acid condition and thus may be used in future as promising agent for immobilizing uranium in low pH waste water environments. (orig.)

  13. Speciation of bioaccumulated uranium(VI) by Euglena mutabilis cells obtained by laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockmann, Sina; Bernhard, Gert; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf; Arnold, Thuro

    2014-01-01

    The ability of Euglena mutabilis cells - a unicellular protozoan with a flexible pellicle, which is typically found in acid mine drainage (AMD) environments - to bioaccumulate uranium under acid conditions was studied in batch sorption experiments at pH 3 and 4 using Na 2 SO 4 and NaClO 4 as background media. It was found that axenic cultures of Euglena mutabilis Schmitz were able to bioaccumulate in 5 days 94.9 to 99.2% of uranium from a 1 x 10 -5 mol/L uranium solution in perchlorate medium and 95.1 to 95.9% in sodium sulfate medium, respectively. The speciation of uranium in solution and uranium bioaccumulated by Euglena mutabilis cells, were studied by laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). The LIFS investigations showed that the uranium speciation in the NaClO 4 systems was dominated by free uranyl(VI) species and that the UO 2 SO 4 species was dominating in the Na 2 SO 4 medium. Fluorescence spectra of the bioaccumulated uranium revealed that aqueous uranium binds to carboxylic and/or (organo)phosphate groups located on the euglenid pellicle or inside the Euglena mutabilis cells. Reduced uranium immobilization rates of 0.93-1.43 mg uranium per g Euglena mutabilis biomass were observed in similar experiments, using sterile filtrated AMD waters containing, 4.4 x 10 -5 mol/L uranium. These lower rates were attributed to competition with other cations for available sorption sites. Additional LIFS measurements, however, showed that the speciation of the bioaccumulated uranium by the Euglena mutabilis cells was found to be identical with the uranium speciation found in the bioaccumulation experiments carried out in Na 2 SO 4 and NaClO 4 media. The results indicate that Euglena mutabilis has the potential to immobilize aqueous uranium under acid condition and thus may be used in future as promising agent for immobilizing uranium in low pH waste water environments. (orig.)

  14. Solution of Heliospheric Propagation: Unveiling the Local Interstellar Spectra of Cosmic-ray Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, M. J.; Torre, S. Della; Gervasi, M.; Grandi, D.; Vacca, G. La; Pensotti, S.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rozza, D.; Tacconi, M. [INFN, Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Jóhannesson, G. [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Kachelriess, M. [Institutt for fysikk, NTNU, NO-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Masi, N.; Quadrani, L. [INFN, Bologna (Italy); Moskalenko, I. V.; Orlando, E.; Porter, T. A. [Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ostapchenko, S. S. [Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-05-10

    Local interstellar spectra (LIS) for protons, helium, and antiprotons are built using the most recent experimental results combined with state-of-the-art models for propagation in the Galaxy and heliosphere. Two propagation packages, GALPROP and HelMod, are combined to provide a single framework that is run to reproduce direct measurements of cosmic-ray (CR) species at different modulation levels and at both polarities of the solar magnetic field. To do so in a self-consistent way, an iterative procedure was developed, where the GALPROP LIS output is fed into HelMod, providing modulated spectra for specific time periods of selected experiments to compare with the data; the HelMod parameter optimization is performed at this stage and looped back to adjust the LIS using the new GALPROP run. The parameters were tuned with the maximum likelihood procedure using an extensive data set of proton spectra from 1997 to 2015. The proposed LIS accommodate both the low-energy interstellar CR spectra measured by Voyager 1 and the high-energy observations by BESS, Pamela, AMS-01, and AMS-02 made from the balloons and near-Earth payloads; it also accounts for Ulysses counting rate features measured out of the ecliptic plane. The found solution is in a good agreement with proton, helium, and antiproton data by AMS-02, BESS, and PAMELA in the whole energy range.

