WorldWideScience

Sample records for uranium metal extrusions

  1. FORMING TUBES AND RODS OF URANIUM METAL BY EXTRUSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method and apparatus are presented for the extrusion of uranium metal. Since uranium is very brittle if worked in the beta phase, it is desirable to extrude it in the gamma phase. However, in the gamma temperature range thc uranium will alloy with the metal of the extrusion dic, and is readily oxidized to a great degree. According to this patent, uranium extrusion in thc ganmma phase may be safely carried out by preheating a billet of uranium in an inert atmosphere to a trmperature between 780 C and 1100 C. The heated billet is then placed in an extrusion apparatus having dies which have been maintained at an elevated temperature for a sufficient length of time to produce an oxide film, and placing a copper disc between the uranium billet and the die.

  2. Metal extrusion using hydrostatic pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauve, Ch.

    1965-01-01

    The main problems connected with the deformation of metals due to extrusion are described. A method is put forward for calculating the rational rate of percentage deformation in the case of bar extrusion using a cylindrical container; reference is made to previous work on extrusion using a hydrostatic pressure with or without back-pressure. An extrusion process is described using hydrostatic pressure, without back-pressure, and using the lubricant for transmitting the thrust. This process has been used for eight years by the C.E.A. for the extrusion of a very wide range of metals, from beryllium to uranium and including steels; it leads to excellent surface textures. A very fine crystallization can be obtained on extruded products when the rate of extrusion is very low. There appears to be nothing against the use of high extrusion rates using this method. (author) [fr

  3. Deformations in micro extrusion of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piwnik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Production technologies of small dimensions metallic elements are known for a long time. They are produced by machining methods:turning, milling, polishing. Recently, methods for manufacturing small details by forming are developed – microforming. This process ischaracterized by the high dimensions accuracy and the surface smoothness of received items and the high production rate. When a forming process is scaled down to micro dimensions, the microstructure of the workpiece, the surface topology of the workpiece and that of the tooling remain unchanged. Size effect is appearing. This paper analyses specifications of a metal extrusion in micro scale. To determine the impact of the tool surface roughness on deformation process the numerical model of roughness as triangle wave were developed. In paper the influence of the wave presence on the material flow is described. Impact of the forming conditions on extrusion forces there is also characterized.

  4. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  5. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  6. Metal extrusion using hydrostatic pressures; Le filage des metaux sous pression hydrostatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauve, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The main problems connected with the deformation of metals due to extrusion are described. A method is put forward for calculating the rational rate of percentage deformation in the case of bar extrusion using a cylindrical container; reference is made to previous work on extrusion using a hydrostatic pressure with or without back-pressure. An extrusion process is described using hydrostatic pressure, without back-pressure, and using the lubricant for transmitting the thrust. This process has been used for eight years by the C.E.A. for the extrusion of a very wide range of metals, from beryllium to uranium and including steels; it leads to excellent surface textures. A very fine crystallization can be obtained on extruded products when the rate of extrusion is very low. There appears to be nothing against the use of high extrusion rates using this method. (author) [French] On expose les problemes generaux lies a la deformation des metaux par filage. On propose un calcul de la vitesse rationnelle de deformation pour cent dans le cas du filage de barres a partir d'un conteneur cylindrique, et l'on cite les travaux anterieurs sur le filage par faction d'une pression hydrostatique sans ou avec une contre-pression. On decrit un procede de filage par l'action d'une pression hydrostatique, sans contre-pression, utilisant le lubrifiant pour transmettre la poussee. Ce procede employe depuis 8 ans au C.E.A. pour filer les metaux les plus divers, depuis le beryllium jusqu'a l'uranium en passant par les aciers, permet d'obtenir d'excellents etats de surface. Une cristallisation tres fine peut etre obtenue sur les produits files lorsque le filage est tres lent. Rien ne parait s'opposer a ce que des filages rapides soient effectues avec cette methode. (auteur)

  7. Melting, casting, and alpha-phase extrusion of the uranium-2.4 weight percent niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.; Beck, D.E.; Kollie, T.G.; Zorinsky, E.J.; Jones, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    The experimental details of the melting, casting, homogenization, and alpha-phase extrusion process used to fabricate the uranium-2.4 wt % niobium alloy into 46-mm-diameter rods is described. Extrusion defects that were detected by an ultrasonic technique were eliminated by proper choice of extrusion parameters; namely, reduction ratio, ram speed, die angle, and billet preheat temperature

  8. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1988-01-01

    A method for converting uranium oxide to uranium metal is described comprising the steps of heating uranium oxide in the presence of a reducing agent to a temperature sufficient to reduce the uranium oxide to uranium metal and form a heterogeneous mixture of a uranium metal product and oxide by-products, heating the mixture in a hydrogen atmosphere at a temperature sufficient to convert uranium metal in the mixture to uranium hydride, cooling the resulting uranium hydride-containing mixture to a temperature sufficient to produce a ferromagnetic transition in the uranium hydride, magnetically separating the cooled uranium hydride from the mixture, and thereafter heating the separated uranium hydride in an inert atmosphere to a temperature sufficient to convert the uranium hydride to uranium metal

  9. Die Defects and Die Corrections in Metal Extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayyad Zahid Qamar

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Extrusion is a very popular and multi-faceted manufacturing process. A large number of products for the automotive, aerospace, and construction sectors are produced through aluminum extrusion. Many defects in the extruded products occur because of the conditions of the dies and tooling. The problems in dies can be due to material issues, design and manufacturing, or severe usage. They can be avoided by maintaining the billet quality, by controlling the extrusion process parameters, and through routine maintenance. Die problems that occur on a day-to-day basis are mostly repairable and are rectified through various types of die correction operations. These defects and repair operations have not been reported in detail in the published literature. The current paper presents an in-depth description of repairable die defects and related die correction operations in metal extrusion. All major die defects are defined and classified, and their causes, preventive measures, and die correction operations are described. A brief frequency-based statistical study of die defects is also carried out to identify the most frequent die corrections. This work can be of direct benefit to plant engineers and operators and to researchers and academics in the field of metal extrusion.

  10. Radiation damage of metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-01-01

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium

  11. Method for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerksen, Walter K.

    1988-01-01

    A process is described for converting scrap and waste uranium oxide to uranium metal. The uranium oxide is sequentially reduced with a suitable reducing agent to a mixture of uranium metal and oxide products. The uranium metal is then converted to uranium hydride and the uranium hydride-containing mixture is then cooled to a temperature less than -100.degree. C. in an inert liquid which renders the uranium hydride ferromagnetic. The uranium hydride is then magnetically separated from the cooled mixture. The separated uranium hydride is readily converted to uranium metal by heating in an inert atmosphere. This process is environmentally acceptable and eliminates the use of hydrogen fluoride as well as the explosive conditions encountered in the previously employed bomb-reduction processes utilized for converting uranium oxides to uranium metal.

  12. METHOD OF DISSOLVING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotin, L.A.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to an economicai means of dissolving metallic uranium. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of perchloric acid to the concentrated nitric acid in which the uranium is being dissolved greatly shortens the time necessary for dissolution of the metal. Thus the use of about 1 or 2 percent of perchioric acid based on the weight of the nitric acid used, reduces the time of dissolution of uranium by a factor of about 100.

  13. Process for electrolytically preparing uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Paul A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for making uranium metal from uranium oxide by first fluorinating uranium oxide to form uranium tetrafluoride and next electrolytically reducing the uranium tetrafluoride with a carbon anode to form uranium metal and CF.sub.4. The CF.sub.4 is reused in the fluorination reaction rather than being disposed of as a hazardous waste.

  14. Inherent safety phenomenon of fission-gas induced axial extrusion in oxide and metal fueled LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.J.; Kalimullah.

    1985-01-01

    The current emphasis in LMFBR design is to develop reactor systems that contain as many features as possible to limit the severity of hypothetical accidents and provide the maximum time before corrective action is required while maintaining low capital costs. One feature is the possibility of fission-gas induced axial extrusion of the fuel within the intact cladding. The potential exists for this phenomenon to enable the reactor to withstand most accidents of the TOP variety, or at least provide an extended time for corrective action to be taken. Under transient conditions which produce a heating of the fuel above its nominal operating temperature, thermal expansion of the material axially produces a negative reactivity effect. This effect is presently considered in most accident analysis codes. The phenomenon of fission-gas induced axial extrusion has received renewed interest because of the consideration of metal alloys of uranium and plutonium for the fuel in some current reactor designs

  15. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  17. PROCESS FOR PREPARING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, C.H. Jr.; Reynolds, F.L.

    1959-01-13

    A process is presented for producing oxygen-free uranium metal comprising contacting iodine vapor with crude uranium in a reaction zone maintained at 400 to 800 C to produce a vaporous mixture of UI/sub 4/ and iodine. Also disposed within the maction zone is a tungsten filament which is heated to about 1600 C. The UI/sub 4/, upon contacting the hot filament, is decomposed to molten uranium substantially free of oxygen.

  18. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  19. METHOD OF PURIFYING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, R.E.; Morrison, B.H.

    1958-12-23

    The removal of lmpurities from uranlum metal can be done by a process conslstlng of contacting the metal with liquid mercury at 300 icient laborato C, separating the impunitycontalnlng slag formed, cooling the slag-free liquld substantlally below the point at which uranlum mercurlde sollds form, removlng the mercury from the solids, and recovering metallic uranium by heating the solids.

  20. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  1. PRETREATING URANIUM FOR METAL PLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmann, R.F.

    1961-05-01

    A process is given for anodically treating the surface of uranium articles, prior to metal plating. The metal is electrolyzed in an aqueous solution of about 10% polycarboxylic acid, preferably oxalic acid, from 1 to 5% by weight of glycerine and from 1 to 5% by weight of hydrochloric acid at from 20 to 75 deg C for from 30 seconds to 15 minutes. A current density of from 60 to 100 amperes per square foot is used.

  2. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  3. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  4. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  5. Metallic uranium as fuel for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a first overview of the use of metallic uranium and its alloys as an option for fuel for rapid reactors. Aspects are discussed concerning uranium alloys which present high solubility in the gamma phase. (author)

  6. The magic metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    ''Magic Metal'' was the first in a range of programmes for the younger secondary student. It is a very simple explanation of how a nuclear reactor works, of the basics of fission and compares nuclear with other fuels. The concepts employed were developed using classroom trials. (author)

  7. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  8. Sequential extraction of uranium metal contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murry, M.M.; Spitz, H.B.; Connick, W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of uranium contaminated dirt collected from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill were analyzed for uranium using a sequential extraction protocol involving a series of five increasingly aggressive solvents. The quantity of uranium extracted from the contaminated dirt by each reagent can aid in predicting the fate and transport of the uranium contamination in the environment. Uranium was separated from each fraction using anion exchange, electrodeposition and analyzed by alpha spectroscopy analysis. Results demonstrate that approximately 77 % of the uranium was extracted using NH 4 Ac in 25 % acetic acid. (author)

  9. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  10. Uranium Metal Analysis via Selective Dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2008-09-10

    Uranium metal, which is present in sludge held in the Hanford Site K West Basin, can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during sludge handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage operations by its oxidation/corrosion in water. A thorough knowledge of the uranium metal concentration in sludge therefore is essential to successful sludge management and waste process design. The goal of this work was to establish a rapid routine analytical method to determine uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of up to 1000-fold higher total uranium concentrations (i.e., up to 30 wt% and more uranium) for samples to be taken during the upcoming sludge characterization campaign and in future analyses for sludge handling and processing. This report describes the experiments and results obtained in developing the selective dissolution technique to determine uranium metal concentration in K Basin sludge.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Metallic Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hin, Celine

    2018-03-10

    used in the original fitting. Moreover, as fuels burn up in the reactor and fission products are built up, thermal conductivity is also significantly changed [3]. Unfortunately, fundamental understanding of the effect of fission products is also currently lacking. In this project, we probe thermal conductivity of metallic fuels with ab initio calculations, a theoretical tool with the potential to yield better accuracy and predictive power than empirical fitting. This work will both complement experimental data by determining thermal conductivity in wider composition and temperature ranges than is available experimentally, and also develop mechanistic understanding to guide better design of metallic fuels in the future. So far, we focused on α-U perfect crystal, the ground-state phase of U metal. We focus on two methods. The first method has been developed by the team at the University of Wisconsin Madison. They developed a practical and general modeling approach for thermal conductivity of metals and metal alloys that integrates ab-initio and semi-empirical physics-based models to maximize the strengths of both techniques. The second method has been developed by the team at Virginia Tech. This approach consists of a determining the thermal conductivity using only ab-initio methods without any fitting parameters. Both methods were complementary and very helpful to understand the physics behind the thermal conductivity in metallic uranium and other materials with similar characteristics. In Section I, the combined model developed at UWM is explained. In Section II, the ab-initio method developed at VT is described along with the uranium pseudo-potential and its validation. Section III is devoted to the work done by Jianguo Yu at INL. Finally, we will present the performance of the project in terms of milestones, publications, and presentations.

  12. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  13. Precise coulometric titration of uranium in a high-purity uranium metal and in uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yoshimori, Takayoshi

    1975-01-01

    Uranium in uranyl nitrate, uranium trioxide and a high-purity uranium metal was assayed by the coulometric titration with biamperometric end-point detection. Uranium (VI) was reduced to uranium (IV) by solid bismuth amalgam in 5M sulfuric acid solution. The reduced uranium was reoxidized to uranium (VI) with a large excess of ferric ion at a room temperature, and the ferrous ion produced was titrated with the electrogenerated manganese(III) fluoride. In the analyses of uranium nitrate and uranium trioxide, the results were precise enough when the error from uncertainty in water content in the samples was considered. The standard sample of pure uranium metal (JAERI-U4) was assayed by the proposed method. The sample was cut into small chips of about 0.2g. Oxides on the metal surface were removed by the procedure shown by National Bureau of Standards just before weighing. The mean assay value of eleven determinations corrected for 3ppm of iron was (99.998+-0.012) % (the 95% confidence interval for the mean), with a standard deviation of 0.018%. The proposed coulometric method is simple and permits accurate and precise determination of uranium which is matrix constituent in a sample. (auth.)

  14. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I 2 ) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF 4 , spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area

  15. Extrusion-formed uranium-2.4 wt. % article with decreased linear thermal expansion and method for making the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.; Jones, J.M.; Kollie, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of an article of uranium-2.4 wt. % niobium alloy in which the linear thermal expansion in the direction transverse to the extrusion direction is less than about 0.98% between 22 0 C and 600 0 C which corresponds to a value greater than the 1.04% provided by previous extrusion operations over the same temperature range. The article with the improved thermal expansion possesses a yield strength at 0.2% offset of at least 400 mpa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1050 mpa, a compressive yield strength of at least 2% offset of at least 675 mpa, and an elongation of at lea 25% over 25.4 mm/sec. To provide this article with the improv thermal expansion, the uranium alloy billet is heated to 630 0 C and extruded in the alpha phase through a die with a reduction ratio of at least 8.4:1 at a ram speed no greater than 6.8 mm/sec. These critical extrusion parameters provide the article with the desired decrease in the linear thermal expansion while maintaining the selected mechanical properties without encountering crystal disruption in the article

  16. Radiological chronometry of uranium metal samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, L.A.; Stalcup, A.M.; Glover, S.E.; Spitz, H.B.; LaMont, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Radiological chronometry is an important tool in nuclear forensics that uses several methods to determine the length of time that has elapsed since a material was last purified. One of the chronometers used in determining the age of metallic uranium involves measuring the fractional ingrowth of 230 Th from its parent 234 U with the assumption that the uranium metal contained no impurities, especially thorium, when it was purified. The affects of different etching procedures were evaluated for the removal of surface oxidation with three different types of uranium metal samples to determine whether the etching procedure affects the radiological age. The sample treated with a rigorous etching procedure had exhibited the most reliable radiological age while less rigorous etching yields a radiological age from 15 years to hundreds of years older than the known age. Any excess thorium on the surface of a uranium metal sample presents a bias in age determination and the sample will appear older than the true age. Although this research demonstrates the need for rigorous surface etching, a bias in the radiological age could have arisen if the uranium in the metal was heterogeneously distributed. (author)

  17. Uranium and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, Ashraf E.M.; King Saud University, Riyadh

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Agricultural applications of chemical fertilizers are a worldwide practice. The specific activity of uranium-238 and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers depends on the phosphate ore from which the fertilizer produced and on the chemical processing of the ore. Composite phosphate fertilizers samples were collected and the uranium-238 specific activity, in Bq/kg, and As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se concentration were measured. The annual addition of these elements in soil due to soil fertilization were calculated and discussed. (author)

  18. Liquid uranium contaimment in refractories metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte, J.L.; Padilha, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Tests were performed on metalic materials for liquid uranium containment up to 2100 0 C. The materials Nb, Mo, Ta and W in the form of crucibles were tested at 2100 0 C for one hour in the presence of flowing argon. After testing, the crucibles were etched using HCl and analysed by optical metallography and electron proble microanalysis. The results are discussed in terms of Berthoud equation and indicated that the solubility limit of the crucible material in uranium at the temperature controlls the crucible dissolution by liquid uranium. The various phases formed, the mechanism of dissolution and the possible material for future use are presented and discussed. (Author) [pt

  19. METHOD OF HOT ROLLING URANIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, A.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method is given for quickly and efficiently hot rolling uranium metal in the upper part of the alpha phase temperature region to obtain sound bars and sheets possessing a good surface finish. The uranium metal billet is heated to a temperature in the range of 1000 deg F to 1220 deg F by immersion iii a molten lead bath. The heated billet is then passed through the rolls. The temperature is restored to the desired range between successive passes through the rolls, and the rolls are turned down approximately 0.050 inch between successive passes.

  20. The Production of Uranium Metal by Metal Hydrides Incorporated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, P. P.

    1943-01-01

    Metal Hydrides Incorporated was a pioneer in the production of uranium metal on a commercial scale and supplied it to all the laboratories interested in the original research, before other methods for its production were developed. Metal Hydrides Inc. supplied the major part of the metal for the construction of the first experimental pile which, on December 2, 1942, demonstrated the feasibility of the self-sustaining chain reaction and the release of atomic energy.

  1. A study on chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Kim, T.J.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, G.Y.; Lee, S.J.; Hur, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) was conducted to derive an easy and simple uranium chloride production method without impurities. In thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, it was predicted that only uranium chlorides can be produced by the reactions between uranium metal and NH 4 Cl. Experimental conditions for the chlorination of uranium metal were determined using a chlorination test of cerium metal using NH 4 Cl. It was confirmed that UCl 3 and UCl 4 in the form of particles as uranium chlorination products can be obtained from the chlorination method using NH 4 Cl. (author)

  2. Extrusion of the uranium-0.75 weight percent titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Lundberg, M.R.; Boland, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures are described for extruding the U--0.75 wt percent Ti alloy in the high alpha region (600 to 640 0 C) , and in the upper gamma region (900 to 1000 0 C). The casting of sound extrusion billets has importance in the production of sound extrusions, and procedures are given for casting sound billets up to 1,100 kilograms . Also important in producing sound extrusions is the use of glass lubricants. Reduction ratios of greater than 50 to 1 were achieved on reasonably sized billets. Extrusion constants of 48,000 pounds per square inch (psi) [296 megapascals (MPa)] for alpha phase (630 0 C) and 8,000 psi (56 MPa) for gamma phase (950 0 C) were achieved. Gamma-phase extrusion has preference over alpha-phase extrusion in that larger billets can be used and temperature control is not as critical. However alpha-phase extrusion offers better surface finish, less die wear, and fewer oxidation problems. Billets up to 14 inches in diameter have been successfully gamma-extruded and plans exist for extruding billets up to 20 inches (508 millimetres) in diameter. (U.S.)

  3. Examination of long-stored uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gate, A.M.; Hambley, D.I.

    2013-01-01

    A small quantity of unirradiated uranium from Magnox fuel elements is currently held in archive storage. Some of these samples date back to the late fifties. This material has been stored, untreated, in unsealed containers in air at ambient temperature, humidity and pressure conditions. Such conditions are relevant to those that may exist in a passive storage facility. A sample of this material has been subject to optical, electron-optical and Raman spectroscopic examination to determine the extent of corrosion and the composition of corrosion product arising from long-term, low-temperature oxidation of uranium metal in air. The examinations have established that, even after a period in excess of 40 years, there was no observable spalling of uranium oxide from the sample during storage. The extent of oxidation of the metal, derived by SEM analysis, was slight and insignificant in relation to overall structural stability of the material. Raman spectroscopy data showed that the bulk of the oxide layer was comprised of hyper-stoichiometric UO 2 , with U 4 O 9 being the dominant component. The oxygen/uranium ratio was observed to be decreased at the metal/oxide interface, with a very thin layer that consisted of mainly UO 2 at the metal surface. At the oxide/air interface, a very thin U 3 O 8 layer was detected. U 4 O 9 is relatively mechanically stable, due to a significantly higher density than UO 2 and U 3 O 8 . It is likely that the lower internal stresses in the thick U 4 O 9 layer have resulted in less oxide film cracking than would be expected from UO 2 or U 3 O 8 and hence the low oxidation rate observed. These results suggest that storage of uranium metal in air over decades is a safe and credible option. (authors)

  4. Concept Feasibility Report for Using Co-Extrusion to Bond Metals to Complex Shapes of U-10Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soulami, Ayoub [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In support of the Convert Program of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been investigating manufacturing processes for the uranium-10% molybdenum (U-10Mo) alloy plate fuel for the U.S. high-performance research reactors (USHPRR). This report documents the results of PNNL’s efforts to develop the extrusion process for this concept. The approach to the development of a co-extruded complex-shaped fuel has been described and an extrusion of DU-10Mo was made. The initial findings suggest that given the extrusion forces required for processing U-10Mo, the co-extrusion process can meet the production demands of the USHPRR fuel and may be a viable production method. The development activity is in the early stages and has just begun to identify technical challenges to address details such as dimensional tolerances and shape control. New extrusion dies and roll groove profiles have been developed and will be assessed by extrusion and rolling of U-10Mo during the next fiscal year. Progress on the development and demonstration of the co-extrusion process for flat and shaped fuel is reported in this document

  5. Dissolution of metallic uranium in alkalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.; Wilkinson, Maria V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of U metallic foils has been studied in the framework of the development of an improved 99 Mo-production process. The best conditions for the dissolution of uranium foils of approximately 150 μm are the following: a) NaClO concentrations of 0.20 and 0.23 M with NaOH of 0.27 and 0.31 M respectively; b) temperature of the solution, 70 C degrees; c) volume of the solution, 15 ml / cm 2 of uranium foil; d) dissolution time, 30 minutes. (author)

  6. Uranium and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khater, A.E.M.

    2008-01-01

    Agricultural applications of chemical fertilizers are a worldwide practice. The specific activity of uranium-238 and heavy metals in phosphate fertilizers depends on the phosphate ore from which the fertilizer produced and on the chemical processing of the ore. Composite phosphate fertilizers samples where collected and the uranium-238 specific activity, in Bq/kg, and As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Se concentration, in ppm, were measured. The annual addition of these elements in soil due to fertilization were calculated and discussed. (author)(tk)

  7. Optimization of the uniformity of a metal flow during continuous extrusion by the Conform method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubanova, A. Sh.; Gorokhov, Yu. V.; Solopko, I. V.; Ziborov, A. Yu.

    2010-03-01

    The scheme of plastic deformation of a billet in a container is considered as part of continuous extrusion by the Conform method. A mathematical model of the motion of a viscoplastic Bingham liquid is used to determine the metal velocity distribution in the plastic-deformation zone. As a result, the optimum angle between the longitudinal axes of the die and container is estimated. This angle is found to be one of the main factors affecting the nonuniformity of deformation when a metal flows into the die. The calculated results are compared to experimental data.

  8. Behavior of metallic uranium-fissium fuel in TREAT transient overpower tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.H.; Klickman, A.E.; Lo, R.K.; Rhodes, E.A.; Robinson, W.R.; Stanford, G.S.; Wright, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    TREAT tests M2, M3, and M4 were performed to obtain information on two key behavior characteristics of fuel under transient overpower accident conditions in metal-fueled fast reactors: the prefailure axial self-extrusion (elongation beyond thermal expansion) of fuel within intact cladding and the margin to cladding breach. Uranium-5 wt% fissium Experimental Breeder Reactor-II driver fuel pins were used for the tests since they were available as suitable stand-ins for the uranium-plutonium-zirconium ternary fuel, which is the reference fuel of the integral fast reactor (IFR) concept. The ternary fuel will be used in subsequent TREAT tests. Preliminary results from tests M2 and M3 were presented earlier. The present report includes significant advances in analysis as well as additional data from test M4. Test results and analysis have led to the development and validation of pin cladding failure and fuel extrusion models for metallic fuel, within reasonable uncertainties for the uranium-fissium alloy. Concepts involved are straightforward and readily extendable to ternary alloys and behavior in full-size reactors

  9. Preparation of the pur uranium-metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.; Vertes, P.

    1955-01-01

    A detailed description of the chemical processes used to prepare in the factory of Bouchet of the CEA (Seine-Et-Oise) pur metal uranium with either relatively rich ores, or extracts coming of physical or chemical treatment of poor ores. The nitric treatment of ores succeeds to the production of uranate of impure sodium carbonate. This last last product is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranyl nitrate is extracted by tributyl-phosphate diluted in an inert solvent. The uranyl nitrate pure is re-extracted and successively transformed in uranium peroxide, in orange oxide then in brown oxide which is transformed in fluoride by the anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Uranate fluoride is then reduced in metal by the pure calcium with an yield superior to 99%. (authors) [fr

  10. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part 1. Review of analytical and process-scale metallic uranium dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on dissolution/reaction systems capable of treating uranium metal waste to remove its pyrophoric properties. The primary emphasis is the review of literature describing analytical and production-scale dissolution methods applied to either uranium metal or uranium alloys. A brief summary of uranium's corrosion behavior is included since the corrosion resistance of metals and alloys affects their dissolution behavior. Based on this review, dissolution systems were recommended for subsequent screening studies designed to identify the best system to treat depleted uranium metal wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). (author)

  11. 50 years of uranium metal production in Uranium Metal Plant, BARC, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Programme in India, from the very beginning, has laid emphasis on indigenous capabilities in all aspects of nuclear technology. This meant keeping pace with developments abroad and recognizing the potentials of indigenous technologies. With the development of nuclear programme in India, the importance of uranium was growing at a rapid pace. The production of reactor grade uranium in India started in January 1959 when the first ingot of nuclear pure uranium was discharged using CTR process at Trombay. The decision to set up a uranium refinery to purify the crude uranium fluoride, obtained as a by-product of the DAE's Thorium Plant at Trombay, and to produce nuclear grade pure uranium metal was taken at the end of 1956. The task was assigned to the 'Project Fire Wood Group'. The main objective of the plant was to produce pure uranium metal for use in the Canada India Reactor and Zerlina. Besides this, it was to function as a pilot plant to collect operational data and to train personnel for larger plants to be set up in future. The plant designing and erection work was entrusted to Messrs. Indian Rare Earths Ltd.

