WorldWideScience

Sample records for uranium project geo

  1. Uranium project GEO 2 attachment: cronostratigraphy aplied to Uranium research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In the article, different sources of information about Uranium stratigraphy from Uruguay have been reviewed. Some results have been presented in Upper Cambrian period and Precambrian era, specially Devonian, Carboniferous and Silurian period

  2. Uranium project GEO 2 attachment: cronostratigraphy aplied to Uranium research; Proyecto Uranio anexo GEO 2: cronoestratigrafia aplicada a la investigacion de Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-07-01

    In the article, different sources of information about Uranium stratigraphy from Uruguay have been reviewed. Some results have been presented in Upper Cambrian period and Precambrian era, specially Devonian, Carboniferous and Silurian period.

  3. Jabiluka uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The Jabiluka uranium and gold deposit located in the Northern Territory of Australia is the world's largest known primary uranium deposits and as such has the potential to become one of the most important uranium projects in the world. Despite the financial and structural challenges facing the major owner Pancontinental Mining Limited and the changing political policies in Australia, Jabiluka is well situated for development during the 1990's. With the availability of numerous financial and development alternatives, Jabiluka could, by the turn of the century, take its rightful place among the first rank of world uranium producers. The paper discusses ownership, location, property rights, licensing, environmental concerns, marketing and development, capital costs, royalties, uranium policy considerations, geologic exploration history, regional and site geology, and mining and milling operations

  4. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.

    1983-01-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results

  5. The Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.

    1997-01-01

    The Kintyre Uranium Project is being developed by Canning Resources Pty Ltd, a subsidiary of Rio Tinto (formerly CRA). The work on the project includes the planning and management of a number of background environmental studies. The company has also commissioned studies by external consultants into process technologies, mining strategies and techniques for extracting the uranium ore from the waste rock. In addition, Canning Resources has made a detailed assessment of the worldwide market potential for Australian uranium in the late 1990s and into the 21st century. The most significant factor affecting the future of this project is the current product price. This price is insufficient to justify the necessary investment to bring this project into production

  6. Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This agreement between the Commonwealth of Australia, Peko-Wallsend Operations Ltd., Electrolytic Zinc Company of Australasia Limited, and the Australian Atomic Energy Commission sets out articles under which the Ranger uranium project in the Northern Territory of Australia is to be operated

  7. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erlendsson, G.; Jensen, J.; Kofoed, S.; Paulsen, J.L.

    1983-11-01

    The draft uranium project ''Kvanefjeld'' describes the establishment and operation of an industrial plant for exploiting the uranium deposit at Kvanefjeld. The draft project is part of the overall pre-feasibility project and is based on its results. The draft project includes two alternative locations for the processing plant and the tailings deposit plant. The ore reserve is estimated at 56 million tons with an average content of 365 PPM. The mine will be established as an open pit, with a slope angle of 55deg. Conventional techniques are used in drilling, blasting and handling the ore. Waste rock with no uranium content will be disposed of in two ponds near the mine. The waste rock volume is estimated at 80 million tons. A processing plant for extracting uranium from the ore will be established. The technical layout of the plant is based on the extraction experiments performed at Risoe from 1981-83. Yearly capacity is 4.2 million tons of ore. Electrical energy will be supplied from a hydroelectric station to be built at Johan Dahl Land. Thermal energy (steam/heat) will be supplied from a coal-fired district heating plant to be built in connection with the processing plant. Expected power consumption is estimated at 225 GWh/year. Heat consumption is of the same order. In the third year the plant is expected to operate at full capacity. Operating costs will be Dkr. 121/ton of ore from years 1 through 7. Consumption of chemicals will be reduced from the 7th year, and operating costs will consequently drop to Dkr. 115/ton of ore. Calculations show that industrial extraction of the uranium deposit in Kvanefjeld is economically advantageous. In addition, the economy of the project is expected to improve by extracting byproducts from the ore. (EG)

  8. Kintyre uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This project book is designed to outline the nature of the Kintyre uranium project for those associated with the project as employees, contractors and consultants and others. It explains why Canning Resources Pty Limited and CRA Exploration believe this resource and other resources in the Rundall region should be developed. It also outlines the environmental and social issues involved and the proposed means of addressing those issues. The Kintyre resource and associated areas of geological prospectivity are located in the Rundall region on the edge of the Great Sandy Desert, in the East Pilbara region of Western Australia. Canning Resources with CRA Exploration has spent over $20 million in the past two years in intensive drilling and exploration efforts in the Kintyre area and intends to spend a further $10 million in 1988. Investigations so far reveal that the resource has features which make it competitive with the best uranium mines in the world

  9. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Overall investments connected with project start constitute approx. Dkr. 3.500 million for the uranium mine, approx. Dkr. 1,100 milion for the hydroelectric station, and approx. Dkr. 400 million for the social infrastructure, adding up to approx. Dkr. 5 billion. This corresponds to Greenlands's gross domestic product over two years or total exports over three years. The effect on employment in the construction phase is assumed to be 650 jobs on average, of which 25%, or approx. 150 jobs, can be filled by Greenland labour. The value of the project on Greenland's economy has been calculated according to its contribution to both the GDP and GNP. The GDP denotes the added value created in a community through production of goods and services in all trades, including public services. The GNP denotes that part of the DGP accruing to the citizens of a country, in this case Greenlanders. Large capital expenditures will be applied towards payment of interest and depreciation. These amounts consitute approx. 70 % of project earnings, measured as its contribution to GDP. The contribution to GNP amounts to approx. Dkr. 170 million per year i the construction phase. However, lack of official data for Greenland's economy makes it difficult to relate these results to other business activities or to assess their size exactly in relation to Greenland's economy. The underlying trend of the calculations is clear nevertheless. The project will have a significant, favourable effect on national accounts and will provide a large number of job openings for Greenland workers. (EG)

  10. National uranium project - an initiative to generate national database on uranium in drinking water of the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Jha, V.N.; Kumar, Ajay; Patra, A.C.; Vinod Kumar, A.

    2018-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring lithophilic heavy element found in earth crust since inception of the earth. It is present naturally in all rock and soil and the concentration depends on geological formation and local geology. Groundwater interact with the host rocks and the wet weathering process facilitate the solubility of uranium in groundwater. The concentration of uranium in groundwater is influenced by geo-chemical parameters such as host rock characteristics and pH, Eh, ORP, ligands, etc. of the interacting water medium. Uranium is a radioactive element of low specific activity (25 Bq/mg) having both chemical and radiological toxicity but its chemical toxicity supersede the radio-toxicity. After a reporting of high uranium content in drinking water of Punjab, BARC has taken a pro-active initiative to generate a national database on uranium in drinking water in all the districts of India under National Uranium Project (NUP)

  11. Kvanefjeld uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This report contains a description and an investment estimate for the infrastructure connected with establishing uranium mining activities at Narssaq. The infrastructure comprises dwellings for employess, etc., personnel and cargo transport, incl. harbours, primary storage facilities and supply routes. The report does not cover the production plant, ore and tailings transport systems, energy supply, nor workshop and administration buildings. The report assumes that the Greenland mining enterprise will employ approx. 280 persons in mining and administration, and approx. 300 persons in processing plants, etc. An increased population will also provide increased demand for shops, institutions and facilities for leisure activities. It is expected that areas will be reserved for local shops, and one or two day-care institutions for children will be built. The increase in cargo transport to and from production plants and in connection with population growth will necessitate the construction of new harbours and/or extension of the existing harbour in Narssaq. The annual volumes of coal and chemical products in bulk for the processing plant will amount to approx. 160,000 t. Approx. 8,000 tons a year will be needed to satisfy the requirements of both mining and the increased population. The present volume passing through the harbour in Narssaq is approx. 7,000 t. (EG)

  12. Financing the Ranger uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodge, S.J.; Miskelly, N.

    1983-01-01

    Construction of the Ranger uranium project located 230 km east of Darwin in the Northern Territory commenced in January 1979. Energy Resources of Australia Ltd was incorporated in February 1980 to acquire all the rights in the project. The total cost to ERA of these rights was $407 million. In October 1980 ERA'S cash requirements were estimated to be $553 million. Overseas participants (power utilities who had agreed to purchase uranium yellowcake under contract) arranged to take up 25% of the equity capital, Peko-Wallsend Ltd and EZ Industries Ltd were allotted 30.5% each and 14% was issued to Australian residents. The loan and equity financing arrangements required the successful resolution of many complex and interlocking factors, including technical and economic feasibility, agreement with aboriginal interests, compliance with Government policies and securing of sales contracts

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials

  14. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1947-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  15. Manhattan Project Technical Series: The Chemistry of Uranium (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabinowitch, E. I. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Katz, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1947-03-10

    This constitutes Chapters 11 through 16, inclusive, of the Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Uranium Oxides, Sulfides, Selenides, and Tellurides; The Non-Volatile Fluorides of Uranium; Uranium Hexafluoride; Uranium-Chlorine Compounds; Bromides, Iodides, and Pseudo-Halides of Uranium; and Oxyhalides of Uranium.

  16. Why new tools were developed for the 'GeoPortalNetwork : Liberty United" project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanmeulebrouk, B.; Van Swol, R.; Kuyper, M.; Bulens, J.; Zevenbergen, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the national innovation co-funding scheme “Space for Geo-information” the projectGeoPortal Network: Liberty United” ran from late 2005 till the end of 2008. Purpose of the project was to promote access to geo-spatial information via web services. To achieve this goal, a network of

  17. GEO-6 project for Galileo data scientific utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buresova, Dalia; Lastovicka, Jan; Boska, Josef; Sauli, Petra; Kouba, Daniel; Mosna, Zbysek

    The future GNSS Galileo system offer a number of benefits (e.g. availability of better accuracy positioning, new frequencies bands allowing the implementation of specific techniques, provable time-stamp and location data using SIS authorisation, integrity, better support ad-hoc algorithms for data analysis and other service guarantee for liability and regulated applications) are widely spread among different disciplines. Also applications which are less interesting from the commercial and market point of view could successfully contribute to the numerous social benefits and support the innovation in the international research. The aim of the GEO-6 project "Scientific research Using GNSS" is to propose and broaden scientific utilization of future GNSS Galileo system data in research. It is a joint project of seven institutions from six countries led by the Atos Origin Company from Spain. The core of the project consists from six projects in five priority areas: PA-1 Remote sensing of the ocean using GNSS reflections, PA-2a Investigating GNSS ionospheric data assimilation, PA-2b 3-D gravity wave detection and determination (both PA-2a and PA-2b are ionospheric topics), PA-3 Demonstration of capability for operational forecasting of atmospheric delays, PA-4 GNSS seismometer, PA-5 Spacecraft formation flying using global navigation satellite systems. Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Prague, Czech Republic is responsible for the project PA-2b, where we developed and tested (to the extent allowed by available data) an algorithm and computer code for the 3-D detection of gravity waves and determination of their characteristics. The main drivers of the GEO-6 project are: high levels of accuracy even with the support of local elements, sharing of solutions and results for the worldwide scientific community. The paper will present basic description of the project with more details concerning Czech participation in it.

  18. Uranium project DINAMIGE-BRGM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirelli, H.

    1982-01-01

    This Uranium review was carried out in the frame work of Uranium prospecting programme between (DINAMIGE-BRGM) from February to June 1982. It was included radimetric cutting in sedimentaries and crystallines ground (gondwanic basin of the NE).The task was developed (1.300.000 scale) in Cunapiru, Carrillada, Vichadero, Minas de Corrales, Paso Mazangano and Yaguari zones.

  19. Jabiluka gold-uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Jabiluka gold-uranium deposit, 230km east of Darwin in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory, was discovered by Pancontinental Mining Limited in 1971. Jabiluka, with reserves in excess of 200,000 tonnes of contained U 3 O 8 in two deposits 500 metres apart, is the world's largest high grade uranium deposit and also contains nearly 12 tonnes of gold. It is proposed that only the larger deposit, Jabiluka II will be mined - by underground extraction methods, and that 275,000 tonnes of ore per year will be mined and processed to produce 1,500 tonnes of U 3 O 8 and up to 30,000 oz of gold. The revenue from the uranium sales is estimated to be of the order of A$100 million per year at A$30/lb. By the end of 1982 all necessary mining and environmental approvals had been obtained and significant marketing progress made. With the Australian Labor Party winning Commonwealth Government in the 1983 election, Pancontinental's permission to seek sales contracts was withdrawn and development of the Jabiluka deposit ceased. Jabiluka remains undeveloped - awaiting a change in Australian Government policy on uranium. figs., maps

  20. The McClean Lake uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The McClean Lake Uranium Project, located in the northern part of Saskatchewan, consists of five uranium deposits, Jeb - Sue A - Sue B - Sue C - McClean, scattered in three different locations on the mineral lease. On 16 March 1995, COGEMA Resources Inc and its partners, Denison Mines Ltd and OURD (Canada) Co Ltd, made the formal decision to develop the McClean Lake Project. Construction of the mine and mill started during summer 1995 and should be finished by mid 1997. Mining of the first deposit, Jeb started in 1996, ore being currently mined. The start of the yellowcake production is scheduled to start this fall. (author)

  1. Multidisciplinary Geo-scientific Hazard Analyses: Istanbul Microzonation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Sema; Baş, Mahmut; Kılıç, Osman; Tarih, Ahmet; Yahya Menteşe, Emin; Duran, Kemal

    2017-04-01

    Istanbul (Turkey) is located on the west edge of North Anatolia Fault and hence is an earthquake prone city with a population that exceeds 15 million people. In addition, the city is still growing as center of commerce, tourism and culture that increases the exposure more and more. During the last decade, although Istanbul grew faster than ever in its history, precautions against a possible earthquake have also increased steadily. The two big earthquakes (in Kocaeli and Duzce Provinces) occurred in 1999 alongside Istanbul and these events became the trigger events that accelerated the disaster risk reduction activities in Istanbul. Following a loss estimation study carried out by Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 2001 and Istanbul Earthquake Master Plan prepared by four major universities' researchers in 2003; it was evaluated that understanding and analyzing the geological structure in Istanbul was the main concern. Thereafter Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality's Directorate of Earthquake and Ground Research (DEGRE) carried out two major geo-scientific studies called "microzonation studies" covering 650 km2 of Istanbul's urbanized areas between 2006 and 2009. The studies were called "microzonation" because the analysis resolution was as dense as 250m grids and included various assessments on hazards such as ground shaking, liquefaction, karstification, landslide, flooding, and surface faulting. After the evaluation of geological, geotechnical and geophysical measurements; Earthquake and Tsunami Hazard Maps for all Istanbul, slope, engineering geology, ground water level, faulting, ground shaking, inundation, shear wave velocity and soil classification maps for the project areas were obtained. In the end "Land Suitability Maps" are derived from the combination of inputs using multi-hazard approach. As a result, microzonation is tool for risk oriented urban planning; consisting of interdisciplinary multi-hazard risk analyses. The outputs of

  2. Felder uranium project--renewed operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Exxon owns a uranium mill and holds two mining leases in Live Oak County, Texas, about halfway between San Antonio and Corpus Christi. The properties made up the Felder Uranium Operations which was reopened earlier this year. The feasibility study for reopening the Felder Project began in late 1975 and was not completed until late 1976. This paper discusses several areas of the feasibility study that required additional work prior to making the decision to renew operations. Mine planning evaluation and the actual mine planning are described briefly

  3. Uranium resource evaluation project quality assurance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    This evaluation was conducted over an eight-month period from February 4 through October 1, 1980. During this time, field sampling was suspended for an indefinite time period while the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program underwent restructuring. In addition, the Uranium Resource Evaluation (URE) Project archives are being restructured. Since it is difficult to evaluate quality assurance needs of a program that is undergoing drastic change and because sections of the evaluation were well along before these changes were announced, this evaluation reflects the situation as it was during February 1980. The following quality assurance related programs are continuing to date: (1) periodic checks of field sampling procedures by the Supervising Field Geologist and the Director of Field Operations; (2) verification of field form information and laboratory analytical data verification for all geochemical surveys; (3) URE Project laboratory quality control program (all elements routinely analyzed); and (4) Ames interlaboratory quality control program (uranium only). UCC-ND was given the responsibility of conducting a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) survey in the Central United States (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Texas, South Dakota, and Wisconsin). During 1979 and 1980, 13 detailed surveys were conducted by the URE Project in the Central and Western United States to characterize the hydrogeochemistry, stream sediment geochemistry, and/or radiometric patterns of known or potential uranium occurrences. Beginning in 1980, the HSSR surveys were modified to the Regional Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment (RHSS) surveys

  4. Projected uranium requirements of developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the uranium requirements of developing countries both in aggregate and individually. Although the cumulative uranium requirements of these countries are expected to account for less than eight percent of total requirements, the fact that many of these countries are expressing renewed interest in nuclear is, in itself, encouraging. The countries analyzed in this paper are Argentina, Brazil, Egypt, India, Israel, Mexico, Pakistan, South Africa, South Korea and Taiwan. For each country, the existing and planned nuclear capacity levels have been identified and capacity factors have been projected. For countries with no previous nuclear power, the world weighted average capacity factor for the specific reactor type is utilized. Other factors influencing nuclear power demand and operations of these developing countries will be discussed, and finally, uranium requirements based on a calculated optimal tails assay of .30 will be provided

  5. Building a Uranium Heap Leach Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Despite all these we have seen many HL successes and many interesting projects coming down the pipe. • Previous experience in Uranium with previous ROM projects in France (Bessines, Langone), Niger (Somair), Canada (Agnew Lake) and other locations had provided some basic background. • Heap leach based on copper experience with crushed ore has operated for many years in Brazil (Caetite). • Many gold operations for many decades in all climates and continents. • Copper at +20% of production, many in Chile, but also now in many other countries. • Uranium with agglomerated crushed ores is now becoming more prominent – Somair, Imouraren, Trekkopje. • Work also ongoing for Ranger, Rossing, and in consideration for other projects. • Other notable work in Nickel, and multi-metal such as Talvivaara

  6. The Honeymoon project: Australia's first in situ leach uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackland, M.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Honeymoon uranium deposit is one of several roll front uranium deposits in South Australia. It was discovered in 1971, the project developed in the 1970's, and was ready for demonstration of the In Situ Leaching (ISL) production techniques by January 1983, when the project was stopped, despite it having met the environmental approvals to proceed, due to the Australian Labour Party's 'three mines policy'. From 1983 until March 1996 the project was mothballed. In late 1996 Southern Cross Resources Inc. (SCRI) reached agreement with Mount Isa Mining (MIM) to purchase its uranium interests in Honeymoon, Goulds Dam and EL 2310 whilst simultaneously acquiring Sedimentary Holdings NL's interests in EL 2310. By April 1997 these interests were consolidated in SCRI's wholly owned subsidiary, Southern Cross Resources Australia Ply Ltd which is the operating company. Activities are presently underway to rehabilitate the existing treatment plant and continue the program that was outlined in the approved 1981 Honeymoon Environmental Impact Statement

  7. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1946-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  8. Towards the creation of a European Network of Earth Observation Networks within GEO. The ConnectinGEO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masó, Joan; Serral, Ivette; Menard, Lionel; Wald, Lucien; Nativi, Stefano; Plag, Hans-Peter; Jules-Plag, Shelley; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Pearlman, Jay; De Maziere, Martine

    2015-04-01

    ConnectinGEO (Coordinating an Observation Network of Networks EnCompassing saTellite and IN-situ to fill the Gaps in European Observations" is a new H2020 Coordination and Support Action with the primary goal of linking existing Earth Observation networks with science and technology (S&T) communities, the industry sector, the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), and Copernicus. ConnectinGEO aims to facilitate a broader and more accessible knowledge base to support the needs of GEO, its Societal Benefit Areas (SBAs) and the users of the Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS). A broad range of subjects from climate, natural resources and raw materials, to the emerging UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will be addressed. The project will generate a prioritized list of critical gaps within available observation data and models to translate observations into practice-relevant knowledge, based on stakeholder consultation and systematic analysis. Ultimately, it will increase coherency of European observation networks, increase the use of Earth observations for assessments and forecasts and inform the planning for future observation systems. ConnectinGEO will initiate a European Network of Earth Observation Networks (ENEON) that will encompass space-based, airborne and in-situ observations networks. ENEON will be composed by project partners representing thematic observation networks along with the GEOSS Science and Technology Stakeholder Network, GEO Communities of Practices, Copernicus services, Sentinel missions and in-situ support data representatives, representatives of the space-based, airborne and in-situ observations European networks (e.g. EPOS, EMSO and GROOM, etc), representatives of the industry sector and European and national funding agencies, in particular those participating in the future ERA-PlaNET. At the beginning, the ENEON will be created and managed by the project. Then the management will be transferred to the network itself to ensure

  9. Radiation requirements for uranium project approvals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, J.

    2014-01-01

    Uranium mining projects in Australia must receive approval under both state and national laws based on a wide ranging impact assessment of the project. The process may take a number of years and involves multiple levels and parts of government and public consultation and scrutiny. The impact assessment is broad and usually covers; environmental, social, health, public safety and economic aspects. Information provided in the approvals documentation needs to be presented in a credible and understandable manner for all audiences. This means making complex information simpler, while making sure that it maintains its technical integrity. Poorly communicated information, which is overly complex, overly simplified or incomplete, can result in significant delays to the project approval which can potentially impact on project timelines. For uranium projects, along with other projects involving radioactive materials, such as minerals sands and rare earths, radiation and its impacts usually draw a disproportionate amount of both government and public scrutiny compared to other potential impacts and risks. It is therefore of key importance that radiation assessments are properly performed and results clearly presented and communicated with sufficient detail for stakeholders to make informed decisions. It is also important to ensure that the radiation risk is presented in perspective with other risks of the project. This presentation outlines a structure for a radiation impact assessment based on experience from a number of projects in Australia. The structure aims to be clear and simple and ensure the right balance between scientific fact, digestible information and demonstrable competence. (author)

  10. Sweetwater Uranium Project. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Minerals Exploration Company for the construction and operation of the proposed Sweetwater Uranium Mill with a nominal capacity of 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day of uranium ore in Wyoming. The applicant proposes also to construct a heap-leaching and resin ion-exchange facility to extract uranium from low-grade ores and mine water. Impacts to the area due to the operation of the Sweetwater Uranium Mine/Mill Project will result in: Alternations of up to 2200 acres by the mill, mine pit area, and roads, and about 3450 acres of Battle Spring Flat to be inundated by mine dewatering operations; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Rawlins and other nearby areas; and tailings from the mill will be produced at a rate of about 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day and will be stored onsite in a lined impoundment. Conditions for the issuance of the license are given

  11. Speculative resources of uranium. A review of International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) estimates 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    On a country by country basis the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) estimates 1982-1983 are reviewed. Information provided includes exploration work, airborne survey, radiometric survey, gamma-ray spectrometric survey, estimate of speculative resources, uranium occurrences, uranium deposits, uranium mineralization, agreements for uranium exploration, feasibilities studies, geological classification of resources, proposed revised resource range, production estimate of uranium

  12. Development of the Falea polymetallic uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, R.; Freeman, P.

    2014-01-01

    The Falea uranium, silver, copper deposit is located in south western Mali, West Africa and is owned by Denison Mines Corp. The current resource estimate is approximately 45 million pounds of U_3O_8 [~17,300 t U] at an average grade of ~ 0.07% U_3O_8. [~0.06% U].The deposit also contains ~37 million Oz Ag and ~70,000 t Cu. The dominant uranium mineral is uraninite, copper is present mainly as chalcopyrite and silver mainly as argentite, and in its native form. Only 5% of the property has been explored to date, and all zones remain open. This paper reports the results of several stages of metallurgical investigations to support ongoing economic studies for the project. The polymetallic nature of the Falea deposit dictates that there are a range of flowsheet options. The ore contains both carbonate and sulphide mineralisations, which have potential impacts on acid and alkaline leaching, respectively. There is also the need to recover both silver and copper. Two primary flowsheet options were considered: 1) Acid leach of ore to recover uranium / flotation of leach residue to recover sulphide concentrate, treatment of concentrate for Cu and Ag recovery; 2) Flotation of ore / alkaline leaching of flotation tails to recover uranium and treatment of flotation concentrate for Cu and Ag recovery. A number of sub-options were considered for each flowsheet. Test work showed that high recoveries of copper and silver to flotation concentrate were obtained for both flotation of ore or acid leach residue. Uranium extraction was also > 90% for both acid and alkaline leaching. The preferred flowsheet was selected after trade-off studies by DRA. This paper presents an overview of the various flowsheet options considered, an outline of the preferred flowsheet, and the results and conclusions of on-going engineering and laboratory/pilot studies to refine the preferred flowsheet. (author)

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    concentration in peat bogs, deposits combined with marine phosphates, with coal and lignite, with black shales, with carbonate rocks, deposits in Precambrian quartz pebble conglomerates, basal-type deposits, deposits in sandstones (tabular, roll-type and tectono-lithologic deposits), breccia chimney filling deposits, deposits in metamorphic rocks, metasomatic deposits, deposits in intrusive rocks, deposits associated with hematite breccia complexes, deposits in granitic rocks, deposits in volcanic rocks, deposits in proterozoic discordances (Athabasca basin, Pine Creek geo-syncline); 4 - French uranium bearing areas and deposits: history of the French uranium mining industry, geological characteristics of French deposits (black shales, sandstones, granites), abroad success of French mining companies (Africa, North America, South America, Australia, Asia); 5 - exploration and exploitation; 6 - uranium economy: perspectives of uranium demand, present day production status, secondary resources, possible resources, market balances, prices and trends, future availability and nuclear perspectives. (J.S.)

  14. Geology of the Honeymoon Uranium Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bampton, K.F.; Haines, J.B.; Randell, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The Honeymoon Uranium Project comprises the Honeymoon Deposit, Goulds Dam Deposit and Yarramba Prospect in the Southern Lake Frome region, South Australia. Both the Yarramba Prospect and Honeymoon Deposit (which includes Honeymoon and East Kalkaroo orebodies) are located in the Yarramba Palaeovalley. The Goulds Dam Deposit is about 75 km north west of Honeymoon, in the Billeroo Palaeovalley. Exploration for sediment-hosted uranium began in the area in the late 1960s, culminating in the discovery of Honeymoon and Goulds Dam in the early 1970s. In 1982, a 25 L/s demonstration plant was built at Honeymoon to confirm suitability for in situ leaching. The project was put on hold in 1983 due to changes in government policy. Southern Cross Resources Australia Pty Ltd acquired the project in mid 1997. Roll-front deposits form from a migrating geochemical cell, an advancing reduction-oxidation interface between oxygenated uranium-bearing groundwater and its reduced aquifer host. The source of metal is uranium-anomalous granites, which were eroded from surrounding ranges. The weathered granites and resultant sediments are stripped of uranium by oxidised groundwaters, to form solutions carrying uranyl carbonate complexes. The solutions percolate down-slope through permeable sand zones until contacting a reduced environment where uranium precipitates. Uranium mineralisation occurs interstitially between and as thin coatings on sand grains, usually in the form of uraninite or coffinite. The palaeovalleys (previously termed palaeochannels) are incised into underlying Cambrian/Precambrian basement rocks and filled with semi-consolidated, largely un-cemented, Tertiary sediments of the Eyre Formation. The late Palaeocene to middle Eocene Eyre Formation is the basal unit of the Tertiary succession in the Callabonna Sub-basin of the Lake Eyre Basin. Further to the north, the Lake Eyre Basin overlies the Jurassic-Cretaceous Eromanga Basin, which comprises much of the Great Australian

  15. Uranium mining environmental restoration project (PRAMU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asenjo, A.

    2002-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) started its activities 50 years ago and obtained significant results. At the present time, the CNEA is defined as an Institution of research and development in the nuclear field. It is also responsible for the management of radioactive wastes and the dismantling of nuclear and radioactive facilities. Mining and milling activities have been carried out during the past 40 years and at present the CNEA is undertaking the Uranium Mining Environmental Restoration Project (PRAMU). The aim of this project is to restore the environment as much as is possible in all places where uranium mining and milling activities were developed when taking into consideration both economic and technical reality. First, the characteristics of the problems in each site are determined through appropriate studies which identify the existing or potential impacts, the possible pathways of contamination, etc. The sites being studied are: MALARGUE (Mendoza Province), CORDOBA (Cordoba Province), LOS GIGANTES (Cordoba Province), HUEMUL (Mendoza Province), PICHINAN (Chubut Province), TONCO (Salta Province), LA ESTELA (San Luis Province), LOS COLORADOS (La Rioja Province). PRAMU seeks to improve the current conditions of the tailings deposits and mines and to ensure the long term protection of people and the environment. The CNEA is required to comply with all legislation that is in force and is under the control of various national, provincial and local State institutions. The main objectives of the project for the various sites are: (a) Malargue site: to implement the actions necessary for environmental restoration and management of the tailings derived from the uranium ores processed in the industrial plant; (b) Cordoba and Los Gigantes sites: to design, engineer and execute the activities required for closure of the sites; (c) Other sites (Huemul, Pichinan, Tonco, La Estela, Los Colorados): to develop an environmental evaluation and, on the basis of

  16. Assessing European capacity for geological storage of carbon dioxide-the EU GeoCapacity project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangkilde-Pedersen, T.; Anthonsen, K.L.; Smith, N.; Kirk, K.; Neele, F.; Meer, B. van der; Le Gallo, Y. le; Bossie-Codreanu, D.; Wojcicki, A.; Nindre, Y.-M. le; Hendriks, C.; Dalhoff, F.; Peter Christensen, N.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the GeoCapacity project is GIS mapping of CO2 point sources, infrastructure and geological storage in Europe. The main objective is to assess the European capacity for geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers, oil and gas structures and coal beds. Other priorities are further

  17. Projections on the future of the natural uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishido, Akio

    1995-01-01

    This discussion looks at the future of the uranium industry and considers what type of procurement policy should be adopted. Viewing the future as an extension of the present, it is possible that supplies of natural uranium will begin to run short around 2015. However, natural uranium will have more resources available than petroleum. If rising uranium prices reinvigorate exploration and lead to the discovery of new uranium deposits, future shortages will be unlikely. Nonetheless, with structural changes expected in the world economy, the nature of natural uranium transactions will no doubt change, thereby increasing the present element of uncertainty that much more. At the same time, the oligopolistic situation created by today's major producers will intensify. Based on these projections, the author has reassessed Japan's past procurement policy of government exploration/development support combined with private-sector uranium purchasing and finds this shared risk approach to be the best. (author)

  18. Uranium supply/demand projections to 2030 in the OECD/NEA-IAEA ''Red Book''. Nuclear growth projections, global uranium exploration, uranium resources, uranium production and production capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, Robert

    2009-01-01

    World demand for electricity is expected to continue to grow rapidly over the next several decades to meet the needs of an increasing population and economic growth. The recognition by many governments that nuclear power can produce competitively priced, base load electricity that is essentially free of greenhouse gas emissions, combined with the role that nuclear can play in enhancing security of energy supplies, has increased the prospects for growth in nuclear generating capacity. Since the mid-1960s, with the co-operation of their member countries and states, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have jointly prepared periodic updates (currently every 2 years) on world uranium resources, production and demand. These updates have been published by the OECD/NEA in what is commonly known as the ''Red Book''. The 2007 edition replaces the 2005 edition and reflects information current as of 1 st January 2007. Uranium 2007: Resources, Production and Demand presents, in addition to updated resource figures, the results of a recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry. It contains official data provided by 40 countries (and one Country Report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat) on uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements to 2030 as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues are also presented. (orig.)

  19. Attachment GEO 1 Permic basin geology in northeast of Uruguay: deposit exam about Uranium traces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Homer, A.; Manigault, B; Doyhenart, A.; Rossi, P.

    1983-01-01

    The article is about different deposit of Uranium traces and their Sedimentology analysis. A revision of main works have been given and Durazno and Gondwana groups, Cerrezuelo, Cordobes, La Paloma, San Gregorio, Tres Islas formations

  20. The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    KAUST Repository

    Kravitz, Ben

    2011-01-31

    To evaluate the effects of stratospheric geoengineering with sulphate aerosols, we propose standard forcing scenarios to be applied to multiple climate models to compare their results and determine the robustness of their responses. Thus far, different modeling groups have used different forcing scenarios for both global warming and geoengineering, complicating the comparison of results. We recommend four experiments to explore the extent to which geoengineering might offset climate change projected in some of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 experiments. These experiments focus on stratospheric aerosols, but future experiments under this framework may focus on different means of geoengineering. © 2011 Royal Meteorological Society.

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Sweden, covers an area of approx. 450 000 square kilometers. It has a population of 8 millions. With few exceptions in the northern part the access can be regarded as good. A dense network of motorroads and railroad exists. The results obtained by the exploration works combined with other available geo-information permit a separation of two principal uranium provinces in Sweden. The first one is confined to sediments of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician which appears in Southern Sweden and along the border of the Caledonian mountain range in Central Sweden. The uranium occurrence are stratiform, of blackshale type which occurs in the Peltura zone of Upper Cambrian or they are associated to a phosphatite-bearing unit of Lower Ordovician overlying the Cambrian shale formation. The distribution of uranium in Upper Cambrian rocks is in general dependant on their lithology which itself is related to the paleography. This conditions explain relatively higher uranium content of the shale from Billigen.The potential resources of the province are estimated at about 1 million tonnes uranium. The second uranium province, called Arjeplog-Arvidsjaur, situated immediately south of the Arctic circle, comprises one deposit - Pleutajokk - and a group of more than twenty occurrences of similar characteristics and age (1 700 - 1 800 my.). The results of the past exploration have shown that uranium is present in different types of rocks. Because of the presence of uranium in many of the pegmatites the possibility of the formation of large low grade deposits should be tested. Favourable areas are those regions where the geological conditions are similar to the geology of the Grenville province in Canada or the Damara belt of SW-Africa. Special studies are recommended on this subject

  2. New Results from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robock, A.; Kravitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) was designed to determine robust climate system model responses to Solar Radiation Management (SRM). While mitigation (reducing greenhouse gases emissions) is the most effective way of reducing future climate change, SRM (the deliberate modification of incoming solar radiation) has been proposed as a means of temporarily alleviating some of the effects of global warming. For society to make informed decisions as to whether SRM should ever be implemented, information is needed on the benefits, risks, and side effects, and GeoMIP seeks to aid in that endeavor. GeoMIP has organized four standardized climate model simulations involving reduction of insolation or increased amounts of stratospheric sulfate aerosols to counteract increasing greenhouse gases. Thirteen comprehensive atmosphere-ocean general circulation models have participated in the project so far. GeoMIP is a 'CMIP Coordinated Experiment' as part of the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and has been endorsed by SPARC (Stratosphere-troposphere Processes And their Role in Climate). GeoMIP has held three international workshops and has produced a number of recent journal articles. GeoMIP has found that if increasing greenhouse gases could be counteracted with insolation reduction, the global average temperature could be kept constant, but global average precipitation would reduce, particularly in summer monsoon regions around the world. Temperature changes would also not be uniform. The tropics would cool, but high latitudes would warm, with continuing, but reduced sea ice and ice sheet melting. Temperature extremes would still increase, but not as much as without SRM. If SRM were halted all at once, there would be rapid temperature and precipitation increases at 5-10 times the rates from gradual global warming. SRM combined with CO2 fertilization would have small impacts on rice production in China, but would increase maize production

  3. ExoGeoLab Pilot Project for Landers, Rovers and Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a pilot facility with a Robotic Test Bench (ExoGeoLab) and a Mobile Lab Habitat (ExoHab). They can be used to validate concepts and external instruments from partner institutes. The ExoGeoLab research incubator project, has started in the frame of a collaboration between ILEWG (International Lunar Exploration working Group http://sci.esa.int/ilewg), ESTEC, NASA and academic partners, supported by a design and control desk in the European Space Incubator (ESI), as well as infrastructure. ExoGeoLab includes a sequence of technology and research pilot project activities: - Data analysis and interpretation of remote sensing and in-situ data, and merging of multi-scale data sets - Procurement and integration of geophysical, geo-chemical and astrobiological breadboard instruments on a surface station and rovers - Integration of cameras, environment and solar sensors, Visible and near IR spectrometer, Raman spectrometer, sample handling, cooperative rovers - Delivery of a generic small planetary lander demonstrator (ExoGeoLab lander, Sept 2009) as a platform for multi-instruments tests - Research operations and exploitation of ExoGeoLab test bench for various conceptual configurations, and support for definition and design of science surface packages (Moon, Mars, NEOs, outer moons) - Field tests of lander, rovers and instruments in analogue sites (Utah MDRS 2009 & 2010, Eifel volcanic park in Sept 2009, and future campaigns). Co-authors, ILEWG ExoGeoLab & ExoHab Team: B.H. Foing(1,11)*#, C. Stoker(2,11)*, P. Ehrenfreund(10,11), L. Boche-Sauvan(1,11)*, L. Wendt(8)*, C. Gross(8, 11)*, C. Thiel(9)*, S. Peters(1,6)*, A. Borst(1,6)*, J. Zavaleta(2)*, P. Sarrazin(2)*, D. Blake(2), J. Page(1,4,11), V. Pletser(5,11)*, E. Monaghan(1)*, P. Mahapatra(1)#, A. Noroozi(3), P. Giannopoulos(1,11) , A. Calzada(1,6,11), R. Walker(7), T. Zegers(1, 15) #, G. Groemer(12)# , W. Stumptner(12)#, B. Foing(2,5), J. K. Blom(3)#, A. Perrin(14)#, M. Mikolajczak(14)#, S. Chevrier(14

  4. How effective project management will add value to your uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, R.; Titley, M.

    2014-01-01

    Up until the recent Fukushima incident in March 2011 project activity in the uranium sector was driven by high uranium prices and merger and acquisition corporate activity. Soon after the incident, project development in the uranium sector collapsed and capital slowly dried up as Uranium prices dropped. New projects were put on hold, significantly reducing growth in the small to medium capital markets. Existing brownfield growth plans were halted as corporate strategies focused on improving the efficiency of existing assets. Recent positive sentiment supported by positive commentary in the uranium market, driven by an improved understanding of the supply and demand fundamentals and the restart of Japan’s nuclear reactors, has seen renewed corporate merger and acquisition activity. Developers are again taking an interest in new uranium project development.

  5. Uranium project. Geochemistry prospection[Study of Uranium geochemical prospection in Uruguay]; Proyecto Uranio. Prospeccion geoquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J

    1983-07-01

    Geochemistry studies the distribution of the chemicals elements in the terrestrial crust and its ways to migrate. The terminology used in this report is the following one: 1) Principles of the prospection geochemistry 2) Stages of the prospection geochemistry 3)utility of the prospection geochemistry 4) geochemistry of uranium 5) procedures used within the framework of uranium project 6) Average available 7) Selection of the zones of prospection geochemistry 8) Stages of the prospection, Sample preparation and analisis 9) Presentation of the results.

  6. Modeling geo-homopholy in online social networks for population distribution projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxing Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Projecting the population distribution in geographical regions is important for many applications such as launching marketing campaigns or enhancing the public safety in certain densely populated areas. Conventional studies require the collection of people’s trajectory data through offline means, which is limited in terms of cost and data availability. The wide use of online social network (OSN apps over smartphones has provided the opportunities of devising a lightweight approach of conducting the study using the online data of smartphone apps. This paper aims to reveal the relationship between the online social networks and the offline communities, as well as to project the population distribution by modeling geo-homophily in the online social networks. Design/methodology/approach – In this paper, the authors propose the concept of geo-homophily in OSNs to determine how much the data of an OSN can help project the population distribution in a given division of geographical regions. Specifically, the authors establish a three-layered theoretic framework that first maps the online message diffusion among friends in the OSN to the offline population distribution over a given division of regions via a Dirichlet process and then projects the floating population across the regions. Findings – By experiments over large-scale OSN data sets, the authors show that the proposed prediction models have a high prediction accuracy in characterizing the process of how the population distribution forms and how the floating population changes over time. Originality/value – This paper tries to project population distribution by modeling geo-homophily in OSNs.

  7. Geo-Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, S.T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments in the field of geo-neutrinos. It describes current and future detection projects, discusses modeling projects, suggests an observational program, and visits geo-reactor hypotheses.

  8. Geo-Neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dye, S.T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2505 Correa Road, Honolulu, Hawaii, 96822 (United States); College of Natural Sciences, Hawaii Pacific University, 45-045 Kamehameha Highway, Kaneohe, Hawaii, 96744 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments in the field of geo-neutrinos. It describes current and future detection projects, discusses modeling projects, suggests an observational program, and visits geo-reactor hypotheses.

  9. Managing and delivering of 3D geo data across institutions has a web based solution - intermediate results of the project GeoMol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gietzel, Jan; Schaeben, Helmut; Gabriel, Paul

    2014-05-01

    The increasing relevance of geological information for policy and economy at transnational level has recently been recognized by the European Commission, who has called for harmonized information related to reserves and resources in the EU Member States. GeoMol's transnational approach responds to that, providing consistent and seamless 3D geological information of the Alpine Foreland Basins based on harmonized data and agreed methodologies. However, until recently no adequate tool existed to ensure full interoperability among the involved GSOs and to distribute the multi-dimensional information of a transnational project facing diverse data policy, data base systems and software solutions. In recent years (open) standards describing 2D spatial data have been developed and implemented in different software systems including production environments for 2D spatial data (like regular 2D-GI-Systems). Easy yet secured access to the data is of upmost importance and thus priority for any spatial data infrastructure. To overcome limitations conditioned by highly sophisticated and platform dependent geo modeling software packages functionalities of a web portals can be utilized. Thus, combining a web portal with a "check-in-check-out" system allows distributed organized editing of data and models but requires standards for the exchange of 3D geological information to ensure interoperability. Another major concern is the management of large models and the ability of 3D tiling into spatially restricted models with refined resolution, especially when creating countrywide models . Using GST ("Geosciences in Space and Time") developed initially at TU Bergakademie Freiberg and continuously extended by the company GiGa infosystems, incorporating these key issues and based on an object-relational data model, it is possible to check out parts or whole models for edits and check in again after modification. GST is the core of GeoMol's web-based collaborative environment designed to

  10. The GeoBus project: a mobile Earth science outreach project for secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Roper, K. A.; Macfarlane, D.; Pike, C.

    2013-12-01

    GeoBus is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews. It is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary (high) schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. These linkages are important for introducing career opportunities in Earth sciences. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 140 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Over 20,000 pupils will have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities by December 2013, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run workshops, field excursions and Enterprise Challenges. GeoBus provides 16 workshops which can be adapted for different learning levels. Workshops are 50 to 80 minute sessions for up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. The Enterprise Challenges are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Current topics are Drilling for Oil, Renewable Energy, a Journey to Mars and Scotland

  11. Uranium project. Borehole cutting with drill core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H.

    1984-01-01

    The topics included in these report are: explanatory note, number of wells and perforated length, key for the location of areas of perforation for the uranium prospection, maps of location of areas of perforation. The list of the drawn perforations and the references and drawings of the perforations

  12. Reguibat calcrete uranium project, Mauritania: Beneficiation upgrades and rapid leaching. A new paradigm for “calcrete” uranium projects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeson, Bob; Clifford, Neil; Goodall, Will

    2014-01-01

    Future of the project: • Scoping Study completed in the next two weeks; • Moving into Feasibility Studies: – Measured and Indicated resources; – Detailed beneficiation testing; – Leach testing of uranium concentrates; – Water drilling; – Commence process for Exploitation Permit. • Decision to mine in 12-18 months subject to funding; • Target production early 2017; • Convert known anomalies to achieve a 100Mlb uranium resource

  13. Health physics program for the Edgemont Uranium Mill decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polehn, J.L.; Wallace, R.G.; Reed, R.P.; Wilson, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is actively involved in decommissioning a uranium mill located near the town of Edgemont, South Dakota. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project, which is unique in many respects, will involve dismantlement of the old inactive mill building and excavation and transportation of several million tons of uranium mill tailings to a permanent disposal site. To ensure that workers are adequately protected from radiation exposure during decommissioning operations, a health physics program appropriate for the decommissioning situation was developed. The Edgemont Mill Decommissioning Project Health Physics Manual (HPM) gives the programmatic requirements for worker radiation protection. The requirements of the HPM are implemented by means of detailed onsite operating procedures. The Edgemont project health physics program was developed using currently available regulations and guidance for an operating uranium mill with appropriate modifications for decommissioning. This paper discusses the development, implementation, and documentation of that program

  14. Uranium project in Cerro Largo south orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, B.

    1982-01-01

    This study of orientation was realized with the purpose of recognizing the extension of the anomalies from a known source , and of being able to determine the choice of the places and the quality of the material to sampling to obtain an ideal response. We have chosen the introduction of this study in a place that offers a source in power of Uranium located accurately and that presents a sequence pedology that group the main types of soils

  15. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  16. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1993 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1993, surface remedial action was complete at 10 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites. In 1993 the UMTRA Project office revised the UMTRA Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, as required by the US DOE. Because the UMTRA Project sites are in different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  17. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence

  18. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  19. Detailed analysis of radon flux studies at Australian uranium projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudd, Gavin M.

    2005-01-01

    The release of radon gas and radon progeny from uranium projects is a major issue during operation as well as for the design of rehabilitation works. In Australia, there have been a number of premining radon flux studies as part of the environmental investigation and potential development of recent uranium projects. There is also an increasing amount of operational data on radon fluxes and loads from various aspects of projects, such as tailings, waste rock and mills. Thus there exists much useful measured data which can be used to assess the design radon flux and load targets for rehabilitation. The main projects for which radon data exists includes Ranger, Olympic Dam, Beverley, Honeymoon, Jabiluka, Yeelirrie, Lake Way, Koongarra, Moline, Coronation Hill, Rockhole, Nabarlek, Rum Jungle, Port Pirie and Ben Lomond. To date, much of this data has not been systematically evaluated. The need to compile and assess this data is twofold. Firstly, to assess the loads released from uranium production as an input into life-cycle analyses of the nuclear fuel cycle, such as those undertaken by UNSCEAR and industry groups. Secondly, there is a need to set suitable design standards for radon flux for the rehabilitation of former and current uranium projects. This paper will present such a detailed compilation of radon fluxes and loads which can then be used as the basis for both life-cycle analyses as well as setting appropriate site-specific rehabilitation criteria for radon. The implications for former and current projects is then discussed as well as future data needs. Ultimately, there is a critical need for thorough baseline surveys prior to mining to ensure accurate assessments of changes to radon fluxes and loads. The data and analysis presented is considered applicable to all uranium projects in Australia, as well as being a useful model for considering such issues internationally

  20. Highland Uranium Solution Mining Project. Draft environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    Exxon Minerals Co. proposes to conduct production-scale solution mining (in situ leaching) of uranium within the existing Highland Operation area in Converse County, Wyoming. The project would result in the temporary removal of 200 acres from grazing and the actual disturbance of 50 acres. About 4500 acre-ft of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer over the 10-year life of the project. There will be no discharge of liquid effluents from the project; atmospheric effluents will be within acceptable limits. Radiation doses at the nearest ranch resulting from solution mining activities were estimated. The project proposes the production and utilization of 1 to 3 million lb of uranium resources. It will not produce any significant socioeconomic impact on the local area. Alternatives to the project were considered, and conditions for issuing the source material license are listed

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Surface Project Management Plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) authorizes the US Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties (VP) containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials. The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project is to minimize or eliminate radiation health hazards to the public and the environment at the 24 sites and related VPs. This document describes the management organization, system, and methods used to manage the design, construction, and other activities required to clean up the designated sites and associated VPs, in accordance with the UMTRCA.

