WorldWideScience

Sample records for uranium recovery operations

  1. 77 FR 33782 - License Amendment To Construct and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Operate New In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery Facility; Uranium One Americas; Ludeman AGENCY: Nuclear... provided the first time that a document is referenced. The Ludeman facility In Situ Leach Uranium Recovery... request to amend Source Material License SUA-1341 to construct and operate a new in situ leach uranium...

  2. Uranium recovery from mine water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    In many plant trials it has been proven that very small amounts (10 to 20 ppm) of uranium dissolved in mine water can be effectively recovered by the use of ion exchange resins and this uranium recovery has many advantages. In this paper an economic analysis at different levels of uranium contamination and at different market prices of uranium are described. For this study an operating mine-mill complex with a sulphuric acid leach circuit, followed by solvent extraction (SX) process, is considered, where contaminated mine water is available in excess of process requirements. It is further assumed that the sulphuric acid eluant containing uranium would be mixed with the mill pregnant liquor stream that proceeds to the SX plant for final uranium recovery

  3. Decommissioning and reclamation of the Beaverlodge uranium mine/mill operation: ecosystem in recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himbeault, K.; Phillips, R.L.J.; Vanriel, P.; Wells, K.; Halbert, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    The Beaverlodge uranium mining and milling facility, located near Uranium City in northern Saskatchewan, operated for a period of thirty-two years between 1950 and 1982, making it one of the longest operating facilities of its type in Canada. Ore was extracted from the ma in underground mine and from smaller underground and open pit satellite deposits in a ratio of 94% and 6% respectively. Decommissioning activities consisted of four phases, shutdown, salvage and reclamation which occurred from 1982-1985, and the current transition monitoring phase from 1985 to present. Following transition monitoring to prove that the system is behaving as expected, licence revocation and hence completion of decommissioning is expected to occur. The plan to achieve delicensing from the federal Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission and surface lease revocation from the provincial government is currently captured in a 10-year plan, 2003-2013. The main remaining objective of the decommissioning plan is to document the aquatic ecosystem recovery of the former tailings management facility (TMF), which consisted of two natural lakes, and of the two former underground satellite areas, Hab and Dubyna. Extensive environmental monitoring has been carried out in the receiving environment, Beaverlodge Lake, the former Dubyna mine area and the TMF. Recovery of the aquatic ecosystems is occurring within an environment containing above-background levels of natural radionuclides. This makes Beaverlodge, with its relatively clean ore and long history of natural recovery, one of the better places to study low-level radioactive environmental biological effects. The Dubyna area has above background uranium concentrations in the water, sediment and fish, and a benthic invertebrate community similar to reference. In the receiving environment, Beaverlodge Lake, metal concentrations are highest with the deeper sediment. This trend fits well with the increased impacts of 32-years of operation followed by

  4. MILDOS - a computer program for calculating environmental radiation doses from uranium recovery operations. Research report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Bander, T.J.

    1981-04-01

    MILDOS is a Fortran Computer Code which calculates the dose commitments received by individuals and the general population within an 80 kilometer radius of an operating uranium recovery facility. In addition air and ground concentrations are presented for individual locations, as well as for a generalized population grid. Extra-regional population doses resulting from transport of radon and export of agricultural produce are also displayed. The transport of radiological emissions from point and area sources is predicted by using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model. Mechanisms such as radioactive decay, plume depletion by deposition, ingrowth of daughter products and resuspension of deposited radionuclides are included in the transport model. Alterations in operation throughout the facility's lifetime can be accounted for in the input stream. The pathways considered are: inhalation; external exposure from ground shine and cloud immersion; and ingestion of vegetables, meat and milk. Dose commitments are calculated primarily on the basis of the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Predictive 40 CFR 190 and 10 CFR 20 compliances are also performed. This computer code is designed primarily for uranium milling facilities and should not be used for operations with different radionuclides or processes

  5. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, James L; Brady, Patrick V

    2014-04-29

    An in situ recovery of uranium operation involves circulating reactive fluids through an underground uranium deposit. These fluids contain chemicals that dissolve the uranium ore. Uranium is recovered from the fluids after they are pumped back to the surface. Chemicals used to accomplish this include complexing agents that are organic, readily degradable, and/or have a predictable lifetime in an aquifer. Efficiency is increased through development of organic agents targeted to complexing tetravalent uranium rather than hexavalent uranium. The operation provides for in situ immobilization of some oxy-anion pollutants under oxidizing conditions as well as reducing conditions. The operation also artificially reestablishes reducing conditions on the aquifer after uranium recovery is completed. With the ability to have the impacted aquifer reliably remediated, the uranium recovery operation can be considered inherently safe.

  6. Recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowden, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    A process is provided for the recovery of uranium from an organic extractant phase containing an amine. The extractant phase is contacted in a number of mixing stages with an acidic aqueous stripping phase containing sulphate ions, and the phases are passed together through a series of mixing stages while maintaining a dispersion of droplets of one phase in the other. Uranium is precipitated from the final stage by raising the pH. An apparatus having several mixing chambers is described

  7. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  8. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  9. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Recovery of uranium by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi; Taki, Tomihiro

    1988-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate by conventional process is generally uneconomic, except that uranium is recovered as a by-product. If an economical process by which uranium is recovered efficiently as a chief product is discovered, uraniferous phosphate will be used effectively as uranium ore. By using chiorination which will be expected to be favorable in comparison with conventional process, the recovery of uranium from uraniferous phosphate has been carried out. The paper describes the reaction machanism and general characteristics of the uranium chiorination, and the research done so for. (author)

  11. Inherently safe in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, James Lee; Beauheim, Richard Louis; Brady, Patrick Vane; Arnold, Bill Walter; Kanney, Joseph F.; McKenna, Sean Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Expansion of uranium mining in the United States is a concern to some environmental groups and sovereign Native American Nations. An approach which may alleviate some problems is to develop inherently safe in situ uranium recovery ('ISR') technologies. Current ISR technology relies on chemical extraction of trace levels of uranium from aquifers that, once mined, can still contain dissolved uranium and other trace metals that are a health concern. Existing ISR operations are few in number; however, high uranium prices are driving the industry to consider expanding operations nation-wide. Environmental concerns and enforcement of the new 30 ppb uranium drinking water standard may make opening new mining operations more difficult and costly. Here we propose a technological fix: the development of inherently safe in situ recovery (ISISR) methods. The four central features of an ISISR approach are: (1) New 'green' leachants that break down predictably in the subsurface, leaving uranium, and associated trace metals, in an immobile form; (2) Post-leachant uranium/metals-immobilizing washes that provide a backup decontamination process; (3) An optimized well-field design that increases uranium recovery efficiency and minimizes excursions of contaminated water; and (4) A combined hydrologic/geochemical protocol for designing low-cost post-extraction long-term monitoring. ISISR would bring larger amounts of uranium to the surface, leave fewer toxic metals in the aquifer, and cost less to monitor safely - thus providing a 'win-win-win' solution to all stakeholders.

  12. Uranium recovery from AVLIS slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, A.E.; Mycroft, J.R.; Oliver, A.J.; Schneider, P.G.; Richardson, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium metal for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project was to have been produced by the magnesiothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. The other product from this reaction is a magnesium fluoride slag, which contains fine and entrained natural uranium as metal and oxide. Recovery of the uranium through conventional mill leaching would not give a magnesium residue free of uranium but to achieve more complete uranium recovery requires the destruction of the magnesium fluoride matrix and liberation of the entrapped uranium. Alternate methods of carrying out such treatments and the potential for recovery of other valuable byproducts were examined. Based on the process flowsheets, a number of economic assessments were performed, conclusions were drawn and the preferred processing alternatives were identified. (author)

  13. Recovery of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Takagi, Norio; Katoh, Shunsaku

    1995-01-01

    Present status of the development of chelating adsorbents for the recovery of uranium from seawater is outlined with emphasis on the research by the author. Uranium is estimated to exist as stable tri (carbonate) uranylate (6) ion in seawater in a very low concentration. The adsorbent for uranium from seawater in a very low concentration. The adsorbent for uranium from seawater should have high selectivity and affinity for uranium around pH 8. The required characteristics for uranium adsorbent are examined. Various chelating adsorbents have been proposed for the uranium adsorbent and their structures are discussed. Amidoxime type adsorbents have the highest adsorbing power for uranium among the adsorbents hitherto developed and fibrous amidoxime adsorbents are most promising for the practical application. Synthesis, structure and suitable shape of the amidoxime adsorbents are discussed. Uranium adsorption behavior and the amount of saturated adsorption are examined theoretically based on the complexation of an amidoxime monomer and the formula for the adsorption equiliburium is derived. The adsorption and recovery process for uranium from seawater is composed of adsorption, desorption, separation and concentration and finally, uranium is recovered as the yellow cake. A floating body mooring system is proposed by Nobukawa. (T.H.)

  14. The evolving regulation of uranium recovery operations in the United States: Inovative approaches are necessary for cost effective regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Lashway, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The US domestic uranium industry is at a crossroads. Historic low prices for uranium, combined with stringent and often irrational regulatory requirements, pose a very real threat to the industry's continued viability. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has taken a number of innovative steps to reform and rationalize its regulatory program. However, if the domestic uranium recovery industry is to remain viable, additional steps toward innovation and reform are needed, and effective implementation of reforms adopted by the Commission is essential. (author)

  15. Uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitte, J.; Fremery, M.I.; Kellner, A.; Schroeer, K.; Knippenberg, W.

    1984-09-01

    The present publication describes the development work of a process to recover uranium from seawater and the proposition of a commercial demonstration plant. The essential components of this process are verified in the laboratory scale as well as in some field tests. A detailed engineering design for a model plant in a semi-technical scale to allow field tests in the marine environment is also presented. These field tests are expected to produce more realistic data on the technical and economical feasibility of the proposed technology. Production cost estimates based on state-of-the-art technology lie around 250 Dollar/1b U 3 O 8 . However, the effect of a corresponding uranium price increase on electricity costs are comparable to cost increases in coal operated power plants caused by the desulfurisation of coal. Further reductions of the production costs in the range below 150 Dollar/1b U 3 O 8 seem possible through special research efforts in the area of sorber development and concept design. (orig.) [de

  16. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column

  17. Yellowcake processing in uranium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J.M.

    1981-10-06

    This information relates to the recovery of uranium from uranium peroxide yellowcake produced by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide. The yellowcake is calcined at an elevated temperature to effect decomposition of the yellowcake to uranium oxide with the attendant evolution of free oxygen. The calcination step is carried out in the presence of a reducing agent which reacts with the free oxygen, thus retarding the evolution of chlorine gas from sodium chloride in the yellowcake. Suitable reducing agents include ammonia producing compounds such as ammonium carbonate and ammonium bicarbonate. Ammonium carbonate and/or ammonium bicarbonate may be provided in the eluant used to desorb the uranium from an ion exchange column.

  18. Development of a stable uranium recovery regulatory framework for uranium recovery activities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, M.C.; Abrams, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has historically regulated operations at all uranium and thorium recovery facilities under the authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Uranium recovery facilities are those plants, or portions of facilities that process uranium- or thorium-bearing material primarily for its source material content. The uranium recovery industry expressed some concerns over several aspects of the NRC's practices, as described in the NRC's guidance documents. In April 1998, the National Mining Association submitted a report to the Commission, that identified specific concerns with NRC's current position and guidance regarding concurrent jurisdiction at uranium mills; dual regulatory authority at in situ leach facilities; the use of mill tailings impoundments for disposal of radioactive material other than 11e.(2) byproduct material; and the ability to process alternate feed material at uranium mills. The NRC staff addressed most of these concerns in two SECY (staff recommendations) papers that were concurrently provided to the Commission, along with a SECY paper on a draft rulemaking plan relating to these and other issues. The issues addressed in these papers included a new rulemaking, disposal of materials other than 11 e.(2) byproduct material, processing of materials other than natural ores, and improved efficiency for regulating in situ leach uranium facilities. The Commission issued final policy decisions on these issues and directions for NRC staff to implement those decisions in July 2000. (author)

  19. Uranium recovery from phosphonitric solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunus, F.T.; Miu, I.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology for uranium and rare earth recovery applied in a semi-industrial plant processing 5 m 3 /h phosphoric acid has been extended to phosphonitric solution, resulting in the process of nitric acid attack of phosphate rock for complex fertilizer production. In this process uranium and rare earths are obtained at larger quantities due to the complete dissolution of elements involved. The method is based on a one cycle extraction-stripping process using as extractants: di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEPA) in mixture either with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) or tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in view of obtaining a synergic effect for U (VI). A mixer-settler extractor in four steps was used. Two stripping steps are involved for the elements mentioned. Before uranium stripping a scrubbing with urea was introduced to eliminate nitric acid extracted. Uranium was obtained as green cake (hydrated uranium tetrafluoride) which can be easily transformed in hexfluoride or converted to a diuranate. At the same time the radium is also eliminated leading to a non-radioactive fertilizer product. (author),. 8 refs, 4 figs

  20. Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, STEVEN H.

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in

  1. Uranium recovery in Sweden. History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Olsson, G.

    1993-08-01

    In 1945 the potential of nuclear energy for military and peaceful purpose had initiated a strong interest in Sweden to establish a national programme in the field. The Atomic Energy Committee was formed at the end of 1945 and charged the Research Institute of National Defence in January 1946 with the test to investigate possibilities of uranium recovery in Sweden. AB Atomenergi, a semi-state owned body, was formed in November 1947 to take charge of nuclear energy related research and development. The search for and the recovery of uranium from indigenous resources became a dominant objective over the first years of the company. The report gives a broad overview of the efforts to establish a national uranium fuel supply programme in Sweden from the early days of the postwar years of the 1940s. Process and plant development, plant operations at Kvarntorp and Ranstad, and the development of the uranium supply policy are presented against a background of the nuclear power development in the country. The nuclear weapons debate and the decision to sign the non proliferation treaty in 1968 are briefly reported. Special attention has been given an account of the technical development and the various projects related to the Ranstad plant and its final restoration in the 1980s

  2. URANIUM LEACHING AND RECOVERY PROCESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClaine, L.A.

    1959-08-18

    A process is described for recovering uranium from carbonate leach solutions by precipitating uranium as a mixed oxidation state compound. Uranium is recovered by adding a quadrivalent uranium carbon;te solution to the carbonate solution, adjusting the pH to 13 or greater, and precipitating the uranium as a filterable mixed oxidation state compound. In the event vanadium occurs with the uranium, the vanadium is unaffected by the uranium precipitation step and remains in the carbonate solution. The uranium-free solution is electrolyzed in the cathode compartment of a mercury cathode diaphragm cell to reduce and precipitate the vanadium.

  3. Recovery of uranium from uranium bearing black shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amrita; Yadav, Manoj; Singh, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Black shale is the unconventional resource of uranium. Recovery of uranium from black shale has been carried out by the following steps: i) size reduction, ii) leaching of uranium in the aqueous medium, iii) fluoride ion removal, iv) solvent extraction of uranium from the aqueous leach solution, v) scrubbing of the loaded solvent after extraction to remove impurities as much as possible and vi) stripping of uranium from the loaded organic into the aqueous phase. Leaching of black shale has been carried out in hydrochloric acid. Free acidity of the leach solution has been determined by potentiometric titration method. Removal of fluoride ions has been done using sodium chloride. Solvent extraction has been carried out by both tributyl phosphate and alamine-336 as extractants. Scrubbing has been tried with oxalic acid and sulphuric acid. Stripping with sodium carbonate solution has been carried out. Overall recovery of uranium is 95%. (author)

  4. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    In the field of metallurgy, specifically processes for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores, problems of imbalance of ion exchange agents, contamination of recycled phosphoric acid with process organics and oxidizing agents, and loss and contamination of uranium product, are solved by removing organics from the raffinate after ion exchange conversion of uranium to uranous form and recovery thereof by ion exchange, and returning organics to the circuit to balance mono and disubstituted ester ion exchange agents; then oxidatively stripping uranium from the agent using hydrogen peroxide; then after ion exchange recovery of uranyl and scrubbing, stripping with sodium carbonate and acidifying the strip solution and using some of it for the scrubbing; regenerating the sodium loaded agent and recycling it to the uranous recovery step. Economic recovery of uranium as a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production is effected. (author)

  5. Uranium accompanying recovery from copper ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golynko, Z.Sh.; Laskorin, B.N.

    1981-01-01

    In the search for new raw material sources for nuclear power engineering a review of the technique of uranium accompaning recovery from copper ores reprocessing products in some countries is presented. In the USA a sorption method of uranium extraction by means of strongly basic ion exchange resins from solutions upon copper case- hardening with subsequent extraction from eluates by solutions of tertiary amines is realized. Elution is realized with sulphuric acid. In South Africa an extraction reprocessing of gravitational concentrate extracted from copper sulphide flotation tailings is organized. In India the uranium extraction from copper ores flotation enrichment tailings is organized on a commerical scale. Presented are data on the scale of uranium recovery, various conditions of its recovery as well as block diagrams of the processes. It is shown that copper ores become an additional source of uranium recovery [ru

  6. Energy balance for uranium recovery from seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, E.; Lindner, H. [The University of Texas, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The energy return on investment (EROI) of an energy resource is the ratio of the energy it ultimately produces to the energy used to recover it. EROI is a key viability measure for a new recovery technology, particularly in its early stages of development when financial cost assessment would be premature or highly uncertain. This paper estimates the EROI of uranium recovery from seawater via a braid adsorbent technology. In this paper, the energy cost of obtaining uranium from seawater is assessed by breaking the production chain into three processes: adsorbent production, adsorbent deployment and mooring, and uranium elution and purification. Both direct and embodied energy inputs are considered. Direct energy is the energy used by the processes themselves, while embodied energy is used to fabricate their material, equipment or chemical inputs. If the uranium is used in a once-through fuel cycle, the braid adsorbent technology EROI ranges from 12 to 27, depending on still-uncertain performance and system design parameters. It is highly sensitive to the adsorbent capacity in grams of U captured per kg of adsorbent as well as to potential economies in chemical use. This compares to an EROI of ca. 300 for contemporary terrestrial mining. It is important to note that these figures only consider the mineral extraction step in the fuel cycle. At a reference performance level of 2.76 g U recovered per kg adsorbent immersed, the largest energy consumers are the chemicals used in adsorbent production (63%), anchor chain mooring system fabrication and operations (17%), and unit processes in the adsorbent production step (12%). (authors)

  7. The new uranium recovery circuit at Blyvooruitzicht

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.; Bosch, D.W.; Craig, W.M.

    1979-01-01

    The response of reclaimed gold tailings to acid leaching was investigated in the laboratory, followed by a pilot-plant program in which the operations of CCD, CIX and SX were tested with plant feed material. These results formed the basis for the design of the extension to the existing uranium plant at Blyvooruitzicht Gold Mine, commissioned in July 1977. This circuit consists of slimes-dam reclamation by bucket-wheel excavator at a rate of 100,000 t solids per month, acid leaching in pachucas, a five-stage CCD washing section, two parallel CIX absorption columns and two elution columns, SX and an ADU precipitation section. Barren solution is recycled to the CCD section as wash and to the repulper at the slimes dam. The performance of the plant during the first year of operation is compared with the predictions on which the plant design was based. Rated capacity was achieved within three weeks of start-up at a nominal dissolved uranium recovery in the ion-exchange section of around 98 percent. Owing to recycle, the over-all recovery in the ion-exchange and solvent extraction sections is somewhat higher than this figure. (author)

  8. The evolving regulation of uranium recovery operations in the United States of America: Innovative approaches are necessary for cost effective regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Lashway, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    The US domestic uranium industry is at a crossroads. Historic low prices for uranium, combined with stringent and often irrational regulatory requirements, pose a very real threat to the industry's continued viability. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has taken a number of innovative steps to reform and rationalize its regulatory programme. However, if the domestic uranium recovery industry is to remain viable, additional steps toward innovation and reform are needed, and effective implementation of reforms adopted by the Commission is essential. (author)

  9. Environmental protection uranium recovery issues in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peake, R.T.; Cherepy, A.; Rosnick, R.; Schultheisz, D.; Setlow, L. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Uranium recovery activities in the United States were at a standstill just a few years ago. Demand for processed uranium yellowcake has increased, as has its price, though the price is down since the Fukushima reactor accident. Interest in producing uranium has increased, too. Currently the most preferred, low-cost uranium extraction method in the United States is in-situ leach (ISL) recovery where the geohydrology is conducive to injection, mobilization and pumping. A number of applications for new ISL and conventional mills have recently been submitted or are expected to be submitted for licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed Health and Environmental Protection Standards for Uranium and Thorium Mill Tailings under the authority of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). These standards are found in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192). The NRC develops implementing regulations for 40 CFR Part 192 and then NRC or delegated States enforce the NRC and EPA regulations. Facilities regulated under 40 CFR Part 192 include conventional uranium and thorium mills as well as in-situ leach operations, which are considered to be 'milling underground' for regulatory purposes. However, there are no explicit standards for ISL operations in 40 CFR Part 192. In addition, EPA has determined that portions of the operations at uranium recovery operations, specifically the radon emissions from tailings impoundments, are covered by Section 112 of the Clean Air Act as a source of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). EPA addresses these operations in 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart W. EPA is in the process of reviewing both 40 CFR Part 192 and 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart W for possible revision. This paper presents some of the issues related to uranium recovery that are being considered in the current regulatory review. (author)

  10. Process for uranium recovery in phosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarthe, J.M.; Solar, Serge.

    1980-01-01

    Process for uranium recovery in phosphorus compounds with an organic phase containing a dialkylphosphoric acid. A solubilizing agent constituted of an heavy alcohol or a phosphoric acid ester or a tertiary phosphine oxide or octanol-2, is added to the organic phase for solubilization of the uranium and ammonium dialkyl pyrophosphate [fr

  11. Radioactive ground-water contamination from an enriched-uranium cold scrap recovery operation, Wood River Junction, Rhode Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B.J.; Kipp, K.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid wastes from a uranium-bearing cold scrap recovery plant at an industrial site in Wood River Junction, Rhode Island were discharged to the environment through evaporation ponds from 1966 to 1980. Leakage from the polyethylene- and polyvinylchloride-lined ponds resulted in a plume of contaminated ground water that extends from the ponds northwestward to the Pawcatuck River through a highly permeable sand and gravel aquifer of glacial origin. Contaminants include: strontium 90, technetium 99, boron, nitrate and potassium. Water quality data from more than 100 observation wells indicate that the plume of contamination is approximately 700 meters long, 100 meters wide, and is confined to the upper 25 meters of saturated thickness where sediments consist of medium to coarse sand and gravel. No contamination has been detected in fine sands and silts underlying the coarser materials. Piezometric-head and water-quality data from wells screened at multiple depths on both sides of the river indicate that contaminants discharge both to the river and to a swampy area at the west edge of the river. Dilution precludes detection of contaminants once they have entered the river, which has an average flow of 5 cubic meters per second

  12. Process for recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiewiorowski, T.K.; Thornsberry, W.L. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Process is claimed for the recovery of uranium from wet process phosphoric acid solution in which an organic extractant, containing uranium values and dissolved iron impurities and comprising a dialkylphosphoric acid and a trialkylphosphine oxide dissolved in a water immiscible organic solvent, is contacted with a substantially iron-free dilute aqueous phosphoric acid to remove said iron impurities. The removed impurities are bled from the system by feeding the resulting iron-loaded phosphoric acid to a secondary countercurrent uranium extraction operation from which they leave as part of the uranium-depleted acid raffinate. Also, process for recovering uranium in which the extractant, after it has been stripped of uranium values by aqueous ammonium carbonate, is contacted with a dilute aqueous acid selected from the group consisting of H 2 SO 4 , HCl, HNO 3 and iron-free H 3 PO 4 to improve the extraction efficiency of the organic extractant

  13. Recovery of uranium resources from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurushima, Morihiro

    1980-01-01

    After the oil crisis in 1973, the development of atomic energy has become important as substitute energy, and the stable acquisition of uranium resources is indispensable, in order to promote smoothly the use of atomic energy. The Ministry of International Trade and Industry has engaged actively in the project ''The survey on the technical development of the system for recovering uranium and others from sea water'' since 1974. 80% of the uranium resources in the world is distributed in USA, Canada, South Africa, Australia and Niger, and in near future, the price of uranium ores may be raised. Japan must promote powerfully the development of foreign uranium resources, but also it is very important to get domestic uranium by efficiently recovering the uranium dissolved in sea water, the amount of which was estimated at 4 billion tons, and its practical use is expected in 1990s. The uranium concentration in sea water is about 3 g in 1000 t sea water. The processes of separation and recovery are as follows: (1) adsorption of uranium to titanic acid powder adsorbent by bringing sea water in contact with it, (2) dissolving the collected uranium with ammonium carbonate, the desorption agent, (3) concentration of uranium solution by ion exchange method or ion flotation method to 2800 ppm. The outline of the model plant is explained. (Kako, I.)

  14. Recovery of uranium from lignites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium in raw lignite is associated with the organic matter and is readily soluble in acid (and carbonate) solutions. However, beneficiation techniques were not successful for concentrating the uranium or removing part of the reagent-consuming materials. Once the lignite was heated, the uranium became much less soluble in both acid and carbonate solutions, and complete removal of carbon was required to convert it back to a soluble form. Proper burning improves acid-leaching efficiency; that is, it reduces the reagent consumption and concentrates the uranium, thereby reducing plant size for comparable uranium throughput, and it eliminates organic fouling of leach liquors. Restrictions are necessary during burning to prevent the uranium from becoming refractory. The most encouraging results were obtained by flash-burning lignite at 1200 to 1300 0 C and utilizing the released SO 2 to supplement the acid requirement. The major acid consumers were aluminum and iron

  15. 78 FR 17450 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery.... SUA- 1341 to Uranium One USA, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR... Commission License No. SUA-1341 For Uranium One USA, Inc., Irigaray and Christensen Ranch Projects (Willow...

  16. Electrolytic recovery of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurr, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for extracting uranium oxide from a solution of one or more uranium compounds, e.g. leach liquors, comprising subjecting the solution to electrolysis utilizing a high current density, e.g. 500 to 4000 amp/m 2 , whereby uranium oxide is formed at the cathode and is recovered. The method is particularly suited to a continuous process using a rotating cathode cell. (author)

  17. Potential for uranium recovery at Nolans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldenhoff, K.; Ho, E.

    2007-01-01

    The concentration of uranium in Nolans is higher than is typical of phosphate rock deposits worldwide. This requires appropriate management of the radioactivity during ore processing, but also provides an opportunity for recovery of uranium as a by-product. The recovery must be integrated into the rare earth process, which is the primary focus of the project. Furthermore, the separation of rare earths from the phosphate matrix and the recovery of phosphoric acid or other fertiliser products is also an important consideration. This paper discusses the various process options that are being considered for the development of a process for Nolans that integrates the recovery of phosphate values and uranium as by-products or rare earth processing

  18. Enriched uranium recovery flowsheet improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    Savannah River uses 7.5% TBP to recover and purify enriched uranium. Adequate decontamination from fission products is necessary to reduce personnel exposure and to ensure that the enriched uranium product meets specifications. Initial decontamination of the enriched uranium from the fission products is carried out in the 1A bank, 16 stages of mixer-settlers. Separation of the enriched uranium from the fission product, 95 Zr, has been adequate, but excessive solvent degradation caused by the long phase contact times in the mixer-settlers has limited the 95 Zr decontamination factor (DF). An experimental program is investigating the replacement of the current 1A bank with either centrifugal contactors or a combination of centrifugal contactors and mixer-settlers. Experimental work completed has compared laboratory-scale centrifugal contactors and mixer-settlers for 95 Zr removal efficiencies. Feed solutions spiked with actual plant solutions were used. The 95 Zr DF was significantly better in the mixer-settlers than in the centrifugal contactors. As a result of this experimental study, a hybrid equipment flowsheet has been proposed for plant use. The hybrid equipment flowsheet combines the advantages of both types of solvent extraction equipment. Centrifugal contactors would be utilized in the extraction and initial scrub sections, followed by additional scrub stages of mixer-settlers

  19. Novel precipitation technique for uranium recovery from carbonate leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujoy Biswas; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from carbonate ore leach solution was studied using novel precipitation method. The uranium from leach liquor was recovered as magnesium diuranate with NaOH in presence of trace amount of Mg 2+ . Effects of various parameters such as addition of H 2 SO 4 , MgO, MgSO 4 as well as NaOH were investigated for maximum uranium recovery. Overall uranium recovery of the process was 97 % with improved particle size (∼57 µm). Based on the experimental findings, a process flow-sheet was developed for uranium recovery from carbonate ore leach solution with a uranium concentration of <1 g/L. (author)

  20. Uranium and thorium recovery in thorianite ore-preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiotte, Joao V.M. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Villegas, Raul A.S.; Fukuma, Henrique T., E-mail: rvillegas@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: htfukuma@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of the studies aiming to develop a hydrometallurgical process to produce uranium and thorium concentrates from thorianite ore from Amapa State, Brazil. This process comprises two major parts: acid leaching and Th/U recovery using solvent extraction strategies. Thorianite ore has a typical composition of 60 - 70% of thorium, 8 - 10% lead and 7 - 10% uranium. Sulfuric acid leaching operational conditions were defined as follows: acid/ore ratio 7.5 t/t, ore size below 65 mesh (Tyler), 2 hours leaching time and temperature of 100 deg C. Leaching tests results showed that uranium and thorium recovery exceeded 95%, whereas 97% of lead ore content remained in the solid form. Uranium and thorium simultaneous solvent extraction is necessary due to high sulfate concentration in the liquor obtained from leaching, so the Primene JM-T primary anime was used for this extraction step. Aqueous raffinate from extraction containing sulfuric acid was recycled to the leaching step, reducing acid uptake around 60%, to achieve a net sulfuric acid consumption of 3 t/t of ore. Uranium and thorium simultaneous stripping was performed using sodium carbonate solution. In the aqueous stripped it was added sulfuric acid at pH 1.5, followed by a second solvent extraction step using the tertiary amine Alamine 336. The following stripping step was done with a solution of sodium chloride, resulting in a final solution of 23 g L-1 uranium. (author)

  1. Uranium mining operations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios, J.-M.; Arnaiz, J.; Criado, M.; Lopez, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Empresa Nacional del Uranio, SA (ENUSA) was founded in 1972 to undertake and develop the industrial and procurement activities of the nuclear fuel cycle in Spain. Within the organisation of ENUSA, the Uranium Division is directly responsible for the uranium mining and production operations that have been carried out since 1973 in the area of Ciudad Rodrigo in the province of Salamanca. These activities are based on open pit mining, heap leaching and a hydrometallurgical plant (Elefante) for extracting uranium concentrates from the ore. This plant was shut down in 1993 and a new plant was started up on the same site (Quercus) with a dynamic leaching process. The nominal capacity of the new plant is 950 t U 3 O 8 per year. Because of the historically low uranium prices which have recently prevailed, the plant is currently running at a strategic production rate of 300 t U 3 O 8 per year. From 1981 to 1990, in the area of La Haba (Badajoz province), ENUSA also operated a uranium production site, based on open pit mining, and an experimental extraction plant (Lobo-G). ENUSA is currently decommissioning these installations. This paper describes innovations and improvements that ENUSA has recently introduced in the field of uranium concentrates production with a view to cutting production costs, and to improving the decommissioning and site restoration processes in those sites where production is being shut down or resources have been worked out. (author)

  2. The design and operation of a continuous ion-exchange demonstration plant for the recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, W.M.; Douglas, M.E.E.; Louw, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    A description is given of the design of the continuous ion-exchange demonstration plant at Blyvooruitzicht Gold Mine, including details of the process design, the column construction, and the control system. The operating and process results gathered over a period of seventeen months are summarized, and devolopment work and modifications to the process are discussed. It is concluded that the system comprising continuous loading and continuous elution is technically feasible and can be scaled up with confidence [af

  3. The recovery of uranium, gold and sulphur from residues from South African mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1978-10-01

    The slimes dams resulting from the operations of gold and gold/uranium mines situated within the Witwatersrand Basin contain low concentrations of gold, uranium and pyrite. As a result of a marked increase in the prices of both gold and uranium in recent years, two schemes involving the recovery of these minerals also the manufacture of sulphuric acid as a by-product are operating profitably. Further schemes are under investigation [af

  4. Feasibility studies on electrochemical separation and recovery of uranium by using domestic low grade uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Won Zin; Jung, Chong Hun; Lee, Kune Woo; Won, Hui Jun; Choi, Wang Kyu; Kim, Gye Nam; Lee, Yu Ri; Lee, Joong Moung

    2005-12-01

    The up-to-date electrochemical uranium separation technology has been developed for uranium sludge waste treatment funded by a long term national nuclear technology development program. The objective of the studies is to examine applicability of the uranium separation technology to making use of the low grade uranium resources in the country. State of the arts of uranium separation and recovery from the low grade national uranium resources. - The amount of the high grade uranium resources(0.1 % U 3 O 8 contents) in the world is 1,750,000MTU and that of the low grade uranium resources(0.04 % U 3 O 8 contents) in the country is 340,000MTU. - The world uranium price will be increase to more than 30$/l0b in 10 years, so that the low grade uranium in the country become worth while to recover. - The conventional uranium recovery technologies are based on both acidic - The ACF electrochemical uranium separation technology is the state of the art technology in the world and the adsorption capability of 690 mgU/g is several ten times higher than that of a conventional zeolite and the uranium stripping efficiency by desorption is more than 99%. So, this technology is expected to replace the existing solvent extraction technology. Feasibility of the ACF electrochemical uranium separation technology as an uranium recovery method. Lab scale demonstration of uranium separation and recovery technologies have been carried out by using an ACF electrochemical method

  5. Recovery of gold and uranium from calcines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey-Goldblatt, E.

    1981-10-06

    The invention concerns the recovery of non-ferrous metals, such as gold, uranium or the like from iron oxide containing calcines which have the non-ferrous metal present in solid solution and/or encapsulated within the iron oxide. The calcine is reacted, while stirring vigorously, with sulphuric acid or another strong inorganic acid to cause the iron to form the ferric salt. The material obtained is mixed with water and the liquid and solid phases are separated from each other. The non-ferrous metal is then obtained from at least one of these phases by leaching, or the like.

  6. Recovery of uranium from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabushi, Iwao; Kobuke, Yoshiaki

    1984-01-01

    The present status of technology for the recovery of uranium has been reviewed. Adsorbent qualities were discussed in terms of three important criteria: adsorption rate, equilibrium adsorption and chemical as well as physical stability. It was elucidated that a significant improvement of the adsorption rate is most important. Efforts were made to clarify factors influencing the adsorption rate. A method to treat a tremendous amount of sea water is of much importance as well. Pumping-up and direct use of sea currents were compared with each other. It has been emphasized that the active utilization of the various advantages of the latter method is crucial for the realization of the recovery project. The physical capability of the method was illustrated. Some composite systems with electric power generation plants were also discussed. (author)

  7. Process evaluations for uranium recovery from scrap material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept being developed by Argonne National Laboratory is based on pyrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear metallic fuel with subsequent fabrication into new reactor fuel by an injection casting sequence. During fabrication, a dilute scrap stream containing uranium alloy fines and broken quartz (Vycor) molds in produced. Waste characterization of this stream, developed by using present operating data and chemical analysis was used to evaluate different uranium recovery methods and possible process variations for the return of the recovered metal. Two methods, comminution with size separation and electrostatic separation, have been tested and can recover over 95% of the metal. Recycling the metal to either the electrochemical process or the injection casting was evaluated for the different economic and process impacts. The physical waste parameters and the important separation process variables are discussed with their effects on the viability of recycling the material. In this paper criteria used to establish the acceptable operating limits is discussed

  8. Conceptual process design for uranium recovery from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Chihara, Kazuyuki; Fujimoto, Masahiko; Yagi, Hiroshi; Wada, Akihiko.

    1985-01-01

    Based on design of uranium recovery process from sea water, total cost for uranium production was estimated. Production scale of 1,000 ton-uranium per year was supposed, because of the big demand for uranium in the second age, i.e., fast breeder reactor age. The process is described as follows: Fluidized bed of hydrous titanium oxide (diameter is 0.1 mm, saturated adsorption capacity is 510 μg-U/g-Ad, adsorption capacity for ten days is 150 μg-U/g-Ad) is supposed, as an example, to be utilized as the primarily concentration unit. Fine adsorbent particles can be transferred as slurry in all of the steps of adsorption, washing, desorption, washing, regeneration. As an example, ammonium carbonate is applied to desorb the adsorbed uranium from titanium oxide. Then, stripping method is adopted for desorbent recovery. As for the secondary concentration, strong basic anion exchange method is supposed. The first step of process design is to determine the mass balance of each component through the whole process system by using the signal diagram. Then, the scale of each unit process, with which the mass balances are satisfied, is estimated by detailed chemical engineering calculation. Also, driving cost of each unit operation is estimated. As a result, minimum total cost of 160,000 yen/kg-U is obtained. Adsorption process cost is 80 to 90 % of the total cost. Capital cost and driving cost are fifty-fifty in the adsorption process cost. Pump driving cost forms a big part of the driving cost. Further concentrated study should be necessary on the adsorption process design. It might be important to make an effort on direct utilization of ocean current for saving the pump driving cost. (author)

  9. Conceptual design on uranium recovery plant from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshiaki; Okugawa, Katsumi; Sugihara, Yutaka; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Uranium containing in seawater is extremely low concentration, which is about 3 mg (3 ppb) per 1 ton of seawater. Recently, a report on development of a more effective collector of uranium in seawater (a radiation graft polymerization product of amidoxime onto polyethylene fiber) was issued by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this paper, an outline design of a uranium recovery plant from seawater was conducted on a base of the collector. As a result of cost estimation, the collection cost of seawater uranium using this method was much higher than that of uranium mine on land and described in the Red Book for mineral uranium cost. In order to make the seawater uranium cost comparable to the on-land uranium cost, it is necessary to establish comprehensive efforts in future technical development, such as development in absorption property of uranium with the collector, resolution method using less HCl, and so forth. (G.K.)

  10. Supplementary recovery of uranium by in-situ leaching at the Brugeaud deposit (Limousin, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyaudet, G.

    1980-01-01

    The actual mining operations at the Brugeaud Deposit (West Brugeaud and East Brugeaud) were followed by supplementary recoveries of uranium by means of in-situ leaching. There were a number of factors which favoured consideration of these operations: the amounts of uranium present at the edge of the stoped areas; the underground mining infrastructure, which did not require supplementary operations for the recovery of solutions; the nature of the rock, which presented a dense network of fractures and micro-fractures conducive to impregnation by the acid solutions; and the immediate proximity of a concentration plant. The amount of uranium recovered by in-situ leaching is close to 200 t. This production is approximately nine per cent of all the uranium extracted from the deposit. The cost of the metal obtained in this way was always less than FF 100 (FF of 1978) per kilogram of uranium. (author)

  11. International overview of ISL uranium mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, P.; Slezak, J.; Pool, T.; Beneš, V.; Gorbatenko, O.; Jones, B.; Märten, H.; Solodov, I.

    2014-01-01

    In situ leach (ISL; also called in situ leaching or in situ recovery, ISR) mining has become one of the standard uranium production methods, following early experimentation and production in the 1960s. Its application to amenable uranium deposits (in certain sedimentary formations) has been growing in view of its competitive production costs and low surface impacts. In 1997 the ISL share in total uranium production was 13%; by 2009 it had grown to over 30%, reaching 46% in 2011. In the past, ISL technology was applied mainly in Ukraine, the Czech Republic, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Bulgaria and the United States of America (USA). Recently it has been used in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, the USA, Australia, China and the Russian Federation, with small operations or experiments elsewhere. ISL mining is gaining widespread acceptance. The IAEA is preparing an overview document to show how ISL experience around the world can be used to direct the development of technical activities, taking into account environmental considerations and an emphasis on the economics of the process, including responsible mine closure. With this document Member States and interested parties will have more information to design and efficiently and safely regulate current and future projects, with a view to maximize economic performance and minimize negative environmental impact. Highlights of the report’s findings will be provided here with a summary of the IAEA’s involvement in ISL over recent decades. Many reference links are provided to allow access to voluminous additional information. (author)

  12. Challenges in radon management at uranium mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Radon and its radioactive decay products are present some unique challenges to radiation protection professionals working at the uranium mining operations. This paper will detail some examples of these challenges and methods that can be employed to ensure doses to workers and members of the public are kept As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). Examples will be presented for conventional open pit and underground mining and In Situ recovery operations. One of the challenges facing new operations seeking approval is the demonstration that radon and its radioactive decay products sourced from the operations will not adversely impact local populations, Methodologies recently employed in the most recent environmental impact statements from uranium mining companies seeking approval are reviewed. The International Commission of Radiological Protection are currently reviewing the dose conversion factors used radon and its decay products. The challenges this change will present to uranium mining operators are presented.

  13. Recovery of uranium mineral concentrate from copper tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, S.; Tewari, U.K.; Beri, K.K.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the studies conducted on the samples of copper tailings from Surda Copper Concentrator plant, wet concentrating table (Diaster Diagonal Deck) was found most suitable for recovering uranium mineral concentrate. Based on this technique, uranium recovery plants were set up at Surda, Rakha and Mosabani. The recoveries obtained from Surda Uranium Recovery Plant and Rakha Uranium Recovery Plant were in the range of 40-50%. But in Mosaboni Uranium Recovery Plant which is treating copper tailings from Mosaboni Copper Concentrator Plant, the biggest concentrator plant processing nearly 2,700 MT/day of copper ore, the recovery by wet concentrating tables was found to be around 22%. Low recovery was mainly due to low concentration of uranium in ore and as well as more percentage of uranium distribution in fines which tables were unable to recover. Studies were done to recover uranium mineral concentrate from the fines with new set of equipment viz. Curved Static Screen/Bartles Mozley Separator/Cross Belt Concentrator. This gave an improvement of 14-16% only. Studies by low acid leaching in chemical process side have shown that an overall recovery of 68% can be achieved. Though the chemical process is best as far as recovery is concerned but there are several constraints. The major constraint is pertaining to environmental and pollution control. Depending on the results of studies to overcome the constraints decision for the process to be adopted will be taken up and executed. The test results and plant performance data have also been included in the paper. (author). 8 figs., 11 tabs., 1 appendix

  14. Recommendations for a coordinated approach to regulating the uranium recovery industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, K.; Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Gormley, P.; Kim, D.H.

    2001-01-01

    A number of regulatory positions that are of central importance to the uranium recovery industry today have their origins in regulatory interpretations that were developed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) staff almost two decades ago, shortly after Congress first granted the Commission the direct authority to regulate uranium mill tailings and related wastes by enacting the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) as an amendment to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA). Consequently, several key regulatory positions that govern uranium recovery activities today were developed at a time when the regulatory programme for uranium milling operations, including the management and disposition of uranium mill tailings and related wastes, was in the earliest stages of conception, and when the uranium recovery industry was at or near peak levels of production. Often, the policies and positions that were developed by the Commission staff dining this period, and subsequently, were developed in an ad hoc manner, rather than being formulated as part of a deliberate, coordinated regulatory strategy. Moreover, many of these positions and policies were based on assumptions that would later turn out to be completely incorrect regarding the future development of the uranium recovery industry and of the regulatory programme governing the industry. In the twenty years that have elapsed since Congress first enacted UMTRCA, a robust programme has been created for the comprehensive regulation of uranium recovery activities. At the same time, the nature of the uranium recovery industry has changed dramatically. As a result, some of the policies and positions that were developed by Commission staff almost two decades ago, that may have seemed reasonable at the time they were developed, appear increasingly unreasonable and inappropriate today, given the current regulatory framework and the realities of the modern uranium recovery industry. This raises concerns

  15. Photochemical process of laboratory uranium wastes recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, O.N.; Barros, M.P. de.

    1984-01-01

    A method for uranium extraction in presence of various aquometallic ions, based on selective photo-reduction of uranium is studied. Some economical advantages in relation with others conventional processes are analysed. (M.J.C.) [pt

  16. Phosphorus and uranium recovery process from phosphated rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, M C.Y.; Long, R H

    1981-01-30

    Improvement of uranium recovery in phosphate rocks by treatment with nitric acid avoiding the formation of a precipitate including a part of the uranium. The separation of uranium from phosphoric acid is obtained by liquid-liquid extraction using dialkyl posphoric acid with at least 10 carbon atoms and a phosphoryl alkyl alkoxy compound with at least 10 carbon atoms and a non water miscible organic solvent.

  17. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM ZIRCONIUM-URANIUM NUCLEAR FUELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, T.A.

    1962-07-10

    An improvement was made in a process of recovering uranium from a uranium-zirconium composition which was hydrochlorinated with gsseous hydrogen chloride at a temperature of from 350 to 800 deg C resulting in volatilization of the zirconium, as zirconium tetrachloride, and the formation of a uranium containing nitric acid insoluble residue. The improvement consists of reacting the nitric acid insoluble hydrochlorination residue with gaseous carbon tetrachloride at a temperature in the range 550 to 600 deg C, and thereafter recovering the resulting uranium chloride vapors. (AEC)

  18. Recovery of uranium and the lanthanides from phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habashi, F; Awadalla, F T; Zailaf, M

    1986-06-01

    A process is proposed for the treatment of phosphate rock for the recovery of uranium and lanthanides. The process assures the production of phosphatic fertilisers without polluting the environment with radioactive material.

  19. Pollution control -- Recovery of uranium from phosphatic fertilizer industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, R.N.; Pachaiyappan, V.

    1979-01-01

    Various uranium recovery processes, viz. Brazilian process (HCL leaching), selective extraction of U, Japanese process, ORNL process and the Indian methods, recently developed, pertaining to the fertilizer industry are reviewed and their relative merits are discussed. Special attention has been paid to the recovery of uranium from the Indian and imported phosphatic rocks, showing the advantages, both from the pollution control and nuclear energy aspects. (K.B.)

  20. Recovery of uranium from phosphatic rock and its derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero Guzman, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    The recovery of uranium present in the manufacture process of phosphoric acid and fertilizers has been one interesting field of study in chemistry. It is true that the recovery of uranium it is not very attractive from the commercial point of view, however the phosphatic fertilizers have an important amount of uranium which comes from the starting materials (phosphatic rock), therefore there must be many tons of uranium that are dispersed in the environmental together with the fertilizers used in agriculture every year. They are utilized for the enrichment of the nutrients which are exhausted in the soil. In this work, uranium was identified and quantified in the phosphatic rocks and in inorganic fertilizers using Gamma Spectroscopy, Neutron Activation Analysis, UV/Visible Spectrophotometry, Alpha Spectroscopy. On the other hand, it was done a correlation of the behaviour of uranium with inorganic elements present in the samples such as phosphorus, calcium and iron; which were determined by UV/Visible Spectrophotometry for phosphorus and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for calcium and iron. The quantity of uranium found in the phosphatic rock, phosphoric acid and fertilizers was considerable (70-200 ppm). The adequate conditions for the recovery of 40% of total of uranium from the phosphatic rock with the addition of leaching solutions were stablished. (Author)

  1. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    The invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and alkaline earth metal oxide (e.g. CaO, MgO) in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. (author)

  2. A process for uranium recovery in phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented about studies carried out envisaging the development of a process for uranium recovery from phosphoric acid, produced from the concentrate obtained from phosphorus-uraniferous mineral from Itataia mines (CE, Brazil). This process uses a mixture of DEPA-TOPO as extractant and the extraction cycle involves the following stages: acid pre-treatment; adjustment of the oxidation potential so to ensure that all uranium is hexavalent; extraction of uranium from the acid; screening of the solvent to remove undesirable impurities; uranium re-extraction and precipitation; solvent recovery. A micro-pilot plant for continuous processing was built up. Data collected showed that uranium can be recovered with an yield greater than 99%, thus proving the feasibility of the process and encouraging the construction of a bigger scale plant. (Author) [pt

  3. Liquid membrane process for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valint, P.L. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An improved liquid membrane emulsion extraction process for recovering uranium from a WPPA feed solution containing uranyl cations wherein said feed is contacted with a water-in-oil emulsion which extracts and captures the uranium in the interior aqueous phase thereof, wherein the improvement comprises the presence of an alkane diphosphonic acid uranium complexing agent in the interior phase of the emulsion. This improvement results in greater extraction efficiency

  4. Recovery of uranium from sea water - a laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayawant, D.V.; Iyer, N.S.; Koppiker, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Sea water contains traces of uranium, but the volume of sea water being enormous, the total quantity of uranium available from the sources is very large. From time to time, claims have been made elsewhere that a breakthrough has been made in developing a technology to recovery this uranium at an economic cost. Studies have been carried out at Uranium Extraction Division over a few years to develop a suitable technique to separate the uranium from sea water. Studies were primarily directed towards preparation of suitable inorganic ion exchangers and studying their properties. In this paper preparation of ion exchangers based on hydrous titanium oxide and the data collected in laboratory trials on their application for uranium adsorption from sea water are presented. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  5. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  6. Recovery of uranium from biological adsorbents - desorption equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsezos, M.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of the experimental investigations of uranium elution and reloading for the waste inactive biomass of Rhizopus arrhizus. The experimental data and the analysis of the present work suggest the following conclusions: recovery of uranium that has been taken up by R. arrhizus is possible by elution; of the six elution systems examined, sodium bicarbonate solutions appear to be the most promising because they can effect near complete uranium recovery and high uranium concentration factors; the bicarbonate solution causes the least damage to the biomass; solid-to-liquid ratios in bicarbonate elution systems can exceed 120:1 (mg:mL) for a 1N NaHCO 3 solution, with almost complete uranium recovery and eluate uranium concentrations of over 1.98 x 10 4 mg/L; mineral acids, although good elution agents, result in substantial damage to the biomass thus limiting the biomass reuse potential; sulfate ions in the elutions solution limit the elution potential of the biomass, possibly by conferring novel crystallinity to the cell wall chitin network and confining inside the chitin network more biosorbed uranium

  7. Compliance determination procedures for environmental radiation protection standards for uranium recovery facilities 40 CFR part 190

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Uranium Milling operations are licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and by some States in agreement with the Commission. The radiation dose to any individual from the operation of facilities within the uranium fuel cycle is limited to levels set by the Environmental Protection Agency. These levels are contained in the EPA Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Nuclear Power Operations, in Part 190 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR Part 190). This report describes the procedures used within NRC's Uranium Recovery Licensing Branch for evaluating compliance with these regulations for uranium milling operations. The report contains descriptions of these procedures, dose factors for evaluating environmental measurement data, and guidance to the NRC staff reviewer

  8. Dynamic removal of uranium by chitosan: influence of operating parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansson-Charrier, Marielle; Guibal, Eric; Roussy, Jean; Surjous, Robert; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    New wastewater treatments involving biosorption processes are being developed. This work focuses on the dynamic removal of uranium using chitosan in fixed-bed reactors and investigates the main operating parameters: particle size, column size, flow velocity and metal ion concentrations. The results confirm the predominant effect of diffusion on the control rate. The optimization of the process should take into account both sorption performances and hydrodynamic behaviour. The process is successfully applied to the treatment of leachates at an abandoned mine site. This study shows that chitosan is an effective sorbent for the treatment and recovery of uranium from dilute effluents. (Author)

  9. Uranium recovery from low-level aqueous sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Goeller, H.E.

    1981-03-01

    The aqueous sources of soluble uranium were surveyed and evaluated in terms of the uranium geochemical cycle in an effort to identify potential unexploited resources. Freshwater sources appeared to be too low in uranium content to merit consideration, while seawater, although very dilute (approx. 3.3 ppB), contains approx. 4 x 10 9 metric tons of uranium in all the world's oceans. A literature review of recent publications and patents concerning uranium recovery from seawater was conducted. Considerable experimental work is currently under way in Japan; less is being done in the European countries. An assessment of the current state of technology is presented in this report. Repeated screening programs have identified hydrous titanium oxide as the most promising candidate absorbent. However, some of its properties such as distribution coefficient, selectivity, loading, and possibly stability appear to render its use inadequate in a practical recovery system. Also, various assessments of the energy efficiency of pumped or tidal power schemes for contacting the sorbent and seawater are in major disagreement. Needed future research and development tasks are discussed. A fundamental sorbent development program to greatly improve sorbent properties would be required to permit practical recovery of uranium from seawater. Major unresolved engineering aspects of such recovery systems are also identified and discussed

  10. Uranium recovery from acid leach liquors: Ix or Sx?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tonder, D.; Kotze, M.