  15. Synthesis, sintering and dissolution of thorium and uranium (IV) mixed oxide solid solutions: influence of the method of precursor preparation; Synthese, frittage et caracterisation de solutions solides d'oxydes mixtes de thorium et d'uranium (IV): influence de la methode de preparation du precurseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingant, N

    2008-12-15

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently considered as potential fuels for the third and fourth generations of nuclear reactors. In this context, thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions were studied as model compounds to underline the influence of the method of preparation on their physico-chemical properties. Two methods of synthesis, both based on the initial precipitation of oxalate precursors have been developed. The first consisted in the direct precipitation ('open' system) while the second involved hydrothermal conditions ('closed' system). The second method led to a significant improvement in the crystallization of the samples especially in the field of the increase of the grain size. In these conditions, the formation of a complete solid solution Th{sub 1-x}U{sub x}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O was prepared between both end-members. Its crystal structure was also resolved. Whatever the initial method considered, these compounds led to the final dioxides after heating above 400 C. The various steps associated to this transformation, involving the dehydration of precursors then the decomposition of oxalate groups have been clarified. Moreover, the use of wet chemistry methods allowed to reduce the sintering temperature of the final thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions. Whatever the method of preparation considered, dense samples (95% to 97% of the calculated value) were obtained after only 3 hours of heating at 1500 C. Additionally, the use of hydrothermal conditions significantly increased the grain size, leading to the reduction of the occurrence of the grain boundaries and of the global residual porosity. The significant improvement in the homogeneity of cations distribution in the samples was also highlighted. Finally, the chemical durability of thorium-uranium (IV) dioxide solid solutions was evaluated through the development of leaching tests in nitric acid. The optimized homogeneity especially in terms of the

  16. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, S.R.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Three overall factors are necessary for formation of uranium deposits in sandstone: a source of uranium, host rocks capable of transmitting uranium-bearing solutions, and a precipitant. Possible sources of uranium in sandstone-type deposits include groundwaters emanating from granitic highlands, arkosic sediments, tuffaceous material within or overlying the host rocks, connate fluids, and overlying black shales. The first three sources are considered the most likely. Host rocks are generally immature sandstones deposited in alluvial-fan, intermontane-basin or marginal-marine environments, but uranium deposits do occur in well-winnowed barrier-bar or eolian sands. Host rocks for uranium deposits generally show coefficients of permeability on the order of 1 to 100 gal/day/ft 2 . Precipitants are normally agents capable of reducing uranium from the uranyl to the uranous state. The association of uranium with organic matter is unequivocal; H 2 S, a powerful reductant, may have been present at the time of formation of some deposits but may go unnoticed today. Vanadium can serve to preserve the tabular characteristics of some deposits in the near-surface environment, but is considered an unlikely primary precipitant for uranium. Uranium deposits in sandstone are divided into two overall types: peneconcordant deposits, which occur in locally reducing environments in otherwise oxidized sandstones; and roll-type deposits, which occur at the margin of an area where an oxidized groundwater has permeated an otherwise reduced sandstone. Uranium deposits are further broken down into four subclasses; these are described

  17. Method for determining microamounts of uranium in solutions from copper ores, by liquid-liquid extraction and spectrophotometry with arsenazo III.; Metodo para determinar microcantidades de uranio en disoluciones de minerales de cobre, por extraccion liquido-liquido y espectrofotometria con arsenazo III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, B.

    1972-07-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for determining small amounts of uranium in aqueous solutions from copper ores. Uranium is quantitatively separated in a single extraction by a solution of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide in benzene, using ethylendiaminetetracetic acid and sodium fluoride as complexing agents, for improving the selectivity of the procedure. An aliquot of the extract is diluted with a hydrocolloidal solution of arsenazo III. Optical density is measured at 650 nm. (Author) 3 refs.

  18. Uranium determination by adsorption-colorimetry method in waters, rocks and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zharov, P.N.