  12. Uranium decontamination of common metals by smelting, a review (handbook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautz, E.W.; Briggs, G.G.; Shaw, W.E.; Cavendish, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    The published and unpublished literature relating to the smelting of common metals scrap contaminated with uranium-bearing compounds has been searched and reviewed. In general, standard smelting practice produces ingots having a low uranium content, particularly for ferrous, nickel, and copper metals or alloys. Aluminum recovered from uranium contaminated scrap shows some decontamination by smelting but the uranium content is not as low as for other metals. Due to the heterogeneous nature and origin of scrap metals contaminated with uranium, information is frequently missing as to the extent of the initial contamination and the degree of decontamination obtained. The uranium content of the final cast ingots is generally all that is available. Results are summarized below by the primary composition of the uranium contaminated scrap metal. (U.S.)

  13. Evidence for single metal two electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; McInnes, Eric J L; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley J; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen T

    2017-12-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido complex in a reaction that satisfies all criteria of a single-metal two-electron oxidative addition. Thermolysis of this complex promotes extrusion of azobenzene, where H-/D-isotopic labelling finds no isotopomer cross-over and the non-reactivity of a nitrene-trap suggests that nitrenes are not generated and thus a reductive elimination has occurred. Though not optimally balanced in this case, this work presents evidence that classical d-block redox chemistry can be performed reversibly by f-block metals, and that uranium can thus mimic elementary transition metal reactivity, which may lead to the discovery of new f-block catalysis.

  14. Examination of long-stored uranium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gate, A.M.; Hambley, D.I. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    A small quantity of unirradiated uranium from Magnox fuel elements is currently held in archive storage. Some of these samples date back to the late fifties. This material has been stored, untreated, in unsealed containers in air at ambient temperature, humidity and pressure conditions. Such conditions are relevant to those that may exist in a passive storage facility. A sample of this material has been subject to optical, electron-optical and Raman spectroscopic examination to determine the extent of corrosion and the composition of corrosion product arising from long-term, low-temperature oxidation of uranium metal in air. The examinations have established that, even after a period in excess of 40 years, there was no observable spalling of uranium oxide from the sample during storage. The extent of oxidation of the metal, derived by SEM analysis, was slight and insignificant in relation to overall structural stability of the material. Raman spectroscopy data showed that the bulk of the oxide layer was comprised of hyper-stoichiometric UO{sub 2}, with U{sub 4}O{sub 9} being the dominant component. The oxygen/uranium ratio was observed to be decreased at the metal/oxide interface, with a very thin layer that consisted of mainly UO{sub 2} at the metal surface. At the oxide/air interface, a very thin U{sub 3}O{sub 8} layer was detected. U{sub 4}O{sub 9} is relatively mechanically stable, due to a significantly higher density than UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. It is likely that the lower internal stresses in the thick U{sub 4}O{sub 9} layer have resulted in less oxide film cracking than would be expected from UO{sub 2} or U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and hence the low oxidation rate observed. These results suggest that storage of uranium metal in air over decades is a safe and credible option. (authors)

  15. PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-10-01

    A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

  16. Protection of uranium by metallic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Koch, P.; Dominget, R.; Darras, R.

    1968-01-01

    A study is made of the possibilities of inhibiting or limiting, by means of protective metallic coatings, the oxidation of uranium by carbon dioxide at high temperature. In general, surface films containing intermetallic compounds or solid solutions of uranium with aluminium, zirconium, copper, niobium, nickel or chromium are formed, according to the techniques employed which are described here. The processes most to be recommended are those of direct diffusion starting from a thin sheet or tube, of vacuum deposition, or of immersion in a molten bath of suitable composition. The conditions for preparing these coatings have been optimized as a function of the protective effect obtained in carbon dioxide at 450 or at 500 C. Only the aluminium and zirconium based coatings are really satisfactory since they can lead to a reduction by a factor of 5 to 10 in the oxidation rate of uranium in the conditions considered; they make it possible in particular to avoid or to reduce to a very large extent the liberation of powdered oxide. Furthermore, the coatings produced generally give the uranium good protection against atmospheric corrosion. (author) [fr

  17. Determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions by potentiometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, H.L.; McElhaney, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast method for the determination of uranium in uranium metal, uranium oxides, and uranyl nitrate solutions has been adapted from the Davies-Gray volumetric method to meet the needs of Y-12. One-gram duplicate aliquots of uranium metal or uranium oxide are dissolved in 1:1 HNO 3 and concentrated H 2 SO 4 to sulfur trioxide fumes, and then diluted to 100-mL volume. Duplicate aliquots are then weighed for analysis. For uranyl nitrate samples, duplicate aliquots containing between 50 and 150 mg of U are weighed and analyzed directly. The weighed aliquot is transferred to a Berzelius beaker; 1.5 M sulfamic acid is added, followed in order by concentrated phosphoric acid, 1 M ferrous sulfate, and (after a 30-second interval) the oxidizing reagent. After a timed 3-minute waiting period, 100 mL of the 0.1% vanadyl sulfate-sulfuric acid mixture is added. The sample is then titrated past its endpoint with standard potassium dichromate, and the endpoint is determined by second derivative techniques on a mV/weight basis

  18. Trace metal assay of uranium silicide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.J.; Argekar, A.A.; Thulasidas, S.K.; Dhawale, B.A.; Rajeswari, B.; Adya, V.C.; Purohit, P.J.; Neelam, G.; Bangia, T.R.; Page, A.G.; Sastry, M.D.; Iyer, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive trace metal assay of uranium silicide, a fuel for nuclear research reactors that employs low-enrichment uranium, is carried out by atomic spectrometry. Of the list of specification elements, 21 metallic elements are determined by a direct current (dc) arc carrier distillation technique; the rare earths yttrium and zirconium are chemically separated from the major matrix followed by a dc arc/inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) excitation technique in atomic emission spectrometry (AES); silver is determined by electrothermal atomization-atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS) without prior chemical separation of the major matrix. Gamma radioactive tracers are used to check the recovery of rare earths during the chemical separation procedure. The detection limits for trace metallics vary in the 0.1- to 40-ppm range. The precision of the determinations as evaluated from the analysis of the synthetic sample with intermediate range analyte concentration is better than 25% relative standard deviation (RSD) for most of the elements employing dc arc-AES, while that for silver determination by ETS-AAS is 10% RSD. The precision of the determinations for four crucially important rare earths by ICP-AES is better than 3% RSD

  19. Fuel elements (uranium clad with zirconium) produced by co-extrusion; Les elements combustibles uranium gaine de zirconium obtenus par coextrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montagne, R.; Winogradzki, A.; Sauve, C.; Buffet, J. [Commissariat a l' energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA, Departement de Metallurgie et de Chimie Appliquee (France)

    1959-07-01

    In this paper a description is given of a process for making fuel elements for atomic reactors. Contact of the most intimate possible kind is achieved between the fuel and the sheath by the simultaneous extrusion of the two elements. Genuine welding between the two metals is thus effected. This can be subsequently improved by a heat-treatment which causes diffusion. Tests made on these co-extruded elements are described in the paper. Reprint of a paper published in Revue de Metallurgie, LV, no. 11, 1958.

  20. Radiation damage of metal uranium; Radijaciono ostecenje metalnog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlovic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This report is concerned with the role of dispersion second phase in uranium and burnup rate. The role of dispersion phases in radiation stability of metal uranium was studies by three methods: variation of electric conductivity dependent on the neutron flux and temperature of pure uranium for different states of dispersion second phase; influence of dispersion phase on the radiation creep; transmission electron microscopy of fresh and irradiated uranium.

  1. Calculated NWIS signatures for enriched uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Koehler, P.E.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) signatures have been calculated using a Monte Carlo transport code for measurement configurations of a 252 Cf source, detectors, and a uranium metal casting. NWIS signatures consist of a wide variety of time-and frequency-analysis signatures such as the time distribution of neutrons after californium fission, the time distribution of counts in a detector after a previous count, the number of times n pulses occur in a time interval, and various frequency-analysis signatures, such as auto-power and cross-power spectral densities, coherences, and a ratio of spectral densities. This ratio is independent of detection efficiency. The analysis presented here, using the MCNP-DSP code, evaluates the applicability of this method for measurement of the 235 U content of 19-kg castings of depleted uranium and uranium with enrichments of 20, 40, 60, 80, 90, and 93.2 wt % 235 U. The dependence of the wide variety of NWIS signatures on 235 U content and possible configurations of a measurement system are presented. These preliminary calculations indicate short measurement times. Additional calculations are being performed to optimize the source-detector-moderator-casting configuration for the shortest measurement time. Although the NWIS method was developed for nuclear weapons identification, the development of a small processor now allows it to be also applied in a practical way to subcriticality measurements, nuclear fuel process monitoring and qualitative nondestructive assay of special nuclear material

  2. Metallization of uranium oxide powders by lithium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I. S.; Seo, J. S.; Oh, S. C.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    Laboratory scale experiments on the reduction of uranium oxide powders into metal by lithium were performed in order to determine the equipment setup and optimum operation conditions. The method of filtration using the porous magnesia filter was introduced to recover uranium metal powders produced. Based on the laboratory scale experimental results, mock-up scale (20 kg U/batch) metallizer was designed and made. The applicability to the metallization process was estimated with respect to the thermal stability of the porous magnesia filter in the high temperature molten salt, the filtration of the fine uranium metal powders, and the operability of the equipment

  3. On Parameters Affecting Metal Flow and Friction in the Double Cup Extrusion Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    1998-01-01

    in numerical simulations often involve strain hardening because friction is expressed as a function of the flow stress or the flow shear stress. The double cup extrusion test is considered to be one of the process tests for determination of friction. In this test, varying heights of the upper and lower cups...... model with constant absolute value excluding the influence of strain hardening on friction was adopted in FEM simulations, in order to more clearly study the individual influence of strain hardening and friction on the metal flow (upper and lower cup height ratio) without interference between the two...... parameters. The predicted results show a good agreement with the experimental data. The influence of material strain hardening. friction and tool geometry on the metal flow in the test has been investigated. By comparisons of the cup height ratio as a function of the punch travel estimated by experiments...

  4. Possibilities of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, B.; Mihajlovic, A.; Drobnjak, Dj.

    1965-11-01

    There are serious economic reasons for using metal uranium in heavy water reactors, because of its high density, i.e. high conversion factor, and low cost of fuel elements production. Most important disadvantages are swelling at high burnup and corrosion risk. Some design concepts and application of improved uranium obtained by alloying are promising for achievement of satisfactory stability of metal uranium under reactor operation conditions [sr

  5. Preparation and Purification of natural uranium metal by Iodine method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taies, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work ,glass-metal apparatus was designed and manufactured which used for preparing a high purity uranium.The reaction is simply take place between iodine vapour and uranium metal at 500C in closed system to form uranium tetra iodide which is decomposed on hot wire at high temperature around 1100C.Also another apparatus was made from Glass and used for preparing a high purity of UI 4 more than 99.9%purity

  6. Possibility of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuric, B.; Mihajlovic, A.; Drobnjak, Dj.

    1965-01-01

    The review of metal uranium properties including irradiation in the reactor core lead to the following conclusions. Using metal uranium in the heavy water reactors would be favourable from economic point of view for ita high density, i.e. high conversion factor and low cost of fuel elements fabrication. Most important constraint is swelling during burnup and corrosion

  7. NWIS Measurements for uranium metal annular castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes measurements performed with annular uranium metal castings of different enrichments to investigate the use of 252 Cf-source-driven noise analysis measurements as a means to quantify the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in the casting. This work in FY 97 was sponsored by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and the DOE Office of Technology Development Programs. Previous measurements and calculational studies have shown that many of the signatures obtained from the source-driven measurement are very sensitive to fissile mass. Measurements were performed to assess the applicability of this method to standard annular uranium metal castings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant under verification by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) using the Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor. Before the measurements with different enrichments, a limited study of source-detector-casting moderator configurations was performed to enhance the correlated information. These configurations consisted of a casting with no reflector and with various thicknesses of polyethylene reflectors up to 10.16 cm in 2.54 cm steps. The polyethylene moderator thickness of 7.62 cm was used for measurements with castings of different enrichments reported here. The sensitivity of the measured parameters to fissile mass was investigated using four castings each with a different enrichment. The high sensitivity of this measurement method to fissile mass and to other material and configurations provides some advantages over existing safeguards methods

  8. Refining of crude uranium by solvent extraction for production of nuclear pure uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Manna, S.; Singha, M.; Hareendran, K.N.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Kumar, K.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is the primary fuel material for any nuclear fission energy program. Natural uranium contains only 0.712% of 235 U as fissile constituent. This low concentration of fissile isotope in natural uranium calls for a very high level of purity, especially with respect to neutron poisons like B, Cd, Gd etc. before it can be used as nuclear fuel. Solvent extraction is a widely used technique by which crude uranium is purified for reactor use. Uranium metal plant (UMP), BARC, Trombay is engaged in refining of uranium concentrate for production of nuclear pure uranium metal for fabrication of fuel for research reactors. This paper reviews some of the fundamental aspects of this refining process with some special references to UMP, BARC. (author)

  9. Uranium recovering from slags generated in the metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN/CNEN-SP has recent/y concluded a program for developing the fabrication technology of the nuclear fuel based on the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion, which is being used in the IEA-R1 research reactor. The uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) fuel production starts with the uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) processing and uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) precipitation. Then, the UF 4 is converted to metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction. The UF 4 reduction by magnesium generates MgF 2 slag containing considerable concentrations of uranium, which could reach 20 wt%. The uranium contained in that slag should be recovered and this work presents the results obtained in recovering the uranium from that slag. The uranium recovery is accomplished by acidic leaching of the calcined slag. The calcination transforms the metallic uranium in U 3 O 8 , promoting the pulverization of the pieces of metallic uranium and facilitating the leaching operation. As process variables, have been considered the nitric molar concentration, the acid excess regarding the stoichiometry and the leaching temperature. As result, the uranium recovery reached a 96% yield. (author)

  10. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  11. The behaviour of uranium metal in hydrogen atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Stevens, J.C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal leads to the formation of UO 2 due to traces of water vapour or oxygen. When extremely pure H 2 is used uranium hydride may be formed but, even with 99.9999% H 2 , uranium dioxide forms preferentially. The present work identifies the presence of UH 3 in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum of a uranium sample which has been exposed to ca. 10 10 L† H 2 at ca. 200 0 C. This spectrum indicates that the hydride possesses a high degree of covalency, since the oxidation state of uranium in UH 3 appears to be ca. 1.4. (author)

  12. Preparation of the pur uranium-metal; La preparation de l'uranium-metal pur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B; Vertes, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    A detailed description of the chemical processes used to prepare in the factory of Bouchet of the CEA (Seine-Et-Oise) pur metal uranium with either relatively rich ores, or extracts coming of physical or chemical treatment of poor ores. The nitric treatment of ores succeeds to the production of uranate of impure sodium carbonate. This last last product is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranyl nitrate is extracted by tributyl-phosphate diluted in an inert solvent. The uranyl nitrate pure is re-extracted and successively transformed in uranium peroxide, in orange oxide then in brown oxide which is transformed in fluoride by the anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Uranate fluoride is then reduced in metal by the pure calcium with an yield superior to 99%. (authors) [French] Description detaillee des procedes chimiques mis en jeu pour preparer a l'Usine du Bouchet du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (Seine-et-Oise) l'uranium metal pur a partir soit de minerais relativement riches, soit de concentres provenant de traitement physique ou chimique de minerais pauvres. Le traitement nitrique des minerais aboutit a la production d'uranate de soude impur. Ce dernier est a son tour dissous dans l'acide nitrique et le nitrate d'uranyle est extrait par du tributyl-phosphate dilue par un solvant inerte. Le nitrate d'uranyle pur reextrait est transforme successivement en peroxyde d'uranium, en oxyde orange puis en oxyde brun qui est transforme en fluorure par l'acide fluorhydrique anhydre. Le fluorure uraneux est reduit en metal par le calcium pur avec un rendement superieur a 99 %. (auteurs)

  13. Preparation of the pur uranium-metal; La preparation de l'uranium-metal pur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.; Vertes, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    A detailed description of the chemical processes used to prepare in the factory of Bouchet of the CEA (Seine-Et-Oise) pur metal uranium with either relatively rich ores, or extracts coming of physical or chemical treatment of poor ores. The nitric treatment of ores succeeds to the production of uranate of impure sodium carbonate. This last last product is dissolved in nitric acid and the uranyl nitrate is extracted by tributyl-phosphate diluted in an inert solvent. The uranyl nitrate pure is re-extracted and successively transformed in uranium peroxide, in orange oxide then in brown oxide which is transformed in fluoride by the anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Uranate fluoride is then reduced in metal by the pure calcium with an yield superior to 99%. (authors) [French] Description detaillee des procedes chimiques mis en jeu pour preparer a l'Usine du Bouchet du Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (Seine-et-Oise) l'uranium metal pur a partir soit de minerais relativement riches, soit de concentres provenant de traitement physique ou chimique de minerais pauvres. Le traitement nitrique des minerais aboutit a la production d'uranate de soude impur. Ce dernier est a son tour dissous dans l'acide nitrique et le nitrate d'uranyle est extrait par du tributyl-phosphate dilue par un solvant inerte. Le nitrate d'uranyle pur reextrait est transforme successivement en peroxyde d'uranium, en oxyde orange puis en oxyde brun qui est transforme en fluorure par l'acide fluorhydrique anhydre. Le fluorure uraneux est reduit en metal par le calcium pur avec un rendement superieur a 99 %. (auteurs)

  14. Improvements to the properties of uranium by addition of small quantities of other metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, M.

    1960-01-01

    The most economical nuclear fuel used in power reaction which produce energy for industrial purposes is metallic uranium, either in natural form or slightly enriched in the 235 U isotope. Under optimum working conditions any fuel should produce a minimum of 3,000 MW days/tonne, i.e. 72 x 10 6 kWh per tonne of natural uranium, while at the same lime being maintained at a temperature sufficiently high for it to fulfil its role of heat-source (at a minimum of between 350 and 550 deg. C). Now it is rather surprising to note that polycrystalline aggregates in uranium billets, obtained either by casting under vacuum or by extrusion at high temperature, are made up of course grains having broken-up, irregular contours and exhibit numerous signs of intergranular deformation (twin crystals, slip-lines) as well as a pronounced sub-structure. As well as this, the range of grain diameters extends from a few microns up to a few millimeters, according to the micrographic zones examined. Under the influence of irradiation at these temperatures, pure cylindrical metallic uranium bars of about 1 inch diameter are deformed: cracks appear in the metal and changes in the length and diameter occur (these produce an 'orange-peel' texture on the surface). These changes are caused either by growths which are more or less oriented, or else by surface distortions which can cause faults in the material and in the canning and can produce bending which may be sufficiently pronounced to interfere with the cooling circuits. It has since been realised that this instability under the effects of thermal stresses of nuclear origin is due to the heterogeneous morphology of uranium and to its anisotropic crystalline structure (U α or U β ). (author) [fr

  15. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW–LDPE–SA Binder System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luquan Ren

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW–LDPE–SA. The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity.

  16. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW–LDPE–SA Binder System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Luquan; Zhou, Xueli; Song, Zhengyi; Zhao, Che; Liu, Qingping; Xue, Jingze; Li, Xiujuan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW–LDPE–SA). The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity. PMID:28772665

  17. Process Parameter Optimization of Extrusion-Based 3D Metal Printing Utilizing PW-LDPE-SA Binder System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Luquan; Zhou, Xueli; Song, Zhengyi; Zhao, Che; Liu, Qingping; Xue, Jingze; Li, Xiujuan

    2017-03-16

    Recently, with a broadening range of available materials and alteration of feeding processes, several extrusion-based 3D printing processes for metal materials have been developed. An emerging process is applicable for the fabrication of metal parts into electronics and composites. In this paper, some critical parameters of extrusion-based 3D printing processes were optimized by a series of experiments with a melting extrusion printer. The raw materials were copper powder and a thermoplastic organic binder system and the system included paraffin wax, low density polyethylene, and stearic acid (PW-LDPE-SA). The homogeneity and rheological behaviour of the raw materials, the strength of the green samples, and the hardness of the sintered samples were investigated. Moreover, the printing and sintering parameters were optimized with an orthogonal design method. The influence factors in regard to the ultimate tensile strength of the green samples can be described as follows: infill degree > raster angle > layer thickness. As for the sintering process, the major factor on hardness is sintering temperature, followed by holding time and heating rate. The highest hardness of the sintered samples was very close to the average hardness of commercially pure copper material. Generally, the extrusion-based printing process for producing metal materials is a promising strategy because it has some advantages over traditional approaches for cost, efficiency, and simplicity.

  18. Improvements in process technology for uranium metal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meghal, A.M.; Singh, H.; Koppiker, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    The research reactors in Trombay use uranium metal as a fuel. The plant to produce nuclear grade uranium metal ingots has been in operation at Trombay since 1959. Recently, the capacity of the plant has been expanded to meet the additional demand of the uranium metal. The operation of the expanded plant, has brought to the surface various shortcomings. This paper identifies various problems and describes the measures to be taken to upgrade the technology. Some comments are made on the necessity for development of technology for future requirement. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig

  19. Effect of CO on surface oxidation of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.; Fu, Y.; Xie, R.

    1997-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 25 and 200 deg C have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS);respectively. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on the surface layer of uranium metal leads to partial reduction of surface oxide and results in U4f photoelectron peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the surface oxide is decreased and O1s/O4f ratio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide. The investigation indicates the surface layer of uranium metal has resistance to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. (author)

  20. Some potential strategies for the treatment of waste uranium metal and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.J.; Frankcom, T.M.; Gordon, P.L.; Sauer, N.N.

    1993-01-01

    Large quantities of uranium metal chips and turnings stored throughout the DOE Complex represent a potential hazard, due to the reactivity of this material toward air and water. Methods are being sought to mitigate this by conversion of the metal, via room temperature solutions routes, to a more inert oxide form. In addition, the recycling of uranium and concomitant recovery of alloying metals is a desirable goal. The emphasis of the authors' research is to explore a variety of oxidation and reduction pathways for uranium and its compounds, and to investigate how these reactions might be applied to the treatment of bulk wastes

  1. U3O8 obtained from metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Marisol; Gonzalez, Alfredo; Pasqualini, Enrique E.

    2003-01-01

    Enriched uranium oxide, U 3 O 8 , used as nuclear powder in MTR's, can be obtained by direct oxidation of metallic uranium at 800 C degrees. Maximum density, 8.2 gr/cm 3 , is achieved after grinding and a high temperature treatment at 1400 C degrees. All the process is highly controllable and performed in dry environments. (author)

  2. Development of metallic uranium recovery technology from uranium oxide by Li reduction and electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Kawabe, Akihiro; Yuda, Ryouichi; Usami, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Reiko; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Yahata, Hidetsugu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop technology for pre-treatment of oxide fuel reprocessing through pyroprocess. In the pre-treatment process, it is necessary to reduce actinide oxide to metallic form. This paper outlines some experimental results of uranium oxide reduction and recovery of refined metallic uranium in electrorefining. Both uranium oxide granules and pellets were used for the experiments. Uranium oxide granules was completely reduced by lithium in several hours at 650degC. Reduced uranium pellets by about 70% provided a simulation of partial reduction for the process flow design. Almost all adherent residues of Li and Li 2 O were successfully washed out with fresh LiCl salt. During electrorefining, metallic uranium deposited on the iron cathode as expected. The recovery efficiencies of metallic uranium from reduced uranium oxide granules and from pellets were about 90% and 50%, respectively. The mass balance data provided the technical bases of Li reduction and refining process flow for design. (author)

  3. Standard specification for uranium metal enriched to more than 15 % and less Than 20 % 235U

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers nuclear grade uranium metal that has either been processed through an enrichment plant, or has been produced by the blending of highly enriched uranium with other uranium, to obtain uranium of any 235U concentration below 20 % (and greater than 15 %) and that is intended for research reactor fuel fabrication. The scope of this specification includes specifications for enriched uranium metal derived from commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium, or highly enriched uranium. Commercial natural uranium, recovered uranium and highly enriched uranium are defined in Section 3. The objectives of this specification are to define the impurity and uranium isotope limits for commercial grade enriched uranium metal. 1.2 This specification is intended to provide the nuclear industry with a standard for enriched uranium metal which is to be used in the production of research reactor fuel. In addition to this specification, the parties concerned may agree to other appropriate conditions. ...