    2007-01-01

    Various technologies for uranium recovery from sulphuric acid leach solutions were compared. Although the main consideration was the economics (Capex, recovery and Opex) of the various technologies and associated unit operations, other factors, such as flexibility, reliability, ease of operation, fire risk, stability with regards to feed flow variations, and feed solids content, would also need to be considered in the overall analysis. The design basis used for the comparison was a production rate or 200 kg/h U 3 O8 over a solution concentration range of 40 to 1500 mg/L U 3 O8. The technologies to be compared included Resin-in-pulp (RIP), Fixed-bed Ion Exchange (FBIX), Continuous Countercurrent Ion Exchange (CCIX, e.g. NIMCIX), and Solvent Extraction (Sx) using Bateman Pulsed Columns (BPC) and Bateman Settlers. Countercurrent Decantation (CCD) and clarification would be required for the Sx and FBIX technologies. The preliminary economic evaluation indicated that a flowsheet, comprising RIP for bulk uranium extraction and upgrade, followed by Sx, employing the BPC for purification of the RIP eluate stream, was the most economic option at leach liquor concentrations below 900 mg/L. Above 900 mg/L the economic evaluation suggested that CCDs followed by Sx in the BPC was the most economical processing option. For applications where the ore is abrasive and not amenable to RIP, due to the rate of resin consumption, Paste Thickeners to remove the bulk of the solids, followed by RIP, was found to be the most economic processing option at leach liquor concentrations below 200 mg/L. However, for leach liquor concentrations above 200 mg/L, a CCD-circuit followed by Sx using BPC was again the most economic favourable route

  11. Uranium recovery from phosphate rocks concentrated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, M.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    The reserves, geological data, chemical data and technical flowsheet from COPEBRAS and Goiasfertil ores are described, including the process of mining ore concentration. Samples of Goiasfertil ores are analysed by gravimetric analysis, for phosphate, and spectrofluorimetry for uranium. (author)

  12. Recovery of uranium from sea-water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llewelyn, G.I.W.

    1976-01-01

    The possibility of extraction of uranium from sea-water on a sufficiently large scale to contribute significantly to national UK requirements is placed in perspective. It seems unlikely that there are sites around the UK coast where this could be achieved, and insufficient work has been done to be confident that sites exist anywhere to enable uranium extraction to be carried out on a large scale. Process techniques have been developed on a small scale, but extensive further research work would be necessary to reduce appreciably the present uncertainties. It would be unwise to expect uranium from sea-water to contribute significant amounts to the world's uranium demand for thermal reactors on an acceptable timescale. (author)

  13. Design of a uranium recovery pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The engineering design of a pilot plant of uranium recover, is presented. The diagrams and specifications of the equipments such as pipelines, pumps, values tanks, filters, engines, etc... as well as metallic structure and architetonic design is also presented. (author)

  14. The Uranium Recovery Industry and the Current Nuclear Renaissance — A Health Physicists Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.H., E-mail: sbrown@senes.ca [SENES, Englewood, CO (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Concurrent with the recognition that nuclear generated electricity must play an increasing role in worldwide energy supply and in consideration of the new nuclear power plants ordered or planned, the demand for uranium needed to fuel these reactors has already outpaced supplies. Accordingly, the price of uranium (typically expressed as US$ per pound U{sub 3}O{sub 8} equivalent) had increased significantly in recent years. As a result, numerous new and reconstituted uranium recovery projects are being developed in the United States and in other countries that possess considerable uranium ore reserves (e.g., Canada, Australia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Namibia, and others). It should be noted that in the United States, the current reactor fleet of 104 operating units, which generate 20 percent of the US’s base-load electricity, requires approximately 55 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} per year, but only about 4–5 million pounds per year is produced domestically. That is, over 90 percent of current demand, ignoring anticipated increase in requirements in the near future as new plants come online, must come from foreign sources. Domestic uranium production over the last 10 years reached a low of about two million pounds in 2003 and has been increasing steadily since then. Uranium recovery as defined in this paper encompasses conventional uranium mining and milling as well as in situ recovery techniques and the recovery of uranium as a byproduct from other processes, such as phosphoric acid production. Following a brief history of uranium recovery in the US, the paper describes the basic methods and technologies associated with conventional uranium mining, conventional uranium milling and In Situ Recovery (ISR). The “health physicists perspective” is introduced into these discussions by providing summaries of the various radiological environmental monitoring and operational health physics programs that are required for these facilities. Applicable regulatory

  15. Uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, O.F.; Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recovering uranium from wetprocess phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange liquidliquid solvent extraction circuits in which in the first circuit (A) the uranium is reduced to the uranous form; (B) the uranous uranium is recovered by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using a mixture of mono- and di-(Alkyl-phenyl) esters of orthophosphoric acid as the ion exchange agent; and (C) the uranium oxidatively stripped from the agent with phosphoric acid containing an oxidizing agent to convert uranous to uranyl ions, and in the second circuit (D) recovering the uranyl uranium from the strip solution by liquid-liquid solvent extraction using di(2ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as a synergist; (E) scrubbing the uranium loaded agent with water; (F) stripping the loaded agent with ammonium carbonate, and (G) calcining the formed ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium oxide, the improvement comprising: (1) removing the organics from the raffinate of step (B) before recycling the raffinate to the wet-process plant, and returning the recovered organics to the circuit to substantially maintain the required balance between the mono and disubstituted esters; (2) using hydogren peroxide as the oxidizing agent in step (C); (3) using an alkali metal carbonate as the stripping agent in step (F) following by acidification of the strip solution with sulfuric acid; (4) using some of the acidified strip solution as the scrubbing agent in step (E) to remove phosphorus and other impurities; and (5) regenerating the alkali metal loaded agent from step (F) before recycling it to the second circuit

  16. Recovery of uranium in mine waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugier, P.

    1967-01-01

    In a brief introductory survey the author indicates the date on which leaching was first observed in the CEA mines and lists the main factors necessary for, or favourable to, the solubilization of uranium in mines. Information is given on the various sources of this type at present identified in France and the methods used to recover uranium in mines situated near ore-concentration plants. An explanation is given for the use of the calcium precipitation technique in connection with waters produced in mines not situated near ore-concentration plants. Data are given on the results of laboratory tests carried out on waters containing uranium, together with a description of an industrial-scale facility built in consequence of these tests. Details are given of the statistical results obtained. The author concludes by outlining the programme which will be implemented in the near future with a view to increasing the tonnage of uranium produced by in situ leaching and indicates that the CEA engineers are very optimistic about the prospects of this new low-cost method of producing uranium. (author) [fr

  17. Uranium ore mill at Dolni Rozinka: 40 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, F.; Jezova, V.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore mined in the Rozna deposit is treated at a chemical treatment plant (a mill) situated in the close vicinity of the Rozna mine. In the mill, uranium is extracted from the crushed and ground-up ore by alkaline leaching. Uranium is then recovered from the solution by sorption on ion exchange resin; the next steps are precipitation and drying. Alkaline leaching is applied at the atmospheric pressure and the temperature of 80 deg C; the recovery factor is moving around 93%. The final product of the milling is uranium concentrate, ammonium diuranate (NH 4 ) 2 U 2 O 7 ), a so-called 'yellow cake' which is treated into a fuel for nuclear power plants in conversion facilities abroad. The milling is carried on under the condition of the closed cycle of technology water. Due to the positive annual precipitation balance, the over balance of technology water in tailings pond has to be purified before discharging into a river. Evaporation and membrane processes (electrodialysis and reverse osmosis) are used to purify the water. The mill at Dolni Rozinka has been in operation since 1968. It has processed 13.2 million tons of uranium ore which is about 14000 tons of uranium and purified more than 6 million m 3 of the over balanced technology water during 40 years. From the organizational point of view, the mine and the chemical treatment plant form the branch plant GEAM, which is a part of the state enterprise DIAMO. (author)

  18. Enriched uranium recovery at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrick, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Graphite casting scrap, fuel elements and nongraphite combustibles are calcined to impure oxides. These materials along with zircaloy fuel elements and refractory solids are leach-dissolved separately in HF-HNO 3 acid to solubilize the contained enriched uranium. The resulting slurry is filtered and the clear filtrate (to which mineral acid solutions bearing enriched uranium may be added) are passed through solvent extraction. The solvent extraction product is filtered, precipitated with H 2 O 2 and the precipitate calcined to U 3 O 8 . Metal is made from U 3 O 8 by conversion to UO 2 , hydrofluorination and reduction to metal. Throughput is 150 to 900 kg uranium per year depending on the type of scrap

  19. Development of metallic uranium recovery technology from uranium oxide by Li reduction and electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kawabe, Akihiro; Yuda, Ryouichi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Reiko; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yahata, Hidetsugu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop technology for pre-treatment of oxide fuel reprocessing through pyroprocess. In the pre-treatment process, it is necessary to reduce actinide oxide to metallic form. This paper outlines some experimental results of uranium oxide reduction and recovery of refined metallic uranium in electrorefining. Both uranium oxide granules and pellets were used for the experiments. Uranium oxide granules was completely reduced by lithium in several hours at 650degC. Reduced uranium pellets by about 70% provided a simulation of partial reduction for the process flow design. Almost all adherent residues of Li and Li 2 O were successfully washed out with fresh LiCl salt. During electrorefining, metallic uranium deposited on the iron cathode as expected. The recovery efficiencies of metallic uranium from reduced uranium oxide granules and from pellets were about 90% and 50%, respectively. The mass balance data provided the technical bases of Li reduction and refining process flow for design. (author)

  20. Uranium in phosphorus-bearing raw materials and technological problems of its recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecki, H; Gorecka, H [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland)

    1981-01-01

    A problem of uranium recovery from phosphorus-bearinq raw materials is discussed. The different methods of uranium recovery from extractive phosphoric acid are briefly described. The information on their applications in the industry is also given.

  1. Converting the Caetité Mill Process to Enhance Uranium Recovery and Expand Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomiero, L. A.; Scassiotti Filho, W.; Veras, A., E-mail: gomiero@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil S/A — INB, Caetité, BA (Brazil); Cunha, J. W. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear-IEN/CNEN, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Morais, C. A. [Centro do Desenvolvimento da Tec. Nuclear-CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The Caetité uranium mill was commissioned in 2000 to produce about 340 t U per year from an uranium ore averaging 0.29% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This production is sufficient to supply the two operating nuclear power plants in the country. As the Brazilian government has recently confirmed its plan to start building another ones from 2009, the uranium production will have to expand its capacity in the next two years. This paper describes the changes in the milling process that are being evaluated in order to not only increase the production but also the uranium recovery, to fulfil the increasing local demand. The heap leaching process will be changed to conventional tank agitated leaching of ground ore slurry in sulphuric acid medium. Batch and pilot plant essays have shown that the uranium recovery can increase from the 77% historical average to about 93%. As the use of sodium chloride as the stripping agent has presented detrimental effects in the extraction and stripping process, two alternatives are being evaluated for the uranium recovery from the PLS: (a) uranium peroxide precipitation at controlled pH from a PLS that was firstly neutralized and filtered. Batch essays have shown good results with a final calcined precipitate averaging 99% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Conversely the results obtained at the first pilot plant essay has shown that the precipitation conditions of the continuous process calls for further evaluation. The pilot plant is being improved and another essay will be carried out. (b) uranium extraction with a tertiary amine followed by stripping with concentrated sulphuric acid solution. Efforts are being made to recover the excess sulphuric acid from the pregnant stripping solution to enhance the economic viability of the process and to avoid the formation of a large quantity of gypsum in the pre-neutralization step before the uranium peroxide precipitation. (author)

  2. Test operation of the uranium ore processing pilot plant and uranium conversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, I.S.; Lee, K.I.; Whang, S.T.; Kang, Y.H.; Lee, C.W.; Chu, J.O.; Lee, I.H.; Park, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    For the guarantee of acid leaching process of the Uranium Ore Processing Pilot Plnat, the KAERI team performed the test operation in coorperation with the COGEMA engineers. The result of the operation was successful achieving the uranium leaching efficiency of 95%. Completing the guarentee test, a continuous test operation was shifted to reconform the reproducibility of the result and check the functions of every units of the pilot plant feeding the low-grade domestic ore, the consistency of the facility was conformed that the uranium can easily be dissolved out form the ore between the temperature range of 60degC-70degC for two hours of leaching with sulfuric acid and could be obtained the leaching efficiency of 92% to 95%. The uranium recovery efficiencies for the processes of extraction and stripping were reached to 99% and 99.6% respectively. As an alternative process for the separation of solid from the ore pulp, four of the Counter Current Decanters were shifted replacing the Belt Filter and those were connected in a series, which were not been tested during the guarantee operation. It was found out that the washing efficiencies of the ore pulp in each tests for the decanters were proportionally increased according to the quantities of the washing water. As a result of the test, it was obtained that washing efficiencies were 95%, 85%, 83% for the water to ore ratio of 3:1, 2:1, 1.5:1 respectively. (Author)

  3. Recovery of uranium from uranium mine waters and copper ore leaching solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, D R; Ross, J R [Salt Lake City Metallurgy Research Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1967-06-15

    Waters pumped from uranium mines in New Mexico are processed by ion exchange to recover uranium. Production is approximately 200 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d from waters containing 5 to 15 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Recoveries range from 80 to 90%. Processing plants are described. Uranium has been found in the solutions resulting from the leaching of copper-bearing waste rock at most of the major copper mines in western United States. These solutions, which are processed on a very large scale for recovery of copper, contain 2 to 12 ppm U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Currently, uranium is not being recovered, but a potential production of up to 6000 lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8}/d is indicated. Ion exchange and solvent extraction research studies are described. (author)

  4. Phased operations and recovery options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankamo, T.

    1989-01-01

    The event sequence diagram is extended with embedded state submodels. This allows process oriented modeling of phased missions, and flexible modeling of recovery from failure states. This also enhances the structured consideration of time dependences in process conditions, and earlier scenario of events. Operational decision alternatives can straightforwardly be included. In fact, the approach has been developed for the analysis of operational alternatives such as plant shutdown versus continued operation, in failure situations of standby safety systems, with the aim of realistic quantification of shutdown related transient risks

  5. Recycling of wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy and recovery of useful resources in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yingjie; Xue Jianxin; Chen Zhongqiu

    2012-01-01

    Recycling of wastes from uranium mining and metallurgy in China and recovery of useful resources are summarized from the aspects such as recovery of uranium from mine water, reusing of waste water, decontaminating and recycling of radioactivity contaminated metal, backfill of gangues and tailings, and comprehensive recovery and utilization of associated uranium deposits. (authors)

  6. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregg, D.; Wang, F.

    1980-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory concept for uranium recovery from seawater involves the following process steps: (1) produce activated carbon via a coal gasification plant; (2) contact activated carbon sorbent with seawater using a settling process (no pumping of seawater); (3) vacuum activated carbon from sea floor; (4) gasify or burn activated carbon (further concentrating the uranium in the ash); (5) extract the uranium from the rich ash ore by conventional techniques. The process advantages are: (1) eliminates seawater pumping, the need for an illuent, and the need for a fresh water wash; (2) should result in much lower capital investment and regional process energy. Major process issues are: (1) uranium loading on activated carbon; (2) activated carbon modifications required to improve the sorbtion performance; (3) activated carbon particle size needed to meet system requirements; (4) minimization of sorbent losses when contacted with seawater

  7. Recovery and treatment of uranium from uranium-containing solution by liquid membrane emulsion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liangshu; Zhou Yantong; Xiao Yiqun; Peng Anguo; Xiao Jingshui; Chen Wei

    2014-01-01

    The recovery and treatment of uranium from uranium-containing solution using liquid membrane emulsion (LME) technology were studied in this paper, which contained the best volume ratio of membrane materials, stirring speed during emulsion process, the conditions of extracting, such as temperature, pH, initial concentration of uranium. Moreover, the mechanism for extracting uranium was also discussed. The best experimental conditions of emulsifying were acquired. The volume fractions of P 204 and liquid paraffin are 0.1 and 0.05, the volume ratios of Span80 and sulphonated kerosene to P 204 are 0.06 and 0.79 respectively, stirring speed is controlled in 2 000 r/min, and the concentration of inner phase is 4 mol/L. The recovery rate of uranium is up to 99% through the LME extracted uranium for 0.5 h at pH 2.5 and room temperature when the initial concentration is less than 400 mg/L and the volume ratio is 5 between the uranium-containing waste water and LME. The calculation results of Gibbs free energy show that the reaction process is spontaneous. (authors)

  8. Felder uranium project--renewed operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Exxon owns a uranium mill and holds two mining leases in Live Oak County, Texas, about halfway between San Antonio and Corpus Christi. The properties made up the Felder Uranium Operations which was reopened earlier this year. The feasibility study for reopening the Felder Project began in late 1975 and was not completed until late 1976. This paper discusses several areas of the feasibility study that required additional work prior to making the decision to renew operations. Mine planning evaluation and the actual mine planning are described briefly

  9. Recovery of uranium from analytical waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Anitha, M.; Singh, D.K.

    2016-01-01

    Dispersion fuels are considered as advance fuel for the nuclear reactor. Liquid waste containing significant quantity of uranium gets generated during chemical characterization of dispersion fuel. The present paper highlights the effort in devising a counter current solvent extraction process based on the synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and Cyanex 923 to recover uranium from such waste solutions. A typical analytical waste solution was found to have the following composition: U 3 O 8 (∼3 g/L), Al: 0.3 g/L, V: 15 ppm, Phosphoric acid: 3M, sulphuric acid : 1M and nitric acid : 1M. The aqueous solution is composed of mixture of either 3M phosphoric acid and 1M sulphuric acid or 1M sulphuric acid and 1M nitric acid, keeping metallic concentrations in the above mentioned range. Different organic solvents were tested. Based on the higher extraction of uranium with synergistic mixture of 0.5M D2EHPA + 0.125M Cyanex 923, it was selected for further investigation in the present work

  10. Initiation in the study of uranium recovery from the phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchondo Adalid, J M

    1974-01-01

    The loss of considerable amounts of uranium in the Mexican phosphoric acid industry makes it important to study economic methods of recovery; the studies can serve as a basis for the construction and operation of a pilot plant as a normal preliminary to larger-scale projects. Routine experimental techniques for solvent extraction were employed. Extraction efficiencies of the order of 90-95% were obtained using 0.09-0.18M solutions of a mixture of phosphoric octyl esters applied to 4 and 6M solutions of phosphoric acid (reagent grade) containing uranium in concentrations of 0.05-0.50g of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ per litre of acid. The conclusion was reached that phosphoric octyl esters can be used for recovering uranium in satisfactory quantities from phosphoric acid solutions by means of solvent extraction, and that the uranium can be separated from the solvent by the established procedures.

  11. Simulation and control synthesis for a pulse column separation system for plutonium--uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCutcheon, E.B.

    1975-05-01

    Control of a plutonium-uranium partitioning column was studied using a mathematical model developed to simulate the dynamic response and to test postulated separation mechanisms. The column is part of a plutonium recycle flowsheet developed for the recovery of plutonium and uranium from metallurgical scrap. In the first step of the process, decontamination from impurities is achieved by coextracting plutonium and uranium in their higher oxidation states. In the second step, reduction of the plutonium to a lower oxidation state allows partitioning of the plutonium and uranium. The use of hydroxylamine for the plutonium reduction in this partitioning column is a unique feature of the process. The extraction operations are carried out in pulse columns. (U.S.)

  12. Initiation in the study of uranium recovery from the phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anchondo Adalid, J.M.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of considerable amounts of uranium in the Mexican phosphoric acid industry makes it important to study economic methods of recovery; the studies can serve as a basis for the construction and operation of a pilot plant as a normal preliminary to larger-scale projects. Routine experimental techniques for solvent extraction were employed. Extraction efficiencies of the order of 90-95% were obtained using 0.09-0.18M solutions of a mixture of phosphoric octyl esters applied to 4 and 6M solutions of phosphoric acid (reagent grade) containing uranium in concentrations of 0.05-0.50g of U 3 O 8 per litre of acid. The conclusion was reached that phosphoric octyl esters can be used for recovering uranium in satisfactory quantities from phosphoric acid solutions by means of solvent extraction, and that the uranium can be separated from the solvent by the established procedures. (author)

  13. Recovery of uranium from low-grade sandstone ores and phosphate rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R H [United States Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, D. C. (United States)

    1967-06-15

    This paper is concerned principally with commercial-scale experience in the United States in the recovery of uranium from low-grade sources. Most of these operations have been conducted by the operators of uranium mills as an alternative to processing normal-grade ores. The operations have been generally limited, therefore, to the treatment of low-grade materials generated in the course of mining normal-grade ores. In some circumstances such materials can be treated by simplified procedures as an attractive source of additional production. The experience gained in uranium recovery from phosphate rock will be treated in some detail. The land pebble phosphate rock of central Florida generally contains about 0.01 to 0.02% U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. While no uranium is being recovered from this source at the present time, it does represent a significant potential source of by-product uranium production because of the large tonnages being mined. (author)

  14. Recovery of uranium and of rare earths from Moroccan phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezahr, I.; El Houari, A.; Smani, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The contents of uranium and of rare earths in Moroccan phosphates vary from 75 to 250 ppm and from 900 to 1500 ppm, respectively. The phosphates produced in Morocco contain therefore about 2500 t of uranium and 25 000 t of rare earths, compared with annual productions of uranium and of rare earths of 43 000 t and 33 000 t, respectively. During the sulphuric leaching of the phosphate ores, uranium is found to 80-90% in the phosphoric acid. Research into the extraction of uranium has shown that for the phosphoric acids produced at Safi the coefficient of extraction: is not very sensitive to the P 2 O 5 concentration on the 28-30% region; is not affected by the sulphur level up to the concentration of 4%; is very sensitive to the fluorine content beyond 1%. On the level of the first cycle of the process in Depa-Topo, four extraction stages permit a yield of between 92 and 98% to be reached. The addition of an oxidizing agent to the phosphoric acids under examination was not necessary, as their potential level is high. The purity of the yellow-cakes obtained varies from 94 to 99%. The overall recovery efficiency lies between 67 and 71%. In a second part, this paper deals with the recovery of the rare earths [fr

  15. Recovery of uranium from Cu-flotation tails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, K.M.V.; Sankaran, R.N.; Dwivedy, K.K.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium occurs along with copper in several parts of India. Since the total contained uranium in some of these deposits is very large, detailed studies were carried out on samples of ore obtained from Surda, Mosabani and Rakha Cu-flotation tails analysing 0.014 per cent, 0.010 per cent and 0.011 per cent U 3 O 8 and 0.12 per cent 0.09 per cent and 0.11 per cent Cu respectively. Uranium in these samples occurs not only as free uraninite but is also associated with other minerals like apatite, magnetite, tourmaline and micas, formed at different stages of paragenitic sequence. The size also varies considerably. Because of this the recovery of uranium varied from 35 to 70 per cent by wet gravity separation of the feed. Since uranium has to be anyway extracted from these concentrates by hydrometallurgical processing, it is suggested that Cu-flotation tails may be treated by hydrometallurgy to increase the ultimate recovery. (author)

  16. Technology of uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi [Saga Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakashio, Fumiyuki

    1982-12-01

    Rock phosphate contains from 0.005 to 0.02 wt.% of uranium. Though the content is a mere 5 to 10 % of that in uranium ore, the total recovery of uranium is significant since it is used for fertilizer manufacture in a large quantity. Wet-process phosphoric acid is produced by the reaction of rock phosphate with sulfuric acid. The recovery of uranium from this phosphoric acid is mostly by solvent extraction at present. According to U/sup 4 +/ or UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ as the form of its existence, the technique of solvent extraction differs. The following matters are described: processing of rock phosphate; recovery techniques including the extraction by OPPA-octyl pyrophosphoric acid for U/sup 4 +/, and by mixed DEHPA-Di-(2)-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid and TOPO-tryoctyl phosphine oxide for UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, and by OPAP-octylphenyl acid phosphate for U/sup 4 +/; the recent progress of the technology as seen in patents.

  17. Itaconic acid based potential sorbent for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyan, Y.; Naidu, G.R.K.; Das, Sadananda; Pandey, A.K.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-linked hydrogels and adsorptive membranes containing Itaconic acid, Acrylamide, Penta erythritol tetra acrylate and α, α-dimethyl- α-phenyl aceto phenone were prepared by UV-initiated bulk polymerization. These hydrogels and adsorptive membranes were characterized for pH uptake, sorption and desorption kinetics and selectivity towards uranium. The sorption ability of the sorbents towards uranyl ion was thoroughly examined. The developed itaconic acid based sorbents were evaluated for the recovery of uranium from lean sources like sea water. (author)

  18. Best practice in situ recovery uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, I.B.; McKay, A.D.; Carson, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    The Australian Government policy is to ensure that uranium mining, milling and rehabilitation is based on world best practice standards. A best practice guide for in situ recovery (ISR) uranium mining has been developed to communicate the Australian Government's expectations with a view to achieving greater certainty that ISR mining projects meet Australian Government policy and consistency in the assessment of ISR mine proposals within multiple government regulatory processes. The guide focuses on the main perceived risks; impacts on groundwaters, disposal of mining residues, and radiation protection. World best practice does not amount to a universal template for ISR mining because the characteristics of individual ore bodies determine the best practice. (author)

  19. Accelerated recovery after cardiac operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Mehmet; Kut, Mustafa Sinan; Yurtseven, Nurgul; Cimen, Serdar; Demirtas, Mahmut Murat

    2002-01-01

    The accelerated-recovery approach, involving early extubation, early mobility, decreased duration of intensive care unit stay, and decreased duration of hospitalization has recently become a controversial issue in cardiac surgery. We investigated timing of extubation, length of intensive care unit stay, and duration of hospitalization in 225 consecutive cardiac surgery patients. Of the 225 patients, 139 were male and 86 were female; average age was 49.73 +/- 16.95 years. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in 127 patients; 65 patients underwent aortic and/or mitral or pulmonary valvular operations; 5 patients underwent valvular plus coronary artery operations; and in 28 patients surgical interventions for congenital anomalies were carried out. The accelerated-recovery approach could be applied in 169 of the 225 cases (75.11%). Accelerated-recovery patients were extubated after an average of 3.97 +/- 1.59 hours, and the average duration of stay in the intensive care unit was 20.93 +/- 2.44 hours for these patients. Patients were discharged if they met all of the following criteria: hemodynamic stability, cooperativeness, ability to initiate walking exercises within wards, lack of pathology in laboratory investigations, and psychological readiness for discharge. Mean duration of hospitalization for accelerated-recovery patients was 4.24 +/- 0.75 days. Two patients (1.18%) who were extubated within the first 6 hours required reintubation. Four patients (2.36%) who were sent to the wards returned to intensive care unit due to various reasons and 6 (3.55%) of the discharged patients were rehospitalized. Approaches for decreasing duration of intubation, intensive care unit stay and hospitalization may be applied in elective and uncomplicated cardiac surgical interventions with short duration of aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass, without risking patients. Frequencies of reintubation, return to intensive care unit, and rehospitalization are quite

  20. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  1. Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Annual progress report, May 1982-May 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently conducting research for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on uranium recovery process wastes for both active and inactive operations. NRC-sponsored uranium recovery research at PNL is focused on NRC regulatory responsibilities for uranium-recovery operations: license active milling and in situ extraction operations; concur on the acceptability of DOE remedial-action plans for inactive sites; and license DOE to maintain inactive sites following remedial actions. PNL's program consists of four coordinated projects comprised of a program management task and nine research tasks that address the critical technical and safety issues for uranium recovery. Specifically, the projects endeavor to find and evaluate methods to: prevent erosion of tailings piles and prevent radon release from tailings piles; evaluate the effectiveness of interim stabilization techniques to prevent wind erosion and transport of dry tailings from active piles; estimate the dewatering and consolidation behavior of slurried tailings to promote early cover placement; design a cover-protection system to prevent erosion of the cover by expected environmental stresses; reduce seepage into ground water and prevent ground-water degradation; control solution movement and reaction with ground water in in-situ extraction operations; evaluate natural and induced restoration of ground water in in-situ extraction operations; and monitor releases to the environment from uranium recovery facilities

  2. Uranium recovery research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Annual progress report, May 1982-May 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Opitz, B.E.; Deutsch, W.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.; Hartley, J.N.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is currently conducting research for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on uranium recovery process wastes for both active and inactive operations. NRC-sponsored uranium recovery research at PNL is focused on NRC regulatory responsibilities for uranium-recovery operations: license active milling and in situ extraction operations; concur on the acceptability of DOE remedial-action plans for inactive sites; and license DOE to maintain inactive sites following remedial actions. PNL's program consists of four coordinated projects comprised of a program management task and nine research tasks that address the critical technical and safety issues for uranium recovery. Specifically, the projects endeavor to find and evaluate methods to: prevent erosion of tailings piles and prevent radon release from tailings piles; evaluate the effectiveness of interim stabilization techniques to prevent wind erosion and transport of dry tailings from active piles; estimate the dewatering and consolidation behavior of slurried tailings to promote early cover placement; design a cover-protection system to prevent erosion of the cover by expected environmental stresses; reduce seepage into ground water and prevent ground-water degradation; control solution movement and reaction with ground water in in-situ extraction operations; evaluate natural and induced restoration of ground water in in-situ extraction operations; and monitor releases to the environment from uranium recovery facilities.

  3. Alkaline elution of uranium and molybdenum and their recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Wenlan; Wu Peisheng; Zhao Pinzhi; Tao Dening; Xie Chaoyan

    1987-01-01

    The uranium and molybdenum can be simultaneously eluted by using eluant (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 + (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 from resin loaded uranium and molybdenum. The ADU is precipitated from eluant by volatilization of ammonia. The molybdenum is extracted by TFA-TBP-kerosene from the filtrate at pH 3.0-3.2 with molybdenum extraction > 98%. Uranium is nearly not extracted. The precipitation of Mo is reached by sulphuric acid after stripping and the ammonium multimolybdate is obtained. This process can give the total recovery more than 99% for U and 90% for Mo. Because of the use of sulphate salt system, the hazard of NO 3 - can be avoided

  4. RECOVERY OF URANIUM FROM LOW GRADE URANIUM BEARING ORES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, H.B.; Pesold, W.F.; Hirshon, J.M.

    1959-06-01

    Recovery of U, Fe, and Al from Chattanooga shale is described. Ground shale (-4 to +325 mesh) is roasted to remove organic and volatile matter. The heated shale is then reacted with a chlorinating agent (CCl/sub 4/, COCl/sub 2/, Cl, and SCl) at 600 to 1000 C. The metal chloride vapor is separated from entrained solids and then contacted with a liquid alkali metal chloride which removes U. The U is reeovered by cooling and dissolving the bath followed by acidification and solvent extraction. A condensed phase of Al, Fe, and K chlorides is treated to separate Al as alumina by passing through a Fe/sub 2/O/ sub 3/ bed. The remaining FeCl/sub 3/ is oxidized by O/sub 2/ at 1000 C to form Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Cl/sub 2/. Alternatively, vapor from the U separation step may be passed to a liquid KCl bath at 500 to 650 C. The resulting mixture is oxidized to form Cl/sub 2/ and Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ + Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The Al and Fe are separated by reaction with NaOH at high temperatures and pressures. (T.R.H.)

  5. Uranium and REE recovery from Florida phosphates – Looking back and going forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Birky, B.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium recovered during the production of phosphoric acid represents a significant source of nuclear fuel as the gap between uranium supply and demand is expected to grow. The phosphate industry in Florida supplied uranium to both the defense and energy sectors in the past, but market conditions ended the recovery process. Currently, the uranium is retained in the phosphoric acid and the granulated fertilizer products, diammonium and monoammonium phosphate, and dispersed on farm fields as a trace element in blended fertilizers. This represents a loss to the nuclear fuel cycle that will never be recovered. In an era of heightened awareness of sustainability and increasing pressure to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, market conditions and social factors may converge to create favorable conditions for uranium recovery to resume. However, the future may not resemble the past as uranium concentrations are lower in the newer mining areas and ion exchange challenges solvent extraction for the extraction technology of choice. New factors will also influence both the economic decision to resume recovery operations, as well as the recovery technology. Rare earth elements (REE) are also present in the processing streams at recoverable levels, and can be co-extracted with uranium using the proven solvent extraction method. REE are vital to the phosphor industry, green energy development, and technology advances in many fields. However, the world has limited REE resources, and the recovery of REE from many of these resources is both economically challenging and environmentally troublesome. Phosphate as a secondary REE resource has a great potential to fill this gap. World annual phosphate rock production has surpassed 200 million tons, representing 60,000 tons of unrecovered REE assuming an average concentration of 300 ppm. In the case of Florida, REE in the phosphate ore reports to four mining and processing streams, with approximately 10% to flotation tailings, 30-40% to

  6. Upgrade Uranium Recovery Project No. 34110: final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The accident analysis of the upgrade uranium recovery system indicated three potential hazards: (1) criticality, (2) toxic fumes from nitric acid solutions, and (3) release of toxic uranyl nitrate solutions. Any of these are capable of causing the death of one or more employees; therefore, they form the basis for the residual risks identified below. The analysis found no hazardous energies or substances capable of causing irreversible injury to, or the death of, any members of the public. The following residual risks will be controlled administratively by procedural constraints: An operator or maintenance error will cause 235 U to be transferred into an unsafe container and cause a criticality. An operator or maintenance error will cause containers of 235 U bearing material to be improperly spaced and cause a criticality. Extensive corrosion will cause a hole to form in a calciner tube, the corrosion will go undetected, and a criticality will result, and a loss of system and/or building solution containment will occur concurrent with a drain being open resulting in a criticality and/or release of toxic material. Additional residual risks that have a small probability are that an earthquake or tornado will affect the building, alter the system geometry, and initiate a criticality; that the compressed-gas (nitrogen) cylinder valve will be sheared off, become airborne, and alter the system geometry; and that loss of system and/or building solution containment may occur concurrently with fire sprinkler system actuation causing a criticality and/or release of toxic material. The following residual risks will be addressed in the Safety Study of the existing X-705 Building: that a spill of raffinate highly contaminated with 99 Tc will occur due to operator error or incorrect lab analysis and that a gaseous or liquid effluent release of small amounts of transuranic elements will occur

  7. The recovery of sulphur, uranium, and gold from residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhmer, W.T.; Botha, F.; Adams, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The report describes the Amuran project in the Welkom area, which is being conducted by six members of the Anglo American Group. The project comprises three plants for the flotation of pyrite, a twin-stream uranium plant for the recovery of gold from calcines. Details of these plants including capital costs and estimated production are given. Mention is made of the adsorption of gold onto activated charcoal and wet high-intensity magnetic separation as possible suitable processes for these residues [af

  8. The acid aging as alternative process for uranium recovery from silicated ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriani, M.; Della Testa, A.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of different variables on the extraction uranium efficiency and on the silicate solubility by means of acid aging is studied. The variables studied in bench scale were: acid/ore, oxidizing/ore and liquid/solid relationships; reaction time; temperature and recovery time. The results are discussed and compared with the ones of continuous operation of a semi-pilot plant. A flowsheet of the industrial process application is presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  10. Rejuvenation of the anion exchanger used for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, T.-Y.; Espenscheid, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to improving the performance of strong base anionic exchange resins used in uranium recovery that exhibit an undesirable decrease in loading capacity and in total exchange capacity. The invention comprises treating an anionic exchange resin to remove physically adsorbed and occluded fouling agents and to remove poisons which may be chemically bound to active ion groups on the resin. The process involves treating the resin, after the uranium ion exchange stage, with an alkaline carbonate solution, preferably treating the resin with an acid eluant first. The acid treatment dissolves insoluble fouling agents which are physically occluded or adsorbed by the resin and that the weak base treatment augments that result and probably removes poisons which are physically or chemically bound to the resin

  11. Development of the Ranger uranium milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, P.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and operation of the Ranger uranium project is described. In 1969 Ranger discovered a uranium-bearing ore deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia. Extensive testwork on drill core samples proved the viability of the extraction of the uranium and a process flowsheet and plant design criteria were developed based on a conventional crushing, grinding, acid leach, C.C.D., solvent extraction circuit. Detailed design concentrated on plant layout, materials of construction, equipment vendor selection and process control. These factors required special attention because of the remote location of the mine and the high cost and difficulty in obtaining trained labour for such sites. Environmental considerations were key factors in design. The mine is located adjacent to a national park and has an average rainfall of 1,600 mm. No water or liquid effluents are to be released from the project area and thus water management is a key factor. Tailings are ponded in an impervious earth-rockfill dam

  12. Recent work at MIT on uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent work at MIT has confirmed the superiority of fiber-form ion exchange media for uranium recovery from seawater, subject to demonstration of the ability to control fouling by suspended particulate matter. Calculations and laboratory experiments indicate loading rates of several hundred ppm U/day: an order of magnitude faster than for bead-type sorbers in fixed or fluidized beds. A high performance, modular, sorber cartridge/seawater contactor system capable of a lifetime-levelized cost of product in the range 100-150 $/1b U 3 O 8 has been designed. (author)

  13. Quality assurance in the enriched uranium operations NDA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, P.K.; Ceo, R.N. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Nondestructive Analysis (NDA) Facility at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has characterized process wastes for Enriched Uranium Operations since 1978. Since that time, over 50,000 items have been analyzed. Analysis results are used to determine whether or not recovery of uranium from process wastes is economically feasible. Our instrument complement includes one large segmented gamma scanner (SGS), two smaller SGS, two solution assay systems (SAS), and Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC). The large SGS is used for analyzing High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters ant 208-L drums filled with combustible contaminated waste. The smaller SGS are used to analyze 4-L containers of ash and leached residues. The SAS are used to analyze 125 ml bottles of aqueous or organic waste solutions that may contain uranium. The gamma-based NDA techniques are used to identify which process wastes can be discarded, and which must be recycled. The AWCC is used to analyze high-density materials which are not amenable to gamma-ray analysis. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  14. Recovery of uranium from alkaline ore (Tummalapalle) leach solution using novel precipitating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Sujoy; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of present study is recovery of uranium from such ore leach solution containing 2 O 7 at pH ∼12.5. The average particle size of the MgU 2 O 7 particles was 20 micron and overall uranium recovery was 97%. The composition of final precipitate was characterized using XRD and surface morphology was studied using SEM

  15. Field Testing of Downgradient Uranium Mobility at an In-Situ Recovery Uranium Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimus, P. W.; Clay, J. T.; Rearick, M.; Perkins, G.; Brown, S. T.; Basu, A.; Chamberlain, K.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ recovery (ISR) mining of uranium involves the injection of O2 and CO2 (or NaHCO3) into saturated roll-front deposits to oxidize and solubilize the uranium, which is then removed by ion exchange at the surface and processed into U3O8. While ISR is economical and environmentally-friendly relative to conventional mining, one of the challenges of extracting uranium by this process is that it leaves behind a geochemically-altered aquifer that is exceedingly difficult to restore to pre-mining geochemical conditions, a regulatory objective. In this research, we evaluated the ability of the aquifer downgradient of an ISR mining area to attenuate the transport of uranium and other problem constituents that are mobilized by the mining process. Such an evaluation can help inform both regulators and the mining industry as to how much restoration of the mined ore zone is necessary to achieve regulatory compliance at various distances downgradient of the mining zone even if complete restoration of the ore zone proves to be difficult or impossible. Three single-well push-pull tests and one cross-well test were conducted in which water from an unrestored, previously-mined ore zone was injected into an unmined ore zone that served as a geochemical proxy for the downgradient aquifer. In all tests, non-reactive tracers were injected with the previously-mined ore zone water to allow the transport of uranium and other constituents to be compared to that of the nonreactive species. In the single-well tests, it was shown that the recovery of uranium relative to the nonreactive tracers ranged from 12-25%, suggesting significant attenuation capacity of the aquifer. In the cross-well test, selenate, molybdate and metavanadate were injected with the unrestored water to provide information on the transport of these potentially-problematic anionic constituents. In addition to the species-specific transport information, this test provided valuable constraints on redox conditions within

  16. Recovery of uranium by a reverse osmosis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, J.G.; Stana, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for concentrating and recovering uranium material from an aqueous solution, comprises passing a feed solution containing uranium through at least one reverse osmosis membrane system to concentrate the uranium, and then flushing the concentrated uranium solution with water in a reverse osmosis membrane system to further concentrate the uranium

  17. Improved NGL recovery designs maximize operating flexibility and product recoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, J.D.; Hudson, H.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the historically cyclical nature in the market for ethane and propane has demonstrated the need for flexible natural gas liquids (NGL) recovery plants. NEwly developed and patented processes are now available which can provide ultra-high recovery of ethane (95%+) when demand for ethane is high and provide essentially complete ethane rejection without the normally concomitant reduction in propane recovery. This provides plant operators the flexibility to respond more readily to NGL market conditions, thus maximizing plant operating profits. The new process designs provide this flexibility without increasing utility requirements. In fact, utility consumption is often lower when compared to conventional designs. This same process technology can also be easily retrofit into existing plants with relatively quick payout of the modifications from both recovery and efficiency improvements

  18. Operating conditions of T.B.P. line uranium purification plant, for uranium dioxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardich, R.N.; La Gamma, A.M.; Anasco, R.; Soler, S.M.G. de; Isnardi, E.; Gea, V.; Chiaraviglio, R.; Matyjasczyk, E.; Aramayo, R.

    1992-01-01

    In this contribution are presented the operative conditions and the results obtained step of the Uranium dioxide production plant of Argentina. The refining step involve the Uranium concentrate dissolution, the silica ageing, the filtration and liquid - liquid extraction with n-tributyl phosphate solution in kerosene. The established operative conditions allow to obtain Uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear purity in industrial scale. (author)

  19. Solvent extraction of uranium: Towards good practice in design, operation and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartsch, P.; Hall, S.; Ballestrin, S.; Hunt, A.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium solvent extraction, USX has been applied commercially for recovery and concentration for over 60 years. Uranium in acidic liquor, which is prepared following ore leaching, solid/liquid separation and clarification, can be treated through a sequence of operations; extraction-scrubbing-stripping, to obtain purified liquor, and hence precipitation of marketable products. USX has dominated the primary uranium industry as the preferred technological route for recovery of uranium into converter grade yellowcake or Uranium Ore Concentrate. The practices of design and operation of USX facilities has found renewed interest as new mines are developed following decades of industry dormancy. Development of the Olympic Dam and Honeymoon operations in Australia has lead to innovative design and operation of pulsed columns technology in applications of solvent extraction. This article seeks to outline principles of design and operation from the practitioner’s perspective. The discussion also reviews historical developments of USX applications and highlights recent innovations. This review is hoped to provide guidance for technical personnel who wish to learn more about good practices that leads to reliable USX performance. (author)

  20. 76 FR 41308 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ..., Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials License Application...-4737, or by e-mail to [email protected] . The Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project License... source and byproduct materials license at its Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project site located in Crook...

  1. Uptake and recovery of americium and uranium by Anacystis biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Jiunntzong Wu

    1993-01-01

    The optimum conditions for the uptake of americium and uranium from wastewater solutions by Anacystis nidulans cells, and the recovery of these radionuclides were studied. The optimum pH range for both actinides was in the acidic region between 3.0 and 5.0. In a pH 3.5 solution with an algal biomass of 70 μg/mL, up to 95% of the Am and U were taken up by the cells. However, the uptake levels were lowered considerably when ethylene dinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA) or iron or calcium ions were present in the solutions. Most of the radionuclides taken up by the cells could also be desorbed by washing with salt solutions. Of nine salt solutions tested, ammonium carbonate was the most effective. Our experiments using algal biomass to remove radionuclides from wastewater showed that about 92% of americium and 85% of uranium in wastewater could be taken up by algal biomass, from which about 46% of the Am and 82% of the U originally present in the wastewater could be recovered by elution with a salt solution. 17 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Treatment of the acid mine drainage residue for uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.M.; Horta, D.G.; Fukuma, H.T.; Villegas, R.A.S.; Carvalho, C.H.T. de; Silva, A.C. da

    2017-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a process that occurs in many mining that have sulfide ores. With water and oxygen, several metals are oxidized, one example being uranium. At the mine pit of the Osamu Utsumi Mine located at INB - Caldas and in two other boot-wastes (mining waste pile), AMD is present and currently, without a technological solution. The acidic water present in the pit is treated with hydrated lime, generating water for disposal and an alkaline residue called calcium diuranate - DUCA. The DUCA has a concentration of approximately 0.32% U 3 O 8 , which makes interesting the development of a process for extracting that metal. One of the processes that can be used is leaching. For this study, it was decided to evaluate the alkaline leaching to extract the uranium present in the residue. It is necessary to optimize operational parameters for the process: percentage of solids, concentration of leaching agent in solution, temperature and reaction time. With these parameters, it is possible to improve the leaching so that the largest amount of uranium is extracted from the sample, to help solve the environmental impact caused by the wastewater from the treatment of acid waters and, in addition, to give an economical destination for this metal that is contained in the deposited DUCA

  3. Uranium from phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are described briefly: the way phosphate fertilizers are made; how uranium is recovered in the phosphate industry; and how to detect covert uranium recovery operations in a phsophate plant

  4. Alternative processes for uranium recovery from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.; Santos Benedetto, J. dos; Aquino, J.A. de

    1987-01-01

    Two processes of solvent extraction using D 2 EHPATOPO synergistic mixture, in order to recover uranium from phosphoric acid proceeding from physical and chemical treatments of the phosphorus-uraniferous ore of Itataia-CE, Brazil, are studied. The steps of each process were studied in laboratory and pilot scales. The flow charts for both processes with detailed description of each step, the operational conditions, the mass balances, the results obtained and the description of pilot units, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Development of a recovery process of scraps resulting from the manufacture of metallic uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Kuada, Terezinha A.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G.O.; Cohen, Victor H.; Araujo, Bertha F.; Lobao, Afonso S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the dissolution of natural metallic uranium fuel samples with aluminium cladding is presented, in order to obtain optimized conditions for the system. The aluminium cladding was dissolved in an alkaline solution of Na OH/Na NO 3 and the metallic uranium with HNO 3 . A fumeless dissolution with total recovery of nitrous gases was achieved. The main purpose of this project was the recovery of uranium from scraps resulting from the manufacture of the metallic uranium fuel or other non specified fuels. (author)

  6. A conceptional design, cost and sensitivity analysis on adsorption process for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Noboru

    1986-01-01

    The system model for a conceptional design and cost estimation was studied on a multi-layered fluidizing bed with a pump which used hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) and amidoxime resin (AOR) as adsorbents. The cost effect of some parameters, namely characteristics of adsorbent, operating conditions, price of materials and some others, were estimated, and finally there was shown a direction of improvement and a possibility of cost reduction. The conceptional design and operating condition were obtained from the balance point on expansion ratio, recovery and characteristics of adsorbent. A suitable plan was obtained from the minimum cost condition in some level of the expansion ratio and some parameters. HTO was heavy in density and cheap in price. The main results of the study indicated that the thickness of the bed was 1 m, the linear velocity of seawater was 52 m/hr, the number of bed layers was 4, the construction cost of a 100 t/y plant was 10 billion yen, and the uranium cost was 160 $/1b. AOR had a large adsorption capacity. As the main results, the thickness of bed was 0.08 m, the linear velosity of seawater was 11.6 m, the number of the bed layers was 27, the construction cost of a 100 t/y plant was 15 billion yen, and the uranium cost was 280 $/1b. The size of the 100 t/y plant was about 800 m length x 80 m depth x 30 m height at 80 % of recovery. An increase of adsorption capacity in HTO, and an increase of density and particle size in AOR had the greatest merit for cost reduction. Other effective parameters were the adsorption velocity, the recovery, temperature, the price of adsorbent, the manufacturing cost of instrument, and the rate of interest. The cost of uranium by this process had a possibility of cost reduction to 67 $/1b at HTO and 79 $/1b at AOR. (author)

  7. Licensing Status of New and Expanding In-Situ Recovery Uranium Projects in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catchpole, G.; Thomas, M., E-mail: gccatchpole@uranerz.com [Uranerz Energy Corporation (URZ), Casper, WY (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The authors investigated the licensing status of new in-situ recovery (“ISR”) uranium projects, as well as the expansion of existing projects, within the United States (“US”). Specific emphasis and analysis is placed on those projects within the states of Texas and Wyoming. Of note, information used to prepare this paper was obtained from public sources that included company web sites, the US Securities and Exchange Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (“NRC”), the US Energy Information Agency (“EIA”), and the relevant state regulatory agencies. The renewed interest in the production of natural uranium has been motivated, in part, by the increased sale price of yellowcake beginning around 2003 resulting in numerous new and existing natural resources companies acquiring mineral rights in the United States. Because of the economic favorability in terms of both operating and capital costs of ISR mines versus conventional mines in the US (with its relatively low grade of uranium ore), the model for most companies was to acquire mineral properties that had the potential for being mined using the ISR method. There were, however, exceptions to this model. The Uravan mineral district in southwest Colorado and southeast Utah, where relatively high-grade, shallow uranium deposits have the potential to be mined using underground methods, is one such exception. However, the focus of this paper will be on ISR projects. In Wyoming, which has been the top producer of natural uranium among the 50 states for the past seven years, there is one producing ISR mine (Bill Smith — Highland), one ISR mine on standby (Christensen Ranch), and two ISR uranium projects licensed but not yet built (Gas Hills and North Butte). Cameco Resources is planning to develop two ISR projects in Wyoming that have been licensed but not yet constructed. Additionally, three new uranium companies (Ur-Energy, Uranerz and Uranium One) have filed applications with the federal and

  8. Collaborative Operations for Personnel Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    framework of the NASA TLX will be used to discuss the implications of the Co-OPR system on workload. The NASA TLX is a subjective workload assessment tool...that allows users to perform subjective workload assessments on operator(s) working with various human- machine systems. NASA TLX is a multi...Bundy, A.), IOS Press. Tate, A. (2006) The Helpful Environment: distributed agents and services which cooperate, in "Cooperative Information Agents X

  9. Solvent extraction and its practical application for the recovery of copper and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J.