    1975-01-01

    The method created by the author and based on the use of activated coal for uranium adsorption from solutions (pH=5) prepared in the course of analysis and its desorption from coal precipitate by weak 2.5% soda ensures complete uranium extraction. The rate of absorption and desorption is provided under dynamic conditions and under vacuum. When pH of desorbing solution collected in small volume is brought to 2 the uranium is calorimetrized with arseno 3 reagent by Savvin. The method is convenient and accurate for uranium analysis in small quantities of all natural species of the inorganic and organic origin. The method is of interest for geological exploration parties, in sanatorium biological and geochemical investigations

  19. Study on remediation for uranium contaminated soils enhanced by chelator using brassica mustard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Qinfang; Pan Ning; Jin Yongdong; Xia Chuanqin

    2012-01-01

    Screening of perfect hyperaccumulators is the key to the application of this technology. Through the previous stage study, mustard was found to be good at absorption and accumulation of uranium among 51 species, the plant grows fast with wide adaptability and large biomass. Researches will focus on the following two aspects: 1. Simulating U- contaminated soils was prepared by two different ways to add uranium. (1). UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 . 6H 2 O solution was sprayed into soil when the plant was grown in the soil; (2). Above U-contaminated soils after planting and placed for a year. Study on whether the way of adding uranium can effect mustard accumulate uranium. Results found: in the first Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reaches 1103.42 mg/kg, roots reach 1909.49 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 7.81%; in the second Phytoremediation, U-contaminated concentration at 100 mg/kg, U concentration in shoots reach 295.83 mg/kg, roots reach 268.42 mg/kg, annual removal rate is 2.52%. Led to the difference between the twice remediation is the speciation of uranium m soils has changed, respectively, Tessier-five step continuous extraction method for determination of uranium speciation in soils and found available uranium (exchangeable uranium, uranium carbonate) in the soil of the first phytoremediation was 52% higher than the second phytoremediation. 2. Study on chelators (Citric acids, Malic acids) and soil amendments (Organic fertilizer, microbe fertilizer. Humic acid organic fertilizer, Urea) whether effect mustard accumulate uranium, found organic fertilizer can reduce shoots accumulate uranium, Citric acid and microbe fertilizer increase shoots enrichment of uranium. (authors)

  20. Uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritcey, G.M.; Haque, K.E.; Lucas, B.H.; Skeaff, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have developed a complete method of recovering separately uranium, thorium and radium from impure solids such as ores, concentrates, calcines or tailings containing these metals. The technique involves leaching, in at least one stage. The impure solids in finely divided form with an aqueous leachant containing HCl and/or Cl 2 until acceptable amounts of uranium, thorium and radium are dissolved. Uranium is recovered from the solution by solvent extraction and precipitation. Thorium may also be recovered in the same manner. Radium may be recovered by at least one ion exchange, absorption and precipitation. This amount of iron in the solution must be controlled before the acid solution may be recycled for the leaching process. The calcine leached in the first step is prepared in a two stage roast in the presence of both Cl 2 and a metal sulfide. The first stage is at 350-450 0 and the second at 550-700 0

  1. MODELING OF THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION EQUILIBRIUM OF URANIUM (VI SULFATE WITH ALAMINE 336

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. C. Avelar

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study investigated the solvent extraction of uranium from sulfate acid solutions using Alamine 336 as an extractant dissolved in commercial kerosene Exxsol D-100 and 5% v/v of tridecanol as a modifying agent at room temperature (25±2 ºC and an aqueous/organic volumetric ratio of unity. Experiments were carried out at typical concentration levels like those used at the uranium plant of INB (Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil, Brazil. Data fitting using the slope analysis method revealed that uranium is extracted by Alamine 336 as UO2SO4 and UO2(SO422- species, forming (R3NH+2UO2(SO422- in the organic phase; the extraction of the species UO2(SO434- seems improbable for the operating conditions investigated. The extraction of uranium is significantly reduced when the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions in the aqueous phase are increased.