  3. Study of geological details towards feasibility of uranium project: Indian case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarangi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate technical evaluation of geological details at early stage of exploration is the key to minimising the lead-time between discovery and production. This has a major influence on economic viability of the deposits. Indian uranium deposits are of medium-tonnage and low-grade occurring in dissimilar geological provinces. Detailed studies of geological characteristics of these deposits are very vital to the proper selection of technology and subsequent successful operation. The method of mining (underground/open pit/in-situ recovery) is influenced by the ore body depth, size, grade, configuration, hostrock and adjoining strata characteristics, hydrological condition etc. The ore processing technology is also subjective to mineralogical characteristics of the ore. In order to draw the flowsheet, determine process parameters and selection of reagents, a comprehensive study on identification of minerals and their probable metallurgical characteristics, general physical relationship between various minerals, mineral liberation size etc is of great significance. The technology for disposal of tailings is also influenced by geological/geo-hydrological characteristics. The key to successful operation of Indian uranium deposits lies in outlining a pre-development strategy as the exploration advances to different stages. This phase called ''exploratory mining'' - which starts with detailed exploration and ends with approval of the project is very critical for early commissioning of the project. The activities during this period include collection of representative drill core samples during exploration, laboratory studies, geo-technical studies and determination of geomechanical properties of ore and waste rock etc. Later, the ore lenses are accessed through limited entry(ies). Developments along the ore body helps in better understanding of the configuration of the lenses. Studies for strata control in case of underground mining are carried out towards deciding the

  4. Realization of economic evaluation expert system for uranium mine project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haifeng

    1993-01-01

    By studying the EVALUATOR, economic evaluation expert system of uranium mine project, the theoretical fundamentals of expert system, principle of inference mechanism, implementation of knowledge base, realization of explanation mechanism, acquisition of domain knowledge and representation of knowledge were described, especially the subjective Bayes approach for inexact reasoning problem used in EVALUATOR was discussed in detail

  5. Development of the Falea Polymetallic Uranium Project, Mali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ring, Bob; Freeman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Falea project basics: • Project now owned by Denison Mines; • ANSTO Minerals working with owner and their consultant, DRA; • Located in south western Mali, West Africa, near the intersection of the Senegal and Guinea borders; • Established mining region (mainly gold); • Location on plateau favourable for underground operation; • Significant uranium, silver and copper mineralisation - different to other U deposits; • Excellent metallurical outcomes to date

  6. UMTRA -- The US Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightner, R.; Cormier, C.; Bierley, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1970s, the United States (US) established the first comprehensive regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of wastes produced from its domestic uranium processing industry. This regulatory framework was established through the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, often referred to as UMTRCA. This legislation created the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project and assigned the US Department of Energy (DOE) the lead in conducting the required remedial action at 24 designated inactive uranium ore processing sites. With the majority of these 22 sites complete, the DOE's UMTRA Project has established a distinguished reputation for safely and effectively remediating these low-level waste sites in a complex regulatory and socioeconomic environment. This paper describes the past accomplishments and current status of the UMTRA Project and discusses the DOE's plans for addressing ground water contamination associated with these sites and its commitment to continuing the long-term care and management of these disposal cells

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    With the exception of the exploration activities in relation with the Beach Sand Project along the eastern Bay of Bengal, no systematic exploration for uranium had been done before December 1976, when a radiometric survey was implemented by the IAEA. As a result of this survey high radioactivity up to 450 cps was detected in placer Tipam deposits, The background of the terrain made up by Tertiary sediments is 160 - 170 cps. An anomaly was found in Kalipur Chara area which coincides with concentration of heavy minerals derived from Tipam Sandstones. Another anomaly was found within a horizon of Tipam sandstone crossing Hari River. An isolated outcrop in the riverbed showed a count rate up to 4 times background. During the follow up work it was found that this steeply dipping mineralized band stretches (with interruptions) over a distance of at least 3km along a strike. Samples collected from three different spils showed concentration of uranium 50, 60 and 140 ppm. The mineralized bed varies in thickness from a few cm to 2 m. It consists of alternating altered and unaltered sandstone. Bangladesh and Australian experts have separated monazite, zircon, ilmenite, rutile and magnetite from local sands at Cox's Bazar, 96 km southeast of Dacca. Radioactive mineral content is around 3,1% and exploitation may be feasible. Concerning the present status of exploration the technical assistance mission of the IAEA in the field of uranium exploration in Bangladesh is continuing with the objective to evaluate uranium potential in Chittongong and Sylhet district. Concerning areas favourable for uranium first priority should be given to areas of Hari River and Kalipur Chara where radioactive anomalies were detected. In general the area covered by Tipam Sandstone appears to be favourable for uranium mineralization. The potential for new discoveries in Bangladesh appears to be not too bad. Speculative potential could be in the order of 1-10,000 tons uranium

  8. Financing uranium exploration and development projects in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    The uranium production industry experienced momentous change during the decade of the 1980s. The Three Mile Island accident took place in the spring of 1979 and, while not necessarily creating the uranium open-quotes bustclose quotes of the ensuing decade, certainly set the tone for the entire nuclear power industry. Ever-increasing forecasts of installed commercial nuclear power coupled with a growing concern regarding the adequacy of uranium reserves and production capacity, ignited a wave of exploration and production capacity development in the mid-to-late 1970s which continued into the early 1980s. This momentum lead to over-production of uranium concentrates when compared to the eventual operation of commercial nuclear power plants. This material resulted in expanding inventories held by uranium producers and consumers alike. As these stockpiles inevitably found their way into the spot market, the price (as indicated by the NUEXCO Exchange Value) fell from a peak of $43.40 per pound U 3 O 8 in May 1978 to its current level of $8.80 per pound U 3 O 8 on April 30, 1990. As the nuclear power industry enters the 1990s, the debate regarding global warming and the subsequent role of nuclear power generation take on more importance. In any event, the nuclear power programs initiated principally in the 1970s are nearing completion. Even though new orders of power reactors have dropped precipitiously in the 1980s, the generation of electricity by nuclear fission accounts for almost twenty percent of WOCA (World Outside Centrally Planned Economies) electricity production. In order to place my main topic of financing future uranium exploration projects in perspective, I will review the conclusions of a uranium market study recently completed by NUEXCO Information Services, a group which closely monitors and evaluates the nuclear power industry and the nuclear fuel cycle

  9. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnane, J.C.; Gill, V.R.; Lee, S.Y.; Morris, D.E.; Nickelson, M.D.; Perry, D.L.; Tidwell, V.C.

    1993-08-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP

  10. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  11. Sustainability of new uranium mining projects in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarra, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    The regulatory framework issued in the 1994-1995 period, connected mining activities in Argentina with international good environmental practices. Agreements between National Government and Provinces allow the application of the regulations, while Act No 24.585, the milestone about the matter, establishes the steps for the approval of the Report of Environmental Impact, on successive stages of the project. Specifically for uranium mining and milling, the assessment of the radiological protection aspects of the planned activities is assigned to the Nuclear Regulatory Authority. The National Atomic Energy Commission is at present carrying out two uranium mining projects, that involve the Sierra Pintada and Cerro Solo deposits. The goal of them is restart uranium production in the country in the medium term, by lowing the gap between indigenous and market uranium prices. The first one consists in updating the feasibility study of the, at present inactive, Sierra Pintada Production Center (Mendoza Province). Studies for improving the mining and treatment methods are performed in the project, co-ordinately with the investigation and forecast of mining waste and processing tailings management. Besides, the procedures will be determined taking into account the methodology to be applied when getting the closure stage, about the existing waste and tailings. Development of the Sierra de Pichinan District, Chubut Province (U-Mo), is the objective of the second project. It is remarkable that about Cerro Solo, the main ore deposit belonging to this area, at the prefeasibility stage, CNEA is currently encouraging private investment through a bidding process. Environmental studies are an important aspect of the activities carried out and planned in the area. As a conclusion, with regard uranium mining and milling activities in Argentina, the regulations and environmental technical-scientific knowledge are becoming friendly with the sustainable practice. (author)

  12. Mining-metallurgical projects for the production of uranium concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajuria-Garza, S.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents an overall view of a complete project for a mining-metallurgical complex for the production of uranium concentrates. Relevant aspects of each important topic are discussed as parts of an integrated methodology. The principal project activities are analyzed and the relationships among the various factors affecting the design are indicated. A list of 96 principal activities is proposed as an example. These activities are distributed in eight groups: initial evaluations preliminary feasibility studies, project engineering, construction, industrial operation, decommissioning and post-decommissioning activities. The environmental impact and the radiological risks due to the construction and operation of the mining metallurgical complex are analyzed. The principles of radiological protection and the regulations, standards and recommendations for radiological protection in uranium mines and mills are discussed. This report is also a guide to the specialized literature: a bibliography with 765 references is included. (author)

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  14. Radiation Requirements for Uranium Mining Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hondros, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: • Radiation impact can be complex and confusing; • Aim to be credible and competent; • Process can be straightforward; – Baseline monitoring; – Project emissions; – Impact of emission; – Management measures. • “Tell the story” (what does it all mean)

  15. Impact of geo-chemical environment of subsurface water on the measurement of ultra trace level of uranium in ground water by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singhal, R.K.; Preetha, J.; Karpe, Rupali; Ajay Kumar; Hegde, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    During the present work, impacts of cations (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , K + ,), anions (Cl -1 , F -1 , and PO 4 3- ) and DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) on the measurement of ultra trace level of uranium (VI) in subsurface water by adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) is studied. The concentrations of these anions, cations and DOC in subsurface water changes due to change in the geo-chemical environment at different locations. In AdSV, concentration of U was determined by forming an uranium-chloranilic acid complex (2,5-dichloro- 3,6-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone). AdSV measurements were carried out in the differential pulse (DP) mode using a pulse amplitude of -50 mV, a pulse time of 30 ms and a potential step of 4 mV. The detection limit, was calculated to 2+ , Mg 2+ , K + ) and anions (Cl -1 , F -1 , and PO 4 3- ) was carried out by using Ion Chromatography. Ground water samples were spiked with varying degree of cations, anions and DOC (dissolved organic carbon). DOC in ground waters were measured by Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzer. Various experiments show that analysis of uranium in the concentration range of 2+ , Mg 2+ , K + , Cl -1 , F -1 , and PO 4 3- . In case of DOC there is no interference observed in the concentration range of 0.02-15 ppm but beyond 15 ppm the concentration of uranium decrease sharply. Further, if DOC exceeded 16 ppm it was not possible to do the analysis of uranium by AdSV without destruction of DOC, as DOC is surface active organic compound and accumulates on Hg electrode preferentially over uranium-chloroanailic complex. (author)

  16. Data analysis and management for the Uranium Resource Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, V.E.

    1980-01-01

    The Department of Energy has funded a large data collection effort with the purpose of determining the US uranium resources. This Uranium Resource Evaluation (URE) Project required a large data management effort which involved collection, retrieval, processing, display, and analysis of large volumes of data. Many of the characteristics of this data processing system are relevant to other applications, particularly where routine processing involves analyses for input into numerous technical reports. The URE Project computing system has a modular program structure which has enabled a straightforward interface with both special and general graphics and analysis packages such as SAS, BMDP, and SURFACE II. Other topics include cost-effective computing, data quality, report quality computer output, and test versus production program development

  17. The SISTEMA Project contribution in the implementation of the GEO Geohazards Supersite initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardo, Giuseppe; Sangianantoni, Agata; Borgstrom, Sven; D'Auria, Luca; De Martino, Prospero; Dolce, Mario; Isaia, Roberto; Marotta, Enrica; Martini, Marcello; Obrizzo, Francesco; Peluso, Rosario; Sansivero, Fabio; Scarpato, Giovanni; Siniscalchi, Valeria; Tammaro, Umberto; Tulino, Sabrina; Castellano, Mario; Bianco, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    SISTEMA Project has been funded by the PO FESR 2007-2013 action, supported by the Campania Region (Italy). The project fosters the integrated use of multidisciplinary data in order to improve the understanding of the volcanic processes at Campi Flegrei and Ischia and to progress in science and surveillance of the territory according to the rationale of Supersite GEO initiative to Campi Flegrei, currently identified as Permanent Supersite. The mission of SISTEMA is to upgrade the existing monitoring and surveillance systems through the design, purchase and installation of new instrumentation, equipment, technology and methods addressing the need of delivering, with improved rapidity, scientific information for decision makers and end-users. The redundancy of monitoring systems is an important issue to guarantee the full operability during emergencies. The Monitoring Centre of INGV-Osservatorio Vesuviano is currently located within the red zone (potentially at risk of invasion by pyroclastic flows in case of eruption) of Campi Flegrei volcano. Its position offers various logistic benefits but at the onset of a volcanic crisis, of course it will be required to shift this Center in a safer area. For this reason, within the SISTEMA project, we envisioned a backup system which, when needed, could guarantee a shift of the Center in a virtually zero time. This can be achieved by fully duplicating the processing system and the data storage. In case of emergency, it would be required only to switch on the visualization systems in the new Center and transferring the personnel involved in the surveillance activities. SISTEMA project has also enabled the development of a permanent GPS and CRs (Corner Reflectors) networks, the latter supporting SAR Interferometry, by helping to improve knowledge of the Campi Flegrei deformation field, both on local and wide scale. In addition, in order to enhance the heat flux measurements from ground based thermal camera observations, the

  18. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.` different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments.

  19. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project 1994 environmental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This annual report documents the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring and protection program. The UMTRA Project routinely monitors radiation, radioactive residual materials, and hazardous constituents at associated former uranium tailings processing sites and disposal sites. At the end of 1994, surface remedial action was complete at 14 of the 24 designated UMTRA Project processing sites: Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Durango, Colorado; Grand Junction, Colorado; Green River Utah, Lakeview, Oregon; Lowman, Idaho; Mexican Hat, Utah; Riverton, Wyoming; Salt Lake City, Utah; Falls City, Texas; Shiprock, New Mexico; Spook, Wyoming, Tuba City, Arizona; and Monument Valley, Arizona. Surface remedial action was ongoing at 5 sites: Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico; Naturita, Colorado; Gunnison, Colorado; and Rifle, Colorado (2 sites). Remedial action has not begun at the 5 remaining UMTRA Project sites that are in the planning stage. Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota; Maybell, Colorado; and Slick Rock, Colorado (2 sites). The ground water compliance phase of the UMTRA Project started in 1991. Because the UMTRA Project sites are.' different stages of remedial action, the breadth of the UMTRA environmental protection program differs from site to site. In general, sites actively undergoing surface remedial action have the most comprehensive environmental programs for sampling media. At sites where surface remedial action is complete and at sites where remedial action has not yet begun, the environmental program consists primarily of surface water and ground water monitoring to support site characterization, baseline risk assessments, or disposal site performance assessments

  20. UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project site management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of this manual is to summarize the organizational interfaces and the technical approach used to manage the planning, design development, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance, engineering, and remedial action required to stabilize and control the designated Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites. This manual describes the Project's objective, participants' roles and responsibilities, technical approach for accomplishing the objective, and planning and managerial controls to be used in performing the site work. The narrative follows the flow of activities depicted in Figure 1.1, which provides the typical sequence of key Project activities. A list of acronyms used is presented at the end of the manual. The comparable manual for UMTRA Project vicinity properties is the ''Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual'' (VPMIM) (UMTRA-DOE/AL-050601). Together, the two manuals cover the remedial action activities associated with UMTRA Project sites. The UMTRA Project's objective is to stabilize and control the uranium mill tailings, vicinity property materials, and other residual radioactive materials at the designated sites (Figure 1.2) in a safe and environmentally sound manner in order to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. 26 figs., 6 tabs

  1. A National contribution to the GEO Science and Technology roadmap: GIIDA Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nativi, Stefano; Mazzetti, Paolo; Guzzetti, Fausto; Oggioni, Alessandro; Pirrone, Nicola; Santolieri, Rosalia; Viola, Angelo; Tartari, Gianni; Santoro, Mattia

    2010-05-01

    The GIIDA (Gestione Integrata e Interoperativa dei Dati Ambientali) project is an initiative of the Italian National Research Council (CNR) launched in 2008 as an inter-departmental project, aiming to design and develop a multidisciplinary e-infrastructure (cyber-infrastructure) for the management, processing, and evaluation of Earth and Environmental resources -i.e. data, services, models, sensors, best practices. GIIDA has been contributing to the implementation of the GEO (Group of Earth Observation) Science and Technology (S&T) roadmap by: (a) linking relevant S&T communities to GEOSS (GEO System of Systems); (b) ensuring that GEOSS is built based on state-of-the-art science and technology. GIIDA co-ordinates the CNR's digital infrastructure development for Earth Observation resources sharing and cooperates with other national agencies and existing projects pursuing the same objective. For the CNR, GIIDA provides an interface to European and international interoperability programmes (e.g. INSPIRE, and GMES). It builds a national network for dialogue and resolution of issues at varying scientific and technical levels. To achieve such goals, GIIDA introduced a set of guidance principles: • To shift from a "traditional" data centric approach to a more advanced service-based solution for Earth System Science and Environmental information. • To shift the focus from Data to Information Spatial Infrastructures in order to support decision-making. • To be interoperable with analogous National (e.g. SINAnet, and the INSPIRE National Infrastructure) and international initiatives (e.g. INSPIRE, GMES, SEIS, and GEOSS). • To reinforce the Italian presence in the European and international programmes concerning digital infrastructures, geospatial information, and the Mega-Science approach. • To apply the National and International Information Technology (IT) standards for achieving multi-disciplinary interoperability in the Earth and Space Sciences (e.g. ISO, OGC

  2. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989.

  3. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies

  4. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project environmental protection implementation plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP is updated annually. This version covers the time period of 9 November 1994, through 8 November 1995. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies.

  5. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. 1995 Environmental Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 23 1. 1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, the DOE prepares an annual report to document the activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project environmental monitoring program. This monitoring must comply with appropriate laws, regulations, and standards, and it must identify apparent and meaningful trends in monitoring results. The results of all monitoring activities must be communicated to the public. The UMTRA Project has prepared annual environmental reports to the public since 1989

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Vicinity Property Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, L.E.; Potter, R.F.; Arpke, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Grand Junction Project Vicinity Property Program is a $165 million program for the removal and disposal of uranium mill tailings that were used in the construction of approximately 4,000 residences, commercial buildings, and institutional facilities in the City of Grand Junction and surrounding Mesa County, Colorado. This paper discusses the UMTRA Vicinity Property Program and the economic benefits of this program for the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, Colorado. The Bureau of Reclamation Economic Assessment Model (BREAM) was used to estimate the increases in employment and increases in personal income in Mesa County that result from the Vicinity Property Program. The effects of program-related changes in income and taxable expenditures on local and state tax revenue are also presented

  7. CO2 Injectivity in Geological Storages: an Overview of Program and Results of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.M.; Egermann, P.; Azaroual, M.; Pironon, J.; Broseta, D.; Egermann, P.; Munier, G.; Mouronval, G.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity project was to develop a methodology to study the complex phenomena involved in the near well bore region during CO 2 injection. This paper presents an overview of the program and results of the project, and some further necessary developments. The proposed methodology is based on experiments and simulations at the core scale, in order to understand (physical modelling and definition of constitutive laws) and quantify (calibration of simulation tools) the mechanisms involved in injectivity variations: fluid/rock interactions, transport mechanisms, geomechanical effects. These mechanisms and the associated parameters have then to be integrated in the models at the well bore scale. The methodology has been applied for the study of a potential injection of CO 2 in the Dogger geological formation of the Paris Basin, in collaboration with the other ANR GeoCarbone projects. (authors)

  8. Spatial and temporal variations of Norwegian geohazards in a changing climate, the GeoExtreme Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jaedicke

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Various types of slope processes, mainly landslides and avalanches (snow, rock, clay and debris pose together with floods the main geohazards in Norway. Landslides and avalanches have caused more than 2000 casualties and considerable damage to infrastructure over the last 150 years. The interdisciplinary research project "GeoExtreme" focuses on investigating the coupling between meteorological factors and landslides and avalanches, extrapolating this into the near future with a changing climate and estimating the socioeconomic implications. The main objective of the project is to predict future geohazard changes in a changing climate. A database consisting of more than 20 000 recorded historical events have been coupled with a meteorological database to assess the predictability of landslides and avalanches caused by meteorological conditions. Present day climate and near future climate scenarios are modelled with a global climate model on a stretched grid, focusing on extreme weather events in Norway. The effects of climate change on landslides and avalanche activity are studied in four selected areas covering the most important climatic regions in Norway. The statistical analysis of historical landslide and avalanche events versus weather observations shows strong regional differences in the country. Avalanches show the best correlation with weather events while landslides and rockfalls are less correlated. The new climate modelling approach applying spectral nudging to achieve a regional downscaling for Norway proves to reproduce extreme events of precipitation much better than conventional modelling approaches. Detailed studies of slope stabilities in one of the selected study area show a high sensitivity of slope stability in a changed precipitation regime. The value of elements at risk was estimated in one study area using a GIS based approach that includes an estimation of the values within given present state hazard zones. The ongoing

  9. China’s OBOR as a Geo-Functional Institutionalist Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaplan Yilmaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the feasibility of China’s One Belt, One Road (OBOR initiative from an institutionalist perspective. The initiative is undertaken as a ‘geo-functional institutionalist’ project, and this strengthens its feasibility. Firstly, the initiative aims to institutionalize a new international structure paralleling the existing Western-dominated one through which China could re-organize its position as an ‘agenda entrepreneur’ in the world without any clash with the West. Secondly, the initiative follows a functionalist strategy. It offers a ‘win-win’ functionalist framework without any hegemonic ambition; thus, the initiative attracts the attention of the rest of the world. China also follows a pure functionalist and bilateral/regional way to deal with the heterogeneity problem among the target countries. However, China’s institutionalization attempt might be isomorphic with the existing Western-dominated system in terms of its hegemonic structure due to the cognitive limitations in finding alternatives, and this might ruin the feasibility of the initiative.

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Before 1959 a private individual (Mr. Rene Abularach) is reported to have made an airborne radiometric survey of the Sierra de las Minas and Sierra Madre Ranges. Although many anomalies were detected by this survey, none were verified in the ground survey followup, despite apparently adequate flight control. In 1968 a United Nations Special Fund Mineral Survey Project completed over 1,000 km of carborne radiometric survey with geiger counter readings at 500 m intervals. No anomalies were detected, but background radioactivity for several formations and geologic environments was established. In 1969 the Guatemalan government solicited the IAEA for technical assistance In conducting a preliminary uranium favorability study designed to formulate recommendations for a national radioactive ore prospecting program. A carborne radiometric survey was made of environments theoretically favorable for uranium deposition, with spot geological and radiometric examinations being .conducted in the more favorable areas. All Important mining regions of Guatemala except the leterites and the ultrabasics were visited. No evidence of a uranium province was observed 1n these field investigations and the recommendation was made that the government not embark on a more detailed national prospecting program at that time. At the time of completion of the IAEA-Guatemalan government (GOG) reconnaissance program in 1971, no uranium reserves or resources were known. More recent information on uranium occurrences and resources 1n Guatemala does not appear to be available. Information on more recent uranium reconnaissance than that undertaken during 1971 IAEA-GOG study is lacking. However, in more recent years the country's mineral potential has been generally evaluated with the aid of the UN and ICAITI (Central American Research Institute for Industry). Except for quarry materials, the state owns all minerals. The state has priority on purchase of any mineral production needed for the country

  11. Geo Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-06-01

    This book is based on the Geo Uruguay project which consists on the analysis and diagnosis of the environmental impact in the human welfare. The main topics covered in the different chapters are: human welfare, geographical aspects, climate change, transport and energy, changes in land use, coastal features, biodiversity, industrial urbanization, waste and territorial ordering, energy offers like oil, wood, natural gas, coal and electricity

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  13. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, A.T.

    1993-10-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (EPIP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1. The UMTRA EPIP covers the time period of November 9, 1993, through November 8, 1994. It will be updated annually. Its purpose is to provide management direction to ensure that the UMTRA Project is operated and managed in a manner that will protect, maintain, and where necessary, restore environmental quality, minimize potential threats to public health and the environment, and comply with environmental regulations and DOE policies. Contents of this report are: (1) general description of the UMTRA project environmental protection program; (2) notifications; (3) planning and reporting; (4) special programs; (5) environmental monitoring programs; (6) quality assurance and data verification; and (7) references.

  15. Projected uranium measurement uncertainties for the Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younkin, J.M.

    1979-02-01

    An analysis was made of the uncertainties associated with the measurements of the declared uranium streams in the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP). The total uncertainty for the GCEP is projected to be from 54 to 108 kg 235 U/year out of a measured total of 200,000 kg 235 U/year. The systematic component of uncertainty of the UF 6 streams is the largest and the dominant contributor to the total uncertainty. A possible scheme for reducing the total uncertainty is given

  16. Methodological approach for evaluating the geo-exchange potential: VIGOR Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Galgaro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of VIGOR Project, a national project coordinated by the Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources (CNR-IGG and sponsored by the Ministry of Economic Development (MiSE, dedicated to the evaluation of geothermal potential in the regions of the Convergence Objective in Italy (Puglia, Calabria, Campania and Sicily, is expected to evaluate the ability of the territory to heat exchange with the ground for air conditioning of buildings. To identify the conditions for the development of low enthalpy geothermal systems collected and organized on a regional scale geological and stratigraphic data useful for the preparation of a specific thematic mapping, able to represent in a synergistic and simplified way the physical parameters (geological, lithostratigraphic, hydrogeological, thermodynamic that most influence the subsoil behavior for thermal exchange. The litho-stratigraphic and hydrogeological database created for every region led to the production of different cartographic thematic maps, such as the thermal conductivity (lithological and stratigraphical, the surface geothermal flux, the average annual temperature of air, the climate zoning, the areas of hydrogeological restrictions. To obtain a single representation of the geo-exchange potential of the region, the different thematic maps described must be combined together by means of an algorithm, defined on the basis of the SINTACS methodology. The purpose is to weigh the contributions of the involved parameters and to produce a preliminary synthesis map able to identify the territorial use of geothermal heat pump systems, based on the geological characteristics and in agreement with the existing regulatory constraints.

  17. The Wiluna Uranium Project, Western Australia: Bringing a new project to the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, V.

    2014-01-01

    The Wiluna Uranium Project is the first uranium mine in Western Australia to receive Government environmental approval since government policy was changed in 2008 to allow uranium mining in Western Australia. Located 960 km northeast of Perth in remote central Western Australia, the Wiluna Project comprises 76.5 million pounds U_3O_8 [~29,000 tU] in six shallow, calcrete-hosted carnotite uranium deposits. Mining is planned at a rate of 1.3 million tonnes annually to produce 2 million pounds U_3O_8 [~770 tU] production using an alkali leach process. The Project requires initial capital investment of AUD$315M and has an operating cost of US$29-31 per pound [~75-~80 USD/kgU]. During the four years it has taken to gain environmental approval, Toro also progressed technical studies to validate the economic and technical viability of the Project. These included the initial Preliminary Feasibility (PFS) to define the processing train; mining optimisation studies, a Resource Evaluation Pit (REP) and a commercial scale Pilot Plant to verify the mining and processing technologies; and finally, Phase 1 of the Definitive Feasibility Study (DFS) which focussed on the processing plant design. (author)

  18. High-school software development project helps increasing students' awareness of geo-hydrological hazards and their risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Ivan; Rossi, Mauro; Balducci, Vinicio; Salvati, Paola; Guzzetti, Fausto; Bianchini, Andrea; Grzeleswki, Emanuell; Canonico, Andrea; Coccia, Rita; Fiorucci, Gianni Mario; Gobbi, Francesca; Ciuchetti, Monica

    2015-04-01

    In Italy, inundation and landslides are widespread phenomena that impact the population and cause significant economic damage to private and public properties. The perception of the risk posed by these natural geo-hydrological hazards varies geographically and in time. The variation in the perception of the risks has negative consequences on risk management, and limits the adoption of effective risk reduction strategies. We maintain that targeted education can foster the understanding of geo-hydrological hazards, improving their perception and the awareness of the associated risk. Collaboration of a research center experienced in geo-hydrological hazards and risks (CNR IRPI, Perugia) and a high school (ITIS Alessandro Volta, Perugia) has resulted in the design and execution of a project aimed at improving the perception of geo-hydrological risks in high school students and teachers through software development. In the two-year project, students, high school teachers and research scientists have jointly developed software broadly related to landslide and flood hazards. User requirements and system specifications were decided to facilitate the distribution and use of the software among students and their peers. This allowed a wider distribution of the project results. We discuss two prototype software developed by the high school students, including an application of augmented reality for improved dissemination of information of landslides and floods with human consequences in Italy, and a crowd science application to allow students (and others, including their families and friends) to collect information on landslide and flood occurrence exploiting modern mobile devices. This information can prove important e.g., for the validation of landslide forecasting models.

  19. Leveraging Google Geo Tools for Interactive STEM Education: Insights from the GEODE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dordevic, M.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; De Paor, D. G.; Karabinos, P.; Burgin, S.; Coba, F.; Bentley, C.; St John, K. K.

    2016-12-01

    Web-based imagery and geospatial tools have transformed our ability to immerse students in global virtual environments. Google's suite of geospatial tools, such as Google Earth (± Engine), Google Maps, and Street View, allow developers and instructors to create interactive and immersive environments, where students can investigate and resolve common misconceptions in STEM concepts and natural processes. The GEODE (.net) project is developing digital resources to enhance STEM education. These include virtual field experiences (VFEs), such as an interactive visualization of the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent, a "Grand Tour of the Terrestrial Planets," and GigaPan-based VFEs of sites like the Canadian Rockies. Web-based challenges, such as EarthQuiz (.net) and the "Fold Analysis Challenge," incorporate scaffolded investigations of geoscience concepts. EarthQuiz features web-hosted imagery, such as Street View, Photo Spheres, GigaPans, and Satellite View, as the basis for guided inquiry. In the Fold Analysis Challenge, upper-level undergraduates use Google Earth to evaluate a doubly-plunging fold at Sheep Mountain, WY. GEODE.net also features: "Reasons for the Seasons"—a Google Earth-based visualization that addresses misconceptions that abound amongst students, teachers, and the public, many of whom believe that seasonality is caused by large variations in Earth's distance from the Sun; "Plate Euler Pole Finder," which helps students understand rotational motion of tectonic plates on the globe; and "Exploring Marine Sediments Using Google Earth," an exercise that uses empirical data to explore the surficial distribution of marine sediments in the modern ocean. The GEODE research team includes the authors and: Heather Almquist, Cinzia Cervato, Gene Cooper, Helen Crompton, Terry Pavlis, Jen Piatek, Bill Richards, Jeff Ryan, Ron Schott, Barb Tewksbury, and their students and collaborating colleagues. We are supported by NSF DUE 1323419 and a Google Geo

  20. Soil spectral measurements in the field: problems and solutions in light of the GEO-CARDEL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor, E. Ben; Granot, Amihai

    2017-09-01

    The GEO-CRADEL project aims to establish several knowhow for GEO applications. One of them is food security in which soil spectroscopy plays a major role. To that end we had developed a new assembly for measuring surface reflectance in the field. This was done in order to fill the gap between laboratory and field soil spectral measurements. This device, named SoilPRO (SP) can be connected to any field spectrometer fiber's tip and used to measure representative and undisturbed surfaces of different soil types. The SoilPRO's performance was evaluated against laboratory measurements under optimal conditions and demonstrated high performance in the field. As the SP measurement is not dependent on main factors such as the sun's radiation, atmospheric variations, operator stability or measurement geometry, and it does not disturb the surface being measured, its measurement can be used with laboratory soil spectral data (SSL). To that end the SSL that is generated under the GEO-CARDEL project is now can be used for agro- application in the field.

  1. The mobile GeoBus outreach project: hands-on Earth and Mars activities for secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ruth; Pike, Charlotte; Roper, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Just under 35,000 pupils have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities since the project began in 2012, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run 50 - 80 minute workshops, and half- or whole-day Enterprise Challenges and field excursions. Workshops are aimed at a class of up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are increasingly popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. Enterprise Challenge are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Topics include "Journey to Mars", "Scotland's Rocks", "Drilling for Oil", and "Renewable Energy". Both of the energy Enterprise Challenges were designed to incorporates ideas and

  2. 3d-modelling workflows for trans-nationally shared geological models - first approaches from the project GeoMol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupf, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    To meet the EU's ambitious targets for carbon emission reduction, renewable energy production has to be strongly upgraded and made more efficient for grid energy storage. Alpine Foreland Basins feature a unique geological inventory which can contribute substantially to tackle these challenges. They offer a geothermal potential and storage capacity for compressed air, as well as space for underground storage of CO2. Exploiting these natural subsurface resources will strongly compete with existing oil and gas claims and groundwater issues. The project GeoMol will provide consistent 3-dimensional subsurface information about the Alpine Foreland Basins based on a holistic and transnational approach. Core of the project GeoMol is a geological framework model for the entire Northern Molasse Basin, complemented by five detailed models in pilot areas, also in the Po Basin, which are dedicated to specific questions of subsurface use. The models will consist of up to 13 litho-stratigraphic horizons ranging from the Cenozoic basin fill down to Mesozoic and late Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and the crystalline basement. More than 5000 wells and 28 000 km seismic lines serve as input data sets for the geological subsurface model. The data have multiple sources and various acquisition dates, and their interpretations have gone through several paradigm changes. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the data with regards to technical parameters and content prior to further analysis (cf. Capar et al. 2013, EGU2013-5349). Each partner will build its own geological subsurface model with different software solutions for seismic interpretation and 3d-modelling. Therefore, 3d-modelling follows different software- and partner-specific workflows. One of the main challenges of the project is to ensure a seamlessly fitting framework model. It is necessary to define several milestones for cross border checks during the whole modelling process. Hence, the main input data set of the

  3. Protection of European Cultural Heritage from geo - hazards: the PROTHEGO project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margottini, Claudio; Spizzichino, Daniele; Cigna, Francesca; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Fernandez Merodo, José Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Tangible cultural heritage includes various categories of monuments and sites, from cultural landscapes and sacred sites to archaeological complexes, individual architectural or artistic monuments and historic urban centers. Such places are continuously impacted and weathered by several internal and external factors, both natural and human-induced, with rapid and/or slow onset, including natural hazards, such as earthquakes or extreme meteorological events, cumulative processes as well as the effects of humans, especially in conflict situations. A clear picture of endangered sites is not available. In particular, the list of List of World Heritage in danger mainly focuses on sites threaten by armed conflicts. New space technology based on radar interferometry (InSAR) is now capable to monitor, since 1992 and with mm precision, surface deformation for reflective targets named persistent scatterers, which consistently return stable signals to the radar satellites. Led by the Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research, and in collaboration with NERC British Geological Survey, Geological and Mining Institute of Spain, University of Milano-Bicocca and Cyprus University of Technology, the project PROTHEGO, co-funded in the framework of JPI on Cultural Heritage EU programme (2015-2018), will make an innovative contribution towards the analysis of geo-hazards in areas of cultural heritage in Europe. The project will apply novel InSAR techniques to monitor monuments and sites that are potentially unstable due to landslides, sinkholes, settlement, subsidence, active tectonics as well as structural deformation, all of which could be effected of climate change and human interaction. To magnify the impact of the project, the approach will be implemented in more than 400 sites on the UNESCO World Heritage List in geographical Europe. After the remote sensing investigation, detailed geological interpretation, hazard analysis, local-scale monitoring, advanced

  4. Geo-neutrino Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Bahrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Bahrain consists of limestone, sandstone and marl of Cretaceous and Tertiary ages. The potential for discoveries of uranium is very limited and thus the Speculative potential is placed in the category of less than 1000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The geology of Israel is relatively simple. Most of the country is underlain by sedimentary rocks of Secondary and Tertiary age. As far as the IAEA is aware no systematic exploration has been done for conventional type uranium deposits. Israel has no uranium deposits, and no high or low-grade uranium ores. However, there are uranium 'sources' which are mainly phosphate rock.Proven phosphate reserves in Israel are estimated at about 220 million tons in five different locations. The average uranium concentration is between 100 and 170 ppm. This makes the uranium content in the proven phosphate reserves of Israel to be about 25,000 tons. Together with the possibility of additional discoveries and on the assumption that the economic conditions for the production of both phosphate and uranium become favourable the Speculative Potential is placed in the 10,000 to 50,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  8. Environmental management audit, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) has established, as part of the internal oversight responsibilities within Department of Energy (DOE), a program within the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), to conduct environmental audits at DOE's operating facilities. This document contains the results of the Environmental Management Audit of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This Environmental Management Audit was conducted by the DOE's Office of Environmental Audit from October 26 through November 6, 1992. The audit's objective is to advise the Secretary as to the adequacy of UMTRA's environmental programs, and management organization in ensuring environmental protection and compliance with Federal, state, and DOE environmental requirements. This Environmental Management Audit's scope was comprehensive and covered all areas of environmental management with the exception of environmental programs pertaining to the implementation of the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which is the responsibility of the DOE Headquarters Office of NEPA Oversight

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The geology of Oman is unlikely to lie favourable for uranium occurrence being mainly of marine sedimentary origin. No exploration for uranium has been reported or is planned. The Speculative Potential is placed in the category of less than 1000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  10. 76 FR 41308 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ..., Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials License Application...-4737, or by e-mail to [email protected] . The Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project License... source and byproduct materials license at its Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project site located in Crook...

  11. Uranium update: geo-socio-political factors of U.S. production, or you wonder where the yellow went

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Industry developments of 1986 indicate a steady but modest confidence for recovery of the domestic nuclear raw materials business. Concerns of oversupply and foreign inroads into utility contracts were somewhat alleviated with long-overdue recognition by the US Department of Energy in November 1985 that the industry in 1984 failed to meet viability tests, as required of government by public law. However, by February of this year, the government had initiated no perceptive corrective help for the domestic industry, and the DOE was accused of enhancing its competitive position as a provider of enrichment services. New Mexico, once the leader in production of domestic uranium, is compared with Wyoming for remaining and potential reserves. The monopoly by south Texas of low-production-cost uranium in the in-situ-leach (ISL) extractive industry is threatened by oncoming ISL operations in Wyoming and the Crawford, Nebraska, area. Arizona breccia-pipe occurrence of high-grade uranium, domestically speaking, bodes well for mining operators there to compete in what is left of the domestic market

  12. The Honeymoon project: Australia`s first in situ leach uranium project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackland, M.C. [Southern Cross Resources Inc. Toowond, QLD (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    The Honeymoon uranium deposit is one of several roll front uranium deposits in South Australia. It was discovered in 1971, the project developed in the 1970`s, and was ready for demonstration of the In Situ Leaching (ISL) production techniques by January 1983, when the project was stopped, despite it having met the environmental approvals to proceed, due to the Australian Labour Party`s `three mines policy`. From 1983 until March 1996 the project was mothballed. In late 1996 Southern Cross Resources Inc. (SCRI) reached agreement with Mount Isa Mining (MIM) to purchase its uranium interests in Honeymoon, Goulds Dam and EL 2310 whilst simultaneously acquiring Sedimentary Holdings NL`s interests in EL 2310. By April 1997 these interests were consolidated in SCRI`s wholly owned subsidiary, Southern Cross Resources Australia Ply Ltd which is the operating company. Activities are presently underway to rehabilitate the existing treatment plant and continue the program that was outlined in the approved 1981 Honeymoon Environmental Impact Statement. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  13. Study of the economic valuation of uranium deposits and mine-projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnajim, N.

    1980-01-01

    A basis is provided for the decisions to be made in connection with the exploration, development mining, processing and marketing of the uranium. Details are given about the kinds and forms of the mines, about the exploration-, extraction- and processing technologies as well as the economicly best extractive processing of uranium. The profitability of uranium mining projects is evaluated according to the economy calculation method. (DG) [de

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  15. Synthesized research report in the second mid-term research phase. Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project, Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project and geo-stability project (Translated document)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Katsuhiro; Sasao, Eiji; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Onoe, Hironori; Sato, Toshinori; Yasue, Kenichi; Asamori, Koichi; Niwa, Masakazu; Osawa, Hideaki; Nagae, Isako; Natsuyama, Ryoko; Fujita, Tomoo; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Nakayama, Masashi; Miyakawa, Kazuya; Ito, Hiroaki; Ohyama, Takuya; Senba, Takeshi; Amano, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized the research results from the Mizunami/Horonobe Underground Research Laboratories (URLs) and geo-stability projects in the second mid-term research phase. This report can be used as a technical basis for the Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan/Regulator at each decision point from siting to beginning of disposal (Principal Investigation to Detailed Investigation Phase). High-quality construction techniques and field investigation methods have been developed and implemented, which will be directly applicable to the National Disposal Program (together with general assessments of hazardous natural events and processes). Acquisition of technical knowledge on decisions of partial backfilling and final closure from actual field experiments in the Mizunami/Horonobe URLs will be crucial as the main theme for the next phases. (author)

  16. Synthesized research report in the second mid-term research phase. Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory project, Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project and geo-stability project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Katsuhiro; Sasao, Eiji; Iwatsuki, Teruki; Saegusa, Hiromitsu; Sato, Toshinori; Umeda, Koji; Yasue, Kenichi; Asamori, Koichi; Osawa, Hideaki; Koide, Kaoru; Nagae, Isako; Natsuyama, Ryoko; Mizuno, Takashi; Fujita, Tomoo; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Yokota, Hideharu; Ishii, Eiichi; Aoyagi, Kazuhei; Nakayama, Masashi; Ito, Hiroaki; Tsusaka, Kimikazu; Ohyama, Takuya; Senba, Takeshi; Amano, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    We have synthesised the research results from Mizunami/Horonobe URLs and geo-stability projects in the second mid-term research phase. It could be used as technical bases for NUMO/Regulator in each decision point from siting to beginning of disposal (Principal Investigation to Detailed Investigation Phase). High quality construction techniques and field investigation methods have been developed and implemented and these will be directly applicable to the National Disposal Program (along with general assessments of hazardous natural events and processes). It will be crucial to acquire technical knowledge on decisions of partial backfilling and final closure by actual field experiments in Mizunami/Horonobe URLs as main themes for the next phases. (author)

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Thailand is a country with an area of 514?000 square kilometres situated in the centre of continental south-east Asia, The geology of Thailand is very varied with sedimentary formations ranging from Cambrian to Quaternary in age and including sandstones, shales, limestones of many varieties. Among the igneous rocks, granites are very important and rhyolites, tuffs diorites, basalts and ultrabasic rocks also exist. Tin is the most important mineral occurrence. Available information on the geology and mineral resources suggests that the country may contain significant resources of radioactive minerals. Favourable potential host types are; 1) uranium and thorium in monazite in beach sands and tin placer deposits; 2) uranium in sandstones, principally in Jurassic sandstones of the Khorat Plateau; 3) uranium in Tertiary lignite deposits; 4) uranium in veins in granites; 5) uranium related to fluorite deposits; 6) uranium in black shales and phosphates. Uranium mineralization in sedimentary rocks at Phu Wieng was discovered in 1970. The area has been radiometrically grid mapped and limited shallow drilling has shown continuity.of the narrow, carbonaceous, conglomeratic sandstone host bed. No uranium reserves or resources can be stated at the present time, but the favourable geology of the Khorat Plateau, the known uranium occurrence and the very small exploration coverage is possibly indicative of a good future potential. The Speculative Potential is estimated to be between 1000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  2. Social Licensing in uranium mining: Experiences from the IAEA review of the planned Mukju River Uranium Project, Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, H.; Hilton, J.; Saint-Pierre, S.; Baldry, K.; Fan, Z.; Tulsidas, H.

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA Uranium Production Site Appraisal Team (UPSAT) programme is designed to assist Member States to enhance the operational performance and the occupational, public and environmental health and safety of uranium mining and processing facilities across all phases of the uranium production cycle. The scope of the appraisal process includes exploration, resource assessment, planning, environmental and social impact assessment, mining, processing, waste management, site management, remediation, and final closure. An UPSAT review was requested in 2010 by the United Republic of Tanzania (URT) to address the challenges the country is currently facing in developing its uranium mining and processing capability for the first time. The review that was carried out from 27 May to 5 June, 2013 had the objective to to appraise URT’s preparedness for overseeing the Uranium Production Cycle in general, at the same time focusing on the planned Mkuju River Project (MRP) in the south of the country in particular. The UPSAT team was tasked to report its findings according to five primary areas: 1. Regulatory system; 2. Sustainable uranium production life cycle; 3. Health, Safety and Environment (HSE); 4. Social licensing; 5. Capacity building. The paper will discuss the key findings and suggestions that were provided to governmental stakeholders and the operater to improve the planned operations. (author)

  3. The Swanson Uranium Project (Marline/Umetco, Pittsylvania County, Virginia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.E.; Notary, A.; Yellich, J.A.; Rekemeyer, P.; Vinych, V.S.; Sealy, C.O.; Lynott, P.

    1985-01-01

    The proposed Swanson Uranium Project is located in Pittsylvania County, south-central Virginia, near the North Carolina border, and will consist of an open pit mine, a conventional alkaline leach mill, and an above-grade tailings management area. Tailings will be filtered to 25 percent moisture content prior to placement on a clay liner in the containment area, which will cover approximately 200 acres. The final tailings configuration will result in a symmetrical prism with rectangular base dimensions of 4,600 by 1,800 feet, a maximum depth of 52 feet at the centerline crest, and an average depth of 32 feet. As portions of the tailings management area reach final depth, grade and stability, a clay cap and rock drainage blanket will be constructed to provide for incremental reclamation. Mine waste rock then will be graded over the cap and blanket, followed by a soil cover to promote growth of vegetation. The encapsulation of the tailings, to a final depth of 100 feet, will enhance geomorphic and seismic stability, while minimizing project land disturbance. The conceptual plan will provide adequate protection of ground water to meet state or federal standards

  4. Management of uranium mining and processing wastes at Turamdih project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.C.; Verma, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Based on environmental impact assessment, comprehensive plan for management of wastes has been drawn up. No solid waste from the mine is being disposed off outside the project area. The quantity of waste generated after processing of ore is large because of low content of uranium in the ore. A big tailings pond has been planned in specially selected suitable valley near the plant. No liquid effluents are to be discharged into general surrounding environment. Mine water is to be fed to the process plant. Effluents from tailings pond will be collected in a storage cum evaporation pond. All water from different zones of the project shall be collected in zonal ponds and then pumped to tailings effluent storage pond. All the ponds will be provided with requisite impervious liners. The effluents of the storage pond will be treated for removal of radium and manganese and discharged into monitoring pond. Large surface areas for various ponds are envisaged to take advantage of evaporation with aim for zero discharge. To reduce impact from gaseous emissions, high efficiency dust suppression and extraction systems shall be provided. High stacks have been incorporated for DG set, boiler plants, sulphuric acid plant and dust extraction systems for crushing and grinding section and the quality of discharges will be very much within the prescribed limits. The paper describes the management plan in detail. (author)

  5. Introduction to in situ leaching technique and facility at Smith Ranch uranium project in USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lechang; Wang Delin; Sun Xianrong; Gao Shangxiong

    2005-01-01

    The history of in situ leaching of uranium in USA is reviewed. Some techniques and parameters of alkaline in situ leach at Smith Ranch uranium project are introduced, including well field, sorption, elution, precipitation, filter and drying, automatic control, radiation protection, safety and environmental protection. (authors)

  6. Environmental management of uranium mining projects in Australia - a national perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usback, R.