  4. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  5. Extrusion-formed uranium-2. 4 wt % article with decreased linear thermal expansion and method for making the same. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.C.; Jones, J.M.; Kollie, T.G.

    1982-05-24

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of an article of uranium-2.4 wt % niobium alloy in which the linear thermal expansion in the direction transverse to the extrusion direction is less than about 0.98% between 22 and 600/sup 0/C which corresponds to a value greater than the 1.04% provided by previous extrusion operations over the same temperature range. The article with the improved thermal expansion possesses a yield strength at 0.2% offset of at least 400 MPa, an ultimate tensile strength of 1050 MPa, a compressive yield strength of at least 0.2% offset of at least 675 MPa, and an elongation of at least 25% over 25.4 mm/s. To provide this article with the improved thermal expansion, the uranium alloy billet is heated to 630/sup 0/C and extruded in the alpha phase through a die with a reduction ratio of at least 8.4:1 at a ram speed no greater than 6.8 mm/s. These critical extrusion parameters provide the article with a desired decrease in the linear thermal expansion while maintaining the selected mechanical properties without encountering crystal disruption in the article.

  6. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  7. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  8. Density and superconducting properties of metal-sheathed YBa2Cu3Oy ceramic processed by hydrostatic extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, M.I.; Korzhov, V.P.; Artamoshin, A.V.; Prokopenko, V.M.

    1994-01-01

    Brittle materials can be deformed without cracking and rupturing using hydrostatic extrusion, which provides the greatest pore annihilation in powder-processed materials and allows large degrees of one-step deformation, which is favorable for texturing. Earlier, a casting slip prepared by mixing a starting powder of Y-based ceramic with an organic binder was conventionally extruded to produce a wire 150 μm in diameter. After special sintering, the critical-current density in the material attained a few hundred amperes per square centimeter at 77 K, and the wire could be rolled into a winding ≥0.3 m in diameter. Hydrostatic extrusion of an assembly composed of Y-based ceramic in a bimetallic Nb/Cu tube 30 mm in diameter was used to produce rods 6 mm in diameter; drawing of these rods yielded samples of wire 2 to 3 mm in diameter. It was shown that the extrusion pressure and strain substantially influence the yield of the rupture-free wire. No signs of rupturing, cracking, or necking were observed in wire extruded at pressures ≤700 MPa and degrees of deformation ≤50%. A pronounced instability of the hydrostatic extrusion, the appearance of defects, and even the rupture of the rods were caused by an increase in the pressure up to 2000 MPa and in the degree of one-step deformation up to 80%. In this work, the authors focus on the possibility of producing thin YBa 2 Cu 3 O y superconductors using only hydrostatic extrusion. They determined the parameters for the hydrostatic extrusion of the metal-sheathed YBa 2 Cu 3 O y ceramic to a diameter of 3 mm or to a rectangular cross section. Effects of the ceramic core, and of the reduction coefficient on superconducting-transition parameters and the critical-current density of the ceramic were examined

  9. Development of uranium metal targets for 99Mo production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    A substantial amount of high enriched uranium (HEU) is used for the production of medical-grade 99 Mo. Promising methods of producing irradiation targets are being developed and may lead to the reduction or elimination of this HEU use. To substitute low enriched uranium (LEU) for HEU in the production of 99 Mo, the target material may be changed to uranium metal foil. Methods of fabrication are being developed to simplify assembly and disassembly of the targets. Removal of the uranium foil after irradiation without dissolution of the cladding is a primary goal in order to reduce the amount of liquid radioactive waste material produced in the process. Proof-of-concept targets have been fabricated. Destructive testing indicates that acceptable contact between the uranium foil and the cladding can be achieved. Thermal annealing tests, which simulate the cladding/uranium diffusion conditions during irradiation, are underway. Plans are being made to irradiate test targets

  10. Parallel assembling and equation solving via graph algorithms with an application to the FE simulation of metal extrusion processes

    CERN Document Server

    Unterkircher, A

    2005-01-01

    We propose methods for parallel assembling and iterative equation solving based on graph algorithms. The assembling technique is independent of dimension, element type and model shape. As a parallel solving technique we construct a multiplicative symmetric Schwarz preconditioner for the conjugate gradient method. Both methods have been incorporated into a non-linear FE code to simulate 3D metal extrusion processes. We illustrate the efficiency of these methods on shared memory computers by realistic examples.

  11. Metals other than uranium affected microbial community composition in a historical uranium-mining site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Jana; Löffler, Sylvia; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Goldfarb, Katherine C; Büchel, Georg; Hazen, Terry C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2015-12-01

    To understand the links between the long-term impact of uranium and other metals on microbial community composition, ground- and surface water-influenced soils varying greatly in uranium and metal concentrations were investigated at the former uranium-mining district in Ronneburg, Germany. A soil-based 16S PhyloChip approach revealed 2358 bacterial and 35 archaeal operational taxonomic units (OTU) within diverse phylogenetic groups with higher OTU numbers than at other uranium-contaminated sites, e.g., at Oak Ridge. Iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (FeRB and SRB), which have the potential to attenuate uranium and other metals by the enzymatic and/or abiotic reduction of metal ions, were found at all sites. Although soil concentrations of solid-phase uranium were high, ranging from 5 to 1569 μg·g (dry weight) soil(-1), redundancy analysis (RDA) and forward selection indicated that neither total nor bio-available uranium concentrations contributed significantly to the observed OTU distribution. Instead, microbial community composition appeared to be influenced more by redox potential. Bacterial communities were also influenced by bio-available manganese and total cobalt and cadmium concentrations. Bio-available cadmium impacted FeRB distribution while bio-available manganese and copper as well as solid-phase zinc concentrations in the soil affected SRB composition. Archaeal communities were influenced by the bio-available lead as well as total zinc and cobalt concentrations. These results suggest that (i) microbial richness was not impacted by heavy metals and radionuclides and that (ii) redox potential and secondary metal contaminants had the strongest effect on microbial community composition, as opposed to uranium, the primary source of contamination.

  12. Radium, uranium and metals in acidic or alkaline uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somot, St.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium mill study sites have been chosen in function of their different characteristics: deposits age, treatment nature (alkaline or acid), mill origin. The realization of specific drilling allowed the simultaneous study of the interstitial water and the solid fraction of samples, cut at determined deep. A radiation imbalance between 230 Th and 226 Ra is observed in the acid treatment residues. The trace elements concentration spectrum is directly bound to the nature of the ore. Diamagnetic evolutions are observed in residues. The uranium concentrations are higher in carbonated waters than in calcic sulfated waters. The selective sequential lixiviation showed that the 226 Ra activity of the interstitial water is controlled by the Gypsum in acid treatment residues. In other hand in the alkaline treatment waters, the carbonates occur. The Ra retention is largely bound to the Fe and Mn oxy-hydroxides. (A.L.B.)

  13. Release of gases from uranium metal at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Yadav, C.S.; Shankaran, P.S.; Chhapru, G.C.; Ramakumar, K.L.; Venugopal, V.

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the ambient environmental conditions, different gaseous species could get entrapped in uranium metal ingots or pellets. On heating, melting or vapourising uranium metal, these get released and depending on the composition, may cause detrimental effects either within the metal matrix itself or on the surrounding materials/environment. For instance, these gases may affect the performance of the uranium metal, which is used as fuel in the heavy water moderated research reactors, CIRUS and DHRUVA. Hence, detailed investigations have been carried out on the release of gases over a temperature range 875-1500 K employing hot vacuum extraction technique, in specimen uranium pellets made from uranium rods/ingots. Employing an on-line quadrupole mass spectrometer, the analysis of released gases was carried out. The isobaric interference between carbon monoxide and nitrogen at m/e = 28 in the mass spectrometric analysis has been resolved by considering their fragmentation patterns. Since no standards are available to evaluate the results, only the reproducibility is tested. The precision (relative standard deviation at 3σ level) of the method is ±5%. The minimum detectable gas content employing the method is 5.00 x 10 -09 m 3 . About 4 x 10 -04 m 3 /kg of gas is released from uranium pellets, with hydrogen as the main constituent. The gas content increases with storage in air

  14. Uranium fluoride and metallic uranium as target materials for heavy-element experiments at SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindler, Birgit [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: b.kindler@gsi.de; Ackermann, Dieter; Hartmann, Willi; Hessberger, Fritz Peter; Hofmann, Sigurd; Huebner, Annett; Lommel, Bettina; Mann, Rido; Steiner, Jutta [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-06-01

    In this contribution we describe the production and application of uranium targets for synthesis of heavy elements. The targets are prepared from uranium fluoride (UF{sub 4}) and from metallic uranium with thin carbon foils as backing. Targets of UF{sub 4} were produced by thermal evaporation in a similar way as the frequently applied targets out of Bi, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pb, PbS, SmF{sub 3}, and NdF{sub 3,} prepared mostly from isotopically enriched material [Birgit Kindler, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 107; Bettina Lommel, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 100]. In order to use more intensive beams and to avoid scattering of the reaction products in the target, metallic uranium is favorable. However, evaporation of metallic uranium is not feasible at a sustainable yield. Therefore, we established magnetron sputtering of metallic uranium. We describe production and properties of these targets. First irradiation tests show promising results.

  15. Transformations of highly enriched uranium into metal or oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nollet, P.; Sarrat, P.

    1964-01-01

    The enriched uranium workshops in Cadarache have a double purpose on the one hand to convert uranium hexafluoride into metal or oxide, and on the other hand to recover the uranium contained in scrap materials produced in the different metallurgical transformations. The principles that have been adopted for the design and safety of these workshops are reported. The nuclear safety is based on the geometrical limitations of the processing vessels. To establish the processes and the technology of these workshops, many studies have been made since 1960, some of which have led to original achievements. The uranium hexafluoride of high isotopic enrichment is converted either by injection of the gas into ammonia or by an original process of direct hydrogen reduction to uranium tetrafluoride. The uranium contained m uranium-zirconium metal scrap can be recovered by combustion with hydrogen chloride followed treatment of the uranium chloride by fluorine in order to obtain the uranium in the hexafluoride state. Recovery of the uranium contained m various scrap materials is obtained by a conventional refining process combustion of metallic scrap, nitric acid dissolution of the oxide, solvent purification by tributyl phosphate, ammonium diuranate precipitation, calcining, reduction and hydro fluorination into uranium tetrafluoride, bomb reduction by calcium and slag treatment. Two separate workshops operate along these lines one takes care of the uranium with an isotopic enrichment of up to 3 p. 100, the other handles the high enrichments. The handling of each step of this process, bearing in mind the necessity for nuclear safety, has raised some special technological problems and has led to the conception of new apparatus, in particular the roasting furnace for metal turnings, the nitric acid dissolution unit, the continuous precipitator and ever safe filter and dryer for ammonium diuranate, the reduction and hydro fluorination furnace and the slag recovery apparatus These are

  16. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  17. Treatment of uranium-containing effluent in the process of metallic uranium parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Guoqi

    1993-01-01

    The anion exchange method used in treatment of uranium-containing effluent in the process of metallic parts is the subject of the paper. The results of the experiments shows that the uranium concentration in created water remains is less than 10 μg/l when the waste water flowed through 10000 column volume. A small facility with column volume 150 litre was installed and 1500 m 3 of waste water can be cleaned per year. (1 tab.)

  18. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-05-27

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  19. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-09-25

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  20. The Resonance Absorption of Uranium Metal and Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-06-15

    The resonance integrals for uranium metal and uranium oxide have been determined for a 1/E flux. The following results were obtained Metal RI 2.95 + 25.8{radical}(S/M); Oxide RI = 4.15 + 26.6{radical}(S/M). The oxide value agrees with the expression found earlier at this laboratory. But the result for the metal is 4. 5 % larger than the earlier one. In addition, the resonance absorption in a R1 fuel rod has been compared with that for a cadmium-covered rod placed in an approximate cell boundary flux. The former came out 3 % larger than the latter. A comparison of the fuel rod absorption with that for a 1/E flux yields a corresponding figure of 7 %. The neutron flux was monitored below the lowest resonance in uranium.

  1. Study on uranium metallization yield of spent Pressurized Water Reactor fuels and oxidation behavior of fission products in uranium metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ke Chon; Lee, Chang Heon; Kim, Won Ho

    2003-01-01

    Metallization yield of uranium oxide to uranium metal from lithium reduction process of spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuels was measured using thermogravimetric analyzer. A reduced metal produced in the process was divided into a solid and a powder part, and each metallization yield was measured. Metallization yield of the solid part was 90.7∼95.9 wt%, and the powder being 77.8∼71.5 wt% individually. Oxidation behaviour of the quarternary alloy was investigated to take data on the thermal oxidation stability necessary for the study on dry storage of the reduced metal. At 600∼700 .deg. C, weight increments of allow of No, Ru, Rh and Pd was 0.40∼0.55 wt%. Phase change on the surface of the allow was started at 750 .deg. C. In particular, Mo was rapidly oxidized and then the alloy lost 0.76∼25.22 wt% in weight

  2. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils...... from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42– radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of 142 ± 20 nmol cm–3 day–1. Concentrations...... of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone...

  3. Gas chromatographic method fr determination of carbon in metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikol'skij, V.A.; Markov, V.K.; Evseeva, T.I.; Cherstvenkova, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Gas chromatographic device to determine carbon in metal uranium is developed. Burnout unite, permitting to load in the burnout tube simultaneously quite a few (up to 20) weight amounts of materials to be burned is a characteristic feature of the device. As a result amendments for control experiment and determination limit are decreased. The time of a single determination is also reduced. Conditions of carbon burn out from metal uranium are studied and temperature and time of complete extraction of carbon in the form of dioxide from weight amount into gaseous phase are established

  4. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment — the formation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Geoffrey C.; Holmes, Nigel R.

    1988-05-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air.

  5. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1987-08-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced however by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (author)

  6. The passivation of uranium metal surfaces by nitrogen bombardment - the formation of uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a detailed investigation of the behaviour of metallic uranium in various atmospheres, we have examined the reaction between nitrogen gas and uranium metal. At room temperature there was no evidence of reaction between nitrogen gas and a clean metal surface; the only changes observed could be attributed to reaction between the metal and traces of oxygen (less than 0.1 ppm) in the nitrogen gas. Reaction between the metal and nitrogen was induced, however, by accelerating nitrogen towards the surface using a fast atom gun. The resulting nitrided surface was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and its oxidation behaviour was monitored over an extended period in UHV and in air. (orig.)

  7. Contribution to the study of the textures of uranium rods prepared by sintering-extrusion, and their consequences on the thermal cycling behaviour; Contribution a l'etude des textures de barreaux d'uranium mis en forme par frittage-extrusion et leurs consequences sur le comportement au cyclage thermique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peix, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-11-01

    Uranium rods prepared by sintering-extrusion in the {alpha} or {beta} phase (at various extrusion ratios) using slightly oxidised powders have been subjected to the thermal cycling test. At the same time, dilatometric and X-ray techniques have made it possible to determine the structures produced in these materials during their fabrication. A relationship is then proposed linking the texture to the increase in length on thermal cycling. 1. Two types of rods have been studied: Sintered-extruded in the {beta} phase: low density (88 per cent theoretical density), large grain-size and no preferential texture. Sintered-extruded in the {alpha} phase: high density (96 per cent theoretical density), fine grain with pronounced preferential texture. 2. After 1000 thermal cycles between 20 and 550 C, the increases in length are the following: 2 per cent for a uranium sintered-extruded in the {beta} phase (with surface cracking). between 14 and 56 per cent according to the extrusion ratio for on uranium sintered-extruded in the {alpha} phase (with no surface effects). 3. In the case of rods sintered-extruded in the {alpha} phase, determination of the pole figure using the Schulz reflection method showed the existence of two preferential orientations parallel to the direction of extrusion: one close to [100], the other close to [110]. By dilatometry it was then possible to measure quantitatively the proportion of each constituent in the overall texture and to show that an increase in the percentage of [100] occurs with increasing amounts of cold-working. 4. Finally, by comparing 2 and 3 it can be seen that the increases in length due to thermal cycling are connected to the percentage amounts of each component. It seems that the increases in length diminish as the percentage of [100] increases. On the other hand the behaviour of materials containing large amount of [110] is still far from clear. (author) [French] Des barreaux d'uranium realises par frittage-extrusion en phase

  8. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-03-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time-temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  9. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J., E-mail: carissahelmreich@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 337 Zachry Engineering Center, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Corbin, Rob, E-mail: rcorbin@terrapower.com [TerraPower, LLC, 330 120th Ave NE, Suite 100, Bellevue, WA 98005 (United States); McDeavitt, Sean M., E-mail: mcdeavitt@tamu.edu [Texas A and M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 337 Zachry Engineering Center, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time–temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal.

  10. Thermal simulation of the magnesium thermal of metallic uranium reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, W.A.; Saliba-Silva, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Metallic uranium production is vital to fabricate fuel elements for nuclear research reactors and to produce radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Metallic uranium is got via magnesiothermal reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is carried out inside a closed graphite crucible inserted in a metallic reactor adequately sealed without any outside contact. The assembled set is gradually heated up inside a pit furnace up to reach the reaction ignition temperature (between 600-650 deg C). The optimization of the reactive system depends on the mathematical modeling using simulation by finite elements and computational calculation with specialized programs. In this way, the reactants' thermal behavior is forecast until they reach the ignition temperature. The optimization of the uranium production reaction is based on minimization of thermal losses using better the exo thermal reaction heat. As lower the thermal losses, as higher would be the heat amount to raise the temperature of reaction products. This promotes the adequate melting of uranium and slag, so allowing better metal/slag separation with higher metallic yield. This work shows how the mathematical simulation is made and supplies some preliminary results. (author)

  11. Measurement of thermal diffusivity of depleted uranium metal microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humrickhouse-Helmreich, Carissa J.; Corbin, Rob; McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    The high void space of nuclear fuels composed of homogeneous uranium metal microspheres may allow them to achieve ultra-high burnup by accommodating fuel swelling and reducing fuel/cladding interactions; however, the relatively low thermal conductivity of microsphere nuclear fuels may limit their application. To support the development of microsphere nuclear fuels, an apparatus was designed in a glovebox and used to measure the apparent thermal diffusivity of a packed bed of depleted uranium (DU) microspheres with argon fill in the void spaces. The developed Crucible Heater Test Assembly (CHTA) recorded radial temperature changes due to an initial heat pulse from a central thin-diameter cartridge heater. Using thermocouple positions and time–temperature data, the apparent thermal diffusivity was calculated. The thermal conductivity of the DU microspheres was calculated based on the thermal diffusivity from the CHTA, known material densities and specific heat capacities, and an assumed 70% packing density based on prior measurements. Results indicate that DU metal microspheres have very low thermal conductivity, relative to solid uranium metal, and rapidly form an oxidation layer even in a low oxygen environment. At 500 °C, the thermal conductivity of the DU metal microsphere bed was 0.431 ± 0.0560 W/m-K compared to the literature value of approximately 32 W/m-K for solid uranium metal

  12. A new method for alkaline dissolution of uranium metal foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, A.V.; Wilkinson, M.V.; Manzini, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop a production process of 99 Mo by fission of low-enriched uranium, the first purification step, which consists of dissolution of a uranium metal foil target, was studied. It was found that alkaline NaClO gave good results, reaching the dissolution of up to 300 μm of uranium foil. The different conditions for the dissolution were studied and the optimum ones were found. The influence of NaClO and NaOH concentration, temperature, dissolving solution volume per unit of surface and dissolution time were investigated. During this step, a gas identified as H 2 , was generated, and a precipitate characterized as Na 2 U 2 O 7 was observed. A stoichiometric reaction for this uranium dissolution is proposed. (author)

  13. On the theory system of hydrothermal uranium metallization in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Letian

    2011-01-01

    Based on summarizing the mass of research outcome of the predecessors, the author attempts to make a brief generalization on the theory system of hydrothermal uranium mineralization in China. The system of uranium metallization is founded in the basic way of uranium source-migration-transportation-richment-reservation. The system mainly consists of the following frames: (1) mineralization type of silification zone; (2) age gap of mineralization to host rock; (3) alkli metasomatism; (4) metallogenic layer of crust; (5)integratation of 4 types mineralization (granite, volcanics, carbonaceous-siliceous-argilaceous rock and sandstone) in tectonic-hydrothermal process; (6) pre-enrichment process of metallization; (7) decouplement of granite magma evolution; (8) types of rich ore by high tempreture sericitization; (9)basalt event;(10) rock and ore formation by HARCON. (authors)

  14. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  15. Uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets - Determination of nitrogen content - Method using ammonia-sensing electrode. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for determining the nitrogen content in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. It is applicable to the determination of nitrogen, present as nitride, in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The concentration range within which the method can be used is between 9 μg and 600 μg of nitrogen per gram. Interference can occur from metals which form complex ammines, but these are not normally present in significant amounts

  16. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E; Scheinost, Andreas C; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the (35)SO(4)(2-) radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that approximately 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems.

  17. Biomonitoring of uranium and heavy metal pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kang Suk; Chun, Ki Jung; Kim, Kug Chan; Choi, Yong Ho; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, In Gyu; Park, Hyo Kook; Lee, Keun Bae

    1992-01-01

    New protein was induced by intraperitoneal injection of uranium. It was purified from liver of carp to which uranium had been at administered 1.5mg/kg fresh for 6 days. The protein was separated by sephadex G-100 and AEAE-Sepharose and characteristics of the metallothionein were not shown by it. It has a molecular weight of 40 KD. Cytosol type superoxide dismutase in carp testis has at least three electrophoretically different forms. Cyanide inhibits the activity of cytosol type superoxide dismutase. When it stored in solution, superoxide dismutase changed into polymeric form which retain its activity. It has been purified by gel permeation, chloroform-ethanol precipitation, and ion exchange column chromatography. (Author)

  18. Study on 'Tannix' an absorbent for heavy metals including uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yasuo

    1997-01-01

    To treat radioactive wastes including uranium and transuranic elements such as plutonium, americium etc., development of an absorbent which can be used to absorb and isolate these elements without producing secondary wastes after treatment was attempted. And an absorbent has been successfully developed by polymerizing tannin, a natural product. It is known that tannin binds heavy metals including uranium resulting to produce their precipitates. There are some reports suggesting its absorption ability for uranium. However, tannin has not been used to isolate a heavy metal from a solution because it is soluble in water. Here, insolubilization of tannin was attempted and a manufacturing method for a gelatinized insoluble tannin named as ''Tannix'' was established. Wattle tannin extracted from Mimosa pudica produced in Africa was dissolved in an alkaline solution and gelatinized by heating after the addition of formalin. Thus obtained insoluble tannin was used after crushing and sieving. This product, ''Tannix'' was able to absorb more than 99% of uranium in the waste. And the absorbed Tannin could be degraded by incineration even at a low temperature, leaving only uranium, but not producing any secondary product. (M.N.)

  19. The composition and character of oxycarbide phase in uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kezhao; Lai Xinchun; Yu Yong; Ni Ranfu

    1999-08-01

    The oxide layer of uranium metal formed by vacuum heating were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). XPS results indicated that the air-exposed surface of the oxide layer were mainly consisted of UO 2 and free carbon. After the air-exposed surface were removed by low energy argon ion sputtering, C1s spectra shifted from 284.8 eV to 281.8 eV, indicating the existence of carbide phase. AES results of C(KVV) Auger transitions confirmed this result. Resolved and fitted using a combination of Gaussian and Lorentzian peak shape, U4f 7/2 spectra showed that three uranium chemical states existed in the layer, there were uranium dioxide, uranium carbide (or oxycarbide, UC x O 1-x ) and uranium metal phase. Calculated the AES data by relatively sensitive factor, the composition of oxycarbide was given as UC 0.41+-0.04 O 0.62+-0.01

  20. Study on `Tannix` an absorbent for heavy metals including uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yasuo [Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    To treat radioactive wastes including uranium and transuranic elements such as plutonium, americium etc., development of an absorbent which can be used to absorb and isolate these elements without producing secondary wastes after treatment was attempted. And an absorbent has been successfully developed by polymerizing tannin, a natural product. It is known that tannin binds heavy metals including uranium resulting to produce their precipitates. There are some reports suggesting its absorption ability for uranium. However, tannin has not been used to isolate a heavy metal from a solution because it is soluble in water. Here, insolubilization of tannin was attempted and a manufacturing method for a gelatinized insoluble tannin named as ``Tannix`` was established. Wattle tannin extracted from Mimosa pudica produced in Africa was dissolved in an alkaline solution and gelatinized by heating after the addition of formalin. Thus obtained insoluble tannin was used after crushing and sieving. This product, ``Tannix`` was able to absorb more than 99% of uranium in the waste. And the absorbed Tannin could be degraded by incineration even at a low temperature, leaving only uranium, but not producing any secondary product. (M.N.)