  2. Studies for the use of water soluble chelating polymer in ultra-filtration technique for the removal of uranium from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, S.K.; Mahatele, A.K.; Tripathi, S.C.; Vijayan, K.; Munshi, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Studies were carried out for the removal of uranium from aqueous medium using water soluble chelating polymer by ultra-filtration technique. The water soluble polymers are the option for the surfactants used in the micellar enhanced ultra-filtration technique. More than 95% separation of uranium carried out under different experimental conditions, suggest that the technique can be effectively employed for the removal uranium from the aqueous effluent streams. (author)

  3. Uranium chemistry: significant advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzanti, M.

    2011-01-01

    The author reviews recent progress in uranium chemistry achieved in CEA laboratories. Like its neighbors in the Mendeleev chart uranium undergoes hydrolysis, oxidation and disproportionation reactions which make the chemistry of these species in water highly complex. The study of the chemistry of uranium in an anhydrous medium has led to correlate the structural and electronic differences observed in the interaction of uranium(III) and the lanthanides(III) with nitrogen or sulfur molecules and the effectiveness of these molecules in An(III)/Ln(III) separation via liquid-liquid extraction. Recent work on the redox reactivity of trivalent uranium U(III) in an organic medium with molecules such as water or an azide ion (N 3 - ) in stoichiometric quantities, led to extremely interesting uranium aggregates particular those involved in actinide migration in the environment or in aggregation problems in the fuel processing cycle. Another significant advance was the discovery of a compound containing the uranyl ion with a degree of oxidation (V) UO 2 + , obtained by oxidation of uranium(III). Recently chemists have succeeded in blocking the disproportionation reaction of uranyl(V) and in stabilizing polymetallic complexes of uranyl(V), opening the way to to a systematic study of the reactivity and the electronic and magnetic properties of uranyl(V) compounds. (A.C.)

  4. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  5. Automated uranium titration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kato, Y.

    1983-01-01

    An automated titration system based on the Davies-Gray method has been developed for accurate determination of uranium. The system consists of a potentiometric titrator with precise burettes, a sample changer, an electronic balance and a desk-top computer with a printer. Fifty-five titration vessels are loaded in the sample changer. The first three contain the standard solution for standardizing potassium dichromate titrant, and the next two and the last two contain the control samples for data quality assurance. The other forty-eight measurements are carried out for sixteen unknown samples. Sample solution containing about 100 mg uranium is taken in a titration vessel. At the pretreatment position, uranium (VI) is reduced to uranium (IV) by iron (II). After the valency adjustment, the vessel is transferred to the titration position. The rate of titrant addition is automatically controlled to be slower near the end-point. The last figure (0.01 mL) of the equivalent titrant volume for uranium is calculated from the potential change. The results obtained with this system on 100 mg uranium gave a precision of 0.2% (RSD,n=3) and an accuracy of better than 0.1%. Fifty-five titrations are accomplished in 10 hours. (author)

  6. Preparation of Ca-alginate coated nZVI core shell beads for uranium (VI) removal from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuhong Hu; Xiaoyan Lin; Yahui Zhang; Meiling Shi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the core-shell nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI)@Alg-Ca beads were synthesized by coaxial electronic injection method for removal of U (VI) from aqueous solution, and characterized by SEM, EDX and XPS. The results showed that the pseudo-second-order models and the Langmuir isotherm model fitted well with the data obtained. The removal mechanism may include both physical adsorption of U (VI) on the surface or inside of core-shell nZVI@Alg-Ca beads and subsequent reduction of U (VI) to U (IV). Therefore, the core-shell nZVI@Alg-Ca beads would have an application prospect in effective removal of U (VI) contamination from aqueous solution. (author)

  7. Removal of uranium and thorium from aqueous solution by ultrafiltration (UF) and PAMAM dendrimer assisted ultrafiltration (DAUF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Ashish Kumar Singha Deb; Ponraju, D.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) from aqueous solution have been carried out by ultrafiltration (UF) and dendrimer assisted ultrafiltration (DAUF) using regenerated cellulose acetate membrane and PAMAM [poly(amido)amine] dendrimer chelating agent. In UF, the U(VI) and Th(IV) are removed from aqueous solution by adsorption/mass deposition on the membrane at pH > 4. In DAUF, the water soluble PAMAM dendrimer chelating agent effectively concentrates these metal ions in retentate thereby preventing the mass deposition on membrane. At acidic pH (≤3), the binding of metal ions with PAMAM dendrimer is very weak and hence PAMAM can be regenerated and reused. Electronic supplementary material. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10967-014-3462-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. (author)