    1987-01-01

    The environmental management of uranium mining projects in Australia is described. The paper reveals that the environmental examination of uranium mining proposals, and the establishment of environmental protection measures for such proposals, have been integrated with other requirements to meet the needs of local communities. (U.K.)

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Very little information is available to IAEA on the geology and uranium potential of Syria. In 1975 a contract was awarded to Huntings Geology and Geophysics Ltd by the Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources to carry out a study of the country's mineral resources with particular reference to phosphate uranium, chrome and industrial materials. The results of this survey are not known. Apart from the assumption of some possibility of uranium recovery as a by-product from phosphate production it is assumed that the Speculative Potential is likely to be less than 1000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  8. Geo-scientific Information in the Radioactive Waste Management Safety Case Main Messages from the AMIGO Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive waste is associated with all phases of the nuclear fuel cycle as well as the use of radioactive materials in medicine, research and industry. For the most hazardous and long-lived waste, the solution being investigated worldwide is disposal in engineered repositories deep underground. The importance of geo-scientific information in selecting a site for geological disposal has long been recognised, but there has been growing acknowledgement of the broader role of this information in assessing and documenting the safety of disposal. The OECD/NEA Approaches and Methods for Integrating Geological Information in the Safety Case (AMIGO) project has demonstrated that geological data and understanding serve numerous roles in safety cases. The project, which ran from 2002 to 2008, underscored the importance of integrating geo-scientific information in the development of a disposal safety case and increasingly in the overall process of repository development, including, for example, siting decisions and ensuring the practical feasibility of repository layout and engineering. (authors)

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Cameroon. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Cameroon estimates the Speculative Resources of that country to be in the order of 10 000 tonnes uranium for syenite-associated U-deposits in southern Cameroon, and in the order of 5 000 tonnes uranium for uranium deposits associated with albitized and desilicified late tectonic Panafrican granites (episyenite) and Paleozoic volcanics in northern Cameroon. No specific tonnage is given for Francevillian equivalents (DJA-Series) and for Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, which are thought to hold limited potential for sandstone hosted uranium. However the Douala basin, consisting of mixed marine and continental sequences merits some attention. No specific budget and programme for uranium exploration are proposed for Cameroon. Instead specific recommendations concerning specific potential environments and general recommendation concerning the methodology of exploration are made. (author)

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: Cost Reduction and Productivity Improvement Program Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The purpose of the Cost Reduction/Productivity Improvement Program Plan is to formalize and improve upon existing efforts to control costs which have been underway since project inception. This program plan has been coordinated with the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and the DOE Field Office, Albuquerque (AL). It incorporates prior Uranium Mill Tallings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office guidance issued on the subject. The opportunities for reducing cosh and improving productivity are endless. The CR/PIP has these primary objectives: Improve productivity and quality; heighten the general cost consciousness of project participants, at all levels of their organizations; identify and implement specific innovative employee ideas that extend beyond what is required through existing processes and procedures; emphasize efforts that create additional value for the money spent by maintaining the project Total Estimated Cost (TEC) at the lowest possible level

  11. GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities in a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer during reoxidation by oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, J.D.; Wu, W.-M.; Wu, L.; Deng, Y.; Carley, J.; Carroll, S.; He, Z.; Gu, B.; Luo, J.; Criddle, C. S.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P. M.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T. C.; Zhou, J.

    2009-07-15

    A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

  12. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-09-20

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project.

  13. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project

  14. Uranium project DINAMIGE-BRGM; Proyecto Uranio DINAMIGE-BRGM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirelli, H

    1982-07-01

    This Uranium review was carried out in the frame work of Uranium prospecting programme between (DINAMIGE-BRGM) from February to June 1982. It was included radimetric cutting in sedimentaries and crystallines ground (gondwanic basin of the NE).The task was developed (1.300.000 scale) in Cunapiru, Carrillada, Vichadero, Minas de Corrales, Paso Mazangano and Yaguari zones.

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Laos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Laos is a land locked country containing about 3.5 million people living primarily at a subsistence level. Geologically, the country contains a few places that may be marginally favourable for uranium deposits. A uranium potential in the upper half of Category 1 is assigned. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the uranium enrichment demonstration plant project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugitsue, Noritake

    2001-01-01

    In this report, the organization system of the uranium enrichment business is evaluated, based on the operation of the uranium enrichment demonstration plant. As a result, in uranium enrichment technology development or business, it was acknowledged that maintenance of the organization which has the Trinity of a research/engineering/operation was necessary in an industrialization stage by exceptional R and D cycle. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (JNFL) set up the Rokkashomura Aomori Uranium Enrichment Research and Development Center in November 2000. As a result, the system that company directly engaged in engineering development was prepared. And results obtained in this place is expected toward certain establishment of the uranium enrichment business of Japan. (author)

  17. The Ellweiler uranium plant - a demolition and recycling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mika, S.; Rohr, T.; Seehars, R.; Feser, A.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium plant at Ellweiler, district of Birkenfeld, was used for the production and storage of uranium concentrates. The owner of the Ellweiler uranium plant (UAE), Gewerkschaft Brunhilde GmbH, ceased processing uranium ore and recycling in 1989 and has been in liquidation since September 1991. The State of Rhineland-Palatinate, had safety measures adopted in a first step, getting the plant into a safe state by former plant personnel. The entire plant was demolished in a second step. The contract for demolishing the former uranium plant was awarded to ABB Reaktor as the general contractor in August 1996. Demolition work was carried out between April 1997 and May 1999. A total of approx. 7900 Mg of material was disposed of. At present, recultivation measures are being carried out. (orig.) [de

  18. Study of Kvanefjeld uranium project for the Ministry for Greenland. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Appendices to volume 1 of the report 'Study of Kvanefjeld uranium project for the Ministry for Greenland'. Calculation sheets and prints dealing with material and energy balance, and estimate of leaching, extraction, pelleting, and many other technological processes. (EG)

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Physiographically India has a total area of 3,268,010 km 2 in three distinct regions. 1. The Peninsular shield in the south with an area of 823,310 km 2 . 2. The Himalayan mountain system with an area of 1,797,200 km 2 . 3. The Indo-Gangetic alluvial plain with an area of 647,500 km 2 . The three presently recognised major uranium provinces in India are: 1. The Singhbhum uranium province; 2. The Rajasthan uranium province, 3. The Madhya Pradesh uranium province. The Atomic Minerals Division of the Department of Atomic Energy has carried out a vigorous exploration programme since 1949 but despite their efforts a great deal of ground has still to be explored. At present, structurally controlled deposits account for most of the uranium resources of India. Uranium occurrences and deposits have been outlined in (1) Vein type deposits (the Singhbhum belt), (2) Conglomerate (Karnataka and Udaipur area, Raiasthan), (3) Sandstones (Madhra Pradesh and Swaliks, Himachal Pradesh, (4) Others such as carbonatites, marine phosphates, etc, (Mussorrie - Sahasradhara In Uttar Pradesh and Chatterpur-Saucur in Madhya Pradesh), (5) By-product Uranium in copper tailings and beach sands. India's total resources are listed as 52,538 tonnes uranium (68,300 short tons U 3 O 8 ) with additional resources from monazite of 12700 tonnes uranium. In view of the wide geological favourability, the many types of occurrences already known and the vast areas of unexplored ground it is estimated that the Speculative Potential may be between 150,000 and 250,000 tonnes uranium which is Category 5. (author)

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Uranium occurrences and resources - To date the uranium identified in Belgium is limited to a number of occurrences and none of these have as yet proved significant from a reserve or resource viewpoint. The main uranium occurrences ares (1) In the Upper Cambrian graphite schists corresponding to the culm of Sweden small zones are found (30 - 50 cm thick) with an average of 20 ppm uranium. (2) Near Vise at the base of the Carboniferous the Visean formation is discordantly superimposed on the Permian (Frasnian) and overlain by shales and phyllites. Solution pockets at the boundary contain phosphatic lenses that contain uranium values of up to 200 ppm. Autunite and Torbernite are the main uranium minerals associated with a number of complex phosphatic minerals. Within the Chalk (Maestrichtien) of the Mons basin, that is mainly in the Ciply - St. Symphorien and Baudow district. Here is found enrichment of uranium up to 140 ppm over large areas related to phosphatic chalk. The thickness of the zone varies from a few to 20 metres. However, as the P 2 O 5 content is not high enough for the deposits to be exploited at present for phosphate there is little possibility of the uranium being concentrated at high enough levels to be exploited for itself alone. (4) Near to Vielsalm (in the Stavelot Massif) are some thin quartz veins containing small amounts of copper and uranium minerals (Torbornite). Values of up to 70 ppm are recorded. (5) A number of low uranium values are recorded associated with phosphatic nodules and zones in the Lower Pleistocene and Tertiary

  1. Copper Mountain, Wyoming, intermediate-grade uranium resource assessment project. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madson, M.E.; Ludlam, J.R.; Fukui, L.M.

    1982-11-01

    Intermediate-grade uranium resources were delineated and estimated for Eocene and Precambrian host rock environments in the 39.64 mi 2 Copper Mountain, Wyoming, assessment area. Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical, geophysical, petrologic, borehole, and structural data were interpreted and used to develop a genetic model for uranium mineralization in these environments. Development of a structural scoring system and application of computer graphics in a high-confidence control area established the basis for estimations of uranium resources in the total assessment area. 8 figures, 5 tables

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Afghanistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    Although Afghanistan has an extent of some 650,065 square kilometres, only a very small proportion of it has been surveyed for uranium, and that only at the preliminary reconnaissance stage. Earlier work by bi-lateral teams identified a number of small uranium anomalies and occurrences and more recently (1974-75) an IAEA geologist discovered evidence of uranium mineralisation in the Neogene - Lower Pleistocene continental sediments of the Jalalabad Basin to the east of Kabul. The I.A.E.A. expert outlined three areas totalling 20,000 km where systematic uranium exploration would be justified. Up to the present no positive programme has been agreed. On very tenuous evidence a Speculative Potential of 2000 tonnes U 3 O 8 is suggested for Afghanistan. (author)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    In Australia most exploration for uranium has been conducted by companies and individuals. The geological mapping and airborne radiometric surveying conducted by the BMR is made available to interested persons. Exploration for uranium in Australia can be divided into two periods - 1947 to 1961 and 1966-1977. During the first period the Commonwealth Government introduced measures to encourage uranium exploration including a system of rewards for the discovery of uranium ore. This reward system resulted in extensive activity by prospectors particularly in the known mineral fields. Equipped with a Geiger counter or scintillometer, individuals with little or no experience in prospecting could compete with experienced prospectors and geologists. During this period several relative small uranium deposits were discovered generally by prospectors who found outcropping mineralisation. The second phase of uranium exploration in Australia began in 1966 at which time reserves amounted to only 6,200 tonnes of uranium and by 3 977 reserves had been increased to 289,000 tonnes. Most of the exploration was done by companies with substantial exploration budgets utilising more advanced geological and geophysical techniques. In the field of airborne radiometer the development of multi-channel gamma ray spectrometers with large volume crystal detectors increased the sensitivity of the tool as a uranium detector and resulted in several major discoveries. Expenditure or exploration for uranium increased from 1966 to 1971 but has declines in recent years. After listing the major geological elements of Australia, its uranium production and resources are discussed. During the period 1954-71 the total production of uranium concentrate in Australia amounted to 7,780 tonnes of uranium, and was derived from deposits at Rum Jungle (2,990 tonnes U) and the South Alligator River (610 tonnes U) in the Northern Territory, Mary Kathleen (3,460 tonnes U) in Queensland and Radium Hill (720 tonnes U

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Taiwan is an island of 36,000 sq km located 160 km east of mainland China. Geologically, the oldest rocks are Tertiary, and the only igneous rocks on the island are Quaternary andesites and basalts. Copper, gold, and silver are the only known metallic minerals produced. Uranium occurrences and exploration efforts are unknown. The potential uranium resource of Taiwan is considered a category 1 resource. (author)

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Honduras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    In 1953, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, on invitation of the government of Honduras, conducted uranium reconnaissance in parts of the country. The survey consisted of scintillometric examination of all formations, veins, dikes, sills and contacts along more than 1,500 km of road. Additionally, 17 mines and prospects were examined, but in no location were uranium occurrences found. The largest and most consistently radioactive deposit noted was a body of volcanic ash at Santa Rosa de Copan, a sample of which assayed 15 ppm U 3 O 8 . A uranium prospect has been described from the Yatnala area in northwest Honduras. Uraninite and oxidation products occur in association with copper and mercury minerals in veinlets as well as disseminations in a Lower Cretaceous limestone conglomerate, the llama Formation. The llama Formation is the conglomeratic facies of the Atima (limestone) Formation, both of which are in the Yojoa Group. At the time of the U. N. development program survey in May, 1970, no uranium deposits were known in Honduras. Information is not available on current exploration in Honduras. The state owns most mineral deposits but may grant rights for exploration and exploitation of the subsoil. Mineral and surface titles are separate. Deposits of uranium and its salts, thorium and similar atomic energy substances are reserved to the state. Foreign citizens and companies, with some exceptions, may acquire mineral rights. Several groups of sediments might be of interest for uranium exploration. The Todos Santos redbeds and the El Plan Formation are both shallow marine and hence may contain marginal marine facies favorable for uranium. In the southern and central Cordillera, the Valle de Angeles sediments, particularly the sandstones, may be of interest. The contacts between Permian granites and schists (Paleozoic) may also warrant attention. Lacking further information on which to base a more optimistic outlook, it is estimated that the uranium potential of

  7. Project GeoPower: Basic subsurface information for the utilization of geothermal energy in the Danish-German border region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsch, Reinhard; Balling, Niels; Fuchs, Sven

    and require reliable cross-border management and planning tools. In the framework of the Interreg4a GeoPower project, fundamental geological and geophysical information of importance for the planning of geothermal energy utilization in the Danish-German border region was compiled and analyzed. A 3D geological......Information on both hydraulic and thermal conditions of the subsurface is fundamental for the planning and use of hydrothermal energy. This is paramount in particular for densely populated international border regions, where different subsurface applications may introduce conflicts of use...... on potential geothermal reservoirs, and a new 3D structural geological model was developed. The interpretation of petrophysical data (core data and well logs) allows to evaluate the hydraulic and thermal rock properties of geothermal formations and to develop a parameterized 3D thermal conductive subsurface...

  8. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Froehlich, Michaela B. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Chemie, Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Vienna (Austria); Steier, Peter [Universitaet Wien, Fakultaet fuer Physik, Isotopenforschung und Kernphysik, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-11-02

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the {sup 230}Th/{sup 234}U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of {sup 236}U and {sup 239}Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A full report has been compiled describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Uganda. The Mission suggest that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 0 to 105 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that most of these speculative resources are related to Proterozoic unconformities and to Cenozoic sandstones of the Western Rift Valley. Some potential is also associated with Post-tectonic granites. The Mission recommends to rehabilitate the Geological Survey of Uganda in order to enable it to conduct and support a uranium exploration programme for unconformity related and for standstone hosted uranium deposits. Recommended exploration methods encompass geological mapping and compilation, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey north of 1 deg. North latitude, stream sediment sampling, and ground scintillometric surveys in favourable areas. Follow up work should include VLF-EM surveys, emanometry and drilling. (author)

  10. Uranium from German nuclear power projects of the 1940s - a nuclear forensic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus; Horta, Joan; Nicholl, Adrian; Rasmussen, Gert; Belle, Pieter van; Varga, Zsolt; Buda, Razvan; Erdmann, Nicole; Kratz, Jens-Volker; Trautmann, Norbert; Fifield, L. Keith; Tims, Stephen G.; Froehlich, Michaela B.; Steier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a nuclear forensic study of uranium from German nuclear projects which used different geometries of metallic uranium fuel. Through measurement of the 230 Th/ 234 U ratio, we could determine that the material had been produced in the period from 1940 to 1943. To determine the geographical origin of the uranium, the rare-earth-element content and the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio were measured. The results provide evidence that the uranium was mined in the Czech Republic. Trace amounts of 236 U and 239 Pu were detected at the level of their natural abundance, which indicates that the uranium fuel was not exposed to any major neutron fluence. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Panama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    About 20 percent of Panama has been covered by airborne radiometric surveys, largely in the Azuero-Petaquilia area. Essentially no ground examinations have been made. About one third of the country remains unmapped. Most of the rest has been examined only in rapid reconnaissance largely by the United Nations and oil companies. Detailed mapping has been confined to the Canal Zone. No uranium deposits or prospects of economic interest are known in Panama. There appears to be no information available on present exploration activities for uranium. Panama has no specific legislation relating to nuclear energy. However, all mineral deposits belong to the state, except for salt and similar materials, and are governed by the mineral resources code. There appears to be only one remote possibility for uranium mineralization in Panama, namely, sandstone-type deposits. Marginal marine and fluvial sediments, such as host sandstone-type deposits elsewhere, are most abundant 1n the lower Cenozoic parts of the Azuero and possibly Bocas del Toro basins and are probably absent or poorly developed in the Darien and Central basin. Rocks with even moderate background uranium concentrations to be leached and deposited in such sediments are confined to the silicic and alkaline Intrusive rocks of the La Yeguada Formation 1n western Panama and possibly the Rio Guayabo stock in the Sierra de Maje of eastern Panama. Only the La Yeguada Formation is extensive enough and near enough to a potential sedimentary ore host to be important. Uranium concentrations have not been measured in this unit but its silicic composition, relatively young age (with respect to other volcanic rocks in Panama) and high ash content suggest that it may have relatively high Teachable uranium content. The best areas for exploration for La Yeguada-derived sandstone-type uranium deposits would be in the Pese formation between Santiago and Chitre in the Azuero basin. Possibly favourable sandstone type exploration ground

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Turkey has an area of 296 185 sq mi or 767 120 square kilometers. The geology is dominated lay Tertiary and post-Tertiary rocks which are very widespread but extensive outcrops of Mesozoic rocks also occur. Paleozoic rocks, mainly gneisses, mica schists and quartzites occur in the ancient massifs, principally the Istranca massif in Thrace, the Merideres massif in western Anatolia and the Karrshir massif in central Anatolia. Prospecting for uranium began in Turkey in 1953 and the Atomic Energy Raw Materials Division of the Maden Tetkikive Arama Enstitusu (M.T.A.) was founded in 1956. By 1962 a total of 78% of the whole country had been covered by serial radiometric reconnaissance prospecting. Uranium was discovered at Kasar in western Anatolia in 1961 and several hundred tons of reserves estimated two years later. Uranium prospecting was largely recessed from 1963 to 1967. IAEA/UNDP assistance was provided in 1962-63 and 1965 and between 1974 and 1977 in a detailed exploration programme in the Kasar area. In the whole country nearly 600 anomalies and occurrences had been identified by 1963. Several occurrences principally in Western Anatolia had been assigned a small reserve. A recent official estimate places the total national reserve at 3150 tonnes uranium in the less than 30% category of reasonably assured resources. A speculative Potential of between 30,000 and 50,000 tonnes uranium is considered to be reasonable. (author)

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Exploration for mineral deposits in Canada resulted in the discovery of large uranium deposits, such as at Great. Bear Lake, Northwest Territories (1930), in the Elliot Lake area, Ontario (1949); Beaverlodge, Wollaston Lake Fold Belt and Carswell Structure in Saskatchewan (1946-1975) and many uranium occurrences in the Canadian Shield, in the Orogenic Belts and in the Platforms. Uranium output in Canada since 1942 until and including 1976 amounted to 112,000 tonnes U. Reasonably Assured uranium resources as of 1976 amounted to 167,000 tonnes U (at a price up to $40/lb. U 3 0 8 ) and 15,000 tonnes U (at a price more than $40 up to $60/lb. U 3 O 8 ). Estimated Additional uranium resources as of 1976 amounted to 392,000 tonnes U (at a price up to $40/lb. U-Og) and 264,000 tonnes U (at a price more than $40 up to $60/lb. U 3 0 8 ). Possible further potential beyond the above mentioned classes is tentatively estimated to be in the 6th category according to NEA/IAEA favourability classification. (author)

  14. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Brunei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    Brunei is a very small country consisting of only 5,800 sq km, and with only 150,000 people. Its main mineral products are crude oil and natural gas. It is hot and humid throughout the year being located only 4 degrees north of the equator on the island of Borneo. The sultanate of Brunei contains very thick sediments, some of which probably have the characteristics of a good uranium host rock for sandstone type deposits, but tacking a classic source, the uranium potential is minimal. Potential for other types of uranium deposits is likewise considered minimal. Therefore Brunei is assigned a potential in category 1 (less than 1000 tonnes U). (author)

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Malaysia is a country of 330,000 square kilometers and a population of 11.9 million. The country is divided into two parts 640 kilometers apart. West Malaysia consists of the Malay Peninsula, and East Malaysia of the provinces of Sarawak and Sabah, formerly North Borneo. The country is the world's leading producer of tin and rubber. Geologic descriptions in detail are difficult to find although maps are available. Uranium exploration, chiefly by the Malaysian Geological Survey, has been carried out without discovery of commercial quantities. Based on possible recovery of uranium from deeply weathered granites on the Malay Peninsula, and possible discoveries in East Malaysia, a uranium potential of 1,000 to 10,000 tonnes U (category 2) is assigned. (author)

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Iraq consists of a lowland trough lying between asymmetrical and very different upland massifs to the east, north and west and continuing southeastwards to the Persian Gulf. The region is one of crustal weakness and subsidence with relatively young plastic sedimentary rocks engulfed in downwarped, ancient, rigid and highly resistant blocks. Exploration in the 1954-55 period found some minor radioactive anomalies and very low uranium contents in limestones and phosphates. The results of an aerial radiometric survey in 1973-74 are not known to IAEA. Iraq has no reported uranium resources but there are several favourable formations which warrant a detailed survey. In view of the size of the country and the small amount of systematic exploration carried out up to the present time, the Speculative Potential is considered to lie in the 1,000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Nigaragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    On invitation of the Nicaraguan Government, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted a reconnaissance for uranium in March, 1953. Operating and abandoned mines, as well as prospects, formations, contacts, dikes and sills enroute to these mines were tested by scintillometer. Reconnaissance included two mineralized areas exposed in windows within the volcanic belt but did not include the schists and granitic intrusions in the north eastern part of the country. No anomalous radioactivity was detected. No uranium occurrences were discovered during the 1953 reconnaissance and no uranium deposits or prospects are indicated on the metallogenetic map of Central America or in the bibliography of Nicaraguan geology. Information is net available on current exploration in Nicaragua. All subsoil mineral resources besides quarry materials belong to the state. In the interest of national defence, uranium, thorium, lithium and their derivatives, along with certain other mineral substances, may be classified as o f temporary strategic interest , and their exploration or exploitation would then be subject to special laws. The Ministry of Economy may establish permanent or temporary national reserves on which mining activities are essentially precluded. Foreign nationals and corporations may acquire mineral concessions although particular regulations may be applicable to such an acquisition. Exploration of any favourable formations has been hindered by volcanic ash cover in western Nicaragua and dense vegetation in the East. Little geologic work has been done on the Paleozoic metamorphic rocks or Todos Santos Formation of the Northern Highlands. These could possibly show some potential for discovery of uranium as might the alaskites near Siuna. The potential resources of Nicaragua are estimated at less than 1,000 tonnes uranium

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Geologically speaking, Lebanon is a young country since the oldest rocks are of Upper Jurassic age. Two volcanic periods are included in the more recent rocks. The country is intersected by numerous faults mainly striking NNE but also including numerous small transverse faults. No prospecting for nuclear raw materials has been recorded and there is no known activity at the present time. Lebanon has no national geological organization to support uranium prospecting. From the geological standpoint, possibilities of occurrences of nuclear minerals in Lebanon are poor and the Speculative Potential is placed in the less than 1000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  20. Desert pioneers go high tech in uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Kintyre uranium deposit discovered in 1985 in Western Australia's Great Sandy Desert by CRA Exploration is a highly competitive, easy to mine deposit, estimated at 35,000 tonnes of uranium oxide. Since its discovery CRA has spent $20 million on evaluation drilling and exploration and will spend another $10 million in 1988. Despite its remoteness the latest technology is being used, with sophisticated computer and assaying facilities, including an automatic X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, being established on site. A CRA-built radiometric ore sorter is being tested there which could cut ore processing costs

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project: technical approach document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604, grants the Secretary of Energy authority and responsibility to perform such actions as are necessary to minimize radiation health hazards and other environmental hazards from inactive uranium mill sites. These cleanup actions are to be performed in compliance with the EPA standards (40 CFR Part 192) which became final on March 7, 1983. This document describes the general technical approaches and design criteria that are adopted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in order to implement Remedial Action Plans (RAPs) and final designs that comply with EPA standards

  2. 78 FR 19330 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery Project in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    ... Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery Project in Crook County, Wyoming AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... Commission (NRC) for a new source materials license for the proposed Ross In-Situ Uranium Recovery (ISR) Project (Ross Project) proposed to be located in Crook County, Wyoming. The NRC is issuing for public...

  3. 75 FR 48305 - Kaibab National Forest; Arizona; Uranium Exploratory Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... Drilling Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: This is a correction to a notice of intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Exploratory Drilling... Exploratory Drilling Project, 800 S. 6th St., Williams, AZ 86046. Questions may also be submitted by facsimile...

  4. Guidebook on the development of projects for uranium mining and ore processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    Bringing a uranium operation into production involves a sequence of interrelated steps. These are outlined in the simplified diagram of Fig. 1. The challenge is to determine how the various steps of the development sequence should function and whether the costs are sufficiently low to return a positive benefit to the owner. This Guidebook has been prepared to aid in the planning, development and implementation of feasible uranium projects. It is one in a series of publications by the IAEA. This guidebook is essentially the executive summary of the other publications. It is an overview of the systematic approach to project development. It might be viewed as the ''road map'' of a project. A list of other publications in this series is provided in the Bibliography. Each chapter of the Guidebook addresses a critical aspect of project development. Chapters follow a general sequence, but none should be considered in isolation. Each Chapter presents an overview of the requirements for reaching decisions necessary to advance a project. References are provided to more definitive information and to documents which will be required by technical personnel on a project. Such detailed publications include IAEA books such as ''An Instruction Manual on Methods for Estimation of Uranium Ore Reserves'', and the ''Significance of Mineralogy in the Development of Flow Sheets for Processing Uranium Ores''. This Guidebook does not detail how to do project development but rather what must be done to insure that all critical elements of a project are considered. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Chaine Annamatique represents the last of the three orogenic episodes that shook Indochina and forms most of Vietnam's boundary with Laos, In south Vietnam the mountains which have a north-south trend are formed of granites, gneisses and mica schists and are inseparable from the anti-hercynian formations. Iron ore, gold, lead, copper, tin, wolfraun, bismuth and molybdenium minerals are found. Plans had been made in 1960 to prospect for uranium but no information is available on whether that work was ever done. The only evidence of occurrences of nuclear raw materials is that titaniferous sands occur in several coastal regions and that uranium was once listed as having been produced in Forth Vietnam. Although the geology of Vietnam is not very conducive to the formation and preservation of uranium deposits it is possible that because of the granite terrain and presence of other metalliferous minerals, the Speculative Potential should be stated as in category 2 i.e. from 1,000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Niue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Niue is described as a coral island containing 259 square kilometers, located between Tonga and the Southern Cook Islands in the Central Pacific. Geologically, little is known, or can be deduced from available information, therefore reported occurrences of uranium are the basis for a potential in category 1 (less than 1,000 tonnes U) . (author)

  7. Engineering preliminary services for TGT Uranium Project. Niger Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The present report based on previous activities carried out by conjoint enterprise McKEE-TRACTIONEL-UNION MINIERE involves IRSA objectives about an uranium exploitation and mineral processing plant construction. After complementary geological research, IRSA will establish mining exploitation plans different from those already established at the beginning of the conjoint enterprise [fr

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Argentina is a predominantly lowland area of 2,789,240 square kilometers. The capital is Buenos Aires. The entire length of Argentina is bordered on the west by the Andes Mountains. Tile Northwest Andes-Piedmont region consists of deep valleys containing salt basins and volcanoes, and is an earthquake zone. Patagonia, in the south, is essentially an arid region of windy plateaus and valleys. The southern Andes are narrower and lower than the northern Andes and in the extreme south contain glaciers and ice fields. The east-central plain (Pampa) of Argentina has dry and humid sectors and contains most of the population. The largest rivers are chiefly in the northeast, many having only seasonal flow. There has been extensive surface and subsurface exploration for uranium in Argentina for over 20 years. Although most of the work has been performed by the CNEA, advisors from the U.S. and from the IAEA have also taken part. Private industry has been involved, but apparently only on a small scale. In the OECD report of 1970, it was stated that 400,000 square kilometers of Argentina appear very favorable for uranium while an additional 900,000 square kilometers offer fair possibilities. Uranium exploration to date suggests that sandstones of Permian and Cretaceous ages exposed in Western Argentina in the Cordillera are very promising for discovery of new deposits. Past CNEA estimates have indicated that there is considerable hope for new discoveries in those areas where reserves are now known. In addition to the known uraniferous provinces which are indeed favorable for further exploration, there are several other large areas that warrant attention. There are, for example, in the Santa Cruz area of about 15,500 square kilometers Cretaceous and Tertiary sediments with favorable facies for uranium deposition. In the Patagonia Cordillera, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sediments are of interest for prospecting, These rocks contain carbonaceous material and have been

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Spain, with an area of 504 748 km''2, occupies a large part of the Iberian Peninsula. At present the country appears to have about 6300 t of reasonably assured uranium reserves and 8500 t of additional estimated reserves (all at less than $30/lb of U 3 O 8 ). Spain has devoted some $33 million to prospecting for uranium since the beginning of such work. Most of the reasonably assured reserves are located in ores impregnating Cambrian schists intersected by Hercynian granites (of so-called 'Iberian type'); a small amount, however, is found in veins in Hercynian granites of the Spanish Meseta. The additional estimated reserves are situated in the peripheral post-Hercynian continental basins of the Meseta. Apart from these classical ores, sub-ores have been identified in Silurian quartzites with low concentrations of uranium associated with refractory minerals, totalling more than 200,000 t of U (at concentrations of a few hundred ppm); there are likewise uranium-bearing Oligocene lignites in the Ebro Basin with some 140,000 t of U. These facts, and also the very wide distribution of uranium in space and time (from the Cambrian to the Miocene!) and the country's favourable geological characteristics, suggest that Spain ought in fact to have large reserves of uranium, a conclusion unfortunately belied by the paucity of the economic reserves identified so far. Two things must be borne in mind, however; firstly, Spain's financial outlay for uranium prospecting up till now represents only a quarter of what has been invested in France, for example, and, secondly, the nature of the mineralised bodies in Spain makes exploration difficult. In conclusion it seems that prospecting both of the Iberian-type deposits in the Meseta region and of the deposits associated with detrital sediments in the peripheral continental basins - especially blind mineralized bodies - should hold out excellent prospects for Spain. Consequently we propose that Spain should be placed at least in

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Bolivia has an area of 1,098,580 square kilometers. Its capital is La Paz. The western part of the country is dominated by two ranges of the Andes Mountains, the Cordillera Occidental on the vest flank of the high plateau (Altiplano) and the Cordillera Real (or Oriental) on the east flank. The northern Andes average 5,486 meters in elevation; the southern Andes are not as lofty. The Altiplano is 3,658 to A,267 meters high and 129 km. in average width; it is the largest basin of inland drainage in South America and contains the renowned Lake Titicaca on the Peruvian-Bolivian border. The eastern tropical lowlands or pampas (Oriente) comprise about two-thirds of the country, with rain forest in the northern portion. An intermediate zone of valleys and basins lies between the eastern Andes and Oriente. Bolivia differs from other Andean countries, like Chile, Peru and Ecuador, in having large areas of Preeambrian schists, gneisses, migmatites and granites. These crop out in the eastern part of the country. Parts of these rocks contain banded iron formations (i.e., in the Muttin region) and are probably early Precambrian in age. Little systematic exploration for uranium was undertaken in Bolivia until the late 1960's. In 1967, 1968 and 1969 technical assistance was requested from, and provided by, the IAEA. This work led to evaluation of radioactive anomalies in veins of northeast Bolivia and in sandstones in the extreme southern part of the country. Although no uranium reserves are now credited to Bolivia, the geologic possibilities for several kinds of uranium deposits coupled with the relatively limited work done to date suggest that uranium orebodies will be discovered. It is estimated that the potential resources of Bolivia are in the range of 10,000 to 100,000 tonnes uranium

  11. Lobachevsky Year at Kazan University: Center of Science, Education, Intellectual-Cognitive Tourism "Kazan - GeoNa - 2020+" and "Kazan-Moon-2020+" projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, A.; Trudkova, N.

    2017-09-01

    Center "GeoNa" will enable scientists and teachers of the Russian universities to join to advanced achievements of a science, information technologies; to establish scientific communications with foreign colleagues in sphere of the high technology, educational projects and Intellectual-Cognitive Tourism. The Project "Kazan - Moon - 2020+" is directed on the decision of fundamental problems of celestial mechanics, selenodesy and geophysics of the Moon(s) connected to carrying out of complex theoretical researches and computer modelling.

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Chile has an area of 740,760 square kilometers. The capital is Santiago. The country is 4,183 km. long and ranges from 22.5 to about 354 km. in width. Its chief topographic features para]lei each other - the Coastal Range, Andes Mountains and Central Valley. The Coastal Range rises to 2,130 meters in the north, but averages from 610 to 700 meters high generally. The range plunges into the Pacific Ocean far south of Valparaiso and reappears in the southern archipelagic islands. The Andes extend along nearly the entire length of Chile and contain 100 volcanoes. Andean peaks range mostly from 3,000 to 6,700 meters in elevation. In southern Chile the Andes are lower, and contain about a dozen major lakes. The mountains disappear in Chilean Patagonia, but reappear at Cape Horn. The Central Valley lies between the Coastal Range and the Andes, being best defined in the midland region as a 64 to 72 km sloping plain. It is the Chilean heartland with three-quarters of the country's population. Salt basins are found over much of northern Chile in the very arid desert, while the region south of the Gulf of Reloncavi consists of unpopulated islands, fjords, channels and heavily forested mountains. The Strait of Magellan, the Tierra del Fuego archipelago and a flat grassland area make up the extreme southern end of the country. Much of Chile is subject to flash floods, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides and avalanches. In September 1976 the Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCEN) was given exclusive rights to negotiate contracts with private companies for the exploration, development and mining of uranium and other radioactive minerals. The new law provides the CCEN with considerable flexibility in the terms of the contracts. Pre-964 owners of uranium deposits may reach agreements with foreign companies to mine the uranium, but since 1964 all uranium has belonged to the state. Uranium produced in the country can only be exported after Chile's needs have been met. The

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Burma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    There is no information on production of nuclear raw materials in Burma, although there are some uranium occurrences. Hunting Geophysics Ltd has done some aerial prospecting work in the area of Victoria Point in Southern Burma. All the data collected has been plotted on several maps and issued to various Burmese organizations, with a complete report. The follow-up ground exploration was done by a prospecting party headed by Dr Gjelsvik. The Hunting Geophysics' and Dr Gjelsvik reports are not available in the IAEA. The Raw Materials Division in the Union of Burma Atomic Energy Center commenced operations in 1955. The area of Mogok was selected by U Soo Win, the head of the Division, as most favourable for uranium exploration. The region is mountainous, with heavy forest cover. A ground gamma-ray survey was carried out in Mogok Mineral Belt by two geologists accompanied by two assistants, at a spacing of one km. This work showed monazite in all streams over an area of about 150 sq km and has given a detailed studies led to the discovery of some uraninite and pitchblende in the overburden of an old lode. Based, on these first discoveries the Government of Burma requested assistance from the IAEA and an expert was sent there for a period of one year. His field work was mainly limited in the Mogok Mineral Belt, however some reconnaissance field trips were made in other parts of the country. Dr D L Searle concluded that the Mogok area represents a zone of high temperature mineralization but a lower temperature form of uranium mineralization may have developed along the outer edges of the principal high grade zone. He recommended that the area between the Mogok scarp and the Shweli River be systematically traversed. Uranium bearing minerals in Burma are the following: monazite bearing beach sands near Amherst, Tenasserim; monazite placers from near Momeik, Northern Shan States; uraninte crystals from the gem-gravels around Mogok; a radioactive anomaly in syenite at

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Burma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1977-10-15

    There is no information on production of nuclear raw materials in Burma, although there are some uranium occurrences. Hunting Geophysics Ltd has done some aerial prospecting work in the area of Victoria Point in Southern Burma. All the data collected has been plotted on several maps and issued to various Burmese organizations, with a complete report. The follow-up ground exploration was done by a prospecting party headed by Dr Gjelsvik. The Hunting Geophysics' and Dr Gjelsvik reports are not available in the IAEA. The Raw Materials Division in the Union of Burma Atomic Energy Center commenced operations in 1955. The area of Mogok was selected by U Soo Win, the head of the Division, as most favourable for uranium exploration. The region is mountainous, with heavy forest cover. A ground gamma-ray survey was carried out in Mogok Mineral Belt by two geologists accompanied by two assistants, at a spacing of one km. This work showed monazite in all streams over an area of about 150 sq km and has given a detailed studies led to the discovery of some uraninite and pitchblende in the overburden of an old lode. Based, on these first discoveries the Government of Burma requested assistance from the IAEA and an expert was sent there for a period of one year. His field work was mainly limited in the Mogok Mineral Belt, however some reconnaissance field trips were made in other parts of the country. Dr D L Searle concluded that the Mogok area represents a zone of high temperature mineralization but a lower temperature form of uranium mineralization may have developed along the outer edges of the principal high grade zone. He recommended that the area between the Mogok scarp and the Shweli River be systematically traversed. Uranium bearing minerals in Burma are the following: monazite bearing beach sands near Amherst, Tenasserim; monazite placers from near Momeik, Northern Shan States; uraninte crystals from the gem-gravels around Mogok; a radioactive anomaly in syenite at

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Reserves of uranium are located in the north eastern part of Mexico, primarily in the states of Tamaulipas and Chihuahua. Most of the remainder of Mexico's reserves are near the Tamaulipas-Neuvo Leon state border in the Tertiary Frio Formation, where they apparently occur in the types of uranium deposits found in Texas, U.S.A. There are two deposits, La Coma and Buenavista, but nothing has been published on dimensions of the ore bodies. Forty-five miles northeast of Hermosillo, in Sonora state is the Los Amoles district where uranium is found associated with gold and other metals in low-grade deposits on the margins of a Cretaceous batholith. Another occurrence is reported in the mining district of Placer de Guadelupe and Puerto del Aire, about 40-50 km northeast of Chihuahua City, in the state of Chihuahua. Reserves of U 3 O 8 which were published in January 1977 by Nuclear Exchange Corporation of Menlo Park, California, are listed. The government of Mexico has not estimated potential resources. It should be noted that much of Mexico appears favourable for uranium, and only 10 percent has been explored. According to NUEXCO (1977), efforts to find uranium are being increased in an attempt to supply Mexico's nuclear reactor requirements through 1990. Activity is reported to be centered in Tamaulipas and Chihuahua states and to a lesser extent in Nueva Leon, Sonora, Coahuila, and Baja California. Major effort will continue to be placed in Chihuahua state to supply the Penna Bianca mill. Correspondence between favorable geological settings for uranium and the geologic regions of Mexico is reported. Mexico is a country with considerable areas that appear promising for discovery of sandstone, vein, and tuff-related deposits. On the other hand, its potential for Precambrian conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits is limited. Considering these geologic factors, as well as the relatively limited amount of exploration done to date, a guesstimate of speculative

  17. Programmatic Environmental Report for remedial actions at UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project vicinity properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This Environmental Report (ER) examines the environmental consequences of implementing a remedial action that would remove radioactive uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated materials from 394 vicinity properties near 14 inactive uranium processing sites included in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project pursuant to Public Law 95--604, the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. Vicinity properties are those properties in the vicinity of the UMTRA Project inactive mill sites, either public or private, that are believed to be contaminated by residual radioactive material originating from one of the 14 inactive uranium processing sites, and which have been designated under Section 102(a)(1) of UMTRCA. The principal hazard associated with the contaminated properties results from the production of radon, a radioactive decay product of the radium contained in the tailings. Radon, a radioactive gas, can diffuse through the contaminated material and be released into the atmosphere where it and its radioactive decay products may be inhaled by humans. A second radiation exposure pathway results from the emission of gamma radiation from uranium decay products contained in the tailings. Gamma radiation emitted from contaminated material delivers an external exposure to the whole body. If the concentration of radon and its decay products is high enough and the exposure time long enough, or if the exposure to direct gamma radiation is long enough, cancers (i.e., excess health effects) may develop in persons living and working at the vicinity properties. 3 refs., 7 tabs

  18. Experimental Plan: Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection 300 Area Uranium Plume Treatability Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-09-20

    This Test Plan describes a laboratory-testing program to be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the 300-FF-5 Feasibility Study (FS). The objective of the proposed treatability test is to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium contaminated groundwater in situ. This study will be used to: (1) Develop implementation cost estimates; (2) Identify implementation challenges; and (3) Investigate the technology's ability to meet remedial objectives These activities will be conducted in parallel with a limited field investigation, which is currently underway to more accurately define the vertical extent of uranium in the vadose zone, and in the capillary fringe zone laterally throughout the plume. The treatability test will establish the viability of the method and, along with characterization data from the limited field investigation, will provide the means for determining how best to implement the technology in the field. By conducting the treatability work in parallel with the ongoing Limited Field Investigation, the resulting Feasibility Study (FS) will provide proven, site-specific information for evaluating polyphosphate addition and selecting a suitable remediation strategy for the uranium plume within the FS time frame at an overall cost savings.

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Ghana. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 15 000 to 40 000 tonnes of uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Proterozoic Panafrican Mobile Belt (up to 17 000 tonnes uranium) and the Paleozoic Obosum Beds of the Voltaian basin (up to 15 000 tonnes uranium), the remainder being associated with various other geological environments. The mission recommends that over a period of three (3) years approximately U.S. $5 million) would be spent on exploration in Ghana. A major part of this (U.S $2 million) would be spent on an airborne spectrometer survey over the Voltaian basin (Obosum beds), much of the remainder being spent on ground surveys, trenching and percussion drilling. (author)

  20. Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    Public concern regarding the potential human health and environmental effects from uranium mill tailings led Congress to pass the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Public Law 95-604) in 1978. In the UMTRCA, Congress acknowledged the potentially harmful health effects associated with uranium mill tailings at 24 abandoned uranium mill processing sites needing remedial action. Uranium processing activities at most of the 24 mill processing sites resulted in the formation of contaminated ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of hazardous constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the Ground Water Project is to protect human health and the environment by meeting EPA-proposed standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated with constituents from UMTRA Project sites. A major first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of the alternatives, including the proposed action. These alternatives are programmatic in that they are plans for conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance. This PEIS is a planning document that will provide a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assess the potential programmatic and environmental impacts of conducting the UMTRA Ground Water Project; provide a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provide data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses documents more efficiently

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Finland covers an area of 337,000 skm. One third of the country lies north of the northern polar circle. 31,613 skm are covered by lakes. 71% of the landscape are covered by coniferous -wood. Climatlcal conditions are continental. The topography of the country is gently rolling with highest elevations of 300 m in the northern part. The most interesting geological units for uranium are Karelian, marginal meta-sediments, mainly quarzites and conglomerates but also schists. These schists are intruded by orogenlc plutonic rocks which are 1800-My-old. Potassium granites are common adjacent to the contact of the Pre-karelian basement (2500 My). In addition to these geological environment uranium and thorium minerals have been found in a large carbonatite in northern Finland, which is explored now

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sikkim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Sikkim is a country in the eastern Himalayas and is bound on the west by Nepal, on the north by Tibet, on the east by Bhutan and on the south by India. Precambrian Darjeeling gneiss forms the rim of the amphitheatre while schists of Late Precambrian to Lower Paleozoic rocks form tee habital interior. A small outcrop of carboniferous to Permain methomorphic rocks is preserved in the Tista Basin as well in a thin outcrop trust upon fluvitile beds of Sivalik which is mostly of Pliestocene age. Imbricate thrusts have stacked the rocks in a vast heap where reverse metamorphism is common. Ni information is available concerning uranium occurrences and resources as well as past and present explorations. The uranium potential of Sikkim is almost zero

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Singapore's fairly small size belies its wealth which comes not from production and use of its own raw materials including mineral products, but from importing raw materials and using them in manufacturing and refining. The state has a granite core exposed in the center of the island covered on the west by quartzites and shales, and on the east by recent detritus. There is no mining industry and no uranium potential is assigned to Singapore. (author)

  4. Environmental assessment report on proposed Yeelirrie uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In accordance with Government requirements, Western Mining Corporation Ltd. has prepared a Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Review and Management Programme for its proposed uranium mine development at Yeelirrie, Western Australia. This report includes an outline of the proposal, an enviromental assessment, recommendations by the Environmental Protection Authority made after consideration of the Company's draft statement and a review of public and State Government Departmental Submissions received on the Yeelirrie EIS/ERMP

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Iran is on the southern flank of the Alpine-Himalayan mountain system and has within its extensive boundaries rocks ranging from crystalline metamorphics and igneous rocks of Precambrian age to sediments of Tertiary - Pleistocene age, some of which could be considered as potentially favourable for uranium deposits. The search for uranium started about 1959 and in the following years some 40 radioactive anomalies and a small number of uranium occurrences were identified. In 1977 the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran greatly expanded its exploration activities and contracted for 895,000 line kilometres to be flown by three contractors in an aerial spectrometric survey designed to cover almost the two fifths of the whole country. The follow-up of this survey will continue for several years. Purely on the basis of its size (1,648,004 km 2 ), its several favourable host rock areas, its location on the flank of the Alpine-Himalayan system and the relatively small amount of systematic exploration coverage completed to date the Speculative Potential could be placed in the 50,000 - 100,000 tonnes category. (author)

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    Comparison between the geology of the Philippines and favourable geological environments for uranium in other parts of the world suggests that the Philippine geology is not likely to be favourable for the discovery of uranium. Previous work has been mainly of a reconnaissance type and orientated mainly to checking the existing mining areas for radioactivity. The only occurrence known at the present time is at Larap Mine in the Paracale District of Camarines Norte in Luzon. A magnetite iron ore body operated by Philippines Iron Mines Inc contained certain distinct beds, which, in addition to magnetite also contain copper, molybdenum and iron sulphides and uraninite. It is estimated that 200 short tons U 3 O 8 is contained in 500,000 tons ore grading 0.04% U 3 O 8 at Larap. A number of other largely untested but similar occurrences have also been identified in the Paracale District. A few small occurrences of uranium have recently been identified on the island of Samar. It is suggested that the Speculative Potential of the Philippines may be of the order of 1000 tonnes U 3 O 8 . (author)

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Indonesia is a country of south east Asia comprising a large island group extending east-west for over 3000 miles. The geology of Indonesia is fairly well known but is extremely complicated. Successive mountain movements took place around an ancient crustal area. The oldest, of Permian-Triassic age formed northeast Sumatra, northern Java and western Kalimantan. This was followed by the Sumatra orogenesis and finally in Cretaceous and Tertiary times the southern half of Java and the islands as far as New Guinea were formed. Geological studies tend to indicate that the most favourable uranium areas are likely to be in West Sumatra and West Kalimantan. Exploration by the Directorate of Survey and Geology of the National Atomic Energy Agency has been carried out on a small scale since 1961. Exploration concession have been granted to French, German and Japanese organisations. No uranium reserve or resource figures have ever been stated but small occurrences and radioactive anomalies have been found in West and South Sumatra, West and Central Kalimantan and in West Irian. Although the geology of some areas appears to be favourable, little success has attended exploration efforts to date and thus the Speculative Potential is noted as between 1,000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Luxembourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a tiny, roughly triangular, sovereign state situated in Western Europe and bordered by Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany and Prance. Its total surface area is 998 sq. miles (2,586 sq. kilometres). Its situation in Europe has made it a natural crossroads, with its language, economic interests and ways of life reflecting its close association with its neighbours. It has, however, remained a separate, if not always autonomous, political unit since the tenth century. It is one of the nine member states of the European Economic Community. The country is made up of an elevated northern tableland and a southern lower plateau. The northern section comprises part of the Ardennes mountains which continue in south-east Belgium and form a plateau generally ranging between 1,000 and 2,000 feet. Iron ore mines are located near the French border. The southern section has an elevation of below 15,000 feet and comprises mainly heavily wooded good agricultural land. There has been virtually no work done; no uranium occurrences of significance are recorded. No specific exploration for uranium in Luxembourg is apparent at the present. There are no specific regulations relating to uranium exploration,which is covered by the rules relating to mineral exploration in general

  9. Report on the geo-environmental inquiry project, central and eastern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattig, U.; Mulder, E.F.J. de

    1998-01-01

    The Commission on Geological Sciences for Environmental Planning (COGEOENVIRONMENT) of IUGS and UNESCO have initiated a joint project to develop a worldwide data base on earthscience-related environmental problems and to assess which geoscientific information is available locally for prevention,

  10. The community project COSA: comparison of geo-mechanical computer codes for salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, M.J.S.; Knowles, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    Two benchmark problems related to waste disposal in salt were tackled by ten European organisations using twelve rock-mechanics finite element computer codes. The two problems represented increasing complexity with first a hypothetical verification and then the simulation of a laboratory experiment. The project allowed to ascertain a shapshot of the current combined expertise of European organisations in the modelling of salt behaviour

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  13. Attachment GEO 1 Permic basin geology in northeast of Uruguay: deposit exam about Uranium traces; Anexo GEO 1 Geologia de la Cuenca Permica del nordeste del Uruguay: examen sedimentologico sobre los indicios de Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L' Homer, A; Manigault, B; Doyhenart, A; Rossi, P

    1983-07-01

    The article is about different deposit of Uranium traces and their Sedimentology analysis. A revision of main works have been given and Durazno and Gondwana groups, Cerrezuelo, Cordobes, La Paloma, San Gregorio, Tres Islas formations.