  1. Nonaqueous chlorination of uranium metal in tributyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchikhin, E.P.; Kuznetsov, A.Yu.; Shatalov, V.V.; Vidanov, V.L.; Chekmarev, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Low-temperature (30-50 deg C) chlorination of uranium metal in the TBP-TCE-Cl 2 system (TCE = tetrachloroethylene) was studied. Dissolution of uranium in the dipolar aprotic solvent proceeds with formation of U(IV) compounds. The activation energy of this process is 31.24 kJ mol -1 , and relative reaction order with respect to Cl 2 is 2. The effect of TBP concentration on chlorination was examined. The chlorination rate sharply increases at a water content in the TBP-TCE system of 0.2- 0.6 vol % [ru

  2. Surface characterization of uranium metal and uranium dioxide using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Trickle, I.R.; Tucker, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra of pure uranium metal and stoichiometric uranium dioxide have been obtained using an AEI ES300 spectrometer. Binding energy values for core and valence electrons have been determined using an internally calibrated energy scale and monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Satellite peaks observed accompanying certain principal core ionizations are discussed in relation to the mechanisms by which they arise. Confirmation is obtained that for stoichiometric UOsub(2.00) a single shake-up satellite is observed accompanying the U 4fsub(7/2,5/2) principal core lines, separated by 6.8 eV to higher binding energy. (author)

  3. Preparation and characterization of uranium alkoxides through oxidation of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, P.L.; Sauer, N.N.; Burns, C.J.; Watkin, J.G.; Van Der Sluys, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Currently the authors are investigating the preparation of halide-containing uranium alkoxides by simultaneous halogen and alcohol oxidation of uranium metal. They recently reported the formation of U 2 I 4 (O-i-Pr) 4 (HO-i-Pr) 2 which upon addition of excess isopropanol forms UI 2 (O-i-Pr) 2 (HO-i-Pr) 2 . They report further characterization and reactivity for this monomeric species. Attempts to prepare similar complexes are being made using chlorine gas in the presence of other alcohols. They describe this ongoing research

  4. Small cell experiments for electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides to uranium metal using fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Adcock, P.W.; Coroneos, A.C.; Hendrix, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was proposed for the preparation of uranium metal feed for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. A laboratory cell of 25-cm ID was operated to obtain additional information in areas important to design and operation of a pilot plant cell. Reproducible test results and useful operating and control procedures were demonstrated. About 20 kg of uranium metal of acceptable purity were prepared. A good supply of dissolved UO 2 feed at the anode is the most important controlling requirement for efficient cell operation. A large fraction of the cell current is nonproductive in that it does not produce a metal product nor consume carbon anodes. All useful test conditions gave some reduction of UF 4 to produce CF 4 in addition to the reduction of UO 2 , but the fraction of metal from the reduction of UF 4 can be decreased by increasing the concentration of dissolved UO 2 . Operation of large continuous cells would probably be limited to current efficiencies of less than 60 pct, and more than 20 pct of the metal would result from the reduction of UF 4

  5. Uranium and other heavy metal resistance and accumulation in bacteria isolated from uranium mine wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Islam, Ekramul; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2012-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains isolated from uranium mine wastes were characterized in terms of their uranium and other metal resistance and accumulation. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified the strains as members of genera Bacillus, Serratia, and Arthrobacter. Strains were able to utilize various carbon sources, particularly aromatic hydrocarbons, grow at broad pH and temperature ranges and produce non specific acid phosphatase relevant for metal phosphate precipitation in contaminated environment. The isolates exhibited high uranium and other heavy metals (Ni, Co, Cu and Cd) resistance and accumulation capacities. Particularly, Arthrobacter sp. J001 and Bacillus sp. J003 were superior in terms of U resistance at low pH (pH 4.0) along with metals and actinides (U and Th) removal with maximum cell loading of 1088 μmol U, 1293 μmol Th, 425 μmol Cu, 305 μmol Cd, 377 μmol Zn, 250 μmol Ni g(-1) cell dry wt. Genes encoding P(1B)-type ATPases (Cu-CPx and Zn-CPx) and ABC transporters (nik) as catalytic tools for maintaining cellular metal homeostasis were detected within several Bacillus spp., with possible incidence of horizontal gene transfer for the later gene showing phylogenetic lineage to α Proteobacteria members. The study provides evidence on intrinsic abilities of indigenous bacteria from U-mine suitable for survival and cleaning up of contaminated mine sites.

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF URANIUM METAL CORROSION MECHANISM AND KINETICS IN WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudanova, Natalya; Maslennikov, Alexander; Peretroukhine, Vladimir F.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2006-01-01

    During long-term underwater storage of low burn-up uranium metal fuel, a corrosion product sludge forms containing uranium metal grains, uranium dioxide, uranates and, in some cases, uranium peroxide. Literature data on the corrosion of non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys do not allow unequivocal prediction of the paragenesis of irradiated uranium in water. The goal of the present work conducted under the program 'CORROSION OF IRRADIATED URANIUM ALLOYS FUEL IN WATER' is to study the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys and the paragenesis of the corrosion products during long-term underwater storage of uranium alloy fuel irradiated at the Hanford Site. The elucidation of the physico-chemical nature of the corrosion of irradiated uranium alloys in comparison with non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys is one of the most important aspects of this work. Electrochemical methods are being used to study uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics. The present part of work aims to examine and revise, where appropriate, the understanding of uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics in water

  7. Using geoelectrochemical technique to extract uranium and other metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yulong

    1990-10-01

    The geoelectrochemical extraction technique, which is a direct deep exploring method, is one of the geoelectrochemical exploring methods. It is developed recently to explore basic metals, precious metals, rare metals and some nonmetal mineral products. It is also a combination of electrical surveying and geochemical surveying. This method is more useful in the seeking of gold ore deposit. The principle and technique of this method and the results in seeking gold, uranium, lead, nickel and tin ore deposits are introduced. The equipment and instruments used in this method are also given

  8. Melting of Uranium Metal Powders with Residual Salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin-Mok Hur; Dae-Seung Kang; Chung-Seok Seo

    2007-01-01

    The Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute focuses on the conditioning of Pressurized Water Reactor spent oxide nuclear fuel. After the oxide reduction step of the ACP, the resultant metal powders containing ∼ 30 wt% residual LiCl-Li 2 O should be melted for a consolidation of the fine metal powders. In this study, we investigated the melting behaviors of uranium metal powders considering the effects of a LiCl-Li 2 O residual salt. (authors)

  9. Estimation of metallic impurities in uranium by carrier distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Deshkar, S.B.; Joshi, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    An emission spectrographic method has been standardised for the estimation of twenty-two metallic impurities in uranium using carrier-distillation technique. Silver chloride with a concentration of 5% has been used as the carrier and palladium and gallium are used as internal standards. Precision and accuracy determinations of the synthetic samples indicate 6-15% deviation for most of the elements. Using the method described here, five uranium reference samples received from C.E.A.-France were analysed. The detection limits obtained for Cd, Co and W are lower than those reported in the literature while limits for the remaining elements are comparable to the values reported. The method is suitable for the chemical quality control analysis of uranium used for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel. (author)

  10. Characterization of uranium isotopic abundances in depleted uranium metal assay standard 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, K.J.; Singleton, G.L.; Essex, R.M.; Hasozbek, A.; Orlowicz, G.; Soriano, M.

    2013-01-01

    Certified reference material (CRM) 115, Uranium (Depleted) Metal (Uranium Assay Standard), was analyzed using a TRITON Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer to characterize the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The certified 235 U/ 238 U 'major' isotope-amount ratio of 0.0020337 (12) in CRM 115 was determined using the total evaporation (TE) and the modified total evaporation (MTE) analytical techniques. In the MTE method, the total evaporation process is interrupted on a regular basis to allow correction of background from peak tailing, internal calibration of the secondary electron multiplier detector versus the Faraday cups, peak-centering, and ion source re-focusing. For the 'minor' 234 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratio measurements using MTE, precision and accuracy comparable to conventional analyses are achieved, without compromising the quality of the 235 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratios. Characterized values of the 234 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratios in CRM 115 are 0.000007545 (10) and 0.000032213 (84), respectively. The 233 U/ 238 U isotope-amount ratio in CRM 115 is estimated to be -9 . The homogeneity of the CRM 115 materials is established through the absence of any statistically significant unit-to-unit variation in the uranium isotope-amount ratios. The measurements leading to the certification of uranium isotope-amount ratios are discussed. (author)

  11. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from dilute solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, I.A.H.; Misra, M.; Smith, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Eichhornia crassipes approaches being a scourge in many parts of the world, choking waterways and hindering transport upon them. At the same time it is known to readily abstract heavy metal ions from water and, thus, aids in the removal of heavy metals found in such waters. This paper considers the possibility of using specific parts of the plant as an inexpensive adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from contaminated chemical and mining industry waste waters. In particular the root of the plant was found to be an excellent accumulator of heavy metal ions including uranium from solution. It is also suggested that dried roots of the plant might be placed in simple bags and used in a very low cost metal ion removal system

  12. Natural uranium metallic fuel elements: fabrication and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammad, F.H.; Abou-Zahra, A.A.; Sharkawy, S.W.

    1980-01-01

    The main reactor types based on natural uranium metallic fuel element, particularly the early types, are reviewed in this report. The reactor types are: graphite moderated air cooled, graphite moderated gas cooled and heavy water moderated reactors. The design features, fabrication technology of these reactor fuel elements and the operating experience gained during reactor operation are described and discussed. The interrelation between operating experience, fuel design and fabrication was also discussed with emphasis on improving fuel performance. (author)

  13. Determination of uranium metal concentration in irradiated fuel storage basin sludge using selective dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Sinkov, S.I.; Chenault, J.W.; Schmidt, A.J.; Pool, K.N.; Welsh, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated uranium metal fuel was stored underwater in the K East and K West storage basins at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The uranium metal under damaged cladding reacted with water to generate hydrogen gas, uranium oxides, and spalled uranium metal particles which intermingled with other particulates to form sludge. While the fuel has been removed, uranium metal in the sludge remains hazardous. An expeditious routine method to analyze 0.03 wt% uranium metal in the presence of >30 wt% total uranium was needed to support safe sludge management and processing. A selective dissolution method was designed based on the rapid uranium oxide dissolution but very low uranium metal corrosion rates in hot concentrated phosphoric acid. The uranium metal-bearing heel from the phosphoric acid step then is rinsed before the uranium metal is dissolved in hot concentrated nitric acid for analysis. Technical underpinnings of the selective dissolution method, including the influence of sludge components, were investigated to design the steps and define the reagents, quantities, concentrations, temperatures, and times within the selective dissolution analysis. Tests with simulant sludge proved the technique feasible. Tests with genuine sludge showed a 0.0028 ± 0.0037 wt% (at one standard deviation) uranium metal analytical background, a 0.011 wt% detection limit, and a 0.030 wt% quantitation limit in settled (wet) sludge. In tests using genuine K Basin sludge spiked with uranium metal at concentrations above the 0.030 wt% ± 25 % (relative) quantitation limit, uranium metal recoveries averaged 99.5 % with a relative standard deviation of 3.5 %. (author)

  14. Nuclear criticality safety parameter evaluation for uranium metallic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Andrea; Abe, Alfredo, E-mail: andreasdpz@hotmail.com, E-mail: abye@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Energia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear criticality safety during fuel fabrication process, transport and storage of fissile and fissionable materials requires criticality safety analysis. Normally the analysis involves computer calculations and safety parameters determination. There are many different Criticality Safety Handbooks where such safety parameters for several different fissile mixtures are presented. The handbooks have been published to provide data and safety principles for the design, safety evaluation and licensing of operations, transport and storage of fissile and fissionable materials. The data often comprise not only critical values, but also subcritical limits and safe parameters obtained for specific conditions using criticality safety calculation codes such as SCALE system. Although many data are available for different fissile and fissionable materials, compounds, mixtures, different enrichment level, there are a lack of information regarding a uranium metal alloy, specifically UMo and UNbZr. Nowadays uranium metal alloy as fuel have been investigated under RERTR program as possible candidate to became a new fuel for research reactor due to high density. This work aim to evaluate a set of criticality safety parameters for uranium metal alloy using SCALE system and MCNP Monte Carlo code. (author)

  15. Improvements to the properties of uranium by addition of small quantities of other metals; Ameliorations apportees a l'uranium par de faibles additions metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englander, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    The most economical nuclear fuel used in power reaction which produce energy for industrial purposes is metallic uranium, either in natural form or slightly enriched in the {sup 235}U isotope. Under optimum working conditions any fuel should produce a minimum of 3,000 MW days/tonne, i.e. 72 x 10{sup 6} kWh per tonne of natural uranium, while at the same lime being maintained at a temperature sufficiently high for it to fulfil its role of heat-source (at a minimum of between 350 and 550 deg. C). Now it is rather surprising to note that polycrystalline aggregates in uranium billets, obtained either by casting under vacuum or by extrusion at high temperature, are made up of course grains having broken-up, irregular contours and exhibit numerous signs of intergranular deformation (twin crystals, slip-lines) as well as a pronounced sub-structure. As well as this, the range of grain diameters extends from a few microns up to a few millimeters, according to the micrographic zones examined. Under the influence of irradiation at these temperatures, pure cylindrical metallic uranium bars of about 1 inch diameter are deformed: cracks appear in the metal and changes in the length and diameter occur (these produce an 'orange-peel' texture on the surface). These changes are caused either by growths which are more or less oriented, or else by surface distortions which can cause faults in the material and in the canning and can produce bending which may be sufficiently pronounced to interfere with the cooling circuits. It has since been realised that this instability under the effects of thermal stresses of nuclear origin is due to the heterogeneous morphology of uranium and to its anisotropic crystalline structure (U{sub {alpha}} or U{sub {beta}}). (author) [French] Les reacteurs de puissance destines a fournir l'energie industriellement recuperable utilisent comme materiau combustible nucleaire le plus economique, l'uranium metallique naturel ou legerement enrichi en isotope U

  16. The measurement of metallic uranium solubility in lithium chloride molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. K.; Choi, I. K.; Yeon, J. W.; Choi, K. S.; Park, Y. J.

    2002-01-01

    For the purpose of more precise solubility measurement of metallic uranium in lithium chloride melt, the effect of lithium chloride on uranium determination and and the change of oxidation state of metallic uranium in the media were investigated. Uranium of higher than 10 μg/g could be directly determined by ICP-AES. In the case of the lower concentration, the separation and concentration of uranium by anion exchanger was followed by ICP-AES, thereby extending the measurable concentration to 0.1 μg/g. The effects of lithium oxide, uranium oxides(UO 2 or U 3 O 8 ) and metallic lithium on the solubility of metallic uranium were individually investigated in glassy carbon or stainless steel crucibles under argon gas atmosphere. Since metallic uranium is oxidized to uranium(III) in the absence of metallic lithium, causing an increase in the solubility, metallic lithium as reducing agent should be present in the reaction media to obtain the more precise solubility. The metallic uranium solubilities measured at 660 and 690 .deg. C were both lower than 10 μg/g

  17. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H 2 formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO 2 and UH 3

  18. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen gas formed by aqueous corrosion of metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonnesbeck, J.

    2000-03-20

    Three unirradiated EBR-II blanket fuel samples containing depleted uranium metal were corrosion tested in simulated J-13 well water at 90 C. The corrosion rate of the blanket uranium metal was then determined relative to H{sub 2} formation. Corrosion of one of the samples was interrupted prior to complete oxidation of the uranium metal and the solid corrosion product was analyzed for UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}.

  19. The life of some metallic uranium based fuel elements; Duree de vie de quelques combustibles a base d'uranium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stohr, J A; Englander, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Description of some theoretical and experimental data concerning the design and most economic preparation of metallic uranium based fuel elements, which are intended to produce an energy of 3 kW days/g of uranium in a thermal reactor, at a sufficiently high mean temperature. Experimental results obtained by testing by analogy or by actually trying out fuel elements obtained by alloying uranium with other metals in proportions such that the resistance to deformation of the alloy produced is much higher than that of pure metallic uranium and that the thermal utilisation factor is only slightly different from that of the uranium. (author) [French] Description de quelques donnees theoriques et experimentales concernant la conception et la preparation la plus economique d'elements combustibles a base d'uranium metallique naturel, destines a degager dans un reacteur thermique une energie de l'ordre de 3 kWj/g d'uranium a une temperature moyenne suffisamment elevee. Resultats experimentaux acquis par tests analogiques ou reels sur combustibles obtenus par alliage de l'uranium avec des elements metalliques en proportions telles que la resistance a la deformation soit bien superieure a celle de l'uranium metal pur et que le facteur propre d'utilisation thermique n ne soit que peu affecte. (auteur)

  20. Determination of fluorine trace amounts in metallic uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukisheva, T N; Bolshakova, A S; Yefimova, N S

    1976-05-01

    A simple and rapid method was proposed for the determination of fluorine in metallic uranium without the removal of the latter. The method is based on the weakening of the color intensity of a complex of zirconium with xylenol orange in the presence of fluorine in a 1 N solution with respect to hydrochloric acid. For preparation for photometry, the solution to be analyzed is neutralized with ammonia to a pH of approximately 3. It is suggested that a complex of sulfosalicylic acid with uranium (VI) be used as the indicator in neutralization. The required acidity in the solution subjected to photometry is provided by the addition of a 5 N hydrochloric acid solution of zirconium. The coefficient of variation V/sub 15/ (at a fluorine content 3x10/sup -3/%) is 10%. In 7 h, 15-20 determinations can be performed.

  1. Production of uranium metal via electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide in molten LiCl and salt distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun-Young Choi; Chan Yeon Won; Dae-Seung Kang; Sung-Wook Kim; Ju-Sun Cha; Sung-Jai Lee; Wooshin Park; Hun Suk Im; Jin-Mok Hur

    2015-01-01

    Recovery of metallic uranium has been achieved by electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O electrolyte at 650 deg C, followed by the removal of the residual salt by vacuum distillation at 850 deg C. Four types of stainless steel mesh baskets, with various mesh sizes (325, 1,400 and 2,300 meshes) and either three or five ply layers, were used both as cathodes and to contain the reduced product in the distillation stage. The recovered uranium had a metal fraction greater than 98.8 % and contained no residual salt. (author)

  2. Chemical Decontamination of Metallic Waste from Uranium Conversion Plant Dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, D. S.; Choi, Y. D.; Hwang, S. T.; Park, J. H.; Byun, J. I.; Jang, N. S.

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) started a decommissioning program of the uranium conversion plant. Pre-work was carried as follows; installation of the access control facility, installation of a changing room and shower room, designation of an emergency exit way and indicating signs, installation of a radiation management facility, preparation of a storage area for tools and equipments, inspection and load test of crane, distribution and packaging of existing waste, and pre-decontamination of the equipment surface and the interior. First, decommissioning work was performed in kiln room, which will be used for temporary radioactive waste storage room. Kiln room housed hydro fluorination rotary kiln for production of uranium tetra-fluoride. The kiln is about 0.8 m in diameter and 5.5 m long. The total dismantled waste was 6,690 kg, 73 % of which was metallic waste and 27 % the others such as cable, asbestos, concrete, secondary waste, etc. And effluent treatment room and filtration room were dismantled for installation of decontamination equipment and lagoon sludge treatment equipment. There were tanks and square mixer in these rooms. The total dismantled waste was 17,250 kg, 67% of which was metallic waste and 33% the others. These dismantled metallic wastes consist of stainless and carbon steel. In this paper, the stainless steel plate and pipe were decontaminated by the chemical decontamination with ultrasonic

  3. The Determination of Uranium and Trace Metal Impurities in Yellow Cake Sample by Chemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    1999-01-01

    The purity of uranium cake is very critical in nuclear-grade uranium (UO 2 ) and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production. The major element in yellow cake is uranium and trace metal impurities. The objective of this study is to determine uranium and 25 trace metal impurities; Aluminum, Barium, Bismuth, Calcium, Cadmium, Cobalt, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Iithium, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Sodium, Niobium, Nickel, Lead, Antimony, Tin, Strontium, Titanium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium, Uranium is determined by Potassium dichromate titration, after solvent extraction with Cupferon in Chloroform, Trace metal impurities are determined by solvent extraction with Tributyl Phosphate in Carbon-tetrachloride ( for first 23 elements) and N-Benzoyl-N-Phenylhydroxylamine in Chloroform ( for last 2 elements), then analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) compared with Inductively Couple Plasma Spectrophotometers (ICP). The accuracy and precision are studied with standard uranium octaoxide

  4. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates

  5. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  6. Metal nitride coatings by physical vapor deposition (PVD) for a wear resistant aluminum extrusion die.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Young; Kim, Sang Ho

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the friction and wear behaviors of CrN, TiN, CrAlN, and TiAIN coated onto SKD61 for application to Al 7000 series extrusion dies. On the wear test, the experimental parameters are the load and the counter material's temperature. The results showed that the friction coefficient increased with load but decreased with the counter material's temperature, and the friction coefficients of CrN and CrAIN were lower than the friction coefficients of TiAIN and TIN, especially at a higher temperature. The wear track with different coatings identified different wear behaviors; the wear behavior of CrAIN was found to be abrasive, but the wear behavior of TiN, CrN, and TiAIN was adhesive. Therefore, CrAIN showed the least wear loss with a lower friction coefficient and less adhesion with counter materials at the highest range of wear load and temperature. This resulted in the easy formation of aluminum oxide in the wear track and less Al adhesion; moreover during the hard second phase, AIN dispersed in the film during deposition.

  7. Development of a recovery process of scraps resulting from the manufacture of metallic uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilo, Ruth L.; Kuada, Terezinha A.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G.O.; Cohen, Victor H.; Araujo, Bertha F.; Lobao, Afonso S.T.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the dissolution of natural metallic uranium fuel samples with aluminium cladding is presented, in order to obtain optimized conditions for the system. The aluminium cladding was dissolved in an alkaline solution of Na OH/Na NO 3 and the metallic uranium with HNO 3 . A fumeless dissolution with total recovery of nitrous gases was achieved. The main purpose of this project was the recovery of uranium from scraps resulting from the manufacture of the metallic uranium fuel or other non specified fuels. (author)

  8. The release of fission products from uranium metal: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.

    1989-03-01

    The literature on the release of fission products as gaseous species from irradiated uranium metal in oxidising atmospheres has been reviewed. Release of actinides and of fission products as spalled particulate were not considered. Data is given on the release in air, carbon dioxide, steam and mixtures of steam and air. The majority of data discussed lie between 800 and 1200 0 C though some results for xenon, krypton and iodine releases below 800 0 C are given. Two measures of fission product release are discussed: the release fraction, F(tot), which is the ratio of the total release to the initial inventory, and the fractional release, F(ox), which is the fraction released from the oxidised metal. The effect of burn-up, atmosphere and temperature on F(tot) and F(ox) is examined and the conditions under which the release fraction, F(tot) is proportional to the extent of oxidation discussed. (author)

  9. Process for recovering uranium and other base metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R. J-J.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium and other base metals are leached from their ores with aqueous solutions containing bicarbonate ions that have been generated or reconstituted by converting other non-bicarbonate anions into bicarbonate ions. The conversion is most conveniently effected by contacting solutions containing SO 4 - and Cl - ions with a basic anion exchange resin so that the SO 4 - and Cl - ions are converted into or exhanged for HCO 3 - ions. CO 2 may be dissolved in the solution so it is present during the exhange. The resin is preferably in bicarbonate form prior to contact and CO 2 partial pressure is adjusted so that the resin is not fouled by depositing metal precipitates. In-situ uranium mining is conducted by circulating such solutions through the ore deposit. Oxidizing agents are included in the injected lixiviant. The leaching strength of the circulating bicarbonate lixiviant is maintained by converting the anions generated during leaching or above-ground recovery processes into HCO 3 - ions. The resin may conveniently be eluted and reformed intermittently

  10. Process for recovering uranium and other base metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and other base metals are leached from their ores with aqueous solutions containing bicarbonate ions that have been generated or reconstituted by converting other non-bicarbonate anions into bicarbonate ions. The conversion is most conveniently effected by contacting solutions containing SO 4 -- and C1 - ions with a basic anion exchange resin so that the SO 4 -- and Cl - ions are converted into or exchanged for HCO 3 - ions. CO 2 may be dissolved in the solution so it is present during the exchange. The resin is preferably in bicarbonate form prior to contact and CO 2 partial pressure is adjusted so that the resin is not fouled by depositing metal precipitates. In-situ uranium mining is conducted by circulating such solutions through the ore deposit. Oxidizing agents are included in the injected lixiviant. The leaching strength of the circulating bicarbonate lixiviant is maintained by converting the anions generated during leaching or above-ground recovery processes into HCO 3 - ions. The resin may conveniently be eluted and performed intermittently. (author)

  11. Process for recovering uranium and other base metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium and other base metals are leached from their ores with aqueous solutions containing bicarbonate ions that have been generated or reconstituted by converting other non-bicarbonate anions into bicarbonate ions. The conversion is most conveniently effected by contacting solutions containing SO 4 2- and Cl - ions with a basic anion exchange resin so that the SO 4 2- and Cl - ions are converted into or exchanged for HCO 3 - ions. CO 2 may be dissolved in the solution so it is present during the exchange. The resin is preferably in bicarbonate form prior to contact and CO 2 partial pressure is adjusted so that the resin is not fouled by depositing metal precipitates. In-situ uranium mining is conducted by circulating such solutions through the ore deposit. Oxidizing agents are included in the injected lixiviant. The leaching strength of the circulating bicarbonate lixiviant is maintained by converting the anions generated during leaching or above-ground recovery processes into HCO 3 - ions. The resin may conveniently be eluted and reformed intermittently

  12. Active method of neutron time correlation coincidence measurement to authenticate mass and enrichment of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Songbai; Wu Jun; Zhu Jianyu; Tian Dongfeng; Xie Dong

    2011-01-01

    The active methodology of time correlation coincidence measurement of neutron is an effective verification means to authenticate uranium metal. A collimated 252 Cf neutron source was used to investigate mass and enrichment of uranium metal through the neutron transport simulation for different enrichments and different masses of uranium metal, then time correlation coincidence counts of them were obtained. By analyzing the characteristic of time correlation coincidence counts, the monotone relationships were founded between FWTH of time correlation coincidence and multiplication factor, between the total coincidence counts in FWTH for time correlation coincidence and mass of 235 U multiplied by multiplication factor, and between the ratio of neutron source penetration and mass of uranium metal. Thus the methodology to authenticate mass and enrichment of uranium metal was established with time correlation coincidence by active neutron investigation. (authors)

  13. Mid-crustal uranium and rare metal mineralisation in the Mount Isa Inlier: a genetic model for formation of orogenic uranium deposits

    OpenAIRE

    McGloin, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Uranium mineralisation near Mount Isa in northwest Queensland, Australia, is widespread yet poorly understood. Within this region in the Western Fold Belt, one hundred and ninety uranium-rare metal occurrences are known. This uranium mineralisation is similar to worldwide examples of albitite-hosted or sodium-metasomatic uranium deposits, which host albite-carbonate ore zones enriched in incompatible elements. Various metal sources and ore-forming processes have been sugg...