    1975-01-01

    In recent years solvent extraction has been developed to a stage that allows practical application first for the recovery of uranium and later also for winning copper from low-grade acid-soluble ores. By now it has been realized in several plants with great technical and ecomomic success. Solvent extraction includes the following essential operations: leaching, solvent extraction, back extraction of the organically bonded valuable mineral to an acid, aqueous solution and finally separation of the valuable metal from the final acid by precipitation or electrolytic procedures. Upon assessing the cost of the solvent extraction process for the recovery of copper it turns out that from an economic point of view it is significantly superior to the conventional cementation process. (orig.) [de

  10. The assisting system for uranium enrichment plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Fumio

    1990-01-01

    We have been developing an operation assisting system, partially supported by AI system, for uranium enrichment plant. The AI system is a proto-type system aiming a final one which can be applied to any future large uranium enrichment plant and also not only to specific operational area but also to complex and multi-phenomenon operational area. An existing AI system, for example facility diagnostic system that utilizes the result of CCT analysis as knowledge base, has weakness in flexibility and potentiality. To build AI system, we have developed the most suitable knowledge representations using deep knowledge for each facility or operation of uranium enrichment plant. This paper describes our AI proto-type system adopting several knowledge representations that can represent an uranium enrichment plant's operation with deep knowledge. (author)

  11. The development of continuous fluidized-bed ion exchange in South Africa, and its use in the recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, A.K.

    1978-01-01

    The status of the South African research and development programme on continouos ion exchange, which was aimed at the technical and economic assesment of that process for the recovery of uranium, is reviewed. The first phase of this programme, which has now been completed, involved devolopment investigations on various pilot plants and culminated in the successfull operation of a large-scale demonstration plant and the incorporation of the system in a number of new South African uranium plants. This account highlights the engineering aspects and the design for the system, its adaptation to process flowsheets, and plans for future development [af

  12. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  13. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished

  14. Measures for waste water management from recovery processing of Zhushanxia uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yaochi; Xu Lechang

    2000-01-01

    Measures for waste water management from recovery processing of Zhushanxia uranium deposit of Wengyuan Mine is analyzed, which include improving process flow, recycling process water used in uranium mill as much as possible and choosing a suitable disposing system. All these can decrease the amount of waste water, and also reduce costs of disposing waste water and harm to environment

  15. Legislatory background of uranium recovery on Greenland with special regard for safety and environmental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, A.

    1983-08-01

    The actual laws on mineral resources in Greenland, on radioactive substance handling and protection and their consequences for uranium recovery at Kvanefjeld are considered. The uranium processing pilot plant at Risoe was on Danish territory and therefore subject to the Danish legislation for nuclear installations. (EG)

  16. Remotely operated facility for in situ solidification of fissile uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, C.P.; Collins, E.D.; Patton, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    A heavily shielded, remotely operated facility, located within the Radiochemical processing Plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has been designed and is being operated to convert approx.1000 kg of fissile uranium (containing approx.75% 235 U, approx.10% 233 U, and approx.140 ppM 232 U) from a nitrate solution (130 g of uranium per L) to a solid oxide form. This project, the Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Program (CEUSP), is being carried out in order to prepare a stable uranium form for longterm storage. This paper describes the solidification process selected, the equipment and facilities required, the experimental work performed to ensure successful operation, some problems that were solved, and the initial operations

  17. Draft environment statement related to operation of Moab uranium mill (Grand County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    This draft environmental impact statement was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and issued by the Commission's Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. The proposed action is the continuation of Source Material License SUA-917 issued to Atlas Corporation for the operation of the Atlas Uranium Mill in Grand County, Utah, near Moab (Docket No. 40-3453). This authorizes a 600-ton (450-MT) per day acid leach circuit (for recovery of vanadium as well as uranium) and a 600-ton (450-MT) per day alkaline leach circuit

  18. Status of technology of uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu; Saito, Kyoichi.

    1990-01-01

    By bringing the solid material called adsorbent in contact with seawater, uranium can be collected, therefore, the adsorbent to which uranium was adsorbed in seawater can be regarded as the resource of uranium storing. To the adsorbent, also rare metals are concentrated in addition to uranium. From such viewpoint, the development of the technology for collecting seawater uranium is important for the Japanese energy policy. The uranium concentration in seawater is about 3 mg/m 3 and its form of dissolution is uranyl tricarbonate ions. The technology of collecting seawater uranium is the separation technology for extracting the component of very low concentration from the aqueous solution containing many components. The total amount of uranium in the whole oceans reaches about 4 billion t, which is about 1000 times as much as the uranium commercially mined on land. It is the target of the technology to make artificial uranium ore of as high quality as possible quickly. The process of collecting seawater uranium comprises adsorption, desorption, separation and enrichment. As the adsorbents, hydrated titanium oxide and chelate resin represented by amidoxime are promising. The adsorption system is described. (K.I.)

  19. Liquid membranes and process for uranium recovery therewith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenfeld, J.W.; Li, N.N.T.; Bruncati, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A liquid membrane system consisting of water-in-oil type emulsions dispersed in water, which is capable of extracting uranium-containing ions from an aqueous feed solution containing uranium ions at a temperature in the range of 25 0 C to 80 0 C, is described. The emulsion comprises an aqueous interior phase surrounded by a surfactant-containing exterior phase. The exterior phase is immiscible with the interior phase and comprises a transfer agent capable of transporting selectively the desired uranium-containing ions and a solvent for the transfer agent. The interior phase comprises a reactant capable of removing uranium-containing ions from the transfer agent and capable of changing the valency of the uranium in uranium-containing ions to a second valency state and converting the uranium-containing ions into a nonpermeable form. (U.K.)

  20. Recovery and removal of uranium by using plant wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akira; Sakaguchi, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    The uranium-adsorbing abilities of seven plant wastes were investigated. High abilities to adsorb uranium from non-saline water containing 10 mg dm -3 of uranium were observed with a number of plant wastes tested. However, with seawater supplemented with 10 mg dm -3 of uranium, similar results were found only with chestnut residues. When the plant wastes were immobilized with formaldehyde, their ability to adsorb uranium was increased. Uranium and copper ions were more readily adsorbed by all plant wastes tested than other metal ions from a solution containing a mixture of seven different heavy metals. The selective adsorption of heavy metal ions differs with different species of plant wastes. The immobilization of peanut inner skin, orange peel and grapefruit peel increased the selectivity for uranium. (author)

  1. Performance of an industrial wet high-intensity magnetic separator for the recovery of gold and uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrans, I.J.; Liddell, K.S.; Dunne, R.C. (Council for Mineral Technology, Randburg (South Africa). Ore-dressing Div.); Gilbert, W.A. (General Mining Union Corp. Ltd., Johannesburg (South Africa))

    1984-03-01

    After bench-scale and pilot-plant tests in which it was shown that wet high-intensity magnetic separation (WHIMS) can achieve good recoveries of gold and uranium from Witwatersrand residues, a production-size machine was installed at a gold mine. The mechanical and metallurgical performance of this machine have been satisfactory, and the economics of the process are attractive. WHIMS can be combined with other unit operations like flotation for the optimization of overall gold and uranium recoveries. This concept is shown to be relevant, not only to operations for the retreatment of tailings, but to processes for the treatment of coarser material. In the latter, there is a saving in energy consumption compared with the energy required for the fine grinding of the total feed, and a material suitable for underground backfill can be produced. Improved, more cost-effective WHIMS machines currently under development are also described.

  2. Progress in recovery technology for uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugo, Takanobu; Saito, Kyoichi.

    1994-01-01

    By the facts that the research group in Japan improved the performance of amidoxime resin which is the adsorbent for collecting seawater uranium, proposed the method of mooring floating bodies utilizing sea current and waves as the adsorption system, and further, verified the results of laboratory basic experiment by marine experiment, the technology of collecting seawater uranium has progressed. After the oil crisis, various countries started the research on seawater uranium, but only Japan has continued the systematic study up to now. In this report, the research on seawater uranium collection carried out so far is summarized, and the characteristics of the adsorbent which was synthesized by radiation graft polymerization and the results of the uranium collection test using coastal seawater are reported. In seawater of 1 m 3 , the uranium of 3.3 mg is dissolved in the form of uranyl tricarbonate complex ions. In the total quantity of seawater, the dissolved uranium amounts to about 4.6 billion tons, about 1000 times of the uranium resources on land. The research on seawater uranium collection and the performance of uranium adsorption of synthesized amidoxime fibers are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Recovery of uranium mineral from Liaoning Fengcheng ludwigite ore by gravity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao; Liang Haijun; Xue Xiangxin

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory research was carried out to recover uranium mineral from Liaoning Fengcheng ludwigite ore. Gravity concentration methods including hydroclone, spiral chute and shaking table were applied in this study. The results show that a concentrate with uranium grade of 0.216% and recovery of 44.24% could be produced from the feed of uranium content 0.006 3%. This research is helpful to comprehensive utilization of the mineral resources. Increasing further uranium mineral liberation degree is the key to improve separation effects. (authors)

  4. recovery of enriched uranium from waste solution obtained from fuel fabrication laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, S.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    reversed-phase partition chromatography is shown to be a convenient and applicable method for the quantitative recovery of uranium (19.7% enriched with 235 U) from highly impure solution . the processing of uranium compounds for atomic energy project especially in FMPP(Egyptian fuel manufacture pilot plant) gives rise to a variety of wastes in which the uranium content is of considerable importance. the recovery of uranium from concentrated mother liquors produced from ADU (ammonium diuranate ) precipitation, as well as those due to ADU washing is studied in this work. column of poly-trifluoro-monochloro-ethilene (Kel-F) supporting tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) retains uranium .impurities are eluted with 6.5 M HCl, and the uranium is eluted with water and the recovery of uranium is better than 94%. A mathematical model was suggested to stimulate the sorption process of uranium ions (or any other ion ) by column of solvent impregnated resin containing organic extractant (the same as the previous column) . An excellent agreement was founded between the experimental results and the mathematical model

  5. Development of the uranium recovery process from rejected fuel plates in the fabrication of MTR type nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming Rubio, Peter Alex

    2010-01-01

    The current work was made in Conversion laboratory belonging to Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission, CCHEN. This is constituted by the development of three hydrometallurgical processes, belonging to the recovery of uranium from fuel plates based on uranium silicide (U_3Si_2) process, for nuclear research reactors MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type, those that come from the Fuel Elements Manufacture Plant, PEC. In the manufacturing process some of these plates are subjected to destructive tests by quality requirement or others are rejected for non-compliance with technical specifications, such as: lack of homogenization of the dispersion of uraniferous compound in the meat, as well as the appearance of the defects, such as blisters, so-called "dog bone", "fish tail", "remote islands", among others. Because the uranium used is enriched in 19.75% U_2_3_5 isotope, which explains the high value in the market, it must be recovered for reuse, returning to the production line of fuel elements. The uranium silicide, contained in the plates, is dispersed in an aluminum matrix and covered with plates and frames of ASTM 6061 Aluminum, as a sandwich coating, commonly referred to as 'meat' (sandwich meat). As aluminum is the main impurity, the process begins with this metal dissolution, present in meat and plates, by NaOH reaction, followed by a vacuum filtration, washing and drying, obtaining a powder of uranium silicide, with a small impurities percentage. Then, the crude uranium silicide reacts with a solution of hydrofluoric acid, dissolving the silicon and simultaneously precipitating UF_4 by reaction with HNO_3, obtaining an impure UO_2(NO_3)_2 solution. The experimental work was developed and implemented at laboratory scale for the three stages pertaining to the uranium recovery process, determining for each one the optimum operation conditions: temperature, molarity or concentration, reagent excess, among others (author)

  6. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL

    2010-09-21

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  7. Recovery of valuable products in liquid effluents from uranium and thorium pilot units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, E.A.; Abrao, A.

    1988-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellowcake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra- and hexafluoride in a sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the refinate from the solvent extraction column where uranium and thorium are purified via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid and ammonium nitrate. Distilled nitric acid and the final sulfuric acid as residue are recycle. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximise the recycle and reuse of the abovementioned chemicals. (author) [pt

  8. Porous membrane electrochemical cell for uranium and transuranic recovery from molten salt electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L.

    2007-09-11

    An improved process and device for the recovery of the minor actinides and the transuranic elements (TRU's) from a molten salt electrolyte. The process involves placing the device, an electrically non-conducting barrier between an anode salt and a cathode salt. The porous barrier allows uranium to diffuse between the anode and cathode, yet slows the diffusion of uranium ions so as to cause depletion of uranium ions in the catholyte. This allows for the eventual preferential deposition of transuranics present in spent nuclear fuel such as Np, Pu, Am, Cm. The device also comprises an uranium oxidation anode. The oxidation anode is solid uranium metal in the form of spent nuclear fuel. The spent fuel is placed in a ferric metal anode basket which serves as the electrical lead or contact between the molten electrolyte and the anodic uranium metal.

  9. Recovery of uranium from the Syrian phosphate by solid-liquid method using alkaline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlewit, H.; Alibrahim, M.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium concentrations were analyzed in the Syrian phosphate deposits. Mean concentrations were found between 50 and 110 ppm. As a consequence, an average phosphate dressing of 22 kg/ha phosphate would charge the soil with 5-20 g/ha uranium when added as a mineral fertilizer. Fine grinding phosphate produced at the Syrian mines was used for uranium recovery by carbonate leaching. The formation of the soluble uranyl tricarbonate anion UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- permits use of alkali solutions of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate salts for the nearly selective dissolution of uranium from phosphate. Separation of iron, aluminum, titanium, etc., from the uranium during leaching was carried out. Formation of some small amounts of molybdates, vanadates, phosphates, aluminates, and some complexes metal was investigated. This process could be used before the manufacture of TSP fertilizer, and the final products would contain smaller uranium quantities. (author)

  10. Recovery of valuable products from the raffinate of uranium and thorium pilot-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, E.A.J.

    1990-01-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellow cake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, uranium tetra-and hexa-fluoride in sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major waste to be worked is the raffinate from purification via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid, ammonium nitrate, uranium, thorium and rare earth elements. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium-free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximize the recycle and reuse of the above mentioned chemicals. (author)

  11. Recovery of uranium as a by product of phosphorites from Brazilian northeast area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, M.; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction and recobery of uranium contained in marine phosphates of northeast Brazil were investigated by treating ores with hydrochloric acid. The average content of uranium in the ore was found to be about 0,03 percent which corresponds to the highest worldly known content of uranium in phoshorite. The solutions obtained in laboratory, by leaching the phosphorite with hydrochloric acid, contained 40-70mg U/1. A method to control the uranium solubilization was outlined. A liquid-liquid extrction of uranium from these liquors was performed using a mixture of 3 percent di (2-ethyl hexyl)-phosphoric acid and 2.2 percent TBP in Kerosene. An overall uranium recovery of about 85 percent was reached

  12. PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY AND PURIFICATION OF URANIUM DEPOSITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Kamen, M.D.

    1958-10-14

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from UCl/sub 4/ deposits formed on calutrons. Such deposits are removed from the calutron parts by an aqueous wash solution which then contains the uranium values in addition to the following impurities: Ni, Cu, Fe, and Cr. This impurity bearing wash solution is treated with an oxidizing agent, and the oxidized solution is then treated with ammonia in order to precipitate the uranium as ammonium diuranate. The metal impurities of iron and chromium, which form insoluble hydroxides, are precipitated along with the uranium values. The precipitate is separated from the solution, dissolved in acid, and the solution again treated with ammonia and ammonium carbonate, which results in the precipitation of the metal impurities as hydroxides while the uranium values remain in solution.

  13. Development of methodology for separation and recovery of uranium from nuclear wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpati, S.K.; Roy, S.B.; Pal, Sangita; Tewari, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium plays a key role in nuclear power supply, demand of which is growing up with time because of its prospective features. Persistent increase in different nuclear activities leads to increase generation of nuclear wastewater containing uranium. Separation and recovery of the uranium from its unconventional source like nuclear wastewater is worth to explore for addressing the reutilisation of the uranium source. It is also necessary to improve remediation technology of nuclear industries for environmental protection. Development of a suitable process methodology is essential for the purpose to supersede the conventional methodology. In the article, recent developments in several possible methodologies for separation of uranium from dilute solution have been discussed with their merits and demerits. Sorption technique as solid phase extraction methodology has been chosen with suitable polymer matrix and functional moiety based on wastewater characteristics. Polyhydroxamic Acid, PHOA sorbent synthesized following eco-friendly procedure is a promising polymeric chelating sorbents for remediation of nuclear wastewaters and recovery of uranium. Sorption and elution characteristics of the PHOA have been evaluated and illustrated for separation and recovery of uranium from a sample nuclear wastewater. For the remediation of nuclear wastewater SPE technique applying the PHOA, a polymeric sorbent is found to be a potentially suitable methodology. (author)

  14. Chattanooga shale: uranium recovery by in situ processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing demand for uranium as reactor fuel requires the addition of sizable new domestic reserves. One of the largest potential sources of low-grade uranium ore is the Chattanooga shale--a formation in Tennessee and neighboring states that has not been mined conventionally because it is expensive and environmentally disadvantageous to do so. An in situ process, on the other hand, might be used to extract uranium from this formation without the attendant problems of conventional mining. We have suggested developing such a process, in which fracturing, retorting, and pressure leaching might be used to extract the uranium. The potential advantages of such a process are that capital investment would be reduced, handling and disposing of the ore would be avoided, and leaching reagents would be self-generated from air and water. If successful, the cost reductions from these factors could make the uranium produced competitive with that from other sources, and substantially increase domestic reserves. A technical program to evaluate the processing problems has been outlined and a conceptual model of the extraction process has been developed. Preliminary cost estimates have been made, although it is recognized that their validity depends on how successfully the various processing steps are carried out. In view of the preliminary nature of this survey (and our growing need for uranium), we have urged a more detailed study on the feasibility of in situ methods for extracting uranium from the Chattanooga shale

  15. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.F.; Phillips, J.F. Jr.; Tate, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid is claimed where the acid is treated with a mixture of an ammonium salt or ammonia, a reducing agent, and then a miscible solvent. Solids are separated from the phosphoric acid liquid phase. The solid consists of a mixture of metal phosphates and uranium. It is washed free of adhering phosphoric acid with fresh miscible solvent. The solid is dried and dissolved in acid whereupon uranium is recovered from the solution. Miscible solvent and water are distilled away from the phosphoric acid. The distillate is rectified and water discarded. All miscible solvent is recovered for recycle. 5 claims

  16. Recovery of uranium from sulphate solutions containing molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weir, D.R.; Genik-Sas-Berezowsky, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium from a sulphate solution containing dissolved uranium and molybdenum includes reacting the solution with ammonia (pH 8 to 10), the pH of the original solution must not exceed 5.5 and after the addition of ammonia the pH must not be in the vicinity of 7 for a significant time. The resultant uranium precipitate is relatively uncontaminated by molybdenum. The precipitate is then separated from the remaining solution while the pH is maintained within the stated range

  17. Regenerating ion-exchangers used in uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, T.; Espenscheid, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    The process claimed restores the ion exchange capacity of a strong base anion exchange resin used for recovering uranium from solutions used to leach uranium from subterranean formations. The resin is eluted with hydrochloric acid to remove uranium in the form of uranyl carbonate anions. It is then washed with a solution containing 0.5 to 100 g/l of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate, or mixtures of both carbonate and bicarbonate until it is free of materials which are either soluble in the solution or react with the solution

  18. Uranium recovery in a pilot plant as by product of the phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, C.C.; Santos, F.S.M. dos; Paula, H.C.B.; Santana, A.O. de

    1984-01-01

    A process was developed and a piloto plant was installed to recovery uranium from chloridric leach liquor of phosphate rocks. The extractor system is a mixture of di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in a kerosene diluent. The phosphate rocks are leached for dicalcium phosphate (CaHPO 4 ) production, by the reactions: Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 + 4 HCl → Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 + CaCl 2 and Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 + Ca(OH) 2 → CaHPO 4 + 2 H 2 O. The uranium recovery process comprises the following steps:extraction, scrubbing, reextraction, iron removal and uranium precipitation. The uranium is precipited as ADU with 80% of U 3 O 8 .(Author) [pt

  19. Separation and recovery of uranium ore by chlorinating, chelate resin and molten salt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taki, Tomohiro

    2000-12-01

    Three fundamental researches of separation and recovery of uranium from uranium ore are reported in this paper. Three methods used the chloride pyrometallurgy, sodium containing molten salts and chelate resin. When uranium ore is mixed with activated carbon and reacted for one hour under the mixed gas of chlorine and oxygen at 950 C, more than 90% uranium volatilized and vaporization of aluminum, silicone and phosphorus were controlled. The best activated carbon was brown coal because it was able to control the large range of oxygen concentration. By blowing oxygen into the molten sodium hydroxide, the elution rate of uranium attained to about 95% and a few percent of uranium was remained in the residue. On the uranium ore of unconformity-related uranium deposits, a separation method of uranium, molybdenum, nickel and phosphorus from the sulfuric acid elusion solution with U, Ni, As, Mo, Fe and Al was developed. Methylene phosphonic acid type chelate resin (RCSP) adsorbed Mo and U, and then 100 % Mo was eluted by sodium acetate solution and about 100% U by sodium carbonate solution. Ni and As in the passing solution were recovered by imino-diacetic acid type chelate resin and iron hydroxide, respectively. (S.Y.)

  20. The Arab activity in uranium exploration and recovery: pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banany, Mohamad; Lababidi, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    This is the second part of a paper given during the third Arab energy conference held in Algeria, 4 - 9 May, 1985. Information concerning uranium resources and exploration in some Arab Countries such as Algeria, Morocco, Somalia, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, and Lybia is presented. In addition to that, uranium content in phosphate rocks in the world and specially in Arab Countries is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  1. Fundamental study on recovery uranium oxide from HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumida, T.; Noguchi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Large numbers of spent HEPA filters are produced at uranium fuel fabrication facilities. Uranium oxide particles have been collected on these filters. Then, a spent HEPA filter treatment system was developed from the viewpoint of recovering the UO 2 and minimizing the volume. The system consists of a mechanical separation process and a chemical dissolution process. This paper describes the results of fundamental experiments on recovering UO 2 from HEPA filters

  2. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Separation and recovery method for depleted uranium from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imoto, Yoshie; Fujita, Reiko.

    1993-01-01

    Spent oxide fuels are reduced in a molten salt of CaCl 2 -CaF 2 to convert them into metals, then melted in an Fe-U bath disposed in an electrolytic refining vessel and brought into contact with molten Mg, to extract transuranium elements and rare earth elements contained in the Fe-U bath as metals in the molten Mg. Then molten Mg is removed and the residue is brought into contact with KCl-LiCl molten salt and electrolyzed using the Fe-U as an anode. Then, uranium is recovered by deposition on an iron cathode disposed in chloride electrolytes of the electrolytic refining vessel. Uranium and transuranium elements can be thus separated and, for example, depleted uranium for use in blanket fuels can be recovered easily. This can greatly reduce the temporary storage amount of depleted uranium, to eliminate requirement for a large-scaled facility used exclusively for storing uranium and long time management for uranium. (T.M.)

  4. Radiological impacts of uranium recovery in the phosphate industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-01-01

    This article characterizes the occupational and public radiological health impacts associated with phosphate mining and milling. These impacts are related to the phosphate industry's uranium production potential and are compared with those associated with conventional uranium mining and milling. The radiological impacts resulting from occupational and nonoccupational exposures are assessed. Occupational exposures in phosphate facilities are compared to background exposures and radiological population dose assessments, which characterize important radionuclides and exposure pathways. The following conclusions were reached: (1) public consequences of phosphate mining will occur whether or not uranium is recovered as a by-product, (2) radiological consequences of phosphate mining may be comparable to those associated with uranium mining and milling per unit uranium production, (3) radiological impacts via surface waterways and crops fertilized with uranium-bearing phosphates are of minor consequence, and (4) major radiological public health problems associated with phosphate mining are related to radon and radon progeny exposures in structures built on reclaimed lands or with phosphate mining residues, although the magnitudes of these impacts are difficult to evaluate with current data

  5. Development of adsorbents for recovery of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Furusaki, Shintaro.

    1987-01-01

    The largest subject for putting the extraction of uranium from seawater in practical use is the development of high performance adsorbents for uranium. In this paper, the way of thinking about the development of adsorbents for extracting uranium from seawater and the recent reports on this subject are described. Next, the research on the adsorbing capacity and adsorbing rate of the adsorbents developed so far is summarized, and the way of thinking about the evaluation of adsorbent performance which is the base of the design of a system for extracting uranium from seawater is explained, taking amidoxime type adsorbent as the example. For Japan where energy resources are scant, the uranium contained in seawater, which is estimated to be about 4.2 billion t, is the most luring important element. Uranium is contained in seawater is very low concentration of 3 ppb, and exists as anion complex salt. In 1960s, the Harwell Atomic Energy Research Establishment in UK found out that titanium oxide hydrate is the most promising as the adsorbent. Also a number of organic absorbents have been developed. In order to bring adsorbents in contact with seawater, pumping, ocean current and wave force are utilized. Adsorbents are in spherical, fiber and film forms, and held as fixed beds and fluidized beds. (Kako, I.) 48 refs

  6. Stripping of Uranium (IV) from D2EHPA + TBP system with ammonium oxalate and its recovery as uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Singh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is an important fissile material for the generation of electricity by nuclear reactors. To obtain uranium as a final product meeting the stringent nuclear specifications, many process steps are involved starting from ore processing to the precipitation of yellow cake. Solvent extraction is one of the process industrially adopted worldwide to achieve such purity of uranium from leach liquor and usually uses amine or organophosphorus types of extractant depending upon the composition of feed material. In solvent extraction technique, stripping is a prominent hydrometallurgical operation which brings the metal values of interest in aqueous solution for further treatment. In the case of uranium, stripping is dependent on its oxidation state. For hexavalent state generally carbonate solutions are used, where as in the case of tetravalent form salt solution such as ammonium oxalate is effective. Use of ammonium oxalate as stripping agent for tetravalent uranium from pyrophosphoric acid has been reported in patent however the details are not disclosed. In the present investigation an effort has been made to investigate the stripping behaviour of uranium from a synthetically loaded synergistic solvent mixture of uranium in tetravalent state

  7. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum elements from gebel gattar raw material, eastern desert, Egypt. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hazek, N.T.; Mahdy, M.A.; Mahmoud, H.M.K.

    1996-01-01

    G. Gatter uranium mineralizations are located along the faults and fracture zones crossing G.Gattar granitic pluton and long the contact of the pluton with the hammamat sediments. Also, molybdenum id presented in more than one mode of occurrence. The molybdenum mineralization treated in this work is the dessimenated type. The uranium and molybdenum raw material was subjected to series of leaching experiments including acid and alkaline agitation, alkaline percolation, and acid heap leaching techniques. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum was achieved by anion-exchange method followed by their elution by acidified sodium chloride. Uranium precipitation was performed in the form of ammonium diuranate (Yellow Cake). On the other hand molybdenum was precipitated in the form of molybdenum oxide. A tentative flowsheet for the extraction of both uranium and molybdenum is proposed and discussed. 13 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum elements from gebel gattar raw material, eastern desert, Egypt. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hazek, N T; Mahdy, M A; Mahmoud, H M.K. [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    G. Gatter uranium mineralizations are located along the faults and fracture zones crossing G.Gattar granitic pluton and long the contact of the pluton with the hammamat sediments. Also, molybdenum id presented in more than one mode of occurrence. The molybdenum mineralization treated in this work is the dessimenated type. The uranium and molybdenum raw material was subjected to series of leaching experiments including acid and alkaline agitation, alkaline percolation, and acid heap leaching techniques. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum was achieved by anion-exchange method followed by their elution by acidified sodium chloride. Uranium precipitation was performed in the form of ammonium diuranate (Yellow Cake). On the other hand molybdenum was precipitated in the form of molybdenum oxide. A tentative flowsheet for the extraction of both uranium and molybdenum is proposed and discussed. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. A new methodology using mathematical treatment in uranium recovery of slags from U-metal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreto, Helio Fernando Rodrigues; Araujo, Berta Floh de

    1999-01-01

    U 3 Si 2 fuel was developed by the Fuel Cycle Department of IPEN/CNEN - SP in order to provide high density fuel elements for the IEA-R1m swimming pool reactor. Uranium containing magnesium fluoride slags are produced during the reduction of U F 4 to metallic uranium, the first step of U 3 Si 2 production. Since enriched uranium is used and taking in account process economics and environmental impacts, the recovery of uranium from the slags is highly recommended. This work deals with the uranium recovery from magnesium fluoride slag via nitric acid leaching process using a new methodology for the study. A statistical procedure for process optimization was applied using a fractional factorial design at two levels and four variables represented as 2 4-1 . Variance analysis followed by multiple regression was used, setting up a first order polygonal model, as follow: y 92,409 +3,825 x 1 - 0,875 x 3 + 1,65 x 4 - 0,95 x 3 x 4 Standard error 1,04572. This equation represents the variables and the most suitable interactions in the uranium recovery process. By using this equation, one can obtain in advance and without making experiments the values from the process variables for a giving process yield. (author)

  10. Application of a precipitation method for uranium recovery from Abu-Zaabal phosphoric acid plant, egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hazek, N.M.T.; Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    Current industrial recovery of uranium from 30% phosphoric acid-produced by the dihydrate process-is based on solvent extraction method. Uranium recovery from concentrated phosphoric acid (45-52% P 2 O 5 ) produced by evaporation of the 30% acid or directly produced by the hemihydrate process, by solvent extraction is difficult to apply in practice. In addition to possible contamination of the acid by the organic solvents and/or their deterioration. This paper investigates the possibility of applying a precipitation method (Weterings and Janssen, 1985) for uranium recovery from both low (28% P 2 O 2 ) and high (48% P 2 O 5 ) concentration phosphoric acids produced by abu-Zaabal phosphoric acid plant (abu-Zaabal fertilizers and chemicals Co., Egypt). The 28% acid produced by H 2 SO 4 dihydrate method and the 48% acid produced by evaporation of the 28% acid

  11. Efficient recovery of uranium using genetically improved microalgae; Recuperacion eficaz de uranio utilizando microalgas geneticamente mejoradas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rodas, V.; Conde Vilda, E.; Garcia-Balboa, C.

    2015-07-01

    We propose an alternative process for the efficient recovery of dissolved uranium based on genetically improved microalgae. We isolate Chlamydomonas cf. fonticola from a pond extremely contaminated by uranium (∼ 25 ppm) from ENUSA U-mine, Saelices (Salamanca, Spain). After a process of genetic improvement we obtained a strain capable to recover 115 mg of U per g of dry weight, by mean of bio-adsorption on the cell wall (mostly) and intra-cytoplasm bioaccumulation. Such a genetically improved microalgae resist extremes of acidity and pollution, but even its dead biomass is still able to recover a large amount of uranium. (Author)

  12. Recovery of uranium from wet process by the chloridic leaching of phosphate rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, A.O.; Paula, H.C.B.; Dantas, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium was recovered from chloridic leach liquor of phosphate rocks by solvent extraction on a laboratory scale. The extractor system is a mixture of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D 2 EHPA) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in a varsol diluent. The uranium concentration is 150 ppm in the rocks and 12 ppm in the leach liquor. The phosphate rocks are leached on a semi-industrial scale for dicalcium phosphate production. The recovery process comprises the following steps: extraction, reextraction, iron removal and uranium precipitation. (orig./EF)

  13. Recovery of uranium from wet process by the chloridic leaching of phosphate rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, A O; Paula, H C.B.; Dantas, C C

    1984-03-01

    Uranium was recovered from chloridic leach liquor of phosphate rocks by solvent extraction on a laboratory scale. The extractor system is a mixture of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D/sub 2/EHPA) and tributyl-phosphate (TBP) in a varsol diluent. The uranium concentration is 150 ppm in the rocks and 12 ppm in the leach liquor. The phosphate rocks are leached on a semi-industrial scale for dicalcium phosphate production. The recovery process comprises the following steps: extraction, reextraction, iron removal and uranium precipitation.

  14. Environmental monitoring program design for uranium refining and conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop recommendations for the design of environmental monitoring programs at Canadian uranium refining and conversion operations. In order to develop monitoring priorities, chemical and radioactive releases to the air and water were developed for reference uranium refining and conversion facilities. The relative significance of the radioactive releases was evaluated through a pathways analysis which estimated dose to individual members of the critical receptor group. The effects of chemical releases to the environment were assessed by comparing predicted air and water contaminant levels to appropriate standards or guidelines. For the reference facilities studied, the analysis suggested that environmental effects are likely to be dominated by airborne release of both radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants. Uranium was found to be the most important radioactive species released to the air and can serve as an overall indicator of radiological impacts for any of the plants considered. The most important nonradioactive air emission was found to be fluoride (as hydrogen fluoride) from the uranium hexafluoride plant. For the uranium trioxide and uranium dioxide plants, air emissions of oxides of nitrogen were considered to be most important. The study recommendations for the design of an environmental monitoring program are based on consideration of those factors most likely to affect local air and water quality, and human radiation exposure. Site- and facility-specific factors will affect monitoring program design and the selection of components such as sampling media, locations and frequency, and analytical methods

  15. Recovery of uranium from different acidic solutions by di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid (DNPPA) and TOPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.L.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2004-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of uranium with DNPPA in combination with TOPO has been established from different acidic media. The extraction order of uranium from these media has been found as perchlorate>nitrate>chloride>sulphate>phosphate. Based on these results extraction of uranium from samples of leach liquors generated in the plant has been carried out and >99% recovery was obtained

  16. Natural uranium metallic fuel elements: fabrication and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.; Abou-Zahra, A.A.; Sharkawy, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The main reactor types based on natural uranium metallic fuel element, particularly the early types, are reviewed in this report. The reactor types are: graphite moderated air cooled, graphite moderated gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactors. The design features, fabrication technology of these reactor fuel elements and the operating experience gained during reactor operation are described and discussed. The interrelation between operating experience, fuel design and fabrication was also discussed with emphasis on improving fuel performance. (author)

  17. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  18. Manufacture of phosphatic fertilisers and recovery of byproduct uranium - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.J.

    1975-11-01

    The processes used in the production of phosphatic fertilisers are reviewed and those in which uranium can be extracted as a byproduct are described in detail. The current status of the world and Australian phosphate rock and fertiliser industries is described and production figures and marketing information for these industries are also presented. Techniques for the recovery of byproduct uranium during the processing of phosphate rock to fertilisers are also examined in detail. Recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid by solvent extraction is the most promising approach. (author)

  19. Advancements in exploration and In-Situ Recovery of sedimentary hosted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Märten, H.; Marsland-Smith, A.; Ross, J.; Haschke, M.; Kalka, H.; Schubert, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent advancements in exploration technologies for sedimentary-hosted uranium deposits as basis for improved model-based planning and optimization of in-situ recovery (ISR). High-resolution shallow (<500 m depth) seismic in combination with refraction tomography is used for high-fidelity imaging of true-depth stratigraphy of sedimentary formations, tectonic faults and specific structures for the improved understanding of (hydro)geology in general and as potential indicator for uranium mineralization in particular. A new-generation geophysical downhole-wireline tool with pulsed neutron generator has been developed (i) to accurately measure U grade (PFN [prompt fission neutron] method with important intool corrections for systematic influences), (ii) to determine geophysical parameters including porosity, density, macroscopic neutron cross section (clay content) and deduced permeability, and (iii) to log the mineral composition (based on element-specific gamma ray spectroscopy applied to natural gamma rays as well as gamma rays from inelastic neutron scattering, thermal-neutron capture and neutron activation) – all by one tool. This new data - together with conventional geophysical and geochemical information – provides an excellent aid to the assessment of ISR feasibility, the design of wellfields and planning of wellfield operation. A new kinetic leaching model (reactive transport) has been specifically adjusted to acidic leaching conditions considering kinetic rates of the main neutralizing and redox reactions as function of both pH and oxidation potential (balance of e- acceptor species). It is used as an effective tool for predicting wellfield recovery curves, estimating chemicals’ consumption and optimizing leaching chemistry (i.e. dosage of chemicals to injection lixiviant) in dependence on mineralogical conditions (abundance of main reactants). (author)

  20. Ergo betters estimates after shaky first years. [Recovery of gold, uranium and sulphuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-20

    Having completed its fourth year of full operation, East Rand Gold and Uranium (ERGO) has established itself as a succesful low-cost gold producer. The recovering of gold, uranium and sulphuric acid from some old slimes dams has beaten its production estimates for 1981 till the end of March 1982. Overall Ergo has settled down well from its first years of production.

  1. 78 FR 19330 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery Project in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery Project in Crook County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission (NRC) for a new source materials license for the proposed Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery (ISR) Project (Ross Project) proposed to be located in Crook County, Wyoming. The NRC is issuing for public...

  2. Recovery of uranium from seawater using amidoxime hollow fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, K.; Uezu, K.; Hori, T.; Furusaki, S.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.

    1988-01-01

    A novel amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent of hollow-fiber form (AO-H fiber) was prepared by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto a polyethylene hollow fiber, followed by chemical conversion of the produced cyano group to an amidoxime group. Distribution of the amidoxime group was uniform throughout hollow-fiber membrane. The fixed-bed adsorption column, 30 cm in length and charged with the bundle of AO-H fibers, was found to adsorb uranium from natural seawater at a sufficiently high rate: 0.66 mg uranium per g of adsorbent in 25 days

  3. Recovery of uranium in the production of concentrated phosphoric acid by a hemihydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, S.; Miyamoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Nissan Chemical Industries as manufacturers of phosphoric acid have studied the recovery of uranium, based on a concentrated phosphoric acid production process. The process consists of two stages, a hemihydrate stage with a formation of hemihydrate and a filtration section, followed by a dihydrate stage with hydration and a filtration section. In the hemihydrate stage, phosphate is treated with a mixture of phosphoric acid and sulphuric acid to produce phosphoric acid and hydrous calcium sulphate; the product is recovered in the filtration section and its concentration is 40-50% P 2 O 3 . In the dihydrate stage, the hemihydrate is transformed by re-dissolution and hydration, producing hydrous calcium sulphate, i.e. gypsum. This process therefore comprises two parts, each with different acid concentrations. As the extraction of uranium is easier in the case of a low concentration of phosphoric acid, the process consists of the recovery of uranium starting from the filtrate of the hydration section. The tests have shown that the yield of recovery of uranium was of the order of 80% disregarding the handling losses and no disadvantageous effect has been found in the combination of the process of uranium extraction with the process of concentrated phosphoric acid production. Compared with the classical process where uranium is recovered from acid with 30% P 2 O 5 , the process of producing high-concentration phosphoric acid such as the Nissan process, in which the uranium recovery is effected from acid with 15% P 2 O 5 from the hydration section, presents many advantages [fr

  4. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum from a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao; Zeng Yijun; Tang Baobin; Meng Shu; Xu Guolong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of process mineralogical research of a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore, leaching behaviors of the uranium-molybdenum ore were studied by alkali agitation leaching, conventional alkali column leaching and alkali curing column leaching processes. The results showed that using the alkali curing column leaching process, the leaching rate of molybdenum increased to more than 90%, and the leaching rate of uranium was about 85%, Compared with the conventional alkali column leaching process, the leaching time of the alkali curing column leaching process decreased by 60 days. (authors)

  5. Method for recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Neto, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a method for recuperation of uranium from phosphoric acid by humid way are presented. The extracting mixture used was di-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D 2 EHPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). An installation in micro-pilot scale was made to get and visualize data for continuous process. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. Decommissioning of nuclear facilities involving operations with uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shum, E.Y.; Neuder, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    When a licensed nuclear facility ceases operation, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ensures that the facility and its site are decontaminated to acceptable levels so they may safely be released for unrestricted public use. Because specific environmental standards or broad federal guidelines governing release of residual radioactive contamination have not been issued, NRC has developed ad hoc cleanup criteria for decommissioning nuclear facilities that involved uranium and thorium. Cleanup criteria include decontamination of buildings, equipment, and land. We will address cleanup criteria and their rationale; procedures for decommissioning uranium/thorium facilities; radiological survey designs and procedures; radiological monitoring and measurement; and cost-effectiveness to demonstrate compliance

  7. Recovery of uranium from seawater-status of technology and needed future research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelmers, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of recent publications concerning uranium recovery from seawater shows that considerable experimental work in this area is currently under way in Japan, less in European countries. Repeated screening programs have identified hydrous titanium oxide as the most promising candidate adsorbent; however, many of its properties, such as distribution coefficient, selectivity, loading, and possibly stability, appear to fall far short of those required for a practical recovery system. In addition, various evaluations of the energy efficiency of pumped or tidal power schemes for contacting the sorbent and seawater are in serious disagreement. Needed future research and development tasks have been identified. A fundamental development program to achieve significantly improved adsorbent properties would be required to permit economical recovery of uranium from seawater. Unresolved engineering aspects of such recovery systems are also identified and discussed. 63 references

  8. Flotation in column-recovery of fine uranium phosphate ore from Itataia, in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Junior, J.B.; Peres, A.E.C.

    1987-01-01

    A systematic study of main variables of the flotation column and, the study of different pillot circuits integrated by flotation cells in colunm and mechanic cells, aiming at reduction the loss of the sludges for processing uranium phosphate from Itataia, in Brazil, are presented. A recovery of 49% of P 2 O 5 for a content of 24% of P 2 O 5 and 0,185% of U 3 O 8 in the concentrate, using a circuit with two columns, a rougher and scavenger, was obtained. For a content of 33.4% of P 2 O 5 and 0.240% of U 3 O 8 , a recovery of 38% of P 2 O 5 was obtained, using a circuit composed by a mechanical cell as scavenger and two columns as rougher and cleaner. The circuit used to obtain these parameters operated with 7,6 Kg/h solid flow in the grain size range of 10μm and 3μm and the flotation column with 5 cm of diameter and 6m of high. (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Recovery of uranium in mine waters; Recuperation de l'uranium dans les eaux des mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugier, P [Direction des Productions, CEA, Chatillon-Sur-Bagneux (France)

    1967-06-15

    In a brief introductory survey the author indicates the date on which leaching was first observed in the CEA mines and lists the main factors necessary for, or favourable to, the solubilization of uranium in mines. Information is given on the various sources of this type at present identified in France and the methods used to recover uranium in mines situated near ore-concentration plants. An explanation is given for the use of the calcium precipitation technique in connection with waters produced in mines not situated near ore-concentration plants. Data are given on the results of laboratory tests carried out on waters containing uranium, together with a description of an industrial-scale facility built in consequence of these tests. Details are given of the statistical results obtained. The author concludes by outlining the programme which will be implemented in the near future with a view to increasing the tonnage of uranium produced by in situ leaching and indicates that the CEA engineers are very optimistic about the prospects of this new low-cost method of producing uranium. (author) [French] Apres un bref rappel historique precisant la date de constatation du phenomene de lixiviation dans les mines d'uranium du Commissariat et un rapide inventaire des principales conditions necessaires ou favorisant la solubilisation de l'uranium dans les mines, auteur indique les differentes sources actuellement reconnues en France et les methodes utilisees pour recuperer l'uranium dans les mines situees pres d'une usine de concentration des minerais. Il donne ensuite les raisons motivant le choix du procede de precipitation calcique pour les eaux produites dans des mines eloignees des usines de concentration des minerais. Les resultats d'essais de laboratoire effectues sur des eaux chargees en uranium sont donnes et l'installation industrielle realisee a la suite de ces essais est decrite; les resultats statistiques obtenus sont detailles. En conclusion de son expose, l

  10. Microbial communities associated with uranium in-situ recovery mining process are related to acid mine drainage assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coral, Thomas; Descostes, Michaël; De Boissezon, Hélène; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Rossi, Pierre

    2018-07-01

    A large fraction (47%) of the world's uranium is mined by a technique called "In Situ Recovery" (ISR). This mining technique involves the injection of a leaching fluid (acidic or alkaline) into a uranium-bearing aquifer and the pumping of the resulting solution through cation exchange columns for the recovery of dissolved uranium. The present study reports the in-depth alterations brought to autochthonous microbial communities during acidic ISR activities. Water samples were collected from a uranium roll-front deposit that is part of an ISR mine in operation (Tortkuduk, Kazakhstan). Water samples were obtained at a depth of ca 500 m below ground level from several zones of the Uyuk aquifer following the natural redox zonation inherited from the roll front deposit, including the native mineralized orebody and both upstream and downstream adjacent locations. Samples were collected equally from both the entrance and the exit of the uranium concentration plant. Next-generation sequencing data showed that the redox gradient shaped the community structures, within the anaerobic, reduced, and oligotrophic habitats of the native aquifer zones. Acid injection induced drastic changes in the structures of these communities, with a large decrease in both cell numbers and diversity. Communities present in the acidified (pH values acid mine drainage, with the dominance of Sulfobacillus sp., Leptospirillum sp. and Acidithiobacillus sp., as well as the archaean Ferroplasma sp. Communities located up- and downstream of the mineralized zone under ISR and affected by acidic fluids were blended with additional facultative anaerobic and acidophilic microorganisms. These mixed biomes may be suitable communities for the natural attenuation of ISR mining-affected subsurface through the reduction of metals and sulfate. Assessing the effect of acidification on the microbial community is critical to evaluating the potential for natural attenuation or active bioremediation strategies

  11. Sulphatising roasting of a Greenlandic uranium ore, reactivity of minerals and recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamborg Hansen, J.K.

    1977-03-01

    Uranium in the lujavrite ore from Kvanefjeld, South Greenland, can be solubilised by sulphatising roasting at 700degC. The reactivity of various lujavrite minerals in the roasting process and the mechanism of the reaction were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, electron microprobe, thermal analysis, Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy. Soluble sulphates are formed on the surface of the grains; an outer zone of the grains is transformed; usually a core remains unchanged. Variations in uranium recovery can be explained by variations in the contents of the uranium-bearing minerals, steenstrupine and uranium-containing pigmentary material (altered Zr containing silicate minerals), and in the degree of alteration os steenstrupine. Characterization of these minerals required many qualitative and a few quantitative electron microprobe analyses. (author)

  12. Recovery of valuable products in the raffinate of the uranium and thorium pilot-plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardim, E.A.; Abrao, A.

    1988-11-01

    IPEN-CNEN/SP has being very active in refining yellowcake to pure ammonium diuranate which is converted to uranium trioxide, uranium dioxide, tetra - and hexafluoride in a sequential way. The technology of the thorium purification and its conversion to nuclear grade products has been a practice since several years as well. For both elements the major to be worked is the raffinate from the solvent extraction colum where and thorium are purified via TBP-varsol in pulsed columns. In this paper the actual processing technology is reviewed with special emphasis on the recovery of valuable products, mainly nitric acid and ammonium nitrate. Distilled nitric acid and the final sulfuric acid as residue are recycle. Ammonium nitrate from the precipitation of uranium diuranate is of good quality, being radioactivity and uranium - free, and recommended to be applied as fertilizer. In conclusion the main effort is to maximize the recycle and reuse of the above mentioned chemicals. (author) [pt

  13. The recovery of sulphur, uranium and gold from residues in OFS scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhmer, W.T.; Botha, F.; Adams, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    This article describes a project comprising three plants for the flotation of pyrite, a twin-stream uranium plant in which high-grade slimes and pyrite can be leached separately, a pyrite burning sulphuric acid plant, and a plant for the recovery of gold from calcines. Details of these plants including capital costs and estimate production are given

  14. Examination of uranium recovery technique from sea water using natural components for adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Masaki, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takao; Tokiwai, Moriyasu

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the potency of natural components as adsorbent for uranium recovery from seawater. In addition, cost evaluation of uranium recovery from seawater using natural components for adsorbents was performed. Furthermore, new ideas on reservation system of adsorbents at sea area were proposed. Several poly-phenols were selected as adsorbent reagents, then they were adsorbed on the support such as cotton fiber by several methods as the followings; chemical syntheses, electrical beam irradiation, and traditional dyeing. As a result, the adsorbent made by traditional dyeing method using gallnut tannin as natural component, was showed high performance for uranium recovery from seawater on only the first. It was evaluated that traditional dyeing method had also advantage in the manufacturing cost, comparing with earlier method. Additionally, it was considered that reservation system of adsorbent at sea was able to be simplified compared with earlier system. Consequently, uranium recovery from sea water using natural components as adsorbent proposed in this study had a potency of practical use. (author)

  15. Raffinate wash of second cycle solvent in the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abodishish, H.A.; Ritchey, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Precipitation of Fe 3 HN 4 H 8 (PO 4 ) 6 is prevented in the second cycle extractor, in a two cycle uranium recovery process, by washing ammonia laden organic solvent stream, from the second cycle stripper, with first cycle raffinate iron stream containing phosphoric acid, prior to passing the solvent stream into the second cycle extractor

  16. 76 FR 71082 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 40-9091; NRC-2011-0148] Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application; Notice of Intent To Prepare a... intent to prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: Strata Energy, Inc. (Strata...