  14. Santa Rosa Geysers Recharge Project: GEO-98-001. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, Edwin Jr.; Carlson, Daniel C.

    2002-10-01

    The Geysers steamfields in northern Sonoma County have produced reliable ''green'' power for many years. An impediment to long-term continued production has been the ability to provide a reliable source of injection water to replace water extracted and lost in the form of steam. The steamfield operators have historcially used cooling towers to recycle a small portion of the steam and have collected water during the winter months using stream extraction. These two sources, however, could not by themselves sustain the steamfield in the long term. The Lake County Reclaimed Water Project (SEGEP) was inititated in 1997 and provides another source of steamfield replenishment water. The Santa Rosa Geysers Recharge Project provides another significant step in replenishing the steamfield. In addition, the Santa Rosa Geysers Recharge Project has been built with capacity to potentially meet virtually all injection water requirements, when combined with these other sources. Figure 2.1 graphically depicts the combination of injection sources.

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Bolivia. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Jacques; Mueller-Kahle, Eberhard

    1982-08-01

    The uranium exploration done so far in Bolivia has been carried out by COBOEN, partly with IAEA support, and AGIP S.p.A. of Italy, which between 1974 and 1978 explored four areas in various parts of Bolivia under a production sharing contract with COBOEN. The basic objective of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) is to 'review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for discovery of additional uranium resources, and to suggest new exploitation efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the country concerned'. Following the initial bibliographic study which formed Phase I of IUREP, it was envisaged that a further assessment in cooperation with, and within, the country concerned would provide a better delineation of areas of high potential and a more reliable estimate as to the degree of favourability for the discovery of additional uranium resources. It was planned that such work would be accomplished through field missions to the country concerned and that these field missions and the resulting report would be known as the Orientation Phase of IUREP. The purpose of the Orientation Phase mission to Bolivia was a) to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, b) to make an estimate of the Speculative Resources of the country, c) to delineate areas favourable for the discovery of these uranium resources, d) to make recommendations as appropriate on the best methods for evaluating the favourable areas, operating procedures and estimated possible costs, e) to develop the logistical data required to carry out any possible further work, and f) to compile a report which would be immediately available to the Bolivian authorities. The mission reports contains information about a general introduction, non-uranium exploration and mining in Bolivia, manpower in exploration, geological review of Bolivia, past uranium

  16. Concerted Uranium Research in Europe (CURE): toward a collaborative project integrating dosimetry, epidemiology and radiobiology to study the effects of occupational uranium exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Olivier; Gomolka, Maria; Haylock, Richard; Blanchardon, Eric; Giussani, Augusto; Atkinson, Will; Baatout, Sarah; Bingham, Derek; Cardis, Elisabeth; Hall, Janet; Tomasek, Ladislav; Ancelet, Sophie; Badie, Christophe; Bethel, Gary; Bertho, Jean-Marc; Bouet, Ségolène; Bull, Richard; Challeton-de Vathaire, Cécile; Cockerill, Rupert; Davesne, Estelle; Ebrahimian, Teni; Engels, Hilde; Gillies, Michael; Grellier, James; Grison, Stephane; Gueguen, Yann; Hornhardt, Sabine; Ibanez, Chrystelle; Kabacik, Sylwia; Kotik, Lukas; Kreuzer, Michaela; Lebacq, Anne Laure; Marsh, James; Nosske, Dietmar; O'Hagan, Jackie; Pernot, Eileen; Puncher, Matthew; Rage, Estelle; Riddell, Tony; Roy, Laurence; Samson, Eric; Souidi, Maamar; Turner, Michelle C; Zhivin, Sergey; Laurier, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    The potential health impacts of chronic exposures to uranium, as they occur in occupational settings, are not well characterized. Most epidemiological studies have been limited by small sample sizes, and a lack of harmonization of methods used to quantify radiation doses resulting from uranium exposure. Experimental studies have shown that uranium has biological effects, but their implications for human health are not clear. New studies that would combine the strengths of large, well-designed epidemiological datasets with those of state-of-the-art biological methods would help improve the characterization of the biological and health effects of occupational uranium exposure. The aim of the European Commission concerted action CURE (Concerted Uranium Research in Europe) was to develop protocols for such a future collaborative research project, in which dosimetry, epidemiology and biology would be integrated to better characterize the effects of occupational uranium exposure. These protocols were developed from existing European cohorts of workers exposed to uranium together with expertise in epidemiology, biology and dosimetry of CURE partner institutions. The preparatory work of CURE should allow a large scale collaborative project to be launched, in order to better characterize the effects of uranium exposure and more generally of alpha particles and low doses of ionizing radiation.

  17. Enhancing youth potential through Civic Service: ethical reflections arising from a geo-educational project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Different forms of Civic Service are present in Europe. The National Civic Service (SCN) of Italy started, with a law, as an alternative to military service in 2001. It was conceived as an opportunity to people from 18 to 28 years, the volunteers, who intend to grow in social, civic, cultural and professional dimensions while performing experiences of social solidarity, national and international cooperation, protection and preservation of national heritage. Each accredited organization, which hosts SCN projects, signs up an ethical charter, regulating relationships between volunteers and the hosting organization. Summarizing, the organization must be aware 1)of putting into effect a law aimed to involve young generations in homeland defense with non violent means through services of social utility; 2) that the Civic Service wants young people to spend one year of their life in a critical phase in which they reach the responsibilities of adults; 3) that adopted working method is learning by doing, working with tutors having to increase skills and exploit the full potential of volunteers; 4) of recognizing the volunteers' right to work to reach the project's objectives, and not only for the benefits of the hosting organization; 5) that volunteers should work with well defined procedures, clear since the beginning; 6) of requiring from volunteers their full commitment to learn and responsibly participate to project's activities as well as to fully express and increase their expertise, skills and personal resources. Ethical implications emerged during an ongoing Earth Sciences education project funded by SCN and involving young volunteers at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). According to SCN's ethical charter, in this case the challenge is to welcome a group of young people in a public research organization, and to integrate them in the limited time lapse of one year. The European Charter for Researchers came as a valuable help. Its principles

  18. GEO portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The USAID GeoPortal is a new application that groups web-based capabilities for on-demand discovery of and access to geospatial content, services, expertise, and...

  19. Stepwise hydrogeological characterisation utilising a geo-synthesis methodology - A case study from the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, H.; Osawa, H.; Onoe, H.; Ohyama, T.; Takeuchi, R.; Takeuchi, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) is now under construction by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) in the Cretaceous Toki granite in the Tono area of central Japan. One of the main goals of the MIU project, which is a broad scientific study of the deep geological environment as a basis of research and development for geological disposal of nuclear wastes, is to establish comprehensive techniques for the investigation, analysis and assessment of the deep geological environment in fractured crystalline rock. For this purpose, a geo-synthesis methodology has been developed and will be tested in a dry run to determine if it produces the data required for repository design and associated integrated safety assessment modelling. Surface-based hydrogeological characterisation, intended to develop conceptual models of the deep geological environment based on an understanding of the undisturbed conditions before excavation of this URL, was carried out in a stepwise manner. This allows field investigations, construction of geological and hydrogeological models and interpretation of resultant groundwater flow simulations to develop in an iterative manner. Investigations have the goal of obtaining information on factors relevant to repository design, associated construction, operational and postclosure safety assessment, evaluation of the practicality of implementation and environmental impact assessment. Such factors include bulk hydraulic conductivity, the locations and properties of water conducting features, direct and indirect indicators of regional and local flow (e.g. based on chemistry or isotopes), etc. Following evaluation of pre-existing site information, field investigations began with fault mapping. This was followed by reflection seismic and vertical seismic profile surveys. In addition, a large programme of investigations was carried out in boreholes, including cross-hole tomography and hydraulic tests. Such input is utilised for the construction

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    France, with an area of 550,000 km 2 , has been prospecting its territory for uranium for more than 30 years. The proven uranium reserves in all the ore categories defined by the NEA/lAEA are estimated at around 120,000 tU, of which 25,000 tU have already been mined. About 70% of these reserves are associated with granites, while the bulk of the remainder is located in Permian sediments and the last in Paleogene sediments. The prospecting effort has not been distributed equally over French territory. More than half of it - recent orogens and large basins - have been little or very little prospected. On the other hand, the Hercynian massifs and their Upper Paleozoic mantle have been systematically prospected. Nevertheless, even within the latter there is still room for further exploration: extensions of already known mineralizations both laterally and vertically, conventional mineralizations deep down or under a mantle, types of mineralizations not investigated previously (those associated with acid or intermediate vulcanism, peribatholithic shales, alkaline complexes etc.). Of course, in the areas that have not been so well explored, because they appear less favourable, there are still some possibilities, namely, in the areas of recent orogens, mineralizations associated with antemesozoic cores (same types as above) or directly associated with orogenesis (slightly to moderately metamorphic sandstone-phyllitic formations, certain sedimentary formations etc.). As for the large basins, they are capable of containing mineralizations associated with some of their formations (Paleogene of the Basin of Aquitaine etc), but they may also cover workable uranium deposits. It is possible that, in the not to distant future access may be gained to such ores in particular cases. On this basis it does not seem unreasonable to reckon with the discovering of new resources of an order of magnitude between half and the same as those already found. (author)

  1. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, T.D.; Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Sekine, K.

    1992-01-01

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the 'surface complexation' approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO 2 and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates

  2. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Uranium sorption. Final Report - Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, T D; Payne, T E [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Davis, J A [United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sekine, K [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In this volume, the results of studies of uranium sorption (adsorption and desorption) to both single, well-defined mineral phases, and to selected natural (Koongarra) substrates are reported. The single phases included the amorphous iron oxide ferrihydrite, crystalline silica and two naturally occurring kaolinites, KGa-1 and Nichika. The surface properties of these materials were rigorously defined, and adsorption studies were conducted over a range of solution pH, ionic strength, carbonate content, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations, and in the presence of uranium complexants and (potentially) competing adsorbates (such as phosphate and fluoride). The results of these studies were modelled using the `surface complexation` approach, with a diffuse layer description of the electrical double layer. The impacts of mineral phase transformations (specifically the aging of amorphous ferrihydrite to more crystalline forms) on the uptake and desorption of uranium are also reported. The amount of data obtained in this study, with a number of experimental parameters being varied over a wide range, has enabled more confidence to be placed in the modelling results. The derived model for ferrihydrite adequately accounts for the effect on U sorption of a number of parameters, most notably pH, pCO{sub 2} and total U present. Few (if any) of the models previously proposed are adequate in this respect. While the modelling of the data for the natural substrates is not as advanced, the U sorption data on the natural substrates show similar features to the U sorption on the model substrates. This suggests that the insights obtained in the modelling of the data for ferrihydrite will be valuable in deriving a model for the more complex natural substrates 87 refs., 27 tabs., 56 figs.

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Maldives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Maldives, an archipelago consisting of between 1,000 and 2,000 islands and atolls in the Indian Ocean contain only 300 square kilometers and is populated by around 130,000 people who are engaged in raising of copra, fruits, taro, and other agricultural products, and in fishing. There is not now and never has been a mining industry except for quarrying of coral road metal. Geologically the coral islands, based on present geological thinking is not a favourable host or source of uranium, and is therefore assigned a zero potential. (author)

  4. A geo-spatial data management system for potentially active volcanoes—GEOWARN project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogu, Radu C.; Dietrich, Volker J.; Jenny, Bernhard; Schwandner, Florian M.; Hurni, Lorenz

    2006-02-01

    Integrated studies of active volcanic systems for the purpose of long-term monitoring and forecast and short-term eruption prediction require large numbers of data-sets from various disciplines. A modern database concept has been developed for managing and analyzing multi-disciplinary volcanological data-sets. The GEOWARN project (choosing the "Kos-Yali-Nisyros-Tilos volcanic field, Greece" and the "Campi Flegrei, Italy" as test sites) is oriented toward potentially active volcanoes situated in regions of high geodynamic unrest. This article describes the volcanological database of the spatial and temporal data acquired within the GEOWARN project. As a first step, a spatial database embedded in a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment was created. Digital data of different spatial resolution, and time-series data collected at different intervals or periods, were unified in a common, four-dimensional representation of space and time. The database scheme comprises various information layers containing geographic data (e.g. seafloor and land digital elevation model, satellite imagery, anthropogenic structures, land-use), geophysical data (e.g. from active and passive seismicity, gravity, tomography, SAR interferometry, thermal imagery, differential GPS), geological data (e.g. lithology, structural geology, oceanography), and geochemical data (e.g. from hydrothermal fluid chemistry and diffuse degassing features). As a second step based on the presented database, spatial data analysis has been performed using custom-programmed interfaces that execute query scripts resulting in a graphical visualization of data. These query tools were designed and compiled following scenarios of known "behavior" patterns of dormant volcanoes and first candidate signs of potential unrest. The spatial database and query approach is intended to facilitate scientific research on volcanic processes and phenomena, and volcanic surveillance.

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Italian Republic comprises a 1200 - Km - long peninsula ex- tending from southern Europe into the Mediterranean Sea, and a number of adjacent islands, among which the principals are Sicily and Sardinia. The total area is in excess of 300,000 Sq.Km, the islands account for some 50, 000 Sq.Km. From a physiographic and morphologic point of view, Italy mainly consists of the Alpine region and the Po valley to the North and of the Appennine range and small Coastal plains to the Centre and South. Plains occupied only 20% of the total area, hills and mountains, up to 4,810 m of elevation, contribute almost equally to the remaining 80%. The most promising uranium mineralizations have been found in the Bergamasc Alps, near the small town of Novazza. Pitchblende and minor sphalerite (formation temperature, 80 deg. - 100 deg. C) occur disseminated in volcanics of permian age. The host rocks at the Novazza uranium deposit, consist of an acid ignimbrite with cineritic texture. The rocks have been affected by metasomatism which brought abundant neo-formation minerals such as silica, sericite, carbonates and minor adularia, albite and muscovite. The reasonably assured resources of the Novazza deposit have been estimated to be 1,200 ton of U having a grade of 900 p.p.m. U. Estimated additional resources are 1,000 ton U. Production is scheduled to start in 1980

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Jordanian geology is dominated by the Great Rift Valley System. Most of the country is covered by Cretaceous and Eocene sediments, largely sandstones and limestones. These include phosphorates and bituminous limestones in the Upper Cretaceous, South of the Dead Sea, Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks overlie exposed granitic Pre Cambrian basement rocks carrying many minor intrusives . Phosphates provide the main mineral export of Jordan. The Natural Resources Authority (Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines) initiated a survey in 1972 of the distribution of uranium on the phosphorite horizon. In 1974 the Survey calculated that the uranium content of the phosphate areas surveyed up to that time was 5 million metric tonnes U 3 O 8 . The average U 3 O 8 content is approximately 0.02% U 3 O 8 . The exploitation of such resources would be as a byproduct of the phosphate industry and dependent on the rate of phosphate production and the capacity of triple super-phosphate plants, none of which exist at the present time. In the southern area in Paleozoic and Pre Cambrian areas there are some hopes of conventional type deposits being found but the potential appears to be small. (author)

  7. Uranium Geologic Drilling Project, Sand Wash Basin, Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This environmental assessment of drill holes in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado considered the current environment; potential impacts from site preparation, drilling operations, and site restoration; coordination among local, state and federal plans; and consideration of alternative actions for this uranium drilling project

  8. 76 FR 71082 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 40-9091; NRC-2011-0148] Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application; Notice of Intent To Prepare a... intent to prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: Strata Energy, Inc. (Strata...

  9. Ross In Situ Uranium Recovery Project NESHAP Subpart W Construction Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    On May 5, 2015, EPA issued a Construction Approval under the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at 40 CFR Part 61, subpart W, to Strata Energy, Inc., for their Ross In Situ Recovery (ISR) Uranium Project in Crook County, WY.

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Republic of Burundi. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrisch, W.; Chaigne, M.

    1983-06-01

    The basic objective of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation project lUREP is to 'Review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for the discovery of additional uranium resources and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the countries concerned'. Therefore, the scope of the IUREP orientation phase Mission to Burundi was to review all data on past exploration in Burundi, to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, to make an estimate of the speculative resources of the country, to make recommendation as appropriate on the best methods or techniques for evaluating the resources in the favourable areas and for estimating possible costs as well, to compile a report which could be immediately available to the Burundian authorities. This mission gives a general introduction, a geological review of Burundi, information on non-uranium mining in Burundi, the history of uranium exploration, occurrences of uranium IUREP mission field reconnaissance, favourable areas for speculative potential, the uranium resources position and recommendations for future exploration. Conclusions are the following. The IUREP Orientation -phase mission to Burundi believes that the Speculative Resources of that country fall b etween 300 and 4100 tons uranium oxide but a less speculative appraisal is more likely between 0 and 1000 tons. There has been no uranium production and no official estimates of Uranium Resources in Burundi. Past exploration mainly dating from 1969 onwards and led the UNDP Mineral project has indicated a limited number of uranium occurrences and anomalies. The speculative uranium resources are thought to be possibly associated with potential unconformity related vein-like deposits of the Lower Burundian. Other speculative uranium resources could be associated with granitic or peribatholitic

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project fiscal year 1997 annual report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 1997 annual report is the 19th report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping. Cleanup has been undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the groundwater project. This report addresses specifics about the UMTRA surface project

  12. Fiscal year 1996 annual report to stakeholders, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This is the Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 annual report on the status of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. In 1978, Congress directed the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction of landscaping. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about the surface phase of the UMTRA Project

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Federal Republic of Austria is situated in the southeastern part of Central Europe. The country covers a total area of 83.350 square kilometers, the population amounts to 7.5 million inhabitants. The geographical features of Austria are dominated by the E-W-trending chain of the Alps (approximately 60% of the country). The northeastern part of the country is formed by the nonalpine mountains and hills of the Bohemian Massif. There are a large depression, the basin of Vienna, as well as parts of the Pannonian basin in the eastern part. The main hydrographic features are characterized by the river Danube and its tributaries. With the exception of a small part in the west of the country, the drainage system of which is directed to the river Rhine, all other rivers are drained by the Danube. The elevations in the Alps reach heights of up to 3 800 m. Many of the E-W striking mountain chains are higher than 2000 to 2500 m. Several major N-S trending passes over the mountains are favourable for the transportation systems (railroads, motorroads) - The kind of land use in Austria is mainly determined by the character of the landscape which is made up of mountains and valleys as well as of depressions in the eastern part of the country. In the lowlands, good farmland is available. At lower and at medium elevations, forests and grassland predominate in the Alps. At higher elevations, the Alps are covered with grasslands; a great part of the rocks has no soil cover, another part is covered by perennial snow and ice.The presence of many uranium occurrences in the Permo-Triassic sediments justifies a detailed survey of these strata. Special studies on the lithology and the formation of uranium in these rocks have been made during the last few years. They should be evaluated to point out new favourable prospective areas. The potential of Uranium which is assumed to be found in Austria is 10,000 - 50,000 t U

  14. Licensing Status of New and Expanding In-Situ Recovery Uranium Projects in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catchpole, G.; Thomas, M., E-mail: gccatchpole@uranerz.com [Uranerz Energy Corporation (URZ), Casper, WY (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The authors investigated the licensing status of new in-situ recovery (“ISR”) uranium projects, as well as the expansion of existing projects, within the United States (“US”). Specific emphasis and analysis is placed on those projects within the states of Texas and Wyoming. Of note, information used to prepare this paper was obtained from public sources that included company web sites, the US Securities and Exchange Commission, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (“NRC”), the US Energy Information Agency (“EIA”), and the relevant state regulatory agencies. The renewed interest in the production of natural uranium has been motivated, in part, by the increased sale price of yellowcake beginning around 2003 resulting in numerous new and existing natural resources companies acquiring mineral rights in the United States. Because of the economic favorability in terms of both operating and capital costs of ISR mines versus conventional mines in the US (with its relatively low grade of uranium ore), the model for most companies was to acquire mineral properties that had the potential for being mined using the ISR method. There were, however, exceptions to this model. The Uravan mineral district in southwest Colorado and southeast Utah, where relatively high-grade, shallow uranium deposits have the potential to be mined using underground methods, is one such exception. However, the focus of this paper will be on ISR projects. In Wyoming, which has been the top producer of natural uranium among the 50 states for the past seven years, there is one producing ISR mine (Bill Smith — Highland), one ISR mine on standby (Christensen Ranch), and two ISR uranium projects licensed but not yet built (Gas Hills and North Butte). Cameco Resources is planning to develop two ISR projects in Wyoming that have been licensed but not yet constructed. Additionally, three new uranium companies (Ur-Energy, Uranerz and Uranium One) have filed applications with the federal and

  15. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document

  16. Execution of pilot tests for an uranium in situ leaching project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Urangesellschaft is presently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of an in situ leaching (ISL) project in Wyoming/USA. This report describes the basic technical principles for ISL-uranium projects and gives the reasons for conducting pilot tests prior to the construction of a commercial plant. It further describes the licensing requirements for an ISL-pilot plant and evaluates the results of the pilot tests. (orig.) [de

  17. Scoping session of the programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-12-31

    This document is about the scoping session which was held at the Community Center in Falls City, Texas. The purpose was to obtain public comment on the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA), specifically on the ground water project. Presentations made by the manager for the entire UMTRA program, manager of the site and ground water program, comments made by two residents of Fall City are included in this document.

  18. 3D Geo-Structures Visualization Education Project (3dgeostructuresvis.ucdavis.edu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    experience in regions without good geologic outcrops, or for students with disabilities that prevent them from going into the field. These exercises and modules are available from 3dgeostructuresvis.ucdavis.edu. We plan to add several new structures to the site each year. This project was funded by a National Science Foundation CAREER grant to Billen.

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Turkey. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Turkey estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 21 000 to 55 000 tonnes of uranium. This potential is expected to lie in areas of Neogene and possibly other Tertiary sediments, in particular in the areas of the Menderes Massif and Central Anatolia. The mission describes a proposed exploration programme with expenditures over a five year period of between $80 million and $110 million, with nearly half of the amount being spent on drilling. (author)

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been made public which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Madagascar. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Madagascar estimates the Speculative Resources of that country to be within the wide range of 4 000 to 38 000 tonnes uranium. Such resources could lie in areas with known occurrences (uranothorianite, Ft. Dauphin up to 5 000 t U, i.e. 'pegmatoids'; uranocircite, Antsirabe up to 3 000 t U in Neogene sediments; carnotiteautonite, Karoo area up to 30 000 t U in sandstones and in areas with as yet untested environments (e.g. related to unconformities and calcretes). Modifications to existing uranium exploration programmes are suggested and policy alternatives reviewed. No specific budget is proposed. (author)

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A full report has been released describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Colombia. The Mission suggests that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 20 000 tonnes of 220 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that the area with the highest potential is the Llanos Orientales (Interior Zone), which has the potential of hosting quartz-pebble conglomerate deposits, Proterozoic unconformity-related deposits and sandstone deposits. The Mission recommends that approximately US$80 million should be expended in a phased ten-year exploration programme. It is likely that the majority of the funds will be needed for drilling, followed by ground surveys and airborne radiometry. It is the opinion of the Mission that the considerable funds required for the proposed programme could most suitably be raised by inviting national or foreign commercial organizations to participate under a shared production agreement. (author)

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Bolivia. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Bolivia estimates that the Speculative Uranium Resources of that country fall within the range of 100 to 107 500 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks of the southwestern part of the Central Brazilian Shield. Other potentially favourable geologic environments include Palaeozoic two mica granites and their metasedimentary hosts, Mesozoic granites and granodiorites as well as the intruded formations and finally Tertiary acid to intermediate volcanics. The mission recommends that approximately US$ 13 million be spent on exploration in Bolivia over a five-year period. The majority of this expenditure would be for airborne and surface exploration utilising geologic, magnetometric, radiometric, and geochemical methods and some pitting, trenching, tunneling and drilling to further evaluate the discovered occurrences. (author)

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published on the findings of the mission to Morocco under the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission estimates that the speculative resources of Morocco range from 70 000 to 180 000 tonnes of uranium, half of which could be expected to occur in the Northern Provinces, which are relatively well explored, and the other half in the little explored Southern Provinces. In the north, speculative resources are fairly evenly distributed among the various types of deposit, in particular vein deposits (intragranitic and contact) linked with Hercynian and Precambrian blocks, the sandstone type deposits linked with Mesozoic strata and the volcanogenic deposits, especially of Precambrian age. The potential for large high-grade deposits, especially for those linked with unconformities and linear albitites, has been little investigated in Morocco and is chiefly thought to lie in the Precambrian in the Anti-Atlas and Southern Provinces. Here, the presence of acid volcanic rock reinforces the uranium potential, and there is also some potential for calcrete-related deposits. Phosphate-related uranium, to be recovered shortly, constitutes by far the largest reserves in Morocco, estimated at about 7 million tonnes of recoverable uranium. Recommendations have been made for further study of known occurrences and identification of new ones, such as unconformity and albitite-related deposits. (author)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published on the findings of the mission to Morocco under the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission estimates that the speculative resources of Morocco range from 70 000 to 180 000 tonnes of uranium, half of which could be expected to occur in the Northern Provinces, which are relatively well explored, and the other half in the little explored Southern Provinces. In the north, speculative resources are fairly evenly distributed among the various types of deposit, in particular vein deposits (intragranitic and contact) linked with Hercynian and Precambrian blocks, the sandstone type deposits linked with Mesozoic strata and the volcanogenic deposits, especially of Precambrian age. The potential for large high-grade deposits, especially for those linked with unconformities and linear albitites, has been little investigated in Morocco and is chiefly thought to lie in the Precambrian in the Anti-Atlas and Southern Provinces. Here, the presence of acid volcanic rock reinforces the uranium potential, and there is also some potential for calcrete-related deposits. Phosphate-related uranium, to be recovered shortly, constitutes by far the largest reserves in Morocco, estimated at about 7 million tonnes of recoverable uranium. Recommendations have been made for further study of known occurrences and identification of new ones, such as unconformity and albitite-related deposits. (author) [fr

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Somalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A full report has been compiled describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Somalia. The Mission suggests that in addition to the reasonably assured resources (RAR) of 5 000 t uranium and estimated additional resources (EAR) of 11 000 t uranium in calcrete deposits, the speculative resources (SR) could be within the wide range of 0 - 150 000 t uranium. The majority of these speculative resources are related to sandstone and calcrete deposits. The potential for magmatic hydrothermal deposits is relatively small. The Mission recommends an exploration programme of about US$ 22 000 000 to test the uranium potential of the country which is thought to be excellent. The Mission also suggests a reorganization of the Somalia Geological Survey in order to improve its efficiency. Recommended methods include geological mapping, Landsat imagery interpretation, airborne and ground scintillometer surveys, and geochemistry. Follow-up radiometric surveys, exploration geophysics, mineralogical studies, trenching and drilling are proposed in favourable areas. (author)

  6. Pilot projects for the remediation of Sillamaee uranium tailings in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasik, T.; Siinmaa, A.

    2001-01-01

    First Estonian uranium, produced in a pilot plant at Narva, was presented to Soviet military administration in 1945 and just a year later - 1946 - installation of an uranium production plant was started at Sillamaee, Estonia. Estonian local ore - alum shale - containing only 0,026% of uranium was used for uranium production for nearly five years, after the plant was launched in 1948. The uranium mine, having been activated from 1947 to 1952, was left in status of 'active conservation' for 17 years, until finally closed in 1969. Potential threats of this hidden legacy have never been revealed. After close-down of local uranium mine, more than 4 million tons of ore, imported mostly from Central and East European countries: Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Eastern Germany were processed at Sillamaee. These activities have left a large tailings impoundment with the total volume of ca. 8 million cubic meters in the immediate vicinity of the Baltic Sea. Today the plant is privatized, converted to civil purposes and provides together its power generating facilities ca. 1200 jobs in the socially sensitive area of North-East Estonia, while environmental hazards of the history, however, remain: - Continuous seepage of tailing waters into the sea contributes and would contribute over long term to the pollution of the Baltic Sea; - stability of the tailings dam seaside under present conditions can not be guaranteed thus risking a sudden release of partly liquid tailings due to potential dam failure; - uncovered surface of the tailings presents a health hazard due to dusting and radon release and hinders the revitalization of the area. The conceptual design of the Estonia's largest environmental remediation project, done by Wismut, is now complete and first implementation steps are underway. The project for mine area restoration is in initiation phase; it shall reveal the current and potential environmental hazards of the facility and create the concept for necessary rehabilitation

  7. GEOS. User Tutorials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Pengchen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Settgast, Randolph R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Walsh, Stuart D.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morris, Joseph P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, Frederick J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-17

    GEOS is a massively parallel, multi-physics simulation application utilizing high performance computing (HPC) to address subsurface reservoir stimulation activities with the goal of optimizing current operations and evaluating innovative stimulation methods. GEOS enables coupling of di erent solvers associated with the various physical processes occurring during reservoir stimulation in unique and sophisticated ways, adapted to various geologic settings, materials and stimulation methods. Developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as a part of a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Strategic Initiative (SI) project, GEOS represents the culmination of a multi-year ongoing code development and improvement e ort that has leveraged existing code capabilities and sta expertise to design new computational geosciences software.

  8. Environmental impact assessment for uranium mine, mill and in situ leach projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    Environmental impact assessments and/or statements are an inherent part of any uranium mining project and are a prerequisite for the future opening of an exploitation and its final closure and decommissioning. Since they contain all information related to the physical, biological, chemical and economic condition of the areas where industrial projects are proposed or planned, they present invaluable guidance for the planning and implementation of environmental mitigation as well as environmental restoration after the mine is closed. They further yield relevant data on the socio-economic impacts of a project. The present report provides guidance on the environmental impact assessment of uranium mining and milling projects, including in situ leach projects which will be useful for companies in the process of planning uranium developments as well as for the regional or national authorities who will assess such developments. Additional information and advice is given through environmental case histories from five different countries. Those case histories are not meant to be prescriptions for conducting assessments nor even firm recommendations, but should serve as examples for the type and extent of work involved in assessments. A model assessment and licensing process is recommended based on the experience of the five countries

  9. Critical management issues for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Themelis, J.G.; Krishnan, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (PL95-604) authorized the Secretary of Energy to enter into cooperative agreements with certain states and Indian Tribes to clean up 24 inactive uranium mill tailing sites and associated vicinity properties. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project includes the three Federal agencies (EPA, DOE, and NRC), eleven state, Indian Tribes, and at least four major contractors. The UMTRA Project extends over a period of ten years. The standards for the Project require a design life of 1000 years with a minimum performance period of 200 years. This paper discusses the critical management issues in dealing with the UMTRA Project and identifies the development of solutions for many of those issues. The highlights to date are promulgation of EPA standards, continued support from Congress and participating states and Indian Tribes, significant leadership shown at all levels, establishment of credibility with the public, and continued motivation of the team. The challenge for tomorrow is making certain NRC will license the sites and maintaining the high level of coordination exhibited to date to assure Project completion on schedule

  10. Environmental impact assessment for uranium mine, mill and in situ leach projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Environmental impact assessments and/or statements are an inherent part of any uranium mining project and are a prerequisite for the future opening of an exploitation and its final closure and decommissioning. Since they contain all information related to the physical, biological, chemical and economic condition of the areas where industrial projects are proposed or planned, they present invaluable guidance for the planning and implementation of environmental mitigation as well as environmental restoration after the mine is closed. They further yield relevant data on the socio-economic impacts of a project. The present report provides guidance on the environmental impact assessment of uranium mining and milling projects, including in situ leach projects which will be useful for companies in the process of planning uranium developments as well as for the regional or national authorities who will assess such developments. Additional information and advice is given through environmental case histories from five different countries. Those case histories are not meant to be prescriptions for conducting assessments nor even firm recommendations, but should serve as examples for the type and extent of work involved in assessments. A model assessment and licensing process is recommended based on the experience of the five countries. 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Greece, with an area of 131,944 km 2 , has been actively explored since 1971 under a programme of co-operation with UNDP and IAEA on which close to US $1 million have been spent so far. The programme is focused on the Rhodope Precambrian massif, which is the most attractive structural unit from the geological point of view. The indications available at present, and which have been known for a long time, are also to be found in this unit. They are associated either with Tertiary continental volcanism or with detritic sediments in basins covering this massif. So far there is no evidence of their being of any economic value. The paucity of data available on the basement of the Rhodope precludes any prediction as to the possibility of its containing Pre-cambrian uranium mineralizations. One might perhaps think in terms of mineralizations of the alaskite or alkaline complex type, or also of vein-type deposits. But it is primarily in the deposits associated with tertiary trachy-rhyolitic volcanism that we have most confidence, especially in the Rhodope massif and the Vardar region but possibly elsewhere in the Hellenides as well. All things considered, we place Greece in Group 2 of the IUREP classification. (author)

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Portugal is situated on the western edge of the Iberian Meseta. At present, its reasonably assured reserves are about 7800 t of U (including 1000 t of U at more than 830/lb U 3 O 8 ) and 850 t of U in estimated additional reserves. This potential is divided between vein deposits and deposits located in the peribatholithic schists or enclaved in granite. Two main districts share these reserves - Beira at the centre of the country and Alto Alentejo in the east, approximately at the same latitude as Lisbon. In spite of the considerable prospecting activities authorized by Portugal in the Meseta area, the subject cannot yet be regarded as exhausted. Additional resources may still be located in the horizontal and vertical extensions of the vein mineralizations or schists from the already known deposits or outside the districts containing such deposits. Moreover, certain post-Palaeozoic sedimentary basins exhibit features favourable for the presence of uranium-bearing deposits and therefore deserve to be taken into consideration. However, there are as yet no examples of economic mineralization in such locations in Portugal. All things considered, we considered it reasonable to place Portugal in category No. 3 of the classiffication adopted by BJREP. (author)

  13. Social Licensing in uranium mining: Experiences from the IAEA review of planned Mukju River Uranium Project, Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnell, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA Uranium Production Site Appraisal Team (UPSAT) programme is designed to assist Member States to enhance the operational performance and the occupational, public and environmental health and safety of uranium mining and processing facilities across all phases of the uranium production cycle. These include exploration, resource assessment, mining, processing, waste management, site management and remediation, and final closure.

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  15. Upgrade Uranium Recovery Project No. 34110: final safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    The accident analysis of the upgrade uranium recovery system indicated three potential hazards: (1) criticality, (2) toxic fumes from nitric acid solutions, and (3) release of toxic uranyl nitrate solutions. Any of these are capable of causing the death of one or more employees; therefore, they form the basis for the residual risks identified below. The analysis found no hazardous energies or substances capable of causing irreversible injury to, or the death of, any members of the public. The following residual risks will be controlled administratively by procedural constraints: An operator or maintenance error will cause 235 U to be transferred into an unsafe container and cause a criticality. An operator or maintenance error will cause containers of 235 U bearing material to be improperly spaced and cause a criticality. Extensive corrosion will cause a hole to form in a calciner tube, the corrosion will go undetected, and a criticality will result, and a loss of system and/or building solution containment will occur concurrent with a drain being open resulting in a criticality and/or release of toxic material. Additional residual risks that have a small probability are that an earthquake or tornado will affect the building, alter the system geometry, and initiate a criticality; that the compressed-gas (nitrogen) cylinder valve will be sheared off, become airborne, and alter the system geometry; and that loss of system and/or building solution containment may occur concurrently with fire sprinkler system actuation causing a criticality and/or release of toxic material. The following residual risks will be addressed in the Safety Study of the existing X-705 Building: that a spill of raffinate highly contaminated with 99 Tc will occur due to operator error or incorrect lab analysis and that a gaseous or liquid effluent release of small amounts of transuranic elements will occur

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Brazil occupies an area of about 8.5 million square kilometers -- almost half of the South American continent. The dominant geographic feature is the Amazon basin. The Amazon River and its more than 200 tributaries drain about 60 percent of the country. The basin is a vast tropical rain forest, whereas the remainder of Brazil is made up predominantly of highlands. The Central Highlands, which extends into the Amazon basin, occupies nearly all of southern Brazil and includes major mountain chains such as the Serra do Mar, Serra da Mantiqueira, and Serra do Espinhago. The Guiana Highlands fringe the northern Amazon basin and extend into Venezuela, Guyana, Surinam, and French Guiana. Lowland areas other than the Amazon basin are found in western Mato Grosso, and along the Atlantic coast from French Guiana to Uruguay. The geology of Brazil is dominated structurally and areally by three major shields composed of crystalline rocks of Archean and Proterozoic age. Collectively they comprise the Brazilian complex which is probably the largest Precambrian outcrop in the world. The complex is made up of gneisses, granites, mica schists, quartzites, dolomites, skarns, diorites, itabirites and gabbros, many of which are deeply metamorphosed. Faults, quartz veins, and dikes are common. Recurrent granitization has occurred from the Precambrian to Late Tertiary. The area of Brazil is large and its geology is favorable, in places, for every known type of uranium deposit. This is not reflected in the amount of 'known' and 'inferred' reserves -- slightly more than 21,000 tons. Rather, it is an indication of the small amount of exploration done, taking into account the large area to be covered. The speculative potential can only be guessed. It is guessed to be 500,000 tons

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, fiscal year 1995 annual report to stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1978, Congress authorized the DOE to assess and clean up contamination at 24 designated former uranium processing sites. The DOE is also responsible for cleaning up properties in the vicinity of the sites where wind and water erosion deposited tailings or people removed them from the site for use in construction or landscaping projects. Cleanup is being undertaken in cooperation with state governments and Indian tribes within whose boundaries the sites are located. It is being conducted in two phases: the surface project and the ground water project. This report addresses specifics about both phases of the UMTRA Project. DOE's UMTRA Project is the world's largest materials management project ever undertaken to reduce or eliminate risk to the general public from exposure to potentially hazardous and radioactive materials. With an estimated cost at completion of nearly $2 billion for both phases of the UMTRA Project, and with the responsibility for encapsulating and isolating almost one-fourth of all the uranium mill tailings generated across the entire US (more than 44 million cubic yards), the UMTRA Project and its people have achieved a long record of safely and effectively completing its mission. It continually enhances its national reputation through its diligent process and cost efficiency as well as its international recognition for its technological innovation

  18. Draft programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for performing remedial action to bring surface and ground water contaminant levels at 24 inactive uranium processing sites into compliance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. DOE is accomplishing this through the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface and Ground Water Projects. Remedial action will be conducted with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the full participation of affected states and Indian tribes. Uranium processing activities at most of 24 the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as uranium and nitrate. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate, or reduce to acceptable levels, the potential health and the environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated. The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of four programmatic alternatives, including the proposed action. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance strategies. Rather, the PEIS is a planning document that provides a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project; provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: intermediate-grade uranium resource assessment project for part of the Maybell District, Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodknight, C.S.

    1983-04-01

    Intermediate-grade uranium resources in the Miocene Browns Park Formation were assessed for part of the Maybell district in the Sand Wash Basin, Colorado, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy. Two sites, each 2 mi 2 (5 km 2 ) in size, in the district were selected to be assessed. Site selection was based on evaluation of geologic, geophysical, and geochemical data that were collected from a larger project area known to contain uranium enrichment. The assessment of the sites was accomplished primarily by drilling 19 holes through the Browns Park Formation and by using the geophysical and geochemical data from those holes and from a larger number of industry-drilled holes. Analytical results of samples from uranium prospects, mainly along faults in the sites, were also used for the assessment. Data from surface samples and from drill-hole samples and logs of the site south of Lay Creek indicate that no intermediate-grade uranium resources are present. However, similar data from the site north of Lay Creek verify that approximately 25 million lb (11.2 million kg) of intermediate-grade uranium resources may be present. This assessment assumes that an average uranium-enriched thickness of 10 ft (3 m) at a grade of 0.017% U 3 O 8 is present in at least two thirds of the northern site. Uranium enrichment in this site occurs mainly in the lower 150 ft (45 m) of the Browns Park Formation in fine- to medium-grained sandstone that contains abundant clay in its matrix. Facies variations within the Browns Park preclude correlation of individual beds or zones of uranium enrichment between closely spaced drill holes

  20. Draft environmental statement related to the Union Carbide Corporation, Gas Hills Uranium Project (Natrona County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The proposed action is the renewal of Source Material License SUA-648 issued for the operation of the Gas Hills Uranium Project in Wyoming, near Moneta. The project is an acid leach, ion-exchange, and solvent-extraction uranium ore processing mill at an increased capacity of 500,000 tons per year and the construction of two heap leach facilities in Natrona and Fremont Counties for initial processing of low-grade ore. After analysis of environmental impacts and adverse effects, it is the proposed position of NRC that the license be renewed subject to conditions relating to stabilization of the tailings, reclamation, environmental monitoring, evaluation of any future activity not evaluated by NRC, archeological survey, analysis of unexpected harmful effects, and decommissioning

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases

  2. Final environmental statement related to the Plateau Resources Limited Shootering Canyon Uranium Project (Garfield County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Plateau Resources, Ltd., for the construction and operation of the proposed Shootering Canyon Uranium Project with a product (U 3 O 8 ) production limited to 2.2 x 10 5 kg (4.9 x 10 5 lb) per year. Impacts to the area from the operation of the Shootering Canyon Uranium Project will include the following: alterations of up to 140 ha (350 acres) that will be occupied by the mill, mill facilities, borrow areas, tailings areas, and roads; an increase in the existing background radiation levels of the mill area as a result of continuous but small releases of uranium, radium, radon, and other, radioactive materials during construction and operation; socioeconomic effects on the local area, particularly the proposed community of Ticaboo, where the majority of workers will be housed during project construction and operation; and production of solid waste material (tailings) from the mill at a rate of about 680 MT (750 tons) per day and deposition as a slurry in an onsite impoundment area; construction and operation of the Shootering Canyon mill will provide employment and induced economic benefits for the region but may also result in some socioeconomic stress. On the basis of the analysis and evaluation set forth in this Environmental Statement, it is proposed that any license issued for the Shootering Canyon mill should be subject to certain conditions for the protection of the environment. A list is included. Nine appendices are also included

  3. Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Gavin M

    2008-02-01

    The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting.

  4. Radon releases from Australian uranium mining and milling projects: assessing the UNSCEAR approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mudd, Gavin M.