  14. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part II. Screening study results: Identification of an effective non-thermal uranium dissolution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Screening experiments were performed to evaluate reagent systems that deactivate pyrophoric, metallic depleted uranium waste streams at ambient temperature. The results presented led to the selection of two systems, which would be investigated further, for the design of the LLNL onsite treatment process of metallic depleted uranium wastes. The two feasible systems are: (a) 7.5 mol/l H 2 SO 4 - 1 mol/l HNO 3 and (b) 3 mol/l HCl - 1 mol/l H 3 PO 4 . The sulfuric acid system dissolves uranium metal completely, while the hydrochloric-phosphoric acid system converts the metal completely into a solid, which might be suitable for direct disposal. Both systems combine oxidation of metallic uranium with complexation of the uranium ions formed to effectively deactivate uranium.s pyrophoricity at ambient temperature. (author)

  15. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Sar, Pinaki, E-mail: sarpinaki@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g{sup -1} cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L{sup -1}, pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation.

  16. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g(-1)cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L(-1), pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrations of heavy metals (lead, manganese, cadmium) in blood and urine of former uranium workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, D.; Pavlova, S.; Paskalev, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Uranium ores contain heavy metals and other stable chemical elements as oxides, hydro-carbonates, sulphates, etc. During chemical processing of ore they could be transformed into compounds soluble in biologic liquids. The purpose of this study was to determine the combined intoxication of uranium miners and millers by heavy metals and radiation. Heavy metal (lead, manganese and cadmium) concentrations in blood and urine od 149 former uranium miners and millers were determined by AAS method. Data of significantly increased lead and manganese concentration in blood (p<0.05) of two groups were established in comparison with a control group. There is no statistical significant differences in the cadmium concentrations. The lead and manganese blood levels at the uranium millers were significant higher than those of the uranium miner group (p<0.05). Tendency towards increased blood lead concentrations of uranium millers depending on the length of service was established

  18. Separation of uranium and other metals from commercial phosphoric acid by ion-exchange and voltammetric determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, J.B.C.; Carvalho, F.M.S. de; Abrao, A.

    1985-11-01

    The separation of metals from crude commercial phosphoric acid is achieved by simple dilution and percolation through a strong cationic ion exchanger. Uranium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, iron and aluminum are quantitatively fixed by the exchanger and can be detected or analysed after their complete elution with 6 M HCI. Titanium and zirconium are only partially retained. Specially for its separation and determination uranium is retained selectively by the resin from the phosphoric acid-EDTA solution, the column is washed with water and then eluted with hydrochloric acid. Uranium is analyzed by voltametry with the hanging drop mercury electrode. (Author) [pt

  19. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium by starfish and Pseudomonas putida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Ju Young; Yang, Jung-Seok

    2009-01-01

    Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from contaminated wastewaters may represent an innovative purification process. This study investigates the removal ability of unit mass of Pseudomonas putida and starfish for lead, cadmium, and uranium by quantifying the adsorption capacity. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing Pb, Cd, and U concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than live cells and starfish. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated wastewaters

  20. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium by starfish and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Ju Young; Yang, Jung-Seok

    2009-01-15

    Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from contaminated wastewaters may represent an innovative purification process. This study investigates the removal ability of unit mass of Pseudomonas putida and starfish for lead, cadmium, and uranium by quantifying the adsorption capacity. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing Pb, Cd, and U concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than live cells and starfish. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI)>Pb>Cd. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated wastewaters.

  1. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I; Razvoj metalnog goriva i ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala (I-VI deo); I deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlovic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors.

  2. Chemical Separation of Fission Products in Uranium Metal Ingots from Electrolytic Reduction Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Heon; Kim, Min-Jae; Choi, Kwang-Soon; Jee, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Chemical characterization of various process materials is required for the optimization of the electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. In the uranium metal ingots of interest in this study, residual process materials and corrosion products as well as fission products are involved to some extent, which further adds difficulties to the determination of trace fission products. Besides it, direct inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) analysis of uranium bearing materials such as the uranium metal ingots is not possible because a severe spectral interference is found in the intensely complex atomic emission spectra of uranium. Thus an adequate separation procedure for the fission products should be employed prior to their determinations. In present study ion exchange and extraction chromatographic methods were adopted for selective separation of the fission products from residual process materials, corrosion products and uranium matrix. The sorption behaviour of anion and tri-nbutylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatographic resins for the metals in acidic solutions simulated for the uranium metal ingot solutions was investigated. Then the validity of the separation procedure for its reliability and applicability was evaluated by measuring recoveries of the metals added

  3. Comparison of heavy metals and uranium removal using adsorbent in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Yun, Hunsik

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates heavy metals (As, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Pb) and uranium removal onto geomaterials (limestone, black shale, and concrete) and biosorbents (Pseudomonas putida and starfish) from waste in soil. Geomaterials or biosorbents with a high capacity for heavy metals and uranium can be obtained and employed of with little cost. For investigating the neutralization capacity, the change in pH, Eh, and EC as a function of time was quantified. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing heavy metals and uranium concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than lother sorbents. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd > Ni. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated soil.

  4. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99 mTc for medical purposes is currently produced from the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers. (author)

  5. Irradiation tests of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Suripto, A.; Nasution, H.; Lufti-Amin, D.; Gogo, A.

    1996-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99m Tc for medical purposes is currently produced form the decay of 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high-enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) metal foils for the HEU UO 2 used in current target designs will allow equivalent 99 Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium alloy and aluminide in other target designs will also allow the conversion of HEU to LEU. Several uranium-metal-foil targets have been fabricated at ANL and irradiated to prototypic burnup in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor. Postirradiation examination of the initial test indicated that design modifications were required to allow the irradiated foil to be removed for chemical processing. The latest test has shown good irradiation behavior, satisfactory dismantling and foil removal when the U-foil is separated from its containment by metallic, fission-recoil absorbing barriers

  6. Operating experience in processing of differently sourced deeply depleted uranium oxide and production of deeply depleted uranium metal ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, S.; Ladola, Y.S.; Sharma, S.; Chowdhury, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Roy, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium Metal Plant (UMP) of BARC had first time experience on production of three Depleted Uranium Metal (DUM) ingots of 76kg, 152kg and 163kg during March 1991. These ingots were produced by processing depleted uranyl nitrate solution produced at Plutonium Plant (PP), Trombay. In recent past Uranium Metal Plant (UMP), Uranium Extraction Division (UED), has been assigned to produce tonnage quantity of Deeply DUM (DDUM) from its oxide obtained from PP, PREFRE and RMP, BARC. This is required for shielding the high radioactive source of BHABHATRON Tele-cobalt machine, which is used for cancer therapy. The experience obtained in processing of various DDU oxides is being utilized for design of large scale DDU-metal plant under XIth plan project. The physico- chemical characteristics like morphology, density, flowability, reactivity, particle size distribution, which are having direct effect on reactivity of the powders of the DDU oxide powder, were studied and the shop-floor operational experience in processing of different oxide powder were obtained and recorded. During campaign trials utmost care was taken to standardized all operating conditions using the same equipment which are in use for natural uranium materials processing including safety aspects both with respect to radiological safety and industrial safety. Necessary attention and close monitoring were specially arranged and maintained for the safety aspects during the trial period. In-house developed pneumatic transport system was used for powder transfer and suitable dust arresting system was used for reduction of powder carry over

  7. Surface Characterization and Electrochemical Oxidation of Metal Doped Uranium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Goo; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Kim, Jong-Yun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Trivalent element in UO{sub 2} matrix makes the oxygen vacancy from loss of oxygen for charge compensation. Tetravalent element alters lattice parameter of UO{sub 2} due to diameter difference between the tetravalent element and replaced U. These structural changes have significant effect on not only relevant fuel performance but also the kinetics of fuel oxidation. Park and Olander explained the stabilization of Ln (III)-doped UO{sub 2} against oxidation based on oxygen potential calculations. In this work, we have been investigated the effect of Gd{sup 3+} and Th{sup 4+} doping on the UO{sub 2} structure with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the surface structure of nuclear fuel material. For Gd doped UO{sub 2}, its electrochemical oxidation behaviors are also investigated. The Gd and Th doped uranium dioxide solid solution pellets with various doping level were investigated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, electrochemical experiments to investigate surface structure and electro chemical oxidation behaviors. The lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra indicated the formation of solid solutions. Raman spectra showed the existence of the oxygen vacancy. SEM images showed the grain structure on the surface of Gd doped uranium dioxide depending on doping level and oxygen-to-metal ratio.

  8. Evidence for Single Metal Two Electron Oxidative Addition and Reductive Elimination at Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, Benedict M; Kefalidis, Christos E; Lu, Erli; Patel, Dipti; Mcinnes, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Wooles, Ashley; Maron, Laurent; Liddle, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Reversible single-metal two-electron oxidative addition and reductive elimination are common fundamental reactions for transition metals that underpin major catalytic transformations. However, these reactions have never been observed together in the f-block because these metals exhibit irreversible one- or multi-electron oxidation or reduction reactions. Here, we report that azobenzene oxidises sterically and electronically unsaturated uranium(III) complexes to afford a uranium(V)-imido compl...

  9. Device for safe disposal of non-utilizable cuttings from depleted uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiala, B.

    1991-01-01

    A device was developed for the production of U 3 O 8 from cuttings of depleted uranium metal or of uranium metal waste whose surface area is sufficiently large for combustion. The waste may contain organic impurities or other metals. The purity of the U 3 O 8 thus obtained is about 98%. Tests gave evidence that the combustion facility meets all requirements set forth by hygienic and ecological regulations. (Z.M.). 1 fig

  10. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

    1995-05-02

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

  11. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, II, William; Miller, Philip E.; Horton, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

  12. Study on the surface oxidation resistance of uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1999-01-01

    The surface reactions of different layers on uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 25, 80 and 200 degree C are studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experimental results show that the carbon monoxide is adsorbed on the surface oxide layer of uranium and interacted each other. The content of oxygen in the surface oxide and O/U ratio are decreased with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The effect of reduction on the metal surface is more obviously with a higher temperature and increasing of layer thickness. The investigation indicates the uranium metal has resistance to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  13. Influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layer of uranium metal and its oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-09-01

    The surface structures of uranium metal and triuranium octaoxide (U 3 O 8 ) and the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface layers have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After exposure to carbon monoxide, contents of oxygen in the surface oxides of uranium metal and U 3 O 8 are decreased and O/U ratios decrease 7.2%, 8.0% respectively. The investigation indicated the surface layers of uranium metal and its oxides were forbidden to further oxidation in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. (11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.)

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  15. Preliminary analysis on tectonic movement and uranium metallization in Kang-Dian the earth's axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yiyue; Wei Mingji; Ma Guangzhong

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of analyzing available data the authors expounds the regional geology, tectonic movement, as well as the relationship between geological evolution and uranium metallization in Kang-Dian the earth's axis and propose that the Jinning Period (960-1006 Ma) is the first metallogenic epoch of uranium in Kang-Dian the earth's axis

  16. Brittle-ductile gliding shear zone and its dynamic metallization in uranium deposit No. 3110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shiyi.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study on the macroscopic geological structure, microstructures of plastic deformation rotary strain, structural geochemistry and zoning regularity of a brittle-ductile gliding shear zone in uranium deposit No. 3110 is made. Structural dynamic metallization of uranium caused by the strong shearing stress is discussed. It is pointed out that great attention must be paid to in further exploration

  17. Study on the dimensional instability of metallic uranium subject to thermal alternation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    Methalographic properties of metallic uranium submitted to a thermal cycle are studied. Microstructures heat treatment and methods utilized are presented. Dimensional instability of uranium is the main subject of the study and it is seen that it is strongly reduced in the presence of molybdenum [pt

  18. Biotransformation of uranium and transition metal citrate complexes by clostridia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.A.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Clostridium sphenoides, which uses citric acid as its sole carbon source, metabolized equimolar Fe(III)-citrate with the degradation of citric acid and the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), but not the U(VI)-citrate complex. However, in the presence of excess citric acid or added glucose it was reduced to U(IV)-citrate. In contrast, Clostridium sp., which ferments glucose but not citrate, reduced Fe(III)-citrate to Fe(II)-citrate and U(VI)-citrate to U(IV)-citrate only when supplied with glucose. These results show that complexed uranium is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the bacterium's inability to metabolize the organic ligand complexed to the actinide. These results also show that the metabolism of the metal-citrate complex depends upon the type of complex formed between the metal and citric acid. Fe(III) forms a bidentate complex with citric acid and was metabolized, whereas U forms a binuclear complex with citric acid and was recalcitrant. (author)

  19. Mixed Uranium/Refractory Metal Carbide Fuels for High Performance Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for advanced, high-performance reactors. Earlier studies of mixed carbides focused on uranium and either thorium or plutonium as a fuel for fast breeder reactors enabling shorter doubling owing to the greater fissile atom density. However, the mixed uranium/refractory carbides such as (U, Zr, Nb)C have a lower uranium densities but hold significant promise because of their ultra-high melting points (typically greater than 3700 K), improved material compatibility, and high thermal conductivity approaching that of the metal. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders, while hypo-stoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.92 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing, dynamic magnetic compaction, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for high performance, ultra-safe nuclear reactor applications. (authors)

  20. Distribution of uranium and some selected trace metals in human scalp hair from Balkans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Z S; Tokonami, S; Mishra, S; Arae, H; Kritsananuwat, R; Sahoo, S K

    2012-11-01

    The possible consequences of the use of depleted uranium (DU) used in Balkan conflicts in 1995 and 1999 for the people and the environment of this reason need attention. The heavy metal content in human hair may serve as a good indicator of dietary, environmental and occupational exposures to the metal compounds. The present work summarises the distribution of uranium and some selected trace metals such as Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Cd and Cs in the scalp hair of inhabitants from Balkans exposed to DU directly and indirectly, i.e. Han Pijesak, Bratoselce and Gornja Stubla areas. Except U and Cs, all other metals were compared with the worldwide reported values of occupationally unexposed persons. Uranium concentrations show a wide variation ranging from 0.9 ± 0.05 to 449 ± 12 µg kg(-1). Although hair samples were collected from Balkan conflict zones, uranium isotopic measurement ((235)U/(238)U) shows a natural origin rather than DU.

  1. Role of modern analytical techniques in the production of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Production of nuclear grade uranium metal conforming to its stringent specification with respect to metallic and non metallic impurities necessitates implementation of a comprehensive quality control regime. Founding members of Uranium Metal Plant realised the importance of this aspect of metal production and a quality control laboratory was set up as part of the production plant. In the initial stages of its existence, the laboratory mainly catered to the process control analysis of the plant process samples and Spectroscopy Division and Analytical Division of BARC provided analysis of trace metallic impurities in the intermediates as well as in the product uranium metal. This laboratory also provided invaluable R and D support for the optimization of the process involving both calciothermy and magnesiothermy. Prior to 1985, analytical procedures used were limited to classical methods of analysis with minimal instrumental procedures. The first major analytical instrument, a Flame AAS was installed in 1985 and a beginning to the trace analysis was made. However during the last 15 years the Quality Control Section has modernized the analytical set up by acquiring appropriate instruments. Presently the facility has implemented a complete quality control and quality assurance program required to cover all aspects of uranium metal production viz analysis of raw materials, process samples, waste disposal samples and also determination of all the specification elements in uranium metal. The current analytical practices followed in QCS are presented here

  2. Synthesis of graphite intercalation compound of group VI metals and uranium hexafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Toshihiro; Hagiwara, Rika; Ema, Keiko; Ito, Yasuhiko

    1993-01-01

    Systematic investigations were made on the synthesis of graphite intercalation compounds of group VI transition metals (W and Mo) and uranium hexafluorides. The reactions were performed by interacting liquid or gaseous metal hexafluorides with or without elemental fluorine at ambient temperature. The degree of intercalation of these metal fluorides depends on the formation enthalpy of fluorometallate anion from the original metal hexafluoride, as has been found for other intercalation reactions of metal fluorides. (author)

  3. A novel method for the preparation of uranium metal, oxide and carbide via electrolytic amalgamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.C.; Lee, H.C.; Lee, T.S.; Lai, W.C.; Chang, C.T.

    1978-01-01

    A solid uranium amalgam was prepared electrolytically using a two-compartment cell separated with an ion exchange membrane for the purpose of regulating pH value within a narrowly restricted region of 2 to 3. The mercury cathode was kept at -1.8V vs SCE during electrolysis. The thereby obtained amalgam containing as high as 1.9gm U/ml Hg is easily converted into uranium metal by heating in vacuo above 1300 0 C. Uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide could be easily obtained at relatively low temperature by reacting the amalgam with water vapor and methane. (author)

  4. Melting decontamination and recycling of radioactive polluted metals from uranium mining and metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Anquan

    2011-01-01

    Melting method is a primary method used for decontamination of radioactive polluted metal from uranium mining and metallurgy. The decontamination mechanism of the method, the way selection and its features are introduced. Taking the ten year's work of CNNC Uranium Mining and Metallurgy Radioactive Polluted Metal Melting Processing Center as example, the effects of processing radioactive polluted metals by smelting method are discussed. The surface pollution levels of radioactive polluted metal from uranium mining and metallurgy decreased from 4-48 Bq/cm 2 before decontamination to 0.004-0.016 Bq/cm 2 after decontamination, and the specific activity of its metal is less than 1 Bq/g, which is below the solution control level proposed by IAEARS-G1.7 'the application of the concepts of exclusion, immunity and solution control'. The metals after decontamination can be recycled by producing tooth plate and bucket teeth of excavator used in mines. (authors)

  5. Effect of extrusion stem speed on extrusion process for a hollow aluminum profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Cunsheng; Zhao, Guoqun; Chen, Zhiren; Chen, Hao; Kou, Fujun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Extrusion stem speed has significant effects on extrusion process. ► An optimum value of stem speed exists for uniform metal flow distribution. ► A higher stem speed leads to a higher required extrusion force. ► A high stem speed leads to an improved welding quality of aluminum profile. - Abstract: Extrusion stem speed is one of important process parameters during aluminum profile extrusion, which directly influences the profile quality and choice of extrusion equipments. In this paper, the extrusion process of a thin-walled hollow aluminum profile was simulated by means of the HyperXtrude commercial software. Through a serial of numerical simulation, the effects of stem speed on extrusion process, such as metal flow behavior at die exit, temperature distribution, extrusion force, and welding pressure, have been investigated. The numerical results showed that there existed an optimum value of stem speed for flow velocity distribution. With the increasing stem speed, the temperature of the extrudate and required extrusion force increased, and the welding quality of extrudate would be improved. Through comprehensive comparison and analysis, the appropriate stem speed could be determined for practical extrusion production. Thus, the research results could give effective guideline for determining initial billet and die temperature and choosing the proper extrusion press in aluminum profile industry.

  6. Influence of Ambient Gas on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Uranium Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dacheng; Ma Xinwen; Wang Shulong; Zhu Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is regarded as a suitable method for the remote analysis of materials in any phase, even in an environment with high radiation levels. In the present work we used the third harmonic pulse of a Nd:YAG laser for ablation of uranium metal and measured the plasma emission with a fiber-optic spectrometer. The LIBS spectra of uranium metal and their features in different ambient gases (i.e., argon, neon, oxygen, and nitrogen) at atmospheric pressure were studied. Strong continuum spectrum and several hundreds of emission lines from UI and UII were observed. It is found that the continuum spectrum observed in uranium not only comes from bremsstrahlung emission but is also due to the complex spectrum of uranium. The influence of ambient gas and the gas flow rate for ablation of uranium metal was investigated. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the uranium lines was enhanced in argon and nitrogen. However, the intensity of uranium lines was decreased in oxygen due to the generation of UO and other oxides. The results also showed that the highest intensity of uranium lines were obtained in argon gas with a gas flow rate above 2.5 L/min. The enhanced mechanism in ambient gas and the influence of the gas flow rate were analyzed in this work. (paper)

  7. Nuclear fuel cycle head-end enriched uranium purification and conversion into metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, A.; Cabrejas, J.; Lio, L. de; Dell'Occhio, L.; Devida, C.; Dupetit, G.; Falcon, M.; Gauna, A.; Gil, D.; Guzman, G.; Neuringer, P.; Pascale, A.; Stankevicius, A.

    1998-01-01

    The CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica - Argentina) operated two facilities at the Ezeiza Atomic Center which supply purified enriched uranium employed in the production of nuclear fuels. At one of those facilities, the Triple Height Laboratory scraps from the production of MTR type fuel elements (mainly out of specification U 3 O 8 plates or powder) are purified to nuclear grade. The purification is accomplished by a solvent extraction process. The other facility, the Enriched Uranium Laboratory produces 90% enriched uranium metal to be used in Mo 99 production (originally the uranium was used for the manufacture of MTR fuel elements made of aluminium-uranium alloy). This laboratory also provided metallic uranium with a lower enrichment (20%) for a first uranium-silicon testing fuel element, and in the near future it is going to recommence 20% enriched uranium related activities in order to provide the metal for the silicon-based fuel elements production (according to the policy of enrichment reduction for MTR reactors). (author)

  8. Determination of the oxygen-metal-ratio of uranium-americium mixed oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartscher, W.

    1982-01-01

    During the dissolution of uranium-americium mixed oxides in phosphoric acid under nitrogen tetravalent uranium is oxidized by tetravalent americium. The obtained hexavalent uranium is determined by constant potential coulometry. The coulombs measured are equivalent to the oxygen in excess of the minimum composition of UO 2 x AmO 1 . 5 . The total uranium content of the sample is determined in a subsequent coulometric titration. The oxygen-metal ratio of the sample can be calculated for a given uranium-americium ratio. An excess of uranium dioxide is necessary in order to suppress the oxidation of water by tetravalent americium. The standard deviation of the method is 0.0017 O/M units. (orig.) [de

  9. Microbial cells as biosorbents for heavy metals: accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent

  10. Selective extraction of metals from acidic uranium(VI) solutions using neo-tridecano-hydroxamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardoncelli, F.; Grossi, G.

    1975-01-01

    According to this invention neo-alkyl-hydroxamic acids are employed as ion-exchanging agents in processes for liquid-liquid extraction with the aim of separating, purifying dissolved metals and of converting a metal salt solution into a solution of a salt of the same metal but with different anion. In particular it is an objective of this invention to provide a method whereby a molecular pure uranium solution is obtained by selective extraction from a uranium solution delivered by irradiated fuel reprocessing plants and containing plutonium, fission products and other unwanted metals, in which method neo-tridecane-hydroxamic acid is employed as ion exchanger. (Official Gazette)

  11. Radiochronological Age of a Uranium Metal Sample from an Abandoned Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, L A; Williams, R W; Glover, S E; LaMont, S P; Stalcup, A M; Spitz, H B

    2012-03-16

    A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940s and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope {sup 230}Th from the decay of {sup 234}U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 {+-} 1.5 years.

  12. Radiochronological age of a uranium metal sample from an abandoned facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, L.A.; Stalcup, A.M.; Glover, S.E.; Spitz, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940 and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope 230 Th from the decay of 234 U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 ± 1.5 years. (author)

  13. Radiochronological Age of a Uranium Metal Sample from an Abandoned Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, L.A.; Williams, R.W.; Glover, S.E.; LaMont, S.P.; Stalcup, A.M.; Spitz, H.B.

    2012-01-01

    A piece of scrap uranium metal bar buried in the dirt floor of an old, abandoned metal rolling mill was analyzed using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (MC-ICP-MS). The mill rolled uranium rods in the 1940s and 1950s. Samples of the contaminated dirt in which the bar was buried were also analyzed. The isotopic composition of uranium in the bar and dirt samples were both the same as natural uranium, though a few samples of dirt also contained recycled uranium; likely a result of contamination with other material rolled at the mill. The time elapsed since the uranium metal bar was last purified can be determined by the in-growth of the isotope 230 Th from the decay of 234 U, assuming that only uranium isotopes were present in the bar after purification. The age of the metal bar was determined to be 61 years at the time of this analysis and corresponds to a purification date of July 1950 ± 1.5 years.

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  15. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totemeier, Terry C.; Pahl, Robert G.; Frank, Steven M.

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2, Ar-9%O 2, and Ar-20%O 2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride.

  16. Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T.C.; Pahl, R.G.; Frank, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from zero power physics reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar-4%O 2 , Ar-9%O 2 , and Ar-20%O 2 . Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125 C and 150 C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to be dependent only on the net flow rate of oxygen in the reacting gas. Due to the higher net oxygen flow rate, burning rates increased with increasing oxygen concentration. Oxidation rates below the ignition temperature were much slower and decreased with increasing test time. The hydride contents of the TGA samples from the two moderately corroded plates, determined from the total weight gain achieved during burning, were 47-61 wt% and 29-39 wt%. Samples from a lightly corroded plate were not reactive; X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that they contained little hydride. (orig.)