  17. Ross In Situ Uranium Recovery Project NESHAP Subpart W Construction Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    On May 5, 2015, EPA issued a Construction Approval under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at 40 CFR Part 61, subpart W, to Strata Energy, Inc., for their Ross In Situ Recovery (ISR) Uranium Project in Crook County, WY.

  18. Recovery of uranium from 30 vol % tributyl phosphate solvents containing dibutyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mailen, J.C.; Tallent, O.K.

    1986-01-01

    A number of solid sorbents were tested for the removal of uranium and dibutyl phosphate (DBP) from 30% tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent. The desired clean uranium product can be obtained either by removing the DBP, leaving the uranium in the solvent for subsequent stripping, or by removing the uranium, leaving the DBP in the solvent for subsequent treatment. The tests performed show that it is relatively easy to preferentially remove uranium from solvents containing uranium and DBP, but quite difficult to remove DBP preferentially. The current methods could be used by removing the uranium (as by a cation exchange resin) and then using either an anion exchange resin in the hydroxyl form or a conventional treatment with a basic solution to remove the DBP. Treatment of a solvent with a cation exchange resin could be useful for recovery of valuable metals from solvents containing DBP and might be used to remove cations before scrubbing a solvent with a basic solution to minimize emulsion formation. 6 refs., 9 figs

  19. Potential radiological impacts of recovery of uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid. Final report to the Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W. Jr.; Haywood, F.F.; Danek, J.L.; Moore, R.E.; Wagner, E.B.; Rupp, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made to determine the radiological impacts associated with recovery of uranium from wet-process (WP) phosphoric acid in central Florida. Removal of U and other radionuclides from phosphoric acid prevents their distribution on farm lands and urban gardens and grasses via fertilizers; this results in a positive impact (decreased dose commitment) on the associated populations. This study considers the potential negative impacts of current and project recovery processes in a site-specific manner using detailed state-of-the-art methodologies. Positive impacts are treated in a generic sense using U.S. average values for important variables such as average and maximum fertilizer application rates and quantities of radionuclides in fertilizer. Three model plants to recover U from WP phosphoric acid were selected and source terms for release of radionuclides are developed for all three and for two treatment methods for airborne particulates. Costs for radwaste treatment were developed. Field measurements were conducted at the only commercial uranium recovery plant in operation. Radiological doses to the population surrounding release points during plant operation were estimated

  20. Extractants for uranium recovery from wet phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musikas, C.; Benjelloun, N.; Lours, S.

    1981-08-01

    It must be pointed out that despite their lower affinity for uranyl, the dialkyldithiophosphates show higher extraction coefficients than dialkylphosphates. In addition, it is possible to back extract uranium with oxalate solutions at pH levels where the solvents remain in their acidic form. This last possibility seems to be correlated with the presence of a H 2 PO 4 - ion in the U(VI) organic complexes

  1. Recovery and purification of uranium-234 from aged plutonium-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keister, P.L.; Figgins, P.W.; Watrous, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The current production methods used to recover and purify uranium-234 from aged plutonium-238 at Mound Laboratory are presented. The three chemical separation steps are described in detail. In the initial separation step, the bulk of the plutonium is precipitated as the oxalate. Successively lower levels of plutonium are achieved by anion exchange in nitrate media and by anion exchange in chloride media. The procedures used to characterize and analyze the final U 3 O 8 are given

  2. Chloride metallurgy for uranium recovery: concept and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, M.C.; Ritcey, G.M.; Joe, E.G.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and radium are all effectively solubilized in chloride media. This provides a means to separate and isolate these species for ultimate sale or disposal. The laboratory work on the applications of hydrochloric acid leaching, chlorine assisted leaching and high temperature chlorination is reviewed. An indication of costs and benefits is provided to enable the evaluation of this technology as an option for reducing the environmental impact of tailings

  3. Analytical methods associated with the recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, K.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarizes various approaches made to the analysis of materials arising from the processing of Karoo deposits for uranium. These materials include head and residue samples, aqueous solutions and organic solvents and, finally, the precipitated cakes of the elements recovered, i.e. uranium, molybdenum, and arsenic. Analysis was required for these elements and also vanadium, carbon, sulphur, and carbonate in the head and residue samples. The concentration of uranium, molybdenum, and arsenic, other than in the precipitated cakes, ranges from 1 to 2000μg/g, and that of carbon, sulphur, and carbonate from 0,1 to 5 per cent. The analysis of cakes necessitates the determination of silver, arsenic, iron, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, lead, tin, titanium, and vanadium within the range 1 to 1000μg/g, and of sodium and silica within the range 10 to 20 000μg/g. The methods used include combustion methods for carbon, sulphur, and carbonate, and atomic-absorption, X-ray-fluorescence, and emission methods for the other analytes. The accuracy of the analysis is within 10 per cent

  4. Improved operating strategies for uranium extraction: a stochastic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, B.R.

    1986-01-01

    Deterministic and stochastic simulations of a Western Transvaal uranium process are used in this research report to determine more profitable uranium plant operating strategies and to gauge the potential financial benefits of automatic process control. The deterministic simulation model was formulated using empirical and phenomenological process models. The model indicated that profitability increases significantly as the uranium leaching strategy becomes harsher. The stochastic simulation models use process variable distributions corresponding to manually and automatically controlled conditions to investigate the economic gains that may be obtained if a change is made from manual to automatic control of two important process variables. These lognormally distributed variables are the pachuca 1 sulphuric acid concentration and the ferric to ferrous ratio. The stochastic simulations show that automatic process control is justifiable in certain cases. Where the leaching strategy is relatively harsh, such as that in operation during January 1986, it is not possible to justify an automatic control system. Automatic control is, however, justifiable if a relatively mild leaching strategy is adopted. The stochastic and deterministic simulations represent two different approaches to uranium process modelling. This study has indicated the necessity for each approach to be applied in the correct context. It is contended that incorrect conclusions may have been drawn by other investigators in South Africa who failed to consider the two approaches separately

  5. Saskatchewan combustion recovery an operational success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-12-04

    Mobil Oil Co.'s in-situ combustion recovery project in the Battrum heavy oil field in SW. Saskatchewan is an operational success, but not a profit-making venture so far. Some of the details resulting from a discussion with the senior project engineer are discussed. It is explained that 100% displacement efficiency is attained in the burned zone by way of fluid convection resulting from heat conduction. Reasons for selecting the Battrum reservoir are also considered. The pilot project currently being conducted is intended to determine information on the following factors: effect of productivity, injectivity index data, air-oil ratio performance, distribution of injected gas, ignition characteristics, and sweep efficiency. The largest problems are associated with equipment, well completions, and handling of produced fluids.

  6. Treatment of pit water from uranium mining operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouton, A.; Lafforgue, P.; Lyaudet, G.

    1984-01-01

    The pit water from uranium mines is normally treated to eliminate the soluble radium and suspended solids. The radium is precipitated together with the barium sulphate. The latter results from the reaction of barium chloride with an excess of sulphate ions. The suspended solids are flocculated by aluminium salts (chloride, polychloride). If necessary, synthetic flocculants are also used. Certain grades of pit water contain, sometimes incidentally, a few milligrams of uranium per litre. These quantities always remain too low for any direct recovery (treatment by ion exchange resins). By applying certain measures, the preceding processes can also be used to eliminate uranium. The latter is carried away by aluminium hydroxide in a very narrow zone of pH (6 to 7,4) which corresponds to the minimum solubility of the hydroxide. Depending on the characteristic of the water (pH, salinity), use is made either of aluminium sulphate or of sodium aluminate, with an addition of a base in extreme cases. This article gives various examples of applications in the Haute-Vienne, Chardon in Vendee, the Commanderie mine in Vendee, at Cerilly in Allier and at Lodeve in Herault [fr

  7. Advantage of fast reacting adsorbents like humic acids for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denzinger, H.; Schnell, C.; Heitkamp, D.; Wagener, K.

    1980-01-01

    This report is divided into two sections. The first part comprises experimental data of humic acid adsorbers; whereas, the second concerns design parameter and costs of a recovery plant using fast reacting adsorbents. Summarizing the experimental results, hydrogen-loaded humic acids on carriers show an exceptionally fast kinetics of uranium fixation in seawater which is practically temperature independent. This fast adsorption performance may be maintained in a technical recovery process if care is taken to minimize slow diffraction controlled steps preceding the uranium fixation reaction. When humic acid was used instead of titanium hydroxide in the recovery plant, there was a decrease of investment and production costs of about 50%. However, there was a higher percentage of energy costs, i.e., electric power consumption and investments for pumps

  8. The Relix process for the resin-in-pulp recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloete, F.L.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Relix process is based on direct contact between an ion-exchange resin and undiluted pulp, thus avoiding prior solid-liquid separation. The resin particles float near the surface of the pulp, forming an inverted fluidized bed with the pulp flowing downwards. The basic idea was demonstrated on a full-scale pachuca tank at Stilfontein Gold Mine in 1970, followed by a small-scale demonstration run in a laboratory at the National Institute for Metallurgy. A pilot plant based on a throughput of 60 tons of ore per day was subsequently operated at West Driefontein Gold Mine for several periods over two years. Although the plant proved operable from a mechanical point of view, the metallurgical performance was not up to expectation. The basic cause of the poor metallurgical performance was shown to be backmixing of both the resin and the pulp between stages. The values obtained for resin losses were inconclusive. Further development of resin-in-pulp processes for the recovery of uranium should be focused on the performance of various techniques for the screening of resin from pulp [af

  9. Uranium from sea-water. Possibilities of recovery, exploiting slow coastal currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettinali, C.; Pantanetti, F.

    1976-01-01

    The authors analyse the interest in uranium recovery from sea-water within the framework of uranium world supply problems. The most reliable methods proposed for recovery are summarized and discussed, both from the chemical and the plant project points of view. Tides as a source of energy for water movement cannot be used in the Mediterranean and therefore only currents can be taken into account. The acceptable cost of an exchanger, in relation to the uranium price, is considered and related to known exchangers. The characteristics of exchanging elements are examined and the influence of the speed of sea currents discussed. The extractable uranium is a function of the exchange rate and of the speed of the flow inside the exchanging system; therefore it is quite clear that the current speed is not a prerequisite and that coastal currents around Italy are suitable. Exchanging elements built with sheets parallel to the flow, exchanging pans containing granular or fibrous exchangers have been considered. The main characteristics of a 1000 t/a plant are discussed considering different possibilities. The most acceptable seems to be the continuous extraction system. The parameters needed to calculate the dimensions of such a plant are given and the relation between the length and speed of the moving chain discussed. A rough economic evaluation of the plant cost - starting from known technologies - and of the final cost of the uranium oxide produced is made. (author)

  10. Review of environmental aspects of uranium mill operations: industry's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverly, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    Problems faced by uranium mill operators in complying with new environmental regulations and guidelines are discussed. It is pointed out that valid data must be available in order to evaluate impacts on the environment, to determine background radiation levels, to measure the effectiveness of control techniques, and to determine compliance with standards and regulations. Specific problem areas facing mill operators today and some of the unresolved questions include: sampling methods and equipment for radon in ambient air, measurements of radon and radon daughter exposures of people, radon emanation rate meaurements applicable to monitoring mill tailings, the calibration of γ counters, measurements of population doses, regulations concerning mill tailings reclamation nd stabilization, and the comparative value of in-vivo counting and uranium urinary excretion measurements for monitoring personnel

  11. Application of a precipitation method for uranium recovery from abu-zaabal phosphoric acid plant, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-hazek, N.M.T.; Hussein, E.M.

    1995-01-01

    Current industrial recovery of uranium from 30% phosphoric acid-produced by the dihydrate process-is based on solvent extraction method. Uranium recovery from concentrated phosphoric acid (45-52% p o5 ) produced by evaporation of the 30% acid or directly produced by the hemihydrate process, by solvent extraction is difficult to apply in practice. In addition to possible contamination of the acid by the organic solvents and/or their deterioration. This paper investigates the possibility of applying a precipitation method (Weterings and Janssen, 1985) for uranium recovery from both low (28% P 2 O 5 ) and high (48% P 2 O 5 ) concentration phosphoric acids produced by abu-zaabal phosphoric acid plant (Abuzaabal fertilizers and chemicals Co., Egypt). The 28% acid produced by H 2 SO 4 dihydrate method and the 48% acid produced by evaporation of the 28% acid The applied precipitation method depends on using NH 4 F as a uranium precipitant from both low and high concentration phosphoric acids in presence of acetone as a dispersing agent. All the relevant factors have been studied

  12. The uranium recovery from UO{sub 2} kernel production effluent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaotong, E-mail: chenxiaotong@tsinghua.edu.cn; He, Linfeng; Liu, Bing; Tang, Yaping; Tang, Chunhe

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: In this study, a flow sheet including evaporation, flocculation, filtration, adsorption, and reverse osmosis was established for the UO{sub 2} kernel production effluent of HTR spherical fuel elements. The uranium recovery could reach 99.9% after the treatment, with almost no secondary pollution produced. Based on the above experimental results, the treating flow process in this study would be feasible for laboratory- and engineering-scale treatment of UO{sub 2} kernel production effluent of HTR spherical fuel elements. - Highlights: • A flow sheet including evaporation, flocculation, filtration, adsorption, and reverse osmosis was established for the UO{sub 2} kernel production effluent. • The uranium recovery could reach 99.9% after the treatment, with almost no secondary pollution produced. • The treating flow process would be feasible for laboratory- and engineering-scale treatment of UO{sub 2} kernel production effluent. - Abstract: For the fabrication of coated particle fuel elements of high temperature gas cooled reactors, the ceramic UO{sub 2} kernels are prepared through chemical gelation of uranyl nitrate solution droplets, which produces radioactive effluent with components of ammonia, uranium, organic compounds and ammonium nitrate. In this study, a flow sheet including evaporation, flocculation, filtration, adsorption, and reverse osmosis was established for the effluent treating. The uranium recovery could reach 99.9% after the treatment, with almost no secondary pollution produced.

  13. Semitechnical studies of uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid by liquid-liquid-extraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poczynajlo, A.; Wlodarski, R.; Giers, M.

    1987-01-01

    A semitechnical installation for uranium recovery from wet process phosphoric acid has been built. The installation is based on technological process comprising 2 extraction cycles, the first with a mixture of mono- and dinonylphenylphosphoric acids (NPPA) and the second with a synergic mixture of di-/2-ethylhexyl/-phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The installation was set going and the studies on the concentration distributions of uranium and other components of phosphoric acid have been performed for all technological circuits. 23 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs. (author)

  14. Recovery and recycling of uranium from rejected coated particles for compact high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Rajesh V., E-mail: pairajesh007@gmail.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mollick, P.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ashok [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Banerjee, J. [Radiometullurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Radhakrishna, J. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    UO{sub 2} microspheres prepared by internal gelation technique were coated with pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide using CVD technique. The particles which were not meeting the specifications were rejected. The rejected/failed UO{sub 2} based coated particles prepared by CVD technique was used for oxidation and recovery and recycling. The oxidation behaviour of sintered UO{sub 2} microspheres coated with different layers of carbon and SiC was studied by thermal techniques to develop a method for recycling and recovery of uranium from the failed/rejected coated particles. It was observed that the complete removal of outer carbon from the spheres is difficult. The crushing of microspheres enabled easier accessibility of oxygen and oxidation of carbon and uranium at 800–1000 °C. With the optimized process of multiple crushing using die & plunger and sieving the broken coated layers, we could recycle around fifty percent of the UO{sub 2} microspheres which could be directly recoated. The rest of the particles were recycled using a wet recycling method. - Highlights: • The oxidation behaviour of coated particles was studied in air, O{sub 2} and moist O{sub 2}. • It was observed that coated layers cannot be completely removed by mere oxidation. • Complete recovery of uranium from the rejected coated particles has been carried out using a combination of dry and wet recovery scheme. • A crushing step prior to oxidation is needed for full recovery of uranium from the coated particles.

  15. A process for the simultaneous recovery of gold and uranium from South African ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Leaching tests carried out on run-of-mine ore from one of South Africa's gold-and-uranium mines show that gold and uranium dissolve simultaneously in an acidic solution containing ferric sulphate and thiocyanate ions, and that, under appropriate conditions, the recovery of both metals is similar to that achieved in conventional leaching. Moreover, since the gold and uranium are leached as anionic complexes, they can be extracted simultaneously from the leach liquor with an anion-exchange resin. The results presented indicate that it is technically feasible to recover the metals onto a strong-base resin, to strip them selectively from the resin, and to recover them in a marketable form from the strip liquors

  16. Uranium and thorium recovery from a sub-product of monazite industrial processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomiero, L.A.; Ribeiro, J.S.; Scassiotti Filho, W.

    1994-01-01

    In the monazite alkaline leaching industrial process for the production of rare earth elements, a by-product is formed, which has a high concentration of thorium and a lower but significant one of uranium. A procedure for recovery of the thorium and uranium contents in this by-product is presented. The first step of this procedure is the leaching with sulfuric acid, followed by uranium extraction from the acid liquor with a tertiary amine, stripping with a Na Cl solutions and precipitation as ammonium diuranate with N H 4 O H. In order to obtain thorium concentrates with higher purity, it is performed by means of the extraction of thorium from the acid liquor, with a primary amine, stripping by a Na Cl solution and precipitation as thorium hydroxide or oxalate. (author)

  17. Chemical process for recovery of uranium values contained in phosphoric mineral lixivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceicao, E.L.H. da; Awwal, M.A.; Coelho, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A recovery process of uranium values from phosporic mineral lixivia for obtaining uranio oxide concentrate adjusted to specifications of purity for its commercialization the process consists of the adjustment of electromotive force of lixiviem to suitable values for uranium extraction, extraction with organic solvent containing phosphoric acid ester and oxidant reextraction from this solvent with phosphoric acid solution, suggesting a new solvent extraction containing synergetic mixture of di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid and tri-octyl phosphine, leaching this solvent with water and re-extraction/precipitation with ammonium carbonate solution, resulting in the formation of uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium, that by drying and calcination gives the uranium oxide with purity degree for commercialization. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte, A.; Ramos, L.; Estrada, J.; del Val, J. L.

    1962-01-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO 2 F 2 solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs

  19. The US uranium industry's operations and financial performance during 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the operating and financial statistics collected from the U.S. uranium industry by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Uranium concentrate production probably is the most important indicator of overall activity in the domestic raw materials industry. Production in 1988 of 13.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 was only slightly higher than 1987 production, however it was about 70 percent less than the peak production level of 43.7 million pounds recorded in 1980. Production in 1988 from conventional milling was 7.0 million pounds, a decrease of 18 percent from the 8.5 million pounds produced in 1987. Production from nonconventional facilities in 1988 was 6.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 , and increase of 37 percent above the level for 1987. This is the highest level for production from nonconventional facilities since 1981

  20. Recovery of uranium from uranyl nitrate raffinate. Contributed Paper PE-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anilkumar Reddy, A.M.; Shiva Kumar, M.; Varadan, K.M.K.; Babaji, P.; Sairam, S. Sheela; Saibaba, N.

    2014-01-01

    At New Uranium Oxide Fuel Plant, NUOFP(O) of Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), the Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate (UNR) generated during solvent extraction process is washed with Treated Lean Solvent(TLS) to recover residual U. Earlier this UNR consisting of 0.5-1 gm/l and 2.5 FA was neutralised with vapour ammonia. The slurry was then filtered over pre coat drum filter and the resultant Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate cake (UNRC) was stored in polyethylene lined MS drums. The valuable U was thus being locked up in UNRC. Also, the storage of UNRC drums required lot of floor space which have to be repacked frequently to contain the radioactivity. Hence the need has come to avoid the generation of UNRC and the recovery of U from the already generated UNRC. The generation of UNRC was avoided by developing alternate process of UNR treatment with Treated Lean Solvent for the removal of residual U and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry (ARS) is disposed. The Uranium recovery from UNRC is done by dissolving the cake in Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate solution to leach the hexavalent Uranium by utilizing the free acidity in UNR. The leaching time is about six hours and the uranium forms uranyl nitrate. The resulting leach solutions are relatively dilute but complex acidic nitrate solutions containing wide variety of ions. Metallic ions commonly present include uranium, iron, magnesium, aluminium, sodium, calcium etc. The uranium concentration is normally 1-1.5 g/L. This uranium is separated by solvent extraction. The active agent in solvent extraction is Tri Butyl Phosphate in kerosene that can selectively extract uranium into an organic complex which is insoluble in aqueous. The organic used for extraction is Treated Lean Solvent in the quality of freshly prepared solvent and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry is disposed by sale. The leaching of Uranium from UNRC was done in plant scale and about 1200 kgs of UNRC was successfully processed in trial batch. The paper deals with details of

  1. 77 FR 70486 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed Dewey-Burdock In-Situ Uranium Recovery...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Proposed Dewey- Burdock In-Situ Uranium Recovery Project in Custer and Fall River Counties, SD AGENCY... draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (Draft SEIS) for the Dewey-Burdock In-Situ Uranium... NRC for a new source materials license for the Dewey-Burdock ISR Project. Powertech is proposing to...

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  3. Method for the recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid, originating from the wet-process of uraniferous phosphate ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrih, R.Z.; Rickard, R.S.; Carrington, O.F.

    1978-01-01

    Improvement in the process for recoverying uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid solution derived from the acidulation of uraniferous phosphate ores by the use of two ion exchange circuits is described. (Auth.)

  4. Treatment of back flow fluids from shale gas exploration with recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajda, D.; Zakrzewska-Koltuniewicz, G.; Abramowska, A.; Kiegiel, K.; Niescior-Borowinska, P.; Miskiewicz, A.; Olszewska, W.; Kulisa, K.; Samszynski, Z.; Drzewicz, P.; Konieczynska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Shale gas exploitation is the cause of many social protests. According to the protesters gas extraction technology threatens the environment: it consumes huge amounts of water, creates danger of poisoning drinking water, the formation of toxic wastewater, air contamination, noise, etc. Hydro-fracturing fluids could also leach radioactive isotopes e.g. uranium from the rock. The upper content of the main elements found in examined back flow fluids in Poland are the following: chlorine: 100.00 Kg/m 3 , sodium: 40.00 kg/m 3 , potassium: 0.90 kg/m 3 , lithium: 0.15 kg/m 3 , magnesium: 2.00 kg/m 3 , calcium: 20.00 kg/m 3 , strontium: 0.80 kg/m 3 and cesium: 0.06 kg/m 3 while the upper content of trace elements are the following: uranium: 3.5 g/m 3 , lanthanum: 12.4 g/m 3 , vanadium: 1.3 g/m 3 , yttrium: 1.3 g/m 3 , molybdenum: 2.0 g/m 3 and manganese: 9.7 g/m 3 . The recovery of uranium, and other valuable metals, from back flow fluids will reduce an environmental impact of hydro-fracturing process. This poster details the treatment of back flow fluids in Poland allowing rare earth elements and uranium recovery

  5. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Quinteros, Raúl D.

    2017-01-01

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calcium−Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO 4 ) as reaction product. The formation of U 3 O 8 and MgU 3 O 10 was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h −1 of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U 3 O 8 the single uranium product obtained. - Highlights: •The chlorination is an effective method for the recovery uranium from Ca-Mg uranates. •The optimal conditions were: 10 hs of reaction time at 700 °C using 3 l/h of Cl 2 (g). •U 3 O 8 is recovery by washing out the chlorination by-products.

  6. Spall wave-profile and shock-recovery experiments on depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, R.S.; Vorthman, J.E.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.; Tonks, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Depleted Uranium of two different purity levels has been studied to determine spall strength under shock wave loading. A high purity material with approximately 30 ppm of carbon impurities was shock compressed to two different stress levels, 37 and 53 kbar. The second material studied was uranium with about 300 ppm of carbon impurities. This material was shock loaded to three different final stress level, 37, 53, and 81 kbar. Two experimental techniques were used in this work. First, time-resolved free surface particle velocity measurements were done using a VISAR velocity interferometer. The second experimental technique used was soft recovery of samples after shock loading. These two experimental techniques will be briefly described here and VISAR results will be shown. Results of the spall recovery experiments and subsequent metallurgical analyses are described in another paper in these proceedings. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Enhancement of Cu, Ni and Mo recoveries in the bulk concentrate of Jaduguda uranium bearing ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, G.V.; Besra, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    The uranium ore treatment plant at Jaduguda, India, recovers copper, nickel and molybdenum as byproducts before the bulk flotation tailings are subjected to leaching to recover uranium values. The recoveries of these sulfide metals in this 900 TPD plant are reported to be around 60 % Cu, 25% Ni and 55% Mo in the bulk concentrate. In this article, flotation studies carried out, at the instance of M/S UCIL, with various reagents and their combination to improve the over all recoveries are presented. It was observed that material coarser than 100 microns, from the flotation feed, could not be floated even in presence of excessive reagent unless it is ground further. It was established that around 95% Cu, 75% Ni and 74% Mo values could be recovered by using either amyl xanthate or mixture of amyl xanthate and Aero Promoter 194 in place of cresylic acid that is being currently used as collector in the plant. (author)

  8. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  9. Ion exchange resin fouling of molybdenum in recovery uranium processess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guowei; Zhao Guirong

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between anion exchange resin fouling and molybdic acid polymerization was studied. By using potentiometer titration and laser-Raman spectroscopy the relationship of molybdic acid polymerization and the pH value of solution or the molybdenum concentration was determined. It was shown that as the concentration of initial molybdenum in solution decreases from 0.2 mol/L to 0.5 mmol/L, the pH value of starting polymerization decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The experimental results show that the fouling of 201 x 7 resin in the acidic solution is mainly caused by the adsorbing of Mo 3 O 26 4- ion and occupying the exchange radical site of the resin. Under the leaching conditions the molybdenum and phosphate existing in the leaching liquor can form 12-molybdo-phosphate ion. It also leads to resin fouling. The molybdenum on the fouled resin can synergically be desorbed by mixed desorbents containing ammonium hydroxide and ammonium sulfate. The desorbed resin can be used for uranium adsorption and the desorbed molybdenum can be recovered by ion exchange method

  10. Lowering operation costs by energy recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, W; Hausmann, H; Hausmann, K H

    1976-01-01

    Heat recovery and the heat sources available as well as possible applications of the heat recovered are discussed. Groundwater, shower water and waste air are considered as energy sources. Energy recovery by means of finned-tube systems and the heat pump, and economic aspects of the techniques are described.

  11. Method for the recovery of uranium from a concentrate using pure phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Procedure for the recovery of an uranium bearing concentrate and pure phosphoric acid from a wet process phosphoric acid from the treatment fluid with a precipitation means in conjunction with an organic diluent, the thus formed precipitate to separate and from the remaining mixture of phosphoric acid and diluent the phosphoric acid to extract, characterised in that one applies an inorganic fluorine compound. (G.C.)

  12. An evaluation of five flowsheets for the recovery of uranium from Wits leach pulps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.; Viljoen, E.B.

    1978-01-01

    This article evaluates five flowsheets for uranium recovery and an incremental net present value is calculated for each by the discounting of cash flows at 25 per cent per year over a projected life of 15 years. The highest net present value results from the circuit that employs belt filtration followed by continuous ion exchange, plus solvent extraction, in the particular case of the material used in the examples

  13. Recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions from the South Chuquicamata mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andalaft, N.; Soto, R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with the recovery of uranium from copper leaching solutions containing between 10 and 18 ppm U 3 O 8 . The study, which covers a laboratory stage and a pilot plant stage, has shown the technical feasibility of producing yellow cake with U 3 O 8 contents of between 13 and 20% by direct precipitation of eluates which, when purified in the laboratory, have contained up to some 85% U 3 O 8 . (author)

  14. Phosphate and phosphate fertilizer sector: structure and future prospects. [Uranium recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenaidi, B

    1981-12-01

    A statement of the past evolution of this sector's structure is given. Various prospective studies which have been made are reviewed and lead to the precision of the phosphate requirement in the year 2000 which is between 200 and 250 Mt. Only a small section p. 696-697 is devoted to recovery of uranium contained in phosphate and prospects in this field are given.

  15. The recovery of uranium from phosphatic sources in relation to the E.E.C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from phosphatic sources is reviewed in the context of the EEC. The potential and technology available for recovery from fertilizer products, furnace slag, beneficiated slimes, lached zone materials, leach residues and indigeneous phosphates is briefly assessed but the main emphasis is on the technology available for recovery from 30 per cent P 2 O 5 phosphoric acid produced from imported phosphate rock concentrate. In particular various solvent extraction processes now being used commercially at large scale phosphoric acid plants, mainly in North America, are discussed in detail together with research and development on solvent extraction and various other possible recovery processes. The available techniques are compared and a discussion of the economic aspects is given

  16. Studies on the recovery of uranium from low-grade ores in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, K.M.V.; Dwivedy, K.K.; Deshpande, A.S.; Ramachar, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to utilize the available para-marginal and low-grade ores - chlorite schists, amphibolites, carbonate ores, clays and quartzites - analysing between 0.027 and 0.08% U 3 O 8 . In addition, tests were undertaken on the technical and economic feasibility of recovering uranium as a byproduct from the copper flotation tailings and phosphorites. Heap and bacterial leaching tests were conducted on quartz-chlorite schists from the Singhbhum district, Bihar, analysing about 0.03% U 3 O 8 . Studies also showed that the ores harbour active Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans. Studies on 10-mesh samples of amphibolites from Inderwa, Bihar, (0.08% U 3 O 8 ) showed that only 32.8% recovery could be obtained by wet tabling and 85% by agitation leaching, while static leaching tests yielded 81% recovery in 24 hours of contact time. Similar tests on calcareous phyllites (0.05% U 3 O 8 ) with 30 kg/t Na 2 CO 3 and 8 kg/t NaHCO 3 yielded 86% uranium leachability at ambient temperature. Biogenic uraniferous clay from Udaisagar (0.029% U 3 O 8 ) yielded 43.3% uranium recovery using 1000 l/t of neutral water for 6 h. Percolation leaching tests were conducted with hard quartzites (0.06% U 3 O 8 ), and the results showed that 81% uranium could be recovered in 24 days. Although preliminary ore dressing studies on tailings obtained from the copper flotation (0.013% U 3 O 8 ) at Surda yielded a concentrate analysing 0.063% U 3 O 8 at 66% recovery, recent tests on the tailings from the copper concentrator indicated only 48% recovery at a grade of 0.112% owing to decrease in the feed grade. Studies on the utilization of large-capacity gravity machines and selective mining of uranium-rich copper lodes may render this source economic. Preliminary studies on a phosphorite sample containing 22.0% P 2 O 5 and 0.04% U 3 O 8 from the Mussorie area in Uttar Pradesh on calcination followed by scrubbing yielded a sand enriched in P 2 O 5 values (33.7% P 2 O 5 at 92.5% recovery) but

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  18. Recovery of an area degraded by uranium mining using phytoremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, Gustavo; Barreto, Helder M.; Pereira, Wagner de S.; Goncalves, Cyntia C.; Oliveira, Gabriela T. de; Pereira, Wagner de S.; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2011-01-01

    Environmental contamination caused by uranium mining is a widespread problem throughout the world, with serious implications. The goal of the remediation actions is to reduce environmental risks and to protect the health of exposed populations. This can be done by removing or reducing the sources or the critical exposure pathways. This remediation is achieved by physical, chemical and biological methods. Among the biological ones phyto remediation is considered the most simple and the cheapest way to remedy contaminated soils. The phyto remediation can act in different ways: Phyto stabilization, phyto degradation, phyto volatilization, rhizodegradation and phyto hydraulics. An important factor in phyto remediation is the bioavailability of radionuclides, which depends on the radionuclide itself, on the time of deposition and on soil characteristics. This paper proposes a strategy of phyto remediation for the unit of ore processing situated at Caldas, MG, BR which is an agricultural area, and the use of land for crops production is, hence, a critical exposure pathway to human. To block this exposure pathways a phyto remediation process was idealized based on the creation of a forest that will be used as an area of permanent preservation (Brazilian legislation term which prevents the use of land for any purpose other than the maintenance of the forest). The main requirement for this type of preservation area is the use of native trees. Thus, a survey of trees native to the region and available in three nearby forest gardens was carried out. The time of flowering, fruiting, ways to break dormancy of seeds and care for the production of seedlings and planting in the field were surveyed. Based on this study, the extension of the area to be covered and the species to be used could be defined. (author)

  19. Recovery of an area degraded by uranium mining using phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonseca, Gustavo [Fundacao de Ensino Octavio Bastos (UNIFEOB), Sao Joao da Boa Vista, SP (Brazil); Barreto, Helder M. [Faculdades Pitagoras, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Curso de graduacao em Engenharia de Producao; Pereira, Wagner de S.; Goncalves, Cyntia C.; Oliveira, Gabriela T. de, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Pereira, Wagner de S. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia. Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental

    2011-07-01

    Environmental contamination caused by uranium mining is a widespread problem throughout the world, with serious implications. The goal of the remediation actions is to reduce environmental risks and to protect the health of exposed populations. This can be done by removing or reducing the sources or the critical exposure pathways. This remediation is achieved by physical, chemical and biological methods. Among the biological ones phyto remediation is considered the most simple and the cheapest way to remedy contaminated soils. The phyto remediation can act in different ways: Phyto stabilization, phyto degradation, phyto volatilization, rhizodegradation and phyto hydraulics. An important factor in phyto remediation is the bioavailability of radionuclides, which depends on the radionuclide itself, on the time of deposition and on soil characteristics. This paper proposes a strategy of phyto remediation for the unit of ore processing situated at Caldas, MG, BR which is an agricultural area, and the use of land for crops production is, hence, a critical exposure pathway to human. To block this exposure pathways a phyto remediation process was idealized based on the creation of a forest that will be used as an area of permanent preservation (Brazilian legislation term which prevents the use of land for any purpose other than the maintenance of the forest). The main requirement for this type of preservation area is the use of native trees. Thus, a survey of trees native to the region and available in three nearby forest gardens was carried out. The time of flowering, fruiting, ways to break dormancy of seeds and care for the production of seedlings and planting in the field were surveyed. Based on this study, the extension of the area to be covered and the species to be used could be defined. (author)

  20. Recovery of uranium from seawater by composite fiber adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubuke, Y.; Aoki, T.; Tanaka, H.; Tabushi, I.; Kamaishi, T.; Hagiwara, I.

    1991-01-01

    The authors of this paper developed a composite fiber adsorbent (CFA) to entrap finely powdered amidoxime into fibrils of supporting material with silica in a previous report. This was further tested for uranyl recovery directly from seawater. The adsorption rate showed a flow rate dependence with almost a saturation value of ∼100 μg of U/g of CFA at a mean flow rate of sea current. Chemical as well as physical deterioration was overcome by using 1 N NaHCO 3 and 0.72 M NaCl as liberating and washing agents, to keep the pH and ionic strength, respectively, constant, and the initial adsorption rate was maintained even after a recycle time of 50. A continuous passage of seawater showed a linear increase of the adsorption to afford 1560 μg of U/g of CFA after 3 weeks

  1. Capital and operating costs of irradiated natural uranium reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiriet, L.; Jouannaud, C.; Couture, J.; Duboz, J.

    1966-01-01

    This paper presents first a method of analysing natural uranium reprocessing plants investment costs (method similar to LANG and BACH well known in the fuel oil industry) and their operating costs (analysed according to their economic type). This method helps establishing standard cost structures for these plants, allowing thus comparisons between existing or planned industrial facilities. It also helps evaluating the foreseeable consequences of technical progress. Some results obtained are given, concerning: the investment costs sensitivity to the various technical parameters defining the fuel and their comparison according to the country or the economic area taken into account. Finally, the influence of the plants size on their investment costs is shown. (author) [fr

  2. Recovery of uranium and plutonium from Redox off-standard aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, C.H.; Matheson, A.R.

    1949-12-31

    In the operation of countercurrent extraction columns as in the Redox process, it is possible, and probable, that from unexpected behaviour of a column, operator error, colloid formation, etc., there will result from time to time excessive losses of uranium and plutonium in the overall process. These losses will naturally accumulate in the waste streams, particularly in the aqueous waste streams. If the loss is excessively high, and such lost material can be recovered by some additional method, then if economical and within reason, the recovered materials ran be returned to a ISF column for further processing. The objective of this work has been to develop such a method to recover uranium and plutonium from such off-standard waste streams in a form whereby the uranium send plutonium can be returned to the process line and subsequently purified and separated.

  3. Uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.; McKamey, D.R.; Baes, C.F.

    1980-01-01

    Studies were continued of a process for recovering uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate (OPAP), a mixture of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids. The mixture contained at least nine impurities, the principal one being octyl phenol, and also material that readily hydrolyzed to octyl phenol and orthophosphoric acid. The combination of mono- and dioctylphenyl phosphoric acids was the principal uranium extractant, but some of the impurities also extracted uranium. Hydrolysis of the extractant had little effect on uranium extraction, as did the presence of moderate concentrations of octyl phenol and trioctylphenyl phosphate. Diluent choice among refined kerosenes, naphthenic mixtures, and paraffinic hydrocarbons also had little effect on uranium extraction, but extraction was much lower when an aromatic diluent was used. Purified OPAP fractions were sparingly soluble in aliphatic hydrocarbon diluents. The solubility was increased by the presence of impurities such as octyl phenol, and by the addition of water or an acidic solution to the extractant-diluent mixture. In continuous stability tests, extractant loss by distribution to the aqueous phase was much less to wet-process phosphoric acid than to reagent grade acid. Uranium recovery from wet-process acid decreased steadily because of the combined effects of extractant poisoning and precipitation of the extractant as a complex with ferric iron. Unaccountable losses of organic phase volume occurred in the continuous tests. While attempts to recover the lost organic phase were unsuccessful, the test results indicate it was not lost by entrainment or dissolution in the phosphoric acid solutions. 21 figures, 8 tables

  4. Recovery of uranium and accompanying metals from various types of industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chajduk, E.; Danko, B.; Gajda, D.; Zakrzewska, G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Bieluszka, P.

    2014-01-01

    On January 28"t"h 2014 the Program of Polish Nuclear Energy was signed by Polish Government. According to this program Poland has to secure a constant supply of uranium for Polish NPPs in the future. Uranium in Poland occurs in Vistula Spit area in sandstone rocks and Podlasie Depression area in black dictyonema shales, which are low grade ores. Scarce uranium resources stimulate interest in its recovery from secondary resources as potential raw materials. Industrial wastes and by-products were considered as a source of uranium in this studies. Apart from uranium other valuable metals (e.g. vanadium, molybdenum or lanthanides) were recovered to improve the economy of the process. Three types of industrial wastes were examined: flotation tailings from the copper industry, phosphoric acid from the fertilizer industry and fracturing fluid from shale gas exploitation. Metals from flotation tailings were separated in two steps: 1) acidic leaching of the flotation waste using sulfuric acid solution and 2) separation of metals by ion-exchange chromatography. All the liquid samples were analyzed by ICP-MS method to determine the separation efficiency of the process. Uranium was recovered from phosphoric acid by high-pressure membrane filtration or by extraction/stripping integrated processes applying membrane modules Liquid-Cel® Extra-Flow (Celgard). Aqueous solutions after hydraulic fracturing are very diverse in terms of chemical composition, depending on borehole and fracturing technology applied. The content of various substances in backflow fluid depends on mechanical behavior and chemical composition of shale. Organic matter content in this type of waste did not exceed 1% usually, but the salinity is high. Initially, organic pollutants were removed and next the fluid was purified by combined various ion-exchangers. Individual metals were selectively eluted from ion-exchanger by combination of different eluents. The content of metals in samples was analyzed by ICP

  5. Recovery of uranium from seawater using wave power and floating offshore units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerk, B.; Vallander, P.

    1981-03-01

    This report is the final contribution to a study of the technical and economic feasibility of floating units for the recovery of uranium from seawater. The seawater is supplied by wave energy and received by a sloping plane. An optimization was carried out which involved study of the number of storeys of adsorbent beds in a floating unit, the number and tonnage of service vessels and the number of moorings. Different absorbent bed areas, thicknesses of layers of adsorbent material, length of floating units and length of extraction cycles were considered. The annual uranium uptake was calculated for an offshore location 20 nautical miles to the south-east of South Africa. The costs of the total plant for each combination of optimization parameters were calculated and are presented. The cost of the recovered uranium for each combination of optimization parameters is shown. The most feasible offshore plant will recover uranium at a cost of about 1 900 SEK/kg. It will comprise 22 floating units, each with an adsorbent bed area of 300 m 2 per metre of the unit and an adsorbent thickness of 0.10 metres. A conceptual layout of the selected floating unit is shown in drawings. (author)

  6. Down in the dumps - cheerfully. [Methods for the recovery of uranium and gold from tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhmer, W.T. (Council for Mineral Technology, Randburg (South Africa))

    1984-07-01

    Scavenging gold and uranium from the sands dumps and slimes dams is a highly profitable operation. In a few pages the author summarises some of the permutations and combinations of the various processes employed by South African concerns to achieve economic results.

  7. Recovery of uranium from liquors from shale attack by ion exchange; Recuperation de l'uranium des liqueurs d'attaque des schistes par echange d'ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parly, B; Pottier, P

    1959-04-01

    This report deals with the recovery of the uranium from a lot of shale mined at Schaentzel with an U content of 285 ppm. Recovery is realized by alkaline attack with a solution of 25 g/l Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 75 C followed by absorption of the dissolved uranium by an anionic Amberlite resin, IRA 410. Final recovery is done by elution with a solution of M NaNO{sub 3}. These treatment tests determine the capacity of the resin in the case of the above solutions, verify the effects of recycling on this capacity, and finally, provide figures on the consumption of reactive and efficiency of attack and uranium recovery. (author) [French] Il s'agit de la recuperation, de l'uranium d'un lot de schiste- de Schaentzel (puits AO) dont la teneur en U est de 285 ppm. Cette recuperation consiste en une attaque alcaline par une solution de CO{sub 3}Na{sub 2} a 25 g/l et a 75 deg C. L'attaque est suivie de l'adsorption de l'uranium solubilise, sur resine anionique Amberlite IRA 410. On recupere finalement l'uranium par elution a l'aide d'une solution de NO{sub 3}Na M. Cet essai de traitement permit de determiner la capacite de la resine dans le cas de ces solutions, de verifier l'effet du recyclage sur la capacite et enfin de chiffrer la consommation en reactifs ainsi que les rendements d'attaque et de recuperation de l'uranium. (auteur)

  8. Uranium recovery from phosphate fertilizer in the form of a high purity compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunus, F.; Coroianu, T.; Filip, G.; Filip, D.

    2001-01-01

    Uranium recovery from phosphate fertilizer industry is based on a one cycle extraction-stripping process. The process was experimented on both sulfuric and nitric acid attack of phosphate rock when uranium is dissolved in phosphoric acid (WPA) or phosphonitric (PN) solution respectively. The WPA and PN solution must be clarified. In the first alternative by ageing and settling and in the second by settling in the presence of flocculant. The organic components must be removed on active carbon for WPA only since in the case of nitric attack calcined phosphates are used. In both alternatives uranium is extracted from aqueous acidic solutions in the same time with the rare earths (REE), by di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (DEPA) as basic extractants, eventually in the presence of octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as synergic agent. The stripping process is carried out in two stages: in the first stage REE are stripped and precipitated by HF or NH 4 F + H 2 S0 4 and in the second stage uranium as U(VI) is stripped by the same reagents but in the presence of Fe(II) as reductant for U(VI) to U(IV) inextractible species. Tetravalent uranium is also precipitated as green cake either UF 4 xH 2 0 or (NH 4 ) 7 U 6 F 31 as dependent on reagents HF or NH 4 F + H 2 S0 4 . Uranium stripping is possible for PN solution only if HNO 3 partially extracted is previously washed out by a urea solution. The green cake washed and filtered is dissolved in nitric acid in presence of Al(OH)3 as complexant for F. The filtered nitric solution is adjusted to 3-5 mol/L HNO 3 and extracted by 20% TBP when uranium is transferred to the organic phase which after scrubbing is stripped in the classic way with acidulated (HN0 3 ) demineralized water. Uranium is precipitated as diuranate of high purity. Rare earths left in the aqueous raffinate are extracted by pure TBP from 8-10 mol/L HNO 3 medium. The stripping process takes place with acidulated water. Rare earths are precipitated as hydroxides. (author)

  9. Recovery of uranium from seawater using wave power and floating offshore units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerk, B.; Vallander, P.

    1981-06-01

    This report is a final contribution to a study of the technical and economic feasibility of floating units for the recovery of uranium from seawater. The seawater is supplied by wave energy and received by a sloping plane. An optimization was carried out which involved study of the number of storeys of adsorbent beds in a floating unit, the number and tonnage of service vessels and the number of moorings. Different adsorbent bed areas, thickness of layers of adsorbent material, length of floating units and length of extraction cycles were considered. The costs of a plant for each combination of optimization parameters were calculated and are presented. The most feasible offshore plant will recover uranium at a cost of about 1900 SEK/kg. It will comprise 22 floating units, each with an adsorbent bed area of 300 m 2 per metre of the unit and an adsorbent thickness of 0.10 metres. (Authors)

  10. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Kyle Shelton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-28

    These are a set of slides intended for an information session as part of recruiting activities at Brigham Young University. It gives an overview of aqueous chloride operations, specifically on plutonium and americium purification/recovery. This presentation details the steps taken perform these processes, from plutonium size reduction, dissolution, solvent extraction, oxalate precipitation, to calcination. For americium recovery, it details the CLEAR (chloride extraction and actinide recovery) Line, oxalate precipitation and calcination.

  11. Offshore oil spill recovery operations in the Persian Gulf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.D.; Gangsaas, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    On or about January 25, 1991, Iraqi forces in Kuwait discharged more than 4 million barrels of Kuwait crude oil into the Persian Gulf. The counterclockwise current carried the resulting slick southeastward along the coast of Saudi Arabia. The Saudi Arabian oil company, Aramco, chartered the multiclassed tanker and response vessel Al Waasit, based in Dubai, to assist in the offshore recovery operation. The Al Waasit's response resulted in the offshore recovery of about 100,000 barrels of oil during a 42-day period, without a recovery system failure. The authors both served on board Al Waasit as operations managers during this response operation

  12. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomiro, Federico J., E-mail: pomiro@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Gaviría, Juan P. [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Quinteros, Raúl D. [Departamento de Fisicoquímica y Control de Calidad, Complejo Tecnológico Pilcaniyeu, Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. Bustillo 9500, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche, Río Negro (Argentina); and others

    2017-07-15

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calcium−Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO{sub 4}) as reaction product. The formation of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and MgU{sub 3}O{sub 10} was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h{sup −1} of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U{sub 3}O{sub 8} the single uranium product obtained. - Highlights: •The chlorination is an effective method for the recovery uranium from Ca-Mg uranates. •The optimal conditions were: 10 hs of reaction time at 700 °C using 3 l/h of Cl{sub 2}(g). •U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is recovery by washing out the chlorination by-products.

  13. Recovery of uranium and lining material from magnesium fluoride slag at UMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.K.; Singh, H.; Shadakshari, B.M.; Meghal, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    At Uranium Metal Plant, uranium metal is produced by reduction of UF 4 with magnesium metal, in a closed reactor lined with refractory MgF 2 lining material. During this reduction, more MgF 2 is produced as the slag. This slag generally contains 2-4% uranium and hence is processed to recover these values and part of the slag, free from uranium is reused for lining the reactor. This paper describes the process parameters finalised for crushing and grinding of the slag and for leaching uranium with nitric acid. The leach liquor contains appreciable amount of fluoride and hence is processed through a separate solvent extraction cycle with tributyl phosphate. The resultant purified uranyl nitrate solution is mixed with the main stream crude solution for final purification. The conditions optimised for the solvent extraction step, the problems faced during the regular operation over the last few years and the experience gained are described. An outline of the scheme to treat larger quantities of the slag on a regular basis is presented. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 40 - Criteria Relating to the Operation of Uranium Mills and the Disposition of Tailings or Wastes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... developed data and site information as to the flow of ground water or contaminants, when the detection... liners are used, a leakage detection system must be installed immediately below the liner to ensure major... water to wells or springs. Any saturated zone created by uranium or thorium recovery operations would...

  15. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice I,b-uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ores and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Sayed, M.H.

    1992-01-01

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking safaga phosphate and qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (U o 3 ). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  16. Uranium extraction from ores with lemon juice; II,b. uranium recovery from pregnant lemon juice liquors obtained by attacking phosphate ore and suggested flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, E.M.