    2008-01-01

    The release of radon gas and progeny from the mining and milling of uranium-bearing ores has long been recognised as a potential radiological health hazard. The standards for exposure to radon and progeny have decreased over time as the understanding of their health risk has improved. In recent years there has been debate on the long-term releases (10,000 years) of radon from uranium mining and milling sites, focusing on abandoned, operational and rehabilitated sites. The primary purpose has been estimates of the radiation exposure of both local and global populations. Although there has been an increasing number of radon release studies over recent years in the USA, Australia, Canada and elsewhere, a systematic evaluation of this work has yet to be published in the international literature. This paper presents a detailed compilation and analysis of Australian studies. In order to quantify radon sources, a review of data on uranium mining and milling wastes in Australia, as they influence radon releases, is presented. An extensive compilation of the available radon release data is then assembled for the various projects, including a comparison to predictions of radon behaviour where available. An analysis of cumulative radon releases is then developed and compared to the UNSCEAR approach. The implications for the various assessments of long-term releases of radon are discussed, including aspects such as the need for ongoing monitoring of rehabilitation at uranium mining and milling sites and life-cycle accounting

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Zambia. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Zambia estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 33 000 and 100 000 tonnes uranium. The majority of these resources are believed to exist in the Karoo sediments. Other potentially favourable geological environments are the Precambrian Katanga sediments, as well as intrusive rocks of different chemical compositions and surficial duricrusts. Previous unofficial estimates of Zambia's Reasonably Assured Resources (RAR) and Estimated Additional Resources (EAR) are considered to be still valid: the total RAR amount to 6 000 tonnes uranium, located in Karoo (4 000 tonnes) and Katanga (2 000 tonnes) sediments, while the EAR are believed to total 4 000 tonnes being found only in Karoo sediments. The mission recommends that approximately US$ 40 million be spent on uranium exploration in Zambia over 10 years. The largest part of this expenditure would be for drilling, while the remainder should be spent on airborne and ground surveys, as well as on interpretative work on previous airborne data, Landsat imageries, etc. (author)

  6. Stake holder involvement in the Canadian review process for uranium production projects in Northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, D.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the Canadian environmental review process for uranium production projects as a case study for the purpose of understanding the nature and value of stakeholder involvement in the management of radiological hazards. While the Canadian review process potentially applies to any development, this case study focuses on the assessment of the uranium projects of northern Saskatchewan conducted during the 1990's. It describes the environmental assessment (EA) conducted in the 1990's for six new uranium facilities (including mines and mills and related tailings disposal sites) planned in northern Saskatchewan. Both the Canadian federal and the Saskatchewan provincial government have extensive environmental review processes that must under law be complete before any major industrial development judged to have potential environmental impacts is undertaken within their respective territories. However, even in those instances where no clear potential environmental impacts are evident, Canadian law mandates 'if public concern about the proposal is such that a public review is desirable, the initiating department shall refer the proposal to the Minister for review by a Panel'. (Wh95) As a stakeholder under law, in both Canada and Saskatchewan, the public plays an important role in the environmental review process. To encourage participation and assist the public in its review the two governments may provide funding (as done in this review) to assist qualified individuals or groups to participant in the review process. The first section of this case study sets the scene. It describes the Saskatchewan uranium mining story, focusing on how the importance of the public stakeholder evolved to become a major component, under law, in the EA process for new uranium mines. This increase in stakeholder involvement opportunities coincided with heightened public concern for the socio-economic impacts of the projects. In the late 1980's both governments were advised by

  7. Development and progress of the South African uranium enrichment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, A.J.A.; Grant, W.L.; Barbour, R.A.; Loubser, R.S.; Wannenburg, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    The earlier development of the project is briefly reviewed, and some of the salient features of the South African process are touched upon. Development of the separation element in the last 18 months is discussed, as well as further work on the helikon cascade process. A brief description of the helikon cascade operation is given by means of diagrams. Because of time limitations, the complete helikon theory is not presented, but only some examples shown. Experimental work done to verify the helikon concept, as well as theoretical treatment, is presented. A brief report of the progress made on the experimental module of 6 t/a separative work capacity is given. This module, known as Mini-Z, is well advanced and details of its features and construction are shown. A short discussion of progress on the full-scale prototype module, known as Proto-Z, is next presented. The flexibility of such a design to fit a wide range of cascade sizes is considered, as well as cost implications of various approaches to design. Apart from progress on the development of the commercial plant, a brief review is given of the present state of the pilot plant at Valindaba. Some of the information obtained is mentioned. In conclusion, some information is given in regard to further planning and other work on the commercial plant at present being undertaken. Projected operation of the plant and some nuclear fuel service aspects are touched on

  8. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE`s overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program.

  9. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    In 1992, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project experienced several health and safety related incidents at active remediation project sites. As a result, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directed the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to establish a program increasing the DOE's overall presence at operational remediation sites to identify and minimize risks in operations to the fullest extent possible (Attachments A and B). In response, the TAC, in cooperation with the DOE and the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), developed the Safety Advancement Field Effort (SAFE) Program

  10. Geo scientific basis for making the safety case for a SF/HL W/IL W repository in Opalinus clay in ne Switzerland (project Entsorgungsnachweis) 1: overview and main conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, A.; Lambert, A.; Zuidema, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the geo-scientific basis and the main conclusions concerning the safety case for Project Entsorgungsnachweis (Nagra, 2002a, see first paper). The key geo-scientific input for the safety case is summarised in the following three papers. The data and arguments are discussed in great detail in Nagra (2002b) and in numerous reference reports cited therein. (author)

  11. GEO600: status and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willke, B

    2007-01-01

    The GEO600 gravitational wave detector located near Hannover in Germany is one of the four detectors of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC). For almost the entire year of 2006, GEO600 participated in the S5 science run of the LSC. Overall an equivalent of about 270 days of science data with an average peak sensitivity of better than 3 x 10 -22 Hz -1/2 have been acquired so far. In this paper, we describe the status of the GEO600 project during the period between January 2006 and February 2007. In addition, plans for the near-term and medium-term future are discussed

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Rwanda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Rwanda. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Rwanda estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 500 to 5 000 tonnes of uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian Ruzizian, especially in conjunction with tectonized pegmatoidal remobilizations of metamorphic sediments of western Rwanda. Other favourable geological environments include lamprophyric dikes and post tectonic granites of central Rwanda. The Mission recommends that over a period of five years approximately US$4.2 million be spent on exploration in Rwanda. The majority of this would be spent on airborne and ground geophysical surveys ($1.5 million) and exploration drilling ($1 million). Prospecting, trenching and tunneling and analytical work would require the remainder of the $4.2 million ($1.7 million). (author)

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Burundi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Burundi. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Burundi estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 300 to more than 4 100 tonnes of uranium. The potential is rather evenly distributed throughout the Proterozoic of Burundi in various geological environments (unconformity, hydrothermal, fault controlled, etc.). The mission recommends that over a period of five years U.S. $ 3 to 4.5 million be spent on exploration in Burundi, with even spending on the various exploration techniques as e.g. prospecting, drilling trenching, geophysical surveys, analyses, etc. (author)

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Venezuela. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Venezuela estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range 2,000 to 42,000 tonnes uranium.- The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks of the Guayana Shield. Other potentially favorable geologic environments include Cretaceous phosphorite beds, continental sandstone and granitic rocks. The mission recommends that approximately US $18 million be spent on exploration in Venezuela over the next five years. The majority of this expenditure would be for surface surveys utilizing geologic studies, radiometric and geochemical surveys and some drilling for geologic information. Additional drilling would be required later to substantiate preliminary findings. (author)

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (TUREP) Mission to Peru. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 6 000 to 11 000 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Other favourable geological environments include calcretes, developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert in southern Peru, and Hercynian subvolcanic granites in the eastern Cordillera of southern Peru. The Mission recommends that over a period of five years approximately U.S. $10 million be spent on exploration in Peru. The majority of this would be spent on drilling ($5 million) and tunnelling ($2 million) with an additional $3 million on surface and airborne radiometric surveys. (author)

  16. Restoration of groundwater after solution mining at the Highland Uranium Project, Wyoming, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, J. [Waste Technology Group, British Nuclear Fuels PLC, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom); Huffman, L. [Power Resources Inc., Highland Uranium Mine, Glenrock, Wyoming (United States)

    2000-07-01

    The Highland Project, located in Converse County, Wyoming, has had a successful 11 year history of in-situ leach mining of Tertiary roll-front uranium deposits. The uranium ore is oxidized and solubilized by circulating native groundwater, containing additional dissolved O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, within confined fluvial aquifers at depths of 200 - 250 m. The changing chemistry of this groundwater during leaching is discussed, as are the various treatment techniques that have been used to restore this fluid at the end of mining. Examples are provided which demonstrate the varying effectiveness of each technique for the reduction of elevated concentrations of different groundwater parameters. The complications arising from the proximity of the earliest wellfields to abandoned, conventional mine workings, as well as unexpected side effects from each restoration method, have combined to make an interesting case history from this long established mining operation. (author)

  17. Energy performance strategies for the large scale introduction of geothermal energy in residential and industrial buildings: The GEO.POWER project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giambastiani, B.M.S.; Tinti, F.; Mendrinos, D.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of shallow geothermal energy, in terms of ground coupled heat pumps (GCHP) for heating and cooling purposes, is an environmentally-friendly and cost-effective alternative with potential to replace fossil fuels and help mitigate global warming. Focusing on the recent results of the GEO.POWER project, this paper aims at examining the energy performance strategies and the future regional and national financial instruments for large scale introduction of geothermal energy and GCHP systems in both residential and industrial buildings. After a transferability assessment to evaluate the reproducibility of some outstanding examples of systems currently existing in Europe for the utilisation of shallow geothermal energy, a set of regulatory, economic and technical actions is proposed to encourage the GCHP market development and support geothermal energy investments in the frame of the existing European normative platforms. This analysis shows that many European markets are changing from a new GCHP market to growth market. However some interventions are still required, such as incentives, regulatory framework, certification schemes and training activities in order to accelerate the market uptake and achieve the main European energy and climate targets. - Highlights: • Potentiality of geothermal applications for heating and cooling in buildings. • Description of the GEO.POWER project and its results. • Local strategies for the large scale introduction of GCHPs

  18. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H.; Hoover, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 210 Po, and the short-lived decay products of 222 Rn with 230 Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 μm AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 μm AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 μm AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower

  19. The Palmottu Analogue Project, Progress Report 1993. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits, Nr. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.; Suksi, J.; Niini, H.

    1994-01-01

    The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out in 1993 at the Palmottu natural analogue study site, which comprises a small U-Th mineralization in Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland. Additionally, the report includes several separate articles dealing with various aspects of the Palmottu Analogue Project: (1) 3-dimensional model of fracture zones, (2) redox chemistry of uranium in groundwater, (3) humic substances in groundwater, (4) uranium mineralogy, (5) importance of selective extractions in uranium migration studies, (6) modelling of matrix diffusion, and (7) uranium in surficial deposits. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes (1) structural interpretations partly based on geophysical measurements, (2) hydrological studies including hydraulic drill-hole measurements, (3) flow modelling, (4) hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, (5) mineralogical studies, (6) geochemical interpretation and modelling, (7) studies on mobilization and retardation of uranium, and (8) modelling of uranium series data. Paleohydrogeological aspects are of special interest, due to the anticipated future glaciation of the Fennoscandian Shield. Surficial sediments and waters are studied to gain information on postglacial migration in the overburden. (orig.)

  20. Overview of uranium mill tailings remedial action project of the United States of America 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edge, R.

    1997-01-01

    From the early 1940's through the 1960's the United States federal government contracted for processed uranium ore for national defense research, weapons development and commercial nuclear energy. When these contracts were terminated, the mills ceased operation leaving large uranium tailings on the former mill sites. The purpose of the Uranium Remedial Action Project (UMTRA) is to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards resulting from exposure of the public to the tailings at these abandons sites. There are 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites, in 10 states and an Indian reservation lands, included for clean up under the auspices of UMTRA. Presently the last 2 sites are under remediation. This paper addresses the progress of the project over the last two years. (author)

  1. Low-enriched uranium high-density target project. Compendium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, George; Brown, M. Alex; Jerden, James L.; Gelis, Artem V.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley; Youker, Amanda; Hebden, Andrew; Solbrekken, G; Allen, C; Robertson., D; El-Gizawy, Sherif; Govindarajan, Srisharan; Hoyer, Annemarie; Makarewicz, Philip; Harris, Jacob; Graybill, Brian; Gunn, Andy; Berlin, James; Bryan, Chris; Sherman, Steven; Hobbs, Randy; Griffin, F. P.; Chandler, David; Hurt, C. J.; Williams, Paul; Creasy, John; Tjader, Barak; McFall, Danielle; Longmire, Hollie

    2016-09-01

    At present, most 99Mo is produced in research, test, or isotope production reactors by irradiation of highly enriched uranium targets. To achieve the denser form of uranium needed for switching from high to low enriched uranium (LEU), targets in the form of a metal foil (~125-150 µm thick) are being developed. The LEU High Density Target Project successfully demonstrated several iterations of an LEU-fission-based Mo-99 technology that has the potential to provide the world’s supply of Mo-99, should major producers choose to utilize the technology. Over 50 annular high density targets have been successfully tested, and the assembly and disassembly of targets have been improved and optimized. Two target front-end processes (acidic and electrochemical) have been scaled up and demonstrated to allow for the high-density target technology to mate up to the existing producer technology for target processing. In the event that a new target processing line is started, the chemical processing of the targets is greatly simplified. Extensive modeling and safety analysis has been conducted, and the target has been qualified to be inserted into the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which is considered above and beyond the requirements for the typical use of this target due to high fluence and irradiation duration.

  2. Baseline environmental survey of proposed uranium mining projects of Domiasiat, Meghalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khathing, D.T.; Myrboh, B.; Nongkynrih, P.; War, S.A.; Marbaniang, D.G.; Iongwai, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    West Khasi Hills District of Meghalaya is identified as having a large and rich deposits of Uranium. However, actual extraction on a commercial scale that may lead to an increase in the socio-economic development of the state in particular and the country in general, is yet to be undertaken. This is due to lack of any baseline environmental survey giving rise to speculative information and causing a fear psychosis in the minds of the locals populace about the negative effects of Uranium mining. A preoperational survey and environmental monitoring of the proposed mining sites and its adjacent areas would establish the baseline status of the natural radioactivity and some chemical constituents in different environmental matrices via. air, water, soil, biota and aquatic ecosystems. The North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, Meghalaya has undertaken the Project funded by DST and BRNS, Department of Atomic Energy, Govt. of India which aims to provide baseline environmental data on ambient air, water and soil quality in and around the proposed Uranium mining site of Domiasiat, West Khasi Hills in the state of Meghalaya. Trace elements (elements like Mg, Zn, Ca, K, Na, Se, As, Fe, Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd, Mn etc) and the status of the activity in the samples are determined. (author)

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Madagascar. September-October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, John H.; Brinck, Johan W.

    1981-01-01

    This study, resulting from the IUREP Orientation Mission to Madagascar, includes the reported information on infrastructure, mining regulations and conditions made available to the Mission. Within the structure of the centrally planned economic system, uranium exploration and mining is considered the exclusive activity of OMNIS, an organization founded by the State for that purpose (Office Militaire National pour les Industries Strategiques). Madagascar has a long history of prospection and small-scale exploitation of uranium (thorium and radium). Some of this activity dates back to 1909, culminating in significant production of both uranium and thorium (in excess of 5900 tonnes of uranothorianite) by the CEA and private contractors in the Fort Dauphin area from 1955 to 1968. Past exploration and development work in a number of areas, notably by the CEA, OMNIS and the IAEA/UNDP, is reviewed and the uranium resources and mineral indications reported. The areas rated at present as the more important and which continue to be investigated (by OMNIS, in conjunction with IAEA/UNDP projects) in the order of priority are: the Fort Dauphin area, the Karroo formation and the Neogene lacustrine basin at Antsirabe. The Mission estimates that Madagascar has a moderate potential for undiscovered resources; it is estimated that such speculative resources could lie within the range of 4000 - 38000 tonnes U. In addition there are areas with as yet untested environments and with no known occurrences which may be favourable but which will require prospection. Modifications to existing programmes and new programmes are suggested. Policy alternatives are reviewed

  4. Preliminary results of radiation monitoring near uranium mines in Namibia EJOLT Project (DRAFT version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    As a part of the EJOLT (Environmental Justice Organizations Liability and Trade) project, EARTHLIFE Namibia and CRIIRAD (Commission for Independent Research and Information about Radiation) have organised visits in areas located in the vicinity of uranium mines in Namibia In the course of an on site mission carried out between September 22 and October 2 2011, scientists from the CRIIRAD laboratory took radiation measurements in situ, and collected 14 samples of top soil, 13 samples of surface sediments of the Swakop, Gawib and Khan rivers, 11 underground water samples in the alluvium of Swakop, and Khan rivers and tap water from Arandis city, and one sample of asparagus. Solid samples have been analysed at the CRIIRAD laboratory in France (measurements performed by HpGe gamma spectrometry) and water samples have been monitored for main chemicals by LDA 26 laboratory in France and for radium 226 and radon 222 at the CRIIRAD laboratory. Some of the preliminary findings are summarised in this report: 1 - The dose rate measured by CRIIRAD on the parking of Roessing mine is about 6 times above natural background value (0.9 μSv/h compared to 0.15 μSv/h); 2 - The management of waste rock dumps needs to be improved: Some waste rocks are dumped on the banks of Khan river (at the intersection with Dome Gorge) without fencing and confinement. The radiological impact of this activity has to be studied in detail but preliminary measurements show various impacts on the environment; 3 - The finest fraction of the radioactive tailings dumped on Roessing tailings dam is blown away by the wind and contaminates the surrounding environment; 4 - The high uranium concentration in underground water collected downstream Roessing uranium mine in the Khan river and Swakop river alluvium raises the question of the origin of this uranium

  5. Preliminary results of radiation monitoring near uranium mines in Namibia EJOLT Project (DRAFT version)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chareyron, Bruno

    2012-04-05

    As a part of the EJOLT (Environmental Justice Organizations Liability and Trade) project, EARTHLIFE Namibia and CRIIRAD (Commission for Independent Research and Information about Radiation) have organised visits in areas located in the vicinity of uranium mines in Namibia In the course of an on site mission carried out between September 22 and October 2 2011, scientists from the CRIIRAD laboratory took radiation measurements in situ, and collected 14 samples of top soil, 13 samples of surface sediments of the Swakop, Gawib and Khan rivers, 11 underground water samples in the alluvium of Swakop, and Khan rivers and tap water from Arandis city, and one sample of asparagus. Solid samples have been analysed at the CRIIRAD laboratory in France (measurements performed by HpGe gamma spectrometry) and water samples have been monitored for main chemicals by LDA 26 laboratory in France and for radium 226 and radon 222 at the CRIIRAD laboratory. Some of the preliminary findings are summarised in this report: 1 - The dose rate measured by CRIIRAD on the parking of Roessing mine is about 6 times above natural background value (0.9 {mu}Sv/h compared to 0.15 {mu}Sv/h); 2 - The management of waste rock dumps needs to be improved: Some waste rocks are dumped on the banks of Khan river (at the intersection with Dome Gorge) without fencing and confinement. The radiological impact of this activity has to be studied in detail but preliminary measurements show various impacts on the environment; 3 - The finest fraction of the radioactive tailings dumped on Roessing tailings dam is blown away by the wind and contaminates the surrounding environment; 4 - The high uranium concentration in underground water collected downstream Roessing uranium mine in the Khan river and Swakop river alluvium raises the question of the origin of this uranium

  6. Report on the second uranium-series intercomparison project workshop, Harwell, 23 to 24, June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanovich, M.; Warchal, R.M.

    1981-03-01

    The second Uranium-series Intercomparison Project Workshop was held on June 23 and 24, 1980 at Harwell. The aim of the Workshop was to analyse the results of Phase III of the Project and to define the future aims of the Project, if any. This report is an account of the matters raised and discussed during the two day workshop. A detailed report of a statistical analysis of USIP results - Phases I, II, and III is included. A final report submitted to USIP by CBNM, Euratom Laboratory, Geel, on the determination of the alpha activity ratio 228 Th/ 232 U in the Harwell spike solution used in USIP Phase III is reproduced in full. An account of an investigation into suitability of a limestone specimen for a geologic standard carried out at Koeln University is also given. (author)

  7. Recycled Uranium Mass Balance Project Y-12 National Security Complex Site Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-12-01

    This report has been prepared to summarize the findings of the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) Mass Balance Project and to support preparation of associated U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) site reports. The project was conducted in support of DOE efforts to assess the potential for health and environmental issues resulting from the presence of transuranic (TRU) elements and fission products in recycled uranium (RU) processed by DOE and its predecessor agencies. The United States government used uranium in fission reactors to produce plutonium and tritium for nuclear weapons production. Because uranium was considered scarce relative to demand when these operations began almost 50 years ago, the spent fuel from U.S. fission reactors was processed to recover uranium for recycling. The estimated mass balance for highly enriched RU, which is of most concern for worker exposure and is the primary focus of this project, is summarized in a table. A discrepancy in the mass balance between receipts and shipments (plus inventory and waste) reflects an inability to precisely distinguish between RU and non-RU shipments and receipts involving the Y-12 Complex and Savannah River. Shipments of fresh fuel (non-RU) and sweetener (also non-RU) were made from the Y-12 Complex to Savannah River along with RU shipments. The only way to distinguish between these RU and non-RU streams using available records is by enrichment level. Shipments of {le}90% enrichment were assumed to be RU. Shipments of >90% enrichment were assumed to be non-RU fresh fuel or sweetener. This methodology using enrichment level to distinguish between RU and non-RU results in good estimates of RU flows that are reasonably consistent with Savannah River estimates. Although this is the best available means of distinguishing RU streams, this method does leave a difference of approximately 17.3 MTU between receipts and shipments. Slightly depleted RU streams received by the Y-12 Complex from ORGDP and

  8. Completion of the uranium mill tailings remedial project and cleanup of the former mill site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rael, G.J.; Cox, S.W.; Artiglia, E.W.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project has successfully completed the cleanup of 22 former uranium mill sites, more than 5400 vicinity properties, and has constructed 18 entombment cells. The Project has recently received the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approval and certification for the last two disposal sites, with these sites being placed under the general license for long term custodial care of residual radioactive material. The UMTRA site located at Grand Junction, Colorado is a good example of the technical, political, economic, and public relations challenges that were overcome in achieving success. The UMTRA Team discussed, negotiated, planned, and eventually acted on this uranium mill tailings problem and brought the project to a successful conclusion for the community. From the early 1940s through the 1970s, uranium ore was mined in significant quantities under United States federal contracts for the government's national defence programmes, i.e. the Manhattan Engineering District and Atomic Energy Commission programmes. The problem started as the need for uranium decreased in the late 1960s, resulting in mills shutting down, leaving behind large quantities of process waste tailings and contaminated mill buildings. The former Climax Uranium Company mill site in Grand Junction was one of the largest of these sites. (author)

  9. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). This report contains the comments and responses received on the draft PEIS

  10. Crystal chemistry of iron in low-temperature chlorites, implications for geo-thermometry and the determination of redox paleo-conditions in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigault, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    In contexts of uranium deposits, redox conditions constitute the main factor controlling the uranium deposition. Often observed in these deposits, chlorites are the unique clay mineral which can be able to record in their structure the redox conditions through their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio. However, the common presence of several populations of chlorites makes difficult to understand the message carried out by these minerals. Thanks to μ-XANES spectroscopy, we are now able to measure on thin sections the Fe"3"+/SFe ratio in chlorites with an accuracy of 5 %. Measurements show that it can reach 60 % in di-tri-octahedral chlorites and 5 % to more than 40 % for tri-octahedral chlorites. In hydrothermal contexts where chlorites crystallize through a dissolution-recrystallization process, their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio decreases with the increase of the global Fe content. Diagenetic chlorites observed resulting from the polymorphic transformation of berthierine have a different behavior because there is no link between their total iron content and their Fe"3"+/SFe ratio: their chemistry is directly inherited from the one of the precursor mineral because this transformation does not allow a reorganization of cations in the structure. This transformation explains that thermodynamic models cannot work for these phases. For the use of chlorites as makers of redox paleo-conditions in contexts of uranium deposits where diagenetic and hydrothermal chlorites can be present, it is decisive to determine their origin, for example analyzing their polytype: Ib (b=90 degrees) for chlorites crystallized from solid-state transformation and IIb for chlorites crystallized through dissolution-recrystallization process. (author)

  11. Project licensing plan for UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Licensing Plan is to establish how a disposal site will be licensed, and to provide responsibilities of participatory agencies as legislated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 (Public Law 95-604). This Plan has been developed to ensure that the objectives of licensing are met by identifying the necessary institutional controls, participatory agency responsibilities, and key milestones in the licensing process. The Plan contains the legislative basis for and a description of the licensing process (''Process'') for UMTRA sites. This is followed by a discussion of agency responsibilities, and milestones in the Process. The Plan concludes with a generic timeline of this Process. As discussed in Section 2.1, a custodial maintenance and surveillance plan will constitute the basis for a site license. The details of maintenance and surveillance are discussed in the Project Maintenance and Surveillance Plan (AL-350124.0000). 5 refs., 4 figs

  12. Application of advanced technologies for uranium mining and processing at Narwapahar and Turamdih projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, R.C.; Verma, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium Corporation of India Ltd. (UCIL) has started construction work on two mines, one each at Narwapahar and Turamdih Projects and a combined processing plant at Turamdih as a part of the country's ambitious Atomic Energy Programme. The adoption of latest concept of declines as mine entries will enable completion of project in 4 years only and will also allow large scale mechanisation underground. Use of latest world technology of LPD trucks, LHD vehicles, drill jumbos, scissor lift, passenger carrying and service vehicles will result in rapid development progress rates and large production from concentrated work places. Mine lay-out providing access ways in waste to ore bodies and use of high capacity high pressure fans for ventillation will enable adequate control on radon in mine workings. Process Plant has been designed based on experiences of Jaduguda operations and information/data of several most modern operations of overseas countries such as Canada, USA, South Africa, France and Australia. Use of horizontal belt filters for filtration, draught tube-circulators for leaching and Himsley continuous counter current fluidized bed ion exchange system provide high efficiency and flexibility for extraction of uranium together with low capital as well as operation and maintenance costs. The paper details the various methods, processes and equipment giving the benefits derived from each. (author). 1 ref., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Perspectives for geo-neutrinos after KamLAND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorentini, Giovanni; Lissia, Marcello; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the implications of KamLAND result on geo-neutrinos for the radiogenic contribution of Uranium to terrestrial heat. We also discuss the potential of future experiments for assessing the amount of Uranium and Thorium in different reservoirs (crust, mantle and core) of the Earth

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Cameroon. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trey, Michel de; Leney, George W.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of the International Uranium Resource Evaluation Project (IUREP) missions to host nations is to: R eview the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for the discovery of additional resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the countries concerned. Guidance in the achievement of these goals is provided through a check list of desired relevant information on: general background, the potential role of nuclear energy, and organizations involved, information on the mining industry, technical manpower employed or available, available maps, aerial photographs, and publications, national geological survey and organizations involved in uranium, private organizations involved in uranium exploration and mining, results of previous exploration, known uranium occurrences, plans for further work, legal and administrative requirements for exploration and logistical information on facilities available. The economy of CAMEROON is sound and continues to expand with an annual growth rates of 5-6%. Emphasis is placed on private investment with government participation in major development projects. The overall investment climate is good. Minerals exploration is carried out under nonexclusive Prospecting License and exclusive Exploration License that may later be converted to a Mining Lease or Mining Concession. Many of the conditions must be negotiated. Uranium is classified as a strategic mineral, and may be subject to special review. There is no defined policy on uranium development. Two government organizations are concerned with geology and mining. The INSTITUT DE RECHERCHES GEOLOGIQUES ET MINIERES (IRGM) conducts programs of geologic mapping and research, mineralogy, hydrology, and alternate energy sources. The DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND GEOLOGY (DMG) is responsible for all minerals exploration and mining. It includes a

  15. Uranium-mill-tailings remedial-action project (UMTRAP) cover and liner technology development project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.; Cline, J.F.; Beedlow, P.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Relyea, J.R.; Tamura, T.

    1982-01-01

    Cover and liner systems for uranium mill tailings in the United States must satisfy stringent requirements regarding long-term stability, radon control, and radionuclide and hazardous chemical migration. The cover placed over a tailings pile serves three basic purposes: (1) to reduce the release of radon, (2) to prevent the intrusion of plant roots and burrowing animals into the tailings, and (3) to limit surface erosion. The liner placed under a tailings pile prevents the migration of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals to groundwater. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing and evaluating cover and liner systems that meet these objectives and conform to federal standards. The cover and liner technology discussed in this paper involves: (1) single and multilayer earthen cover systems, (2) asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems, (3) biobarrier systems, (4) revegetation and rock covers, and (5) asphalt, clay, and synthetic liner systems. These systems have been tested at the Grand Junction, Colorado, tailings pile, where they have been shown to effectively reduce radon releases and radionuclide and chemical migration

  16. From industry to academia: Benefits of integrating a professional project management standard into (geo)science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Scientific and technological research carried out within universities and public research institutions often involves large collaborations across several countries. Despite the considerable budget (typically millions of Euros), the high expectations (high impact scientific findings, new technological developments and links with policy makers, industry and civil society) and the length of the project over several years, these international projects often rely heavily on the personal skills of the management team (project coordinator, project manager, principal investigators) without a structured, transferable framework. While this approach has become an established practice, it's not ideal and can jeopardise the success of the entire effort with consequences ranging from schedule delays, loss of templates/systems, financial charges and ultimately project failure. In this presentation I will show the advantages of integrating a globally recognised standard for professional project management, such as the PMP® by the Project Management Institute, into academic research. I will cover the project management knowledge areas (integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, human resources management, risk management, procurement management, and stakeholder management) and the processes within these throughout the phases of the project lifetime (project initiation, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closure). I will show how application of standardised, transferable procedures, developed within the business & administration sector, can benefit academia and more generally scientific research.

  17. The Impact of Climatological Conditions on Low Enriched Uranium Loading Station Operations for the HEU Blend Down Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model was developed using COREsim to perform a time motion study for the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Loading Station operations. The project is to blend Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) with Natural Uranium (NU) to produce LEU to be shipped to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for further processing. To cope with a project cost reduction, the LEU Loading Station concept has changed from an enclosed building with air-conditioning to a partially enclosed building without air conditioning. The LEU Loading Station is within a radiological contaminated area; two pairs of coveralls and negative pressure respirator are required. As a result, inclement weather conditions, especially heat stress, will affect and impact the LEU loading operations. The purposes of the study are to determine the climatological impacts on LEU Loading operations, resources required for committed throughputs, and to find out the optimum process pathways for multi crews working simultaneously in the space-lim ited LEU Loading Station

  18. CERISE - Combining energy and spatial information standards as enabler for smart grids - TKI smart grid project : TKISG01010 - D4.1 Semantic mappings to harmonize energy, geo and government-related information models. Work package 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steen, M.; Knibbe, F.; Quak, C.W.; Janssen, P.; Stap, R.; Daniele, L.

    2015-01-01

    Version 1.0 - Final The CERISE-SG project (Combining Energy and Geo information standards as enabler for Smart Grids) focuses on interoperability with a special interest in the information exchanges between smart grids and their surroundings. We hereby focus on the exchange of information to and

  19. The Wiluna Uranium Project, Western Australia: Bringing a new project to the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary - Wiluna: One of the few projects able to provide new production from 2016 to take advantage of the predicted U market upswing. The 3Ps: • Process – Sound science is fundamental; – There are no short-cuts (but can be lots of delays)! • Persistence: – Tell your story over and over again; – Every roadblock can be overcome; • Patience: – Start early; – Expect all stakeholders to take longer to accept the project

  20. Assessment of heavy metal concentration in water around the proposed Mkuju river uranium project in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Msaki, P.K.; Mohammed, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effective verification for compliance with water quality standards in uranium mining in Tanzania requires data sensitive to monitor heavy metal concentration in water around the Mkuju River Uranium Project before mining commences. The area susceptible for pollution by the project was estimated using AERMOD dispersion model and found to cover about 1300 km"2. Thirty one surface and groundwater samples were collected and analysed for heavy metals and physicochemical properties using ICP-MS and standards techniques, respectively. The physicochemical properties for water samples analysed ranges from 5.7 to 7.8 for pH, 2.8 to 80.2 mg/L for TDS and 15 to 534.5 mS/cm for EC. These values show that the water in the vicinity of the Mkuju River Uranium Project is normal. The ranges of concentration of heavy metals (µgL"-"1) determined in water ranges were: Al(2 to 9049), Cr(0.2 to 19.96), Mn (0.1 to 1452), Fe(2 to 53890), Co(0.02 to 27.63), Ni(0.2 to 9.7), Cu(2 to 17), Zn(2 to 62.94), As(0.4 to 19.17), Cd(0.02 to 0.14), Pb (0.02 to 78.68), Th (0.002 to 1.73), U(0.002 to 29.76). These values are below the tolerance levels of concentrations set by different International organisations. Therefore heavy metal toxicity in the study area is marginal. The parameters that could serve as baseline data because of their enhanced sensitivity to pollution were (i) concentration of chromium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead in water (ii) pH, TDS and EC for water, (iii) TDS ratio for surface to ground water values and (iv) correlation coefficients between the heavy metals. However, since TDS values are season dependent, this indicator can serve as baseline data when measured during the dry season as was the case in the study. (author)

  1. Feasibility study on consolidation of Fernald Environmental Management Project depleted uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1991, the DOE made a decision to close the FMPC located in Fernald, Ohio, and end its production mission. The site was renamed FEMP to reflect Fernald's mission change from uranium production to environmental restoration. As a result of this change, the inventory of strategic uranium materials maintained at Fernald by DOE DP will need to be relocated to other DOE sites. Although considered a liability to the Fernald Plant due to its current D and D mission, the FEMP DU represents a potentially valuable DOE resource. Recognizing its value, it may be important for the DOE to consolidate the material at one site and place it in a safe long-term storage condition until a future DOE programmatic requirement materializes. In August 1995, the DOE Office of Nuclear Weapons Management requested, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to assess the feasibility of consolidating the FEMP DU materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This feasibility study examines various phases associated with the consolidation of the FEMP DU at the ORR. If useful short-term applications for the DU fail to materialize, then long-term storage (up to 50 years) would need to be provided. Phases examined in this report include DU material value; potential uses; sampling; packaging and transportation; material control and accountability; environmental, health and safety issues; storage; project management; noneconomic factors; schedule; and cost

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Portugal. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Portugal estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range 20,000 to 80,000 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in intergranitic vein deposits and in pre-Ordovician schists, but other favourable geological environments include episyenites and Meso-Cainozoic continental sediments. The mission recommends that approximately US$25 million be spent on exploration in Portugal over the next 10 years. The majority of this ($18 million) would be spent on drilling, with a further $7 million on surface surveys and airborne radiometric surveys. It is the opinion of the IUREP Orientation Phase Mission that the considerable funding required for the outlined programme would most suitably be realized by inviting national or foreign commercial organisations to participate in the exploration effort under a partnership or shared production arrangements. (author)

  3. U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project: Project plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA Project processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1987). This scope of work will entail the following activities on a site-specific basis: Develop a compliance strategy based on modification of the UMTRA Surface Project RAPs or develop Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC concurrence on the RAP and full participation of the affected states and tribes. Implement the RAP to include institutional controls, where appropriate, as an interim measure until compliance with the standards is achieved. Institute long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate long-term surveillance program on or before the Project end date. Prepare certification or confirmation reports and modify the long-term surveillance plan (LTSP), where needed, on those sites completed prior to the Project end date

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    . Industry surveys indicated that 10.3 Billion meters were drilled during 1976 at an estimated cost of $156.9 million. For 1977 plans are projected at 11.4 million meters at a cost of $167.8 million. Costs include land acquisition, geological and geophysical surveys, site preparation, logging, end site restoral. The uranium potential of the U.S.A. is estimated to be well in excess of 1,000,000 tonnes

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Peru. August - October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetland, Donald L.; Michie, Uisdean McL.

    1981-01-01

    cored drilling in assessment areas. Ground surveys should involve basin mapping geophysics, soil .and rock geochemistry, volcanic faces mapping and regional radon surveys. Airborne surveys should be initially helicopter-mounted total count surveys and only later spectrometric surveys. The IUREP Orientation Mission suggests that over a period of five years, some ten million US dollars be spent on surface and sub-surface exploration. Closer liaison, perhaps even joint project teams, should be initiated with the general state mapping and minerals organisation INGEMMET. This would serve to broaden significantly the geologic background and expertise in the search for uranium. In the event that private companies, local and/or foreign, are invited to participate in the exploration for uranium in Peru, it is recommended that no areas should be reserved solely to government exploration and assessment. All districts should be open to private companies' participation. This could be either joint ventures in chosen areas or merely IPEN supervision of activities and collection of data

  6. Use of project management approach for planning of decommissioning activities of a uranium mining site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Saulo F.Q.; Lage, Ricardo F.; Gomes, Danielle E.; Ogawa, Iukio

    2017-01-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the fuel cycle is an extremely important factor for the continuity of nuclear program in any country, especially in that countries such as Brazil, where there are some facilities are in process of being dismantled or must be decommissioned in the medium and long term. Since the decommissioning is a process quite complex and expensive and for this reason, it must be handle with modern management practices for so that the chances of success are increased. This work aims to describe the management plan and the strategy adopted for the execution of the decommissioning and environmental remediation (D and ER) activities for the first uranium mine in Brazil, located in the Minas Gerais State and known as Unidade de Tratamento de Minério (UTM). This facility was operated between 1982 and 1995. All the economically recoverable uranium was extracted and nowadays there is no mining activity is underway and there are only research and laboratory activities are running in the site. The conceptual plans for decommissioning and remediation for this unit have been prepared and emergency activities were recommended. These activities are related to studies about drainage acid, ensure safety of dams, adequacy of CAKE II storage conditions and request for operating licenses for the decommissioning from IBAMA and the authorization from CNEN. The majority of the critical factors for decommissioning had their origin due the characteristics of the project have been implemented and has remained due to uncertainties in the decision-making process over time. This project has a set of variables that need to be analyzed considering different aspects as licensing and regulatory framework, radiological, technical and engineering issues, beyond costs, schedule, risks and human resources. In this sense, it was decided to adopt the good practices of project management, published by the Project Management Institute - PMI and to give a differentiated

  7. Use of project management approach for planning of decommissioning activities of a uranium mining site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Saulo F.Q.; Lage, Ricardo F.; Gomes, Danielle E.; Ogawa, Iukio, E-mail: quintao.saulo@gmail.com, E-mail: rflage@gmail.com, E-mail: danielle@inb.gov.br, E-mail: iukio@inb.gov.br [Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The decommissioning of nuclear facilities in the fuel cycle is an extremely important factor for the continuity of nuclear program in any country, especially in that countries such as Brazil, where there are some facilities are in process of being dismantled or must be decommissioned in the medium and long term. Since the decommissioning is a process quite complex and expensive and for this reason, it must be handle with modern management practices for so that the chances of success are increased. This work aims to describe the management plan and the strategy adopted for the execution of the decommissioning and environmental remediation (D and ER) activities for the first uranium mine in Brazil, located in the Minas Gerais State and known as Unidade de Tratamento de Minério (UTM). This facility was operated between 1982 and 1995. All the economically recoverable uranium was extracted and nowadays there is no mining activity is underway and there are only research and laboratory activities are running in the site. The conceptual plans for decommissioning and remediation for this unit have been prepared and emergency activities were recommended. These activities are related to studies about drainage acid, ensure safety of dams, adequacy of CAKE II storage conditions and request for operating licenses for the decommissioning from IBAMA and the authorization from CNEN. The majority of the critical factors for decommissioning had their origin due the characteristics of the project have been implemented and has remained due to uncertainties in the decision-making process over time. This project has a set of variables that need to be analyzed considering different aspects as licensing and regulatory framework, radiological, technical and engineering issues, beyond costs, schedule, risks and human resources. In this sense, it was decided to adopt the good practices of project management, published by the Project Management Institute - PMI and to give a differentiated

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Yemen Arab Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Yemen Arab Republic occupies a part of the southern Arabian Shield and has been subject to considerable faulting and movement. As far as is known no uranium exploration has ever been undertaken or is presently contemplated in the country. Uranium could occur in the Shield rocks and conditions are right for calcrete type uranium deposits. The Speculative Potential may be in category 2, i.e. between 1000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  9. Environmental assessment related to the operation of Hansen uranium mill project, WM-24, Cyprus Mines Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental assessment was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, in response to a request for technical assistance from the State of Colorado in connection with licensing action on the proposed Cyprus Mines Corporation, Hansen uranium project. The major components of discussion are (1) a summary and recommended licensing conditions, (2) a description of the site environment and the proposed facility operation as well as alternatives in comparison with NRC's performance objectives for tailings management, and (3) a radiological assessment for estimating the facility's compliance with 10 CFR 20 and 40 CFR 190 dose regulations. The NRC recommends licensing the proposed mill subject to stipulated license conditions

  10. Environmental assessment related to the operation of San Miguel uranium project, WM-20, Phoneer Uravan, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An environmental assessment was prepared by the staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, in response to a request for technical assistance from the State of Colorado in connection with licensing action on the proposed Pioneer Uravan, Inc., San Miguel uranium project. The major components of discussion are (1) a summary and recommended licensing conditions, (2) a description of the site environment and the proposed facility operation as well as alternatives in comparison with NRC's performance objectives for tailings management, and (3) a radiological assessment for estimating the facility's compliance with 10 CFR 20 and 40 CFR 190 dose regulations. The NRC recommends licensing the proposed mill subject to stipulated license conditions

  11. Geotechnical and water resource aspects of uranium mill tailings pile reclamation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, J.A.; Tackston, J.W.; Portillo, R.

    1986-01-01

    Design and construction work is currently in progress at more than twenty sites associated with the UMTRA Project - this involves final reclamation of the uranium mill tailings piles so that they are stable for at least 200 years and for up to 1000 years. Remedial action construction plans for the tailings piles involve detailed consideration of the present and possible future ground water and surface-water impacts of the pile. Since the stabilized pile is ultimately a major geotechnical structure, detailed consideration of the long-term resistance to erosion and containment of radioactive material is also required. A case history illustrates how the critical design criteria governing the remedial action activities at the various piles are applied to the pile at the Lakeview site to provide for long-term protection of the water resource and public health and safety

  12. Probabilistic comparison of alternative characterization technologies at the Fernald Uranium-in-Soils Integrated Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautman, C.A.; McGraw, M.A.; Istok, J.D.; Sigda, J.M.; Kaplan, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of four alternative characterization technologies proposed for use in characterization of surficial uranium contamination in soil at the Incinerator and Drum Baling Areas at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in southwestern Ohio has been evaluated using a probabilistic, risk-based decision-analysis methodology. The basis of comparison is to minimize a computed total cost for environmental cleanup. This total-cost-based approach provides a framework for evaluating the trade-offs among remedial investigation, the remedial design, and the risk of regulatory penalties. The approach explicitly recognizes the value of information provided by remedial investigation; additional measurements are only valuable to the extent that the information they provide reduces total cost

  13. The Michelin uranium project, Labrador, Canada metallurgical testwork, economic studies and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goode, J.R., E-mail: jrgoode@sympatico.ca [Aurora Energy Resources Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Brown, J.A. [SGS Mineral Services, Lakefield, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Aurora Energy Resources Inc. is proposing to build and operate a 10,000 t/d process plant to produce 97 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} over a seventeen-year project life from deposits in coastal Labrador. This paper summarizes the testwork, generally done by SGS Mineral Services in Lakefield, Ontario, and the economic studies that support flowsheet selection. The selected flowsheet includes SAG and ball milling, acid leaching using air/SO{sub 2} as an oxidant, and resin-in-pulp (RIP) extraction of uranium from the leached slurry. Other unit operations examined include ore sorting, heap leaching, liquid-solid separation, solvent extraction, and nanofiltration for eluate upgrading. We also review the extensive programs of environmental testwork and studies that were completed. (author)

  14. The feasibility of uranium enrichment in Brazil for use in nuclear bombs and the conceptual project of a nuclear explosive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.P.

    1990-05-01

    This work reports the steps to define a brazilian system of nuclear safeguards under the congress responsibility. It discusses as well the feasibility of uranium enrichment for nuclear weapons, the construction of a nuclear submarine and the conceptual project of a nuclear explosive. (A.C.A.S.)

  15. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  16. Uranium project in Cerro Largo south orientation[Geochemical prospection of Uranium in Uruguay]; Proyecto uranio: orientacion Cerro Largo Sur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradier, B

    1982-07-01

    This study of orientation was realized with the purpose of recognizing the extension of the anomalies from a known source , and of being able to determine the choice of the places and the quality of the material to sampling to obtain an ideal response. We have chosen the introduction of this study in a place that offers a source in power of Uranium located accurately and that presents a sequence pedology that group the main types of soils.

  17. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards

  18. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  19. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project

  20. An outline of the application of an environmental management system to the PRAMU (Uranium Mining Environmental Restitution Project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetniansky de De Grande, Nelida; Avila Cadena, Guadalberto; Cardozo, Damian

    2000-01-01

    In Argentina the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) has the responsibility to restore uranium mining facilities, when milling operations have been shut down. To carry out this clean up actions CNEA created the Project for Uranium Mining Environmental Restoration (PRAMU in Spanish). To take into account the environmental aspects of the restoration activities, the PRAMU includes in its management an Environmental Management System (SGA in Spanish), which is of central importance in determining the environmental policy, objectives and targets. In this work a general view of the Environmental Management System is presented and an example of one of the environmental programs to be implemented is detailed. (author)

  1. Final environmental statement related to the operation of the Teton Uranium ISL Project (Docket No). 40-8781

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-08-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement is issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in response to the request by Teton Exploration Drilling, Inc. for the issuance of an NRC Source and Byproduct Material License authorizing operation of the proposed Teton Project to mine uranium in situ by injecting a carbonate/bicarbonate lixiviant into the ore body. The statement considers: (1) alternative of no licensing action, (2) alternative energy sources, and (3) alternatives if uranium ore is mined and refined on the site. The proposed action is to grant a Source and Byproduct Material License to the applicant subject to the stipulated license condition

  2. Uranium from German nuclear projects of the 1940ies. A nuclear forensic study; Uran aus deutschen Nuklearprojekten der 1940er Jahre. Eine nuklearforensische Untersuchung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, Klaus; Wallenius, Maria; Luetzenkirchen, Klaus [European Comission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements (ITU); and others

    2015-11-02

    In the 1940ies in Germany studies using uranium in different geometries were started. Using the isotope ration Th-230/U-234 it was possible to determine the materials used in 1949-1943.The geographic origin was determined from trace amounts of rare earths. The uranium used in German research projects came from Czech uranium mines. Traces of U-236 and Pu-236 were found corresponding to the normal occurrence. This fact indicates that no significant neutron irradiation has occurred.