  17. Elution of Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-Based Polymer Adsorbents for Sequestering Uranium from Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wai, Chien M.; Miyamoto, Naomi; Joshi, Ruma; Wood, Jordana R.; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Janke, Christopher J.; Oyola, Yatsandra; Das, Sadananda; Mayes, Richard T.; Gill, Gary A.

    2015-11-30

    High-surface-area amidoxime and carboxylic acid grafted polymer adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were tested for sequestering uranium in a flowing seawater flume system at the PNNL-Marine Sciences Laboratory. FTIR spectra indicate that a KOH conditioning process is necessary to remove the proton from the carboxylic acid and make the sorbent effective for sequestering uranium from seawater. The alkaline conditioning process also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. Both Na2CO3-H2O2 and hydrochloric acid elution methods can remove ~95% of the uranium sequestered by the adsorbent after 42 days of exposure in real seawater. The Na2CO3-H2O2 elution method is more selective for uranium than conventional acid elution. Iron and vanadium are the two major transition metals competing with uranium for adsorption to the amidoxime-based adsorbents in real seawater.

  18. Behavior of uranium and its surrogates in molten aluminosilicate glasses in contact with liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevreux, Pierrick

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns an innovative process used for conditioning nuclear waste that contain metallic parts contaminated with actinides. High actinides concentrations are expected to be incorporated in the glass melt in contact with the molten metals. Among these metals, aluminum and/or stainless steel impose a strongly reducing environment to the glass melt involving redox reactions. These reactions modify actinides oxidation states and therefore change their solubilities in the glass and could also reduce them into the metallic form. In this work, we focus on the behavior of uranium and its surrogates, namely hafnium and neodymium, in aluminosilicate glasses from the Na 2 O-CaO-SiO 2 -Al 2 O 3 system melted in highly reducing conditions. The first step consists in comparing the hafnium and uranium solubilities in the glass as functions of redox conditions and glass composition. A methodology has been set up and a specific device has been used to control the oxygen fugacity and the alkali content of the glass. The results show that uranium is far less soluble in the glass than hafnium (Hf(IV)) in reducing conditions. The uranium solubility ranges from 4 to 7 wt% UO 2 for an oxygen fugacity below 10 -14 atm at 1250 C-1400 C. Uranium oxidation states have been investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES). It has been pointed out that U(IV) is the main form in the glass for such imposed oxygen fugacities. The second step of this work is to identify the glass-metal interaction mechanisms in order to determine the localization of uranium and its surrogates (Nd, Hf) in the glass-metal system. Mechanisms are mostly ruled by the presence of metallic aluminum and are similar for uranium, neodymium and hafnium. Glass-metal interaction kinetics demonstrate that uranium and its surrogates can temporarily be reduced into the metallic form for particular conditions. A re-oxidation occurs with time which is in good agreement with thermodynamics. Regarding uranium, the re

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  20. Preparation of metallic uranium tubes; Elaboration des tubes d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, G.; Decours, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The production furnace is an induction heated vacuum furnace having a capacity at the moment of 250 kg. Previously the crucible was heated by the inductor, the mould being outside the inductor. The tubes thus produced contained cavities, the alloy structure was fine; this was cold-mould casting, At the moment the top of the moulds are pre-heated, this is the so called hot-mould casting. This method has the advantage of eliminating the cavities but leads to a less fine microstructure. The alloy used for the 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm tubes is U-Mo (1.1 per cent). Since the moulds are now heated at the top, the solidification of the metal is very slow in this zone leading to a pronounced {gamma} grain, whereas towards the base the faster cooling leads to a smaller {gamma} grain. The {gamma} structure depends essentially on the solidification rate and on the time spent in this zone. In order to obtain a fine and homogeneous grain along the whole length of the tube, a controlled cooling treatment is effected. It consists in heating the uranium tubes in the {gamma} place and then in cooling them at a rate of between 20 and 50 deg C/mm down to 400 deg C. The 77 x 95 mm and 54 x 70 mm annular elements are at the moment being produced for research purposes. Their preparation is similar to that of 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm elements. The 77 x 95 mm tubes are at the moment made from U-Cr alloy (0.1 per cent); because of their size, their preparation is carried out in 600 mm diameter furnaces. (authors) [French] Le four d'elaboration est un four sous vide chaufffe par induction, dont la capacite actuelle est de 250 kg. Anterieurement le creuset seul etait chauffe par l'inducteur, les moules etaient hors de l'inducteur. Les tubes obtenus presentaient des cavites, la structure de l'alliage etait fine, c'etait la coulee en moules froids. Actuellement on prechauffe le haut des moules, c'est la coulee dite en moules chauds. Cette facon de faire a l

  1. Preparation of metallic uranium tubes; Elaboration des tubes d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, G; Decours, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The production furnace is an induction heated vacuum furnace having a capacity at the moment of 250 kg. Previously the crucible was heated by the inductor, the mould being outside the inductor. The tubes thus produced contained cavities, the alloy structure was fine; this was cold-mould casting, At the moment the top of the moulds are pre-heated, this is the so called hot-mould casting. This method has the advantage of eliminating the cavities but leads to a less fine microstructure. The alloy used for the 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm tubes is U-Mo (1.1 per cent). Since the moulds are now heated at the top, the solidification of the metal is very slow in this zone leading to a pronounced {gamma} grain, whereas towards the base the faster cooling leads to a smaller {gamma} grain. The {gamma} structure depends essentially on the solidification rate and on the time spent in this zone. In order to obtain a fine and homogeneous grain along the whole length of the tube, a controlled cooling treatment is effected. It consists in heating the uranium tubes in the {gamma} place and then in cooling them at a rate of between 20 and 50 deg C/mm down to 400 deg C. The 77 x 95 mm and 54 x 70 mm annular elements are at the moment being produced for research purposes. Their preparation is similar to that of 18 x 40 mm and 23 x 43 mm elements. The 77 x 95 mm tubes are at the moment made from U-Cr alloy (0.1 per cent); because of their size, their preparation is carried out in 600 mm diameter furnaces. (authors) [French] Le four d'elaboration est un four sous vide chaufffe par induction, dont la capacite actuelle est de 250 kg. Anterieurement le creuset seul etait chauffe par l'inducteur, les moules etaient hors de l'inducteur. Les tubes obtenus presentaient des cavites, la structure de l'alliage etait fine, c'etait la coulee en moules froids. Actuellement on prechauffe le haut des moules, c'est la coulee dite en moules chauds. Cette facon de faire a l'avantage de supprimer les cavites

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  5. Determination of uranium in plutonium--238 metal and oxide by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, N.C.

    1976-01-01

    A differential pulse polarographic method was developed for the determination of total uranium in 238 Pu metal and oxides. A supporting electrolyte of 0.5 M ascorbic acid in 0.15 N H 2 SO 4 was found satisfactory for the determination of 500 ppM or more of uranium in 10 mg or less of plutonium. A relative standard deviation of 0.27 to 4.3 percent was obtained in the analysis of samples ranging in uranium content from 0.65 to 2.79 percent. The limit of detection was 0.18 μg ml -1 . Peak current was a linear function of uranium concentration up to at least 100 μg ml -1 . Amounts of neptunium equal to the uranium content were tolerated. The possible interference of a number of other cations and anions were investigated

  6. Development of 99Mo isotope production targets employing uranium metal foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Wood, E.L.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program has continued its effort in the past 3 yr to develop use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) to produce the fission product 99 Mo. This work comprises both target and chemical processing development and demonstration. Two major target systems are now being used to produce 99 Mo with highly enriched uranium-one employing research reactor fuel technology (either uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide-aluminum dispersion) and the other using a thin deposit of UO 2 on the inside of a stainless steel (SST) tube. This paper summarizes progress in irradiation testing of targets based on LEU uranium metal foils. Several targets of this type have been irradiated in the Indonesian RSG-GAS reactor operating at 22.5 MW

  7. Aluminum extrusion with a deformable die

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assaad, W.

    2010-01-01

    Aluminum extrusion process is one of metal forming processes. In aluminum extrusion, a work-piece (billet) is pressed through a die with an opening that closely resembles a desired shape of a profile. By this process, long profiles with an enormous variety of cross-sections can be produced to

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  10. Migration of heavy metals in soils in a uranium mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ruixia; Gao Bai; Hu Baoqun; Feng Jiguang

    2009-01-01

    Contents of several heavy metals (Zn,Ni,Cu,Cd,Pb) in soil samples collected from different depths of the soil sections in a uranium mining area were analyzed, and vertical migration dis-ciplines of heavy metals were obtained. The results show that the concents of heavy metals in vertical direction decrease as the soil increases in thickness and there is a trend of facies-cumulation for the heavy metals. The accumulation status of each heavy metal in soils differs, which is dependent on the content and migration velocity of the heavy metal itself, the local natural environment about the soil, etc. (authors)

  11. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, M.

    1957-11-01

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the γ phase. (author) [fr

  12. Determination of uranium and plutonium in metal conversion products from electrolytic reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Heon; Suh, Moo Yul; Joe, Kih Soo; Sohn, Se Chul; Jee, Kwang Young; Kim, Won Ho

    2005-01-01

    Chemical characterization of process materials is required for the optimization of an electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. A study on the determination of fissile materials in the uranium metal products containing corrosion products, fission products and residual process materials has been performed by controlled-potential coulometric titration which is well known in the field of nuclear science and technology. Interference of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg (corrosion products), Nd (fission product) and LiCl molten salt (residual process material) on the determination of uranium and plutonium, and the necessity of plutonium separation prior to the titration are discussed in detail. Under the analytical condition established already, their recovery yields are evaluated along with analytical reliability

  13. Uranium metal oxidation, grinding, and encapsulation in BorobondR: TRU waste management - 59279

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Kevin S.; Addington, Larry A.; Utley, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen generation mitigation for K Basin sludge was examined by encapsulation of uranium metal in BoroBond R , pre-oxidation of uranium metal with Fenton's reagent and grinding of Densalloy SD170, an irradiated uranium metal surrogate. Encapsulation in BoroBond R resulted in pressure increase rates at 60 deg. C ranging from 0.116 torr/h to 0.186 torr/h compared to 0.240 torr/h for a uranium metal in water standard. Samples cast with higher water content led to increased rates. A Fenton's reagent system consisting of a simple reagent mix of FeSO 4 .7H 2 O, H 2 O 2 and HCl effectively oxidized 1/4'' cubes of uranium metal in under four days at room temperature. Increased peroxide addition rate, increased FeSO 4 .7H 2 O concentration and low pH all increase the corrosion rate. Densalloy SD170 with an average particle size of 581 μm with 7.63 % of particles less than 90 μm was milled so that over 90 % of the Densalloy mass measured less than 90 μm in 6 hours of milling. Acceptable wear rates were seen on wear components that were from standard materials (Nitronic SS and 440SS). (authors)

  14. Sorption of uranium by clinoptilolite modified by a some metals hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.I.; Medvedeva, Z.V.; Zhabykbaev, G.T.

    2005-01-01

    In the present report the sorption character of uranium (IV) in the static conditions on the thin layer sorbents with application of the clinoptilolite of the Chankan deposit of the Republic of Kazakhstan is shown. A wide circle of metal hydroxides - in both the individual form and in the their mixture - is used. It is shown that the most sorptive capacity against the uranium (IV) has the modified clinoptilolite of MnO 2

  15. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  16. UN2−x layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Zhong; Hu, Yin; Chen, Lin; Luo, Lizhu; Liu, Kezhao; Lai, Xinchun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN 2−x . TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed

  17. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  18. Impurities determination of uranium metal flame spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukihati.

    1978-01-01

    The atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry has been applied to the determination of chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel in the metal of uranium. The first step to be done is to dissolve the uranium sample in nitric acid and then the uranium is extracted by a tributylphosphate-carbon tetrachloride solution. The aqueous phase which contains the chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel is aspirated into an airacetylene flame. The results of this method are compared with the results of emission spectrographic method. It is found that this technique is competative to other methods in the sense that it is quite fast and accurate. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travelli, Armando

    1988-01-01

    A flat or curved plate structure, to be used as fuel in a nuclear reactor, comprises elongated fissionable wires or strips embedded in a metallic continuous non-fissionable matrix plate. The wires or strips are made predominantly of a malleable uranium alloy, such as uranium silicide, uranium gallide or uranium germanide. The matrix plate is made predominantly of aluminum or an aluminum alloy. The wires or strips are located in a single row at the midsurface of the plate, parallel with one another and with the length dimension of the plate. The wires or strips are separated from each other, and from the surface of the plate, by sufficient thicknesses of matrix material, to provide structural integrity and effective fission product retention, under neutron irradiation. This construction makes it safely feasible to provide a high uranium density, so that the uranium enrichment with uranium 235 may be reduced below about 20%, to deter the reprocessing of the uranium for use in nuclear weapons.

  20. Study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere with XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1998-01-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 25 degree C and 200 degree C and effects of temperature and carbon monoxide to the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapor. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing exposure to H 2 in the initial stages. The U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 has been found to be 378.6 eV. Investigation indicates carbon monoxide inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmosphere

  1. Enhanced performance of nano-sized SiC reinforced Al metal matrix nanocomposites synthesized through microwave sintering and hot extrusion techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Penchal Reddy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, nano-sized SiC (0, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 vol% reinforced aluminum (Al metal matrix composites were fabricated by microwave sintering and hot extrusion techniques. The structural (XRD, SEM, mechanical (nanoindentation, compression, tensile and thermal properties (co-efficient of thermal expansion-CTE of the developed Al-SiC nanocomposites were studied. The SEM/EDS mapping images show a homogeneous distribution of SiC nanoparticles into the Al matrix. A significant increase in the strength (compressive and tensile of the Al-SiC nanocomposites with the addition of SiC content is observed. However, it is noticed that the ductility of Al-SiC nanocomposites decreases with increasing volume fraction of SiC. The thermal analysis indicates that CTE of Al-SiC nanocomposites decreases with the progressive addition of hard SiC nanoparticles. Overall, hot extruded Al 1.5 vol% SiC nanocomposites exhibited the best mechanical and thermal performance as compared to the other developed Al-SiC nanocomposites. Keywords: Al-SiC nanocomposites, Microwave sintering, Hot extrusion, Mechanical properties, Thermal expansion

  2. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY FOR DETERMINATION OF SOME HEAVY METALS IN URANIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saryati Saryati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The direct determination of some metals impurity in uranium by using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV method at a hanging mercury drop electrode and in a carbonate buffer media was developed. It was found that the carbonate buffer show the strongest affinity for uranium and gives the best separation between the DPASV peaks of heavy metals impurities. The carbonate concentration markedly affects the oxidation and reduction the major and the minor constituents of the uranium samples. In 0.1 M carbonate buffer solution pH 10, copper, bismuth, thalium, lead, cadmium, zinc, could be determined without the removal of the uranium matrix. Recovery and relative standard deviation (RSD of this method was in the range of 174% - 85.2% for recovery and 36.8% - 1.2% for RSD. The larger error of analytical result was obtained for Zn at low concentration. In general, the analytic results error and RSD decreased with increasing metals concentration.   Keywords: heavy metal determination, differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry, uranium

  3. Cell-metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, S.; Carriere, M.; Thiebault, C.; Berger, P.; Khodja, H.; Gouget, B.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se IV and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se VI , Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS

  4. Cell-metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Carriere, M. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thiebault, C. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berger, P. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Khodja, H. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gouget, B. [Laboratoire Pierre Suee, CEA-CNRS UMR 9956, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]. E-mail: barbara.gouget@cea.fr

    2007-07-15

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se{sup IV} and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se{sup VI}, Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS.

  5. A study on the reduction of uranium oxide to uranium metal in LiCl molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Hur, J. M.; Lee, W. K.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    Research for the analysis on a metallization process of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li molten salt was carried out. Effect of a concentration of Li 2 O on the metallization process was also studied. The new concept, electrochemical reduction of uranium oxide in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt was proposed. The concept is based on the integrated process of metallization of UO 2 with simultaneous electrochemical reduction of Li 2 O which is recycled in a closed system. In a LiCl-Li molten salt system, U 3 O 8 whose conversion ratio to U turns out to be 97.1%, showed a better metallization characteristic than UO 2 . It is verified that electrochemically reduced Li is well deposited on the UO 2 powder cathode through a porous magnesia filter in LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. In that process Li 2 O was from by the reduction process of UO 2 to U. This electrochemical reduction process showed good results to covert UO 2 to U

  6. Thermochemistry of uranium(VI), arsenic, and alkali metal triple oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyakin, N.V.; Chernorukov, G.N.

    1994-01-01

    The standard enthalpies of reactions of stoichiometric mixtures of potassium dyhydrogen orthoarsenate, uranium(VI) oxide, alkali metal nitrates, and of mixtures of triple oxides with the general formula M I AsUO 6 (M I =Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) and potassium nitrate with aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid were determined an an adiabatic calorimeter at 298.15 K. The standard enthalpies of formation of uranium(VI), arsenic, and alkali metal triple oxides at 298.15 K were calculated form the data obtained. 8 refs., 1 tab

  7. Study on the influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Duan Rongliang; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Zuo Changming; Zhao Chunpei; Chen Hong

    1997-01-01

    The influence of carbon monoxide to the surface oxide layer of uranium metal has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and gas chromatography (GC). Carbon monoxide adsorption on the oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy. The content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased and the atomic ratio (O/U) is decreased by 7.2%. The amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere after the surface reaction is increased by 11.0%. The investigation indicates that the surface layer can prevent the further oxidation uranium metal in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide

  8. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoling; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou; Huang Ruiliang

    1996-12-01

    The surface reaction of uranium metal with carbon monoxide at 200 degree C has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The carbon monoxide adsorption on the surface oxide layer resulted in U4f peak shifting to the lower binding energy and the content of oxygen in the oxide is decreased. O/U radio decreases with increasing the exposure of carbon monoxide to the surface layer. The investigation indicated the surface layer of uranium metal was further reduced in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide at high temperature. (3 refs., 5 figs.)

  9. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopic study of the adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been investigated at 25 0 C. Clean surfaces were prepared in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopies (AES). Adsorption of I 2 was studied for exposures up to 100 langmuirs (1 langmuir = 10 -6 torr s) on uranium metal and to 75 langmuirs on uranium dioxide. Above about 2-langmuir I 2 exposure on uranium, spectroscopic evidence is obtained to indicate the beginning of UI 3 formation. Saturation coverage for I 2 adsorption on uranium dioxide occurs at approximately 10-15 langmuirs. Analysis of the XPS and AES results as well as studies of spectra as a function of temperature lead to the conclusions that a dissociative chemisorption/reaction process occurs on uranium metal while nondissociative adsorption occurs on uranium dioxide. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extra-atomic relaxation processes. 42 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  10. Difficulties in preparing a standard sample of uranium metal having traces of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Jangida, B.L.; Sundaresan, M.

    1991-01-01

    Normally in the analysis of uranium for nitrogen, the nitrides are hydrolysed to give NH 3 and that for standardisation purposes to approximate the closest conditions of analysis of ammonia, NH 4 Cl is added to the sample and the recovery is tested. An appropriate method will be to have a standard sample of uranium with known amounts of nitrogen to be used as reference sample. The present work describes the efforts made in the preparation of such a reference sample and a general assessment of such methods available. In present work, known microamounts of nitrogen in an enclosed volume were allowed to react at a temperature of 773 K with a fixed amount of uranium metal of nitrogen content determined chemically. As the reaction of nitrogen with uranium is essentially a surface reaction, a sample had to be homogenised by allowing the nitrided sample to melt at about 1500 K and allow the nitrogen to diffuse through so that the concentration gradient along the profile will disappear. Attempts were made to prepare such samples in the range to 40 to 100 ppm of nitrogen. The density differences of uranium nitride and uranium metal made this diffusion and homogenisation process difficult. The prepared samples were analysed by the micro-kjeldahl's method and the recoveries tested. The equipment used for the preparation of the nitrided samples, for homogenisation and analysis of the results obtained are detailed in the paper together with the assessment of the general methods. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Machine for extrusion under vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, A.

    1958-01-01

    In a study of the behaviour of easily oxidised metals during the extrusion process, it is first necessary to find an effective mean of fighting corrosion, since this, even when barely detectable, has an important influence on the validity of the results recorded. The neatest and also the most efficient of all the methods tried consists in creating a vacuum around the test piece. Working on this principle, and at the same time respecting the conventional rules for extrusion tests (loading the sample after stabilisation at the testing temperature, differential measurements of lengthening, etc.) we found it necessary to construct an original machine. (author) [fr

  12. Analysis of Hazards Associated with a Process Involving Uranium Metal and Uranium Hydride Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullock, J.S.

    2000-05-01

    An analysis of the reaction chemistry and operational factors associated with processing uranium and uranium hydride powders is presented, focusing on a specific operation in the Development Division which was subjected to the Job Hazard Analysis (JHA) process. Primary emphasis is on the thermodynamic factors leading to pyrophoricity in common atmospheres. The discussion covers feed powders, cold-pressed and hot-pressed materials, and stray material resulting from the operations. The sensitivity of the various forms of material to pyrophoricity in common atmospheres is discussed. Operational recommendations for performing the work described are given.

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Metallic and Ceramic Components by the Material Extrusion of Highly-Filled Polymers: A Review and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM, molten or viscous materials are pushed through an orifice and are selectively deposited as strands to form stacked layers and subsequently a three-dimensional object. The commonly used materials for MEAM are thermoplastic polymers and particulate composites; however, recently innovative formulations of highly-filled polymers (HP) with metals or ceramics have also been made available. MEAM with HP is an indirect process, which uses sacrificial polymeric binders to shape metallic and ceramic components. After removing the binder, the powder particles are fused together in a conventional sintering step. In this review the different types of MEAM techniques and relevant industrial approaches for the fabrication of metallic and ceramic components are described. The composition of certain HP binder systems and powders are presented; the methods of compounding and filament making HP are explained; the stages of shaping, debinding, and sintering are discussed; and finally a comparison of the parts produced via MEAM-HP with those produced via other manufacturing techniques is presented. PMID:29783705

  14. Additive Manufacturing of Metallic and Ceramic Components by the Material Extrusion of Highly-Filled Polymers: A Review and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Joamin; Cano, Santiago; Schuschnigg, Stephan; Kukla, Christian; Sapkota, Janak; Holzer, Clemens

    2018-05-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM, molten or viscous materials are pushed through an orifice and are selectively deposited as strands to form stacked layers and subsequently a three-dimensional object. The commonly used materials for MEAM are thermoplastic polymers and particulate composites; however, recently innovative formulations of highly-filled polymers (HP) with metals or ceramics have also been made available. MEAM with HP is an indirect process, which uses sacrificial polymeric binders to shape metallic and ceramic components. After removing the binder, the powder particles are fused together in a conventional sintering step. In this review the different types of MEAM techniques and relevant industrial approaches for the fabrication of metallic and ceramic components are described. The composition of certain HP binder systems and powders are presented; the methods of compounding and filament making HP are explained; the stages of shaping, debinding, and sintering are discussed; and finally a comparison of the parts produced via MEAM-HP with those produced via other manufacturing techniques is presented.

  15. Recovery of uranium and accompanying metals from various types of industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chajduk, E.; Danko, B.; Gajda, D.; Zakrzewska, G.; Harasimowicz, M.; Bieluszka, P.

    2014-01-01

    On January 28"t"h 2014 the Program of Polish Nuclear Energy was signed by Polish Government. According to this program Poland has to secure a constant supply of uranium for Polish NPPs in the future. Uranium in Poland occurs in Vistula Spit area in sandstone rocks and Podlasie Depression area in black dictyonema shales, which are low grade ores. Scarce uranium resources stimulate interest in its recovery from secondary resources as potential raw materials. Industrial wastes and by-products were considered as a source of uranium in this studies. Apart from uranium other valuable metals (e.g. vanadium, molybdenum or lanthanides) were recovered to improve the economy of the process. Three types of industrial wastes were examined: flotation tailings from the copper industry, phosphoric acid from the fertilizer industry and fracturing fluid from shale gas exploitation. Metals from flotation tailings were separated in two steps: 1) acidic leaching of the flotation waste using sulfuric acid solution and 2) separation of metals by ion-exchange chromatography. All the liquid samples were analyzed by ICP-MS method to determine the separation efficiency of the process. Uranium was recovered from phosphoric acid by high-pressure membrane filtration or by extraction/stripping integrated processes applying membrane modules Liquid-Cel® Extra-Flow (Celgard). Aqueous solutions after hydraulic fracturing are very diverse in terms of chemical composition, depending on borehole and fracturing technology applied. The content of various substances in backflow fluid depends on mechanical behavior and chemical composition of shale. Organic matter content in this type of waste did not exceed 1% usually, but the salinity is high. Initially, organic pollutants were removed and next the fluid was purified by combined various ion-exchangers. Individual metals were selectively eluted from ion-exchanger by combination of different eluents. The content of metals in samples was analyzed by ICP

  16. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  17. Electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the electrodeposition in molten salts of metals used in nuclear industry: hafnium and uranium. The experiment is carried out in a molten alkaline halogenide medium in a temperature range between 670 and 750 degrees Celsius. The first part of this work concerns more particularly the electrochemical behaviour of the hafnium and uranium ions in the electrolytic solution. The reduction mechanisms of these ions have been studied by the use of three methods: cyclic voltametry, chrono-potentiometry and square wave voltametry. Results have shown that the process of metal deposition is difficult to explain because secondary reactions (as for instance: adsorption phenomena or cathodic deposit dissolution) occur. The uranium germination has then been studied by modelling of chrono-amperograms. The experiments have shown that the deposition is the result of the initial uranium crystal growth and depends on the electrolyte diffusion. The second part of this work deals with the implementation of hafnium and uranium deposition taking into account the preceding mechanistic studies. Depositions have all been observed by physical methods as for instance scanning electron microscopy. Particular experimental solutions (soluble anode, addition of fluoride ions to the electrolyte) have been used. The obtained deposition of hafnium is smooth and adheres very well to the substrate. The uranium depositions have been implemented with the use of a soluble anode. Uranium is deposited in a dendritic shape to the cathode. It has also been shown that the electro-kinetic parameters (temperature, uranium ions concentration, current density) have not an important influence on the dendritic morphology of the deposition. This morphology could be the consequence of particular convection movements to the surface of the cathode. (O.M.)