  8. Filtration aids in uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, H.L.; Levine, N.M.; Risdon, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    A process of improving the filtration efficiency and separation of uranium ore pulps obtained by carbonate leaching of uranium ore which comprises treating said ore pulps with an aqueous solution of hydroxyalkyl guar selected from the group consisting of hydroxyethyl and hydroxypropyl guar in the amount of 0.1 and 2.0 pounds of hydroxyalkyl guar per ton of uranium ore

  9. Uranium hexafluoride purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Eneas F. de

    1986-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride might contain a large amount of impurities after manufacturing or handling. Three usual methods of purification of uranium hexafluoride were presented: selective sorption, sublimation, and distillation. Since uranium hexafluoride usually is contaminated with hydrogen fluoride, a theoretical study of the phase equilibrium properties was performed for the binary system UF 6 -HF. A large deviation from the ideal solution behaviour was observed. A purification unity based on a constant reflux batch distillation process was developed. A procedure was established in order to design the re boiler, condenser and packed columns for the UF 6 -HF mixture separation. A bench scale facility for fractional distillation of uranium hexafluoride was described. Basic operations for that facility and results extracted from several batches were discussed. (author)

  10. Heap leaching for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Denison Mines Ltd. is using two bacterial leaching processes to combat the high cost of extracting uranium from low grade ore in thin reefs. Both processes use thiobacillus ferro-oxidans, a bacterium that employs the oxidation of ferrous iron and sulphur as its source of energy for growth. The first method is flood leaching, in which ore is subjected to successive flood, drain and rest cycles. The second, trickle leaching, uses sprinklers to douse the broken muck continuously with leaching solution. In areas where grades are too low to justify the expense of hauling the ore to the surface, the company is using this biological process underground to recover uranium. In 1987 Denison recovered 840 000 lb of uranium through bacterial heap leaching. It plans to have biological in-place leaching contribute 25% of the total uranium production by 1990. (fig.)

  11. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  12. Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhainsa, K.C.; D'Souza, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium accumulation by aquatic macrophyte, Pistia stratiotes from aqueous solution was investigated in laboratory condition. The objective was to evaluate the uranium accumulation potential and adopt the plant in uranium containing medium to improve its uptake capacity. The plant was found to tolerate and grow in the pH range of 3-7. Accumulation of uranium improved with increasing pH and the plant could remove 70% uranium from the medium (20 mg/L) within 24 hours of incubation at pH 5-6. Uptake of uranium on either side of this pH range decreased

  13. Electro-volatilization of ruthenium in nitric medium: influences of ruthenium species nature and models solutions composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.

    2004-12-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products in the reprocessing of irradiated fuels that requires a specific processing management. Its elimination, upstream by the PUREX process, has been considered. A process, called electro-volatilization, which take advantage of the RuO 4 volatility, has been optimised in the present study. It consists in a continuous electrolysis of ruthenium solutions in order to generate RuO 4 species that is volatilized and easily trapped. This process goes to satisfying ruthenium elimination yields with RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 synthetic solutions but not with fuel dissolution solutions. Consequently, this work consisted in the speciation studies of dissolved ruthenium species were carried out by simulating fuel solutions produced by hot acid attack of several ruthenium compounds (Ru(0), RuO 2 ,xH 2 O, polymetallic alloy). In parallel with dissolution kinetic studies, the determination of dissolved species was performed using voltammetry, spectrometry and spectro-electrochemistry. The results showed the co-existence of Ru(IV) and RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 . Although these species are different from synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 , their electro-oxidation behaviour are similar. The electro-volatilization tests of these dissolution solutions yielded to comparable results as the synthetic RuNO(NO 3 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 solutions. Then, complexity increase of models solutions was performed by in-situ generation of nitrous acid during ruthenium dissolution. Nitrous acid showed a catalytic effect on ruthenium dissolution. Its presence goes to quasi exclusively RuNO(NO 2 ) 2 (H 2 O) 3 species. It is also responsible of the strong n-bond formation between Ru 2+ and NO + . In addition, it has been shown that its reducing action on RuO 4 hinders the electro-volatilization process. Mn 2+ and Ce 3+ cations also reveal, but to a lesser extent, an electro-eater behaviour as well as Pu 4+ and Cr 3+ according to the thermodynamics data. These results allow one to