  3. Geology, geochemistry, and geophysics of the Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site, southeastern Utah - Indications of contaminant migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otton, James K.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Horton, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The Fry Canyon uranium/copper project site in San Juan County, southeastern Utah, was affected by the historical (1957-68) processing of uranium and copper-uranium ores. Relict uranium tailings and related ponds, and a large copper heap-leach pile at the site represent point sources of uranium and copper to local soils, surface water, and groundwater. This study was designed to establish the nature, extent, and pathways of contaminant dispersion. The methods used in this study are applicable at other sites of uranium mining, milling, or processing. The uranium tailings and associated ponds sit on a bench that is as much as 4.25 meters above the level of the adjacent modern channel of Fry Creek. The copper heap leach pile sits on bedrock just south of this bench. Contaminated groundwater from the ponds and other nearby sites moves downvalley and enters the modern alluvium of adjacent Fry Creek, its surface water, and also a broader, deeper paleochannel that underlies the modern creek channel and adjacent benches and stream terraces. The northern extent of contaminated groundwater is uncertain from geochemical data beyond an area of monitoring wells about 300 meters north of the site. Contaminated surface water extends to the State highway bridge. Some uranium-contaminated groundwater may also enter underlying bedrock of the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone along fracture zones. Four dc-resistivity surveys perpendicular to the valley trend were run across the channel and its adjacent stream terraces north of the heap-leach pile and ponds. Two surveys were done in a small field of monitoring wells and two in areas untested by borings to the north of the well field. Bedrock intercepts, salt distribution, and lithologic information from the wells and surface observations in the well field aided interpretation of the geophysical profiles there and allowed interpretation of the two profiles not tested by wells. The geophysical data for the two profiles to the north of the

  4. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1993 (July 1, 1992, through June 30, 1993). To capture employment benefits, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Rifle, and Gunnison, Colorado. An estimated 52 percent of the employees working on the UMTRA Project responded to this information request. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  5. Project development for mining-metallurgical complexes for production of uranium concentrates - an analysis and a methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajuria G, S.; Blanco P, B.; Pena A, J.; Manzanera Q, C.

    1978-10-01

    Activities comprising the development of a project for a mining-metallurgical complex for production of uranium concentrates, from sampling and evaluation of an orebody until plant start-up, are analyzed. The analysis of the orebody, characterization of the ore, bench scale and pilot plant metallurgical studies, environmental studies and economic analyses of the project are described. The mining project and mine preparation and engineering and construction of the plant are reviewed in less detail. The estimated time lapse for the development of a typical project under ideal conditions is 66 months. A bar diagram is included showing an approximate timetable for each activity. (author)

  6. Preliminary evaluations of social and environmental impacts from mine-industrial project - uranium of Lagoa Real, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrao, F.I.; Oliveira, G.G. de; Zanetti, J.C.; Cunha, R.P.P. da.

    1990-01-01

    The Uranium Province of Lagoa Real is situated in the central south of the State of Bahia and constitutes at the moment the second uranium resource of Brazil, containing, in several anomalies, as available resource, 93.850 ton. of U sub(3) O sub(8). The Uranio do Brasil S.A. develops a mine-industrial complex in this Province with the aim to extract and benefit uranium and intending to improve in 1992. The project is considered with high hazard, because involves te management of radioactive material, and becomes necessary an available of environmental impact, in accordance with CONAMA 001/86 and an active participation of the society. This paper aims to indentify the social and environmental impacts of this process, as a contribution of this important discussion. (author)

  7. The Social Construction of Public Infrastructure: The Case of the Dutch National Geo-information Clearinghouse Project.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, Henk; Veenswijk, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Disclosure of governmental map related information is increasingly being conceptualized as management of inter-organizational National Spatial Data Infrastructures (NSDIs). Until now, studies have been published on how NSDI projects should be designed, set up and monitored. While these approaches

  8. Waste minimization opportunities at the U.S. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Rifle, Colorado, site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, G.L.; Arp, S.; Hempill, H.

    1993-01-01

    At two uranium mill sites in Rifle, Colorado, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is removing uranium mill tailings and contaminated subgrade soils. This remediation activity will result in the production of groundwater contaminated with uranium, heavy metals, ammonia, sulfates, and total dissolved solids (TDS). The initial remediation plan called for a wastewater treatment plant for removal of the uranium, heavy metals, and ammonia, with disposal of the treated water, which still includes the sulfates and TDSS, to the Colorado River. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permit issued by the Colorado Department of Health for the two Rifle sites contained more restrictive discharge limits than originally anticipated. During the detailed review of alternate treatment systems to meet these more restrictive limits, the proposed construction procedures were reviewed emphasizing the methods to minimize groundwater production to reduce the size of the water treatment facility, or to eliminate it entirely. It was determined that with changes to the excavation procedures and use of the contaminated groundwater for use in dust suppression at the disposal site, discharge to the river could be eliminated completely

  9. The environmental impact of a projected uranium development in Co. Donegal, Ireland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses both the generic and the site specific aspects of the projected uranium developments in Co. Donegal. The main focus is upon the health and safety issues arising from the dispersion of radioactivity in the vicinity of the project and the long term implications of waste disposal. The socio-economic aspects are also reviewed, in particular the likely balance of advantages and disadvantages with regard to employment in the region. The impact on the natural resources of the region is assessed. The effects of a single small operation and of regional development of mining and milling are compared. The radiological hazards of mine tailings require careful control, particularly in siting. A major review of the Low Level Radiation controversy is presented. A review of the international system for regulating radiation protection concludes that national authorities should take a greater role in the assessment of acceptable risks and that the ICRP recommendations and EEC directives should not be seen as an effective substitute. Finally, the report provides an extensive bibliography and overview of mitigation technology and monitoring programmes, and should prove of use as a guide for further analysis by the local authorities. (author)

  10. Quality assurance program plan for the Radiological Survey Activities Program - Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  11. Quality assurance program plan for the radiological survey activities program: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, S.J.; Berven, B.A.; Little, C.A.

    1986-08-01

    The Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude the site from UMTRAP based on whether the onsite residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels onsite are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the quality assurance program plan for the RASA program in conducting all activities related to the UMTRA project. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA, and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the RASA/UMTRAP QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Ghana. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelpa, Jean-Paul; Vogel, Wolfram

    1982-12-01

    The Republic of Ghana has no claimed uranium resources in the categories Reasonably Assured and Estimated Additional. The only occurrences known are within pegmatites and are of no economic importance. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana estimates that the Speculative Resources of the country fall between 15,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana believes that the Panafrican Mobile Belt has the highest uranium potential of all geological units of the country. The Obosum beds are the priority number two target. A three years exploration programme is recommended for a total cost of US $ 5,000,000. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and the Ghana Geological Survey provide a basic infrastructure for uranium exploration. Any future uranium development in Ghana should be embedded in a well defined national uranium policy. It is recommended that such a policy be draw, up by the Ghanaian authorities

  13. Uranium supply and demand projections in the pacific basin Australia's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    By the year 2000 O.E.C.D. estimates indicate that somewhere between 22% to 33% of the world's base load electrical energy will originate from nuclear power plants. In all major pacific basin countries, Australia has the world's largest known uranium reserves and is currently supplying around 12% of world uranium production. She should be preparing to compete on the world markets for uranium sales and should anticipate increased uranium fuel demands despite the possibility the Canada and China might further penerate this market. (Liu Wencai)

  14. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized

  15. Solubility of airborne uranium compounds at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffernan, T.E.; Lodwick, J.C.; Spitz, H.; Neton, J.; Soldano, M.

    2000-01-01

    The in vitro volubility of airborne uranium dusts collected at a former uranium processing facility now undergoing safe shutdown, decontamination and dismantling was evaluated by immersing air filters from high volume samplers in simulated lung fluid and measuring the 238 U in sequential dissolution fractions using specific radiochemical analysis for uranium. X rays and photons from the decay of uranium and thorium remaining on the filter after each dissolution period were also directly measured using a planar germanium detector as a means for rapidly evaluating the volubility of the uranium bearing dusts. Results of these analyses demonstrate that two -distinct types of uranium bearing dusts were collected on the filters depending upon the location of the air samplers. The first material exhibited a dissolution half-time much less than one day and was most likely UO 3 . The dissolution rate of the second material, which was most likely U 3 O 8 , exhibited two components. Approximately one-third of this material dissolved with a halftime much less than one day. The remaining two-thirds of the material dissolved with half times between 230 ± 16 d and 1350 ± 202 d. The dissolution rates for uranium determined by radiochemical analysis and by gamma spectrometry were similar. However, gamma spectrometry analysis suggested a difference between the half times of 238 U and its daughter 234 Th which may have important implications for in vivo monitoring of uranium

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Cook Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The Cook Islands total only 320 square kilometers in area are located in the central South Pacific, and are made up of either volcanic material or coral. Since neither rock type is considered a good host or source of uranium, the uranium potential of the Cook Islands is considered nil. (author)

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Democratic Kampuchea (Cambodia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The potential for uranium deposits appears to be poor in Cambodia. It is largely alluvium. Uranium may occur in discordant deposits in metamorphics and intrusives in the Cardamon and Elephant Hills in the south, and in placers of U/TH minerals in the delta or banks of the Mekong River. The potential is in category 1 (less than 1000 tonnes U ). (author)

  18. Quality Assurance Program Plan for the radiological survey activities program --- Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, R.R.; Little, C.A.

    1991-08-01

    The Pollutant Assessments Group (PAG) at the Grand Junction Office (GJO), Colorado, of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for surveying designated sites in the vicinity of 24 inactive mill sites involved in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP). The purpose of these surveys is to provide a recommendation to DOE whether to include or exclude these sites from UMTRAP based on whether the on-site residual radioactive material (if any) originated from the former mill sites, and radiation levels on-site are in excess of appropriate Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria. This report describes the Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) for the PAG in conducting all activities related to UMTRAP. All quality assurance provisions given by the DOE, DOE/UMTRA and ORNL organizations are integrated into this plan. Specifically, this report identifies the policies and procedures followed in accomplishing the PAG/UMTRA QA program, identifies those organizational units involved in the implementation of these procedures, and outlines the respective responsibilities of those groups. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Analysis of expert opinion on uranium mill tailings remedial action project (UMTRAP) alternatives: a decision-support-system pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, E.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project requires a specific remedial action individually chosen for each site. A panel of professionals was asked to rate objectives for remedial action and to rank alternatives for meeting the objectives. Responses were statistically analyzed. The panel's preference was earth cover in place at the Salt Lake City, Utah, and Shiprock, New Mexico, sites. Asphalt cover was next at Salt Lake City. This decision support system is appropriate for use with other inactive and active tailings sites

  20. Draft environmental statement related to the Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc., White Mesa Uranium Project (San Juan County, Utah)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc., for the construction and operation of the proposed White Mesa Uranium Project (Utah) with a product (U 3 O 8 ) production limited to 7.3 x 10 5 kg (1.6 x 10 6 lb) per year. Possible environmental impacts and adverse effects were identified. Conditions for the protection of the environment are set forth before the license can be issued

  1. Report about drilling works made in 13 Anomaly de Taylor and in the N- NE of its, around Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district): Uranium project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H.

    1983-01-01

    The perforations were carried out to investigate in depth denominated anomaly 13 detected during the Taylor Mission (1975) and extended the punch area of study during you are suitable DINAMIGE-BRGM (Project the present report details the activities realised in the environs Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district) by the command team of perforations of the uranium project. Previously and contemporarily to the executed works, prospection became geophysical ground geochemistry geology and, works. (Uranium)

  2. Evaluation and design of the uranium project “Tigre I – La Terraza”, Sierra Pintada, Mendoza, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, M.; Dieguez, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Sierra Pintada uranium district in Mendoza Province, Argentina, was discovered by airborne survey. This deposit is associated with a volcanic caldera and occurs in the Lower Permian volcaniclastic sediments of the Cochico Group, in which aeolian and fluvial sandstones, inter-bedded with ignimbrites, were reworked by pyroclastic flows. The origin of the mineralization is interpreted as a product of the leaching of the inter-bedded rhyolitic tuff. The mineralization is lenticular and nearly concordant with the bedding. The deposit has been affected by a complex fault system, which is responsible for mineralization and disposition via spatial displacement. The primary uranium minerals are uraninite, brannerite and coffinite. Uranophane and low liebigite uranium are the products of the oxidative alteration of primary minerals. This study involves the technical and economical evaluation of the open pit uranium mining project Tigre I – La Terraza in Mendoza, Argentina, at prefeasibility level. Its development includes geological modeling through economic evaluation, and the incorporation of different mining-specific software.

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-07-08

    Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

  4. Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3-2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21 C and 50 C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004 ± 0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21 C than the particles prepared at 50 C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: El Salvador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    No information is available on past uranium exploration in El Salvador. The foetallogenic map of Central America (ICAITI, 1970) shows no uranium occurrences, and no descriptions of occurrences are available for this study. Information on current uranium exploration in El Salvador is not available. The 1922 mining code, as amended, covers all minerals, with special rules applicable to phosphates, petroleum and other hydrocarbons. The state owns all minerals, including phosphates, except for salt and other common materials. Mineral and surface rights are distinct. Both citizens and aliens may acquire mineral rights. There is a possibility of uranium potential in the clastic sediments containing interbedded volcanics, particularly where the latter are tuffaceous. These rocks occur chiefly in the north western part of the country and are of limited areal extent. The possibility of uranium occurrences associated with acid volcanics cannot be discounted, but it is difficult to evaluate rocks of this type for uranium with the present state of knowledge. Accordingly, potential resources are estimated at between 0 and 1,000 tonnes uranium

  6. Uranium in Niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelmann, E.

    1978-03-01

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities [fr

  7. Sense of ownership and evaluation of safety. Questionnaire survey for reclamation project in the uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Kaoru; Gofuku, Akio; Tanaka, Masaru; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    To obtain public understanding on the uranium mining sites reclamation at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, it is necessary to conduct appropriate Risk Communication (RC). In this study, to discuss the appropriate Risk communication method on the uranium mining sites reclamation, we conducted questionnaire survey and SEM analysis. The results of the pass analysis are as follows: (1) in the group which has high-sense of ownership, risk acceptance has a strong impact on sense of security for uranium mining sites reclamation, (2) in the group which shows low-sense of ownership, hatred for radioactive ray has a strong impact relatively. (author)

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Somalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levich, Robert A.; Muller-Kahle, Eberhard

    1983-04-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Somalia suggests that in addition to the reasonably assured resources (RAR) of 5 000 t uranium and estimated additional resources (EAR) of 11 000 t uranium in calcrete deposits, the speculative resources (SR) could be within the wide range of 0 - 150 000 t uranium. The majority of these speculative resources are related to sandstone and calcrete deposits. The potential for magmatic hydrothermal deposits is relatively small. The Mission recommends an exploration programme of about US $ 22 000 000 to test the uranium potential of the country which is thought to be excellent. The Mission also suggests a reorganization of the Somalia Geological Survey in order to improve its efficiency. Recommended methods include geological mapping, Landsat Imagery Interpretation, airborne and ground scintillometer surveys, and geochemistry. Follow-up radiometric surveys, exploration geophysics, mineralogical studies, trenching and drilling are proposed in favourable areas

  9. Transportation of foreign-owned enriched uranium from the Republic of Georgia. Environmental assessment for Project Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (NN) has prepared a classified environmental assessment to evaluate the potential environmental impact for the transportation of 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-235 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom. The nuclear fuel consists of primarily fresh fuel, but also consists of a small quantity (less than 1 kilogram) of partially-spent fuel. Transportation of the enriched uranium fuel would occur via US Air Force military aircraft under the control of the Defense Department European Command (EUCOM). Actions taken in a sovereign nation (such as the Republic of Georgia and the United Kingdom) are not subject to analysis in the environmental assessment. However, because the action would involve the global commons of the Black Sea and the North Sea, the potential impact to the global commons has been analyzed. Because of the similarities in the two actions, the Project Sapphire Environmental Assessment was used as a basis for assessing the potential impacts of Project Partnership. However, because Project Partnership involves a small quantity of partially-spent fuel, additional analysis was conducted to assess the potential environmental impacts and to consider reasonable alternatives as required by NEPA. The Project Partnership Environmental Assessment found the potential environmental impacts to be well below those from Project Sapphire

  10. An investigation for the economic assessment of uranium deposits and mining projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnajim, N.

    1980-01-01

    It is the aim of this thesis to supply a comprehensive basis for decisions to be made in connection with the detection, exploration, extraction processing and marketing of uranium. The deposit types and forms, the technologies of exploration, extraction and processing as well as the most economic procedure for the exploitation of such deposits are presented in detail. This results in an assessment system which serves to consider the necessity for the construction of uranium ore deposits. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Research on metallogenic conditions of intersection-type uranium ore-deposits in Zhongdong area, Northern Guangdong province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengqi; Wu Lieqin; Zhang Guoyu

    2007-12-01

    The methods following as field geological investigation, trace element geo- chemistry and isotope geochemistry were used in this project. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics of Xiaoshui uranium ore deposits in Zhongdong area, Xiazhuang ore-field, Guangdong province, it could be concluded that: (1) The Provenance of Cretaceous mantle is a enriched mantle; (2) Silicified zone-type and intersection-type uranium ore are distinctness in the metallogenic period and mineralization process, and main metallogenic period of Xiaoshui uranium ore-deposit is 73.5 Ma; (3) The sources of uranium mineralization substance derived from enriched mantle; and (4)The intersection-type high grade uranium deposits were controlled by substances derived from mantle (contain with U, CO 2 , F, et al), tracks of intersection of NWW-across with NNE-trending faults and lithology of diabase. (authors)

  12. Research on metallogenic conditions of intersection-type uranium ore-deposits in Zhongdong area, Northern Guangdong province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengqi, Wang [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China); [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology, Beijing (China); Lieqin, Wu [Institute No.290, CNNC, Shaoguan (China); Guoyu, Zhang [East China Inst. of Technology, Fuzhou (China)

    2007-12-15

    The methods following as field geological investigation, trace element geo- chemistry and isotope geochemistry were used in this project. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics of Xiaoshui uranium ore deposits in Zhongdong area, Xiazhuang ore-field, Guangdong province, it could be concluded that: (1) The Provenance of Cretaceous mantle is a enriched mantle; (2) Silicified zone-type and intersection-type uranium ore are distinctness in the metallogenic period and mineralization process, and main metallogenic period of Xiaoshui uranium ore-deposit is 73.5 Ma; (3) The sources of uranium mineralization substance derived from enriched mantle; and (4)The intersection-type high grade uranium deposits were controlled by substances derived from mantle (contain with U, CO{sub 2}, F, et al), tracks of intersection of NWW-across with NNE-trending faults and lithology of diabase. (authors)

  13. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Weathering and its effects on uranium redistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, H.; Ohnuki, T.; Yanase, N.; Sato, T.; Kimura, H.; Sekine, K.; Nagano, T.; Klessa, D.A.; Conoley, C.; Nakashima, S.; Ewing, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    In the vicinity of the uranium ore deposit at Koongarra, quartz-chlorite schist, the ore host rock, has been subjected to weathering. Although quartz is resistant to weathering, chlorite has been altered to clays and iron minerals. The chlorite weathering and the uranium association with the weathered minerals are the main topics of this study. In order to clarify the weathering of chlorite and its effects on the redistribution of uranium, the processes, mechanisms, and kinetics of the chlorite weathering, and the uranium concentrations in minerals were examined by various methods: X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, transmission electron microscopy, autoradiography, visible spectroscopy, alpha and gamma spectrometry. The observed results were compared to those calculated, based on two different models developed for the present study. Water-rock interactions have resulted in the weathering of chlorite and precipitation and sorption of uranyl from the groundwaters with the weathering products. It is concluded that the chlorite weathering affects the uranium retardation factor, and thus uranium redistribution at Koongarra. 55 refs., 20 tabs., 120 figs

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Netherlands is part of the lowlands of Western Europe formed by negative crustal movements that have been offset by sedimentation. This specific area stretching from western Belgium into north-western Germany forms part of an epicontinental area that has been relatively stable since the end of the Hercynian orogeny. In Holland the subsidence has generally been small through- out the Mesozonic and Cenozoic though interrupted by short periods of erosion and non-subsidence. Thus the general geology of the Netherlands is dominated by the fact that throughout the Tertiary and Quaternary what now comprises the Netherlands formed part of a subsiding basin. Most of the surface geology of the country is dominated by f luvio-glacial shallow marine and lacoustine deposits. Prospecting for radioactive minerals in the Netherlands has been very limited. Some work has been carried out by the Geological Survey and by private consultants but this was very preliminary. To-date no uranium reserves or resources have been identified in the Netherlands. One small uranium occurrence has been recorded in Zeeland near Walcheren where some small uranium concentrations were found in association with phosphatic nodules. Apart from very limited targets in the Cretaceous and small phosphatic uranium associations there are no apparent uranium exploration targets in the Netherlands. On this basis we would, at this time, place the uranium potential of the Netherlands in Group I of the IUREP classification

  15. Project JADE. Geo scientific studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munier, R.; Follin, S.; Rhen, I.; Gustafson, Gunnar; Pusch, R.

    2001-08-01

    In the present report an evaluation of the geological impact on various deposition methods is presented. The studied methods are KBS-3 V (vertical deposition), KBS-3 H (horizontal deposition) and MLH (medium long holes).The investigation has been subdivided into three separate studies concerning rock mechanics, hydrogeology and structural geology. These are included as appendices. Various methods have been used for the analyses for example DFN-models (Discrete Fracture Networks), DFN, FEM (Finite Element Method), BEM (Boundary Element Method), DEM (Discrete Element Method) and BayMar (Bayesian-Markov). The prerequisites used for these investigations are based on earlier investigations of the TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. As a consequence thereof, the results presented here are specific to the locale but some conclusions of general character still can be made. In short the results of the investigations can be concluded as follows: If the rock mass exhibits a hydraulic anisotropy, the level of acceptance is strongly correlated to the direction of the deposition tunnels (applies to MLH and KBS-3 H). Differences between the methods concerning mechanical stability have been identified. The final choice of method will depend on the possibility to place the deposition tunnels in a favorable orientation. However, engineering can solve the problems associated to instability in the tunnels. KBS-3 (bored deposition tunnels) is recommended for rock masses in which the stress field has a moderate variation in magnitude and orientation. KBS-3 V (drilled and blasted deposition tunnels) and MLH are considered more robust and therefore recommended for rock masses in which the stress field has a large variation in magnitude or orientation. The impact of the fracture array differs for the studied methods. The level of acceptance differs but the differences are considered to be of no practical importance. For the studied rock mass (Aespoe), KBS-3 is recommended. MLH can only be recommended for rock masses in which the density of fractures of type D2-D3 is low. Further, MLH can only be recommended if the amount of discriminating rock types is low. As a consequence thereof MLH is considered unsuitable for the studied rock mass

  16. GeoServer cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Iacovella, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This book is ideal for GIS experts, developers, and system administrators who have had a first glance at GeoServer and who are eager to explore all its features in order to configure professional map servers. Basic knowledge of GIS and GeoServer is required.

  17. Development of Geo-Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Ozhereleva

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the state and development of geo-marketing. The author illustrates the multi-aspectedness of geo-marketing: applied technology and management technology. The article demonstrates that geo-marketing can be viewed as a reflection of the processes of co-evolution in society. The author brings to light the specifics of geo-marketing research and situational analysis in geo-marketing. The article describes applications of geo-marketing

  18. Development of Geo-Marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Ozhereleva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the state and development of geo-marketing. The author illustrates the multi-aspectedness of geo-marketing: applied technology and management technology. The article demonstrates that geo-marketing can be viewed as a reflection of the processes of co-evolution in society. The author brings to light the specifics of geo-marketing research and situational analysis in geo-marketing. The article describes applications of geo-marketing

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Colombia. February - March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.; Meunier, A.R.; Tauchid, M.

    1980-01-01

    The basic objective of IUREP is to 'review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for discovery of additional uranium resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising new areas in collaboration with the countries concerned'. Following the initial bibliographic study, which formed Phase I of IUREP, it was envisaged that a further assessment in co-operation with the country in question would lead to a better delineation of areas of high potential and a more reliable estimate as to the degree of favourability for the discovery of additional uranium resources. It was planned that such work would be accomplished through field missions to the country and that these field missions and the resulting report would constitute the IUREP Orientation Phase. The purpose of the Orientation Mission to Colombia was (i) to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, (ii) to delineate areas favourable for the discovery of speculative uranium resources, (iii) to make recommendations, as appropriate, on the best methods for evaluating the favourable areas, operating procedures and estimated possible costs, (iv) to develop the logistical data required to carry out any possible further work, and (v) to compile a report that would be immediately available to the Colombian authorities. Uranium exploration in Colombia is of very recent date, with the majority of activities getting under way only after 1970. In spite of the limited work that has been done, however, over 1300 radioactive anomalies have been recorded. The total number of uranium mineral occurrences resulting from follow-up work is still very small, and some are unusual in world terms. Topographic and geographic conditions in Colombia make geological and exploration work very difficult and costly, especially in the Cordilleras and the Interior Zone (Llanos Orientales). There are, at

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The Republic of Korea, occupies the southern end of the Korean peninsula. It has a long history of mining and mineral production, and has an active and fairly well equipped Geological Survey. The country in general is quite highly mineralized with many minerals including uranium although there has been no uranium production from it yet. Uranium occurs in granites, schists, and in black carbonaceous shales. The Korean Geological survey has estimated that one ore body contains 650 tonnes U in 1,600,000 tons of ore at an average grade of 0.047 percent U 3 O 8 . Many recent reports also indicate very large resources of uranium in very low grade ranges. The uranium potential for the Republic of Korea is considered in Category 2 (1,000 - 10,000 tonnes U) in the normal IUREP context. However, a very large resource may exist in the very low grades in black shales of the country. This resource is considered as in category 6 (500,000 to 1,000,000 tonnes U). (author)

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Most parts of Costa Rica, except for the Quaternary volcanic belt, have neither been studied or mapped in detail. Concerning past exploration limited uranium exploration took place in the late 1960's but details are lacking. No additional information is available. A bibliography of Costa Rican geology (Dengo, 19t>2a) and the metallogenic map of Central America (1CAITI, 1970) do not report any uranium occurrences. Data on current exploration activities for uranium are lacking. Mining is essentially regulated by a 1953 code and a 1964 supplement, but the production and use of radioactive materials are controlled by the Costa Rican Atomic Energy Commission. New raining and petroleum laws reportedly are being considered. Mining rights are available with few restrictions to foreign nationals and corporations. Costa Rica contains no rocks older than Cretaceous. The Mesozoic continental clastic sequences of Honduras and northern Nicaragua do not extend this far south. The massive intrusions of acidic granites and syenites in the Talamanca ranges are probably older than the oldest formations now seen adjacent to them and could not have contributed to their mineralization except through weathering. There may be a faint possibility for uranium deposition in lodes and fracture zones within the granitic rocks, but no such deposits have been reported. Insofar as the sediments are concerned, only the shallow water faces of the marine sediments of the Caribbean coastal region offer the remotest possibilities. The uranium potential of Costa Rica is estimated, at less than 1,000 tonnes

  2. Using geological information to develop new exploration project for uranium deposits in Southern Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Osamu

    1992-01-01

    Unconformity related uranium deposits which contain a large amount of resources with higher grades will be economically superior to other types of deposits. This paper presents the integrated use of geological information, which includes compilation data for the Precambrian geology in southern Africa and selected structural geologic data for some analogues of unconformity related uranium deposit in Canada (e.g. Key Lake deposit in Athabasca Basin) and the Precambrian rock hosted uranium deposit in Africa (e.g. Oklo-Munana, Rossing, Shinkolobwe and Dome deposits). Finally, some favourable geological terrains for unconformity related uranium deposit and the Precambrian rock hosted uranium deposit were selected on the basis of geological information. Further significant discoveries are likely in the following geological terrains. 1. Both the unconformity related and Oklo-Munana type deposits are favourable at (a) and (b). (a) the Lower Proterozoic Eburnian belts which are unconformably overlain by sequences of Kibaran and also the unmetamorphosed sequences in Pan-African. The age and paleoenvironment of the unmetamorphosed sequences in Pan-African is comparable to Kibaran. (b) the unmetamorphosed sequences in Eburnian. 2. The Rossing, Shinkolobwe and Dome type deposits are favourable at the Upper Proterozoic Pan-African Belts. (author)

  3. Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    While most of the rocks in the United Arab Emirates are of sedimentary marine origin there are also some granites and metamorphic rock areas. It is understood that Hunting Geology and Geophysics Ltd were contracted in 1975 to carry out a mineral survey over 11,500 square kilometres utilising, among others, gamma-ray spectrometry. The results of this survey are not known. A report in 1974 of a large occurrence of uranium in Fujairah was later discredited but at least two radioactive anomalies are known in the country. The existence of granitic rocks and the appropriate conditions for calcareous duricrust formations may indicate some slight potential for uranium. The Speculative Potential may be in the 1000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The IURBP Orientation Phase Mission assesses the Speculative Uranium Resources in Thailand to be within the range of 1 500 to 38 500 tonnes U. Geological environments which are considered by the Mission to be favourable for uranium occurrences include the following: sandstones of Jurassic to Triassic age; Tertiary sedimentary basins (northern Thailand); Tertiary sedimentary basins (southern Thailand); associated with fluorite deposits; granitic rocks; black shales and graphitic slates of the Palaeozoic; associated with sedimentary phosphate deposits; and associated with monazite sands. Physical conditions in Thailand, including a wet tropical climate, dense forest growth and rugged terrain in some areas and relative inaccessibility, make exploration difficult and costly. There is currently no ready accessibility to detailed topographic and geological maps and other basic data. This lack of availability is a severe constraint to systematic exploration. The lack of skilled personnel experienced in uranium studies and the low level of technical support is a serious hindrance to exploration in Thailand. (author)

  6. Determination of total and isotopic uranium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry at the Fernald Environmental Management Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.L.; Bolin, R.N.; Feller, M.T.; Danahy, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    At the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) in southwestern Ohio, ICP-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), with sample introduction by peristaltic pumping, is used to determine total and isotopic uranium (U-234, U-235, U-236 and U-238) in soil samples. These analyses are conducted in support of the environmental cleanup of the FEMP site. Various aspects of the sample preparation and instrumental analysis will be discussed. Initial sample preparation consists of oven drying to determine moisture content, and grinding and rolling to homogenize the sample. This is followed by a nitric/hydrofluoric acid digestion to bring the uranium in the sample into solution. Bismuth is added to the sample prior to digestion to monitor for losses. The total uranium (U-238) content of this solution and the U 235 /U 238 ratio are measured on the first pass through the ICP-MS. To determine the concentration of the less abundant U 234 and U 236 isotopes, the digestate is further concentrated by using Eichrom TRU-Spec extraction columns before the second pass through the ICP-MS. Quality controls for both the sample preparation and instrumental protocols will also be discussed. Finally, an explanation of the calculations used to report the data in either weight percent or activity units will be given

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: New Hebrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The New Hebrides consists of about 70 islands in the Southwest Pacific Ocean. The 12 largest, and main islands are volcanic cones with a few marine sediments. A manganese mining industry is presently producing but there has been no known activity in uranium exploration or mining. The area of the New Hebrides is nearly 15,000 square kilometers, and the principal industries are centered around agriculture and fishing. The uranium potential is estimated in category 1 (less than 1,000 tonnes U) (author)

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Belize (Former British Honduras)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Belize is a well-forested area of 22,960 square kilometers. Its capital is Belmopan. The country is generally flat north of the capital city. The flat, swampy Caribbean Coast of Belize gradually ascends to the low peaks of the Maya and Cockscomb Mountains (elevation to 1,120 meters). The area south of the Maya Mountains is much more rugged than the area to the north. The country is drained by seventeen rivers, the chief ones being the Belize, Hondo, New, Sibun, Monkey and Moho. There is 'hurricane danger in the July-October period. Belize has reportedly been surveyed by Gamma Ray Spectrometer for phosphates which probably would have contained sufficient uranium to be detectable. The survey traversed about 1,000 line kms along major north-south and east-west roads as well as many secondary roads and trails. The uranium readings ranged from 0. to 9.9 ppm with a uranium content of 1-2 ppm in the limestone areas and 2-7 ppm in the alluvium-covered areas. The U/Th ratio varied from 0.11 to 1.65. A recent traverse across the Mountain Pine Ridge batholith gave one reading as high as 36 ppm but the average was about 9-10 ppm. The upper 1000-3000 feet of core and cuttings from nine deep oil wells were checked for phosphates and uranium. Most of the core and cuttings were almost pure limestones. The P 2 0 3 content was less than 0.05 percent and no uranium was detected. It is very doubtful that any significant uranium occurrences will be found in the sediments surrounding the Maya Mountain uplift. However, there is a slight chance that uranium might occur in the granites and pegmatites in the Maya Mountains. The potential of Belize is estimated to be in the less than 1.000 tonnes uranium range, considering the restricted range, of geologic environments encountered there

  9. Uranium: one utility's outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    The perspective of the Arizona Public Service Company (APS) on the uncertainty of uranium as a fuel supply is discussed. After summarizing the history of nuclear power and the uranium industries, a projection is made for the future uranium market. An uncrtain uranium market is attributed to various determining factors that include international politics, production costs, non-commercial government regulation, production-company stability, and questionable levels of uranium sales. APS offers its solutions regarding type of contract, choice of uranium producers, pricing mechanisms, and aids to the industry as a whole. 5 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  10. Final environmental statement related to the Wyoming Mineral Corporation Irigaray uranium solution mining project (Johnson County, Wyoming)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The Irigaray project consists of solution mining (in situ leaching) operations involving uranium ore deposits in Johnson County, Wyoming. Solution mining activities will include a processing facility with an annual production of 500,000 lb of U 3 O 8 from up to 50 acres of well fields through the initial license authorization. The Irigaray project has an estimated lifetime of up to 10 to 20 years with known ore deposits and the current level of solution mining technology. The site is mostly used as grazing land for cattle and sheep. Initiation of the Irigaray project would result in the temporary removal from grazing and the disturbance of approximately 60 acres during operation as proposed by the staff. All disturbed surface areas will be reclaimed and returned to their original use. Approximately 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 of water will be withdrawn from the ore zone aquifer. 43 figs, 52 tables

  11. Use of GIS at treatment of risk analysis of the project Remediation of uranium liabilities in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grand, T.; Daniel, S.; Thorne, M.C.; Baker, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to show of use of the geographic information system (GIS) at solving of the projects with evaluation of influence of mining on the environment. This work is consequent with the PHARE project on the territory of Slovakia in 1998-1999 in the region of Novoveska Huta. The main aim of the project was to evaluate of effectiveness of the re-cultivation measures in the space of former uranium deposits, localised in adjacent around of Novoveska Huta and their present influence on the environment. Constitution of the space oriented database in GIS enable identification of sources, receptors and migration ways as well as obtaining of introductory data for quantification of ecologically weight in the frame of EIA and MUAU methods.The possibilities of use of GIS at the quantification and evaluation of influence of mining on the environment was showed

  12. South African oil dependency : geo-political, geo-economic and geo-strategic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ph.D. There is little research undertaken on the economic assessment of oil security of supply from the dimensions of geo-politics, geo-economics and geo-strategy. This study seeks to bridge the gap by providing new analytical and empirical work that captures the impact of geo-politics, geo-economics and geo-strategy on oil supply, consumption and price. This study is the first to define, analyse and contextualise the South African oil security of supply from a geo-political, geo-economic ...

  13. The ultrasonic ranging and data system for radiological surveys in the UMTRA [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action] Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Blair, M.S.; Dickerson, K.S.; Pickering, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data System (USRADS) was developed to allow radiation exposure data and positional information to be collected, stored and analyzed in a more efficient manner than currently employed on the (Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project. USRADS is a portable unit which employs ultrasonics, radio frequency transmissions, and a personal computer. Operational experience indicates that the system results in increased information about the property with decreased data analysis and transcription effort and only slightly more field effort. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Uranium energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erkes, P.

    1981-06-01

    Uranium supply and demand as projected by the Uranium Institute is discussed. It is concluded that for the industrialized countries, maximum energy independence is a necessity. Hence it is necessary to achieve assurance of supply for uranium used in thermal power reactors in current programs and eventually to move towards breeders

  15. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  16. Integration of health physics, safety and operational processes for management and disposition of recycled uranium wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, James; Buckley, James

    2003-01-01

    Fluor Fernald, Inc. (Fluor Fernald), the contractor for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), recently submitted a new baseline plan for achieving site closure by the end of calendar year 2006. This plan was submitted at DOE's request, as the FEMP was selected as one of the sites for their accelerated closure initiative. In accordance with the accelerated baseline, the FEMP Waste Management Project (WMP) is actively evaluating innovative processes for the management and disposition of low-level uranium, fissile material, and thorium, all of which have been classified as waste. These activities are being conducted by the Low Level Waste (LLW) and Uranium Waste Disposition (UWD) projects. Alternatives associated with operational processing of individual waste streams, each of which poses potentially unique health physics, industrial hygiene and industrial hazards, are being evaluated for determination of the most cost effective and safe met hod for handling and disposition. Low-level Mixed Waste (LLMW) projects are not addressed in this paper. This paper summarizes historical uranium recycling programs and resultant trace quantity contamination of uranium waste streams with radionuclides, other than uranium. The presentation then describes how waste characterization data is reviewed for radiological and/or chemical hazards and exposure mitigation techniques, in conjunction with proposed operations for handling and disposition. The final part of the presentation consists of an overview of recent operations within LLW and UWD project dispositions, which have been safely completed, and a description of several current operations

  17. National uranium resource evaluation program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Oklahoma City NTMS Quadrangle, Oklahoma. Uranium resource evaluation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 812 groundwater samples and 847 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possibly uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on the results from groundwater sampling, the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization in the quadrangle are the Permian Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hills Formations. These units are characterized by relatively high average concentrations of uranium, conductivity, arsenic, calcium, lithium, molybdenum, and sulfate. In addition, groundwaters from the Pennsylvanian Oscar Formation are characterized by values above the 85th percentile for uranium, conductivity, the uranium/sulfate ratio, arsenic, and vanadium. Results of stream sediment sampling indicate that the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization include the same Permian Formation as indicated by groundwater sampling (Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog-Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hill Formations) in an area where these formations crop out north of the North Canadian River. Stream sediment samples from this area are characterized by concentrations above the 85th percentile for uranium, thorium, arsenic, lithium, manganese, and vanadium

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Western Samoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Western Samoa consists principally of two large islands with seven other smaller ones, five of which are uninhabited. No concrete geologic description could be found, but on the basis of a volcanic origin for some of the islands a category 1 uranium potential is assigned. There is no mining industry, and no government agency appears to have a geologic department. (author)

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Although uranium prospecting was commenced in the United Kingdom (area 244,813 km) at the end of the last century and was resumed just after the Second World War, it does not seem, for various reasons, despite the level of competence of its specialists and the level of instrumentation available, that the country has been adequately prospected for uranium. The small reserves discovered to date, some 7400t U for all the official NEA/lAEA categories, probably do not reflect the true uranium potential of the United Kingdom. However, they do indicate without doubt that the resources remaining to be discovered are so located that detection will be difficult. The most promising areas of investigation in our opinion are the Old Red Sandstones of the Devonian period on the one hand and the districts where the uraniferous black shales of the Cambro-Ordovician and Namurian have suffered perturbations which may have led to immobilization of their uranium content (in particular, granitizations). All the considerations put forward in this analysis lead us to place the United Kingdom in category 4 of the classification adopted for IUREP. (author)

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Morocco. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aniel, Mlle B.; Hetland, Donald L.; Glassom, Pierre J.

    1983-07-01

    The results of the study carried out during the IUREP Orientation Phase in Morocco permit to think that the possible reserves of uranium in this country range between 33,500 t and 89,500 t U 3 O 8 for what concerns the known traces and the already prospected zones in the Northern provinces. If we consider the favourability criteria of certain geological contexts that have not been researched yet in the same provinces and the speculative potential of the Southern provinces that have not been prospected at all, we can reasonably estimate reserves to double. In this case, the potential in uranium for the whole Morocco could range between 70,000 and 180,000 tons. The uranium phosphate constitutes by far the most important reserves of Morocco and the Moroccan government has decided to recuperate this uranium as sub-product from phosphoric acid. The consultants of the IUREP mission have estimated that the 'geological reserves' were ranging at about 12,3 million tons of U 3 O 8 and that the recoverable reserves could be between 7 and 10 million tons of U 3 O 8

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sri Lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Sri Lanka is essentially a detached portion of the Deccan Plateau of south India and like it, is underlain almost everywhere by hard old Precambrian rocks. Prior to 1940 there was no systematic organised geological survey work on the island. Between 1957 and 1962 a partial aerial survey and field traverses were conducted in a search for radio- active minerals. Since then a modest programme has continued. Thorianite was first discovered in placer deposits in 1903 and prospecting has found many other refractory radioactive minerals probably derived from the weathering of pegmatites. Monazite is found as an important constituent of beach placer deposits and it is estimated to have an average content of 8-10%ThO 2 and 0.3 - 0.5% U 3 O 8 . Up to 1000 tons monazite per year could be produced from the beach sand industry. Sri Lanka has had very little systematic exploration for uranium and as it is largely composed of Precambrian rocks it deserves closer attention. On the other hand it is part of a thorium rich province and there is a body of technical opinion that believes that thorium rich provinces are unlikely to contain significant uranium deposits. For these reasons it is estimated that the Speculative Potential may be within the range of 1000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium. In addition it maybe possible to produce up to 5 tonnes uranium and 100 tonnes thorium from the beach sand industry on an annual basis. (author)

  2. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress ''that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. How Effective Project Management Will Add Value to Your Uranium Asset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, Russell; Titley, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Key learnings: • Timely stakeholder communication and education; • Mineralogy and testwork; • Learn from other Uranium developers. Feasibility work can cost anywhere from $1m up to $30m, construction and operation costs run into $100m’s. Spend investors money wisely to ensure a good product.

  4. Environmental assessment: Uranium Geologic Drilling Project, Winnemucca Dry Lake, Pershing, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This environmental assessment has been prepared to provide the environmental input into the DOE decision to drill and log ten (10) holes of under 7-in. diameters to depths of 100 to 1500 feet in the northern margin of Winnemucca Dry Lake, Pershing County, Nevada, to obtain subsurface information related to uranium favorability

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Fiji Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The Fiji Islands, comprising over 300 islands, with a total area of 18,700 square kilometers are basically either volcanic or coral. A small mining industry exists, however, and on the basis of that fact, and without geologic support of any kind a Category 1 (0 to 1,000 tonnes U) uranium potential has been assigned. (author)

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Sudan. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneupper, G.; Scivetti, N.

    1981-01-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to the Democratic Republic of the Sudan believes that the Speculative Resources of the country might fall between 20,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium and more. This indicates that the Speculative Resources of the Sudan could be significantly higher than previously estimated (7,500 tonnes uranium) by the NEA/IAEA Steering Group on the Uranium Resources - IUREP Phase I. The Government is willing to consider valid exploration programmes presented by prospective partners as long as they serve the interests of both parties. Within the general six-year (1977/78-1982/83) plan for development of the country's mineral resources, the Ministry of Energy and Mining has set up certain priorities which it would like to see expeditiously implemented: uranium exploration and production stands high on the list of priorities. On the basis of very limited information on regional geology and on previous exploration which was available to the Mission, it is estimated that the greatest potential for the Speculative Resources of possible economic significance will prove to occur in the following geological environments of the Sudan (Red Sea Hills area is not included): precambrian basement complex, palaeozoic-mesozoic-tertiary sedimentary basins and the tertiary to recent calcretes. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission believes that some 20 Million US$ (very rough estimate) will be needed to (1) check the validity of the basic geological concepts formulated on the uranium potential of the selected areas, (2) accumulate diagnostic geological, geophysical, geochemical data indicative of a true uranium potential there, (3) study the basement complex rocks and the sedimentary formations at least on a broad structural-stratigraphic reconnaissance basis (a tremendous amount of valuable water drilling data has accumulated over the last years for some of the selected sedimentary basins) and (4) determine the most appropriate investigation techniques to be utilized

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Turkey. September to November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziehr, H.; Komura, A.

    1985-02-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Turkey estimates the Speculative Resources of the country to lie between 21 000 and 55 000 tonnes uranium. Past exploration in Turkey, dating from 1953, has indicated a very high number of uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies, but ore deposits of significant size and grade have not been found. Present reserves amount to 4 600 tonnes uranium which can be allocated to approximately 15 sandstone type deposits in Neogene continental sediments. Several hundreds of other occurrences and radioactive anomalies exist where ore reserves have not been delineated. The uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies can be divided according to host rock into (a) crystalline massif and (b) Tertiary continental sediment. The greatest geological potential for further resources is estimated to exist in the above mentioned two geological terrains. The most favourable geological potential exists in Neogene continental sedimentary basins near the crystalline massifs. Because surface exploration in the known favourable areas such as the Koepruebasi Basin has been so systematic, extensive, and successful, it is improbable that additional surface work will have much effect in increasing the number of new radioactive anomalies or uranium occurrences detected at the surface in these areas. Surface survey work in these areas should be mainly designed to assist the understanding of structures at depth. Surface reconnaissance survey work is, however, required in other parts of the above mentioned two geological terrains in this country. Before starting such a reconnaissance survey in new areas, the Mission suggests that a careful and extensive library study be conducted in close co-operation with sedimentologists, petrologists, and remote sensing specialists. The Mission suggests that in the medium term, 8 to 10 years, some 85 - 110 million U.S. Dollars be spent on airborne and ground surveys, including geological, radiometric, geochemical, and

  8. EuroGeoSurveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demicheli, L.; Ludden, J. N.; Robida, F.

    2012-04-01

    information and advice, EGS runs a number of Expert Groups in areas such as Carbon Capture and Storage, Earth Observation, Geochemistry, Spatial Information, Marine Geology, Mineral Resources, Water Resources, GeoEnergy, Natural Hazards, Soils Resources, as well as International Cooperation and Development or Communication to improve on external relations, dissemination and outreach. The Expert Groups consist of a panel of leading scientists from the member organisations of EGS who meet on a regular basis and provide technical support to the Secretariat. Having built its reputation as the leading source of European geological expertise to the European Institutions, EGS is now looking to develop their reputation in the private sector as well as their public profile through the Communication Strategy 2010-2016. EGS international profile, already consolidated through association with international geological organisations such as the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) or as a participating organisation in the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), has recently gaining momentum through participation in outstanding projects (such as OneGeology). Most notably in 2010 agreements were signed for increased collaboration with the European Environment Agency (EEA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Already consolidated EU priorities and emerging ones, such as those induced by globalization and the financial crisis, have opened a series of challenges for geosciences, forcing geological surveys to re-organise themselves. EGS is preparing to evolve again to even more successfully deal with those challenges. In this framework the cooperation with EPOS is being followed with much interest, as it is clear for EGS that only an open access data policy and the exploitation of synergies with other geoscientific bodies can reinforce our joint capacity to improve the security, health and wealth of European citizens.

  9. The Population of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Ed; Buckalew, Brent; Burkhardt, Andrew; Cowardin, Heather; Frith, James; Gomez, Juan; Kaleida, Catherine; Lederer, Susan M.; Lee, Chris H.