    1997-01-01

    In order to recover uranium from the pregnant liquors obtained by attacking Safaga phosphate and Qatrani phosphatic sandstone ore materials with lemon juice, methylation for acidic fraction-salt separation has been carried out. Afterwards, separation of uranium from the associated calcium (mainly present in lemon juice liquors as citrate) has been performed by making-use of the wide difference in their water solubility. The solutions containing the separated uranium were then subjected to evaporation till dryness whereby the precipitated uranyl citrate was calcined at 500 degree C to obtain the yellow orange oxide powder (UO 3 ). On the basis of one ton ore treatment, a flowsheet for uranium recovery from the two ore materials has been suggested

  17. Recovery of uranium from uranium and lanthanides in LiCl-KCl molten salt by electrowinning including Cd-Li anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Moon Shik; Kim, Eung Ho

    2005-01-01

    A trans-uranium (TRU) fuel should be manufactured and loaded in transmutation systems in order to transmute the long-lived TRU nuclides into short-lived ones. However, since all of the TRU nuclides are not completely transmuted in one cycle lifetime in transmutation systems, the spent TRU fuel has to be treated to recover the long-lived radionuclides or fuel matrix materials. One concept to manufacture TRU fuel for transmutation is to recover uranium from TRU and molten salt. If this type of fuel is adopted for transmutation, uranium could also be an objective material to be recovered and recycled. Since electrowinning is a promising technology to be employed for the recovery of uranium from fuel materials, some experimental work of electrowinning using anode of Cd-Li alloy was carried out in this study. The basic salt chosen was a mixture of LiCl-KCl which has an eutectic point at 357 .deg. C

  18. Process for in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenscheid, W.F.; Yan, F.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to the recovery of uranium from subterranean ore deposits, and more particularly to an in-situ leaching operation employing an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide as the lixiviant. Uranium is solubilized in the lixiviant as it traverses the subterranean uranium deposit. The lixiviant is subsequently recovered and treated to remove the uranium

  19. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan

  20. A new immobilized biomass technical adsorbent for uranium recovery from bioleach solutions in the mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsezos, Marios; Noh, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    A new type of metal adsorbent has been developed using inactive microbial biomass as the raw material. The adsorbent can be made to a desirable particle size. The particles have good mechanical strength and resistance to compression and consequently can be used in a packed bed resulting in a low pressure drop. The new biosorbents have been shown to maintain well the biosorptive properties of the immobilized biomass used for their production. We have tested successfully the new biosorbents for the recovery of uranium from actual bioleach solutions. (author)

  1. Method for oxygen reduction in a uranium-recovery process. [US DOE patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1981-11-04

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous iron and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds.

  2. Removing oxygen from a solvent extractant in an uranium recovery process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, F.J.; Brown, G.M.; Posey, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in effecting uranium recovery from phosphoric acid solutions is provided by sparging dissolved oxygen contained in solutions and solvents used in a reductive stripping stage with an effective volume of a nonoxidizing gas before the introduction of the solutions and solvents into the stage. Effective volumes of nonoxidizing gases, selected from the group consisting of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, and mixtures thereof, displace oxygen from the solutions and solvents thereby reduce deleterious effects of oxygen such as excessive consumption of elemental or ferrous and accumulation of complex iron phosphates or cruds

  3. For Valor or Value: An Examination of Personnel Recovery Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Billy

    2001-01-01

    .... Next, he examines the commonly held beliefs for conducting personnel recovery operations to include sanctity of human life/casualty aversion, loss of a valuable resource, denial of intelligence...

  4. Experimental study and numerical modelling of geochemical reactions occurring during uranium in situ recovery (ISR) mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Simon, R.

    2011-09-01

    The in situ Recovery (ISR) method consists of ore mining by in situ chemical leaching with acid or alkaline solutions. ISR takes place underground and is therefore limited to the analysis of the pumped solutions, hence ISR mine management is still empirical. Numerical modelling has been considered to achieve more efficient management of this process. Three different phenomena have to be taken into account for numerical simulations of uranium ISR mining: (1) geochemical reactions; (2) the kinetics of these reactions, and (3) hydrodynamic transport with respect to the reaction kinetics. Leaching tests have been conducted on ore samples from an uranium mine in Tortkuduk (Kazakhstan) where ISR is conducted by acid leaching. Two types of leaching experiments were performed: (1) tests in batch reactors; and (2) extraction in flow through columns. The assumptions deduced from the leaching tests were tested and validated by modelling the laboratory experiments with the numerical codes CHESS and HYTEC, both developed at the Geosciences research center of Mines ParisTech. A well-constrained 1D hydrogeochemical transport model of the ISR process at laboratory-scale was proposed. It enables to translate the chemical release sequence that is observed during experiments into a geochemical reaction sequence. It was possible to highlight the controlling factors of uranium dissolution, and the precipitation of secondary mineral phase in the deposit, as well as the determination of the relative importance of these factors. (author)

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  6. Recovery of enriched Uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for argonaut type reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte, A; Ramos, L; Estrada, J; Val, J L. del

    1962-07-01

    Results obtained with the two following installations for recovering enriched uranium (20% U-235) from wastes obtained in the preparation of fuel elements for Argonaut type reactors are presented. Ion exchange unit to recover uranium form mother liquors resulting from the precipitation ammonium diuranate (ADU) from UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} solutions. Uranium recovery unit from solid wastes from the process of manufacture of fuel elements, consisting of a) waste dissolution, and b) extraction with 10% (v/v) TBP. (Author) 9 refs.

  7. Field Evaluation of the Restorative Capacity of the Aquifer Downgradient of a Uranium In-Situ Recovery Mining Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-22

    A two-part field study was conducted in Smith Ranch-Highland in-situ recovery (ISR) near Douglas, Wyoming, to evaluate the restorative capacity of the aquifer downgradient (i.e., hydrologically downstream) of a Uranium ISR mining site with respect to the transport of uranium and other potential contaminants in groundwater after mining has ceased. The study was partially conducted by checking the Uranium content and the alkalinity of separate wells, some wells had been restored and others had not. A map and in-depth procedures of the study are included.

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  9. Status and future possibilities for the recovery of uranium, thorium, and rare earths from Canadian ores, with emphasis on the problem of radium: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.R.; Poon, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    Canadian uranium resources and processing practices are described, following which the special problems and potential associated with the recovery of uranium World-wide are examined in the context of a bibliographical review of the leaching of uranium, radium, thorium, and the rare earths. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of radium

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  14. Technological problems concerning the complex recovery of uranium and accompanying elements from sedimentary ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkas, K.

    1977-01-01

    In Poland a deposit of carbonaceous clay shales has been discovered, it contains 1600ppmV, 100ppmu and 180ppm Mo. On the basis of the experiments carried out on the laboratory scale, it has been shown, that the leaching of the shales by means of the diluted solutions of sulphuric acid or sodium carbonates does not assure the high recovery of vanadium and uranium because of their occurrence in shales in refractory forms. The treatment of the shales by using of the concentrated sulphuric acid /250g/1kg shales/, according to the ''acid cure'' method and baking them in the temperature of 250 0 C, has permitted the recovery of 70% vanadium and 65% uranium. From the acid leaching residue, or from the shales directly, 70% of molybdenum can be gained, employing an alkaline pretreatment. The solutions after acid leaching contain great quantities of Al and Fe, which before the separation of U and V by solvent extraction must be to some extent removed. The performed tests have confirmed this, and by using a crystallization process, as by-products the aluminum- and iron sulphates have been obtained. From the solutions, after crystallization by amine solvent extraction, the uranium and vanadium concentrates have been recovered. The currently recognized technological method has been estimated as difficult and expensive. In order to utilize, more economically, this low grade and very refractory for pretreatment shales it is necessary to continue intensive technological research on the improvement of the recognized method and explore new ways, which could contribute to successful solution of this complicated technological problem

  15. Improvement of Particle Recovery Method for Uranium Isotope Analysis Using SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehee; Park, Jinkyu; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Lim, Sang Ho; Han, Sun-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new design of vacuum-suction impactor with wider inlet nozzle and outlet nozzle for guiding particles to disperse the particles on the surface of carbon planchet. We prepared simulated samples with lead dioxide and examined particle recovery yield and degree of dispersion using the conventional vacuum impactor and the newly designed ones with different inlet nozzle diameters. We tried to improve the inlet part of vacuum impactor, in order to increase the recovery yield and disperse the collected particle on carbon planchet. As the diameter of inlet nozzle became larger, the collected particles were better dispersed on planchet. In addition, when the inner diameter of the impactor was 3 mm or 5 mm, the recovery yield was higher than that of conventional impactor. Considering the degree of dispersion and recovery yield, we used the impactor with 5 mm exit diameter and recovered the mixed uranium standard materials for SIMS measurement. We were able to reduce the mixing effect and measure the isotopic ratio more accurately and precisely.

  16. CW Energy Recovery Operation of XFELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacek Sekutowicz; S. Bogacz; Dave Douglas; Peter Kneisel; Gwyn P. Wiliams; Massimo Ferrario; Luca Serafini; Ilan Ben-Zvi; James Rose; Triveni Srinivasan-Rao; Patrick Colestock; Wolf-Dietrich Moeller; Bernd Petersen; Dieter Proch; S. Simrock; James B. Rosenzweig

    2003-01-01

    Commissioning of two large coherent light facilities at SLAC and DESY should begin in 2008 and in 2011 respectively. In this paper we look further into the future, hoping to answer, in a very preliminary way, two questions. First: What will the next generation of the XFEL facilities look like ? Believing that super-conducting technology offers several advantages over room-temperature technology, such as high quality beams with highly populated bunches and the possibility of energy recovery or higher overall efficiency, we focus this preliminary study on the superconducting option. From this belief the second question arises: ''What modifications in superconducting technology and in machine design are needed, as compared to the present DESY XFEL, and what kind of R and D program is required over the next few years to arrive at a technically feasible solution with even higher brilliance and increased overall conversion of AC power to photon beam power. In this paper we will very often refer to and profit from the DESY XFEL design, acknowledging its many technically innovative solutions

  17. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  18. Optimal recovery of linear operators in non-Euclidean metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipenko, K Yu [Moscow State Aviation Technological University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-31

    The paper looks at problems concerning the recovery of operators from noisy information in non-Euclidean metrics. A number of general theorems are proved and applied to recovery problems for functions and their derivatives from the noisy Fourier transform. In some cases, a family of optimal methods is found, from which the methods requiring the least amount of original information are singled out. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  19. Operating experience in processing of differently sourced deeply depleted uranium oxide and production of deeply depleted uranium metal ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, S.; Ladola, Y.S.; Sharma, S.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Roy, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium Metal Plant (UMP) of BARC had first time experience on production of three Depleted Uranium Metal (DUM) ingots of 76kg, 152kg and 163kg during March 1991. These ingots were produced by processing depleted uranyl nitrate solution produced at Plutonium Plant (PP), Trombay. In recent past Uranium Metal Plant (UMP), Uranium Extraction Division (UED), has been assigned to produce tonnage quantity of Deeply DUM (DDUM) from its oxide obtained from PP, PREFRE and RMP, BARC. This is required for shielding the high radioactive source of BHABHATRON Tele-cobalt machine, which is used for cancer therapy. The experience obtained in processing of various DDU oxides is being utilized for design of large scale DDU-metal plant under XIth plan project. The physico- chemical characteristics like morphology, density, flowability, reactivity, particle size distribution, which are having direct effect on reactivity of the powders of the DDU oxide powder, were studied and the shop-floor operational experience in processing of different oxide powder were obtained and recorded. During campaign trials utmost care was taken to standardized all operating conditions using the same equipment which are in use for natural uranium materials processing including safety aspects both with respect to radiological safety and industrial safety. Necessary attention and close monitoring were specially arranged and maintained for the safety aspects during the trial period. In-house developed pneumatic transport system was used for powder transfer and suitable dust arresting system was used for reduction of powder carry over

  20. Trace recovery of uranium and rare earth contained in phosphates by liquid-liquid extraction in sulfuric attack liquor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet, F.; Foraison, D.; Leveque, A.; Sabot, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium and rare earths can be recovered in sedimentary phosphates during the wet processing of the ore by sulfuric acid giving raw phosphoric acid at 30 per cent of P 2 O 5 . Practically all the uranium contained and only part of rare earths are put into solution in this treatment. Separation of these elements in the phosphoric solution is obtained by liquid-liquid extraction with alkylphosphoric acids and especially with their mono and di esters. Partition isotherms are determined and counter-current tests are effected. Uranium and rare earths reextraction from these solvents can be simultaneous or separate with aqueous solutions alkaline or containing HF or by antisynergism. Pros and cons of each reextraction process are discussed. In conclusion HDEHP or OPPA are recommended because of availability, stability and hydrodynamic, OPPA less selective with rare earths allows the recovery with uranium of ceric earths, yttrium and yttric earths [fr

  1. Experimental study on full-scale ZrCo and depleted uranium beds applied for fast recovery and delivery of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Huaqin; Huang, Zhiyong; Luo, Wenhua; Sang, Ge; Meng, Daqiao; Luo, Deli; Zhang, Guanghui; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Changwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thin double-layered annulus beds with ZrCo and depleted uranium were fabricated. • Depleted uranium bed delivered 16.41 mol H 2 at rate of 20 Pa m 3 /s within 30 min. • The delivery property of depleted uranium bed was very stable during the 10 cycles. - Abstract: Metal hydride bed is an important component for the deuterium–tritium fusion energy under development in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in which the hydrogen recovery and delivery properties are influenced by the bed configuration, operation conditions and the hydrogen storage materials contained in the bed. In this work, a thin double-layered annulus bed configuration was adopted and full-scale beds loaded with ZrCo and depleted uranium (DU) for fast recovery and delivery of hydrogen isotopes were fabricated. The properties of hydrogen recovery/delivery together with the inner structure variation in the fabricated beds were systematically studied. The effects of operation conditions on the performances of the bed were also investigated. It was found that both of the fabricated ZrCo and DU beds were able to achieve the hydrogen storage target of 17.5 mol with fast recovery rate. In addition, experimental results showed that operation of employing extra buffer vessel and scroll pump could not only promote the hydrogen delivery process but also reduce the possibility about disproportionation of ZrCo. Compared with ZrCo bed, DU bed exhibited superior hydrogen delivery performances in terms of fast delivery rate and high hydrogen delivery amount, which could deliver over 16.4 mol H 2 (93.7% of recovery amount) within 30 min at the average delivery rate of 20 Pa m 3 /s. Good reversibility as high as 10 cycles without obvious degradation tendency in both of hydrogen delivery amount and delivery rate for DU bed was also achieved in our study. It was suggested that the fabricated thin double-layered annulus DU bed was a good candidate to rapidly deliver and recover

  2. Studies on entrained DNPPA separation by charcoal adsorption from aqueous solutions generated during uranium recovery from strong phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2010-01-01

    During the separation of metal ions by solvent extraction technique in hydrometallurgical operations, organic solvents either get entrained or dissolved in various types of aqueous streams, which need to be separated out to prevent environmental pollution and solvent loss. Generally entrained solvents are separated on plant scale by parallel plate separators or by froth floatation cells, while the dissolved solvents are recovered either by organic diluent wash or by charcoal adsorption. A novel process has been developed to recover uranium from merchant grade phosphoric acid (MGA) employing synergistic mixture of DNPPA (di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid ) and TOPO (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) dissolved in petrofin. After recovery of uranium, MGA has to be returned to the host company for the production of fertilizer. This MGA has to be free from any contamination due to DNPPA and TOPO. Separation of DNPPA and TOPO from MGA by diluent wash method has been reported. There is no information available in literature for the separation of DNPPA and TOPO from such aqueous streams by carbon adsorption. The present investigation describes the methodology based on charcoal adsorption study (batch and continuous column operation) to separate DNPPA from MGA. Three different types of charcoal namely coconut shell based, coal based and pelletized charcoal were evaluated for DNPPA separation from MGA containing 100 mg/L DNPPA. It was found that the % DNPPA adsorptions in single contact (0.5g C/50 ml) were 57, 34 and 10 in coconut shell, coal based and pelletised charcoal respectively. Based on the results, the coconut shell based charcoal was selected for further study. Adsorption of DNPPA by coconut shell based charcoal was investigated by carrying out the experiments with 50 ml MGA containing 770 mg/L DNPPA by adding 1 to 7 g charcoal respectively in separate beakers

  3. Geochemical data from groundwater at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.

    2012-01-01

    This report releases groundwater geochemistry data from samples that were collected in June 2011 at the Dewey Burdock proposed uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. The sampling and analytical methods are summarized, and all of the data, including quality assurance/quality control information are provided in data tables.

  4. Overview of Fuel Resources Program – Seawater Uranium Recovery Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, Stephen; Britt, Phillip F.; Gill, Gary A.; Schneider, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Investment strategy: To develop advanced adsorbents that can simultaneously enhance U sorption capacity, selectivity, kinetics, and materials durability to reduce the technology cost and uncertainties; Program goals: To develop lab-scale uranium recovery technology demonstration under marine conditions, and to work with potential commercial/industry partner(s) to establish technolog pricing threshhold

  5. Design of mixer settler extraction cycles II for recovery uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Jami; Hafni Lissa Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Mixer settler is technically designed for extraction and separation process of uranium from phosphoric acid solution. Design calculation results shows that: the mixer settler consists of two parts: part of extraction process in the mixer tank and part of separation process in settler tank. The mixer tank type of box with 4 baffles, the size of mixer tank, 0.8 m width, 0.8 m length, 1 m high of liquid, 1.05 m high of mixer tank, stirrer type of disk 6 blade, and power of mixing 4 hp and the settler tank type of rectangular with size of settler tank, 0.8 m width 5 m length, 1 m high of liquid, 1.05 m high of settler tank. For uranium recovery efficiency up to 91%, extraction process is done in 3 stage counter current flow using a solvent Organic (O) DEHPA-TOPO in Kerosene at a phase of ratio A/O of 2:1. The aqueous enter through stage 3 and the organic solvent enter through stage 1. The process of settling occurred with the value of settling velocity is 0.000694 m/s, dispersion factor Ψ = 0.3638 and the light fraction as the dispersed phase and value of Reynolds number (NRE) = 3,438. Because of the Reynolds number is lower than 5,000, it indicates that the quality of the separation is very good. (author)

  6. Standard test methods for the strong-base resins used in the recovery of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.A.; Lombaard, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    There are no detailed specifications for the strong-base ion-exchange resins used in continuous ion-exchange plants, and it was considered that a very useful purpose would be served by the publication of a series of standard laboratory tests on which such specifications could be based. This report describes test methods that are relevant to the ion-exchange recovery of uranium. They include tests of the physical properties of strong-base resins (relative density, particle-size distribution, and moisture content) and of their chemical properties (theoretical capacity, equilibrium capacity, kinetics of loading and elution). Included are several supporting procedures that are used in conjunction with these methods

  7. Feasibility of the recovery of uranium from alkaline waste by amidoximated grafted polypropylene polymer matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, S.K.; Gandhi, P.M.; Bhardwaj, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    The amidoximated grafted polypropylene polymer matrix was prepared by post irradiation grafting of acrylonitrile (AN) onto thermally bonded non-woven matrix of poly(propylene) sheet using electron beams. This precursor polymer was reacted with hydroxylamine to convert AN to poly(acrylamidoxime) (AO) groups, and conditioned by treating them with 2.5 % KOH at 80 deg C for 1 h. The polymer matrix was having the degree of AN grafting ∼106 wt% and its subsequent conversion to AO groups ∼70 %. The water uptake capacity of AO polymer matrix were found to be 100 ± 5 % (w/w). Quantitative recovery of uranium from alkaline waste (ammonium diuranate supernatant) solution was achieved by this polymer matrix. The other radionuclides present in the waste solution were not extracted by the polymer matrix. For all other radionuclides, the uptake was found to be <6 %. (author)

  8. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1983-11-01

    The principal uranium bearing mineral in Greenland steenstrupine is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th, U are minor constituents. The Na 2 CO 3 extractant is used for specially acidconsuming ores. However, steenstrupine is decomposed by Na 2 CO 3 only at temperatures above 220degC, so the leaching must be carried out under pressure. Laboratory tests have shown the optimal temperature to be 260degC and the leach liquor composition120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 CO 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary as uranium will not dissolve in carbonate unless it is brought in its highest state of oxidation. According to the laboratory tests it may be estimated that 1 kg of ore suspended in 1 l of leach liquor and ground to 80% minus 200 mesh can be extracted in 20-40 minutes. On the basis of data obtained a process was suggested in which the ore is ground with carbonate leach liquor to a suitable suspension which is fed to an autoclave with a retentiontime of 20 minutes at 260degC. The residue is filtered off and the liquor reused for grinding and ex- traction. The demand for a reaction temperature near 300degC, a pressure up to 120 atm. and a continuos operation favours a tubular flow autoclave with so narrow a bore that the turbulence provides the mechanical agitation of the suspension. From the mined material it appears that more than 80% of the uranium can be extracted in the pipe autoclave. Some samples give off the obtainable uranium in 20 minutes. The precipitated yellow cake is contaminated with more Na and Si than admitted by international standards. (EG)

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  10. Medical Operational Challenges in the Expedition 16 Landing and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, S.; Johnston, S. L.; Ilcus, L. S.; Shevchenko, V.

    2009-01-01

    On April 19, 2008 the crew of Expedition 16 left the International Space Station and returned to earth via their Soyuz TMA-11 capsule after 192 days on orbit. Their capsule experienced the second consecutive and third ballistic reentry in the last 10 TMA recoveries and landed approximately 260 miles (420 km) from the prime landing site. Issues: The purpose of this presentation will be to describe, not only the typical medical operational challenges faced by Flight Surgeons recovering a long duration crew from space, but also address the unique challenges that existed with the Expedition 16 landing and crew recovery. Nominal Soyuz recovery challenges include remote recovery sites with crew exposures to sleep shifting and fatigue, dehydration, hypothermia and hyperthermia, and rotational, sustained, and impact g-forces. These environmental factors coupled with the patho-physiologic neuro-vestibular and orthostatic intolerance changes that occur secondary to the crews reintroduction into the earth s gravity field will be detailed. Additional challenges that were unique to this expedition included a ballistic reentry with higher g-loads, the presence of fire outside of the capsule on landing, a contingency medical event of a ground support personnel, and loss of communications with the crew just prior to landing and during recovery operations. Conclusions: In spite of these unique challenges the Russian Search and Rescue Forces and Medical Support personnel along with U.S. Medical Support performed well together. Possible improvements in training and coordination will be discussed.

  11. Effect of shape and size of amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent on the recovery of uranium from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, H.; Kataki, A.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.; Katoh, S.; Sakane, K.; Sugasaka, K.; Itagaki, T.

    1987-01-01

    An amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent for the recovery of uranium from sea water was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polypropylene fiber of round and cross-shaped sections. The tensile strength and elongation of the synthesized adsorbent, both of which were one-half those of the raw material, were not affected by the shape of the fiber. The deterioration of the adsorption ability induced by immersing the adsorbent in HCl was negligible because of the short immersion time required for the desorption with HCl. The concentration factors for uranium and transition metals in 28 days were in the order of 10 5 , while those for alkali metals and alkaline earth metals were in the order 10 -1 -10 1 . The recovery of uranium with the cross-shaped adsorbent was superior to that of the round-shaped one. XMA line profiles show that the distribution of uranium is much restricted to the surface layer when compared with that of alkaline earth metals. Diminishing the diameter or increasing the surface area was effective for increasing the adsorption of uranium

  12. Uranium 2000 : International symposium on the process metallurgy of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozberk, E.; Oliver, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The International Symposium on the Process Metallurgy of Uranium has been organized as the thirtieth annual meeting of the Hydrometallurgy Section of the Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM). This meeting is jointly organized with the Canadian Mineral Processors Division of CIM. The proceedings are a collection of papers from fifteen countries covering the latest research, development, industrial practices and regulatory issues in uranium processing, providing a concise description of the state of this industry. Topics include: uranium industry overview; current milling operations; in-situ uranium mines and processing plants; uranium recovery and further processing; uranium leaching; uranium operations effluent water treatment; tailings disposal, water treatment and decommissioning; mine decommissioning; and international regulations and decommissioning. (author)

  13. Development of an alternative process for recovery of uranium from rejected plates in the manufacture of MTR type fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores Gonzalez, Jocelyn Natalia

    2011-01-01

    This work discusses the recovery of enriched uranium in U 235 , from fuel plates rejected during the fuel elements manufacturing process for the La Reina Nuclear Studies Center, RECH-1, CCHEN. The plates have an aluminum based alloy coating, AISI-SAE 6061, with U 3 Si 2 powder distributed evenly inside and dispersed in an aluminum matrix. The high cost of enriched uranium means that it must be recovered from plates rejected in the production process because of non-compliance with the plate specifications, and also because some of them undergo destructive testing, to measure the aluminum coating's thickness on each side of the plate. The thickness of the uranium nucleus is measured as well and the size of the defects on the ends of the plate such as 'dog bone' and 'fish tail', that is, for the purposes of quality control. The first step in the process is carried out by dissolving the aluminum in a hot solution of NaOH in order to release the uranium silicide powder that is insoluble in the soda. A second step involves dissolving the uranium silicide in a hot HNO 3 solution, followed by washing and filtering, and then extracting the SX and analyzing its behavior during this stage. During the process 98.9% of the uranium is recovered together with a solution that is enough for the SX process given the experiences that were carried out in the extraction stage

  14. Development and optimisation of process parameters for recovery of uranium from calcia slag and lining material (SLM) by leaching process and subsequent recovery of uranium from the leach liquor generated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Srivastava, Praveen Kumar; Das, Santanu; Kumar, Raj; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Presently uranium value is recovered by nitric acid dissolution of the SLM, to get uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) and subsequent solvent extraction process. UNS generated After SLM dissolution is very lean in uranium content and create difficulty in solvent extraction. Moreover, NO X is also generated during SLM dissolution in nitric acid. An alternate process was developed where nitric acid is not being used and uranium is being recovered by leaching out the SLM using acetic acid. The process was also optimised for recovery and overall economics of the process by using process effluent AALL (Acetic Acid Leach Liquor) as a leaching agent. The uranium value in the leach liquor was precipitated by using sodium hydroxide. The precipitate was dissolved in nitric acid and the Uranyl Nitrate Solution generated was having Uranium concentration of 15-30 g/l. The alternate process developed will have less effluent generation, less NO X generation and will produce more concentrated UNS in comparison to the nitric acid dissolution process

  15. Delayed gastrointestinal recovery after abdominal operation – role of alvimopan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger NG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas G Berger, Timothy J Ridolfi, Kirk A LudwigDivision of Colorectal Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin USAAbstract: Postoperative Ileus (POI, which occurs after surgical manipulation of the bowel during abdominal operations, is associated with prolonged hospital stay, increasing medical costs, and delayed advancement of enteral diet, which contributes to a significant economic burden on the healthcare system. The use of accelerated care pathways has shown to positively impact gut function, but inevitable postoperative opioid use contributes to POI. Alvimopan is a peripherally acting µ-opioid receptor antagonist designed to mitigate antimotility effects of opioids. In our review, we examined ten trials on alvimopan's use after abdominal operations. Several of the earlier studies on patients undergoing bowel resection showed correlations between the study group and GI recovery as defined by passage of flatus, first bowel movement, and time to readiness for discharge. Data in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy showed similarly decreased GI recovery time. Additionally, data within the past few years shows alvimopan is associated with more rapid GI recovery time in patients undergoing radical cystectomy. Based on our review, use of alvimopan remains a safe and potentially cost-effective means of reducing POI in patients following open GI surgery, radical cystectomy, and total abdominal hysterectomy, and should be employed following these abdominal operations.Keywords: postoperative ileus, alvimopan, ileus, bowel resection, return of bowel function

  16. The elimination of chlorinated, chlorofluorocarbon, and other RCRA hazardous solvents from the Y-12 Plant's enriched uranium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.H.; Patton, R.L.; Thompson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    A major driving force in waste minimization within the plant is the reduction of mixed radioactive wastes associated with operations on highly enriched uranium. High enriched uranium has a high concentration of the uranium-235 isotope (up to 97.5% enrichment) and is radioactive, giving off alpha and low level gamma radiation. The material is fissionable with as little as two pounds dissolved in water being capable of producing a spontaneous chain reaction. For these reasons the material is processed in small batches or small geometries. Additionally, the material is completely recycled because of its strategic and monetary value. Since the early eighties, the plant has had an active waste minimization program which has concentrated on substitution of less hazardous solvents wherever possible. The following paper summarizes efforts in two areas - development of a water-based machining coolant to replace perchloroethylene and substitution of an aliphatic solvent to replace solvents producing hazardous wastes as defined by the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA)

  17. Studies on uranium recovery from inlet stream of Effluent Treatment Plant by novel 'In-House' sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangita Pal; Tewari, P.K.; Suchismita Mishra; Pandit, G.G.; Puranik, V.D.; Satpati, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    'In-House' resin Polyacrylhydroxamic acid (PHOA) has been synthesized and utilized targeting ground water remediation; recovery of uranium from low concentration aqueous solution e.g., mining activities related water, flooding of excavated or deplumed areas, nuclear plant washed effluent and process generated effluents in nuclear plant during front-end as well as back-end treatment. In the present study, treatment of field effluent containing heavy metals and radio-nuclides from contaminated mining sites reflected preference for uranium with respect to manganese. The specific complexation between the extractant and metal ion especially uranium provides high distribution co-efficient (K d ) for uranium (K d,U = 1,450 mL/g from inlet of Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) and K d,U = 74,950 mL/g for synthetic solution) compared to high level impurity (1,000 times higher concentration) of manganese (K d,Mn = 111 mL/g from inlet of ETP and K d,Mn = 10,588 mL/g for synthetic solution). The 'In-House' resin showed significant extractability (70-95% elution efficiency) and indicates a possibility of selective removal/recovery of the valuable metal ions even from secondary sources. As a specialty, resin can be regenerated and reused. (author)

  18. Overview of the nuclear fuel resources – seawater uranium recovery program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, S.

    2014-01-01

    For nuclear energy to remain a sustainable energy source, there must be assurance that an economically viable supply of nuclear fuel is available. One major goal of the Fuel Cycle Technology Research and Development (R&D) Program in the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is to develop sustainable fuel cycles options. The development of technology to recover uranium from seawater has the potential to fulfill this program goal. Seawater uranium recovery technology is identified in the U.S. DOE NE Roadmap as an area most appropriate for federal involvement to support long-term, “game-changing” approach. Seawater contains more than 4 billion metric tons of dissolved uranium. This unconventional uranium resource, combined with a suitable extraction cost, can potentially meet the uranium demands for centuries to come. The challenge, however, is the low concentration of uranium in seawater – approximately 3.3 ppb. A multidisciplinary team from the U.S. national laboratories, universities, and research institutes has been assembled to address this challenge. Polymeric adsorbents materials containing amidoxime ligands, developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), have demonstrated great promise for the extraction of uranium from seawater. These ORNL adsorbents showed adsorption capacities for the extraction of uranium from seawater that exceed 3 mg U/g adsorbent in testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Marine Sciences Laboratory. A key component of this novel technology lies in the unique high surface-area polyethylene fibers that considerably increase the surface area and thus the grafting yield of functional groups without compromising its mechanical properties. In addition, high surface area nanomaterial adsorbents are under development at ORNL with the goal of increasing uranium adsorption capacity by taking advantage of the high surface areas and tunable porosity of carbon-based nanomaterials

  19. Research on deeply purifying effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy to remove uranium by ion exchange. Pt.2: Elution uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the intense fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqiang; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    Developing macroporous resin for purifying uranium effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy is presented. The Intense Fractionation Process is employed to elute uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the eluent of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. The result is indicated that the uranium concentration in the rich elutriant is greatly increased, and the rich liquor is only one bed column volume, uranium concentration in the elutriant is increased two times which concentration is 10.1 g/L. The eluent is saved about 50% compared with the conventional fixed bed elution operation. And also the acidity in the rich elutriant is of benefit to the later precipitation process in uranium recovery

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  2. Early operational experience with uranium beams at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; Nolen, J.A.; Specht, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The first acceleration of a uranium beam using the new ATLAS Positive Ion Injector(PII) took place on July 27, 1992. Since that first run, ATLAS and PII have completely achieved the design goals of the project and now provide high-current heavy-ion beams with energies beyond the Coulomb barrier for the research program. ATLAS routinely and reliably provides low-emittance beams of uranium and other very high-mass ions at energies in excess of 6 MeV/n with available on-target beam intensities exceeding 5 particle nA. The expectation that the beam quality for heavy beams would be significantly better than that of the tandem injector has been fully realized. The longitudinal emittance of beams from the PII is typically one-third that of similar beams from the tandem injector. In the past year ATLAS provided uranium beams for approximately 19% of the total research beam time, while beams with A≥100 were used 33% of the time. The system performance and techniques developed which made for this successful result will be discussed. Improvement projects underway will be presented and future goals described

  3. Data base for a CANDU-PHW operating on a once-through natural uranium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This report, prepared for INFCE, describes a standard 600 MW(e) CANDU-PHW reactor operating on a once-through natural uranium fuel cycle. Subsequently, data are given for an extrapolated 1000 MW(e) design (the nominal capacity adopted for the INFCE study) operating on the same fuel cycle. (author)

  4. Operating and life-cycle costs for uranium-contaminated soil treatment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.M.; Armstrong, A.Q.

    1995-09-01

    The development of a nuclear industry in the US required mining, milling, and fabricating a large variety of uranium products. One of these products was purified uranium metal which was used in the Savannah River and Hanford Site reactors. Most of this feed material was produced at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center at Fernald, Ohio. During operation of this facility, soils became contaminated with uranium from a variety of sources. To avoid disposal of these soils in low-level radioactive waste burial sites, increasing emphasis has been placed on the remediating soils contaminated with uranium and other radionuclides. To address remediation and management of uranium-contaminated soils at sites owned by DOE, the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) evaluates and compares the versatility, efficiency, and economics of various technologies that may be combined into systems designed to characterize and remediate uranium-contaminated soils. Each technology must be able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from soil, (3) treat or dispose of resulting waste streams, (4) meet necessary state and federal regulations, and (5) meet performance assessment objectives. The role of the performance assessment objectives is to provide the information necessary to conduct evaluations of the technologies. These performance assessments provide the basis for selecting the optimum system for remediation of large areas contaminated with uranium. One of the performance assessment tasks is to address the economics of full-scale implementation of soil treatment technologies. The cost of treating contaminated soil is one of the criteria used in the decision-making process for selecting remedial alternatives

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  6. Decommissioning and reclamation of the Beaverlodge uranium mine-mill operation: current state of the transition phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.L.J.; Himbeault, K.T.; Topp, B.J.; Halbert, B.E.; Fernandes, S.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Beaverlodge uranium mining and milling facilities were operated from 1952 to 1981 with about 94% of the ore extracted from the main underground mine and 6% from smaller satellite deposits. Decommissioning work occurred from 1982 to 1985 involving periods of shutdown, salvage and reclamation. Transition phase monitoring, leading to eventual delicencing commenced in July 1985. Over the last 15 years, discharge from the tailings management facility (TMF) and a fresh water stream, impacted during the operational phase by tailings spills, has improved in water quality for most parameters of concern. Loadings to the environment of three key contaminants (radium-226, total dissolved solids and uranium) have consistently been less than during the operational phase with radium-226 having the greatest variability. Outstanding environmental issues associated with the recovering drainage system formerly used for tailings disposal, are being addressed in an enhanced environmental monitoring program to commence in 2000. Changes in water chemistry and the natural re-introduction of aquatic organisms are issues of concern. In the meantime, application for release from selected satellite areas commenced in 1999. This paper reviews the issues which have arisen during the transition phase, outlines how they have and are being addressed, and provides a comparison of original and current predictions of the recovery process underway at the former Beaverlodge mine site. (author)

  7. Recovery of uranium from seawater. 14. System arrangements for the recovery of uranium from seawater by spherical amidoxime chelating resins utilizing natural seawater motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Hiroaki; Kabay, Nalan; Shuto, Taketomi; Jyo, Akinori

    1993-01-01

    In order to evaluate performances of lightly cross-linked highly porous amidoxime resins in uranium-adsorption systems utilizing natural seawater motions, uranium uptake by the resins from seawater was studied by different approaches, such as simulated sea current exposure tests, towing trials, and/or mooring trials. In general, the efficiency of uranium uptake became higher with a decrease in the thickness of packing layers, indicating important roles of fluidization of the resin particles. On the basis of these fundamental data, mooring tests in the natural sea current were designed and conducted. By mooring flat adsorption beds (base area 260 cm 2 , height 3.0 cm) packed with 780 ml of the resin for 40 h, promising uranium uptake as high as 44 mg/kg of resin (9.9 mg/l of resin) was achieved under sea conditions in which the velocity of sea currents and the vertical velocity of waves were 5.5-49.7 cm/s and 3.4-27 cm/s, respectively

  8. Assessment of surface contamination level in an operating uranium ore processing facility of Jaduguda, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meena, J.S.; Patnaik, R.L.; Jha, V.N.; Sahoo, S.K.; Ravi, P.M.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological concern of the occupational workers and the area is given priority over other safety issue in confirmation with the stipulated guideline of national regulatory agency (AERB/FEFCF/SG-2, 2007). The key concern from the radiological hazard evaluation point of view is air activity, external gamma level and surface contamination. Present investigations was carried out to ascertain the surface contamination level of uranium ore processing facility at Jaduguda, Jharkhand. For a low grade uranium ore processing industry surface contamination is a major concern in product precipitation and recovery section. In view of this, the ore processing plant can broadly be classified into three areas i.e. ion exchange area, precipitation and product recovery section and other areas. The monitoring results incorporate the level of surface contamination of the plant during the last five years. The geometric mean activity of surface contamination level was 31.1, 34.5 and 9.8 Bq dm -2 in ion exchange, product precipitation and recovery and other areas with GSD of 2, 2.5 and 1.9. In most of the cases the surface contamination level was well within the recommended limit of 100 Bq dm -2 for M class uranium compound. Occasional cases of surface contamination levels exceeding the recommended limit were addressed and areas were decontaminated. Based on the study, modification in the design feature of the surface of the finished product section was also suggested so that the decontamination procedure can be more effectively implemented

  9. Heat recovery unit operation of HVAC system in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, S. R.; Oh, Y. W.; Song, E. S.; Park, D. K.; Joo, Y. S.; Hong, K. P.

    2003-01-01

    HVAC system including a supply and exhaust air system in IMEF(Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) is an essential facility for preventing a leakage of radioactive materials and for a preservation of a working environment. It costs a lot to operate the HVAC system in IMEF because our ventilation type is once-through system, and an air flow is maintained from low level contamination area to high level and maintained high turns of ventilation air under certain conditions. As HRU(Heat Recovery Unit) at HVAC system based on PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) operation experiences is designed and adopted, it prevents from a heating coil freezing destruction in winter and makes much energy saving etc.. Heat pipe type HRU is adopted in IMEF, and a construction and operation result of HRU is examined

  10. Water Recovery System Architecture and Operational Concepts to Accommodate Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Layne; Tabb, David; Anderson, Molly

    2017-01-01

    Future manned missions beyond low Earth orbit will include intermittent periods of extended dormancy. The mission requirement includes the capability for life support systems to support crew activity, followed by a dormant period of up to one year, and subsequently for the life support systems to come back online for additional crewed missions. NASA personnel are evaluating the architecture and operational concepts that will allow the Water Recovery System (WRS) to support such a mission. Dormancy could be a critical issue due to concerns with microbial growth or chemical degradation that might prevent water systems from operating properly when the crewed mission began. As such, it is critical that the water systems be designed to accommodate this dormant period. This paper identifies dormancy issues, concepts for updating the WRS architecture and operational concepts that will enable the WRS to support the dormancy requirement.

  11. Uranium recovery from waste of the nuclear fuel cycle plants at IPEN-CNEN/SP, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Antonio A.; Ferreira, Joao C.; Zini, Josiane; Scapin, Marcos A.; Carvalho, Fatima Maria Sequeira de, E-mail: afreitas@ipen.b, E-mail: jcferrei@ipen.b, E-mail: jzini@ipen.b, E-mail: mascapin@ipen.b, E-mail: fatimamc@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Sodium diuranate (DUS) is a uranium concentrate produced in monazite industry with 80% typical average grade of U{sup 3}O{sup 8}, containing sodium, silicon, phosphorus, thorium and rare earths as main impurities. Purification of such concentrate was achieved at the nuclear fuel cycle pilot plants of uranium at IPEN by nitric dissolution and uranium extraction into an organic phase using TBP/Varsol, while the aqueous phase retains impurities and a small quantity of non extracted uranium; both can be recovered later by precipitation with sodium hydroxide. Then the residual sodium diuranate goes to a long term storage at a safeguards deposit currently reaching 20 tonnes. This work shows how uranium separation and purification from such bulk waste can be achieved by ion exchange chromatography, aiming at decreased volume and cost of storage, minimization of environmental impacts and reduction of occupational doses. Additionally, the resulting purified uranium can be reused in nuclear fuel cycle.(author)

  12. Moderation control in low enriched 235U uranium hexafluoride packaging operations and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, R.H.; Kovac, F.M.; Pryor, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    Moderation control is the basic parameter for ensuring nuclear criticality safety during the packaging and transport of low 235 U enriched uranium hexafluoride before its conversion to nuclear power reactor fuel. Moderation control has permitted the shipment of bulk quantities in large cylinders instead of in many smaller cylinders and, therefore, has resulted in economies without compromising safety. Overall safety and uranium accountability have been enhanced through the use of the moderation control. This paper discusses moderation control and the operating procedures to ensure that moderation control is maintained during packaging operations and transportation

  13. Study of uranium(VI) speciation in phosphoric acid solutions and of its recovery by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dartiguelongue, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    Because small amounts of uranium are present in phosphate rocks, wet phosphoric acids may contain up to 300 ppm of uranium(VI). Therefore, such acids are a cost-effective unconventional source of this metal. Its recovery is a challenge for metallurgical firms which must develop reliable and selective solvent extraction processes. Such processes need to know the chemical equilibria involved in the extraction process, the speciation of uranium and its thermodynamics in solution. These two last points have been investigated in this work. Firstly, the most probable species of uranium(VI) in phosphoric acid solutions have been selected thanks to a detailed review of the literature. Then, a thermodynamic model founded on an equation of state for electrolytes has been built according these hypotheses. It has been validated with speciation data coming from original ATR-IR spectroscopy measurements. Finally, the composition of the aqueous phosphoric acid solutions and the activity coefficients obtained have been combined with a chemical model of uranium(VI) extraction into an organic phase containing a synergistic mixture of bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) in order to represent the variation of the distribution coefficient of uranium(VI) with H 3 PO 4 concentration. This model had been previously developed at Chimie ParisTech at a given concentration of H 3 PO 4 (i.e., 5,3 mol/L), but in the present study we have tested its validity in an extended range of phosphoric acid concentrations (i.e., 1-7 mol/L) and improved it. (author)

  14. Development and operation of the JAERI superconducting energy recovery linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minehara, Eisuke J.

    2006-02-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute free-electron laser (JAERI FEL) group at Tokai, Ibaraki, Japan has successfully developed one of the most advanced and newest accelerator technologies named "superconducting energy recovery linacs (ERLs)" and some applications in near future using the ERLs. In the text, the current operation and high power JAERI ERL-FEL 10 kW upgrading program, ERL-light source design studies, prevention of the stainless-steel cold-worked stress-corrosion cracking failures and decommissioning of nuclear power plants in nuclear energy industries were reported and discussed briefly as a typical application of the ERL-FEL.

  15. Chapter 3. Classical method of uranium leaching from ores and reasons for incomplete recovery at dumps of State Enterprise 'VOSTOKREDMET'. 3.3. Basic regularities of uranium ores leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2012-01-01

    Present article is devoted to basic regularities of uranium ores leaching. It was found that the basic method of uranium ores enrichment and producing of reasonably rich and pure uranium concentrates (usually technical uranium oxide) is a chemical concentration concluded in selective uranium leaching from ore raw materials with further, uranium compounds - so called uranium chemical concentrates. Such reprocessing of uranium ores with the purpose of uranium chemical concentrates production, currently, are produced everywhere by hydrometallurgical methods. This method in comparison with enrichment and thermal reprocessing is a universal one. Hydrometallurgy - the part of chemical technology covering so called moist methods of metals and their compounds (in the current case, uranium) extraction from raw materials, where they are contained. It can be ores or ore concentrates produced by radiometric, gravitational, floatation enrichment, sometimes passed through high-temperature reprocessing or even industry wastes. The basic operation in hydrometallurgy is its important industrial element - metal or metals leaching as one or another compound. Leaching is conversion of one or several components to solution under impact of relevant technical solvents: water, water solutions, acids, alkali or base, solution of some salts and etc. The basic purpose of leaching in uranium technology is to obtain the most full and selective solution of uranium.

  16. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S.D.; Li, S.X.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl - 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  17. A model for recovery of scrap monolithic uranium molybdenum fuel by electrorefining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kleeck, Melissa A.

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program (RERTR) is toreduce enrichment at research and test reactors, thereby decreasing proliferation risk at these facilities. A new fuel to accomplish this goal is being manufactured experimentally at the Y12 National Security Complex. This new fuel will require its own waste management procedure,namely for the recovery of scrap from its manufacture. The new fuel is a monolithic uraniummolybdenum alloy clad in zirconium. Feasibility tests were conducted in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner using scrap U-8Mo fuel alloy. These tests proved that a uranium product could be recovered free of molybdenum from this scrap fuel by electrorefining. Tests were also conducted using U-10Mo Zr clad fuel, which confirmed that product could be recovered from a clad version of this scrap fuel at an engineering scale, though analytical results are pending for the behavior of Zr in the electrorefiner. A model was constructed for the simulation of electrorefining the scrap material produced in the manufacture of this fuel. The model was implemented on two platforms, Microsoft Excel and MatLab. Correlations, used in the model, were developed experimentally, describing area specific resistance behavior at each electrode. Experiments validating the model were conducted using scrap of U-10Mo Zr clad fuel in the Planar Electrode Electrorefiner. The results of model simulations on both platforms were compared to experimental results for the same fuel, salt and electrorefiner compositions and dimensions for two trials. In general, the model demonstrated behavior similar to experimental data but additional refinements are needed to improve its accuracy. These refinements consist of a function for surface area at anode and cathode based on charge passed. Several approximations were made in the model concerning areas of electrodes which should be replaced by a more accurate function describing these areas.

  18. Image enhancement software for underwater recovery operations: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, William J.; Therrien, Charles W.

    1989-06-01

    This report describes software for performing image enhancement on live or recorded video images. The software was developed for operational use during underwater recovery operations at the Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station. The image processing is performed on an IBM-PC/AT compatible computer equipped with hardware to digitize and display video images. The software provides the capability to provide contrast enhancement and other similar functions in real time through hardware lookup tables, to automatically perform histogram equalization, to capture one or more frames and average them or apply one of several different processing algorithms to a captured frame. The report is in the form of a user manual for the software and includes guided tutorial and reference sections. A Digital Image Processing Primer in the appendix serves to explain the principle concepts that are used in the image processing.

  19. Radioactive air emissions from non-uranium mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silhanek, J.S.; Andrews, V.E.

    1981-01-01

    Section 122 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, Public Law 9595, directed the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency to review all relevant information and determine whether emissions of radioactive pollutants into ambient air will cause or contribute to air pollution which may reasonably be anticipated to endanger public health. A section of this document presented a theoretical analysis of the radioactive airborne emissions from several non-uranium mines including iron, copper, zinc, clay, limestone, fluorspar, and phosphate. Since 1978 EPA's Las Vegas Laboratory has been gathering field data on actual radionuclide emissions from these mines to support the earlier theoretical analysis. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of those field measurements in comparison with the assumed values for the theoretical analysis

  20. Ion-exchange fibers for uranium recovery. Final report, September 8, 1980-November 6, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babcock, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    Development was initiated of ion-exchange fibers that could be used to extract uranium ions from solutions containing 10 ppM uranium or less, such as acid mine waters, leach solutions, various natural groundwaters, and perhaps even seawater. These fibers would ultimately be used to make large, loosely woven mats that could be placed in dilute solutions or uranium. Periodically, the mats would be removed and stripped of uranium with an appropriate solution. Two major approaches to making these fibers were investigated. One involved incorporating conventional amine solvent-extraction reagents into the pores of microporous, polysulfone fibers. This approach was unsuccessful due to a rapid loss of the reagents from the fibers. The second approach was to incorporate water-swollen gels of polymeric amines into the pores of the fibers. These fibers effectively extracted uranium from solutions containing 10 ppM uranium. An economic analysis based on the projected costs of mats made from these fibers and on the value of the uranium recovered by the fibers shows that the mats could be used to economically recover uranium from dilute solutions and that they offer a substantial cost advantage over conventional ion exchange

  1. Recovery of uranium and lanthanides during the production of nitrophosphate fertilizers using tertiary amyl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habashi, F; Awadalla, F T

    1986-01-01

    When phosphate rock is dissolved in nitric acid, phosphoric acid and uranium can be selectively extracted by tertiary amyl alcohol; other impurities including the lanthanides remain in the aqueous phase. Uranium can be recovered from the alcohol phase by selective stripping and the lanthanides from the raffinate by extraction with tributyl phosphate.

  2. Potential Aquifer Vulnerability in Regions Down-Gradient from Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR) Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstone-hosted roll-front uranium ore deposits originate when U(VI) dissolved in groundwater is reduced and precipitated as insoluble U(IV) minerals. Groundwater redox geochemistry, aqueous complexation, and solute migration are instrumental in leaching uranium from source rock...

  3. Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-08-12

    The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

  4. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  5. Resin-based preparation of HTGR fuels: operation of an engineering-scale uranium loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1977-10-01

    The fuel particles for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared from uranium-loaded carboxylic acid ion exchange resins which are subsequently carbonized, converted, and refabricated. The development and operation of individual items of equipment and of an integrated system are described for the resin-loading part of the process. This engineering-scale system was full scale with respect to a hot demonstration facility, but was operated with natural uranium. The feed uranium, which consisted of uranyl nitrate solution containing excess nitric acid, was loaded by exchange with resin in the hydrogen form. In order to obtain high loadings, the uranyl nitrate must be acid deficient; therefore, nitric acid was extracted by a liquid organic amine which was regenerated to discharge a NaNO 3 or NH 4 NO 3 solution waste. Water was removed from the uranyl nitrate solution by an evaporator that yielded condensate containing less than 0.5 ppM of uranium. The uranium-loaded resin was washed with condensate and dried to a controlled water content via microwave heating. The loading process was controlled via in-line measurements of the pH and density of the uranyl nitrate. The demonstrated capacity was 1 kg of uranium per hour for either batch loading contractors or a continuous column as the resin loading contractor. Fifty-four batch loading runs were made without a single failure of the process outlined in the chemical flowsheet or any evidence of inability to control the conditions dictated by the flowsheet

  6. Uranium recovery from the concentrated phosphoric acid prepared by the hemi-hydrate process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, E A; Mahdy, M A; Bakr, M Y [Nuclear materials authority, Cairo, (Egypt); Zatout, A A [Faculty of engineering, Alex. university, Alex, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    It has been proved that the uranium dissolution from El-sebaiya phosphate ore was possible by using 10 Kg of K Cl O{sub 4}/ ton rock during the preparation of high strength phosphoric acid using the hemi hydrate process. In the present work, effective extraction of uranium (about 90%) from the high strength phosphoric acid using a new synergistic solvent mixture of 0.75 M D 2 EHPA/0.1 M TOHPO had been a success. Stripping of uranium from the organic phase was possible by 10 M phosphoric acid while the direct precipitation of uranium concentrate from the later was feasible by using N H{sub 4} F in presence of acetone. 8 figs.