  14. Effects of Pig Slurry Application and Crops on Phosphorus Content in Soil and the Chemical Species in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lessandro De Conti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of pig slurry rates and plant cultivation can modify the soil phosphorus (P content and distribution of chemical species in solution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the total P, available P and P in solution, and the distribution of chemical P species in solution, in a soil under longstanding pig slurry applications and crop cultivation. The study was carried out in soil columns with undisturbed structure, collected in an experiment conducted for eight years in the experimental unit of the Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, Santa Maria (RS. The soil was an Argissolo Vermelho distrófico arênico (Typic Hapludalf, subjected to applications of 0, 20, 40, and 80 m3 ha-1 pig slurry. Soil samples were collected from the layers 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-40, and 40-60 cm, before and after black oat and maize grown in a greenhouse, for the determination of available P, total P and P in the soil solution. In the solution, the concentration of the major cations, anions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, and pH were determined. The distribution of chemical P species was determined by software Visual Minteq. The 21 pig slurry applications increased the total P content in the soil to a depth of 40 cm, and the P extracted by Mehlich-1 and from the solution to a depth of 30 cm. Successive applications of pig slurry changed the balance between the solid and liquid phases in the surface soil layers, increasing the proportion of the total amount of P present in the soil solution, aside from changing the chemical species in the solution, reducing the percentage complexed with Al and increasing the one complexed with Ca and Mg in the layers 0-5 and 5-10 cm. Black oat and maize cultivation increased pH in the solution, thereby increasing the proportion of HPO42- and reducing H2PO4- species.

  15. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  16. Translocation of uranium from water to foodstuff while cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnapriya, K.C.; Baksi, Ananya; Chaudhari, Swathi; Gupta, Soujit Sen; Pradeep, T.

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • Rice can efficiently uptake uranium from water contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}) 2.6 H{sub 2}O), while cooking. • Unusual uranium uptake to the extent of about 1000 ppm is observed when rice is cooked in highly concentrated uranium contaminated water (1240 ppm). • Nature of interaction of uranium with carbohydrates is probed using small monosaccharides like glucose and mannose. • Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to be the most stable species in water in such solutions which can form complexes with sugars. • The species (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is also observed in the case of water exposed to the common mineral, uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and similar type of complexation is observed with sugars. - Abstract: The present work report the unusual uranium uptake by foodstuff, especially those rich in carbohydrates like rice when they are cooked in water, contaminated with uranium. The major staple diet in South Asia, rice, was chosen to study its interaction with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, the active uranium species in water, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Highest uptake limit was checked by cooking rice at very high uranium concentration and it was found to be good scavenger of uranium. To gain insight into the mechanism of uptake, direct interaction of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} with monosaccharides was also studied, using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry taking mannose as a model. The studies have been done with dissolved uranium salt, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O), as well as the leachate of a stable oxide of uranium, UO{sub 2}(s), both of which exist as UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in water. Among the eight different rice varieties investigated, Karnataka Ponni showed the maximum uranium uptake whereas unpolished Basmati rice showed the minimum. Interaction with other foodstuffs (potato, carrot, peas, kidney beans and lentils) with and