    2016-01-01

    The 6.5-m Magellan telescope 'Walter Baade' at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile has been used for spot surveys of the GEO orbital regime to study the population of optically faint GEO debris. The goal is to estimate the size of the population of GEO debris at sizes much smaller than can be studied with 1-meter class telescopes. Despite the small size of the field of view of the Magellan instrument (diameter 0.5-degree), a significant population of objects fainter than R = 19th magnitude have been found with angular rates consistent with circular orbits at GEO. We compare the size of this population with the numbers of GEO objects found at brighter magnitudes by smaller telescopes. The observed detections have a wide range in characteristics starting with those appearing as short uniform streaks. But there are a substantial number of detections with variations in brightness, flashers, during the 5-second exposure. The duration of each of these flashes can be extremely brief: sometimes less than half a second. This is characteristic of a rapidly tumbling object with a quite variable projected size times albedo. If the albedo is of the order of 0.2, then the largest projected size of these objects is around 10-cm. The data in this paper was collected over the last several years using Magellan's IMACS camera in f/2 mode. The analysis shows the brightness bins for the observed GEO population as well as the periodicity of the flashers. All objects presented are correlated with the catalog: the focus of the paper will be on the uncorrelated, optically faint, objects. The goal of this project is to better characterize the faint debris population in GEO that access to a 6.5-m optical telescope in a superb site can provide.

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Uganda. Draft. November 1982 - January 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trey, Michel de; Levich, Robert A.

    1983-02-01

    At present, there are no reasonably assured resources of uranium in Uganda in any price category. Speculative resources are restricted to 2,400 metric tons of uranium in an apatite deposit, which in the past has been actively mined for phosphate. The possible recovery of this uranium is dependent upon a number of economic and technological conditions which have never been thoroughly studied. Although the geology of Uganda holds some interesting possibilities for hosting uranium deposits, the studies conducted between 1949 and 1979 were limited to known radioactive occurrences and anomalies in limited areas which had little economic significance. Vast areas, less known and less accessible were completely ignored. Uranium exploration must therefore be started again in a systematic manner using modern methods. The current economic situation in Uganda is so critical that International technical and financial assistance is vitally needed to help rehabilitate the Geological Survey and Mines Department. Uganda currently can offer only very restricted services. The transportation system is quite deficient: the railway does not presently cross the frontier with Kenya, and all equipment and goods must be transported from Mombasa by road. Housing is in very short supply, and many basic commodities are often unobtainable. Any organization or private company which begins an exploration program in Uganda must plan to import essentially all the equipment and supplies it shall require. It shall also have to construct offices and staff housing, and import and stockpile fuel and staple goods, so as not to be at the mercy of the (at times) inadequate local supplies. It shall most probably also have to provide basic local and imported food to its Ugandan staff and should plan to pay much higher local salaries than is customary. Lastly, it will have to provide its own fleet of trucks and organize its own transport system. (author)

  11. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-10-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are

  12. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings ' ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.' Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in

  13. InnovaRig, a new drilling concept for research drilling projects of GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam; InnovaRig - ein neues Bohranlagenkonzept fuer Forschungsbohrungen des GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) Potsdam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, L.; Prevedel, B. [GFZ Potsdam (Germany); Binder, J. [Herrenknecht Vertical GmbH, Schwanau (Germany); Mueller Ruhe, W. [H. Anger' s Soehne mbH, Hessisch Lichtenau (Germany); Wundes, B. [World Wide Drilling Consultants, Gladbeck (Germany)

    2007-09-13

    The world-wide experience in scientific drilling projects gained by GFZ has shown that there is no commercial drilling system that meets all technical requirements of either geoscientific or geotechnical projects. Research must therefore be done on a flexible and economical drilling system for special applications. GFZ Potsdam is therefore developing an optimized drilling system for a depth of up to 5000 m, in a joint R + D project with the industrial partners Herrenknecht-Vertical GmbH, a subsidiary of Herrenknecht AG (Schwanau), and H. Anger's Soehne Bohr- und Brunnenbaugesellschaft mbH (Hessisch-Lichtenau). (orig.)

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Venezuela. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetland, Donald L.; Obellianne, Jean-marie

    1981-04-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Venezuela believes that the Speculative Uranium Resources of that country fall between 2,000 and 42,000 tonnes. This assumes that a part of the Speculative Resources would be extracted as by-product uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid production. Past exploration in Venezuela has resulted in the discovery of very few uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies except for the many airborne anomalies recorded on the Guayana Shield. To date no economic deposits or significant uranium occurrences have been found in Venezuela except for the uraniferous phosphorites in the Cretaceous Navey Formation which are very low grade. The uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies can be divided according to host rock into: (1) Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks, (2) Cretaceous phosphorite beds, (3) continental sandstone, and (4) granitic rocks. The greatest geological potential for further uranium resources is believed to exist in the crystalline and sedimentary Precambrian rocks of the Guayana Shield, but favorable geological potential also exist in younger continental sandstones. Since the Guayana Shield is the most promising for the discovery of economic uranium deposits most of the proposed exploration effort is directed toward that area. Considerable time, effort and capital will be required however, because of the severe logistical problems of exploration in this vast, rugged and inaccessable area, Meager exploration work done to date has been relatively negative suggesting the area is more of a thorium rather than a uranium province. However because of the possibility of several types of uranium deposits and because so little exploration work has been done, the Mission assigned a relatively small speculative potential to the area, i.e. 0 to 25,000 tonnes uranium. A small speculative potential (0 to 2,000 tonnes) was assigned to the El Baul area in Cojedes State, in the Llanos Province. This potential is postulated

  15. Treatment of liquid effluent from uranium mines and mills. Report of a co-ordinated research project 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    Treatment and control of liquid effluents produced during uranium mining and milling operations is an integral part of environmental project management. Research has continued to add to the large body of science that has been built up around the treatment of radioactive and non-radioactive effluents to minimize their long-term environmental impact. The objective of the meetings on which this publication is based was to exchange information on active effluent treatment technologies that have application during operations and passive treatment techniques such as constructed wetlands and use of micro-organisms that are applicable during project reclamation and long-term care and maintenance. Papers describe effluent treatment case histories from active uranium mining and processing operations as well as effluent treatment research on both active and passive systems that have potential application under a wide range of operating and post-operational conditions including new information on high-density sludge from effluent neutralization (Australia), aerated manganese hydroxide for removal of radium (China), nanofiltration and macropore resins to treat mine water (Australia and China), in situ microbial treatment and permeable reactive walls for treatment of contaminated groundwater (Germany), construction of wetlands to treat mine water runoff (Australia and Germany), biogenic granules to remove 226 Ra from mill effluent (India), self-remediation of acidic in situ leach aquifers (Kazakhstan) and sorption characteristics of soil for self-remediation of contaminated groundwater (Hungary). These and other topics presented in this publication will be of interest to technical personnel who deal with day-to-day practical aspects of liquid effluent control and treatment at uranium production facilities worldwide

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement to construct and operate the Crownpoint Uranium Solution Mining Project, Crownpoint, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) addresses the proposed action of issuing a combined source and 11e(2) byproduct material license and minerals operating leases for Federal and Indian lands to Hydro Resources, Inc. (HRI). This action would authorize HRI to conduct in-situ leach uranium mining in McKinley County, New Mexico. Such mining would involve drilling wells to access the ore bodies, then recirculating groundwater with added oxygen to mobilize uranium found in the ore. Uranium would then be removed from the solution using ion exchange technology in processing plants located at three separate sites. As proposed by HRI, a central plant would provide drying and packaging equipment for the entire project. The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the proposed action was prepared by an interagency review group comprising staff from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Land Management, and published in October 1994. After evaluating the environmental impacts of the proposed action in the DEIS, the reviewing agencies concluded that the appropriate action was to issue the requested license and proposed leases authorizing HRI to proceed with the project. This FEIS reevaluates the proposed licensing action on the basis of written and oral comments received on the DEIS and on additional information obtained in 1995 and 1996. The FEIS describes and evaluates (1) the purpose of and need for the proposed action, (2) alternatives to the proposed action, (3) the environmental resources that could be affected by the proposed action and alternatives, (4) the potential environmental consequences of the proposed action and alternatives, and (5) the economic costs and benefits associated with the proposed action. Based on this assessment, the FEIS makes recommendations concerning the requested license and proposed leases

  17. Cleanup protocols when encountering thorium-230 at U.S. DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.L.; Hylko, J.M.; Cornish, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, established the regulatory framework, under which the US EPA charged with developing standards for the cleanup and disposal of tailings at 24 designated inactive uranium processing sites located in 10 states. 40 CFR 192.12 requires that the concentration of Ra-226 in land averaged over any area of 100 square meters shall not exceed the background level by more than 5 pCi/g, averaged over the first 15 cm of soil below the surface, 15 pCi/g, averaged over 15-cm-thick layers of soils more than 15 cm below the surface. However, Th-230 is not specifically addressed by the EPA in 40 CFR 192.12, which naturally decays with a half-life of 77,000 years to form Ra-226. Consequently, the cleanup of the initial Ra-226 contamination according to the standards will not necessarily mitigate against the eventual ingrowth of residual Ra-226 with time, due to the radioactive decay of residual Th-230. Therefore, to direct the excavation of residual Th-230, four generic protocols are being used at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, as follows: Determining the allowable remaining concentration of Th-230 in surface and subsurface soils; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the unsaturated subsurface soil; Encountering Th-230 contamination in the saturated zone; and Verification sampling. The four generic protocols, developed in conjunction with the supplemental standards provision, ensure protection of the general public by reducing exposures to levels that are As Low As Reasonably Achievable, while considering practical measures necessary to excavate Th-230 under conditions encountered at the UMTRA Project site

  18. Internet Geo-Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    INTERNET GEO-LOCATION DUKE UNIVERSITY DECEMBER 2017 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR...REPORT TYPE FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) MAY 2014 – MAY 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERNET GEO-LOCATION 5a. CONTRACT...of SpeedTest servers that are used by end users to measure the speed of their Internet connection. The servers log the IP address and the location

  19. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  20. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  1. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado State fiscal year 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994 (1 July 1993 through 30 June 1994). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. Information on wages, taxes, and subcontract expenditures in combination with estimates and economic multipliers is used to estimate the dollar economic benefits to Colorado during the state fiscal year. Finally, the fiscal year 1994 estimates are compared to fiscal year 1993 employment and economic information

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Papua New Guinea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    No uranium mineralisation has been identified in Papua New Guinea; there has, however, been virtually no exploitation specifically for uranium. The extensive Mesozoic platform sediments overlying Palaeozoic metamorphic and Permian or Triassic granite basement appear to be the most prospective units for uranium. During the Triassic, fluviatile and marginal marine arkose, feldspathic and volcanic sandstone, and minor reffal limestone were deposited in downfaulted interior and marginal basins of the platform. Locally these sediments are underlain by dacitic volcanics. A new and more widespread phase of shallow marine, deltaic, and fluciatile sedimentation occurred during the Middle and at places also during the Early Jurassic. Arkose and feldspathic and quartzose sandstone are interbedded with a grade laterally into carbonaceous and pyritic shale, and siltstone. By the Late Jurassic the shales had transgressed over the coarse clastics, and marginal marine sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone with some coal beds had been deposited over the larger part of the platform. From Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, shales remain the dominant rock type but are intercalated with quartz-feldspar sandstone associated with marine regressions. The Jurassic and Cretaceous shales are source rocks for petroleum. During the Late Cretaceous the northeast part of the platform was uplifted and the Mesozoic cover partly eroded. Sedimentation of fine elastics continued over the edge of the platform and on the continental slope. The Mesozoic sandstones are potential host rocks to uranium mineralisation, particularly where they are interbedded with carbonaceous and pyritic shale. Their potential is enhanced where they are situated near petroleum reservoirs which could have provided hydrogen sulphide or hydrocarbons capable of precipitating uranium from circulating solutions by reduction. Triassic and Jurassic coarse clastics, which are restricted to a few areas, are considered to be the most

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: People's Democratic Republic of Yemen (ADEN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Arabian Shield forms the western part of the country and is composed of Precambrian metasediments of undescribed composition. The literature mentions calcareous duricrust formations in the eastern desert part of the country. This juxtaposition of possible source and duricrust is very similar to Somalia and leads to the view that the Speculative Potential may be in the 1000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Denmark (Greenland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The report deals almost exclusively with Greenland. A major omission is any broad description of the geology of the island. One which can be recommended is 'A survey of the economic geology of Greenland' by B.J. Nielsen published by the Geological Survey of Greenland. Nielsen has also published several articles on the uranium occurrences in Greenland, some of which are noted in the references. A review of the geology is necessary in order to determine how the known occurrences fit into the pattern of uranium mineralisation in the North Atlantic regions and Canada, and to suggest further potential by analogy with these regions. Maps are significantly also lacking and three suitable examples are attached. Additions to the general map would be the areas examined and the extent of airborne radiometry. A further major omission is a definition of the meaning of potential resources, especially as 250,000 tonnes are claimed for the lujavrites at present and a future potential of 500,000 tonnes. I presume that this is the contained uranium which can be calculated as being present in the rock units, rather than any estimate of the amount of uranium which could be recovered economically. The figures for RAH and EAR at Kvanefjeld could conveniently be updated (Nov. 77) to RAH 15,750 t U, EAR 10,000 t U, TOTAL 25,750 t U. As these alkalic rocks are confined to the Garder province of the Ketilidian mobile belt some more definite indication of similar uraniferous types could be made from the excellent published maps and lead to more realistic estimates using the NURE formulae

  5. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Thailand. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inazumi, Satoru; Meyer, John H.

    1981-01-01

    The I.U.R.E.P. Orientation Phase Mission assesses the Speculative Uranium Resources in Thailand to be within the range of 1,500 to 38,500 tonnes U. This range is higher than the previous assessment in Phase I because the Mission recognizes additional favourable geological environments. At the same time, the untested and therefore the unknown degree of mineralization in some of these environments is acknowledged. Past exploration, dating from 1977, has been mainly confined to ground surveys of a small mineralized area and to airborne gamma-ray surveys of two small test areas. Ground reconnaissance work and prospecting has recognized some mineralization in several different host rocks and environments. Geological environments considered by the Mission to be favourable for uranium occurrences include sandstone of Jurassic to Triassic age, tertiary sedimentary basins (northern Thailand), tertiary sedimentary basins (southern Thailand), associated with fluorite deposits, granitic rocks, black shales and graphitic slates of the Paleozoic, associated with sedimentary phosphate deposits and associated with monazite sands. It is recommended that exploration for uranium resources in Thailand should continue. Planners of future exploration programmes should take the following activities into consideration. Rapid extension of carborne surveys to cover, without excessive overburdening, all areas having sufficient road density. Airborne gamma-ray surveys should be carried out in certain selected areas. In the selection of such areas, the considerable higher cost factor attendant on this method of surveying dictates that airborne surveys should only be carried out where carborne surveys prove ineffective (lack of adequate road network.) and where the topography is sufficiently even to assure a low but safe clearance and meaningful results. In certain areas, including the Khorat Plateau and the Tertiary Basins in northern and southern Thailand, there is a need for widely spaced

  6. Evaluation of the Cerro Solo nuclear ore, province of Chubut. The Cerro Solo project within the frame of uranium exploration in Argentina. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, R.J.; Navarra, P.R.; Benitez, A.F.; Gallucci, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Cerro Solo ore deposit was selected by the CNEA to invest in an assessment project because of their promising grade and amount of known and potential resources, significant to Argentina's uranium requirements. The deposit, which is located in the central region of the Chubut Province, belongs to the sandstone type and is hosted by the cretaceous Chubut Group. Technical studies carried out forecast an important growth of nuclear capacity to meet Argentina's energy requirements in the first two decades of of the the next century. To be in position to confront the challenge presented by increasing uranium resources to fuel the nuclear powers plants it is very important, as a first step, to improve the geological knowledge of uranium favorability in the country. The preliminary results of the Cerro Solo project indicate that the eastern slope of the Pichinan hills is a promising area for development of uranium resources, increasing the favorability of the San Jorge Basin in order to allow contributing to meet future uranium requirements. The Cerro Solo Project was planned in a sequential manner, as a multidisciplinary effort which includes studies on: geologic setting of mineralization, resource estimates, costs of mining and milling methods, economic analysis and environmental impact research. Among the mining methods, studies include the alternative of the in-situ leaching technology, which is becoming a low producing cost interesting possibility. (Author)

  7. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    Saudi Arabia occupies most of the Arabian Peninsula and has an area of 872,722 sq miles, or 2,260,350 sq km. The ancient Arabian Shield of igneous and metamorphic rocks comprises most of the western third of the country. The shield contains many extinct volcanoes surrounded by lava beds. Sloping eastwards are the newer sedimentary areas in which rich oil fields are found. In Saudi Arabia oil is paramount and less effort has been put into searching for mineral deposits than in other countries of similar size and geology. Pour aerial radiometric surveys have been undertaken and some of the anomalies discovered in the earlier ones were ground checked by an IAEA expert in 1963-64. Two anomalies warranted more detailed work, these were the Jabal Said anomaly in the Central Shield area and the Al Ghrayyat in Wadi Sawawin about 70 miles from the Jordan border. The Jabal Said anomaly consists of a zone of altered rocks consisting largely of pegmatite and pegmatite granite= Allanite, pyrochlore, cyrtolite, xenotime and monazite are the ore minerals,, The deposit was estimated to have 2.2 million tons of ore grading 0.2 - 0.3 percent Nb 2 O 5 and 0.03 - 0,05% U 3 O 8 . The other occurrence at Al Ghrayyat is similar but with much lower grade uranium content. In view of the huge size of Saudi Arabia, the existence of many geologically favourable rock types and the poor coverage by sophisticated uranium exploration techniques, the Speculative Potential is placed between 10,000 and 50,000 Tonnes uranium. (author)

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: People's Republic of Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Mongolia, a country of 1,525,000 square kilometers, and a population of almost the same number of people is land locked between China and USSR. Historically it's closest ties have been with China, but it is now more closely associated with USSR. Geologically it's complex - most exposed formations are younger than PreCambrian although old exist. Potential for uranium is considered fairly good because the fairly complex geology appears to be favourable both for continental sandstone type deposits and calcretes (less than 50%) and vein type, and other deposits (more than 50$). Considerable effort should be made to obtain additional information related to Mongolian geology. (author)

  10. Uranium milling, project M-25. Volume I. summary and text. Final generic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement (GEIS) on Uranium Milling focuses primarily upon the matter of mill tailings disposal. It evaluates both the costs and benefits of alternative tailings disposal modes and draws conclusions about criteria which should be incorporated into regulations. Both institutional and technical controls are evaluated. Health impacts considered were both short and long term. Restatement and resolution of all public comments received on the draft (GEIS) are presented. There are three volumes: Volume I is the main text and Volumes II and III are supporting appendices

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    China with an area close to 10,000,000 sq km and a fifth of the world's population, has a history of mining and, in fact is quite self sufficient in most of it's needs for the more basic mineral products.However, there is a dearth of knowledge of its resources of uranium. One can however, make the assumption that geologically, there are probably several areas that contain the combination of favourable host rocks and source. The speculative potential of China is estimated to be in Category 5, 100,000 to 500,000 tonnes U. (author)

  12. Jackpile-Paguate Uranium Mine Reclamation Project, Laguna Indian Reservation, Cibola County, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The final version of environmental impact statement, EPA No. 860443F, relates to a proposed reclamation plan for the Jackpile-Paguate uranium mine in New Mexico. The statement describes backfilling of disturbed areas, the reduction of waste dump slopes, steam stabilization, and revegetation plans. Positive impacts include the restoration of the site to productive land use, the reduction of hazards, and aesthetic improvements. Negative impacts include a one-time loss of water and assignment of labor. The Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 provides a legal mandate for the statement. The summary includes a reference to the draft statement

  13. Geostatistics project of the national uranium resource evaluation program. Progress report, October 1979-March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, K.; Bement, T.R.; Howell, J.A.; Beckman, R.J.; Jackson, K.; Buslee, P.

    1980-08-01

    During the period covered by this report, the authors investigated the serial properties of aerial radiometric data. Results were applied to the choice of minimum segment width in the maximum variance segments algorithm and to the use of aerial radiometric data in the design of ground sampling experiments. The report also presents the results of a comparison of normal and lognormal percentile estimation techniques. Twenty-two quadrangles are being analyzed in the search for a uranium favorability index. Computer codes developed during this investigation have been provided to the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation in Grand Junction, Colorado

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: French Polynesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    French Polynesia comprises several district groups of islands in the South Pacific having a total population of 134,000 and an area of 5000 square kilometers. The high islands are commonly volcanic in origin while the lower islands are generally coral. They lie in the Tropic zone and are generally warm. Rainfall ranges from a few centimeters per year to as much as 1000. Because of their volcanic or coral origins, the islands of French Polynesia are not considered to have a uranium potential. (author)

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Beeville NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium resource evaluation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-31

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Beeville Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 373 groundwater and 364 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. The groundwater data indicate that the northwestern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential uranium mineralization. Favorability is indicated by high uranium concentrations; high arsenic, molybdenum, and vanadium concentrations; and proximity and similar geologic setting to the mines of the Karnes County mining district. Other areas that appear favorable are an area in Bee and Refugio Counties and the northeastern part of the quadrangle. Both areas have water chemistry similar to the Karnes County area, but the northeastern area does not have high concentrations of pathfinder elements. The stream sediment data indicate that the northeastern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential mineralization, but agricultural practices and mineralogy of the outcropping Beaumont Formation may indicate a false anomaly. The northwestern corner of the quadrangle is considered favorable because of its proximity to the known uranium deposits, but the data do not seem to support this.

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Beeville NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium resource evaluation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Beeville Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 373 groundwater and 364 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. The groundwater data indicate that the northwestern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential uranium mineralization. Favorability is indicated by high uranium concentrations; high arsenic, molybdenum, and vanadium concentrations; and proximity and similar geologic setting to the mines of the Karnes County mining district. Other areas that appear favorable are an area in Bee and Refugio Counties and the northeastern part of the quadrangle. Both areas have water chemistry similar to the Karnes County area, but the northeastern area does not have high concentrations of pathfinder elements. The stream sediment data indicate that the northeastern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential mineralization, but agricultural practices and mineralogy of the outcropping Beaumont Formation may indicate a false anomaly. The northwestern corner of the quadrangle is considered favorable because of its proximity to the known uranium deposits, but the data do not seem to support this

  17. 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in North Dakota is to improve the environment and reduce the negative health effects associated with residual radioactive material (RRM) from the inactive processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. A secondary benefit of the UMTRA Project is economic gain. The 1992 North Dakota Economic Impact Study (NDEIS) analyzes the impact of the remedial actions at the inactive Belfield and Bowman processing sites and their associated vicinity properties. This analysis is based on the assumption that the state of North Dakota will provide 10 percent of the funding required for remediation. For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests in the Belfield and Bowman onsite portion of the UMTRA Project, it will realize $5.04 in gross labor income (i.e., gross labor income divided by the state's total funding requirement). For every dollar the state of North Dakota invests, it will realize a net return of $3.04 (i.e., net benefit divided by the state's total funding requirement). This reflects only labor expenditure and employment impact. ff state and local non-labor tax benefits were considered in the net economic benefit, North Dakota could receive significantly more than $3.04 for each dollar it invests. The UMTRA Project work at Belfield and Bowman will benefit the state of North Dakota. Benefits include a reduction in the negative health effects caused by low-level RRM, an improvement in the environment, and increased economic growth

  18. Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state's 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs

  19. Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project is to eliminate, reduce, or address to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards. One of the first steps in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The EPA standards allow the use of different strategies for achieving compliance with the standards. This document analyzes the potential impacts of four alternatives for conducting the Ground Water Project. Each of the four alternatives evaluated in the PEIS is based on a different mix of strategies to meet EPA ground water standards. The PEIS is intended to serve as a programmatic planning document that provides an objective basis for determining site-specific ground water compliance strategies and data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impact analyses more efficiently. DOE will prepare appropriate further National Environmental Policy Act documentation before making site-specific decisions to implement the Ground Water Project. Affected States, Tribes, local government agencies, and members of the public have been involved in the process of preparing this PEIS; DOE encourages their continued participation in the site-specific decision making process

  20. Geo-neutrino review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolich, N.

    2012-01-01

    The principal source of energy for dynamic processes of the earth, such as plate tectonics is thought to come from the radioactive decays of 238 U, 232 Th, and 40 K within the earth. These decays produce electron-antineutrinos, so-called geo-neutrinos, the measurement of which near the earth's surface allows for a direct measure of the total radiogenic heat production in the earth. The KamLAND and Borexino experiments have both measured a geo-neutrino flux significantly greater than zero. As shown in these proceedings, more precise future measurements will significantly constrain earth composition models.

  1. Uinta Arch Project: investigations of uranium potential in Precambrian X and older metasedimentary rocks in the Unita and Wasatch ranges, Utah and Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1980-06-01

    This study is part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program to understand the geologic setting, amount, and availability of uranium resources within the boundaries of the United States. The systematic study of Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates and areas that may contain such conglomerates is an integral part of DOE's resource evaluation program, because deposits of world-wide importance occur in such terrains in Canada and South Africa, and because terrains similar to those producing uranium from quartz-pebble conglomerates exist elsewhere in the United States. Because of the ready availability of Tertiary sandstone and Colorado Plateau-type uranium deposits, large areas of Precambrian rocks in the US have not been fully assessed for uranium potential. Thus, the Uinta Arch Project was undertaken to assess the favorability of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in northern Utah for deposits of uranium in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates. Rocks of interest to this study are the thick, clastic sequences within the Uinta Arch that are considered to be of Early Proterozoic age. The Uinta Arch area is known to contain rocks which generally fit the lithologic characteristics that are understood to limit the occurrence of Precambrian fossil placers. However, detailed geology of these rocks and their exact fit to the model described for uraniferous conglomerates was not known. The primary goal of the Uinta Arch Project was to determine how well these Precambrian rocks resemble known deposits and to describe the favorability of placer uranium deposits.

  2. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  3. Marquez Uranium Project, McKinley County, New Mexico: draft environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Development and operation of an underground mine to remove uranium deposits from the Canon de Marquez in McKinley County, New Mexico is proposed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Uranium mined from the area would be used by TVA to supply fuel for its nuclear plants, ensuring a continued supply of inexpensive electricity and a source of employment for the population of the TVA's region. In addition, the mine would employ 55 to 120 persons and generate $21.1 million in state and local taxes during its lifetime. Construction and operation of mine facilities would alter land uses on 120 acres of wildlife habitat, alter the topography of the area in the vicinity of the proposed pond and rock pile sites, depress groundwater levels in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation in the vicinity of the mine, degrade groundwater and air quality in the vicinity of the mine, decrease plant and animal species at the site, degrade water quality in creeks downstream of the mine, and increase ambient noise levels. All negative impacts would be confined to the life of the mine, since reclamation activities would return the mine area to premining conditions

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Site Integrated Management plan, uranium 233 storage and disposition. Volume 1: Project scope and description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Erickson, R.

    1997-01-01

    This Site Integration Management plan provides the Los Alamos Response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-1. This recommendation addresses the safe storage and management of the Departments uranium 233 ( 233 U) inventory. In the past, Los Alamos has used 233 U for a variety of different weapons related projects. The material was used at a variety of sites in varying quantities. Now, there is a limited need for this material and the emphasis has shifted from use to storage and disposition of the material. The Los Alamos program to address the DNFSB Recommendation 97-1 has two emphases. First, take corrective action to address near term deficiencies required to provide safe interim storage of 233 U. Second, provide a plan to address long term storage and disposition of excess inventory at Los Alamos

  5. Arsenic and Uranium Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA -Final Performance Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the performance evaluation of an arsenic (As) and uranium (U) removal technology demonstrated at Upper Bodfish in Lake Isabella, CA. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effecti...

  6. Dominique-Janine extension, McClean Lake project, and midwest joint venture: report of the joint Federal-Provincial panel on uranium mining developments in Northern Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-10-01

    A report of the joint federal-provincial panel on uranium mining developments in northern Saskatchewan. The review of the projects have taken into consideration the impact upon the peoples living in northern Saskatchewan. Benefits will be seen in the form of employment, business opportunities and royalties while causing only a small incremental increase to existing environmental and health risks.

  7. Dominique-Janine extension, McClean Lake project, and midwest joint venture: report of the joint Federal-Provincial panel on uranium mining developments in Northern Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    A report of the joint federal-provincial panel on uranium mining developments in northern Saskatchewan. The review of the projects have taken into consideration the impact upon the peoples living in northern Saskatchewan. Benefits will be seen in the form of employment, business opportunities and royalties while causing only a small incremental increase to existing environmental and health risks

  8. Living with geo-resources and geo-hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangx, Suzanne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483579X; Niemeijer, André|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370832132

    2015-01-01

    Two of the key strategic topics on the European Committee’s Horizon2020 Roadmap revolve around geo-resources and geo-hazards, and their impact on societal and economic development. On the way towards a better policy for sustainable geo-resources production, such as oil, gas, geothermal energy and

  9. Contribution of seismic processing to put up the scaffolding for the 3-dimensional study of deep sedimentary basins: the fundaments of trans-national 3D modelling in the project GeoMol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, Laure

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the transnational project GeoMol geophysical and geological information on the entire Molasse Basin and on the Po Basin are gathered to build consistent cross-border 3D geological models based on borehole evidence and seismic data. Benefiting from important progress in seismic processing, these new models will provide some answers to various questions regarding the usage of subsurface resources, as there are geothermal energy, CO2 and gas storage, oil and gas production, and support decisions-making to national and local administrations as well as to industries. More than 28 000 km of 2D seismic lines are compiled reprocessed and harmonized. This work faces various problems like the vertical drop of more than 700 meters between West and East of the Molasse Basin and to al lesser extent in the Po Plain, the heterogeneities of the substratum, the large disparities between the period and parameters of seismic acquisition, and depending of their availability, the use of two types of seismic data, raw and processed seismic data. The main challenge is to harmonize all lines at the same reference level, amplitude and step of signal processing from France to Austria, spanning more than 1000 km, to avoid misfits at crossing points between seismic lines and artifacts at the country borders, facilitating the interpretation of the various geological layers in the Molasse Basin and Po Basin. A generalized stratigraphic column for the two basins is set up, representing all geological layers relevant to subsurface usage. This stratigraphy constitutes the harmonized framework for seismic reprocessing. In general, processed seismic data is available on paper at stack stage and the mandatory information to take these seismic lines to the final stage of processing, the migration step, are datum plane and replacement velocity. However several datum planes and replacement velocities were used during previous processing projects. Our processing sequence is to

  10. Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidle, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water investigations at a former US Department of Energy nuclear weapons complex near Fernald, in southwestern Ohio, included the delineation of uranium contamination above the USEPA proposed drinking water standard of 20 microg/l. Contamination occurs in a buried valley and has migrated >1.5 km south-southeast of the facility boundary. Flooring of the plume(s) appears to be ≅ 32 m below the water table of the Great Miami Aquifer. U 6+ predominates in the modeled U-O 2 -CO 2 -H 2 O system and U retardation decreases at depth. U 234 /U 238 disequilibria analyses complement hydrogeologic studies which suggest that U leakage through the clayey till cap is less significant than the predominant transport pathway of infiltration via drainage channels incised into the aquifer

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany is situated in Central Europe. It covers an area of 250,000 square kilometres and has a population of 60 millions. The Federal Republic consists of 10 individual states. The capital of the country is Bonn. The northern and northwestern parts of the country are formed of flat lowlands, the Norddeutsche Tiefebene. Towards the south follow hilly and mountainous regions with elevations not exceeding 1000 m. In the southwestern and southeastern regions the elevations may reach 1500m in the Black Forest and Bayerischer Wald. The foreland of the Alps and the northern part of the Alps itself with elevations close to 3000 m make up the southern part of the Federal Republic. The main rivers - Rhine, Weser and Elbe - are directed towards northwest and drain the country to the North Sea. Only the southern part is drained by the southeast running river Danube. The climate is moderate, generally with frequent snow during the winter season and warm periods during the summer. The precipitation is distributed uniformly throughout the year. Due to the high industrialization a dense network of railroads, highways and motorroads exists.According to what is geologically known about the country, the chances for the discovery of large quantities of low-coast uranium resources must be considered to be limited. The potential for new discoveries of those deposits can be estimated to be around 10 000 t U. The potential for very low-grade uranium ore, such as granites, low-grade sedimentary rocks (sandstones, shales) can be estimated to range between 10,000 - 50,000 t U or possibly more taking into account very low-grade concentrations in shales. This material is not mineable under present conditions. Environmental considerations may prevent mining in the future

  12. Study of RC method on reclamation project in the uranium mine (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Kaoru; Tanaka, Masaru; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    To obtain public understanding on the uranium mining sites reclamation at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, it is necessary to conduct appropriate Risk Communication (RC). In this study, to discuss the appropriate Risk communication method on the uranium mining sites reclamation, comparative investigation of risk communication cases which concern the siting of solid waste management facilities and nuclear facilities, and questionnaire survey on the risk perception of landfill were conducted. As a result of comparative investigation, information disclosure and the information supplement are important factor to obtain public trust on the siting plan and developer (government and company). However, it is necessary not only to offer information but also to foster information literacy at the same time. In the cases of best practice on consensus-building toward siting of facilities, there was suggestion that is importance to set up the public participation opportunity at an early planning stage to avoid adversary relationship between stakeholders. As assumption of the public participation, it is necessary the safety assurance of the siting plan and regional development plan cover a long period. As a result of questionnaire survey. It was shown that the almost people worried about health and the environmental impact of radioactive waste; moreover, there are a lot of ratios of the peoples who felt a dangerous and scary sensuously. Public trust on government was very low, Over 60 percent does not trust 'countermeasures at the accident' and nearly 70 percent does not trust the information disclosure at the accident'. 'Questions concern on public trust: countermeasures at the accident, information disclosure at the accident, environmental standard, and environmental technology show significant correlation with risk perception of landfill site. (author)

  13. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  14. The Treatment of Mixed Waste with GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finucane, K.G.; Campbell, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    AMEC's GeoMelt R In-Container Vitrification (ICV) TM has been used to treat diverse types of mixed low-level radioactive waste. ICV is effective in the treatment of mixed wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. The GeoMelt vitrification process destroys organic compounds and immobilizes metals and radionuclides in an extremely durable glass waste form. The process is flexible allowing for treatment of aqueous, oily, and solid mixed waste, including contaminated soil. In 2004, ICV was used to treat mixed radioactive waste sludge containing PCBs generated from a commercial cleanup project regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and to treat contaminated soil from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The Rocky Flats soil contained cadmium, PCBs, and depleted uranium. In 2005, AMEC completed a treatability demonstration of the ICV technology on Mock High Explosive from Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes results from these mixed waste treatment projects. (authors)

  15. US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date

  16. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, the Alpena, Blind River, Cheboygan, Escanaba, and Sault Sainte Marie quadrangles of Michigan and Wisconsin. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    During the month of September, 1979, EG and G geoMetrics collected 2,547 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin in five 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles. This project is part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully correcthed and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as four Volumes (one Volume I and three Volume II's). The study area is dominated by Pleistocene glacial debris. Underlying sediments of the Michigan Basin are predominantly limestone and dolomites of Ordovician through Devonian age. No uranium deposits are known in this region, but major uranium-producing areas lie just north of the project area in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates

  17. Why Geo-Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  18. Uranium project. Borehole cutting with drill core[Study of Uranium prospection in Uruguay]; Proyecto uranio. cortes de los sondeos con testigos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H

    1984-07-01

    The topics included in these report are: explanatory note, number of wells and perforated length, key for the location of areas of perforation for the uranium prospection, maps of location of areas of perforation. The list of the drawn perforations and the references and drawings of the perforations.

  19. Pine Creek uranium province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bower, M.B.; Needham, R.S.; Page, R.W.; Stuart-Smith, P.G.; Wyborn, L.A.I.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project is to help establish a sound geological framework of the Pine Creek region through regional geological, geochemical and geophysical studies. Uranium ore at the Coronation Hill U-Au mine is confined to a wedge of conglomerate in faulted contact with altered volcanics. The uranium, which is classified as epigenetic sandstone type, is derived from a uranium-enriched felsic volcanic source

  20. The Palmottu natural analogue project. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits. Summary report 1992-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomqvist, R; Ruskeeniemi, T; Ahonen, L [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Suksi, J [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry; Niini, H [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Engineering Geology and Geophysics; Vuorinen, U [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jakobsson, K [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-06-01

    The Palmottu U-Th mineralization at Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland, has been studied as a natural analogue to deep disposal of radioactive wastes since 1988. The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out during the years 1992-1994. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes structural interpretations based in part on geophysical measurements, hydrological studies including hydraulic downhole measurements, flow modelling, hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, mineralogical studies, geochemical interpretation and modelling, including paleohydrogeological aspects, and studies of radionuclide mobilization and migration processes including numerical simulations. The project has produced a large amount of data related to natural analogue aspects. The data obtained have already been utilized in developing logical conceptual ideas of the time frames and processes operating in the bedrock of the site. (61 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.).

  1. The Palmottu natural analogue project. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits. Summary report 1992-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, R.; Ruskeeniemi, T.; Ahonen, L.; Suksi, J.; Jakobsson, K.

    1995-06-01

    The Palmottu U-Th mineralization at Nummi-Pusula, southwestern Finland, has been studied as a natural analogue to deep disposal of radioactive wastes since 1988. The report gives a summary of the results of investigations carried out during the years 1992-1994. The Palmottu Analogue Project aims at a more profound understanding of radionuclide transport processes in fractured crystalline bedrock. The essential factors controlling transport are groundwater flow and interaction between water and rock. Accordingly, the study includes structural interpretations based in part on geophysical measurements, hydrological studies including hydraulic downhole measurements, flow modelling, hydrogeochemical characterization of groundwater, uranium chemistry and colloid chemistry, mineralogical studies, geochemical interpretation and modelling, including paleohydrogeological aspects, and studies of radionuclide mobilization and migration processes including numerical simulations. The project has produced a large amount of data related to natural analogue aspects. The data obtained have already been utilized in developing logical conceptual ideas of the time frames and processes operating in the bedrock of the site. (61 refs., 24 figs., 8 tabs.)

  2. An assessment of plant biointrusion at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project rock-covered disposal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    This study is one of a number of special studies that have been conducted regarding various aspects of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This special study was proposed following routine surveillance and maintenance surveys and observations reported in a special study of vegetative covers (DOE, 1988), in which plants were observed growing up through the rock erosion layer at recently completed disposal cells. Some of the plants observed were deep-rooted woody species, and questions concerning root intrusion into disposal cells and the need to control plant growth were raised. The special study discussed in this report was designed to address some of the ramifications of plant growth on disposal cells that have rock covers. The NRC has chosen rock covers over vegetative covers in the arid western United States because licenses cannot substantiate that the vegetative covers ''will be significantly greater than 30 percent and preferably 70 percent,'' which is the amount of ''vegetation required to reduce flow to a point of stability.'' The potential impacts of vegetation growing in rock covers are not addressed by the NRC (1990). The objectives, then, of this study were to determine the species of plants growing on two rock-covered disposal cells, study the rooting pattern of plants on these cells, and identify possible impacts of plant root penetration on these and other UMTRA Project rock-covered cells

  3. Translation of environmental leadership objectives into routine project execution for the uranium mining industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breker, J.; Studer, T.; Voykin, N.; Berg, B.; Scott, W.

    2010-01-01

    Cameco Corporation (Cameco) aligns its social and environmental responsibilities with its vision, mission and values. Environmental Leadership is established as a corporate objective that emphasizes the triple-bottom-line and a systematic approach to understanding environmental, social and economic issues, risks and opportunities. These are ingrained in the project culture, systems and processes and used to influence solutions derived by the project teams to achieve Cameco's objectives. This paper traces the organizational objectives from the early stages of a project through to implementation and turn over to Operations. A case study is used to demonstrate how an asset is influenced by Cameco's strategy. (author)

  4. Translation of environmental leadership objectives into routine project execution for the uranium mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breker, J.; Studer, T.; Voykin, N.; Berg, B., E-mail: jeremy_breker@cameco.com [Cameco Corp., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Scott, W. [Wardrop Engineering, Thunder Bay, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Cameco Corporation (Cameco) aligns its social and environmental responsibilities with its vision, mission and values. Environmental Leadership is established as a corporate objective that emphasizes the triple-bottom-line and a systematic approach to understanding environmental, social and economic issues, risks and opportunities. These are ingrained in the project culture, systems and processes and used to influence solutions derived by the project teams to achieve Cameco's objectives. This paper traces the organizational objectives from the early stages of a project through to implementation and turn over to Operations. A case study is used to demonstrate how an asset is influenced by Cameco's strategy. (author)

  5. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Emory Peak NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium Resource Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Emory Peak Quadrangle, Texas, are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 193 groundwater samples and 491 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and the pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. In groundwater, uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile outline an area in the northwest portion of the quadrangle which is dominated by tertiary tuffaceous ash beds which disconformably overlie cretaceous units. The relationship between uranium and related variables indicates this area appears to have the best potential for uranium mineralization within the quadrangle. Stream sediment data indicate four areas that appear to be favorable for potential uranium mineralization: the Upper Green Valley-Paradise Valley region, the Terlingua Creek-Solitario region, an area in the vicinity of Big Bend National Park, and an area east of long. 102 0 15' W. In the first three of the preceding areas, soluble uranium is associated with tertiary igneous rocks. In the fourth area, soluble uranium is present in carbonate-dominant cretaceous strata

  6. Hydrochemistry of the Falls City uranium mine tailings remedial action project, Karnes County, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.J.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed of on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960's. Previous workers found a larger, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. Our study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the geology and hydrology of the two shallow aquifers at the site, (2) determining the chemistry of the contaminant source (tailings solutions), and (3) identifying geochemical reactions that have altered the composition of contaminant plumes within each aquifer. The tailings solutions are composed of sodium chloride and neutral sulfate salts of aluminum and ammonium, with lesser amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium sulfate. Hydrolysis of aluminum sulfate produces an acid pH (3 to 4). Also, aluminum sulfate is a pH buffer, and it controls acidity of the tailings solutions. Cation exchange and neutralization by calcite modify the tailings solutions as they migrate through the aquifers. These reactions explain chemical patterns, which delineate five separate contaminant plumes in the aquifers. In the Deweesville sandstone, cation exchange has removed ammonium from acidic contaminant plumes. However, neutralization is incomplete because of the paucity of calcite in the Deweesville. In contrast, in the calcite-rich Conquista fossilferous sandstone, cation exchange and complete neutralization by calcite have removed most contaminant ions. Those contaminant plumes are delineated by elevated concentrations of calcium and carbon dioxide. The amount of contamination in both aquifers is much smaller than that estimated previously

  7. Public information experience in the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.R.; Skinner, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    To enhance public perception of the UMTRA Project remedial actions at some 23 sites in the US, an information program has been designed to demonstrate the small risk associated with the work in each community. An unusual aspect of this information program has involved a specific effort to educate listeners concerning the Health Physics terminology being used. The information program has been successful in reducing the level of public anxiety associated with UMTRA remedial action at the first Project site, and is currently being applied at several new sites

  8. A GeoWall with Physics and Astronomy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Phillip; Bruton, Dan

    2008-03-01

    A GeoWall is a passive stereoscopic projection system that can be used by students, teachers, and researchers for visualization of the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional systems and data. The type of system described here adequately provides 3-D visualization in natural color for large or small groups of viewers. The name ``GeoWall'' derives from its initial development to visualize data in the geosciences.1 An early GeoWall system was developed by Paul Morin at the electronic visualization laboratory at the University of Minnesota and was applied in an introductory geology course in spring of 2001. Since that time, several stereoscopic media, which are applicable to introductory-level physics and astronomy classes, have been developed and released into the public domain. In addition to the GeoWall's application in the classroom, there is considerable value in its use as part of a general science outreach program. In this paper we briefly describe the theory of operation of stereoscopic projection and the basic necessary components of a GeoWall system. Then we briefly describe how we are using a GeoWall as an instructional tool for the classroom and informal astronomy education and in research. Finally, we list sources for several of the free software media in physics and astronomy available for use with a GeoWall system.

  9. Draft programmatic environmental impact statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to protect human health and the environment by meeting the proposed EPA standards in areas where ground water has been contaminated. The first step in the UMTRA Ground Water Project is the preparation of this programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This document analyzes potential impacts of four programmatic alternatives, including the proposed action. The alternatives do not address site-specific ground water compliance. Rather, the PEIS is a planning document that provides a framework for conducting the Ground Water Project; assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project; provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies; and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. This PEIS differs substantially from a site-specific environmental impact statement because multiple ground water compliance strategies, each with its own unique set of potential impacts, could be used to implement all the alternatives except the no action alternative. Implementing a PEIS alternative means applying a ground water compliance strategy or strategies at a specific site. It is the use of a strategy or a combination of strategies that would result in site-specific impacts

  10. Uranium in Niger; L'uranium au Niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabelmann, E

    1978-03-15

    This document presents government policy in the enhancement of uranium resources, existing mining companies and their productions, exploitation projects and economical outcome related to the uranium mining and auxiliary activities. [French] Le document presente la politique de l'Etat dans le cadre de la mise en valeur des ressources d'uranium, les societes minieres existantes et leurs productions, les projets d'exploitation d'uranium et les retombees economiques liees aux activites uraniferes et connexes.

  11. Paradigm shift from cartography to geo-communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues that the domain of GIS, cartography, geo-information etc. is facing a paradigm shift. The implication of a paradigm shift is a complete and necessary re-definition of e.g. the philosophical foundation of the system, as well as with a major upgrade and readjustment of procedures......-information is actually not possible at all without having a usage (a project identity and a purpose) in mind. Objective and neutral geo-information does not exist. Therefore the overall philosophy of the geo-domain will be that it is a communication discipline....

  12. Cooperative research and the carbon fiber development for application in uranium centrifuges project; Pesquisa cooperativa e o desenvolvimento de fibra de carbono para aplicacao em ultracentrifugas nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Paulo Cesar Beltrao [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: paulocbqueiroz@gmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2009-08-15

    This paper analyzes both the carbon fiber-based development for uranium centrifuges and the research project that supports its development effort over time. The carbon fibre-based engineering properties make it a valuable supply for high technological products, such as uranium ultracentrifuge. There is no production of such fibers in Brazil. Its trade is subject to international market restrictions due to carbon fibers' dual applications. The Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), the Universidade de Campinas (UNICAMP), the Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), the RADICIFIBRAS Company, and the Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos (FINEP), which is responsible for the project financial support, established a partnership aiming the development of a domestic polyacrylonitrile (Pan)-based carbon fiber industry. Such alliances or technological partnerships are best known in developed countries, such as USA and Japan, as Cooperative Research or Research Joint Ventures (RJV). (author)

  13. The ConnectinGEO Observation Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M.; Nativi, S.; Jirka, S.; McCallum, I.