  7. Uranium recovery from the concentrated phosphoric acid prepared by the hemi-hydrate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, E.A.; Mahdy, M.A.; Bakr, M.Y.; Zatout, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    It has been proved that the uranium dissolution from El-sebaiya phosphate ore was possible by using 10 Kg of K Cl O 4 / ton rock during the preparation of high strength phosphoric acid using the hemi hydrate process. In the present work, effective extraction of uranium (about 90%) from the high strength phosphoric acid using a new synergistic solvent mixture of 0.75 M D 2 EHPA/0.1 M TOHPO had been a success. Stripping of uranium from the organic phase was possible by 10 M phosphoric acid while the direct precipitation of uranium concentrate from the later was feasible by using N H 4 F in presence of acetone. 8 figs

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  9. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu ++ , Co ++ , Fe +++ , Ni ++ , Cr +++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  10. In situ carbonate leaching and recovery of uranium from ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunkin, G.G.; Fife, T.P.; Stano, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium is leached from redox roll ore deposits by selective in-situ leaching with a solution of pH 7.4 to 9 (preferably 7.5 to 8.5) containing from about 0.5 to 5g/l of NH 4 HCO 3 and from about 0.1 to 3g/l of peroxide (preferably aqueous H 2 O 2 ), and sufficient NH 3 to maintain the desired pH. The leach solution is then withdrawn from the ore deposit and contacted with a strong base anion exchange material to strip the uranium from the leach solution. The uranium is eluted from the anion exchange material by an aqueous eluant, and the uranium is recovered from the eluate by first acidifying it and then treating it with ammonia to produce a precipitate of relatively pure ammonium diuranate. The content of the three components in the stripped leach solution is adjusted, and then the leach solution is recirculated through the ore deposit. After the uranium ore is removed to the extent economically practicable, the leach solution is replaced with an aqueous reducing solution which when passed into the ore deposit precipitates and renders insoluble any uranium and elements such as vanadium, molybdenum, and selenium. This process produces above ground a very low volume of impurities and waste solutions requiring disposal and does not cause material contamination of the underground deposit or any aquifer associated with the deposit

  11. From USA operation experience of industrial uranium-graphite reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    The review on materials, presented by a group of the USA specialists at the seminar in Moscow on October 9-11, 1995 is considered. The above specialists shared their experience in operation of the Hanford industrial reactors, aimed at plutonium production for atomic bombs. The purpose of the above visit consisted in providing assistance to the Russian specialists by evaluation and modernization of operational conditions safety improvement of the RBMK type reactors. Special attention is paid to the behaviour of the graphite lining and channel tubes with an account of possible channel power interaction with the reactor structural units. The information on the experience of the Hanford reactor operation may be useful for specialists, operating the RBMK type reactors

  12. Process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremanns, R.H.; Vandersteene, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention concerns a process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide in the form of PuO 2 . Mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide are being used more and more. The plants which prepare these mixed fuels have around 5% of the total mass of fuels as fabrication residue, either as waste or scrap. In view of the high cost of plutonium, it has been attempted to recover this plutonium from the fabrication residues by a process having a purchase price lower than the price of plutonium. The problem is essentially to separate the plutonium, the uranium and the impurities. The residues are fluorinated, the UF 6 and PuF 6 obtained are separated by selective absorption of the PuF 6 on NaF at a temperature of at least 400 0 C, the complex obtained by this absorption is dissolved in nitric acid solution, the plutonium is precipitated in the form of plutonium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, and the precipitated plutonium oxalate is calcined

  13. Magnesio-thermic reduction of UF4 to uranium metal : plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayekar, S.V.; Singh, H.; Meghal, A.M.; Koppiker, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium Metal Plant has switched over from calcio-thermy to magnesio-thermy for production of uranium ingots. In this paper, the plant operating experience for magnesio-thermic reduction is described. Based on trials, the production has been stepped up from 40 kg ingots to 200 kg ingots. The operating parameters optimised include : heating schedule, UF 4 quality, magnesium quantity and quality, and particle size. The effect of quality of refractory lining has been discussed. Conditions for lining are optimised with regard to type of material used and size. Developmental work has also been carried out on use of pelletised charge and on use of graphite sleeves. Some experience in the machining of ingots for removal of surface slag is also discussed. Impurity problems, occasionally encountered, have been investigated and results are discussed. Based on the experience gained, specifications for operation have been laid down, and areas for further improvement are identified. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Guidebook on design, construction and operation of pilot plants for uranium ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The design, construction and operation of a pilot plant are often important stages in the development of a project for the production of uranium concentrates. Since building and operating a pilot plant is very costly and may not always be required, it is important that such a plant be built only after several prerequisites have been met. The main purpose of this guidebook is to discuss the objectives of a pilot plant and its proper role in the overall project. Given the wide range of conditions under which a pilot plant may be designed and operated, it is not possible to provide specific details. Instead, this book discusses the rationale for a pilot plant and provides guidelines with suggested solutions for a variety of problems that may be encountered. This guidebook is part of a series of Technical Reports on uranium ore processing being prepared by the IAEA's Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management. 42 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Remediation of a uranium-contaminated quarry utilizing submersible, remotely operated vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, K.N.

    1992-01-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) Disposal Site on the Oak Ridge (Tennessee) Reservation was previously used to treat and dispose of pyrophoric and water-reactive wastes contaminated with small quantities of radioactive materials (almost exclusively uranium and uranium daughters) from processes at the Department of Energy-owned, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This paper describes remediation techniques utilizing a small, remotely operated submarine with an attached camera to visually locate waste containers, determine whether containers have been breached, transport small containers, and direct a larger remotely operated grappling machine to move larger waste for shredding operations. Most of the solid waste is reduced under water by a metal shredder. Non-shreddable items (e. g. , gas cylinders and larger structures) are mechanically breached under water to allow the contents to fully react. The waste is then removed from the water, monitored, the material is segregated, and transported to a temporary waste storage area until disposal

  16. Recovery of uranium contained in phosphoric acid by a wet method and its transformation in a high-purity uraniferous concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davister, A.; Dubreucq, A.; Granville, G.; Gray, H.

    1984-01-01

    There are altogether three plants in active operation today for the recovery of uranium contained in the phosphoric acid, two in the USA and one in Prayon in Belgium. All three utilize the same solvant, i.e. the Depa-Topo mixture. The Prayon plant was started up in May 1980. Phosphoric acid is desaturated before the extraction for a long time at a low temperature, totally free from mineral and organic solids and rid of its soluble humic matter until a clear acid of very low optical density is obtained. During the re-extraction of the first cycle, the reduction of U 6+ into U 4+ is effected by metallic iron, according to an original patented process which permits the reduction of the introduced iron to a strict minimum. At the end of the second cycle, an original technique permits the precipitation of a uranium and ammonium hydroxide, starting from the aqueous phase, first separated from the organic phase and purified as regards iron; because of this, the concentrate requires no roasting [fr

  17. The model of interaction with the National Operator when doing uranium mining in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yermilov, A.; Niyetbayev, M.; Sakharova, Y.

    2014-01-01

    The report presents a model of organizational and production interaction with the National Operator, NAC Kazatomprom JSC, with regard to uranium mining in Kazakhstan by means of mechanism of joint management of mining, processing and service companies. NAC Kazatomprom JSC is the world's largest producer of uranium, and Uranium One Holding is the largest foreign partner of the National Operator. The mining assets of Uranium One Holdings include the following joint ventures: Betpak Dala LLP (South Inkai and Akdala Mines), Karatau LLP, Akbastau JSC, Kyzylkum LLP and KRC Zarechnoye JSC. It shows that the project management in the form of joint ventures allows for minimization of investment risks in Kazakhstan. The practice of corporate communication with NAC Kazatomprom JSC goes far beyond the “investment– receipt of dividends” scheme when the investment guarantees mean control over the enterprise activities through participation in the meetings of enterprise management bodies. The sustainable model has been developed for the interaction with the National Operator and with state authorities of the Republic of Kazakhstan through or together with the National Operator, whereby various projects have been implemented starting with the joint support of social development of Kazakhstan regions in excess of the minimum amounts established by the government in subsoil use contracts (through Kazatomprom-Demeu LLP, specially established for this purpose) and ending with the implementation of such major projects as the “Atomic Ring” or innovative projects on the construction of alternative energy sources (solar power plant) on sites of joint industrial projects. Effective cooperation with the National operator Kazatomprom allowed to successfully establish and run at the jointly owned mines the program of efficiency improvement which stimulates continuous improvement of current operations and results in considerable cost reduction. The key ideas of the Efficiency

  18. Data base for a CANDU-PHW operating on a once-through, slightly enriched uranium cycle (AECL-6594)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This report, prepared for INFCE, gives data for an extrapolated 1000 MW(e) CANDU-PHW design operating on a once-through fuel cycle with a feed fuel of slightly enriched uranium - 1.2 weight % U-235 in uranium. The effects of varying fuel enrichment, maximum channel power, and economic parameters are also discussed

  19. Uncertainty and variability in laboratory derived sorption parameters of sediments from a uranium in situ recovery site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangelmayr, Martin A; Reimus, Paul W; Johnson, Raymond H; Clay, James T; Stone, James J

    2018-06-01

    This research assesses the ability of a GC SCM to simulate uranium transport under variable geochemical conditions typically encountered at uranium in-situ recovery (ISR) sites. Sediment was taken from a monitoring well at the SRH site at depths 192 and 193 m below ground and characterized by XRD, XRF, TOC, and BET. Duplicate column studies on the different sediment depths, were flushed with synthesized restoration waters at two different alkalinities (160 mg/l CaCO 3 and 360 mg/l CaCO 3 ) to study the effect of alkalinity on uranium mobility. Uranium breakthrough occurred 25% - 30% earlier in columns with 360 mg/l CaCO 3 over columns fed with 160 mg/l CaCO 3 influent water. A parameter estimation program (PEST) was coupled to PHREEQC to derive site densities from experimental data. Significant parameter fittings were produced for all models, demonstrating that the GC SCM approach can model the impact of carbonate on uranium in flow systems. Derived site densities for the two sediment depths were between 141 and 178 μmol-sites/kg-soil, demonstrating similar sorption capacities despite heterogeneity in sediment mineralogy. Model sensitivity to alkalinity and pH was shown to be moderate compared to fitted site densities, when calcite saturation was allowed to equilibrate. Calcite kinetics emerged as a potential source of error when fitting parameters in flow conditions. Fitted results were compared to data from previous batch and column studies completed on sediments from the Smith-Ranch Highland (SRH) site, to assess variability in derived parameters. Parameters from batch experiments were lower by a factor of 1.1 to 3.4 compared to column studies completed on the same sediments. The difference was attributed to errors in solid-solution ratios and the impact of calcite dissolution in batch experiments. Column studies conducted at two different laboratories showed almost an order of magnitude difference in fitted site densities suggesting that experimental

  20. Uncertainty and variability in laboratory derived sorption parameters of sediments from a uranium in situ recovery site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangelmayr, Martin A.; Reimus, Paul W.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Clay, James T.; Stone, James J.

    2018-06-01

    This research assesses the ability of a GC SCM to simulate uranium transport under variable geochemical conditions typically encountered at uranium in-situ recovery (ISR) sites. Sediment was taken from a monitoring well at the SRH site at depths 192 and 193 m below ground and characterized by XRD, XRF, TOC, and BET. Duplicate column studies on the different sediment depths, were flushed with synthesized restoration waters at two different alkalinities (160 mg/l CaCO3 and 360 mg/l CaCO3) to study the effect of alkalinity on uranium mobility. Uranium breakthrough occurred 25% - 30% earlier in columns with 360 mg/l CaCO3 over columns fed with 160 mg/l CaCO3 influent water. A parameter estimation program (PEST) was coupled to PHREEQC to derive site densities from experimental data. Significant parameter fittings were produced for all models, demonstrating that the GC SCM approach can model the impact of carbonate on uranium in flow systems. Derived site densities for the two sediment depths were between 141 and 178 μmol-sites/kg-soil, demonstrating similar sorption capacities despite heterogeneity in sediment mineralogy. Model sensitivity to alkalinity and pH was shown to be moderate compared to fitted site densities, when calcite saturation was allowed to equilibrate. Calcite kinetics emerged as a potential source of error when fitting parameters in flow conditions. Fitted results were compared to data from previous batch and column studies completed on sediments from the Smith-Ranch Highland (SRH) site, to assess variability in derived parameters. Parameters from batch experiments were lower by a factor of 1.1 to 3.4 compared to column studies completed on the same sediments. The difference was attributed to errors in solid-solution ratios and the impact of calcite dissolution in batch experiments. Column studies conducted at two different laboratories showed almost an order of magnitude difference in fitted site densities suggesting that experimental methodology

  1. Effect of reagent parameters on recovery of South Africa uranium ore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afolabi, A.S., E-mail: afolaas@unisa.ac.za [Univ. of South Africa, Dept. of Civil and Chemical Engineering, Johannesburg (South Africa); Muzenda, E. [Univ. of Johannesburg, Chemical Engineering Technology Dept., Johannesburg (South Africa); Sigwadi, R. [SGS Lakefield Research Africa (Pty) Ltd., Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of leach parameters to determine the variability of reagents consumption on a uranium ore was investigated in this work. The effects of time, temperature sulphates, and acid consumption on the rate of dissolution of the comminuted uranium ore samples were also studied. It was found that 77% dissolution of uranium was achieved after 8 hours while maximum uranium leaching of 92% was achieved at temperature 30{sup o}C for 1 hour. The addition of ferric sulphate at 30{sup o}C showed a decrease in acid consumption from 79.32 kg/t to 32.32 kg/t as well as decrease in the MnO{sub 2} consumption from 21.03 kg/t to 15.06 kg/t. At elevated temperature of 6{sup o}C a higher acid consumption of 100 kg/t was obtained and this is attributed to the fact that other acid consuming minerals were leached at this temperature. Maximum uranium dissolution of 89.37% was achieved after 24 hours and the acid consumption was 31 kg/t with a MnO{sub 2} addition of 24.26 kg/t. (author)

  2. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  3. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  4. Optimal operation of integrated processes. Studies on heat recovery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glemmestad, Bjoern

    1997-12-31

    Separators, reactors and a heat exchanger network (HEN) for heat recovery are important parts of an integrated plant. This thesis deals with the operation of HENs, in particular, optimal operation. The purpose of heat integration is to save energy, but the HEN also introduces new interactions and feedback into the overall plant. A prerequisite for optimisation is that there are extra degrees of freedom left after regulatory control is implemented. It is shown that extra degrees of freedom may not always be utilized for energy optimisation, and a quantitative expression for the degrees of freedom that can be so utilized are presented. A simplified expression that is often valid is also deduced. The thesis presents some improvements and generalisations of a structure based method that has been proposed earlier. Structural information is used to divide possible manipulations into three categories depending on how each manipulation affects the utility consumption. By means of these categories and two heuristic rules for operability, the possible manipulations are ordered in a priority table. This table is used to determine which manipulation should be preferred and which manipulation should be selected if an active manipulation is saturated. It is shown that the method may correspond to split-range control. A method that uses parametric information in addition to structural information is proposed. In this method, the optimal control structure is found through solving an integer programming problem. The thesis also proposes a method that combines the use of steady state optimisation and optimal selection of measurements. 86 refs., 46 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Recovery of uranium from phosphoric acid medium by polymeric composite beads encapsulating organophosphorus extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, D.K.; Yadav, K.K.; Varshney, L.; Singh, H. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-07-01

    The present study deals with the preparation and evaluation of the poly-ethersulfone (PES) based composite beads encapsulating synergistic mixture of D2EHPA and Cyanex 923 (at 4:1 mole ratio) for the separation of uranium from phosphoric acid medium. SEM was used for the characterization of the composite materials. Addition of 1% PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) improved the internal morphology and porosity of the beads. Additionally, microscopic examination of the composite bead confirmed central coconut type cavity surrounded by porous polymer layer of the beads through which exchange of metal ions take place. Effect of various experimental variables including aqueous acidity, metal ion concentration in aqueous feed, concentration of organic extractant inside the beads, extractant to polymer ratio, liquid to solid (L/S) ratio and temperature on the extraction of uranium was studied. Increase in acidity (1-6 M), L/S ratio (1- 10), metal ion concentration (0.2-3 g/L U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) and polymer to extractant ratio (1:4 -1:10) led to decrease in extraction of uranium. At 5.5 M (comparable to wet process phosphoric acid concentration) the extraction of uranium was about 85% at L/S ratio 5. Increase in extractant concentration inside the bead resulted in enhanced extraction of metal ion. Increase in temperature in the range of 30 to 50 Celsius degrees increased the extraction, whereas further increase to 70 C degrees led to the decrease in extraction of uranium. Amongst various reagents tested, stripping of uranium was quantitative by 12% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. Polymeric beads were found to be stable and reusable up-to 10 cycles of extraction/stripping. (authors)

  6. Recovery treatment for the non fissioned uranium in the production of Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Acosta C, A.L.; Lopez M, B.E.

    1991-09-01

    An effective modification of the chemical processes has been obtained to dissolve at the uranium-IV and to extract it as uranyl triperoxidate that facilitates its manipulation and final conversion to uranyl nitrate like a concentrate of high purity. (Author)

  7. Percolation leaching and uranium recovery of El erediya granitic rocks, eastern desert, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Monem, H.M.; Ali, M.M.; Hassan, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    El erediya uranium occurrence is located in the vicinity of qena-safaga road, central eastern desert. A bulk head sample of about 50 kg was prepared for this study. mineralogically, uranophane is the essential uranium mineral identified in the studied bulk head sample. It occurs as yellow flakes and acicular grains filling fractures, whereas the gangue minerals are mainly composed of quartz, altered potash feldspar, and minor plagioclase. The head sample assays as 74.36% SiO 2 , 13.81% Al 2 O 3 and 0.091% U. Percolation leaching utilizing H 2 SO 4 was performed at a fairly low Ph value. The examined factors include Ph of the leach solution, the grain size beside the duration time. More than 97% leaching of the uranium was reported after percolating the leach solution for 6 weeks at ph 1.4. Thus it could be possible to produce a pregnant leach solution assaying more than 1.2 g U/L by using a multi-stage leaching system. For recovering uranium, tri-octyl-phosphine oxide (TOPO) in kerosene was found to be the most powerful U-extractant. Good U-distribution coefficient (E) of 103 has been obtained with 0.1 M TOPO in the presence of 0.1 M HNO 3

  8. Seismicity induced by mining operations in the surrounding of the uranium ore mine Schlema-Alberoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, Olaf; Hiller, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The uranium mine Schlema-Alberoda of the Wismut GmbH (Chemnitz, Federal Republic of Germany) is situated in the Westerzgebirge between the villages Aue, Schneeberg and Hartenstein. This 22 km 2 large area contains the villages Bad Schlema with the districts Oberschlema, Niederschlema and Wildbach as well as the district Alberode of the village Aue. The most important waters are the Zwickauer Mulde flowing through this territory from the south to the north. This territory can be designated as a densely populated low mountain range landscape being characterized by mining operations for centuries. Subsequently to the year 1945, the former Soviet 'Saxonian mining administration' started the first explorations on uranium ores inter alia in the area around Schneeberg and Schlema. In the year 1946, the intensive exploration and exploitation began in the health resort Oberschlema well-known by the existence of water containing radium. Up to the year 1959, the part deposit Oberschlema was dismantled. The dismantling ranged till to a depth of 750 m. With the expansion of the explorations in north-western direction, in 1948 the first uranium containing corridors of the part deposit Niederschlema-Alberoda was verified. The mining activities began in the year 1949 and culminated in the midst of the 1960ies with an annual production of more than 4,000 tons of uranium. The 1,800 m floor level as the deepest floor level was reached in the year 1986. A total of 49.5 million cubic meters of rocks was dissolved, and a total of 80,500 tons of uranium ores was mined. These were nearly 35% of the total production of the former Soviet-German public limited company Wismut (SDAG Wismut).

  9. Recovery of thorium and uranium from monazite processing Liquor produced by INB/Caldas, M G, by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Janubia Cristina Braganca da Silva

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the study of thorium and uranium recovery from sulfuric liquor generated in chemical monazite treatment by solvent extraction technique. The sulfuric liquor was produced by Industries Nuclear of Brazil - INB, Caldas - Minas Gerais State. The study was carried out in two steps: in the first the process variable were investigated through discontinuous experiments; in the second, the parameters were optimized by continuous solvent extraction experiments. The influence of the following process variables was investigated: type and concentration of extracting agents, contact time between phases and aqueous/organic volumetric ratio. Extractants used in this study included: Primene J M-T, Primene 81-R, Alamine 336 and Aliquat 336. Thorium and uranium were simultaneously extracted by a mixture of Primene J M-T and Alamine 336, into Exxsol D-100. The stripping was carried out by hydrochloric acid (HCl) 2.0 mol/L. The study was carried out at room temperature. After selected the best process conditions, two continuous experiments of extraction and stripping were carried out. In the first experiment a mixture of 0.15 mol/L Primene J M-T and 0.05 mol/L Alamine 336 were used. The second experiment was carried out using 0.15 mol/L Primene J M-T and 0.15 mol/L Alamine 336. Four extraction stages and five stripping stages were used in both experiments. The first experiment showed a ThU 2 and U 3 O 8 content in loaded strip solution of 34.3 g/L and 1.49 g/L respectively and 0.10 g/L Th) 2 and 0.05 g/L U 3 O 8 in the raffinate. In the second experiment a loaded strip solution with 29.3 g/L ThO 2 and 0.94 g/L U 3 O 8 was obtained. In this experiment, the metals content in raffinate was less than 0.001 g/L, indicating a thorium recovery over 99.9% and uranium recovery of 99.4%. (author)

  10. Recovery of 233U from irradiated J rods - operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmanan, K.; Natarajan, D.; Muthukumar, M.; Halder, Surajit; Jayakrishnan, G.; Selvarasan, M.; Kuppusamy, V.; Ganesan, V.; Vijayakumar, V.

    2000-01-01

    The first campaign of reprocessing was completed in 1988 and 233 U was delivered for fabrication of fuel for KAMINI. After revamping the facility, the second campaign was started in Dec 1998 and has processed some of the high density thoria rods from CIRUS successfully. Currently the campaign is in progress and it is planned to process the irradiated thorium rods from Dhruva. Interim 23 process selective to 233 U is adopted for separation of uranium from thorium and fission products

  11. Persistent U(IV) and U(VI) following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining of a sandstone uranium deposit, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Reimus, P.W.; J.T. Clay,; N. Janot,; J. J. Bargar,; Benzel, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Drill-core samples from a sandstone-hosted uranium (U) deposit in Wyoming were characterized to determine the abundance and distribution of uranium following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining with oxygen- and carbon dioxide-enriched water. Concentrations of uranium, collected from ten depth intervals, ranged from 5 to 1920 ppm. A composite sample contained 750 ppm uranium with an average oxidation state of 54% U(VI) and 46% U(IV). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated rare high uranium (∼1000 ppm U) in spatial association with P/Ca and Si/O attributed to relict uranium minerals, possibly coffinite, uraninite, and autunite, trapped within low permeability layers bypassed during ISR mining. Fission track analysis revealed lower but still elevated concentrations of U in the clay/silica matrix and organic matter (several 10 s ppm) and yet higher concentrations associated with Fe-rich/S-poor sites, likely iron oxides, on altered chlorite or euhedral pyrite surfaces (but not on framboidal pyrite). Organic C (mining, the likely sequestration of uranium within labile iron oxides following mining and sensitivity to changes in redox conditions requires careful attention during groundwater restoration.

  12. Recovery of thorium along with uranium 233 from Thorex waste solution employing Chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priya, S.; Reghuram, D.; Kumaraguru, K.; Vijayan, K.; Jambunathan, U.

    2003-01-01

    The low level waste solution, generated from Thorex process during the processing of U 233 , contains thorium along with traces of Th 228 and U 233 . Chitosan, a natural bio-polymer derived from Chitin, was earlier used to recover the uranium and americium. The studies were extended to find out its thorium sorption characteristics. Chitosan exhibited very good absorption of thorium (350 mg/g). Chitosan was equilibrated directly with the low level waste solution at different pH after adjusting its pH, for 60 minutes with a Chitosan to aqueous ratio of 1:100 and the raffinates were filtered and analysed. The results showed more than 99% of thorium and U 233 could be recovered by Chitosan between pH 4 and 5. Loaded thorium and uranium could be eluted from the Chitosan by 1M HNO 3 quantitatively. (author)

  13. Processing of Indian monazite for the recovery of thorium and uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    The mineral monazite, a phosphate of rare earths and thorium with significant quantity of uranium is one of the six heavy minerals present in the beach sands of specific coastal areas of India. Indian Rare Earths Ltd is mining and processing monazite at its Rare Earths Division for the last many decades with an aim of building up enough stock of thorium concentrate for its future use in the three stage nuclear power programme of the country. The present paper briefly describes the monazite resource position of he country, the past and present modified processing schemes and the future programme commensurate with the requirement of the country for quality thorium and uranium bearing nuclear materials

  14. Nuclear material control and accounting system evaluation in uranium conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Jose Pontes

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems in uranium conversion operations are described. The conversion plant, uses ammonium diuranate (ADU), as starting material for the production of uranium hexafluoride. A combination of accountability and verification measurement is used to verify physical inventory quantities. Two types of inspection are used to minimize the measurements uncertainty of the Material Unaccounted For (MUF) : Attribute inspection and Variation inspection. The mass balance equation is the base of an evaluation of a Material Balance Area (MBA). Statistical inference is employed to facilitate rapid inventory taking and enhance material control of Safeguards. The calculation of one sampling plan for a MBA and the methodology of inspection evaluation are also described. We have two kinds of errors : no detection and false delation. (author)

  15. Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs

  16. Pretreatment of phosphoric acid for uranium recovery by the wet phosphoric acid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chern, S.L.P.; Chen, Y.C.L.; Chang, S.S.H.; Kuo, T.S.; Ting, G.C.M.

    1980-01-01

    The proposal deals with reprocessing of phosphoric acid arising from uranium separation according to the wet phosphoric acid process and being intended for recycling. In detail, the sludge will be removed by means of an inclined separating device containing corrugated plates, then the organic impurities are washed out with kerosene in suitable facilities, and the crude phase remaining in the settling tank will be separated from the kerosene in a separating centrifuge. The method has only got low cost of installation. (UWI) [de

  17. Uranium recovery by leaching with sodium carbonate at high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, E.; Koefoed, S.; Lundgaard, T.

    1990-09-01

    An alkaline rock from the Ilimaussaq instrusion, SW Greenland, was proposed as a source of uranium. Its principal uranium bearing mineral, Steenstrupine, is a complex sodium REE phosphosilicate in which Fe, Mn, Th and U are minor constituents. A special feature of this ore body is the content of water soluble minerals: NaF (Villiaumite), Na 2 Si 2 O 5 (Natrosilite) and an organic substance which displays the characteristics of humus. Sulfides are sparse, the most important one being ZnS (Sphalerite) of which the content is generally less than 0.5%. In the mineral under consideration (Lujavrite) the Steenstrupine is mainly finelay disseminated throughout the rock, yielding a uranium content of 300-400 ppm and thorium content of 800-1000 ppm. Laboratory tests indicated that high temperature carbonate leaching was necessary to decompose Steenstrupine. The optium temperature was shown to be 260 deg. C and the leach liquor composition 120 g/l of NaHCO 3 and 20 g/l of Na 2 C0 3 . Addition of oxygen is necessary. The process was developed to industrial scale in a continuous pipe autoclave with a retention time of 20 min. After filtering on a belt filter, the liquor was recycled several times to obtain a higher U-concentration. By reductive precipitation with iron powder a raw UO 2 was obtained. It was purified after dissolution in HNO 3 . An overall yield of 80% could be obtained. (author) 32 tabs., 13 ills., 24 refs

  18. Selective recovery of uranium from Ca-Mg uranates by chlorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomiro, Federico J.; Gaviría, Juan P.; Quinteros, Raúl D.; Bohé, Ana E.

    2017-07-01

    A chlorination process is proposed for the uranium extraction and separation using Calciumsbnd Magnesium uranates such as starting reactants which were obtained by precipitation from uranyl nitrate solutions with calcium hydroxide. The study is based on thermodynamic and reaction analysis using chlorine gas as chlorination agent. The results showed that the chlorination reaction of Ca uranate is more feasible to occur than the Mg uranate. The products obtained after chlorination reactions were washed with deionized water to remove the chlorides produced and analyzed. The XRD patterns of the washed products indicated that the chlorination between 400 and 500 °C result in a single phase of calcium uranate (CaUO4) as reaction product. The formation of U3O8 and MgU3O10 was observed at temperatures between 600 °C and 700 °C for 8 hs. The optimal conditions to recover uranium were 3 l h-1 of chlorine and 10 hs of reaction at 700 °C being U3O8 the single uranium product obtained.

  19. Critical parameters in the dump and heap leaching of gold, silver, copper and uranium: permeability, solution delivery and solution recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastra, M.K.; Chase, C.K.

    1984-02-01

    Critical to successful dump and heap leaching for gold, silver, copper and uranium are factors such as permeability, solution delivery to the ore, and solution recovery. This paper deals with possible techniques for successful accomplishment of these three factors. New developments as well as older techniques are discussed, together with rationals for use of some techniques in reference to others. The authors hope to present a checklist so that the ideal application to individual mine situations can be achieved. This involves a discussion of the merits of each different method and the situations for most logical application. It is hoped that such discussion will broaden the geographic areas where dump and heap leaching can be applied to include greater winter cold and tropical regions of large amounts of rainfall.

  20. Critical parameters in the dump and heap leaching of gold, silver, copper and uranium: permeability, solution delivery and solution recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lastra, M.K.; Chase, C.K.

    1984-01-01

    Critical to successful dump and heap leaching for gold, silver, copper and uranium are factors such as permeability, solution delivery to the ore, and solution recovery. This paper deals with possible techniques for successful accomplishment of these three factors. New developments as well as older techniques are discussed, together with rationals for use of some techniques in reference to others. The authors hope to present a checklist so that the ideal application to individual mine situations can be achieved. This involves a discussion of the merits of each different method and the situations for most logical application. It is hoped that such discussion will broaden the geographic areas where dump and heap leaching can be applied to include greater winter cold and tropical regions of large amounts of rainfall

  1. Uranium extraction at Rossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, S.B.; Fahrbach, D.O.E.

    1982-01-01

    Rossing Uranium Ltd. operates a large open pit uranium mine and extraction plant at a remote site in the Namib desert. Production started at the plant in 1978. A ferric leach process was introduced later, and the new leach plant began commissioning in October 1981. The process has proved to be reliable and easily controlled. Ferric iron is supplied through recovery from the acid plant calcine, and levels can be maintained above the design levels. Leach extractions were increased more than expected when this process was adopted, and the throughput has been considerably reduced, allowing cost savings in mining and milling

  2. Uranium recovering from slags generated in the metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN/CNEN-SP has recent/y concluded a program for developing the fabrication technology of the nuclear fuel based on the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion, which is being used in the IEA-R1 research reactor. The uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) fuel production starts with the uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) processing and uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) precipitation. Then, the UF 4 is converted to metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction. The UF 4 reduction by magnesium generates MgF 2 slag containing considerable concentrations of uranium, which could reach 20 wt%. The uranium contained in that slag should be recovered and this work presents the results obtained in recovering the uranium from that slag. The uranium recovery is accomplished by acidic leaching of the calcined slag. The calcination transforms the metallic uranium in U 3 O 8 , promoting the pulverization of the pieces of metallic uranium and facilitating the leaching operation. As process variables, have been considered the nitric molar concentration, the acid excess regarding the stoichiometry and the leaching temperature. As result, the uranium recovery reached a 96% yield. (author)

  3. Topical and working papers on uranium resources and availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic topics relative to world-wide resources and availability of uranium resources; potential for recovery of uranium from mill tailings in Canada; uranium from seawater; depleted uranium as an energy source; world uranium requirements in perspective

  4. Characterization of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in uranium mill operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in several mechanical and physico-chemical operations in a uranium mill have been investigated. The study consisted of the determination of dust size distribution, and of the radionuclides contained in the particles of each dimension class ranging from <0.1 to 26 μm in diameter. Experiments were conducted using several cascade impactors operating at different sample flow rates. Two different types of cascade impactors were used. Radionuclide identification was done using α-spectrometry and γ-spectrometry. Long-lived and short-lived radionuclides were identified in dust samples. The characteristics of the dust clouds depended on the mill operation. The following operations were studied: crushing (vibrating grizzly, jaw crusher, cone crusher); screening; ore transportation; grinding; acid leaching; counter-current decantation; yellowcake precipitation and drying; and yellowcake packaging. In addition, other dust and radioactivity measurements have been carried out

  5. Operational status of the uranium beam upgrade of the ATLAS accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, R.C.; Bollinger, L.M.; Nolen, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Positive-Ion Injector (PII) for ATLAS is complete. First beams from the new injector have been accelerated and used for experiments at ATLAS. The PH consists of an ECR ion source on a 350-kV platform and a low-velocity superconducting linac. The first acceleration of uranium for the experimental program has demonstrated the design goals of the project have been met. Since the summer of 1992, the new injecter has been used for the research program approximately 50% of the time. Longitudinal beam quality from the new injector has been measured to be significantly better than comparable beams from the tandem injecter. Changes to the mix of resonators in the main ATLAS accelerator to match better the velocity profile for heavy beams such as uranium are nearly complete and uranium energies up to 6.45 MeV per nucleon have been achieved. The operating experience of the new ATLAS facility will be discussed with emphasis on the measured beam quality as well as achieved beam energies and currents

  6. Development of sorbers for the recovery of uranium from seawater. Part 2. The accumulation of uranium from seawater by resins containing amidoxime and imidoxime functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astheimer, L.; Schenk, H.J.; Witte, E.G.; Schwochau, K.

    1983-01-01

    Hydroxylamine derivatives of cross-linked poly(acrylonitriles), so-called poly(acrylamidoxime) resins, are suitable for the accumulation of uranium from natural seawater of pH = 8.1 to 8.3. Depending on the method of manufacture, these sorbers yield excellent uranium loadings up to some thousand ppM which roughly equals the average uranium content of actually explored uranium ores. The rate of uranium uptake, which is 5 to 30 ppM/d at room temperature, increases with increasing temperature of seawater. Uranium can be eluted by 1 M HCl with an elution efficiency of more than 90%. Owing to a certain instability of the uranium binding groups in acid eluants, the uranium uptake decreases with increasing number of sorption-elution cycles. Hydroxylamine derivatives of poly(acrylonitrile) are shown to contain simultaneously at least two kinds of functional groups: open-chain amidoxime groups which are stable and cyclic imidoxime groups which are unstable in 1 M HCl. Experimental evidence is presented that the uptake of uranium from natural seawater is closely related to the presence of cyclic imidoxime configurations in the polyacrylic lattice. Polystyrene and poly(glycidylmethacrylate)-based amidoxime and imide dioxime resins are less effective in extracting uranium from natural seawater. 10 figures, 4 tables

  7. Recovery of Uranium from Seawater: Modified Polyacrylonitrile Fibers as Selective Extractants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandratos, Spiro D. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-03-15

    A new bifunctional fiber has been prepared and found to have a significant loading capacity of uranium from real seawater. The fiber support is polyacrylonitrile and bifunctionality is provided by amidoxime and either diethylenetriamine (DETA) or ethylenediamine (EDA) ligands. The key feature is adjusting the hydrophilic /lipophilic balance within the fiber and this was best accomplished by partially acetylating or carboxylating EDA ligands. The bifunctional carboxylated EDA /AO fiber had a loading capacity of 3.83 mg U/g fiber at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with a 21 day contact time in real seawater.

  8. Recent studies of uranium recovery from wet-process phosphoric acid with octylphenyl acid phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, W.D.

    1978-01-01

    Commercial OPAP is a complex mixture that contains at least 11 components. Octyl phenol is the principal impurity. Commercial OPAP contains readily-hydrolyzable material. The concentrations of octyl phenol and an unidentified impurity increase in the hydrolyzed product. Uranium extraction power is decreased slightly by hydrolysis of the reagent. Four major problems were encountered in continuous stability tests: (1) Microemulsion or micelle formation--loss of organic phase into phosphoric acid. We do not have a solution to this problem at this time. It could involve alteration of the organic, e.g., adding a modifier, changing the reagent structure, or changing the diluent. (2) Reagent poisoning--reduction of uranium extraction and interference with organic titrations by material extracted from the acid. Additional work is needed to identify the poisoning material or materials. It can then be removed if it originates in the phosphate rock, or avoided if it originates in chemicals added during processing. (3) Crystallization with iron--loss of both major components of the reagent as a complex with ferric iron. We believe this problem can be controlled by controlling the ferric iron concentration in the phosphoric acid. (4) MOPPA distribution loss--a selective loss to the aqueous phase. We believe this can be minimized by controlling the iron concentration of the phosphoric acid. The iron concentration will need to be kept low enough to avoid reagent crystallization and high enough to avoid MOPPA distribution loss. 15 figs

  9. Pilot-scale recovery of rare earths and scandium from phosphogypsum and uranium leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashkovtsev Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ural Federal University (UrFU and VTT have performed joint research on development of industrial technologies for the extraction of REM and Scandium compounds from phosphogypsum and Uranium ISL leachate solutions. Leaching-absorption experiments at UrFU have been supported with multicomponent solution modelling by VTT. The simulations have been performed with VTT’s ChemSheet/Balas program and can be used for speciation calculations in the lixiviant solution. The experimental work combines solvent extraction with advanced ion exchange methodology in a pilot facility capable of treating 5 m3 solution per hour. Currently, the plant produces cerium carbonate, lanthanum oxide, neodymium oxide and concentrate of heavy rare earth metals. A batch of 45 t solids has been processed with the gain of 100 kg’s of REM concentrate. A mini-pilot plant with productivity above 50 liters per hour has been applied to recover scandium oxide and REE concentrates from the uranium ISL solution. As the preliminary product contains radioactivity (mainly strontium, an additional decontamination and cleaning of both concentrates by extraction has rendered a necessity. Finally a purified 99% concentrate of scandium oxide as well as 99% rare earth concentrate are received.

  10. Radionuclides in the lichen-caribou-human food chain near uranium mining operations in northern Saskatchewan, Canada.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, P A; Gates, T E

    1999-01-01

    The richest uranium ore bodies ever discovered (Cigar Lake and McArthur River) are presently under development in northeastern Saskatchewan. This subarctic region is also home to several operating uranium mines and aboriginal communities, partly dependent upon caribou for subsistence. Because of concerns over mining impacts and the efficient transfer of airborne radionuclides through the lichen-caribou-human food chain, radionuclides were analyzed in tissues from 18 barren-ground caribou (Ran...

  11. Development of a computer systems for operational data acquisition of uranium isotopic enrichment pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, W.M.C.

    1985-01-01

    A pilot plant for uranium enrichment using the jet nozzle process was transfered from Federal Republic of Germany to Brazil, to train Brazilian technicist in its operation and to improve the process. This pilot plant is monitored by a data acquisition system and the possibility of faulty events would cause serious dificulties, as far as maintenance is concerned (for instance, unvailable special components). It is described the development of a new system, which is proposed in order to minimize difficulties with maintenance that utilizes in the assembling integrated circuits of large scale of integration. It is controlled by a microcomputer. (Author) [pt

  12. Solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, near Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Benzel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This report releases solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. These cores were collected by Powertech Uranium Corporation, and material not used for their analyses were given to the U.S. Geological Survey for additional sampling and analyses. These additional analyses included total carbon and sulfur, whole rock acid digestion for major and trace elements, 234U/238U activity ratios, X-ray diffraction, thin sections, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and cathodoluminescence. This report provides the methods and data results from these analyses along with a short summary of observations.

  13. Ship-in-a-bottle CMPO in MIL-101(Cr) for selective uranium recovery from aqueous streams through adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Decker, Jeroen [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics, and Catalysis (COMOC), Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Folens, Karel [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Clercq, Jeriffa [Department of Materials, Textiles, and Chemical Engineering, Industrial Catalysis and Adsorption Technology (INCAT), Ghent University, Valentin, Vaerwyckweg 1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Meledina, Maria; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Du Laing, Gijs [Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Der Voort, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.vandervoort@ugent.be [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Center for Ordered Materials, Organometallics, and Catalysis (COMOC), Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S3, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2017-08-05

    Highlights: • Highly stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr), for uses in aqueous, acidic adsorption. • Uranium recovery from low concentration acidic solutions. • One-step ship-around-the-bottle synthetic approach to incorporate CMPO in MIL-101(Cr). • Highly selective U(VI) adsorbent in competition with a high variety of metals, incl. rare earths and transition metals. • Regenerable and reusable adsorbent via 0.1 M nitric acid stripping. - Abstract: Mesoporous MIL-101(Cr) is used as host for a ship-in-a-bottle type adsorbent for selective U(VI) recovery from aqueous environments. The acid-resistant cage-type MOF is built in-situ around N,N-Diisobutyl-2-(octylphenylphosphoryl)acetamide (CMPO), a sterically demanding ligand with high U(VI) affinity. This one-step procedure yields an adsorbent which is an ideal compromise between homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, where the ligand can act freely within the pores of MIL-101, without leaching, while the adsorbent is easy separable and reusable. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, XRF, ADF-STEM and EDX, to confirm and quantify the successful encapsulation of the CMPO in MIL-101, and the preservation of the host. Adsorption experiments with a central focus on U(VI) recovery were performed. Very high selectivity for U(VI) was observed, while competitive metal adsorption (rare earths, transition metals...) was almost negligible. The adsorption capacity was calculated at 5.32 mg U/g (pH 3) and 27.99 mg U/g (pH 4), by fitting equilibrium data to the Langmuir model. Adsorption kinetics correlated to the pseudo-second-order model, where more than 95% of maximum uptake is achieved within 375 min. The adsorbed U(VI) is easily recovered by desorption in 0.1 M HNO{sub 3}. Three adsorption/desorption cycles were performed.

  14. Ship-in-a-bottle CMPO in MIL-101(Cr) for selective uranium recovery from aqueous streams through adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Decker, Jeroen; Folens, Karel; De Clercq, Jeriffa; Meledina, Maria; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Du Laing, Gijs; Van Der Voort, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Highly stable metal-organic framework, MIL-101(Cr), for uses in aqueous, acidic adsorption. • Uranium recovery from low concentration acidic solutions. • One-step ship-around-the-bottle synthetic approach to incorporate CMPO in MIL-101(Cr). • Highly selective U(VI) adsorbent in competition with a high variety of metals, incl. rare earths and transition metals. • Regenerable and reusable adsorbent via 0.1 M nitric acid stripping. - Abstract: Mesoporous MIL-101(Cr) is used as host for a ship-in-a-bottle type adsorbent for selective U(VI) recovery from aqueous environments. The acid-resistant cage-type MOF is built in-situ around N,N-Diisobutyl-2-(octylphenylphosphoryl)acetamide (CMPO), a sterically demanding ligand with high U(VI) affinity. This one-step procedure yields an adsorbent which is an ideal compromise between homogeneous and heterogeneous systems, where the ligand can act freely within the pores of MIL-101, without leaching, while the adsorbent is easy separable and reusable. The adsorbent was characterized by XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, XRF, ADF-STEM and EDX, to confirm and quantify the successful encapsulation of the CMPO in MIL-101, and the preservation of the host. Adsorption experiments with a central focus on U(VI) recovery were performed. Very high selectivity for U(VI) was observed, while competitive metal adsorption (rare earths, transition metals...) was almost negligible. The adsorption capacity was calculated at 5.32 mg U/g (pH 3) and 27.99 mg U/g (pH 4), by fitting equilibrium data to the Langmuir model. Adsorption kinetics correlated to the pseudo-second-order model, where more than 95% of maximum uptake is achieved within 375 min. The adsorbed U(VI) is easily recovered by desorption in 0.1 M HNO 3 . Three adsorption/desorption cycles were performed.

  15. Flotation-nitric acid leach procedure for increasing uranium recovery from a refractory ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnahan, T.G.; Lei, K.P.V.

    1979-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines investigated a flotation-nitric acid leach procedure as part of the goal to maximize minerals and metals recovered from primary and secondary domestic resources. Studies were conducted on an ore that contained carbon-bearing and sulfide mineralization that rendered a portion of the ore refractory (resistant) to conventional leaching technology. The procedure investigated for treating the ore consisted of the following: (1) separation by flotation of the carbonaceous and sulfidic components from the ore, (2) leaching the flotation concentrate with nitric acid at 100 0 to 110 0 C, (3) leaching the flotation tailings with sulfuric acid, and (4) processing the combined leached slurries in a conventional manner to recover yellow cake. In step 2, HNO 3 is converted to gaseous products from which it is regenerated by reacting these products with air and water for further leaching. An overall uranium extraction of 96% was achieved by this procedure

  16. Data base for a CANDU-PHW operating on a once-through, natural uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This report, prepared for INFCE, describes a standard 600 MW(e) CANDU-PHW reactor operating on a once-through natural uranium fuel cycle. Subsequently, data are given for an extrapolated 1000 MW(e) design (the nominal capacity adopted for the INFCE study) operating on the same fuel cycle. (author)

  17. An Australian perspective on environmental protection at uranium mines during the operational and post-operational phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, S.

    1996-01-01

    A high level of public interest surrounds uranium mining in Australia near Kakadu National Park, and government regulatory and audit systems are in place to deliver a high level of environmental protection. There is considered to be no significant level of radiological risk of the environment, although there is evidence of radio accumulation in some organisms which is relevant to calculation of radiological dose to Aboriginal communities pursuing a traditional lifestyle in the region. Assessment of environmental risk focuses mainly on water chemistry, where the main contaminants are uranium, sulphate, and magnesium. Assessment of ecosystem health are made mainly on the basis of whole effluent tests. Post-operational protection is aimed at achieving rehabilitation compatible with likely future land use: mainly wilderness and traditional Aboriginal foraging and occasional occupation. Passive management systems with landscapes and vegetation similar to the preexisting condition, and a high degree of chemical, radiological and physiographic stability for the long term (<10000 years) are key objectives in rehabilitation planning and execution

  18. Probabilistic estimates of US uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Long, L.W.; McLaren, R.A.; Ford, C.E.

    1981-02-01

    This report develops and presents probabilistic estimates of total US uranium supply. The word supply is used in the broad sense that both uranium quantity and cost are of interest. Cost implies minimum acceptable selling price rather than market price. Specifically, four types of probability distributions are developed: (1) quantity of US uranium; (2) cost of US uranium; (3) quantity of US uranium available at or below a certain cost; and (4) cost of US uranium given a certain consumption. In this report, uranium refers to recoverable U 3 O 8 (endowment adjusted for mining recovery and milling losses) occurring in both reserve and potential deposits meeting minimum size requirements with minimum grade above 0.01%. Cost includes operating and capital costs, taxes, profit, and cost capital. This definition of cost is often used to better denote this meaning. This definition of cost is contrasted with forward costs, that exclude sunk costs, taxes, and return on investment. Consumption refers to uranium that has been used from the current time to any point in the future. Uranium quantity and consumption are expressed in short tons, while full recovery costs are stated in constant 1980 dollars per pound

  19. Review of recent developments in uranium extraction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfredson, P.G.; Crawford, R.E.; Ring, R.J.

    1978-12-01

    Developments in uranium ore processing technology since the AAEC Symposium on Uranium Processing in July 1972 are reviewed. The main developments include the use of autogenous or semi-autogenous grinding, beneficiation techniques such as radiometric sorting, flotation, magnetic and gravity seperation, strong acid and ferric bacterial leaching processes, solution mining and heap leaching operations, horizontal belt filters for solid-liquid separation, continuous ion exchange processes for use with solutions containing up to 8 wt % solids, hydrogen peroxide and ammonia for the precipitation of uranium to improve product yield and purity, and the recovery of by-product uranium from the manufacture of phosphoric acid and copper processing operations

  20. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  1. Real time gamma monitoring for employees working in an operational underground copper / uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, Cameron E.

    2010-01-01

    For many years electronic devices have been available that are compact enough to utilise for personal gamma radiation monitoring. At BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam underground copper / uranium mine two different types of electronic gamma dosimeters are being used to assess and control exposure to gamma rays present in the underground operations. Canberra Dosicards are being used as part of a program that replaced the use of monthly issued Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) badges with quarterly issue for some work groups. Two types of Polimaster gamma watches have also been introduced to specific work groups to assist with the determination of sites that may require remedial controls for their level of gamma radiation. To date, both programs have been successfully implemented into the radiation monitoring program for the underground operation and have provided dramatic improvements for the control and determination of sources of gamma radiation in the underground environment.