  17. Uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelelli, Victorio.

    1984-01-01

    The main uranium deposits and occurrences in the Argentine Republic are described, considering, in principle, their geologic setting, the kind of 'model' of the mineralization and its possible origin, and describing the ore species present in each case. The main uraniferous accumulations of the country include the models of 'sandstong type', veintype and impregnation type. There are also other kinds of accumulations, as in calcrete, etc. The main uranium production has been registered in the provinces of Mendoza, Salta, La Rioja, Chubut, Cordoba and San Luis. In each case, the minerals present are mentioned, having been recognized 37 different species all over the country (M.E.L.) [es

  18. Uranium complex recycling method of purifying uranium liquors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elikan, L.; Lyon, W.L.; Sundar, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium is separated from contaminating cations in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is mixed with sufficient recycled uranium complex to raise the weight ratio of uranium to said cations preferably to at least about three. The liquor is then extracted with at least enough non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent to theoretically extract about all of the uranium in the liquor. The organic solvent contains a reagent which reacts with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the aqueous liquor is acidic, the organic solvent is then scrubbed with water. The organic solvent is stripped with a solution containing at least enough ammonium carbonate to precipitate the uranium complex. A portion of the uranium complex is recycled and the remainder can be collected and calcined to produce U 3 O 8 or UO 2

  19. Interactions of uranium (VI) with biofilms; Wechselwirkung von Uran(VI) mit Biofilmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, Sina; Arnold, Thuro; Bernhard, Gert

    2013-07-01

    In this study a detailed investigation was made of natural biofilms from two uranium-contaminated sites, namely the former uranium mine in Koenigstein (Saxony) and the ground surface of the former Grassenhalde tailing heap in Thuringia. A predominance of uranyl sulphate (UO{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), a highly mobile, solute uranium species, was found in the mine waters of both sites. In this study an investigation was made of the capacity of Euglena mutabilis cells for bioaccumulation of uranium in a pH range of 3 to 6 using living cells and sodium perchlorate (9 g/l) or sodium sulphate (3.48 g/l) as background media. At acidic pH values in the range from 3 to 4 it was possible to remove more than 90% of the original uranium content from the test solution regardless of the medium being used. The speciation of the uranium accumulated in the Euglena cells was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS). It was found that a new uranium species of low variability forms on the cells independent of the background medium, state of life of the cells and pH value. By comparing the data from the LIFS measurements with reference values it was possible to narrow down the identity of the uranium species to one bonded to (organo) phosphate and/or carboxylic functional groups. Using time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy it was possible to demonstrate carboxylic bonding of uranium to dead cells. However it was not possible to exclude (organo) complexation with this method. An investigation of the specific location of the uranium on or in the cells using combined CLSM/LIFS technology yielded first indications of intracellular accumulation of uranium in the living cells. Supplementary TEM/EDX measurements confirmed the intracellular uptake, showing it to occur in round to oval cell organelles which are thought to be vacuoles or vacuole-like vesicles. It was not possible to detect uranium on dead cells using these methods. This points to passive, homogeneously distributed

  20. Discussion of metallogenic substance source of Xiangshan uranium orefield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Fei; Tang Xiangsheng; Zou Maoqin; Hu Maomei; He Xiaomei; Chen Xiaoming; Xu Hengli

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of uranium source is a key problem for study on uranium deposit genesis. Based on analysis of general implication for determination of uranium source on distribution characteristics of regional uranium abundance, according to temporal and spatial evolution of regional metallogenic substances in process of geological history, and combining with indication for analysis of uranium source by Pb isotopic composition of ores and REE geochemistry of both rocks and ores in Xiangshan orefield, Lower Cambrian strata are determined as regional uranium source bed, Xiangshan volcanic basin is the accumulation area for regional metallogenic substances, magma and hydrothermal solution of post magmatism are media for uranium. Magmatism realizes uranium migration from 'source' to 'accumulation'. In process of magmatic evolution, uranium transformed into gas phase to provide substance base for uranium mineralization. Fluid-rock interaction of post magmatism also promoted some uranium from schist of the basement and rhyodacite into metallogenic solution. (authors)