  18. Evaluation of residual uranium contamination in the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassford, Eric; Spitz, Henry; Lobaugh, Megan; Spitler, Grant; Succop, Paul; Rice, Carol

    2013-02-01

    A single, large, bulk sample of uranium-contaminated material from the dirt floor of an abandoned metal rolling mill was separated into different types and sizes of aliquots to simulate samples that would be collected during site remediation. The facility rolled approximately 11,000 tons of hot-forged ingots of uranium metal approximately 60 y ago, and it has not been used since that time. Thirty small mass (≈ 0.7 g) and 15 large mass (≈ 70 g) samples were prepared from the heterogeneously contaminated bulk material to determine how measurements of the uranium contamination vary with sample size. Aliquots of bulk material were also resuspended in an exposure chamber to produce six samples of respirable particles that were obtained using a cascade impactor. Samples of removable surface contamination were collected by wiping 100 cm of the interior surfaces of the exposure chamber with 47-mm-diameter fiber filters. Uranium contamination in each of the samples was measured directly using high-resolution gamma ray spectrometry. As expected, results for isotopic uranium (i.e., U and U) measured with the large-mass and small-mass samples are significantly different (p 0.05) from results for the large- or small-mass samples. Large-mass samples are more reliable for characterizing heterogeneously distributed radiological contamination than small-mass samples since they exhibit the least variation compared to the mean. Thus, samples should be sufficiently large in mass to insure that the results are truly representative of the heterogeneously distributed uranium contamination present at the facility. Monitoring exposure of workers and the public as a result of uranium contamination resuspended during site remediation should be evaluated using samples of sufficient size and type to accommodate the heterogeneous distribution of uranium in the bulk material.

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  20. Diversity, metal resistance and uranium sequestration abilities of bacteria from uranium ore deposit in deep earth stratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Ekramul; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-05-01

    Metal resistance and uranium (U) sequestration abilities of bacteria residing in subsurface U ore was investigated using 122 pure culture strains isolated through enrichment. The cumulative frequencies of isolates resistant to each metal tested were as follows: As(V), 74%; Zn, 58%; Ni, 53%; Cd, 47%; Cr(VI), 41%; Co, 40%; Cu, 20%; and Hg, 4%. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed that isolated bacteria belonged to 14 genera with abundance of Arthrobacter, Microbacterium, Acinetobacter and Stenotrophomonas. Cobalt did not interfere with the growth of most of the bacterial isolates belonging to different groups while U allowed growth of four different genera of which Stenotrophomonas and Microbacterium showed high U tolerance. Interestingly, tolerance to Ni, Zn, Cu, and Hg was observed only in Microbacterium, Arthrobacter, Paenibacillus¸ and Acinetobacter, respectively. However, Microbacterium was found to be dominant when isolated from other five different metal enrichments including U. Uranium removal study showed that 84% of the test bacteria could remove more than 50mgUg(-1) dry weight from 80 or 160mgL(-1) U within 48h. In general, Microbacterium, Arthrobacter and Acinetobacter could remove a higher amount of U. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of U exposed cells revealed that accumulated U sequestered mostly around the cell periphery. The study highlights that indigenous U ore deposit bacteria have the potential to interact with U, and thus could be applied for bioremediation of U contaminated sites or wastes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel ceramic coatings for containment of uranium and reactive molten metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Satpute, R.U.; Ramanathan, S.; Thiyagarajan, T.K.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.; Kutty, T.R.G.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma sprayed aluminium oxide coatings, which are currently used for casting uranium metal are, however, not suitable for long duration handling of molten uranium and is also unstable under reducing conditions. Yttrium oxide and rare earth phosphates are suggested as promising materials for prevention of high temperature corrosion by molten metals. The present paper reports research efforts directed towards development of plasma sprayed coatings of yttria and lanthanum phosphate. Thermal spray grade powders of yttrium oxide and lanthanum phosphate, synthesized using locally available raw materials have been used as feedstock powders for plasma spray deposition. The coatings have been deposited using the indigenously developed 40 kW atmospheric plasma spray system and have been characterized. Results of preliminary experiments on compatibility of yttria and lanthanum phosphate with molten uranium are quite encouraging. (author)

  2. The crystallographic structure of the air-grown oxide on depleted uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher P.; Petherbridge, James R.; Davis, Sean A.; Jones, Jonathon A.; Scott, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of depleted uranium coupons under ambient conditions and 150 °C. • Oxide characterised using SEM, TEM and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, • Layer comprises of UO 2 crystallites 12 nm in diameter. • Preferred [110] growth direction normal to the surface of the metal. • Oxide growth direction is independent of the underlying crystal orientation. - Abstract: Oxide formation on depleted uranium metal was investigated using a combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterisation. Diffraction analysis of the oxide revealed an FCC crystalline formation of UO 2 crystallites whilst TEM data indicated an average grain size of 12 nm with a standard deviation of 3.8 nm. EBSD analysis revealed a preferential texture of [110] normal to the surface of the metal. This data implied that lattice matching between the oxide and the underlying metal did not occur, therefore, the observed preferential growth direction is independent of the underlying crystal orientation.

  3. Thermochemistry of the complex oxides of uranium, vanadium, and alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karyakin, N.V.; Chernorukov, N.G.; Suleimanov, E.V.; Kharyushina, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    The standard enthalpies of the formation at T 298.15 K of complex oxides of uranium(VI), vanadium(V) and alkali metals with the general formula M 1 VUO 6 where M 1 = Na, K, Rb, and Cs, were calculated from the results of calorimetric experiments and from published data. 8 refs., 1 tab

  4. Alkaline-earth metal bicarbonates as lixiviants for uranium (VI) under CO2 sparging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, F.; White, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years it has become apparent that uranium is significantly soluble in solutions of alkaline-earth metal bicarbonates -particularly those of magnesium and calcium. A system has been proposed by previous authors in which milled uranium ore is leached in a medium to which an oxidizing agent, the metal hydroxide and CO 2 are added. The alkaline-earth metal hydroxides are much more readily soluble in this medium than the corresponding carbonates. Magnesium and calcium bicarbonates are quite soluble in aqueous media at neutral or nearly neutral pH. The pH determines the relative quantities of bicarbonate and carbonate ions in the system. Even if the pH is quite low, small amounts of carbonate ion are present that can complex with the uranyl ion to produce anionic uranyl complexes. Both UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 2- and UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- complexes are known and both have a very high stability constant. Despite the appearance of several patents on the use of alkaline-earth metal ions in carbonate media as uranium lixiviants, little theoretical or experimental work on the system has been published. In view of the potential of these systems for cheap, large-scale dissolution of uranium the present contribution will discuss the theory behind this method and provide some experimental data to verify the theoretical treatment. (author)

  5. Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Cylinders Surrounded by Various Reflector Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard Jones; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Monteirth

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1958 to determine critical masses of cylinders of Oralloy (Oy) reflected by a number of materials. The experiments were all performed on the Comet Universal Critical Assembly Machine, and consisted of discs of highly enriched uranium (93.3 wt.% 235U) reflected by half-inch and one-inch-thick cylindrical shells of various reflector materials. The experiments were performed by members of Group N-2, particularly K. W. Gallup, G. E. Hansen, H. C. Paxton, and R. H. White. This experiment was intended to ascertain critical masses for criticality safety purposes, as well as to compare neutron transport cross sections to those obtained from danger coefficient measurements with the Topsy Oralloy-Tuballoy reflected and Godiva unreflected critical assemblies. The reflector materials examined in this series of experiments are as follows: magnesium, titanium, aluminum, graphite, mild steel, nickel, copper, cobalt, molybdenum, natural uranium, tungsten, beryllium, aluminum oxide, molybdenum carbide, and polythene (polyethylene). Also included are two special configurations of composite beryllium and iron reflectors. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with six different parameters was evaluated; namely, extrapolation to the uranium critical mass, uranium density, 235U enrichment, reflector density, reflector thickness, and reflector impurities. In addition to the idealizations made by the experimenters (removal of the platen and diaphragm), two simplifications were also made to the benchmark models that resulted in a small bias and additional uncertainty. First of all, since impurities in core and reflector materials are only estimated, they are not included in the benchmark models. Secondly, the room, support structure, and other possible surrounding equipment were not included in the model. Bias values that result from these two simplifications were determined and associated

  6. Oxidation experiment of metal uranium waste for the treatment of depleted uranium waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K. H.; Kwac, K. I.; Kim, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted on the oxidation behavior of U-Ti chips(Depleted Uranium, DU chips) using an XRD and a thermogravimetric analyzer in the temperature range from 250 to 500 .deg. C in air. At the temperature lower than 400 .deg. C, DU chips were converted to UO 2 , U 3 O 7 and U 3 O 8 whereas at the temperature higher than 400 .deg. C, DU chips were completely converted to U 3 O 8 , the most stable form of uranium oxide. The activation energy for the oxidation of U-Ti chips is found, 44.9 kJ/mol and the oxidation rate in terms of weight gain (%) can be expressed as ; dW/dt=8.4 x 10 2 e(-44.9 kJ/mol /RT) wt %/min (250≤T(deg. C)≤500) where W=weight gain (%), t=time and T=temperature

  7. A new methodology using mathematical treatment in uranium recovery of slags from U-metal production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreto, Helio Fernando Rodrigues; Araujo, Berta Floh de

    1999-01-01

    U 3 Si 2 fuel was developed by the Fuel Cycle Department of IPEN/CNEN - SP in order to provide high density fuel elements for the IEA-R1m swimming pool reactor. Uranium containing magnesium fluoride slags are produced during the reduction of U F 4 to metallic uranium, the first step of U 3 Si 2 production. Since enriched uranium is used and taking in account process economics and environmental impacts, the recovery of uranium from the slags is highly recommended. This work deals with the uranium recovery from magnesium fluoride slag via nitric acid leaching process using a new methodology for the study. A statistical procedure for process optimization was applied using a fractional factorial design at two levels and four variables represented as 2 4-1 . Variance analysis followed by multiple regression was used, setting up a first order polygonal model, as follow: y 92,409 +3,825 x 1 - 0,875 x 3 + 1,65 x 4 - 0,95 x 3 x 4 Standard error 1,04572. This equation represents the variables and the most suitable interactions in the uranium recovery process. By using this equation, one can obtain in advance and without making experiments the values from the process variables for a giving process yield. (author)

  8. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  9. The study of molten salt electrorefining characteristics of metallic uranium and cerium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Young Ho; Yoo, Jae Hyung; Woo, Mun Sik; Hwang, Sung Chan

    2000-01-01

    Uranium was electrodeposited on solid cathode in LiCl-KCl eutectic with some CdCl 2 as an oxidizing agent at 550 deg C. In every electro-transport, uranium metal deposit was obtained in the form of dendrite grown on the cathode surface The shape of dendrite on the cathode surface was changed on applied voltage. At the current density range of 100 ∼150 mA/cm 2 , the highest efficiency was observed in this experiment. The deposition rate and current efficiency was the highest at about 75 rpm

  10. Research on the surface chemical behavior of uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere by XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiaoguo; Wang Xiaolin; Yu Yong; Zhao Zhengping

    2001-01-01

    The surface chemical behavior clean uranium metal in hydrogen atmosphere at 100 and 200 degree C is studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. It leads to hydriding reaction when the hydrogen exposure is 12.0 Pa·s, and the U4f 7/2 binding energy of UH 3 is found to be 378.7 eV. The higher temperature (200 degree C) is beneficial to UH 3 formation at the same hydrogen exposures. XPS elemental depth profiles indicate that the distribution of uranium surface layer is UO 2 , UH 3 and U after exposure to 174.2 Pa·s hydrogen

  11. Uranium and base metal dispersion studies in the Maquire Lake area, Saskatchewan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopuck, V.J.; Lehto, D.A.W.; Alley, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The objective of this study was to study uranium and base metal dispersion in various sample media occurring in the Maguire Lake area of Saskatchewan: bedrock, overburden, lake water, and lake sediments. Factors controlling partitioning of metals among various sample media were investigated, and lake sediment data were interpreted in terms of the factors to determine the significance of lake sediment data in indicating local mineralization. The association between organic matter contents and metal contents was found to vary between lake-center and nearshore sediments. Nickel, cobalt and zinc in lake sediments are strongly controlled by hydroxide precipitation and are less dependent on bedrock type. The concentration of Fe in center-lake sediments appears to reflect only the physicochemical parameters in the lake. Uranium and copper are strongly controlled by and preferentially concentrated in the organic matter; however, in center-lake sediments with >12 percent organic matter, U and Cu strongly reflect rock type

  12. Sequential separation of transuranic elements and fission products from uranium metal ingots in electrolytic reduction process of spent PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Heon Lee; Kih Soo Joe; Won Ho Kim; Euo Chang Jung; Kwang Yong Jee

    2009-01-01

    A sequential separation procedure has been developed for the determination of transuranic elements and fission products in uranium metal ingot samples from an electrolytic reduction process for a metallization of uranium dioxide to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt at 650 deg C. Pu, Np and U were separated using anion-exchange and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatography. Cs, Sr, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Zr and Mo were separated in several groups from Am and Cm using TBP and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) extraction chromatography. Effect of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg, which were corrosion products formed through the process, on the separation of the analytes was investigated in detail. The validity of the separation procedure was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the stable metals and 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am and 244 Cm added to a synthetic uranium metal ingot dissolved solution. (author)

  13. XPS study on the surface reaction of uranium metal in H2 and H2-CO atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaolin; Fu Yibei; Xie Renshou

    1996-04-01

    The surface reactions of uranium metal in H 2 and H 2 -CO atmospheres and the effects of temperature and CO on the hydriding reaction have been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal at 25 degree C leads mainly to the further oxidation of surface layer of metal due to traces of water vapour. At 200 degree C, it may lead to the hydriding reaction of uranium and the hydriding increases with increasing the exposure of H 2 . Investigation indicates CO inhibits both the hydriding reaction and oxidation on the condition of H 2 -CO atmospheres. (13 refs., 10 figs.)

  14. Uranium concentration by Crustacea: a structural, ultrastructural and microanalytical study by secondary ion emission and electron probe X ray microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassard-Bouchaud, Colette

    1982-01-01

    Experimental intoxications were performed on the Crayfish Pontastacus leptodactylus using hydrosoluble uranium nitrate. Investigations demonstrate that Crustacea are able to concentrate both uranium main radioactive isotopes 238 U and 235 U within the cuticle, gill epithelium, midgut gland (=hepatopancreas) and macrophagic hemocytes. The storage occurs within nucleus and lysosomal system where uranium is precipitated in the form of an unsoluble phosphate. The proposed hypothesis for the metal extrusion is the following: residual bodies containing the uranium precipitates are extruded into the extracellular space where they are absorbed by phagocytosis, by the macrophagic hemocytes [fr

  15. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor Cores using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Support Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, WuSeung; Hong, Ser Gi

    2014-01-01

    The depleted uranium plays important roles in the SFR burner cores because it substantially contributes to the inherent safety of the core through the negative Doppler coefficient and large delayed neutron. However, the use of depleted uranium as a diluent nuclide leads to a limited value of TRU support ratio due to the generation of TRUs through the breeding. In this paper, we designed sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) cores having uranium-free fuels 3,4 for maximization of TRU consumption rate. However, the uranium-free fuelled burner cores can be penalized by unacceptably small values of the Doppler coefficient and small delayed neutron fraction. In this work, metallic fuels of TRU-(W or Ni)-Zr are considered to improve the performances of the uranium-free cores. The objective of this work is to consistently compare the neutronic performances of uranium-free sodium cooled fast reactor cores having TRU-Zr metallic fuels added with Ni or W and also to clarify what are the problematic features to be resolved. In this paper, a consistent comparative study of 400MWe sodium cooled burner cores having uranium-based fuels and uranium-free fuels was done to analyze the relative core neutronic features. Also, we proposed a uranium-free metallic fuel based on Nickel. From the results, it is found that tungsten-based uranium-free metallic fuel gives large negative Doppler coefficient due to high resonance of tungsten isotopes but this core has large sodium void worth and small effective delayed neutron fraction while the nickel-based uranium-free metallic fuelled core has less negative Doppler coefficient but smaller sodium void worth and larger effective delayed neutron fraction than the tungsten-based one. On the other hand, the core having TRU-Zr has very high burnup reactivity swing which may be problematic in compensating it using control rods and the least negative Doppler coefficient

  16. Recent metal fuel safety tests in TREAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, A.E.; Bauer, T.H.; Lo, R.K.; Robinson, W.R.; Palm, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In-reactor safety tests have been performed on metal-alloy reactor fuel to study its response to transient-overpower conditions, in particular, the margin to cladding breach and the axial self-extrusion of fuel within intact cladding. Uranium-fissium EBR-II driver fuel elements of several burnups were tested, some to cladding breach and others to incipient breach. Transient fuel motions were monitored, and time and location of breach were measured. The test results and computations of fuel extrusion and cladding failure in metal-alloy fuel are described

  17. XPS characterization of the anodic oxide film formed on uranium metal in sodium hydroxide solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Xiaoguo; Wang Xiaolin; Guo Huanjun; Wang Qingfu; Zhao Zhengping; Zhong Yongqiang

    2002-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to examine the anodic oxide film formed on uranium metal in 0.8 mol/L NaOH solution. The U4f 7/2 fitting spectra suggests that the anodic oxide film is composed of uranium trioxide and a small amount of UO 2+x . Under UHV condition, the U4f peak shifts to the lower binding energy, while a gradual increase in the intensity of U5f peak and the broad of U4f peak are also observed. All of these changes are due to reduction of uranium trioxide in the anodic oxide film. XPS quantitative analysis confirms the occurrence of reduction reaction

  18. Determination of carbon in uranium and its compounds; Determinacion de carbono en uranio metal y sus compuestos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Garcia, M M

    1972-07-01

    This paper collects the analytical methods used our laboratories for the determination of carbon in uranium metal, uranate salts and the oxides, fluorides and carbides of uranium. The carbon is usually burned off in a induction or resistance oven under oxygen flow. The CO{sub 2} is collected in barite solution. Where it is backtitrated with potassium biphthalate. (Author)

  19. Comprehensive uranium thiophosphate chemistry: Framework compounds based on pseudotetrahedrally coordinated central metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhausen, Christine; Panthoefer, Martin; Tremel, Wolfgang; Hatscher, Stephan T.; Urland, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The new ternary compounds UP 2 S 6 , UP 2 S 7 , U(P 2 S 6 ) 2 , and U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 were prepared from uranium metal, phosphorus pentasulfide, and sulfur at 700 C. The crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods. UP 2 S 6 (I) crystallizes in the ZrP 2 S 6 structure type [tetragonal, P4 2 /m, a = 6.8058(7) Aa, c = 9.7597(14) Aa, Z = 2], which consists of central uranium(IV) atoms coordinated by P 2 S 6 4- anions (staggered conformation). The anions are two-dimensional connectors for four uranium cations arranged in one plane. The structure of UP 2 S 7 (II) [orthorhombic, Fddd, a = 8.9966(15) Aa, b = 15.2869(2) Aa, c = 30.3195(5) Aa, Z = 16] is closely related to the monoclinic ZrP 2 S 7 structure type. It consists of U 4+ cations linked by P 2 S 7 4- ligands, the resulting 3D network contains large pores (diameter approx. 3.5 x 16.7 Aa). In the previously reported compound U(P 2 S 6 ) 2 (III) [I4 1 /a, a = 12.8776(9) Aa, c = 9.8367(10) Aa, Z = 2], the metal atoms are coordinated by four bidentate P 2 S 6 2- ligands. This arrangement can be considered as a pseudotetrahedral coordination of the uranium atoms by the linear ligands. Three of the resulting diamondoid frameworks are inseparably interwoven in order to optimize space filling. U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 (IV) [I4 1 /acd, a = 10.7440(9) Aa, c = 19.0969(2) Aa, Z = 2] crystallizes in a defect variant of the PrPS 4 structure type, with 50 % of the U2 sites statistically occupied with uranium atoms. The resulting stoichiometry is U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 with tetravalent uranium atoms. The structure of U 3 (PS 4 ) 4 consists of uranium atoms connected by PS 4 3- groups, each PS 4 group linking four central uranium atoms. Vibrational spectra, which were recorded for I-III, show good agreement between the obtained results and the expected values for the anionic units, while magnetic measurements confirm the presence of tetravalent uranium. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGa

  20. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  3. Carbothermic reduction of uranium oxides into solvent metallic baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guisard Restivo, Thomaz A.; Capocchi, Jose D.T.

    2004-01-01

    The carbothermic reduction of UO 2 and U 3 O 8 is studied employing tin and silicon solvent metallic baths in thermal analysis equipment, under Ar inert and N 2 reactive atmospheres. The metallic solvents are expected to lower the U activity by several orders of magnitude owing to strong interactions among the metals. The reduction products are composed of the solvent metal matrix and intermetallic U compounds. Silicon is more effective in driving the reduction since there is no residual UO 2 after the reaction. The gaseous product detected by mass spectrometer (MS) during the reduction is CO. A kinetic study for the Si case was accomplished by the stepwise isothermal analysis (SAI) method, leading to the identification of the controlling mechanisms as chemical reaction at the surface and nucleation, for UO 2 and U 3 O 8 charges, respectively. One example for another system containing Al 2 O 3 is also shown

  4. Computational simulation studies of the reduction process of UF4 to metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Wesden de Almeida

    2011-01-01

    The production of metallic uranium is essential for production of fuel elements for using in nuclear reactors manufacturing of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. In IPEN, metallic uranium is produced by magnesiothermical reduction of UF 4 . This reaction is performed in a closed graphite crucible inserted in a sealed metal reactor and no contact with the outside environment. The set is gradually heated in an oven pit, until it reaches the ignition temperature of the reaction (between 600-650 degree C). The modeling of the heating profile of the system can be made using simulation programs by finite element method. Through the thermal profiles in the load, we can have a notion of heating period required for the reaction to occur, allowing the identification of the same group in a greater or smaller yield in metallic uranium production. Thermal properties of UF 4 are estimated, obtaining thermal conductivity and heat capacity using the Flash Laser Method, and for the load UF 4 + Mg, either. The results are compared to laboratory tests to simulate the primary production process. (author)

  5. Grain growth of metal uranium; Rast zrna kod metalnog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerovic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    In order to study the grain growth, uranium samples were deformed by molding up to 50% and then by rolling at 600 deg C for recrystallization. Grains obtained by recrystallization having diameter 10 - 15 {mu} were heated at different temperatures and during different time intervals to record the changes of grain size. Characteristic grain growth values, rate constants, time exponent and activation energy, were calculated by using the obtained data. U cilju proucavanja rasta zrna uzorci urana deformisani su valjanjem do 50%, a zatim zareni na 600 deg C da rekristalisu. Rekristalizacijom su dobijena sitna zrna, precnika 10-15 {mu} koja su zatim podvrgavana zarenju pri raznim temperaturama i razlicitm vremenskim intervalima, pri cemu je pracena promena velicine zrna. Na osnovu dobijenih podataka izracunate su karakteristicne velicine rasta zrna: konstante brzine, vremenski eksponent i energija aktivacije (author)

  6. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base; Contribution a l'etude des materiaux combustibles nucleaires a base d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englander, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-11-15

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the {gamma} phase. (author) [French] Dans un reacteur de puissance destine a fournir de l'energie thermique industriellement recuperable, la source de chaleur la plus economique reste constituee par de l'uranium metallique naturel. Or, le materiau combustible nucleaire, employe le plus souvent sous forme de barreaux de 20 a 40 mm de diametre, se trouve soumis a un ensemble de contraintes qui provoque des deformations irreversibles, le plus souvent incompatibles avec l'infrastructure du reacteur. Par consequent, le materiau combustible doit presenter a l'origine un certain nombre de qualites qu'il est necessaire de determiner. Aussi a-t-on d'abord etudie les caracteres technologiques propres a chacune des trois phases allotropiques de l'uranium-metal pur et leurs interactions sur la stabilisation du materiau constitue soit par de l'uranium coule, soit par de l'uranium traite en pile en phase {gamma}. (auteur)

  7. Study and development of refractory coatings for metallic uranium fusion and evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Getulio de

    2004-01-01

    In melting process or evaporation of metallic uranium, the reaction with the crucible and the possible contamination of the molten metal should be avoided. This effect can be reduced using an inert and protective coating on the crucible walls. The selection of the coating should be based on the chemical inertia and the kinetic of the reaction products. By avoiding chemical reactions, the amount of impurities in the molten metal can be reduced, leading to an increased crucible lifetime. This work presents a comparative study among different crucible coatings used in the melting process of metallic uranium, at temperatures above its melting point. Samples of metallic uranium are melted in contact with different materials in a vacuum furnace. The reactions occur at a given temperature during a certain time interval; samples are then cooled down to room temperature. Finally, samples are characterized by optical and electronic microscopy, dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, surface roughness and X-ray diffraction. Samples preparation consists of polishing selected areas, and milling the reaction products originated from the corroded interfaces. The extent of the reactions is determined as a function of the temperature by optical microscopy and roughness analyses. The compositions of the reacted products are determined by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, and the phase changes by X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that alumina presented higher activation energy (39 kcal.mol -1 ) than magnesia (12 kcal.mol -1 ), otherwise, it is corroded faster. On the other hand, the alumina could be protected by a thick coating of titanium nitride, because no rection between titanium nitride and uranium was observed at temperatures near to 1700 K. After cooling to the room temperature, there is stress concentration between the graphite and the TiN layer, generating a compressive stress of 0,5 GPa. When uranium is deposited on the TiN, a tensile stress is generated in this new layer, which

  8. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  11. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  12. Quality assurance in the manufacture of metallic uranium fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Kumar, Arbind; Nanekar, P.P.; Vaidya, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Two Research Reactors viz. CIRUS and DHRUVA are operating at Trombay since 1960 and 1985 respectively. Cirus is a 40 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and light water as coolant. Dhruva is a 100 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and coolant. The maximum neutron flux of these reactors are 6.7 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s (Cirus) and 1.8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /s (Dhruva). Both these reactors are used for basic research, R and D in reactor technology, isotope production and operator training. Fuel material for these reactors is natural uranium metallic rods claded in finned aluminium (99.5%) tubes. This presentation will discuss various issues related to fabrication quality assurance and reactor behavior of metallic uranium fuel used in research reactors

  13. Surface area and chemical reactivity characteristics of uranium metal corrosion products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-02-17

    The results of an initial characterization of hydride-containing corrosion products from uranium metal Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates are presented. Sorption analyses using the BET method with a Kr adsorbate were performed to measure the specific areas of corrosion product samples. The specific surface areas of the corrosion products varied from 0.66 to 1.01 m{sup 2}/g. The reactivity of the products in Ar-9%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were measured at temperatures between 35 C and 150 C using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. Ignition of the products occurred at temperatures of 150 C and above. The oxidation rates below ignition were comparable to rates observed for uranium metal.