  2. Some design and operating aspects of the Ranger uranium mine treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baily, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    Environmental considerations were key factors in the design of the Ranger Uranium Mines treatment plant. The mine is located adjacent to the Kakadu National Park and has an average rainfall of 1.6m per annum. No contaminated water or liquid effluents are to be released from the project area and thus water management is a key design and operating fact. Particulate and gas emission criteria influenced design as did occupational hygiene factors (dust, radon, housekeeping, maintenance access). Equipment selection and engineering standards were conservative and resulted in the plant attaining design performance in less than three months from the date of commissioning. A number of mechanical and operational problems were experienced. However, none of these problems have had a significant effect on production

  3. The Impact of Climatological Conditions on Low Enriched Uranium Loading Station Operations for the HEU Blend Down Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model was developed using COREsim to perform a time motion study for the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Loading Station operations. The project is to blend Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) with Natural Uranium (NU) to produce LEU to be shipped to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for further processing. To cope with a project cost reduction, the LEU Loading Station concept has changed from an enclosed building with air-conditioning to a partially enclosed building without air conditioning. The LEU Loading Station is within a radiological contaminated area; two pairs of coveralls and negative pressure respirator are required. As a result, inclement weather conditions, especially heat stress, will affect and impact the LEU loading operations. The purposes of the study are to determine the climatological impacts on LEU Loading operations, resources required for committed throughputs, and to find out the optimum process pathways for multi crews working simultaneously in the space-lim ited LEU Loading Station

  4. Evaluation of environmental impacts of uranium mining and milling operations in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, M.; Lopez Romero, A.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium mining and production activities have been carried out by ENUSA since 1973. This report describes the evaluation of environmental aspects connected with uranium mining and milling. (author). 7 figs, 3 tabs

  5. The selection of a matrix for the recovery of uranium by wet high-intensity magnetic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.

    1985-01-01

    The proper choice of a suitable matrix for high-intensity magnetic separation is of the utmost importance, since the geometry and size of the matrix play decisive roles in the achievement of optimum separation conditions. In relatively simple filtration applications, the matrix must offer a high efficiency of collision with suspended particles, a high probability of retention of intercepted particles, and high loading capacity. Also, it must be easily cleaned. The results obtained by the use of theoretical models of magnetic separation fail to agree with the experimental results for basic parameters like the ratio of particle size to matrix size, the length of the matrix, and the magnetic properties of the matrix material. Preconceived ideas about the matrix often lead to the erroneous choice of a matrix, and hence to its unsatisfactory performance during magnetic separation. The potential value of high-intensity magnetic separation as applied to the recovery of uranium and gold from leach residues and in association with the development of a large-scale magnetic separator to be used for the same purpose led to the present investigation in which a wide spectrum of matrix shapes and sizes were tested. It was found that the optimum recovery and selectivity of separation are obtained at a ratio of particle size to matrix-element size ranging from 200 to 300. The use of these matrices also results in a low degree of mechanical entrapment, particularly of coarser particles, for which straining plays a significant role for fine matrices. It was also found that the magnetization of a matrix plays a minor role, contrary to the theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the effects of matrix height, matrix loading, and scalping of the pulp by paramagnetic matrices were evaluated for various types of matrices

  6. Operation of Nuclear Fuel Based on Reprocessed Uranium for VVER-type Reactors in Competitive Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyanov, V.; Molchanov, V.; Tuzov, A. [TVEL Corporation, 49 Kashirskoe shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Semchenkov, Yu.; Lizorkin, M. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V. [OKB ' Gidropress' (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Current nuclear fuel cycle of Russian nuclear power involves reprocessed low-enriched uranium in nuclear fuel production for some NPP units with VVER-type LWR. This paper discusses design and performance characteristics of commercial nuclear fuel based on natural and reprocessed uranium. It presents the review of results of commercial operation of nuclear fuel based on reprocessed uranium on Russian NPPs-unit No.2 of Kola NPP and unit No.2 of Kalinin NPP. The results of calculation and experimental validation of safe fuel operation including necessary isotope composition conformed to regulation requirements and results of pilot fuel operation are also considered. Meeting the customer requirements the possibility of high burn-up achieving was demonstrated. In addition the paper compares the characteristics of nuclear fuel cycles with maximum length based on reprocessed and natural uranium considering relevant 5% enrichment limitation and necessity of {sup 236}U compensation. The expedience of uranium-235 enrichment increasing over 5% is discussed with the aim to implement longer fuel cycles. (authors)

  7. The modelling of the uranium-leaching and ion-exchange processes of the Hartebeestfontein Gold Mine and its role in economic plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, B.R.; Ward, B.

    1985-01-01

    Computer facilities available in the Metallurgical Department at Hartebeestfontein Gold Mine have enabled the research staff to develope complex, practical mathematical models of their uranium hydrometallurgical processes. Empirical models of uranium leaching, uranium loading on resin and redox potential in leach liquors are discussed. These models, developed with non-linear regression techniques, form the basis of an over all mathematical model for a uranium plant. The most economic operating conditions can be predicted for specific prices of uranium and reagents. Substantial profit improvements have been achieved as a result of the changes in the process and equipment that have been made

  8. The effect of the conditions of amidoximation on the adsorptive characteristics of amide oxime resin for uranium recovery from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Takahiro; Furusaki, Shintaro; Sugo, Takanobu; Okamoto, Jiro.

    1987-01-01

    A hollow-fiber type chelating resin containing the amide oxime group for the recovery of uranium from seawater was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization. The effect of the conditions of amidoximation on the amount and/or distribution of the functional groups and on the durability to the recycle adsorption was investigated. The amount of adsorbed copper on the resin increased with the reaction time of the amidoximation, but that of adsorbed hydrochloric acid gradually decreased after reaching the maximum. From the results of elemental analysis, infrared adsorption spectra, visible light and ultraviolet adsorption spectra and the observation of coloration of the resin by alkaline treatment, the amidoximation was found to be a consecutive reaction. The results also suggested that, after the introduction of the amide oxime group, the acidic amide, hydroxamic acid and/or cyclic functional groups were formed. From the measurement of the distribution of adsorbed copper by X-ray microanalyzer, it was confirmed that the amidoximation occured uniformly across the resin. An experiment was carried out on the recycle adsorption of the amide oxime resin using natural seawater, and the sufficient durability was recognized for the case that the resin was taken out from the hydroxylamine solution at the time when the amount of adsorbed hydrochloric acid reached the maximum. In this case the resin contained the largest amount of the amide oxime group and least amount of the by-products formed from the secondary reactions. (author)

  9. Nitrate Anion Exchange in Pu-238 Aqueous Scrap Recovery Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pansoy-Hjelvik, M.E.; Silver, G.L.; Reimus, M.A.H.; Ramsey, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    Strong base, nitrate anion exchange (IX) is crucial to the purification of 238 Pu solution feedstocks with gross levels of impurities. This paper discusses the work involved in bench scale experiments to optimize the nitrate anion exchange process. In particular, results are presented of experiments conducted to (a) demonstrate that high levels of impurities can be separated from 238 Pu solutions via nitrate anion exchange and, (b) work out chemical pretreatment methodology to adjust and maintain 238 Pu in the IV oxidation state to optimize the Pu(IV)-hexanitrato anionic complex sorption to Reillex-HPQ resin. Additional experiments performed to determine the best chemical treatment methodology to enhance recovery of sorbed Pu from the resin, and VIS-NIR absorption studies to determine the steady state equilibrium of Pu(IV), Pu(III), and Pu(VI) in nitric acid are discussed

  10. Application of a weak base anion exchange resin for recovery of uranium at Uravan, Colorado, U.S.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, N.E.; Kunin, R.

    1976-01-01

    Resin ion-exchange technology has been used to recover uranium at the Uravan, Colorado plant for over 18 years; however, since the end of U.S. Atomic Energy Commission purchase of U 3 O 8 concentrate in 1970, it has become necessary to develop techniques for upgrading the product to meet the more stringent specifications of private sales. The standard gel type quaternary ammonium anion exchange resin had been used previously. The development of the tertiary amine anion exchange resin, Amberlite XE-299, led to an experimental program of laboratory and pilot plant work to evaluate the resin on actual plant solutions. General information on ion-exchange resin structure and chemistry is discussed. Summary data of specific test work on loading the resin, various elution schemes, resin regeneration and product purity from the pilot plant tests and comments on actual plant operation using Amberlite XE-299 resin are presented. (author)

  11. Operation of the joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, H.; Duport, P.J.; Brown, L.D.

    1993-07-01

    The Joint Panel, formed in 1976, is a Canadian organization (composed of federal and provincial government departments and agencies, uranium mining companies, labour unions, and non-profit research institutions) whose members have voluntarily agreed to share information regarding planned, ongoing and completed research on the effects of uranium (and thorium) production on the radiological health and safety of workers and on the environment. The objectives of the Joint Panel are: the identification of areas (within its purview of interest) where research is required; the stimulation of research in areas where the needs have been identified; the dissemination of subsequent research results; and, the avoidance of unnecessary duplication in research activities. The operation of this unique organization permits a free and open discussion of a wide variety of research activities, draws upon its member institutions to form working groups for the preparation of technical documents, and complements its more formal business sessions with technical presentations on topics of current interest. Copies of reports of completed research are maintained by a secretariat, which also issues the minutes of all meetings as well as the annual reports

  12. Evaluation of spectral shift controlled reactors operating on the uranium fuel cycle. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Sider, F.M.

    1979-08-01

    The performance of the spectral shift controlled reactor (SSCR) operating on uranium fuel cycles was evaluated and compared with the conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR). In order to analyze the SSCR, the PSR design methodology was extended to include systems moderated by mixtures of light water and heavy water and these methods were validated by comparison with experimental results. Once the design methods had been formulated, the resouce requirements and power costs were determined for the uranium-fueled SSCR. The ore requirements of the UO 2 once-through fuel cycle and the UO 2 fuel cycle with self-generated recycle (SGR) of plutonium were found to be 10% and 19% less than those of similarly fueled PWRs, respectively. A fuel cycle optimization study was performed for the UO 2 once-through SSCR and the SGR SSCR. By individually altering lattice parameters, discharge exposure or number of in-core batches, savings of less than 8% in resource requirements and less than 1% in power costs were obtained

  13. For Valor or Value: An Examination of Personnel Recovery Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thompson, Billy

    2001-01-01

    .... In doing so, the author first develops the history of rescue within the United States and particularly the United States Air Force beginning with World War I and building through Operation Allied Force...

  14. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  15. Recovery of uranium low grade ores by froth flotation: study of the texture and synergetic effects of flotation reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duverger, Agathe

    2013-01-01

    Due to the energy growing demand, uranium low grade ores may be those exploited in the future. Uranium ores conventional treatment does not often use mineral processing such as concentration methods for reducing leaching reagent consumption. The aim of this work is to develop an upgrading process to improve the operating process (alkaline heap leaching) taking into account the mineralogical and textural variability of the ore. The Trekkopje deposit is composed of calcrete and a gypscrete. The uranium bearing mineral is carnotite (K 2 (UO 2 ) 2 [VO 4 ] 2 .3H 2 O). The gangue minerals are composed by silicates, such as quartz, feldspars, micas and Ca-minerals, calcite and gypsum (XRD and ICP-MS analysis). A SEM image processing was used to study the textural properties and the exposed free surface of mineral inclusions in clay clusters. In calcrete milled to -200 μm, 50 % of all carnotite is associated with clay clusters, which are composed by 98 % of palygorskite, 2 % of illite, montmorillonite, and interbedded clays (XRD and microprobe analysis). The carnotite grain size is 95 % less than 70 μm. Calcite is the main inclusion in clay clusters. Indeed, the calcite inclusions average rate in the clay clusters is 12 % and 5 % for carnotite inclusion. And the free exposed surface percentage of these minerals in clay clusters is 3 % and 6 %, thus indicating that the inclusions should not affect the behavior of mixed clay particles. However, ore flotation essays did not verify this hypothesis. Three minerals separation have been proposed based on the mineral ability to consume leaching reagents: separating Ca-minerals from silicates, palygorskite from gangue minerals and carnotite from gangue minerals. A study of silicates and Ca-minerals electrokinetic properties (electrophoresis) was carried out to select the collectors and the optimum pH range for selective flotation. Basic pH near neutral was proved to be optimal for the separation of gangue minerals with cationic

  16. Automatic Error Recovery in Robot Assembly Operations Using Reverse Execution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Johan Sund; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Ellekilde, Lars-Peter

    2015-01-01

    , in particular for small-batch productions. As an alternative, we propose a system for automatically handling certain classes of errors instead of preventing them. Specifically, we show that many operations can be automatically reversed. Errors can be handled through automatic reverse execution of the control...... program to a safe point, from which forward execution can be resumed. This paper describes the principles behind automatic reversal of robotic assembly operations, and experimentally demonstrates the use of a domain-specific language that supports automatic error handling through reverse execution. Our...

  17. Proposed continuous wave energy recovery operation of an XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Sekutowicz; S. A. Bogacz; D. Douglas; P. Kneisel; G. P. Williams; M. Ferrario; L. Serafini; I. Ben-Zvi; J. Rose; J. Smedley; T. Srinivasan-Rao; W.-D. Moeller; B. Petersen; D. Proch; S. Simrock; P. Colestock; J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-01-01

    Commissioning of two large coherent light facilities at SLAC and DESY should begin in 2008 and in 2011 respectively. In this paper we look further into the future, hoping to answer, in a very preliminary way, two questions. First: ''What will the next generation of XFEL facilities look like?'' Believing that superconducting technology offers advantages such as high quality beams with highly populated bunches, the possibility of energy recovery and higher overall efficiency than warm technology, we focus this preliminary study on the superconducting option. From this belief the second question arises: ''What modifications in superconducting technology and in the machine design are needed, as compared to the present DESY XFEL, and what kind of R and D program should be proposed to arrive in the next few years at a technically feasible solution with even higher brilliance and increased overall conversion of AC power to photon beam power?'' In this paper we will very often refer to and profit from the DESY XFEL design, acknowledging its many technically innovative solutions

  18. Continuous wave energy recovery operation of an XFEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacek Sekutowicz; Bogacz, S. A.; Douglas, D.; Kneisel, Peter; Williams, G. P.; Ferrario, M.; Serafini, L.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rose, J.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Mueller, W.-D.; Petersen, B.; Proch, D.; Simrock, S.; Colestock, P.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Commissioning of two large coherent light facilities at SLAC and DESY should begin in 2008 and in 2011 respectively. In this paper we look further into the future, hoping to answer, in a very preliminary way, two questions. First: ''What will the next generation of XFEL facilities look like?'' Believing that superconducting technology offers advantages such as high quality beams with highly populated bunches, the possibility of energy recovery and higher overall efficiency than warm technology, we focus this preliminary study on the superconducting option. From this belief the second question arises: ''What modifications in superconducting technology and in the machine design are needed, as compared to the present DESY XFEL, and what kind of R and D program should be proposed to arrive in the next few years at a technically feasible solution with even higher brilliance and increased overall conversion of AC power to photon beam power?'' In this paper we will very often refer to and profit from the DESY XFEL design, acknowledging its many technically innovative solutions

  19. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Hansen uranium mill project, WM-24, Cyprus Mines Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental assessment was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, in response to a request for technical assistance from the State of Colorado in connection with licensing action on the proposed Cyprus Mines Corporation, Hansen uranium project. The major components of discussion are (1) a summary and recommended licensing conditions, (2) a description of the site environment and the proposed facility operation as well as alternatives in comparison with NRC's performance objectives for tailings management, and (3) a radiological assessment for estimating the facility's compliance with 10 CFR 20 and 40 CFR 190 dose regulations. The NRC recommends licensing the proposed mill subject to stipulated license conditions

  20. Environmental assessment related to the operation of San Miguel uranium project, WM-20, Phoneer Uravan, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental assessment was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, in response to a request for technical assistance from the State of Colorado in connection with licensing action on the proposed Pioneer Uravan, Inc., San Miguel uranium project. The major components of discussion are (1) a summary and recommended licensing conditions, (2) a description of the site environment and the proposed facility operation as well as alternatives in comparison with NRC's performance objectives for tailings management, and (3) a radiological assessment for estimating the facility's compliance with 10 CFR 20 and 40 CFR 190 dose regulations. The NRC recommends licensing the proposed mill subject to stipulated license conditions

  1. The determination of a continuous radon daughter equilibrium factor in an operating uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billingsley, D.

    1992-01-01

    Radon daughter exposures to workers at the Olympic Dam Operations copper and uranium mine are calculated from a series of grab samples obtained from various work locations around the mine. Currently under consideration is the introduction of personal passive radon dosimeters to determine the workers' radon daughter exposures. The study reported in this paper involved the determination of long-term equilibrium factors using real-time monitoring of radon and radon daughters. Consequently, variation in equilibrium factor for different tasks can be identified. In practice, the equilibrium factor varies with location and task; however, a conservative over-estimate of 0.28 can be confidently applied to all tasks. The error due to over-estimation remains minimal for all workers. This real-time monitoring method will reduce potential errors in dose assessment compared with the grab sampling technique. 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  2. Feasibility studies on electrochemical recovery of uranium from solid wastes contaminated with uranium using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazorium chloride as an electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Yusuke, E-mail: ohhashi.yusuke@jaea.go.jp [Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1550 Kamisaibara, Kagamino-cho, Tomata-gun, Okayama 708-0698 (Japan); Harada, Masayuki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Asanuma, Noriko [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuhisa [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The uranium component of steel wastes and spent NaF adsorbent are easily dissolved into BMICl. • The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl are reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V. • The dissolved uranium species in BMICl are recovered as black deposits electrolytically. • The deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. - Abstract: In order to examine feasibility of the electrochemical deposition method for recovering uranium from the solid wastes contaminated with uranium using ionic liquid as electrolyte, we have studied the electrochemical behavior of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and the steel waste contaminated with uranium in BMICl (1-butyl-3-methyl- imidazolium chloride). The uranyl(VI) species in BMICl solutions were found to be reduced to U(V) irreversibly around −0.8 to −1.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The resulting U(V) species is followed by disproportionation to U(VI) and U(IV). Based on the electrochemical data, we have performed potential controlled electrolysis of each solution prepared by soaking the spent NaF adsorbents and steel wastes in BMICl at −1.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Black deposit was obtained, and their composition analyses suggest that the deposit is the mixtures of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds containing O, F, Cl, and N elements. From the present study, it is expected that the solid wastes contaminated with uranium can be decontaminated by treating them in BMICl and the dissolved uranium species are recovered electrolytically.

  3. ICPP custom dissolver explosion recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demmer, R.; Hawk, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the recovery from the February 9, 1991, small scale explosion in a custom processing dissolver at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) a Department of Energy facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The custom processing facility is a limited production area designed to recover unirradiated uranium fuel. A small amount of the nuclear material received and stored at the ICPP is unique and incompatible with the major head end dissolution processes. Custom processing is a small scale dissolution facility for processing these materials in an economical fashion in the CPP-627 hot chemistry laboratory. Two glass dissolvers were contained in a large walk in hood area. Utilities for dissolution and connections to the major ICPP uranium separation facility were provided. The fuel processing operations during this campaign involved dissolving uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranium/fissium alloy in nitric acid

  4. Dry recovery test of plutonium-uranium mixed oxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinugasa, Manabu; Kawamata, Kazuhiko; Kashima, Sadamitsu

    1981-01-01

    The oxidation conditions for pulverizing directly Pu-U mixed oxide pellets without mechanical crushing were examined to simplify the process and to reduce radiation exposure during the dry recovery of highly enriched Pu pellets. The specimens used were the Pusub(0.3) Usub(0.7) Osub(2-x) pellets with different density, which were sintered at 1650 deg C for 2 hours under an atmosphere of 5 % H 2 - N 2 . The oxidation experiment was carried out under several conditions. The oxidation products were examined by weight gain, X-ray diffraction, appearance pictures, SEM photographs and so on. From these studies, it can be concluded that the oxidation in NO 2 diluted with air was very powerful, but if only the coarse spalling of Pusub(0.3) Usub(0.7) O 2 sintered pellets is required, it is sufficient to oxidize them in air for 1 hr in a temperature range from 400 to 600 deg C. (Asami, T.)

  5. Recovery or removal of uranium contained in small quantity in waste water by tannic-group adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komoto, Shigetoshi [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Kamisaibara, Okayama (Japan). Ningyo Toge Works

    1991-12-01

    It was found that tannic compounds have a very strong affinity for uranium and thorium which are nuclear fuel materials, and the new uranium adsorbents composed mainly by tannic-group compounds were made. The solid-state refractory persimmon tannins in those compounds has the most superior capacity for uranium as high as 1.7 g of uranium on 1 g of the adsorbent. The tests adsorbing uranium on the adsorbent are carried out practically by using dam water of Ningyo-toge Works, PNC. Adsorption tests changed the pH or temperature of dam water, elution test, and adsorption-elution repeating test were performed, and it was found that uranium in dam water contained from ppb-level to ppm-level was recovered or removed with very excellent efficiency. (author).

  6. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall provide... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. 426.23 Section 426.23 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF...

  7. Regulatory principles, criteria and guidelines for site selection, design, construction and operation of uranium tailings retention systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coady, J.R.; Henry, L.C.

    1978-01-01

    Principles, criteria and guidelines developed by the Atomic Energy Control Board for the management of uranium mill tailings are discussed. The application of these concepts is considered in relation to site selection, design and construction, operation and decommissioning of tailings retention facilities

  8. Main trends in scientific-research works during construction and operation of uranium mines and open cuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosinets, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to main trends in research works during construction and operation of uranium mines and open cuts of Priargunsky mine-chemical association. Develops and introduced principally new design solutions and technologies in the field of open mining, underground mining, as well as in-situ and heap leaching, are described

  9. Final environmental statement related to the operation of the Teton Uranium ISL Project (Docket No). 40-8781

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement is issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to the request by Teton Exploration Drilling, Inc. for the issuance of an NRC Source and Byproduct Material License authorizing operation of the proposed Teton Project to mine uranium in situ by injecting a carbonate/bicarbonate lixiviant into the ore body. The statement considers: (1) alternative of no licensing action, (2) alternative energy sources, and (3) alternatives if uranium ore is mined and refined on the site. The proposed action is to grant a Source and Byproduct Material License to the applicant subject to the stipulated license condition

  10. Forensic Archaeological Recovery of a Large-Scale Mass Disaster Scene: Lessons Learned from Two Complex Recovery Operations at the World Trade Center Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnasch, Scott C

    2016-05-01

    In 2006, unexpected discoveries of buried World Trade Center (WTC) debris and human remains were made at the World Trade Center mass disaster site. New York City's Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) was given the task of systematically searching the site for any remaining victims' remains. The subsequent OCME assessment and archaeological excavation conducted from 2006 until 2013, resulted in the recovery of over 1,900 victims' remains. In addition, this operation demonstrated the essential skills archaeologists can provide in a mass disaster recovery operation. The OCME excavation data illustrates some of the challenges encountered during the original recovery effort of 2001/2002. It suggests that when understood within the larger site recovery context, certain fundamental components of the original recovery effort, such as operational priorities and activities in effect during the original recovery, directly or indirectly resulted in unsearched deposits that contained human remains. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Removal of Trace Elements by Cupric Oxide Nanoparticles from Uranium In Situ Recovery Bleed Water and Its Effect on Cell Viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilz, Jodi R.; Reddy, K. J.; Nair, Sreejayan; Johnson, Thomas E.; Tjalkens, Ronald B.; Krueger, Kem P.; Clark, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    In situ recovery (ISR) is the predominant method of uranium extraction in the United States. During ISR, uranium is leached from an ore body and extracted through ion exchange. The resultant production bleed water (PBW) contains contaminants such as arsenic and other heavy metals. Samples of PBW from an active ISR uranium facility were treated with cupric oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). CuO-NP treatment of PBW reduced priority contaminants, including arsenic, selenium, uranium, and vanadium. Untreated and CuO-NP treated PBW was used as the liquid component of the cell growth media and changes in viability were determined by the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2) cells. CuO-NP treatment was associated with improved HEK and HEP cell viability. Limitations of this method include dilution of the PBW by growth media components and during osmolality adjustment as well as necessary pH adjustment. This method is limited in its wider context due to dilution effects and changes in the pH of the PBW which is traditionally slightly acidic however; this method could have a broader use assessing CuO-NP treatment in more neutral waters. PMID:26132311

  12. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-06-05

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

  13. LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE, IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT, HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-01-01

    This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU

  14. Close-out concepts for the Elliot Lake uranium mining operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, K.B.; Chakravatti, J.L.; Gorber, D.M.; Knapp, R.A.; Davis, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    In the Elliot Lake area, approximately 100 million tonnes of tailings have been generated and deposited in ten separate management areas covering a total of 460 hectares. With continued placement of tailings into land-based management areas, the ultimate combined area covered with tailings would be in the order of 1500 to 2000 hectares. The principal environmental concerns associated with the land-based management areas in the long term (after mining has ceased), as seen by the Canadian regulatory authorities, are the potential of acid generation from pyrite oxidation, and the release and migration of radionuclides into air and water. The development of close-out criteria and concepts, therefore, has focussed on addressing these concerns. A position paper was issued for comment by the Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board on long-term aspects of uranium tailings management. In response, three of the uranium companies, Rio Algom Limited, Denison Mines Limited, and Eldorado Nuclear Limited, have countered with their own position and supported it with the extensive research on close-out procedures that has been carried out on their properties. The companies' position is that regulations should allow for site specific solutions and that institutional control is a valid long-term control option. As radiological loadings to air and water in the long term will be less than during operations, the only long-term concern in Elliot Lake is pyrite oxidation. Research has indicated that pyrite oxidation can be controlled in the upper zone of tailings. A summary of options available to control pyrite oxidation in this upper zone, including vegetation, limestone addition, pyrite removal, and physical cover is presented as well as preliminary cost estimates of each alternative. (author)

  15. Recovery of the matrix operators in the similarity and congruency transformations: Applications in polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    November, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Formulas are presented for the recovery of the matrix operators in arbitrary-order similarity and congruency transformations. Two independent input and output matrix pairs exactly determine the similarity-transformation matrix operator, while three independent Hermitian-matrix pairs are required for the congruency-transformation operator. The congruency transformation is the natural form for the quantum observables of a multiple-element wave function, e.g., for polarized-light transfer: the recovery of the Jones matrix for a nondepolarizing device is demonstrated, given any three linearly independent partially polarized input Stokes states. The recovery formula gives a good solution even with large added noise in the test matrices. Combined with numerical least-squares methods, the formula can give an optimized solution for measures of observation error. A more general operator, which includes the effect of isotropic depolarization, is defined, and its recovery is demonstrated also. The recovery formulas have a three-dimensional geometric interpretation in the second-order case, e.g., in the Poincare sphere. It is pointed out that the geometric property is a purely mathematical property of quantum observables that arises without referring to spatial characteristics for the underlying wave function. 36 refs., 9 figs

  16. Procedure for recovery from an uranium containing concentrate and phosphoric acid, as well as an uranium containing concentrate and phosphoric acid obtained by this procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The phosphate ore is dissolved in sulphuric acid and the formed calcium sulphate is separated from the solution. The uranium is then precipitated by adding ammonium fluoride solution to the remaining phosphoric acid solution. When the phosphate ore is dissolved in sulphuric acid, fluorine gas is liberated and this is then used to produce the ammonium fluoride solution. (Th.P.)

  17. Operational impacts of low-enrichment uranium fuel conversion on the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, F.E.; Brannon, C.C.; Burgard, N.E.; Burn, R.R.; Cook, G.M.; Simpson, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Michigan Department of Nuclear Engineering and the Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Project have been engaged in a cooperative effort with Argonne National Laboratory to test and analyze low-enrichment fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR). The effort was begun in 1979, as part of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, to demonstrate on a whole-core basis the feasibility of enrichment reduction from 93% to <20% in Materials Test Reactor-type fuel designs. The first low-enrichment uranium (LEU) core was loaded into the FNR and criticality was achieved on December 8, 1981. The final LEU core was established October 11, 1984. No significant operational impacts have resulted from conversion of the FNR to LEU fuel. Thermal flux in the core has decreased slightly; thermal leakage flux has increased. Rod worths, temperature coefficient, and void coefficient have changed imperceptibly. Impressions from the operators are that power defect has increased slightly and that fuel lifetime has increased

  18. Medical Support for Aircraft Disaster Search and Recovery Operations at Sea: the RSN Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Kok Ann Colin; Chong, Tse Feng Gabriel; Liow, Min Han Lincoln; Tang, Kong Choong

    2016-06-01

    The maritime environment presents a unique set of challenges to search and recovery (SAR) operations. There is a paucity of information available to guide provision of medical support for SAR operations for aircraft disasters at sea. The Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) took part in two such SAR operations in 2014 which showcased the value of a military organization in these operations. Key considerations in medical support for similar operations include the resultant casualty profile and challenges specific to the maritime environment, such as large distances of area of operations from land, variable sea states, and space limitations. Medical support planning can be approached using well-established disaster management life cycle phases of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery, which all are described in detail. This includes key areas of dedicated training and exercises, force protection, availability of air assets and chamber support, psychological care, and the forensic handling of human remains. Relevant lessons learned by RSN from the Air Asia QZ8501 search operation are also included in the description of these key areas. Teo KAC , Chong TFG , Liow MHL , Tang KC . Medical support for aircraft disaster search and recovery operations at sea: the RSN experience. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2016; 31(3):294-299.

  19. Performance and metallography of a uranium tritide bed operated at elevated temperatures and tritium pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mote, M.W. Jr.; Mintz, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    A uranium gettering bed was cycled between room temperature/zero pressure and 600C/275 psi (D 2 ) for 210 cycles over a period of 8 months. Metallographic examination of the hardware revealed an acceptable amount of reaction between the uranium and the stainless steel container. This exposure is estimated to represent about ten years of normal use

  20. Successive Recovery of Copper and Uranium From Carbonate-Rich Latosol, Um Bogma Formation, Abuthor Locality, South Western Sinai, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sheikh, E.M.; Amin, M.M.; Aita, S.K.; Rezk, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    A technological sample of a copper/ uranium mineralization in carbonate rich latosol rock sequence of Urn Bogma Formation Abu Thor locality at southwestern Sinai, Egypt, has been properly processed. The working sample assaying 12.5 % CuO and 875 ppm U was subjected to adipic acid leaching for copper followed by bioleaching of uranium in a manner to avoid excessive acid consumption in the classical leaching procedure. It is thus possible to achieve leaching efficiencies of 95% for Cu in the first stage and 82% for U in the second stage. From the two separately obtained leach liquors of Cu and uranium, pure products have conveniently been prepared. Accordingly, Cu adipate product was first prepared by crystallization,followed by acid dissolution and alkali precipitation of copper hydroxide. In case of uranium, the impure precipitate of the bioleach liquor is purified via Amberlite IRA-400 anion exchanger resin

  1. A hydraulic test stand for demonstrating the operation of Eaton’s energy recovery system (ERS)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Meng (Rachel); Danzl, Per; Mahulkar, Vishal; Piyabongkarn, Damrongrit (Neng); Brenner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cost represents a significant operating expense for owners and fleet managers of hydraulic off-highway vehicles. Further, the upcoming Tier IV compliance for off-highway applications will create further expense for after-treatment and cooling. Solutions that help address these factors motivate fleet operators to consider and pursue more fuelefficient hydraulic energy recovery systems. Electrical hybridization schemes are typically complex, expensive, and often do not satisfy customer pay...

  2. Assessment, mechanisms, prevention, and measures for quick recovery of military operation-associated fatigue

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao-shen LI; Wen HUANG

    2012-01-01

    Fatigue is a worldwide problem. Military members frequently feel fatigue in military operations, which hinders the successful completion of their tasks. In complicated international military environments, military fatigue has received great attention from the armed forces in all countries. The present paper elaborates the performances, assessment, and mechanism of fatigue in military operations. In addition, the current study discusses the prevention and rapid recovery of fatigue, aiming at p...

  3. The Benefit of Variable-Speed Turbine Operation for Low Temperature Thermal Energy Power Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Brasz, Joost J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes, given the large variation in turbine discharge pressure with changing ambient temperatures, whether variable-speed radial-inflow turbine operation has a similar benefit for Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) power recovery systems as variable-speed centrifugal compression has for chiller applications. The benefit of variable-speed centrifugal compression over fixed-speed operation is a reduction in annual electricity consumption of almost 40 %. Air-conditioning systems are by ne...

  4. Optimization of operating parameters and rate of uranium bioleaching from a low-grade ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, A.; Roosta-Azad, R.; Safdari, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the bioleaching of a low-grade uranium ore containing 480 ppm uranium has been reported. The studies involved extraction of uranium using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans derived from the uranium mine samples. The maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) and doubling time (t d ) were obtained 0.08 h -1 and 8.66 h, respectively. Parameters such as Fe 2+ concentration, particle size, temperature and pH were optimized. The effect of pulp density (PD) was also studied. Maximum uranium bio-dissolution of 100 ± 5 % was achieved under the conditions of pH 2.0, 5 % PD and 35 deg C in 48 h with the particles of d 80 = 100 μm. The optimum concentration of supplementary Fe 2+ was dependent to the PD. This value was 0 and 10 g of FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O/l at the PD of 5 and 15 %, respectively. The effects of time, pH and PD on the bioleaching process were studied using central composite design. New rate equation was improved for the uranium leaching rate. The rate of leaching is controlled with the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions in solution. This study shows that uranium bioleaching may be an important process for the Saghand U mine at Yazd (Iran). (author)

  5. Accumulation of selenium in aquatic systems downstream of a uranium mining operation in northern Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscatello, J.R.; Belknap, A.M.; Janz, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the accumulation of selenium in lakes downstream of a uranium mine operation in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Selenium concentrations in sediment and biota were elevated in exposure areas even though water concentrations were low (<5 μg/L). The pattern (from smallest to largest) of selenium accumulation was: periphyton < plankton and filterer invertebrates < detritivore and predator invertebrates < small bodied (forage) fish and predatory fish. Biomagnification of selenium resulted in an approximately 1.5-6 fold increase in the selenium content between plankton, invertebrates and forage fish. However, no biomagnification was observed between forage fish and predatory fish. Selenium content in organisms from exposure areas exceeded the proposed 3-11 μg/g (dry weight) dietary toxicity threshold for fish, suggesting that the selenium released into these aquatic systems has the potential to bioaccumulate and reach levels that could impair fish reproduction. - Selenium bioaccumulation patterns in a north temperate, cold water aquatic ecosystem were similar to those reported from warm water systems

  6. An alternate procedure in the recovery of no fissioned remainder uranium in the production of molybdenum 99 from fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Chavez, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    An effective modification of the chemical processes to dissolve the U-IV in the dissolver has been obtained, using its highly alkaline pH and extracting it as Uranyl Triperoxidate soluble anionic complex, in its experimental design without fission products. Even when the extraction of uranium is usually more complete through acidic dissolution, the characteristics for the dissolver used in production of fission Mo-99 do not allow this kind of extraction and alkaline option is more adecuate for this purpose. The dissolution of the insoluble residue, through the production of the anionic Triperoxidate Uranyl complexes, arises rapidly due to the presence of and oxidizing agent. The best results in the extraction of soluble Uranium were obtained with and organic solvent and a mixture of carbonate/bicarbonate. The concentrated Uranium in the aqueous alkaline solution was separated through fixation as an anion Tricarbonate of Uranyl in columns of anionic resin, moderately basic in dynamic conditions. The superiority of the resin used, over other exchangers, was evident in the elution with nitric acid that may be done for small volumes with a quite favorable separation of Uranium. The eluate contains the Uranium as an hexahydrated Uranyl Nitrate with a high degree of purity in reduced volume, in an average concentration of 90.2 % with respect to the initial concentration of Uranium (Author)

  7. Assessment of radiological status of Bagjata underground uranium mine operating in the east Singhbhum District of Jharkhand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, B.K.; Meena, J.S.; Thakur, V.K.; Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2012-01-01

    Bagjata uranium mine deposits (22 °28’ 07”N and 86°29’ 36” E) is located in Dhalmugarh subdivision of East Singhbhum district of Jharkhand. This mine was commissioned in 2008 and presently it is operating with a production capacity of 500 tonne/day. The mining of uranium ores can lead to both internal and external exposures of workers. Internal exposure arises from the inhalation of radon gas and its decay products and radionuclides in ore dust. The contribution of respirable ore dust toward internal exposure has been reported to be insignificant in a low ore grade uranium mines by several authors. Radon gas is produced by the alpha decay of 226 Ra, which is a product of the long lived antecedent uranium ( 238 U), is present in the rocks, decays to a number of short-lived decay products that are themselves radioactive. Radon gas diffuses into the mine air through cracks and fissures present in the ore body, during blasting, mucking and fragmentation of ore body in mine. The short-lived daughters, 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, are the principal contributor to internal exposure to mine workers. Radon has been recognized as a radiation hazard causing excess lung cancer among underground miners (NAS, 1988; ATSDR, 1990). 222 Rn concentration in the mine air was estimated by using a scintillation cell technique

  8. Use of Sodium Dithionite as Part of a More Efficient Groundwater Restoration Method Following In-situ Recovery of Uranium at the Smith-Ranch Highland Site in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.; Reimus, P. W.; Ware, D.; Williams, K.; Chu, D.; Perkins, G.; Migdissov, A. A.; Bonwell, C.

    2017-12-01

    Uranium is primarily mined for nuclear power production using an aqueous extraction technique called in-situ recovery (ISR). ISR can pollute groundwater with residual uranium and other heavy metals. Reverse osmosis and groundwater sweep are currently used to restore groundwater after ISR mining, but are not permanent solutions. Sodium dithionite is being tested as part of a method to more permanently restore groundwater after ISR mining at the Smith-Ranch Highland site in Wyoming. Sodium dithionite is a chemical reductant that can reduce sediments that were oxidized during ISR. The reduced sediments can reduce soluble uranium (VI) in the groundwater to insoluble uranium (IV). Laboratory studies that use sodium dithionite to treat sediments and waters from the site may help predict how it will behave during a field deployment. An aqueous batch experiment showed that sodium dithionite reduced uranium in post-mined untreated groundwater from 38 ppm to less than 1 ppm after 1 day. A sediment reduction batch experiment showed that sodium dithionite-treated sediments were capable of reducing uranium in post-mined untreated groundwater from 38 ppm to 2 ppm after 7 days. One column experiment is showing post-mined sodium dithionite-treated sediments are capable of reducing uranium in post-mined groundwater for over 30 pore volumes past the initial injection. While these results are promising for field deployments of sodium dithionite, another column experiment with sodium dithionite-treated sediments containing uranium rich organic matter is showing net production of uranium instead of uranium uptake. Sodium dithionite appears to liberate uranium from the organic matter. Another sediment reduction experiment is being conducted to further investigate this hypothesis. These experiments are helping guide plans for field deployments of sodium dithionite at uranium ISR mining sites.

  9. The Recovery of Uranium From The Rejected Fuel Plate Dispersion Type of U3O8-Al and U3Si2Al by NaOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widodo, G; Aji, D

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from the rejected fuel plate dispersion type of U 3 O 8 -AI And U 3 Si 2 -AI with a dissolution has been performed.Each of 5 fragment of fuel plate dispersion of U 3 O 8 -AI or U 3 Si 2 Al of 1x4 cm size was put in the distilled glass content of 250 ml NaOH solution whit The concentration variation 10,15,20,25,and 30%,and than was heated at temperature of 102 o C and was stirred constantly by magnetic stirred.Uranium in the form of U 3 O 8 or U 3 Si 2 was separated by filtration and Either residu and filtrate was analyzed by potentiometry using modified Devies Gray method. From the experiment data it was found in the residu that presentation of uranium was 83.99-84.05% and 84.67-86.556% while in filtrate it was found 53.90 ppm and 69.3 ppm

  10. The value of a mature, stable, and transparent regulatory framework in facilitating ER programs lessons learned in decommissioning of uranium recovery and other facilities in the USA - 59411

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Keith I.; Camper, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The history of decommissioning activities in the United States has demonstrated the value of a mature, stable and transparent regulatory framework in facilitating the timely completion of environmental remediation. Two examples are given as case studies. The first example relates to the history of uranium concentrate (yellowcake) production in the U.S. to support the initial development of civilian nuclear power in the U.S. in the 1950's, 60's, 70's and 80's. This yellowcake production, which took place mostly in the western U.S., was undertaken before laws and regulations to prevent contamination and protect public health and safety were fully developed. Significant contamination occurred in terms of both surface and ground water contamination. Although most conventional mills producing uranium during these early years entered decommissioning in the 70's and 80's, the vast majority are still remediating their sites because of persistent contamination in ground water. Had an effective regulatory framework been in place, much of this contamination would have been prevented and remediation accomplished more effectively. In contrast to this experience, a second example is provided related to development of the regulatory framework for decommissioning of non-uranium recovery facilities in the U.S. in the late 1990's and early 2000's

  11. Recovery of uranium from (U,Gd)O{sub 2} nuclear fuel scrap using dissolution and precipitation in carbonate media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang-Wook, E-mail: nkwkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); KEPCO NF 1047 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Jun-Taek; Lee, Eil-Hee; Park, Geun-Il; Lee, Kune-Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Myung-June [KEPCO NF 1047 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kee-Chan; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeok daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > A treatment of (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scrap with a dissolution in carbonate solution with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. > Partial dissolution of Gd together with uranium in carbonate solution. > Solubilities of Gd in solutions with and without carbonate at several pHs. > Purification of Gd-contaminated UO{sub 4} by dissolution and precipitation of UO{sub 4}. - Abstract: This work studied a process to recover uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps generated from nuclear fuel fabrication processes by using the dissolution of (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps in a carbonate with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the precipitation of the dissolved uranium as UO{sub 4}. The dissolution characteristics of uranium, Gd, and impurity metal oxides were tested, and the behaviors of UO{sub 4} precipitation and Gd solubility were evaluated with changes of the pH of the solution. A little Gd was entrained in the UO{sub 4} precipitate to contaminate the uranium precipitate. Below a pH of 3, the uranium dissolved in the form of uranyl peroxo-carbonato complex ions in the carbonate solution was precipitated as UO{sub 4} with a high precipitation yield, and the Gd had a very high solubility. Using these characteristics, the Gd-contaminated UO{sub 4} could be purified using dissolution in a 1-M HNO{sub 3} solution with heating and re-precipitation upon addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to the solution. Finally, an environmentally friendly and economical process to recover pure uranium from contaminated (U,Gd)O{sub 2} scraps was suggested.

  12. Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of a depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

    2005-09-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF6 inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site.

  13. Using CONFIG for Simulation of Operation of Water Recovery Subsystems for Advanced Control Software Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Flores, Luis; Fleming, Land; Throop, Daiv

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid discrete/continuous simulation tool, CONFIG, has been developed to support evaluation of the operability life support systems. CON FIG simulates operations scenarios in which flows and pressures change continuously while system reconfigurations occur as discrete events. In simulations, intelligent control software can interact dynamically with hardware system models. CONFIG simulations have been used to evaluate control software and intelligent agents for automating life support systems operations. A CON FIG model of an advanced biological water recovery system has been developed to interact with intelligent control software that is being used in a water system test at NASA Johnson Space Center

  14. Reducing spontaneous recovery and reinstatement of operant performance through extinction-cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Gamboa, Rodolfo; Gámez, A Matías; Nieto, Javier

    2017-02-01

    It has been argued that the response recovery effects share a common mechanism. A possible way to test it is evaluating whether the techniques that impaired renewal would impair the other recovery effects as well. Two experiments with rats used a free operant procedure to explore whether an extinction-cue could prevent the spontaneous recovery and reinstatement of an extinguished lever-pressing. Both experiments consisted of four phases: Acquisition, Extinction and Test 1 and Test 2. First, all rats were trained to perform one instrumental response (R1) for food in context A, and a different instrumental response (R2) for food in context B. Then, responses were extinguished within the same context: R1 in context A and R2 in context B. Throughout this phase all rats received brief presentations of a tone (extinction-cue). In both experiments animals were tested twice. The first test was conducted immediately after the last extinction session. In this test, rats received the extinction-cue for both responses. During the second test, rats experienced the tone only for R1. In Experiment 1 rats were tested after 5days, while for Experiment 2 test 2 took place after a single session of re-exposure to the food. Both experiments showed a recovery effect (spontaneous recovery in Experiment 1 and reinstatement in Experiment 2) for both responses. However, a cue featured in extinction attenuated recovery of R1 in both experiments when presented on the test. The findings suggest that spontaneous recovery, reinstatement and renewal might share a common mechanism. In addition, the present data shows that using an extinction-cue could help to reduces relapsing of voluntary behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 40 CFR Table 30 to Subpart Uuu of... - Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery Units 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 30 Table 30 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Operating Limits for HAP Emissions From Sulfur Recovery...

  16. Simultaneous removal and recovery of uranium from aqueous solution using TiO_2 photoelectrochemical reduction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huichao He; Meirong Zong; Faqin Dong; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Pengpan Yang; Gaili Ke; Mingxue Liu; Xiaoqin Nie; Wei Ren; Liang Bian; Southwest University of Science and Technology, Sichuan; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xinjiang

    2017-01-01

    U(VI)-containing wastewater has potential radiation hazard to the environment, but contains valuable uranium resource. Based on the reduction of U(VI) and the difference in solubility between U(VI) and U(IV), here we construct a TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell to remove U(VI) and recover uranium from aqueous solution. By irradiating TiO_2 photoanode at E = 0.45 V versus SCE, U(VI) can be simultaneously removed from aqueous solution and recovered as solid uranium compounds on a FTO glass cathode. Since ethanol can act as hole scavenger to protect the formed U(IV) and provide CO_2"−"· as reductant, ethanol adding improved the U(VI) reduction efficiency of TiO_2-based photoelectrochemical cell. (author)

  17. Guidebook on good practice in the management of uranium mining and mill operations and the preparation for their closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Over the past fifty years the uranium industry has moved from a labor-intensive industry to a 'high-tech' and capital intensive industry. Organization of knowledge, manpower and material had to change to meet the demands of several stakeholders inherent to any project and to constantly adapt to technological innovations. Today, the mission of a uranium operation is not only to make a profit while selling yellow cake to electrical power stations but also to address issues regarding safety, health, environment and demands of the regulators and the public and assure the sustainability of the operations. Good mining practice begins with the proper planning and forecasting from the discovery of a deposit to decommissioning of a mine. This report describes and defines what is considered as good practice in the various activities of a mining operation and provides an overview of the management of a single operation. As technologies are progressing rapidly in the mining industry, and as this industry is transitional, this report emphasizes the importance of training employees at all levels of the organization. The statement on good practices for the various activities of a mining operation will be useful for organizations which are planning to open new mines or intend to modernize ongoing operations. Practical examples are given in the case of histories for four different countries. The objective of this publication is not to provide strict rules on the application of good practice but to give general guidelines that can be consulted and used in many different countries

  18. Recovery of fluorine, uranium, and rare earth metal values from phosphoric acid by-product brine raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamser, C.A.; Bruen, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    A method for recovering substantially all of the fluorine and uranium values and at least 90 percent of the rare earth metal values from brine raffinate obtained as by-product in the production of phosphoric acid by the hydrochloric acid decomposition of tricalcium phosphate minerals is described. A basically reacting compound is added to the brine raffinate to effect a pH 9 or greater, whereby fluorine, uranium and rare earth metal values are simultaneously precipitated. These values may then be separately recovered from the precipitate by known processes

  19. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980. The following topics were discussed: uranium producton in South Africa; radiation physics; internal dosimetry and radiotoxicity of long-lived uranium isotopes; uranium monitoring; operational experience on uranium monitoring; dosimetry and radiotoxicity of inhaled radon daughters; occupational limits for inhalation of radon-222, radon-220 and their short-lived daughters; radon monitoring techniques; radon daughter dosimeters; operational experience on radon monitoring; and uranium mill tailings management

  20. Concentrations and biological availability of 238U and 230Th in the environs of a uranium milling operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.; Flot, S.; Whicker, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on a study whose objectives were to determine 238 U and 230 Th concentrations in soil and native plants from various sites around a conventional acid leach uranium milling operation in the Western US, and to estimate plant/soil concentration factors. Soil and vegetation samples were collected from exposed, weathered tailings; near the edge of a tailings pond; from a reclamation area; and at several native range background (control) locations. The results indicate that mean plant/soil concentration factors varied significantly among sites and between radionuclides, but no significant differences between plant groups were found. Concentration factors for 230 Th were greater than for 238 U for plants growing at the edge of the tailings pond. It is speculated that the lower concentration factors for uranium relative to thorium at this site may be due to the proportion of their contents in soil that is biologically available for plant uptake

  1. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, Th.

    2004-01-01

    The controversy about the extend of the uranium resources worldwide is still important, this article sheds some light on this topic. Every 2 years IAEA and NEA (nuclear energy agency) edit an inventory of uranium resources as reported by contributing countries. It appears that about 4.6 millions tons of uranium are available at a recovery cost less than 130 dollars per kg of uranium and a total of 14 millions tons of uranium can be assessed when including all existing or supposed resources. In fact there is enough uranium to sustain a moderate growth of the park of nuclear reactors during next decades and it is highly likely that the volume of uranium resources can allow a more aggressive development of nuclear energy. It is recalled that a broad use of the validated breeder technology can stretch the durability of uranium resources by a factor 50. (A.C.)