    2016-12-01

    ConnectinGEO (Coordinating an Observation Network of Networks EnCompassing saTellite and IN-situ to fill the Gaps in European Observations) is an EU-funded project under the H2020 Framework Programme. The primary goal of the project is to link existing coordinated Earth Observation networks with science and technology (S&T) communities, the industry sector and the GEOSS and Copernicus stakeholders. An expected outcome of the project is a prioritized list of critical gaps within GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) in observations and models that translate observations into practice relevant knowledge. The project defines and utilizes a formalized methodology to create a set of observation requirements that will be related to information on available observations to identify key gaps. Gaps in the information provided by current observation systems as well as gaps in the systems themselves will be derived from five different threads. One of these threads consists in the analysis of the observations and measurements that are currently registered in GEO Discovery and Access Broker (DAB). To this aim, an Observation Inventory (OI) has been created and populated using the current metadata information harmonized by the DAB. This presentation describes the process defined to populate the ConnectinGEO OI and the resulting system architecture. In addition, it provides information on how to systematically access the OI for performing the gap analysis. Furthermore it demonstrates initial findings of the gap analysis, and shortcomings in the metadata that need attention. The research leading to these results benefited from funding by the European Union H2020 Framework Programme under grant agreement n. 641538 (ConnectinGEO).

  14. Uranium Mill Tailings Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at the Fifth Symposium on Uranium Mill Tailings Management. Advances made with regard to uranium mill tailings management, environmental effects, regulations, and reclamation are reviewed. Topics considered include tailings management and design (e.g., the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, environmental standards for uranium mill tailings disposal), surface stabilization (e.g., the long-term stability of tailings, long-term rock durability), radiological aspects (e.g. the radioactive composition of airborne particulates), contaminant migration (e.g., chemical transport beneath a uranium mill tailings pile, the interaction of acidic leachate with soils), radon control and covers (e.g., radon emanation characteristics, designing surface covers for inactive uranium mill tailings), and seepage and liners (e.g., hydrologic observations, liner requirements)

  15. The economics of uranium demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    The major characteristics of the demand for uranium are identified, and a number of factors which determine the actual level of uranium requirements of the nuclear power industry are discussed. Since the role of inventories is central to the process of short-term price formation, by comparing projections of uranium production and apparent consumption, the relative level of total inventories is calculated and an assessment is made of its likely impact on the uranium market during the 1980s. (author)

  16. Nuclear threat initiative - Kazakhstan project on elimination of high-enriched uranium. 8 October 2005, Ust Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    Since its establishment in 2001, NTI (Nuclear Threat Initiative) has made important contributions towards securing weapon-usable nuclear material and reducing the threat of nuclear terrorism. Shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 2001, NTI pledged $1.15 million to the Agency?s Nuclear Security Fund, which has been used to achieve tangible nuclear security improvements: upgrades to physical protection of nuclear facilities and nuclear and radioactive material; urgently needed training in nuclear security for national officials; enhanced detection capabilities at border crossings; and improved national and international readiness for responding to terrorist acts. NTI has consistently sought to target its contributions to address areas of high priority. A primary point of focus has been to secure (and, where possible, eliminate) material that could be diverted for weapons purposes. In P roject Vinca , NTI committed $5 million in 2002 to help remove high enriched uranium fuel from a research reactor near Belgrade, for return to Russia. With support from Russia, the United States and NTI, seven transfers of fresh fuel back to Russia have been made since 2002 - a total of 112 kilograms of HEU. Current plans foresee further shipments of fresh HEU from another three countries in the next 15 months. The IAEA is also continuing to work on arrangements for the repatriation of spent research reactor fuel of Russian origin. In 2001, Sam Nunn and NTI president Charles Curtis approached the Kazakh Government to offer support for the safe transportation of the unused nuclear fuel from the shutdown BN-350 reactor - nearly 3000 kilograms - to the Ulba Metallurgical Plant JSC (UMP), where it could be dismantled and down-blended into LEU (NTI-Kazakhstan project). By the end of this year, 2897 kilograms of HEU - enough to produce dozens of nuclear bombs - will have been down-blended to LEU and placed in safe storage. Throughout the project, the IAEA has been implementing

  17. Effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titus, F.B.

    1988-01-01

    Potential groundwater contamination beneath the 24 tailings piles that are to be stabilized under the UMTRA Project was intended in early project plans to be minimized by placing disposal piles over thick stratigraphic sequences of tight (minimally permeable) formations, and by designing covers that contained low permeability soil/clay infiltration barriers. The court-ordered revision of the UMTRA groundwater standards by EPA (proposed standards of September 1987) include very low Maximum Concentration Limits (MCLs), which are based mostly on Primary Drinking Water Standards. EPA also mandates that the designs should control radioactivity and hazardous constituents...for up to one thousand years, to the extends reasonably achievable, and, in any case, for at least two hundred years.... In order to accommodate this stipulation, transport modeling of water and contaminants in both the vadose and saturated zones beneath the piles is run until steady state conditions are reached. The early decision to locate stabilized piles over tight formations now exacerbates the problem of complying with the standards, since the contaminants percolate to groundwater that moves only slowly through strata having low permeabilities. Innovative solutions have been evaluated that are aimed at further minimizing long-term infiltration, geochemically fixing contaminants in place before they reach groundwater, or otherwise minimizing contaminant flux

  18. Final environmental statement related to the Minerals Exploration Company, Sweetwater Uranium Project (Sweetwater County, Wyoming). Docket No. 40-8584

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of a Source Material License to Minerals Exploration Company (MEC) for the construction and operation of the proposed Sweetwater Uranium Mill in Sweetwater County, Wyoming, with a nominal capacity of 3000 tons (2.7 x 10 6 kg) per day of uranium ore. As part of this proposal, the applicant proposes also to construct a heap leaching and resin ion-exchange facility to extract uranium from low-grade ores and mine water. Conditions for the protection of the environment are set forth

  19. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  20. Advances of the low enriched uranium utilization project in CNA-1 during 1998 and 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Jose M.; Higa, Manabu; Sidelnik, Jorge I.; Perez, Ramon A.; Casario, Jose A.; Alvarez, Luis A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, a general description of advances of the Enriched Fuel Introduction Project in CNA-1 and the main tasks performed during 1998 and 1999 are presented. The program is being satisfactorily developed and during that period the number of slightly enriched fuels (LEU) introduced had significantly increased in relation to previous years. At present, there are 181 LEU fuel elements in the core and 125 LEU fuel elements have been extracted. The number of full power burnt fuel elements per day decreased from 1.31 FE/dpp in 1994 (when all fuel was natural) to 0.92 in 1998 and 0.83 in 1999, reaching the predicted value for homogeneous LEU core of 0.7. The cost of burnt fuel in 1998 was 25% lower that if only natural fuel would have been used. (author)

  1. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by

  2. Research Establishment progress report 1978 - uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    A report of research programs continuing in the following areas is presented: mining and treatment of uranium ores, uranium enrichment, waste treatment, reprocessing and the uranium fuel cycle. Staff responsible for each project are indicated

  3. Bi-static Optical Observations of GEO Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitzer, Patrick; Barker, Edwin S.; Cowardin, Heather; Lederer, Susan M.; Buckalew, Brent

    2014-01-01

    A bi-static study of objects at Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO) was conducted using two ground-based wide-field optical telescopes. The University of Michigan's 0.6-m MODEST (Michigan Orbital Debris Survey Telescope) located at the Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory in Chile was employed in a series of coordinated observations with the U.S. Naval Observatory's (USNO) 1.3-m telescope at the USNO Flagstaff Station near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA. The goals of this project are twofold: (1) Obtain optical distances to known and unknown objects at GEO from the difference in the observed topocentric position of objects measured with respect to a reference star frame. The distance can be derived directly from these measurements, and is independent of any orbital solution. The wide geographical separation of these two telescopes means that the parallax difference is larger than ten degrees, and (2) Compare optical photometry in similar filters of GEO objects taken during the same time period from the two sites. The object's illuminated surfaces presented different angles of reflected sunlight to the two telescopes.During a four hour period on the night.of 22 February 2014 (UT), coordinated observations were obtained for eight different GEO positions. Each coordinated observation sequence was started on the hour or half-hour, and was selected to ensure the same cataloged GEO object was available in the field of view of both telescopes during the thirty minute observing sequence. GEO objects were chosen to be both controlled and uncontrolled at a range of orbital inclinations, and the objects were not tracked. Instead both telescopes were operated with all drives off in GEO survey mode to discover un-cataloged objects at GEO. The initial results from this proof-of-concept observing run will be presented, with the intent of laying the foundation for future large-scale bi-static observing campaigns of the GEO regime.

  4. Environmental restoration of uranium contaminated sites in Estonia within the framework of IAEA project (RER/9/022) in 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratas, R.

    1997-01-01

    In Estonia there are several radioactively contaminated sites left from the military and uranium progressing activities by the former Soviet Union. Enhanced radiation levels are prevalent in the Paldiski area, a former nuclear submarine training centre; on the territory of the waste depository at Saku/Tammiku and at Sillamae, where a large depository of uranium milling tailings is situated. During the last two years considerable effort has been put into restoration of these sites. To start with, designing of reasonably achievable remediation projects have been taken up. Estonia has received large contributions from many western countries and organisations. Practical remediation work on contaminated areas, e.g. at Sillamae is, however, delayed due to lack of funds. (author)

  5. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    In 1974 the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources (EMR) established a Uranium Resource Appraisal Group (URAG) within EMR to audit annually Canada's uranium resources for the purpose of implementing the federal government's uranium export policy. A major objective of this policy was to ensure that Canadian uranium supplies would be sufficient to meet the needs of Canada's nuclear power program. As projections of installed nuclear power growth in Canada over the long term have been successively revised downwards (the concern about domestic security of supply is less relevant now than it was 10 years ago) and as Canadian uranium supply capabilities have expanded significantly. Canada has maintained its status as the western world's leading exporter of uranium and has become the world's leading producer. Domestic uranium resource estimates have increased to 551 000 tonnes U recoverable from mineable ore since URAG completed its last formal assessment (1982). In 1984, Canada's five primary uranium producers employed some 5800 people at their mining and milling operations, and produced concentrates containing some 11 170 tU. It is evident from URAG's 1984 assessment that Canada's known uranium resources, recoverable at uranium prices of $150/kg U or less, are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuelling requirements of those reactors that are either in opertaion now or committed or expected to be in-service by 1995. A substantial portion of Canada's identified uranium resources, recoverable within the same price range, is thus surplus to Canadian needs and available for export. Sales worth close to $1 billion annually are assured. Uranium exploration expenditures in Canada in 1983 and 1984 were an estimated $41 million and $35 million, respectively, down markedly from the $128 million reported for 1980. Exploration drilling and surface development drilling in 1983 and 1984 were reported to be 153 000 m and 197 000 m, respectively, some 85% of which was in

  6. Instrumental Genesis in GeoGebra Based Board Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I address the use of digital tools (GeoGebra) in open ended design activities, with primary school children. I present results from the research and development project “Creative Digital Mathematics”, which aims to use the pupil’s development of mathematical board games as a vehicle...... in their work with GeoGebra and how they relate their work with GeoGebra and mathematics to fellow pupils and real life situations. The results show that pupils’ consider development of board games as meaningful mathematical activity, and that they develop skills with GeoGebra, furthermore the pupils considers...... potential use of their board game by classmates in their design activities....

  7. Uranium exploration, mining and ore enrichment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.D.; Wentzlau, D.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the different types of uranium deposits and their importance. It is shown that during the present depressed uranium market situation, mainly high grade deposits such as unconformity-related deposits can be mined economically. The different successive exploration steps are outlined including methods used for uranium. Uranium mining does not greatly differ from normal mining, but the uranium metallurgy needs its own specialized but already classic technology. Only a relative small amount of uranium can be expected from projects where uranium is produced by in situ leach methods or by extraction from phosphoric acid. A short summary of investment costs and operating costs is given for an average uranium mine. The last chapter deals with the definition of different reserve categories and outlines the uranium reserves of the western world including the uranium production (1983) and the expected uranium production capacity for 1985 and 1990. (orig.) [de

  8. The geo-genic radon potential map of the aspiring 'Buzau Land' Geo-park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldovan, M. C.; Burghele, B. D.; Roba, C. A.; Sferle, T. L.; Buterez, C.; Mitrofan, H.

    2017-01-01

    Mapping the geo-genic radon potential in Buzau County is part of a research project aiming to apply research for sustainable development and economic growth following the principles of geo-conservation in order to support the 'Buzau Land' UNESCO Geo-park initiative. The mapping of geo-genic radon will be used as an overview for planning purposes. The main geological formations of the studied area were identified as Cretaceous and Paleogene flysch, included in a thin-skinned nappes pile and consisting of alternating sandstones, marls, clays and, subordinately, conglomerates, all tightly folded or faulted. Significant variations in the concentration of radon were therefore determined in the ground. However, no high values were determined, the maximum measured activity concentration being 101.6 kBq m -3 . (authors)

  9. Western Australian uranium opening to global markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.

    2008-01-01

    The change of government in Western Australia (WA) in September 2008 brought with it a change in the state policy on uranium mining. For a period previously, although uranium exploration was allowed, mining leases were granted excluding the right to mine uranium. The Barnett Liberal/National Government has reversed that policy, and is now granting mining leases including uranium, and will allow uranium mining projects to proceed into production subject to all appropriate approvals processes.

  10. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  11. Aerial gamma spectrometry of the uranium province of Lagoa Real (Caetite, BA, Brazil): go environmental aspects and distribution of the absorbed dose in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Esau Francisco Sena

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, it was analyzed the surface concentrations of the natural radioelements K, U and Th, as well as the absorbed dose rate in air caused by gamma radiation from the Lagoa Real uranium province, which is located at the center southern portion of Bahia State and comprises an area of approximately 4.600 Km 2 . Data from the airborne gamma ray spectrometric survey of the region (Sao Timoeo Project) carried out in 1979, was used in this study. Besides, recent data of U, Th and absorbed dose rates from the Environmental Monitoring Program of the uranium concentration plant (URA), operated in the region by the Brazilian Nuclear Industries (INB), were used with the aim of inter compare the sampling points in the same geo referenced area. Imaging geo processing software's give support to frame maps of surface concentrations and ternary maps, as well as allow the integration of these with other themes (e.g. hydrology, geology, pedology) favouring the interpretation of geo environmental process from the radioactive cartography. Considering the whole study area, it was obtained the following mean values: absorbed dose rate in air (61,08 nGy.h -1 ), Potassium (1,65 % K) , Uranium (3,02 ppm eU) and thorium (18,26 ppm eTh). The geological unities bounding the uranium anomalies were placed in the areas characterized by the highest values of radioelements and, as expected, the major dose levels. The use of ternary maps coupled with the geology and hydrology allowed distinguishing the relationship between the surface distribution of natural radioelements and the geo environmental aspects, including the influence of the catchment in their transport and migration. (author)

  12. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  13. EnerGEO biomass pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tum, M.; Guenther, K.P.; McCallum, I.; Balkovic, J.; Khabarov, N.; Kindermann, G.; Leduc, S.; Biberacher, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 project EnerGEO (Earth Observations for Monitoring and Assessment of the Environmental Impact of Energy Use) sustainable energy potentials for forest and agricultural areas were estimated by applying three different model approaches. Firstly, the Biosphere Energy Transfer Hydrology (BETHY/DLR) model was applied to assess agricultural and forest biomass increases on a regional scale with the extension to grassland. Secondly, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) - a cropping systems simulation model - was used to estimate grain yields on a global scale and thirdly the Global Forest Model (G4M) was used to estimate global woody biomass harvests and stock. The general objective of the biomass pilot is to implement the observational capacity for using biomass as an important current and future energy resource. The scope of this work was to generate biomass energy potentials for locations on the globe and to validate these data. Therefore, the biomass pilot was focused to use historical and actual remote sensing data as input data for the models. For validation purposes, forest biomass maps for 1987 and 2002 for Germany (Bundeswaldinventur (BWI-2)) and 2001 and 2008 for Austria (Austrian Forest Inventory (AFI)) were prepared as reference. (orig.)

  14. EnerGEO biomass pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tum, M.; Guenther, K.P. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Wessling (Germany). German Remote Sensing Data Center (DFD); McCallum, I.; Balkovic, J.; Khabarov, N.; Kindermann, G.; Leduc, S. [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Laxenburg (Austria); Biberacher, M. [Research Studios Austria AG (RSA), Salzburg (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the EU FP7 project EnerGEO (Earth Observations for Monitoring and Assessment of the Environmental Impact of Energy Use) sustainable energy potentials for forest and agricultural areas were estimated by applying three different model approaches. Firstly, the Biosphere Energy Transfer Hydrology (BETHY/DLR) model was applied to assess agricultural and forest biomass increases on a regional scale with the extension to grassland. Secondly, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) - a cropping systems simulation model - was used to estimate grain yields on a global scale and thirdly the Global Forest Model (G4M) was used to estimate global woody biomass harvests and stock. The general objective of the biomass pilot is to implement the observational capacity for using biomass as an important current and future energy resource. The scope of this work was to generate biomass energy potentials for locations on the globe and to validate these data. Therefore, the biomass pilot was focused to use historical and actual remote sensing data as input data for the models. For validation purposes, forest biomass maps for 1987 and 2002 for Germany (Bundeswaldinventur (BWI-2)) and 2001 and 2008 for Austria (Austrian Forest Inventory (AFI)) were prepared as reference. (orig.)

  15. InSAR analysis of the crustal deformation affecting the megacity of Istanbul: the results of the FP7 Marsite Project as a GEO Supersite Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaro, Giuseppe; Bonano, Manuela; Manzo, Mariarosaria

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is one of the most active faults worldwide, extending approximately 1,200 km from Eastern Turkey to the Northern Aegean Sea. During the 20th century series of damaging earthquakes occurred along the NAF, generally propagated westward towards Istanbul; the last one occurred in 1999 at Izmit, a city 80 km away from Istanbul. Within this scenario, the FP7 MARsite project (New Directions in Seismic Hazard assessment through Focused Earth Observation in Marmara Supersite), supported by EU, intends to collect, share and integrate multidisciplinary data (seismologic, geochemical, surveying, satellite, etc.) in order to carry out assessment, mitigation and management of seismic risk in the region of the Sea of Marmara. In the framework of the MARsite project, we performed the analysis and monitoring of the surface deformation affecting the Istanbul mega city by exploiting the large archives of X-band satellite SAR data, made available through the Supersites Initiatives, and by processing them via the advanced multi-temporal and multi-scale InSAR technique, known as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach. In particular, we applied the SBAS technique to a dataset of 101 SAR images acquired by the TerraSAR-X constellation of the German Space Agency (DLR) over descending orbits and spanning the November 2010 - August 2014 time interval. From,these images, we generated 312 differential interferograms with a maximum spatial separation (perpendicular baseline) between the acquisition orbits of about 500 m., that were used to generate, via the SBAS approach, mean deformation velocity map and corresponding ground time series of the investigated area. The performed InSAR analysis reveals a generalized stability over the Istanbul area, except for some localized displacements, related to subsidence and slope instability phenomena. In particular, we identified: (i) a displacement pattern related to the Istanbul airport, showing a mostly linear

  16. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  17. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy's (DOE's) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites

  18. Project Opalinus clay Zuercher Weinland of Nagra. Evaluation of the geo-scientific data base and of the construction engineering aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    In this report the Commission for Nuclear Waste Management (KNE) assesses the geological and engineering aspects of the project Opalinus Clay, in which Nagra demonstrates the postclosure safety of geological disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level wastes (HLW) and intermediate-level wastes (ILW) in a repository in the Opalinus Clay of the Zuercher Weinland in northern Switzerland. After in-depth examination of the geological database, KNE concludes that the demonstration of a suitable geological site for final disposal of SF, HLW and ILW in the Opalinus Clay of the Zuercher Weinland has been achieved. The geological assumptions Nagra uses for the assessment of long-term safety are based on data that have been carefully collected and interpreted. KNE acknowledges that Nagra interpreted the geological data correctly and adequately using state-of-the-art techniques. In case of lacking information, Nagra has used conservative or worst-case assumptions. The information documented by Nagra represents a good synthesis of field, laboratory and literature data. The tectonic situation of the Zuercher Weinland was examined in great details by Nagra. In the centre of the investigated region, where the Opalinus Clay occurs at 600 to 750 meters depth, the 3D-seismic data confirm its undisturbed stratification in an area of about 15 km 2 . Analysis and interpretation of the available information on the geological evolution provides no indication that erosion would expose the confining units above the Opalinus Clay within the next million years. The Opalinus Clay in the Zuercher Weinland is quite homogeneous and about 110 m thick. The properties of this rock are examined and found to be favourable for a repository. The dominance of the fine grain size and the high clay content indicate a very low hydraulic conductivity suitable for the isolation of radioactive wastes. Pore water extracted from drill-core samples is saline and has remained trapped for millions of years

  19. Uranium. Resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The events characterising the world uranium market in the last several years illustrate the persistent uncertainly faced by uranium producers and consumers worldwide. With world nuclear capacity expanding and uranium production satisfying only about 60 per cent of demand, uranium stockpiles continue to be depleted at a high rate. The uncertainty related to the remaining levels of world uranium stockpiles and to the amount of surplus defence material that will be entering the market makes it difficult to determine when a closer balance between uranium supply and demand will be reached. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand until well into the next century. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost reference on uranium. This world report is based on official information from 59 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1997. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States, including the first-ever official reports on uranium production in Estonia, Mongolia, the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and worldwide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply

  20. The proto-Earth geo-reactor: Reassessing the hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Degueldre

    2016-09-01

    The present paper focuses on the geo-reactor hypothetical conditions including history, spatial extension and regimes. The discussion based on recent calculations involves investigations on the limits in term of fissile inventory, size and power, based on coupling of geochemical reactions and stratification through the gravitational field considering behavior through the inner mantle, the boundary with the core and the core. The reconstruction allows to formulating that from the history point of view it would have been possible that the geo-reactor reached criticality in a proto-Earth period as a reactor triggered by 235-uranium and that thorium may have worked as an absorber if the actinide concentration was locally large enough. Without actinide separation the initiation of the criticality is unlikely. However did the segregation of actinides occur in any Earth layer?

  1. The energy geo-policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duval, M.

    2005-01-01

    This analysis updates and develops the analysis of the energy geo-policy proposed by the French Review of geo-policy. In this framework the today policies of the different sate and geographical actors, as suppliers and consumers of petroleum energy, are examined. Then the author analyzes the political problems resulting from, this petroleum energy transfers by earth and sea and the problems resulting specifically from the nuclear energy. The last part brings the author own opinions. (A.L.B.)

  2. The politics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, N.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: what God hath joined (historical and technical summary of the atomic bomb project and the post-war attempt at international control of atomic energy); finding uranium and using it; atoms for peace; nuclear optimists (development of nuclear power); the Treaty brake (Non-Proliferation Treaty); bending the rules; plowshares and swords; the club and the gambler (uranium production industry); turnabout (government policies); the uranium cycle; nuclear conflict; tiger in the nursery (radiation hazards; nuclear controversy); breaking the rules (proliferation); new answers, old questions. (U.K.)

  3. Ranger uranium environmental enquiry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The submission is divided into three sections. Section A considers the international implications of the development of uranium resources including economic and resource aspects and environmental and social aspects. Section B outlines the government's position on export controls over uranium and its effect on the introduction of nuclear power in Australia. Section C describes the licensing and regulatory functions that would be needed to monitor the environmental and health aspects of the Ranger project. (R.L.)

  4. Uranium recovery from AVLIS slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, A.E.; Mycroft, J.R.; Oliver, A.J.; Schneider, P.G.; Richardson, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium metal for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project was to have been produced by the magnesiothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. The other product from this reaction is a magnesium fluoride slag, which contains fine and entrained natural uranium as metal and oxide. Recovery of the uranium through conventional mill leaching would not give a magnesium residue free of uranium but to achieve more complete uranium recovery requires the destruction of the magnesium fluoride matrix and liberation of the entrapped uranium. Alternate methods of carrying out such treatments and the potential for recovery of other valuable byproducts were examined. Based on the process flowsheets, a number of economic assessments were performed, conclusions were drawn and the preferred processing alternatives were identified. (author)

  5. 1992 Colorado Economic Impact Study for the US Department of Energy and Colorado Department of Health Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The findings of the 1992 Colorado Economic Impact Study (CEIS) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project are outlined below. All dollar amounts used in the study are in year-of-expenditure dollars. The total funding requirement for the State of Colorado for the UMTRA Project is estimated to be $66.8 million, or 10 percent of the remedial action costs for the UMTRA Project in Colorado. The UMTRA Project will generate $487.5 million in gross labor income in Colorado between 1983 and 1996. This includes $54.4 million in state and local tax revenues and $41.2 million in federal individual income tax revenues. The net economic benefit of the UMTRA Project to Colorado is $355.1 million. For every dollar the State of Colorado invests in the UMTRA Project, it will realize $5.32 in gross labor income. The employment impact to the Western Slope region is significant. The UMTRA Project will create a total employment impact of 13,749 fulltime equivalents (FTES) spread over. a period of 13 years in seven site areas. Nearly 100 percent of the labor will be drawn from the local communities. The State of Colorado's Western Slope is anticipated to be minimally impacted by the phaseout of the UMTRA Project. Unlike industries that shut down operations without warning, the UMTRA Project workers, local government, and businesses know the schedule for completion and can consider and prepare for the impact of UMTRA Project conclusion. Further, because the majority of the work force is local, there has not been a significant investment in each community's infrastructure. Any small increases in the infrastructure will not be abandoned at the end of the UMTRA Project due to a marked increase in migration out of the local community

  6. GeoPro: Technology to Enable Scientific Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Juan

    2004-01-01

    Development of the ground-water flow model for the Death Valley Regional Groundwater Flow System (DVRFS) required integration of numerous supporting hydrogeologic investigations. The results from recharge, discharge, hydraulic properties, water level, pumping, model boundaries, and geologic studies were integrated to develop the required conceptual and 3-D framework models, and the flow model itself. To support the complex modeling process and the needs of the multidisciplinary DVRFS team, a hardware and software system called GeoPro (Geoscience Knowledge Integration Protocol) was developed. A primary function of GeoPro is to manage the large volume of disparate data compiled for the 100,000-square-kilometer area of southern Nevada and California. The data are primarily from previous investigations and regional flow models developed for the Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain projects. GeoPro utilizes relational database technology (Microsoft SQL Server(trademark)) to store and manage these tabular point data, groundwater flow model ASCII data, 3-D hydrogeologic framework data, 2-D and 2.5-D GIS data, and text documents. Data management consists of versioning, tracking, and reporting data changes as multiple users access the centralized database. GeoPro also supports the modeling process by automating the routine data transformations required to integrate project software. This automation is also crucial to streamlining pre- and post-processing of model data during model calibration. Another function of GeoPro is to facilitate the dissemination and use of the model data and results through web-based documents by linking and allowing access to the underlying database and analysis tools. The intent is to convey to end-users the complex flow model product in a manner that is simple, flexible, and relevant to their needs. GeoPro is evolving from a prototype system to a production-level product. Currently the DVRFS pre- and post-processing modeling tools are being re

  7. Research on Utilization of Geo-Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Michaela; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; GeoEn Working Group

    2013-04-01

    The world's energy demand will increase year by year and we have to search for alternative energy resources. New concepts concerning the energy production from geo-resources have to be provided and developed. The joint project GeoEn combines research on the four core themes geothermal energy, shale gas, CO2 capture and CO2 storage. Sustainable energy production from deep geothermal energy resources is addressed including all processes related to geothermal technologies, from reservoir exploitation to energy conversion in the power plant. The research on the unconventional natural gas resource, shale gas, is focussed on the sedimentological, diagenetic and compositional characteristics of gas shales. Technologies and solutions for the prevention of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide are developed in the research fields CO2 capture technologies, utilization, transport, and CO2 storage. Those four core themes are studied with an integrated approach using the synergy of cross-cutting methodologies. New exploration and reservoir technologies and innovative monitoring methods, e.g. CSMT (controlled-source magnetotellurics) are examined and developed. All disciplines are complemented by numerical simulations of the relevant processes. A particular strength of the project is the availability of large experimental infrastructures where the respective technologies are tested and monitored. These include the power plant Schwarze Pumpe, where the Oxyfuel process is improved, the pilot storage site for CO2 in Ketzin and the geothermal research platform Groß Schönebeck, with two deep wells and an experimental plant overground for research on corrosion. In addition to fundamental research, the acceptance of new technologies, especially in the field of CCS is examined. Another focus addressed is the impact of shale gas production on the environment. A further important goal is the education of young scientists in the new field "geo-energy" to fight skills shortage in this field

  8. Influence factors of risk perception of radiation and its background. Questionnaire survey for reclamation project in the uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaka, Kaoru; Gofuku, Akio; Tanaka, Masaru; Tokizawa, Takayuki; Sato, Kazuhiko; Koga, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    To obtain public understanding on the uranium mining sites reclamation at Ningyo-toge Environmental Engineering Center, it is necessary to conduct appropriate Risk Communication (RC). In this study, to discuss the appropriate Risk communication method on the uranium mining sites reclamation, we conducted questionnaire survey and text analysis. The results of the text analysis are as follows: (1) The main elements of the concern of radiation are the uneasiness to oncogenesis or a health effect. (2) The trusts for technology or scientists are the main elements of the reliance for the standard of radiation, in the group which shows low-sense of ownership, hatred for radioactive ray has a strong impact relatively. (author)

  9. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Nebraska/Texas Project, the Alliance and Scottsbluff quadrangles of Nebraska. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    During the months of September and October 1979, EG and G geoMetrics collected 3156 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in the state of Nebraska in two 1 by 2 degree NTMS quadrangles. This project is part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully corrected and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as three Volumes (one Volume I and two Volume II's). Both quadrangles are dominated by Tertiary nonmarine strata, though the Sand Hills in the eastern central portion of the area is covered by Quaternary dune sand. Some Late Cretaceous marine shales are exposed in the northwest quadrant of Alliance quadrangle. No uranium deposits are known in this area, but outcrops of shales thought to be uraniferous outcrop in the Alliance quadrangle

  10. Metallogenetic prospecting in 1:2,000,000 scale for in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang; Qin Mingkuan; Zhao Ruiquan; Dong Wenming; Li Tiangang; Zheng Dayu; Li Sen; Lin Shuangxing

    2002-01-01

    By introducing the advanced theory and technology of systematic geo-mapping which is popularized in Central-Asian countries, the project is aimed at metallogenic prospecting in 1:2,000,000 scale for in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in Xinjiang and its adjacent area. Based on the comprehensive understanding of accumulated data and on the field study in both the work area and the abroad nearby, the authors propose creatively a new concept that the uranium mineralization in the area is controlled by the moderate tectonic movements during the last large-scale orogenic movement, and set up a new epi-genetically metallogenic system of Meso-Cenozoic depositional basins. Furthermore, the temporal-spatial evolution of the ore-controlled Himalaya orogenic movement is brought to light, and a new method to reconstruct the palaeo-tectonic and palaeo-hydrodynamic systems is created. Accordingly, the main differences in metallogenic conditions and prospecting evaluation between the work area and the Central-Asian areas are illustrated, and the favorable and unfavorable influences of the reduction by the exudative oil and gas on the sandstone type uranium mineralization in the work area are explained in detail. Finally, on the basis of compiling the systematic geo-maps and summarizing the assessment criteria, 2 metallogenic provinces and 12 prospecting areas are predicted. This conclusion can provide a scientific foundation for strategic plans to be made by leading groups and other branches. Another achievement of the project is that a guidebook of the systematic geo-mapping theory and technology has been compiled, which is beneficial to the spreading of the method

  11. Narrating national geo information infrastructures : Balancing infrastructures and innovation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerten, H.; Veenswijk, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines narratives relating to the development of National Geo Information Infrastructures (NGII) in eth-nographic research on a Dutch NGII project which was monitored throughout its course. We used an approach which focuses on narratives concerning the environment, groups and practice

  12. Big Data analytics in the Geo-Spatial Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Goncalves (Romulo); M.G. Ivanova (Milena); M.L. Kersten (Martin); H. Scholten; S. Zlatanova; F. Alvanaki (Foteini); P. Nourian (Pirouz); E. Dias

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractBig data collections in many scientific domains have inherently rich spatial and geo-spatial features. Spatial location is among the core aspects of data in Earth observation sciences, astronomy, and seismology to name a few. The goal of our project is to design an efficient data

  13. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  14. GeoCEGAS: natural gas distribution management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Lorena C.J. [Companhia de Gas do Ceara (CEGAS), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Targa, Fernando O. [Gestao Empresarial e Informatica Ltda. (GEMPI), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This Technical Paper approach the conception, architecture, design, construction, and implementation of GeoCEGAS, a spatially enabled corporate management information system, oriented to store and provide Web access, to information associated with the natural gas distribution network, owned by CEGAS. This paper reports business processes, business entities and business intelligence approached on the project, as well as an overview of system architecture, applications, and technology used on the implementation of GeoCEGAS. Finally, is presented an introduction to the work methodology used, as well a synopsis of benefits achievements. (author)

  15. Worldwide developments in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoellen, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    World uranium production will continue to change in most major producing nations. Canadian production will increase and will be increasingly dominated by western producers as eastern Canadian high-cost production declines. Australian production will increase as major projects come into operation before 2000. US production will stabilize through the end of the century. South African production will be dependent upon the worldwide support for economic sanctions. China's entry into the world market injects yet another variable into the already cloudy supply picture. Many risks and uncertainties will face uranium producers through the 1980s. Recognizing that the uranium industry is not a fast-growing market, many existing and potential producers are seeking alternate investment courses, causing a restructuring of the world uranium production industry in ways not anticipated even a few years ago. During the restructuring process, world uranium production will most likely continue to exceed uranium consumption, resulting in a further buildup of world uranium inventories. Inventory sales will continue to redistribute this material. As inventory selling runs its course, users will turn to normal sources of supply, stimulating additional production to meet needs. Stimulation in the form of higher prices will be determined by how fast producers are willing and able to return to the market. Production costs are expected to have an increasing impact as it has become apparent that uranium resources are large in comparison to projected consumption. Conversely, security-of-supply issues have seemed to be of decreasing magnitude as Canada, Australia, and other non-US producers continue to meet delivery commitments

  16. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  17. Value Assessment in Managing Cartography and Geo-communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, Lars

    2006-01-01

    dramatic changes particularly within the following areas: technology, availability of geo-information, professional skills and mobility of labour, conventions as well as resources. It was recognized at the KMS that the existing professional skills and methods were no longer sufficient for the design...... and the management in modern cartography and in modern geo-spatial communication projects. It was recognized that there was a lack of adequate theories, models, methods and tech-niques. This forced the cartographers and the project managers to lock several parameters to well known values. One example...... is that the prevalent processes for design revision, if any, were based on historical conditions. Previously it was common praxis to make changes in each separate step of the whole process without recognizing the overall aspects of the entire process or the entire project. The aim of the project was to create...

  18. Uranium in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 Canada's five uranium producers reported output of concentrate containing a record 12,470 metric tons of uranium (tU), or about one third of total Western world production. Shipments exceeded 13,200 tU, valued at $Cdn 1.1 billion. Most of Canada's uranium output is available for export for peaceful purposes, as domestic requirements represent about 15 percent of production. The six uranium marketers signed new sales contracts for over 11,000 tU, mostly destined for the United States. Annual exports peaked in 1987 at 12,790 tU, falling back to 10,430 tU in 1988. Forward domestic and export contract commitments were more than 70,000 tU and 60,000 tU, respectively, as of early 1989. The uranium industry in Canada was restructured and consolidated by merger and acquisition, including the formation of Cameco. Three uranium projects were also advanced. The Athabasca Basin is the primary target for the discovery of high-grade low-cost uranium deposits. Discovery of new reserves in 1987 and 1988 did not fully replace the record output over the two-year period. The estimate of overall resources as of January 1989 was down by 4 percent from January 1987 to a total (measured, indicated and inferred) of 544,000 tU. Exploration expenditures reached $Cdn 37 million in 1987 and $59 million in 1988, due largely to the test mining programs at the Cigar Lake and Midwest projects in Saskatchewan. Spot market prices fell to all-time lows from 1987 to mid-1989, and there is little sign of relief. Canadian uranium production capability could fall below 12,000 tU before the late 1990s; however, should market conditions warrant output could be increased beyond 15,000 tU. Canada's known uranium resources are more than sufficient to meet the 30-year fuel requirements of those reactors in Canada that are now or are expected to be in service by the late 1990s. There is significant potential for discovering additional uranium resources. Canada's uranium production is equivalent, in

  19. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  20. Canadian uranium policy and resource appraisal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, H.B.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews the history of uranium production in Canada, leading up to the turn-around from a buyer's to a seller's market in early 1974. The specific objectives of Canada's new uranium policy, announced in that year, are then spelled out and explained. The paper also describes the producing uranium deposits in Canada, the definition of uranium resources and projected production capacity. Finally, there is a section on the proposed laws governing non-resident ownership provisions in the industry. (author)

  1. Report about drilling works made in 13 Anomaly de Taylor and in the N- NE of its, around Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district): Uranium project[Study of Uranium prospection in Uruguay]; Informe sobre los trabajos de perforacion efectuados en la Anomalia 13 de Taylor y al N-NE de la misma , en los alrededores de Fraile Muerto (Departamento de Cerro Largo). Proyecto Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massa, J; Pirelli, H

    1983-07-01

    The perforations were carried out to investigate in depth denominated anomaly 13 detected during the Taylor Mission (1975) and extended the punch area of study during you are suitable DINAMIGE-BRGM (Project the present report details the activities realised in the environs Fraile Muerto (Cerro Largo district) by the command team of perforations of the uranium project. Previously and contemporarily to the executed works, prospection became geophysical ground geochemistry geology and, works. (Uranium)

  2. Geo-Enabled, Mobile Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    2006-01-01

    We are witnessing the emergence of a global infrastructure that enables the widespread deployment of geo-enabled, mobile services in practice. At the same time, the research community has also paid increasing attention to data management aspects of mobile services. This paper offers me...

  3. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  4. GeoGebra for Mathematical Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The GeoGebra software is attracting a lot of interest in the mathematical community, consequently there is a wide range of experience and resources to help use this application. This article briefly outlines how GeoGebra will be of great value in statistical education. The release of GeoGebra is an excellent example of the power of free software…

  5. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system diseases. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies uranium mine air agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema. Histopathologic data from serially sacrificed rats are reported for approximately 20- to 640- working-level-month (WLM) radon-daughter exposures delivered at one-tenth the rate of previous exposures. Exposure of male rats to radon daughters and uranium ore dust continues, along with exposure of male and female beagle dogs to uranium ore dust alone

  6. Uranium production in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    The history of uranium production in Sweden is reviewed in the article. The World War II led to an exploitation of the Swedish alum shale on a large scale. In the last phase of the war it also became obvious that the shale might be used for energy production of quite another kind than oil. In 1947 AB Atom energy was founded, an enterprise with one of its purposes to extract uranium for peaceful use. A plant with a yearly capacity of 120 tons of uranium was erected at Ranstad and ready for production by 1965. From the start in Ranstad and for many years to come there was hardly any interest in an immediate large uranium production. It was decided to use the plant for studies on its more effective exploitation in case of an expansion in the future, bearing in mind the reactor programme. In the course of time economical reasons began to speak against the project. The shale seemed to have a future neither as oil nor as uranium resource. The complete termination of the work on uranium production from shale occurred in 1989

  7. Chilean geo client application for disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Rodrigo F.; Lovison, Lucia; Potters, Martinus

    2018-05-01

    The global network of the Group on Earth Observation, GEO, connects all kinds of professionals from public and private institutions with data providers, sharing information to face the challenges of global changes and human development and they are creating a Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) to connect existing data infrastructures. A GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot Project for Disasters in Chile (AIP-8) was created as part of a capacity building initiative and representatives of different national agencies in Chile, along with international experts, formed a GEOSS Capacity Building Working Group (Lovison et al, 2016). Consistent with the objectives of GEOSS AIP-8 Chile, we developed and implemented a prototype service based on web services, mobile applications and other communication channels, which allows connecting different sources of information, aiming to reduce population vulnerability to natural disasters such as: earthquakes, flooding, wild fires and tsunamis, which is presented here. The GEO Chile client application is a JavaScript application using GEODAB brokering services, GIS technology and disaster information provided by national and international disaster services, including public and private organizations, where cartography becomes fundamental as a tool to provide realism and ubiquity to the information. Seven hotpots are targeted: Calbuco, Copahue and Villarrica volcanoes areas, Valparaíso city, which is frequently a victim of wildfires in the zone where population meets forest and Iquique, Illapel and Talcahuano, areas frequently struck by earthquakes and tsunamis.

  8. Development of metal fuel and study of construction materials (I-IV), Part V, Vol. II, Project of the device for irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; 2. Construction of the loop for uranium radiation creep testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.; Pavlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This volume includes the design description for construction of the loop for testing uranium radiation creep. It covers the following: construction of the loop head, protection closure; system for pressure regulation and uranium temperature regulation; system for recording samples dilatation and temperature. Testing of components and the loop on the whole is described as well as the safety reports

  9. Pricing Analysis in Geo/Geo/1 Queueing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the equilibrium behavior of customers and optimal pricing strategies of servers in a Geo/Geo/1 queueing system. Two common pricing mechanisms are considered. The first one is called ex-post payment (EPP scheme where the server collects tolls proportional to queue times, and the second one is called ex-ante payment (EAP scheme where the server charges a flat fee for the total service. The server sets the toll price to maximize its own profit. It is found that, under a customer’s choice equilibrium, the two toll mechanisms are equivalent from the economic point of view. Finally, we present several numerical experiments to investigate the effects of system parameters on the equilibrium customer joining rate and servers’ profits.

  10. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1983-01-01

    This project is investigating levels or uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological), and their exposure levels, that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumoconiosis, and emphysema

  11. Inhalation hazards to uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1982-01-01

    This project is investigating levels of uranium mine air contaminants, using both large and small experimental animals to model human respiratory system disease. Lung cancer and deaths by degenerative lung disease have reached epidemic proportions among uranium miners, but the cause-effect relationships for these diseases are based on inadequate epidemiological data. This project identifies agents or combinations of agents (both chemical and radiological) and their exposure levels that produce respiratory tract lesions, including respiratory epithelial carcinoma, pneumonconiosis and emphysema

  12. 78 FR 17450 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery.... SUA- 1341 to Uranium One USA, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR... Commission License No. SUA-1341 For Uranium One USA, Inc., Irigaray and Christensen Ranch Projects (Willow...

  13. The Palmottu natural analogue project. Progress report 1995. The behaviour of natural radionuclides in and around uranium deposits, Nr. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruskeeniemi, T.; Blomqvist, R.

    1996-01-01

    Natural analogue studies at Palmottu (in Finland) have concentrated on characterising the general geological, hydrogeological and radiochemical setting of the uranium mineralisation. Since 1992 a research program focusing on the hydrogeological characterisation of potential flow routes has been in progress, and the basis for a constrained flow system has already been identified. Sophisticated studies have also been performed on groundwater redox chemistry and matrix diffusion processes. The report consists of an introduction to the activities carried out in 1995 followed by topical summaries documented by the principal investigators in charge of each activity. The following summaries are included in the report (1) Hydrogeological studies at Palmottu, (2) Modelling of groundwater flow, (3) TV-logging of boreholes, (4) Mineralogical and petrological studies, (5) Radionuclide migration studies and (6) Humic substances. Full technical and scientific results are documented in appropriate topical reports and publications referred to in this Progress Report. (46 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.)

  14. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  15. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  17. An outline of the application of an environmental management system to the PRAMU (Uranium Mining Environmental Restitution Project); Ejemplo de aplicacion de un sistema de gestion ambiental en el PRAMU: Proyecto de Restitucion Ambiental de la Mineria del Uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetniansky de De Grande, Nelida; Avila Cadena, Guadalberto; Cardozo, Damian [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Unidad Ejecutora del Proyecto PRAMU

    2000-07-01

    In Argentina the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) has the responsibility to restore uranium mining facilities, when milling operations have been shut down. To carry out this clean up actions CNEA created the Project for Uranium Mining Environmental Restoration (PRAMU in Spanish). To take into account the environmental aspects of the restoration activities, the PRAMU includes in its management an Environmental Management System (SGA in Spanish), which is of central importance in determining the environmental policy, objectives and targets. In this work a general view of the Environmental Management System is presented and an example of one of the environmental programs to be implemented is detailed. (author)

  18. An integrated risk sensing system for geo-structural safety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.W. Huang; D.M. Zhang; B.M. Ayyub

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, geo-structures are experiencing a rapid development in China. The potential risks inherent in the huge amount of construction and asset operation projects in China were well managed in the major project, i.e. the project of Shanghai Yangtze tunnel in 2002. Since then, risk assessment of geo-structures has been gradually developed from a qualitative manner to a quantitative manner. However, the current practices of risk management have been paid considerable attention to the assessment, but little on risk control. As a result, the responses to risks occurrences after a comprehensive assessment are basically too late. In this paper, a smart system for risk sensing incorporating the wireless sensor network (WSN) on-site visualization techniques and the resilience-based repair strategy was proposed. The merit of this system is the real-time monitoring for geo-structural performance and dynamic pre-warning for safety of on-site workers. The sectional convergence, joint opening, and seepage of segmental lining of shield tunnel were monitored by the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based sensors. The light emitting diode (LED) coupling with the above WSN system was used to indicate different risk levels on site. By sensing the risks and telling the risks in real time, the geo-risks could be controlled and the safety of geo-structures could be assured to a certain degree. Finally, a resilience-based analysis model was proposed for designing the repair strategy by using the measured data from the WSN system. The application and efficiency of this system have been validated by two cases including Shanghai metro tunnel and underwater road tunnel.

  19. The geo-reactor. A link between nuclear fission and geothermal energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Fiorina, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-precision isotope analysis data suggests the potential occurrence of a geo-reactor. Specific gas isotopes that could have been generated by binary and ternary fissions were identified in volcano emanations or as soluble/associated species in crystalline rocks and semi-quantitatively evaluated as isotopic ratio or estimated amounts. Presently if it is evident that according to the actinide inventory on the Earth, local potential criticality of the geo-system may have been reached, several questions remain such as why, where and when did a geo-reactor be operational? Even if the hypothesis of a geo-reactor operation in the proto-Earth period should be acceptable, it could be difficult to anticipate that a geo-reactor is still operating today. This could be tested in the future by assessing and reconstructing the system by antineutrino detection and tomography through the Earth. The present paper focuses on the geo-reactor conditions including history, spatial extension and regimes. The discussion based on recent calculations involves investigations on the limits in term of fissile inventory, size and power, based on stratification through the gravitational field and the various features through the inner mantel, the boundary with the core, the external part and the inner-core. the reconstruction allows to formulating that from the history point of view there are possibilities that the geo-reactor reached criticality in a proto-Earth period as a thorium/uranium reactor triggered by an under-layer with heavier actinides. The geo-reactor should be a key component of geothermal energy sources. (author)

  20. Project and supply agreement. The text of the agreement of 20 September 1990 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Governments of the Republic of Zaire and the United States of America concerning the transfer of enriched uranium for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Project and Supply Agreement which was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 15 June 1990, and concluded on 20 September 1990, among the Agency and the Governments of the Republic of Zaire and the United States of America for the transfer of enriched uranium for a research reactor in Zaire. The supplied material will be an instrumented fuel element containing uranium enriched to 19.98 percent in the isotope uranium-235. 1 tab