  2. Technology for recovery of byproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyl, H.H.

    1983-02-01

    In this paper, a byproduct is considered to be any product from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant other than the principal products of uranium and plutonium. Those which have been recovered on a large scale include: 237 Np, 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 85 Kr, 147 Pm, 241 Am, 244 Cm, and 144 Ce. Other byproducts which have been recovered in small amounts during development efforts are: Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, and Xe. This paper reviews the byproducts of interest, compares and contrasts byproduct recovery with waste management, describes current and past byproduct recovery operations, development status of alternative processes, and bases for selection among alternative processes in developing an integrated byproduct recovery plant

  3. Uranium mining in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The mining of uranium in Australia is criticised in relation to it's environmental impact, economics and effects on mine workers and Aborigines. A brief report is given on each of the operating and proposed uranium mines in Australia

  4. Mathematical Modeling for the Extraction of Uranium and Molybdenum with Emulsion Liquid Membrane, Including Industrial Application and Cost Evaluation of the Uranium Recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kris Tri Basuki

    2008-01-01

    Emulsion liquid membrane systems are double emulsion drops. Two immiscible phases are separated by a third phase which is immiscible with the other two phases. The liquid membrane systems were classified into two types: (1) carrier mediated mass transfer, (2) mass transfer without any reaction involved. Uranium extraction, molybdenum extraction and solvent extraction were used as purposed elements for each type of the membrane systems in the derivation of their mathematical models. Mass transfer in emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) systems has been modeled by several differential and algebraic equations. The models take into account the following : mass transfer of the solute from the bulk external phase to the external phase-membrane interface; an equilibrium reaction between the solute and the carrier to form the solute-carrier complex at the interface; mass transfer by diffusion of the solute-carrier complex in the membrane phase to the membrane-internal phase interface; another equilibrium reaction of the solute-carrier complex to release the solute at the membrane-internal phase interface into the internal phase. Models with or without the consideration of film resistances were developed and compared. The models developed in this study can predict the extraction rate through emulsion liquid membranes theoretically. All parameters required in the models can be determined before an experimental extraction run. Experimental data from literature (uranium extraction) and (molybdenum extraction and solvent extraction) were used to test the models. The agreements between the theoretical predictions and the experimental data were very good. The advantages of emulsion liquid membrane systems over traditional methods were discussed. The models developed in this research can be used directly for the design of emulsion liquid membrane systems. The results of this study represent a very significant step toward the practical applications of the emulsion liquid membrane

  5. Port Radium start to finish life cycle: a case study on Canada's historic radium/uranium mine, initial operation and closure, concerns of the aboriginal Dene people, subsequent assessments, remediation - 59332

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiatzka, Gerd; Brown, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: This paper provides a life study cycle case study on the historic Port Radium mine. In addition to the history of operations, it discusses the unique and successful approach used to identify the key issues and concerns associated with the former radium, uranium and silver mining property and the program activities undertaken to define the remedial issues and options that ultimately lead to the development of a preferred remedial plan. The Port Radium Mine site, situated approximately 275 km north of Yellowknife on the east shore of Great Bear Lake, Northwest Territories, was operated almost continuously between 1932 and 1982, initially for recovery of radium and uranium and subsequently for recovery of silver. Tailings production equalled an estimated 900, 000 tons from uranium ore processing and 800, 000 tons from silver processing operations. While the site was decommissioned at mine closure, site investigations were undertaken to address concerns expressed by residents of the community of Deline about residual contamination at the site and exposure of Deline residents as traditional land users and to identify residual environmental and safety issues based on current closure standards. Assessment of past radiation exposures of worker based on past practices associated with ore handling and concentrate shipping were also addressed. The paper provides insights into the approach and activities undertaken over a seven (7) year period that ultimately concluded with the final decommissioning of the site in 2007 and post remedial actions being carried out under the long term care and maintenance program. (authors)

  6. New type of amidoxime-group-containing adsorbent for the recovery of uranium from seawater. III. Recycle use of adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omichi, H.; Katakai, A.; Sugo, T.; Okamoto, J.

    1986-01-01

    An amidoxime-group adsorbent for recovering uranium from seawater was made by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile onto polymeric fiber, followed by amidoximation. Uranium adsorption of the adsorbent contacted with seawater in a column increased with the increase in flow rate, then leveled off. The relationship between uranium adsorption in a batch process and the ratio of the amount of seawater to that of adsorbent was found to be effective in evaluating adsorbent contacted with any amount of seawater. The conditioning of the adsorbent with an alkaline solution at higher temperature (∼80 0 C) after the acid desorption recovered the adsorption ability to the original level. This made it possible to apply the adsorbent to recycle use. On the other hand, the adsorbent conditioned at room temperature or that without conditioning lost adsorption ability during recycle use. The increase in water uptake was observed as one of the physical changes produced during recycle use of the alkaline-conditioned adsorbent, while the decrease in water uptake was observed with the unconditioned adsorbent. The IR spectra of the adsorbent showed a probability of reactions of amidoxime groups with acid and alkaline solutions, which can explain the change in uranium adsorption during the adsorption-desorption cycle

  7. The design of a continuous ion-exchange pilot plant for the recovery of uranium from partially clarified solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloete, F.L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary design is given for a pilot plant to recover uranium from partially clarified slime pulp by continuous ion exchange. Process and plant-design methods are indicated briefly, and an outline is given of experimental work that should be undertaken before the start-up of the pilot plant

  8. Control of waste well casing vent gas from a thermal enhanced oil recovery operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peavy, M.A.; Braun, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a waste gas treatment system designed to control emissions from thermally enhanced oil recovery wells. This case study discusses the need, design, installation and operations of the system. Oryx Energy Company (Oryx) operates approximately 940 wells in the Midway-Sunset (MWSS) field under casing vapor recovery systems. The emissions collected from well casing vent gas cotaining hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide that are collected and processed through casing vapor recovery skids. These skids are composed of condensers, compressors, and pumps that separate fluids from the waste gas stream. The non-condensible gas is then disposed of in incinerators that reduce the hydrocarbon and sulfur emissions into the atmosphere. Approximately 91,000 lbs/day of hydrocarbon and 10,116 lbs/day of sulfur dioxide are removed from the atmosphere from wells contained within these systems operated by Oryx. These hydrocarbons yield approximately 550 barrels of oil per day (BOPD). The system helps manage the pressure differential from the reservoir into each wellbore and contributes to improved ambient air quality in Kern County, California

  9. [Effect factors analysis of knee function recovery after distal femoral fracture operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bei, Chaoyong; Wang, Ruiying; Tang, Jicun; Li, Qiang

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the effect factors of knee function recovery after operation in distal femoral fractures. From January 2001 to May 2007, 92 cases of distal femoral fracture were treated. There were 50 males and 42 females, aged 20-77 years old (average 46.7 years old). Fracture was caused by traffic accident in 48 cases, by falling from height in 26 cases, by bruise in 12 cases and by tumble in 6 cases. According to Müller's Fracture classification, there were 29 cases of type A, 12 cases of type B and 51 cases of type C. According to American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, there were 21 cases of grade I, 39 cases of grade II, 24 cases of grade III, and 8 cases of grade IV. The time from injury to operation was 4 hours to 24 days with an average of 7 days. Anatomical plate was used in 43 cases, retrograde interlocking intramedullary nail in 37 cases, and bone screws, bolts and internal fixation with Kirschner pins in 12 cases. After operation, the HSS knee function score was used to evaluate efficacy. Ten related factors were applied for statistical analysis, to knee function recovery after operation in distal femoral fractures, such as age, sex, preoperative ASA classification, injury to surgery time, fracture type, treatment, reduction quality, functional exercise after operation, whether or not CPM functional training and postoperative complications. Wound healed by first intention in 88 cases, infection occurred in 4 cases. All patients followed up 16-32 months with an average of 23.1 months. Clinical union of fracture was achieved within 3-7 months after operation. Extensor device adhesions and the scope of activities of fracture displacement in 6 cases, mild knee varus or valgus in 7 cases and implant loosening in 6 cases. According to HSS knee function score, the results were excellent in 52 cases, good in 15 cases, fair in 10 cases and poor in 15 cases with an excellent and good rate of 72.83%. Single factor analysis showed that age

  10. Capital and operating costs of irradiated natural uranium reprocessing plants; Couts d'investissement et d'exploitation des usines de retraitement de l'uranium naturel irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiriet, L; Jouannaud, C; Couture, J; Duboz, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Oger, C [Saint Gobain Nucleaire (France)

    1966-07-01

    This paper presents first a method of analysing natural uranium reprocessing plants investment costs (method similar to LANG and BACH well known in the fuel oil industry) and their operating costs (analysed according to their economic type). This method helps establishing standard cost structures for these plants, allowing thus comparisons between existing or planned industrial facilities. It also helps evaluating the foreseeable consequences of technical progress. Some results obtained are given, concerning: the investment costs sensitivity to the various technical parameters defining the fuel and their comparison according to the country or the economic area taken into account. Finally, the influence of the plants size on their investment costs is shown. (author) [French] La communication expose d'abord une methode d'analyse des couts d'investissement des usines de retraitement de l'uranium naturel irradie (inspiree de celles de LANG et de BACH, bien connues dans l'industrie petroliere) et de leurs couts d'exploitation (selon leur nature economique). Cette methode permet d'etablir des structures types de couts de ces usines et de comparer les realisations industrielles et les projets. Elle facilite l'exploration des consequences previsibles du progres technique. On indique un certain nombre de resultats obtenus, concernant la sensibilite des couts d'investissement de ces usines aux differents parametres techniques definissant le combustible et leur confrontation selon les pays ou aires economiques envisages. On montre enfin comment doit pouvoir s'exprimer l'influence de la taille des usines sur leur cout d'investissement. (auteur)

  11. Investigations into the operating behavior of separation nozzle cascades for uranium-235 enrichment in a 10-stage pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bley, P.; Hein, H.; Linder, G.

    1984-03-01

    The separation nozzle method developed by the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center is based on the centrifugal force in a curved jet consisting of uranium hexafluoride and a light auxiliary gas. To determine in experiments the operating and controlling behavior of separation nozzle cascades a 10-stage pilot plant was erected some year ago. This plant was transferred to the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) in Belo Horizonte as a donation made within the framework of the German-Brazilian Agreement on scientific cooperation in the field of uranium enrichment. The plant previously equipped with single deflection systems was modified to operate with the double deflection system envisaged for commercial plants. A controlling concept meanwhile developed and improved for separation nozzle cascades equipped with single and double deflection systems was verified experimentally and optimized at the pilot plant of the CDTN. A comparison of the experimental operating behavior with the operating behavior calculated by simulation programs has confirmed the faithfulness of simulation of the computer codes developed to apply to cascades with double deflection systems as well. (orig.) [de

  12. Management and control of radioactive wastes from uranium-milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.H.; Deal, L.J.; Haywood, F.F.; Goldsmith, W.A.

    1977-01-01

    Of the 39 privately owned mills that produced and sold uranium to the U.S. Government during 1948 to 1971, 22 have closed down either due to exhaustion of reserves or lack of market. On the inactive mill sites there remains 24 million metric tons of tailings containing 14,000 curies of radium. Success in stabilization has been variable. In the past, theoretical models have had to be used in estimation of the environmental effects of uranium milling for lack of a sufficient factual base. ERDA in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and the states involved is undertaking a comprehensive radiological assessment at each site. The results of this assessment should provide valuable basic information on the environmental impact of uranium ore processing. The current studies reveal that the inactive sites are a cause of small public exposure to radiation, primarily from radon-222 from the tailings piles. This paper reviews radioactivity management in uranium ore processing to control spread of radioactive materials, including methods used for stabilization to prevent wind and water erosion. Recent measurements of radioactivity levels in soils, ground and surface waters, and in air near tailings piles are summarized, and public health implications are evaluated. Guidelines have been developed for land decontamination, and procedures evaluated for long-term management of contaminated material to minimize future human exposure. Alternative methods for long-term tailings stabilization, their costs and benefits in terms of serious health effects avoided are presented

  13. Uranium resource technology, Seminar 3, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This conference proceedings contains 20 papers and 1 panel discussion on uranium mining and ore treatment, taking into account the environmental issues surrounding uranium supply. Topics discussed include: the US uranium resource base, the technology and economics of uranium recovery from phosphate resources, trends in preleash materials handling of sandstone uranium ores, groundwater restoration after in-situ uranium leaching, mitigation of the environmental impacts of open pit and underground uranium mining, remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites, environmental laws governing in-situ solution mining of uranium, and the economics of in-situ solution mining. 16 papers are indexed separately

  14. A study on recovery of uranium in the anode basket residues delivered from the pyrochemical process of used nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, H. C.; Kim, T. J.; Jang, J. H.; Kim, G. Y.; Park, S. B.; Yoon, D. S.; Kim, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Lee, S. J.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium oxide (UO2) using ammonium chloride and zirconium as chemical agents was conducted to recover the uranium in the anode basket residues from the pyrochemical process of used nuclear fuel. The chlorination of UO2 was predicted using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. The experimental conditions for the chlorination were determined using a chlorination test with cerium oxide (CeO2). In the chlorination test, it was confirmed that UO2 was chlorinated into UCl3 at 320 °C, some UO2 remained without changes in the chemical form, and ZrO2, Zr2O, and ZrCl2 were generated as byproducts.

  15. Simulation study for purification, recovery of plutonium and uranium from plant streams of Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukumar, S.; Siva Kumar, P.; Radhika, R.; Subbuthai, S.; Mohan, S.V.; Subha Rao, R.V.

    2005-01-01

    A method for removal of plutonium from the lean organic streams obtained after co-stripping of uranium -plutonium was developed. Plutonium from lean organic phase was stripped using U 4+ /hydrazine as the stripping agent. The effect of concentrations of stripping agent U 4+ and feed Pu concentration in the lean organic phase was studied. Lean organic phases having higher plutonium concentration require three stages of stripping to bring plutonium concentration 4+ stabilized by hydrazine reduces Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby stripping plutonium from the organic phase. The non-extractability of Pu (III) by TBP was utilized for development of flow sheet for obtaining a uranium product lean of plutonium for ease of handling. (author)

  16. Designing Mission Operations for the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Glen G.; Beerer, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, to understand the internal structure and thermal evolution of the Moon, offered unique challenges to mission operations. From launch through end of mission, the twin GRAIL orbiters had to be operated in parallel. The journey to the Moon and into the low science orbit involved numerous maneuvers, planned on tight timelines, to ultimately place the orbiters into the required formation-flying configuration necessary. The baseline GRAIL mission is short, only 9 months in duration, but progressed quickly through seven very unique mission phases. Compressed into this short mission timeline, operations activities and maneuvers for both orbiters had to be planned and coordinated carefully. To prepare for these challenges, development of the GRAIL Mission Operations System began in 2008. Based on high heritage multi-mission operations developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Lockheed Martin, the GRAIL mission operations system was adapted to meet the unique challenges posed by the GRAIL mission design. This paper describes GRAIL's system engineering development process for defining GRAIL's operations scenarios and generating requirements, tracing the evolution from operations concept through final design, implementation, and validation.

  17. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jr., James S.; Westmoreland, Clyde G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  18. The recovery of 99Mo from solutions of irradiated Uranium using a column with nanoparticles of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, G. E.; Petre, M.; Lazar, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Molyibdenum-99 (T½ = 66.02 h) decays by beta emission to 99 Tcm (T½ = 6.02 h). The latter nuclide is used in many nuclear medicine applications. The 99 Mo is produced from irradiated high (HEU) or low (LEU) enriched uranium. In this work a sensitive and selective method for recovering Mo from uranium solution, using a column with titanium dioxide nanoparticles, is developed. The titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method using titanium tetra-chloride as starting material and urea as a reacting medium. A 40 ml uranium solution containing 450 g/L uranyl nitrate, 1 M HNO 3 , and 4 mg Mo was loaded on a column containing 6 g of TiO 2 sorbent at 75°C. After loading, the column was washed with 1 M HNO 3 and H 2 O. Mo was stripped from the column with 0.1 M NaOH at 25°C. The ICP-MS results indicate that 80-95% of the initial mass of Mo was loaded on the column, and 90-94% of this quantity was recovered in the strip fraction. (authors)

  19. Reducing emissions from uranium dissolving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Huxtable, W.P.; Googin, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    This study was designed to assess the feasibility of decreasing NO x emissions from the current uranium alloy scrap tray dissolving facility. In the current process, uranium scrap is dissolved in boiling nitric acid in shallow stainless-steel trays. As scrap dissolves, more metal and more nitric acid are added to the tray by operating personnel. Safe geometry is assured by keeping liquid level at or below 5 cm, the depth of a safe infinite slab. The accountability batch control system provides additional protection against criticality. Both uranium and uranium alloys are dissolved. Nitric acid is recovered from the vapors for reuse. Metal nitrates are sent to uranium recovery. Brown NO x fumes evolved during dissolving have occasionally resulted in a visible plume from the trays. The fuming is most noticeable during startup and after addition of fresh acid to a tray. Present environmental regulations are expected to require control of brown NO x emissions. A detailed review of the literature, indicated the feasibility of slightly altering process chemistry to favor the production of NO 2 which can be scrubbed and recycled as nitric acid. Methods for controlling the process to manage offgas product distribution and to minimize chemical reaction hazards were also considered

  20. Gold and uranium extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, G.S.; Davidson, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    A process for extracting gold and uranium from an ore containing them both comprising the steps of pulping the finely comminuted ore with a suitable cyanide solution at an alkaline pH, acidifying the pulp for uranium dissolution, adding carbon activated for gold recovery to the pulp at a suitable stage, separating the loaded activated carbon from the pulp, and recovering gold from the activated carbon and uranium from solution

  1. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Adam C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Belooussova, Olga N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hetrick, Lucas Duane [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  2. Removal of uranium from ammonium nitrate solution by nanofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Runci; Yuan, Zhongwei; Yan, Taihong; Zheng, Weifang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China). Dept. of Radiochemistry

    2017-07-01

    Two types of nanofiltration membranes were tested to remove uranium dissolved in ammonium nitrate solution, and the influence of operating parameters as transmembrane pressure, tangential velocity and feed temperature was investigated. Experimental results showed NF270 membrane can reject more than 96% uranium and allow most (90% min) ammonium nitrate solution passed by, and with a permeate flux of 60 L/(m{sup 2}.h). Nanofiltration seems to be a promising technology for the removal of uranium and recovery of ammonium nitrate simultaneously.

  3. Recovery operations in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made over the last decade in the field of emergency planning and preparedness, including the development of guidance, criteria, training programmes, regulations and comprehensive plans in the support of nuclear facilities. To provide a forum for international review and discussion of actual experiences gained and lessons learned from the different aspects of recovery techniques and operations in response to serious accidents at nuclear facilities and accidents associated with radioactive materials, the IAEA organized the International Symposium on Recovery Operations in the Event of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The symposium was held from 6 to 10 November 1989 in Vienna, Austria, and was attended by over 250 experts from 35 Member State and 7 international organizations. Although the prime focus was on on-site and off-site recovery from nuclear reactor accidents and on recovery from radiological accidents unrelated to nuclear power plants, development of emergency planning and preparedness resources was covered as well. From the experiences reported, lessons learned were identified. While further work remains to be done to improve concepts, plans, materials, communications and mechanisms to assemble quickly all the special resources needed in the event of an accident, there was general agreement that worldwide preparations to handle any possible future radiological emergencies had vastly improved. A special feature of the symposium programme was the inclusion of a full session on an accident involving a chemical explosion in a high level waste tank a a plutonium extraction plant in the Southern Urals in the USSR in 1957. Information was presented on the radioactive release, its dissemination and deposition, the resultant radiation situation, dose estimates, health effects follow-up, and the rehabilitation of contaminated land. This volume contains the full text of the 49 papers presented at the symposium together with a

  4. Longwall face recovery operations at Mine 26 of the Old Ben Coal Company, Benton, Illinois, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monks, W R; Hodgkinson, D; Ferris, W

    1985-02-01

    The paper describes a longwall face recovery (salvage) operation witnessed by National Coal Board Western Areas personnel at No. 26 Mine of the Old Ben Coal Company in Venton, Illinois. A brief review is made of the company and No. 26 Mine, and followed by a description of the longwall face salvage operations detailing the face equipment, preparation work, salvage equipment used, the method of operation and the results obtained. Particular reference is made to the successful use of Free Steered Vehicles (FSVs) for salvaging equipment and the use of roof bolts for the primary support of the face line. Finally, a number of conclusions are made which lead to firm recommendations for UK adoption.

  5. The first six years of the Chemwes uranium plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.A.; Simonsen, H.A.; Janssen, M.S.; Viljoen, E.B.; Taylor, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Stilfontein and Buffelsfontein Gold Mines, near Klerksdorp in the Transvaal, had accumulated a large amount of uranium-containing residue and, when the price of uranium rose in the 1970s, consideration was given to the possible recovery of this uranium. Preliminary tests showed that concentration of the uranium prior to leaching would not be economic. However, the pyrite in the residue could be concentrated by flotation, and the flotation concentrate could be roasted to provide both enough acid for leaching the uranium and a calcine from which the gold could be recovered. The feasibility study showed that a uranium operation of 270 kt per month would be most economically attractive, and a plant of that size was accordingly designed and built. In the first six years of its existence, the plant treated over 20 Mt of residue and produced about 3,5 kt of uranium oxide. During that time, the plant was continually being improved to make it more reliable and cost-efficient. This paper analyses the operation of the plant during its first six years from the viewpoints of its mechanical, process, and economic performance. The criteria on which the selection of the process was based are reviewed and compared with the actual performance of the plant, emphasis being placed on the leaching, solid-liquid separation, recovery, and purification stages

  6. Depleted uranium internal contamination of US soldiers deployed in Samawah, Iraq during operation Iraqi freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaf Durakovic; Isaac Zimmerman; Axel Gerdes

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the concentration and precise isotopic composition and ratios of four uranium isotopes ( 234 U, 235 U, 236 U, and 238 U) in the urine of United States soldiers deployed in Samawah, Iraq during the second Gulf War. Methods: Seven active duty US soldiers deployed as military police unit 442 presenting with non-specific symptoms of intractable headaches, excessive fatigue, intermittent fevers, musculoskeletal pains, respiratory impairment, affect changes, urinary tract symptoms, and neurological alterations were clinically evaluated. Each soldier signed a consent form to participate in our study. The collection of 24-hour urine samples of each subject was performed under controlled conditions. The urine samples were personally carried to the laboratory of the Institute of Geochemistry, JW Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany. Each sample was analyzed in duplicate by multicollector inductively coupled plasma ionization mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Control samples consisting of an internal urine standard were also analyzed by the same procedure. The analytical methodology included pre-concentration of the urine samples using evaporation, oxidation of organic matter, uranium purification by ion-exchange chromatography, and analysis by mass spectrometry. The final analysis of the specimens was performed by using a double-focusing Thermo Finnigan Neptune multicollector ICP-MS equipped with retarding potential quadrupole lens and a secondary electron multiplier for ion counting. Results: The mean concentration of total uranium was 3.6±1.3 ng/L. The average 238 U/ 235 U ratio was 146.2±10.2. The ratio of 238 U/ 235 U, being considered as the single most important parameter in determining the quantitative state of depletion of the natural uranium ratio, demonstrates a significant internal contamination with depleted uranium in four soldiers. The 234 U/ 238 U ratio was 6.5 x 10 -5 ±5.7 x 10 -6 . The 236 U/ 238 U ratio was

  7. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  8. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  9. Solvent Extraction of Uranium Towards Good Practice in Design, Operation and Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, Bob; Freeman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Historical Origins: •Originated from nuclear industry uranium concentrates –Based on TBP extractant from nitric acid solutions; –Extractant screening by Oak Ridge National laboratories; • Pilot investigations with acid leach slurries; • Development through commercial application: – Organic phosphoric acids; Dapex e.g. Shiprock –Secondary amine; e.g. Mexican Hat; – Tertiary amine; Amex, e.g. Grants; • Equipment design evolved with each installation

  10. Uranium mine venting during operation of self-propelled Diesel engine mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemer, M.

    1983-01-01

    A draft directive has been issued for the ventilation of uranium mines which takes into consideration the concentration of radon daughter products, radon volume activity as well as the concentration of harmful wastes emitted by the Diesel engines of mining mechanisms. The mathematical relations are given for the calculation of the required amount of pure mine winds. Also listed are the technical requirements for ventilation, dust emission and the control and maintenance of mining mechanisms. (M.D.)

  11. Operations management system advanced automation: Fault detection isolation and recovery prototyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matt

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to address the global fault detection, isolation and recovery (FDIR) requirements for Operation's Management System (OMS) automation within the Space Station Freedom program. This shall be accomplished by developing a selected FDIR prototype for the Space Station Freedom distributed processing systems. The prototype shall be based on advanced automation methodologies in addition to traditional software methods to meet the requirements for automation. A secondary objective is to expand the scope of the prototyping to encompass multiple aspects of station-wide fault management (SWFM) as discussed in OMS requirements documentation.

  12. A time-dependent event tree technique for modelling recovery operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Fitzpatrick, R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a simplified time dependent event tree methodology is presented. The technique is especially applicable to describe recovery operations in nuclear reactor accident scenarios initiated by support system failures. The event tree logic is constructed using time dependent top events combined with a damage function that contains information about the final state time behavior of the reactor core. Both the failure and the success states may be utilized for the analysis. The method is illustrated by modeling the loss of service water function with special emphasis on the RCP [reactor coolant pump] seal LOCA [loss of coolant accident] scenario. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Air quality monitoring of the post-operative recovery room and locations surrounding operating theaters in a medical center in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Sheng Tang

    Full Text Available To prevent surgical site infection (SSI, the airborne microbial concentration in operating theaters must be reduced. The air quality in operating theaters and nearby areas is also important to healthcare workers. Therefore, this study assessed air quality in the post-operative recovery room, locations surrounding the operating theater area, and operating theaters in a medical center. Temperature, relative humidity (RH, and carbon dioxide (CO2, suspended particulate matter (PM, and bacterial concentrations were monitored weekly over one year. Measurement results reveal clear differences in air quality in different operating theater areas. The post-operative recovery room had significantly higher CO2 and bacterial concentrations than other locations. Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. bacteria often existed in the operating theater area. Furthermore, Acinetobacter spp. was the main pathogen in the post-operative recovery room (18% and traumatic surgery room (8%. The mixed effect models reveal a strong correlation between number of people in a space and high CO2 concentration after adjusting for sampling locations. In conclusion, air quality in the post-operative recovery room and operating theaters warrants attention, and merits long-term surveillance to protect both surgical patients and healthcare workers.

  14. Air quality monitoring of the post-operative recovery room and locations surrounding operating theaters in a medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chin-Sheng; Wan, Gwo-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    To prevent surgical site infection (SSI), the airborne microbial concentration in operating theaters must be reduced. The air quality in operating theaters and nearby areas is also important to healthcare workers. Therefore, this study assessed air quality in the post-operative recovery room, locations surrounding the operating theater area, and operating theaters in a medical center. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and carbon dioxide (CO2), suspended particulate matter (PM), and bacterial concentrations were monitored weekly over one year. Measurement results reveal clear differences in air quality in different operating theater areas. The post-operative recovery room had significantly higher CO2 and bacterial concentrations than other locations. Bacillus spp., Micrococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. bacteria often existed in the operating theater area. Furthermore, Acinetobacter spp. was the main pathogen in the post-operative recovery room (18%) and traumatic surgery room (8%). The mixed effect models reveal a strong correlation between number of people in a space and high CO2 concentration after adjusting for sampling locations. In conclusion, air quality in the post-operative recovery room and operating theaters warrants attention, and merits long-term surveillance to protect both surgical patients and healthcare workers.

  15. Launch and recovery of ROV: Investigation of operational limit from DNV Recommended Practices and time domain simulations in SIMO

    OpenAIRE

    Valen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Offshore contractors seek to operate their remotely operated vehicles for the widest range of sea conditions where particularly launch and recovery through splash zone are critical phases in the offshore operation. The analytical methods for calculation of operational limit proposed by guidelines from DNV Recommended Practices may lead to an over-estimation of the hydrodynamic forces and consequently to an unduly restrictive operational limit. Accurate predictions of the hydrodynamic forces a...

  16. Integration of health physics, safety and operational processes for management and disposition of recycled uranium wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, James; Buckley, James

    2003-01-01

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald), the contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), recently submitted a new baseline plan for achieving site closure by the end of calendar year 2006. This plan was submitted at DOE's request, as the FEMP was selected as one of the sites for their accelerated closure initiative. In accordance with the accelerated baseline, the FEMP Waste Management Project (WMP) is actively evaluating innovative processes for the management and disposition of low-level uranium, fissile material, and thorium, all of which have been classified as waste. These activities are being conducted by the Low Level Waste (LLW) and Uranium Waste Disposition (UWD) projects. Alternatives associated with operational processing of individual waste streams, each of which poses potentially unique health physics, industrial hygiene and industrial hazards, are being evaluated for determination of the most cost effective and safe met hod for handling and disposition. Low-level Mixed Waste (LLMW) projects are not addressed in this paper. This paper summarizes historical uranium recycling programs and resultant trace quantity contamination of uranium waste streams with radionuclides, other than uranium. The presentation then describes how waste characterization data is reviewed for radiological and/or chemical hazards and exposure mitigation techniques, in conjunction with proposed operations for handling and disposition. The final part of the presentation consists of an overview of recent operations within LLW and UWD project dispositions, which have been safely completed, and a description of several current operations

  17. Nitrous oxide levels in operating and recovery rooms of Iranian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroufi, Sh Sadigh; Gharavi, Mj; Behnam, M; Samadikuchaksaraei, A

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is the oldest anesthetic in routine clinical use and its occupational exposure is under regulation by many countries. As studies are lacking to demonstrate the status of nitrous oxide levels in operating and recovery rooms of Iranian hospitals, we aimed to study its level in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. During a 6-month period, we have measured the shift-long time weighted average concentration of N(2)O in 43 operating and 12 recovery rooms of teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The results show that the level of nitrous oxide in all hospitals is higher than the limits set by different countries and anesthetists are at higher risk of exposure. In addition, it was shown that installation of air ventilation could reduce not only the overall exposure level, but also the level of exposure of anesthetists in comparison with other personnel. The high nitrous oxide level in Iranian hospitals necessitates improvement of waste gas evacuation systems and regular monitoring to bring the concentration of this gas into the safe level.

  18. Themoeconomic optimization of triple pressure heat recovery steam generator operating parameters for combined cycle plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammd Mohammed S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a method for optimization of operating parameters of a triple pressure heat recovery steam generator. Two types of optimization: (a thermodynamic and (b thermoeconomic were preformed. The purpose of the thermodynamic optimization is to maximize the efficiency of the plant. The selected objective for this purpose is minimization of the exergy destruction in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG. The purpose of the thermoeconomic optimization is to decrease the production cost of electricity. Here, the total annual cost of HRSG, defined as a sum of annual values of the capital costs and the cost of the exergy destruction, is selected as the objective function. The optimal values of the most influencing variables are obtained by minimizing the objective function while satisfying a group of constraints. The optimization algorithm is developed and tested on a case of CCGT plant with complex configuration. Six operating parameters were subject of optimization: pressures and pinch point temperatures of every three (high, intermediate and low pressure steam stream in the HRSG. The influence of these variables on the objective function and production cost are investigated in detail. The differences between results of thermodynamic and the thermoeconomic optimization are discussed.

  19. Geothermal waste heat utilization from in situ thermal bitumen recovery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakevska, Nevenka; Schincariol, Robert A; Dehkordi, S Emad; Cheadle, Burns A

    2015-01-01

    In situ thermal methods for bitumen extraction introduce a tremendous amount of energy into the reservoirs raising ambient temperatures of 13 °C to as high as 200 °C at the steam chamber edge and 50 °C along the reservoir edge. In essence these operations have unintentionally acted as underground thermal energy storage systems which can be recovered after completion of bitumen extraction activities. Groundwater flow and heat transport models of the Cold Lake, Alberta, reservoir, coupled with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) model, allowed for investigating the use of closed-loop geothermal systems for energy recovery. Three types of BHEs (single U-tube, double U-tube, coaxial) were tested and analyzed by comparing outlet temperatures and corresponding heat extraction rates. Initial one year continuous operation simulations show that the double U-tube configuration had the best performance producing an average temperature difference of 5.7 °C, and an average heat extraction of 41 W/m. Given the top of the reservoir is at a depth of 400 m, polyethylene piping provided for larger extraction gains over more thermally conductive steel piping. Thirty year operation simulations illustrate that allowing 6 month cyclic recovery periods only increases the loop temperature gain by a factor of 1.2 over continuous operation. Due to the wide spacing of existing boreholes and reservoir depth, only a small fraction of the energy is efficiently recovered. Drilling additional boreholes between existing wells would increase energy extraction. In areas with shallower bitumen deposits such as the Athabasca region, i.e. 65 to 115 m deep, BHE efficiencies should be larger. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  20. Leaching and solvent extraction at Mary Kathleen Uranium Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, G.D.

    1978-01-01

    Mary Kathleen Uranium Ltd. recommenced operations in early 1976 following a twelve year period of care and maintenance. Several sections of the plant were modified or completely changed for the second operation. The most important change was the replacement of ion exchange with solvent extraction as the means of purifying and upgrading uranium rich solutions. Most of the problems experienced in the solvent extraction system originate from the leach liquor which has a strong tendency to form stable emulsions. This has been countered by some careful control of leaching conditions and by closer observation of operations in the solvent extraction area. Most problems have now been resolved and plant recoveries are quite satisfactory

  1. Final Environmental Impact Statement to construct and operate the Crownpoint Uranium Solution Mining Project, Crownpoint, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of issuing a combined source and 11e(2) byproduct material license and minerals operating leases for Federal and Indian lands to Hydro Resources, Inc. (HRI). This action would authorize HRI to conduct in-situ leach uranium mining in McKinley County, New Mexico. Such mining would involve drilling wells to access the ore bodies, then recirculating groundwater with added oxygen to mobilize uranium found in the ore. Uranium would then be removed from the solution using ion exchange technology in processing plants located at three separate sites. As proposed by HRI, a central plant would provide drying and packaging equipment for the entire project. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed action was prepared by an interagency review group comprising staff from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Land Management, and published in October 1994. After evaluating the environmental impacts of the proposed action in the DEIS, the reviewing agencies concluded that the appropriate action was to issue the requested license and proposed leases authorizing HRI to proceed with the project. This FEIS reevaluates the proposed licensing action on the basis of written and oral comments received on the DEIS and on additional information obtained in 1995 and 1996. The FEIS describes and evaluates (1) the purpose of and need for the proposed action, (2) alternatives to the proposed action, (3) the environmental resources that could be affected by the proposed action and alternatives, (4) the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, and (5) the economic costs and benefits associated with the proposed action. Based on this assessment, the FEIS makes recommendations concerning the requested license and proposed leases

  2. Operation of the D0 uranium liquid-argon calorimeter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, J.

    1992-12-01

    The DO calorimeter consists of three separate cryostats containing uranium modules in liquid argon. This odorimeter has transverse segmentation of 0.1 x 0.1 in η x 0 and consists of eight or nine longitudinal readout segments. The coverage in η extends to 4. As a result of the large coverage and fine segmentation there are 50,000 channels of electronics. After a brief description of the electronics, stability and noise aspects will be investigated. Results of the liquid-argon purity studies will be discssed. The backgrounds in the calorimeter due to the Fermilab main ring will also be examined

  3. Prediction of the net radon emission from a model open pit uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Perkins, R.W.; Schwendiman, L.C.; Enderlin, W.I.

    1979-09-01

    Radon emission from a model open pit uranium mining operation has been estimated by applying radon exhalation fluxes measured in an open pit uranium mine to the various areas of the model mine. The model mine was defined by averaging uranium concentrations, mine dimensions, production and procedural statistics for eight major open pit uranium mines in the Casper, Wyoming area. The resulting emission rates were 630 Ci/RRY (1 RRY one = 1000-MW(e) reactor operating for 1 year) during mining operations and 26 Ci/RRY/y after abandoment of the mine assuming 100% recovery of U 3 O 8 from the ore, or 700 Ci/RRY and 29 Ci/RRY/y assuming 90.5% recovery

  4. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a site-specific environmental impact statement (EIS) for construction and operation of a proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) conversion facility at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Paducah site in northwestern Kentucky (Figure S-1). The proposed facility would convert the DUF 6 stored at Paducah to a more stable chemical form suitable for use or disposal. In a Notice of Intent (NOI) published in the ''Federal Register'' (FR) on September 18, 2001 (''Federal Register'', Volume 66, page 48123 [66 FR 48123]), DOE announced its intention to prepare a single EIS for a proposal to construct, operate, maintain, and decontaminate and decommission two DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (''United States Code'', Title 42, Section 4321 et seq. [42 USC 4321 et seq.]) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (''Code of Federal Regulations'', Title 10, Part 1021 [10 CFR Part 1021]). Subsequent to award of a contract to Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (hereafter referred to as UDS), Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on August 29, 2002, for design, construction, and operation of DUF 6 conversion facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah, DOE reevaluated its approach to the NEPA process and decided to prepare separate site-specific EISs. This change was announced in a ''Federal Register'' Notice of Change in NEPA Compliance Approach published on April 28, 2003 (68 FR 22368); the Notice is included as Attachment B to Appendix C of this EIS. This EIS addresses the potential environmental impacts from the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning (DandD) of the proposed conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; from the transportation of depleted uranium conversion products to a disposal facility; and from the transportation, sale, use, or disposal of the fluoride-containing conversion products

  5. PUMA code simulation of recovery power transients after a short shutdown of the Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, Javier; Pomerantz, Marcelo E.

    2003-01-01

    A simulation of recovery power transients after a short shutdown on Embalse nuclear power plant equilibrium core with slightly enriched uranium fuel was performed in order to know the response of the reactor under such conditions. Also, comparison against the same event in a natural uranium core were done. No significant restrictions were found in operating with enriched fuel in the conditions of the analyzed event and in fact, slightly differences arose with natural uranium fuels. (author)

  6. Stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction of monazite hydroxides for the recovery of cerium lean rare earths, cerium, uranium and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, T.V.; Nair, V.R.; John, C.V.

    1988-01-01

    Monazite sand is normally processed by the caustic soda route to produce mixed rare earth chloride, thorium hydroxide and trisodium phosphate. Bulk of the mixed rare earth chloride is used for the preparation of FC catalysts. Recently some of the catalyst producers have shown preference to cerium depleted (lanthanum enriched) rare earth chloride rather than the natural rare earth chloride obtained from monazite. Therefore, a process for producing cerium depleted rare earth chloride, cerium, thorium and uranium from rare earth + thorium hydroxide obtained by treating monazite, based on stepwise hydrochloric acid extraction, was developed in the authors laboratory. The process involves drying of the mixed rare earth-thorium hydroxide cake obtained by monazite-caustic soda process followed by stepwise extraction of the dried cake with hydrochloric acid under specified conditions

  7. Decontamination and recovery of a nuclear facility to allow continued operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaghan, Josh

    2017-01-01

    A power supply failure caused a loss of power to key ventilation systems in an operating nuclear facility. The in-cell depression was lost, which led to an egress of activity through prepared areas and into the normal operating areas. After an initial programme of radiological monitoring to quantify and categorise the activity in the operating areas, a plan was developed for the decontamination and remediation of the plant. The scope of the recovery plan was substantial and featured several key stages. The contamination was almost entirely "1"3"7Cs, reflecting the α:β/γ ratio for the facility. In addition to the physical remediation work, several administrative controls were introduced such as new local rules, safety signage to indicate abnormal radiological conditions in certain areas and training of the decontamination teams. All areas of plant, which were contaminated, were returned to normal access arrangements and the plant was successfully returned to full operational capability, <12 months from the date of the event. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of human health risk from in situ recovery uranium mining, pre-and post-mining, and post-restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, E.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Borch, T.; Johnson, T. [Colorado State University (United States); Till, J. [Risk Assessment Corporation (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In the United States, the restoration of in situ recovery (ISR) uranium mines is aimed at returning sites to pre-mining conditions. While this may seem an appropriate goal, little or no scientific information is available to justify utilizing baseline conditions for regulatory compliance. The chemical and radiological contaminants monitored for restoration compliance have not been evaluated to ensure they are proper indicators of the mitigation of risk. Pre-mining aquifers do not meet minimum United States drinking water standards, and must have an aquifer exemption in place prior to mining. Under these conditions, returning groundwater to near the original concentrations of contaminants may be unnecessary. Post-mining groundwater is also unlikely to meet standards for drinking water, but may be depleted in at least some toxic species as a result of the mining process. Here, we examine the risk to representative person from the personal use of groundwater sourced from an Uranium ISR mine. Water samples were collected from Cameco Resource's Smith Ranch-Highlands ISR Uranium mine near Casper, Wyoming, USA. Samples were acquired pre-mining, post-mining, and post-restoration. Concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides were assessed by appropriate analytical techniques (e.g., mass spectroscopy or alpha spectroscopy) and these concentrations were used to estimate human health risk for three exposure scenarios: a scenario with high exposure, a scenario with medium exposure, and a scenario with low exposure. A simple biosphere transport model was constructed for each scenario to estimate the risk to humans from the use of contaminated waters for subsistence-related activities. Chemical and radiological risks were harmonized according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for superfund sites. Each exposure scenario and its subsequent risk were evaluated individually for pre-mining, post-mining, and post-restoration aquifer waters

  9. How much uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenward, M.

    1976-01-01

    Comment is made on the latest of a series of reports on world uranium resources from the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency and the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency (Uranium resources, production and demand (including other nuclear fuel cycle data), published by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris). The report categories uranium reserves by their recovery cost and looks at power demand and the whole of the nuclear fuel cycle, including uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing. The effect that fluctuations in uranium prices have had on exploration for new uranium resources is considered. It is stated that increased exploration is essential considering the long lead times involved but that thanks to today's higher prices there are distinct signs that prospecting activities are increasing again. (U.K.)

  10. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  11. Bois-Noirs ore. Recovery of uranium of solutions from acid treatment. Results of industrial tests at the Gueugnon plant; Minerai des Bois-Noirs. Recuperation de l'uranium des solutions d'attaques acides. Resultats des essais industriels effectues a l'usine de Gueugnon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bris, J

    1959-04-01

    Industrial-scale tests are reported of the efficiency of two recovery processes for the separation of uranium from sulfuric acid pickling solutions used on ore from Bois-Noirs, at the Gueugnon works. The final stage of each process is sodium uranate. The earlier part of the report deals with tests of the separation of uranium from foreign metals by fractional precipitation. The second part deals with the separation of uranium from these metals by carbonation of the solutions. (author) [French] Le present rapport concerne les essais industriels de deux procedes de recuperation de l'uranium de solutions d'attaque sulfurique du minerai des Bois-Noirs a l'usine de Gueugnon. Le stade final pour ces deux procedes etant l'uranate de sodium, une premiere partie est consacree aux essais de separation de l'uranium des metaux etrangers par precipitation fractionnee; une deuxieme partie est consacree aux essais de separation de l'uranium des metaux etrangers par carbonatation des solutions d'attaque du minerai. (auteur)

  12. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  13. An Investigation on the Current Status of the Operation Recovery Rooms in Yazd Hospitals in 2010-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Khajeh Aminian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The recovery ward is a vital unit to care patients awaking from anesthesia and is a standard requirement for the operating room. Recovery ward is located adjacent to the operation room and is easily accessible to trained and skilled individuals. The unit must have adequate equipment for surveillance and monitoring of patients and required medication should also be provided. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional conducted in one phase through referring to hospital facilities and equipment. Physical space, personnel and their skill levels and other factors that are involved in the care of patients in the recovery have been investigated. The instruments used in this study were a check list and observe sheet which were completed by the researchers. Data analysis was conducted by SPSS software. Results: The results showed that the standards of buildings and physical space in the researched areas were mostly nonstandard. Equipment standards were to some extent in line with the criteria set by American Association of Anesthesia. Besides, some equipment was blow standard levels. Personnel standards regarding the number of nurses toward the number of recovery beds did not meet the standard criteria in most of the cases. Conclusion: The research shows that building standards in most cases are not in line with mentioned references. Undertaking equipment standards in the hospital recovery wards needs reviewing and providing controlling equipment for preventing the complications of recovery phase of anesthesia in recovery wards.

  14. Determination of 228Th, 230Th, and 232Th in environmental samples from uranium mining and milling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, R.W.; Joshi, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of 228 Th, 230 Th, and 232 Th in environmental samples from uranium mining and milling operations. The analytical procedure is based on the direct determination of 228 Th in the sample by high resolution γ-spectrometry followed by extraction and purification of the thorium fraction using high molecular weight amines and an anion-exchange technique, respectively, prior to α-spectrometry to determine isotopic ratios. The lowest level of detection for each thorium isotope is 0.01 pCi/g for solid samples and 20 pCi/l for aqueous samples. Replicate analyses of a typical mine waste stream gave a standard deviation of +-3% for 228 Th. Standard deviations of the 230 Th and 232 Th increased to +-11% apparently due to traces of 210 Po interfering in the α-spectrometry. (author)

  15. The uranium production cycle and the environment. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    issues and performance in several countries; problems of acid rock drainage at uranium mine sites; national examples of environmental impact assessment in the uranium industry; natural background radioactivity of the earth's surface at and away from uranium production facilities; technology and the uranium industry; environmental design aspects of uranium mines and mills; design, management and closure of uranium tailings facilities; national experience with management and disposal of liquid and solid wastes from uranium mining and milling; national experience with treatment and restoration of waste water from both conventional and in situ leach uranium mining; safe management of radioactive waste from mining and milling activities; evolving regulation and rehabilitation standards for uranium recovery operations; national experience with regulation of uranium production. This publication contains 71 individual papers presented at the symposium. Each of the papers was indexed separately.

  16. The uranium production cycle and the environment. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    and performance in several countries; problems of acid rock drainage at uranium mine sites; national examples of environmental impact assessment in the uranium industry; natural background radioactivity of the earth's surface at and away from uranium production facilities; technology and the uranium industry; environmental design aspects of uranium mines and mills; design, management and closure of uranium tailings facilities; national experience with management and disposal of liquid and solid wastes from uranium mining and milling; national experience with treatment and restoration of waste water from both conventional and in situ leach uranium mining; safe management of radioactive waste from mining and milling activities; evolving regulation and rehabilitation standards for uranium recovery operations; national experience with regulation of uranium production. This publication contains 71 individual papers presented at the symposium. Each of the papers was indexed separately

  17. Status of domestic uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chenoweth, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    The domestic uranium industry continues to operate at a reduced level, due to low prices and increased foreign competition. For four years (1984-1987) the Secretary of Energy declared the industry to be nonviable. A similar declaration is expected for 1988. Exploration and development drilling, at the rate of 2 million ft/year, continue in areas of producing mines and recent discoveries, especially in northwestern Arizona, northwestern Nebraska, south Texas, Wyoming, and the Paradox basin of Colorado and Utah. Production of uranium concentrate continues at a rate of 13 to 15 million lb of uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) per year. Conventional mining in New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, and Texas accounts for approximately 55% of the production. The remaining 45% comes from solution (in situ) mining, from mine water recovery, and as by-products from copper production and the manufacture of phosphoric acid. Solution mining is an important technique in Wyoming, Nebraska, and Texas. By-product production comes from phosphate plants in Florida and Louisiana and a copper mine in Utah. Unmined deposits in areas such as the Grants, New Mexico, district are being investigated for their application to solution mining technology. The discovered uranium resources in the US are quite large, and the potential to discover additional resources is excellent. However, higher prices and a strong market will be necessary for their exploitation

  18. Cooling energy efficiency and classroom air environment of a school building operated by the heat recovery air conditioning unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhao, Fu-Yun; Kuckelkorn, Jens; Liu, Di; Liu, Li-Qun; Pan, Xiao-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The recently-built school buildings have adopted novel heat recovery ventilator and air conditioning system. Heat recovery efficiency of the heat recovery facility and energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit were analytically modeled, taking the ventilation networks into account. Following that, school classroom displacement ventilation and its thermal stratification and indoor air quality indicated by the CO 2 concentration have been numerically modeled concerning the effects of delivering ventilation flow rate and supplying air temperature. Numerical results indicate that the promotion of mechanical ventilation rate can simultaneously boost the dilution of indoor air pollutants and the non-uniformity of indoor thermal and pollutant distributions. Subsequent energy performance analysis demonstrates that classroom energy demands for ventilation and cooling could be reduced with the promotion of heat recovery efficiency of the ventilation facility, and the energy conservation ratio of the air conditioning unit decreases with the increasing temperatures of supplying air. Fitting correlations of heat recovery ventilation and cooling energy conservation have been presented. - Highlights: • Low energy school buildings and classroom environment. • Heat recovery facility operating with an air conditioning unit. • Displacement ventilation influenced by the heat recovery efficiency. • Energy conservation of cooling and ventilation through heat recovery. • Enhancement of classroom environment with reduction of school building energy

  19. Bioassays with caged hyalella azteca to determine in situ toxicity downstream of two Saskatchewan, Canada, uranium operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Erin L; Liber, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    The main objectives of this in situ study were to evaluate the usefulness of an in situ bioassay to determine if downstream water bodies at the Key Lake and Rabbit Lake uranium operations (Saskatchewan, Canada) were toxic to Hyalella azteca and, if toxicity was observed, to differentiate between the contribution of surface water and sediment contamination to in situ toxicity. These objectives were achieved by performing 4-d in situ bioassays with laboratory-reared H. azteca confined in specially designed, paired, surface water and sediment exposure chambers. Results from the in situ bioassays revealed significant mortality, relative to the respective reference site, at the exposure sites at both Key Lake (p operations, although this relationship was stronger at Key Lake. At Key Lake, the primary cause of aquatic toxicity to H. azteca did not appear to be correlated with the variables measured in this study, but most likely with a pulse of organic mill-process chemicals released during the time of the in situ study-a transient event that was caused by a problem with the mill's solvent extraction process. The suspected cause of in situ toxicity to H. azteca at Rabbit Lake was high levels of uranium in surface water, sediment, and pore water.

  20. Application of Taguchi method for separation of uranium from acetate bearing wastewater using hydroxamic acid based sorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.; Roy, S.B.; Vaidya, A.; Bankar, V.; Dasgupta, K.; Pal, S.

    2016-01-01

    Separation and recovery of uranium from effluent of nuclear facility has drawn immense attention in separation science research. The acetic acid based uranium solution effluent generated in uranium metal powder production facility was targeted for the study. Solid state separation technique has been employed using hydroxamic acid based chelating sorbent because of several advantages. In the study, the sorbent performances have been evaluated for its important parameters like isotherm, efficiency and kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity (q e ) and distribution coefficient (K d ) of U(VI) have been evaluated as 3.24 mg/g sorbent and 805 ml/g sorbent respectively. Uranium has been recovered using HCl solution. Uranium removal from the feed was found to be more than 95% and the recovery of uranium was more than 99% from the adsorbed phase. Elution process is faster than sorption process. Taguchi optimization method has been applied for designing experimental study and also to identify the optimum operational conditions for uranium separation process.The developed process is useful for separation and recovery of uranium from acetate bearing wastewater generated in uranium processing facilities