  14. Theoretical study of adsorption of water vapor on surface of metallic uranium

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong Bi Tao; Xue Wei Dong; Zhu Zheng He; Jiang Gang; Wang Hong Yan; Gao Tao

    2002-01-01

    According to the experimental data, there is an intermediate substance that formed in the initial stage of oxidation reaction when water vapor is absorbed onto the metallic uranium. The minimum energy of UOH sub 2 witch C sub 2 subupsilon configuration is obtained in the state of sup 5 A sub 1 by B3LYP method of the density function theory (DFT), which is consistent with that by statics of atoms and molecules reaction (AMRS) and group theory. The results from calculations indicate that the adsorption of water vapor on the metallic uranium is an exothermic reaction and that the adsorbed amount decreases with the elevated temperatures. The adsorptive heat at 1 atm is -205.4747 kJ centre dot mol sup - sup 1 , which indicates a typical chemical adsorption

  15. Surface area and chemical reactivity characteristics of uranium metal corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an initial characterization of hydride-containing corrosion products from uranium metal Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates are presented. Sorption analyses using the BET method with a Kr adsorbate were performed to measure the specific areas of corrosion product samples. The specific surface areas of the corrosion products varied from 0.66 to 1.01 m 2 /g. The reactivity of the products in Ar-9%O 2 and Ar-20%O 2 were measured at temperatures between 35 C and 150 C using a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. Ignition of the products occurred at temperatures of 150 C and above. The oxidation rates below ignition were comparable to rates observed for uranium metal

  16. Former uranium mine-induced effects in caged roach: a multiparametric approach for the evaluation of in situ metal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Béatrice; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Betoulle, Stéphane; Amara, Rachid; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle; Chadili, Edith; Delahaut, Laurence; Kerambrun, Elodie; Orjollet, Daniel; Palluel, Olivier; Sanchez, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    To characterize environmental risks linked to former uranium mines in the Limousin region of France, a study was conducted on fish health effects from uranium releases. Two private ponds were compared in this study, one with uranium contamination and one background site, upstream of the mining zone. Roach, Rutilus rutilus, were caged for 28 days in both ponds. Physico-chemical parameters of water and sediments and bioaccumulation of metals in several organs were determined. After 14 and 28 days of caging, immune, oxidative stress, biotransformation, neurotoxicity and physiological parameters were measured. Iron and aluminium were quantified in the water of both sites; however, barium and manganese were only present in the water of the uranium contaminated site. Uranium was present in both sites but at very different concentrations. The sediments from the uranium contaminated site contained high levels of radioactive elements coming from the disintegration chain of uranium. Results of biological parameters indicated stimulation of immune parameters and of oxidative stress and a decrease of AChE in fish caged in the uranium contaminated pond compared to the uranium-free pond. Overall, the results determined roach health status in the context of pollution from poly-metallic mining. The data strengthen our knowledge of the environmental risk assessment associated with radioactive substances in the environment.

  17. Measurement of thermal conductivity of uranium metal using transient plane source technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, G.G.S.; Bapuji, T.; Panneerselvam, G.; Antony, M.P.; Nagarajan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Thermo physical properties of fuel, cladding and structural materials play a significant role in the reactor operation. Thermal conductivity is one of the most important physical properties of the fuel which determines the maximum linear heat rating of the fuel in a reactor. As part of this study, the thermal conductivity of uranium metal was measured using a transient plane source (TPS) by Hot-disc method

  18. Experience in the development of metal uranium-base nuclear fuel for heavy-water gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikhmin, V.P.; Vorob'ev, M.A.; Gusarov, M.S.; Davidenko, A.S.; Zelenskij, V.F.; Ivanov, V.E.; Krasnorutskij, V.S.; Petel'guzov, I.A.; Stukalov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were carried out to solve the problem of making the development of radiation-resistant uranium fuel for power reactors including the heavy-water gas-cooled KS-150 reactor. Factors are considered that limit the lifetime of uranium fuel elements, and the ways of suppressing them are discussed. Possible reasons of the insufficient radiation resistance of uranium rod fuel element and the progress attained are analyzed. Some general problems on the fuel manufacture processes are discussed. The main results are presented on the operation of the developed fuel in research reactor loops and the commercial heavy-water KS-150 reactor. The results confirm an exceptionally high radiation resistance of fuel to burn-ups of 1.5-2%. The successful solution of a large number of problems associated with the development of metal uranium fuel provides for new possibilities of using metal uranium in power reactors

  19. Nitrogen content determinations in different stages of thermal treatment involved in conversion of ammonium diuranate to uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, K.C.; Shelke, G.P.

    2017-01-01

    Determination of nitrogen content in the uranium metal and uranium oxide based reactor fuels is important to meet the requirement of specifications given by fuel designer. Therefore, a systematic study was carried out to determine the variations in nitrogen content during the conversion of ammonium diuranate (ADU) to uranium oxides (UO 3 and UO 2 ), and finally to uranium metal by inert gas fusion-thermal conductivity detection (IGF-TCD) technique. To understand the measured nitrogen content variations, the thermal decomposition study of ADU was carried out using thermogravimetry (TG)/differential thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) in the temperature range of 25-1073 K. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used to confirm the formation of uranium oxide precursors at different temperature. (author)

  20. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, P; Hellstrand, E; Homer, S

    1960-06-15

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above.

  1. The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral for uranium metal and oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, P.; Hellstrand, E.; Homer, S.

    1960-06-01

    The temperature coefficient of the resonance integral in uranium metal and oxide has been measured over a wide temperature range for rods with three different diameters. The results for metal agree with most earlier results from activation measurements but differ as much as a factor of two from results obtained with reactivity methods. For oxide only one measurement has been reported recently. Our value is considerably lower than the result of that measurement. The experiments will continue in order to find the reason for the large discrepancy mentioned above

  2. Electrodeposition of uranium metal by reduction of uranium oxides in molten Lif-KF=NaF-CaF 2-UF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pao, D.S.; Burris, L.; Steunenberg, R.K.; Tomczuk, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Although electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides was shown to be feasible in the early 1960's it is recognized that considerable improvement in the electrolytic reduction technology must be achieved for practical applications. This exploratory work on electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was undertaken to investigate potential improvements in the technology. The approach taken was to deposit solid uranium metal directly on a solid cathode at temperatures below the melting point of uranium (1132 degrees C). The lower temperature electrolytic reduction process has several advantages over the existing chemical reduction processes. It lessens materials problems and special heating and insulating requirements associated with high-temperature operations. It removes most impurities. It does not produce the large quantities of byproduct oxides wastes typical of chemical reduction processes

  3. Uranium, rare metals, and granulite-facies metamorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Cuney

    2014-09-01

    The Tranomaro metasomatized marbles recrystallizing under granulite-facies conditions represent a demonstrative example of fluid transfer from granulite-facies supracrustals to traps represented by regional scale skarns. Such fluids may be at the origin of the incompatible element enrichment detected in leucosomes of migmatites from St Malo in Brittany (France and Black Hills in South Dakota. The northern French Massif Central provides us with an example of a potential association between incompatible element enrichment of granitic melts and granulite-facies metamorphism. U- and F-enriched fine-grained granites are emplaced along a crustal scale shear zone active during the emplacement within the St Sylvestre peraluminous leucogranitic complex. We propose that during granulite-facies metamorphism dominated by carbonic waves in a deep segment of the continental crust, these shear zones control: (i the percolation of F-, LILE-, rare metal-rich fluids liberated primarily by the breakdown of biotite; (ii the enhancement of partial melting by F-rich fluids at intermediate crustal levels with the generation of F-, LILE-, rare metal-rich granitic melts; (iii their transfer through the crust with protracted fractionation facilitated by their low viscosity due to high F-Li contents; and finally (iv their emplacement as rare metal intrusions at shallow crust levels.

  4. Insertion compounds of transition-metal and uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chippindale, A.M.; Dickens, P.G.; Powell, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    Several transition-metal and actinide oxides, in which the metal occurs in a high oxidation state, have open covalent structures and are capable of incorporating alkali and other electropositive metals under mild conditions to form insertion compounds A x MO n . These are solids which have several features in common: Over a range of compositions, A x MO n exists as one or more stable or metastable phases in which the structure of the parent oxide MO n is largely retained and the insertion element A is accommodated interstitially. Insertion is accompanied by a redox process A=A i . + e - M in which M is reduced and the electronic properties of the parent oxide change to those typical of a mixed-valence compound. The insertion process xA + MO n = A x MO n can be reversed, at least to some extent, by chemical or electrochemical reaction, with retention of structure (topotactic reaction). This review concentrates on methods of synthesis, characterisation, crystal structure and thermochemistry of these insertion compounds. It updates and extends previous work. (author)

  5. The oxidative corrosion of carbide inclusions at the surface of uranium metal during exposure to water vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, T.B.; Petherbridge, J.R.; Harker, N.J.; Ball, R.J.; Heard, P.J.; Glascott, J.; Allen, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → High resolution imagery (FIB, SEM and SIMS) of carbide inclusions in uranium metal. → Real time images following the reaction of the carbide inclusions with water vapour. → Shown preferential consumption of carbide over that of the bulk metal. → Quantity of impurities in the metal therefore seriously influence reaction rate. → Metal purity must be considered when storing uranium in air or moist conditions. - Abstract: The reaction between uranium and water vapour has been well investigated, however discrepancies exist between the described kinetic laws, pressure dependence of the reaction rate constant and activation energies. Here this problem is looked at by examining the influence of impurities in the form of carbide inclusions on the reaction. Samples of uranium containing 600 ppm carbon were analysed during and after exposure to water vapour at 19 mbar pressure, in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) system. After water exposure, samples were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) imaging and sectioning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD). The results of the current study indicate that carbide particles on the surface of uranium readily react with water vapour to form voluminous UO 3 .xH 2 O growths at rates significantly faster than that of the metal. The observation may also have implications for previous experimental studies of uranium-water interactions, where the presence of differing levels of undetected carbide may partly account for the discrepancies observed between datasets.

  6. Reoxidation of uranium metal immersed in a Li{sub 2}O-LiCl molten salt after electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun-Young, E-mail: eychoi@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Min Ku [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung-Jai [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Quantum Energy Chemical Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Gajeong-ro 217, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daedoek-daero 989-111, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We present our findings that uranium (U) metal prepared by using the electrolytic reduction process for U oxide (UO{sub 2}) in a Li{sub 2}O–LiCl salt can be reoxidized into UO{sub 2} through the reaction between the U metal and Li{sub 2}O in LiCl. Two salt types were used for immersion of the U metal: one was the salt used for electrolytic reduction, and the other was applied to the unused LiCl salts with various concentrations of Li{sub 2}O and Li metal. Our results revealed that the degree of reoxidation increases with the increasing Li{sub 2}O concentration in LiCl and that the presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal. - Highlights: • Uranium (U) metal can be reoxidized into UO{sub 2} through the reaction between the U metal and Li{sub 2}O in LiCl. • The degree of reoxidation increases with the Li{sub 2}O concentration in LiCl. • The presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal.

  7. Use of metal/uranium mixtures to explore data uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, C.V.; Jordan, W.C.; Petrie, L.M.; Wright, R.Q.

    1995-01-01

    A table of k ∞ values for three homogenized metal/ 235 U systems calculated using both MCNP and the SCALE code system was presented in Ref. 3. The homogenized metal/ 235 U ratios were selected such that the MCNP analyses for each mixture provided k ∞ ≅ 1.0. The metals considered were Al, Zr, and Fe. These simplified systems were created in an effort to ease an investigation of discrepant results obtained using MCNP and SCALE to analyze large, dry systems of metal-clad, highly enriched fuel assemblies. Reference 3 has received considerable attention at ORNL and elsewhere because the reported k ∞ values varied by as much as 38% between the MCNP results and those of SCALE. The ORNL approach was to analyze the systems using a broad range of codes and data and to seek an understanding of the discrepancies by studying differences in the basic data and processing methods. The continuous-energy codes and data applied in the ORNL study were (1) MCNP, using ENDF/B-V, ENDF/B-VI, and LANL data evaluations, (2) VIM, using ENDF/B-V data, and (3) MONK, using a 8,200-point library based on UKNDL evaluations and a preliminary JEF library. The VIM code provides treatment of unresolved resonances; MCNP does not. The MONK analyses provided a result using both an independent code and independent data evaluations. Although accessing continuous-energy data typically requires the use of Monte Carlo codes, 1-D deterministic codes can be used to accurately calculate K ∞ values using a variety of multigroup data libraries and processing methods. The multigroup codes used in the study were MC and the CSAS1X sequence of the SCALE system. Both systems provide problem-dependent resonance processing of cross-section data and available fine-group libraries were used for the analyses. Broad-group libraries were not studied in any depth because there were non-readily available for intermediate-energy systems

  8. Improvements made in the methods of purifying uranium compounds and in the production of uranium metal at the Bouchet plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decrop, J.; Delange, M.; Holder, J.; Huet, H.; Sauteron, J.; Vertes, P.

    1958-01-01

    We intend to chart the development of the techniques used at the Bouchet plant since the First International Conference held in Geneva in 1955. During that Conference, the methods adopted at that time were described by B. GOLDSCHMIDT and P. VERTES. Generally speaking, the development since that time has been governed by the following factors: 1- Conversion to a mass-production scale: The metal output, which amounted to approximately 10 tons in 1952, practically doubled each year, reaching successive figures of 80 tons in 1955, 160 tons in 1956 and 300 tons in 1957. At this very moment the output capacity of the plant is approaching its maximum, set at 500 tons/year, which it will reach at the end of the year. Beyond this output figure, the work will be carried on by the second French uranium production plant, which is now being erected at Narbonne. 2- Gradual abandoning of ore treatment, resulting from the decentralization of the duties performed by the CEA; The Bouchet Plant had, as a matter of fact, the first French treatment facilities, operating on the basis of 10 to 20 tons of ore per day. This ore, first concentrated at the production site proper by means of physical or physico-chemical methods to at least a 2 per cent uranium content, was sufficiently valuable to warrant quite well the cost involved in shipping it. However, the increase in the production schedules led to the treatment of ores of lower and lower grades, and it became more profitable to proceed with the chemical treating of these low-grade ores at the site after more or less thorough grading and, if necessary, preconcentration. As a result, the Bouchet plant scarcely ever receives uranium ores; on the contrary, the mining companies send their chemical concentrates, uranous phosphate and then sodium uranate from the Gueugnon Works in Saone-et-Loire since 1955; magnesium uranate from the Ecarpiere Works in Vendee since the beginning of 1957 and, very soon, products from the works which are now

  9. Transformations of highly enriched uranium into metal or oxide; Etudes des procedes de transformation des composes d'uranium a fort enrichissement isotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nollet, P; Sarrat, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The enriched uranium workshops in Cadarache have a double purpose on the one hand to convert uranium hexafluoride into metal or oxide, and on the other hand to recover the uranium contained in scrap materials produced in the different metallurgical transformations. The principles that have been adopted for the design and safety of these workshops are reported. The nuclear safety is based on the geometrical limitations of the processing vessels. To establish the processes and the technology of these workshops, many studies have been made since 1960, some of which have led to original achievements. The uranium hexafluoride of high isotopic enrichment is converted either by injection of the gas into ammonia or by an original process of direct hydrogen reduction to uranium tetrafluoride. The uranium contained m uranium-zirconium metal scrap can be recovered by combustion with hydrogen chloride followed treatment of the uranium chloride by fluorine in order to obtain the uranium in the hexafluoride state. Recovery of the uranium contained m various scrap materials is obtained by a conventional refining process combustion of metallic scrap, nitric acid dissolution of the oxide, solvent purification by tributyl phosphate, ammonium diuranate precipitation, calcining, reduction and hydro fluorination into uranium tetrafluoride, bomb reduction by calcium and slag treatment. Two separate workshops operate along these lines one takes care of the uranium with an isotopic enrichment of up to 3 p. 100, the other handles the high enrichments. The handling of each step of this process, bearing in mind the necessity for nuclear safety, has raised some special technological problems and has led to the conception of new apparatus, in particular the roasting furnace for metal turnings, the nitric acid dissolution unit, the continuous precipitator and ever safe filter and dryer for ammonium diuranate, the reduction and hydro fluorination furnace and the slag recovery apparatus These are

  10. Magnesio-thermic reduction of UF4 to uranium metal : plant operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayekar, S.V.; Singh, H.; Meghal, A.M.; Koppiker, K.S.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium Metal Plant has switched over from calcio-thermy to magnesio-thermy for production of uranium ingots. In this paper, the plant operating experience for magnesio-thermic reduction is described. Based on trials, the production has been stepped up from 40 kg ingots to 200 kg ingots. The operating parameters optimised include : heating schedule, UF 4 quality, magnesium quantity and quality, and particle size. The effect of quality of refractory lining has been discussed. Conditions for lining are optimised with regard to type of material used and size. Developmental work has also been carried out on use of pelletised charge and on use of graphite sleeves. Some experience in the machining of ingots for removal of surface slag is also discussed. Impurity problems, occasionally encountered, have been investigated and results are discussed. Based on the experience gained, specifications for operation have been laid down, and areas for further improvement are identified. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  12. Measurement of highly enriched uranium metal buttons with the high-level neutron coincidence counter operating in the active mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, J.E.

    1980-10-01

    The portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter is used in the active mode with the addition of AmLi neutron sources to assay the 235 U content of highly enriched metal pieces or buttons. It is concluded that the portable instrument is a practical instrument for assaying uranium metal buttons with masses in the range 1.5 to 4 kg

  13. Electrodeposition of uranium and transuranic metals (Pu) on solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplace, A. F.; Lacquement, J.; Willitt, J. L.; Finch, R. A.; Fletcher, G. A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The results from a study of U and Pu metal electrodeposition from molten eutectic LiCl-KCl on a solid inert cathode are presented. This study has been conducted using ∼ to 50 g of U-Pu together with rare earths (mostly Nd) and 1.5 kg of salt. The introduction of a three-electrode probe with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode has allowed voltammetric measurement during electrolysis and control of the cathode potential versus the reference. Cyclic and square-wave voltammetric measurements proved to be very useful tools for monitoring the electrolysis as well as selecting the cathode versus reference potential to maximize the separation between actinides and rare earths. The voltammetric data also highlighted the occurrence of back reactions between the cathode deposit and oxidizing equivalents formed at the anode that remained in the molten salt electrolyte. Any further electrolysis test needs to be conducted continuously and followed by immediate removal of the cathode to minimize those back reactions. (authors)

  14. Metal-metal bonds involving the f elements. 4. Molecular orbital studies of metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in dinuclear uranium(V) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, R.H.; Novo-Gradac, K.J.; Bursten, B.E.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of a series of dinuclear uranium(V) complexes have been investigated using Xα-SW molecular orbital calculations including quasirelativistic corrections. Complexes of the formula U 2 H 10 and U 2 (OH) 10 were used to model the metal-ligand σ and π interactions, respectively, in the known species U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 . Two basic geometries were investigated: a vertex-sharing bioctahedron with only terminal ligands (D 4h symmetry) and an edge-sharing bioctahedron containing two bridging ligands (D 2h symmetry). The latter geometry, which is that of U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 , was also examined at U-U bonding and nonbonding distances. The calculations indicate that the U-U interactions are significantly perturbed when H is replaced by OH, owing to strong donation from the OH pπ orbitals into selected U 5f orbitals. The result is a lack of any appreciable U-U interaction for U 2 (OH) 10 in either the D 4h or D 2h geometry. In addition, the overall OH π donation to the U 5f levels is enhanced in the D 2h geometry. The electronic structure of a hypothetical U(V) dimer, Cp 2 U 2 O 4 , was also examined in both bridged and unsupported geometries. The unbridged geometry, like that for U 2 (OH) 10 , suffered from a destabilization of the U-U σ orbital due to ligand π donation and revealed no net U-U bonding. However, the geometry exhibiting two bridging oxo ligands maintains the U-U σ-bonding MO as its lowest energy U 5f orbital. 21 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  15. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  16. Exposure to enhanced levels of radioactivity and toxic metals in uranium mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.P.; Madruga, M.J.; Alves, J.G.; Reis, M.C.; Oliveira, J.M.; Leite, M.M.; Pinto, E.M.; Falcao, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The areas of several former uranium mines in Portugal were investigated for concentrations of radionuclides belonging to the uranium and thorium series as well as for stable metals eventually present in the radioactive ore. Concentrations of radionuclides were determined by alpha and gamma spectrometry in mining and milling waste as well as in soils, water and vegetables grown in the area. Stable metals were determined by mass spectrometry in soils and waters from the mining regions. Concentrations of radionuclides, such as uranium isotopes, 226 Ra and 210 Po, were enhanced in mill tailings and in mine waters, as well as in surface waters near the facilities of uranium ore treatment. For instance, the concentrations of 226 Ra in mill tailings reached 25 kBq/kg whereas in mud from ponds used to treat acid mine water 238 U concentrations reach about 42 kBq/kg in radioactive equilibrium with 234 U. The areas receiving surface runoff and drainage from mill tailings display enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. These concentrations in the most contaminated soils may be up to 200 times higher than concentrations in agriculture soils of the region. With increasing distance to the tailings and mining waste heaps, the concentrations of radionuclides decrease rapidly to background values. The same trend is observed with environment radiation doses that may reach values of 20 μSv/h on the tailings and decreasing to values near 0.2 μSv/h on agriculture fields. Radiation doses received by people living near the uranium mill tailings may be higher than the radiation dose from natural background. Results of external radiation dos e measurements are discussed in the light of recommended dose limits for members of the public. Regarding stable metals and other chemical contaminants present in the ore, the majority were measured in soils and underground waters in concentrations below the maximum permissible concentrations generally accepted, although more

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  18. Friction measurement and modelling in forward rod extrusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Xincai; Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi

    2003-01-01

    Forward extrusion is one of the important processes in bulk metal forming. Friction stress can be estimated from the slope of the load±displacement curve at the steady state after the maximum load in a forward extrusion test. In this paper, forward rod extrusion tests are carried out to determine...... as the lubricant. Friction stresses are obtained from measurements of slopes of extrusion pressure±punch travel curves at the steady state stage. Normal pressures are evaluated by using Mohr’s circle, in which shear ¯ow stresses are estimated at the maximum elastic deformation points from the same extrusion...... pressure±punch travel curves. It is found that the relationship between normal pressure and friction stress appears linear, and therefore Coulomb’s friction model ®ts the experimental data very well. Extrusion pressure±punch travel curves before the steady state can be divided into four stages: elastic...

  19. Reoxidation of uranium metal immersed in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt after electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jeon, Min Ku; Lee, Jeong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Sung-Jai; Heo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-03-01

    We present our findings that uranium (U) metal prepared by using the electrolytic reduction process for U oxide (UO2) in a Li2O-LiCl salt can be reoxidized into UO2 through the reaction between the U metal and Li2O in LiCl. Two salt types were used for immersion of the U metal: one was the salt used for electrolytic reduction, and the other was applied to the unused LiCl salts with various concentrations of Li2O and Li metal. Our results revealed that the degree of reoxidation increases with the increasing Li2O concentration in LiCl and that the presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal.

  20. Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Annuli and Cylinders with Polyethylene Reflectors and/or Internal Polyethylene Moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler Sumner; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Montierth

    2007-01-01

    A variety of critical experiments were constructed of enriched uranium metal during the 1960s and 1970s at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility in support of criticality safety operations at the Y-12 Plant. The purposes of these experiments included the evaluation of storage, casting, and handling limits for the Y-12 Plant and providing data for verification of calculation methods and cross-sections for nuclear criticality safety applications. These included solid cylinders of various diameters, annuli of various inner and outer diameters, two and three interacting cylinders of various diameters, and graphite and polyethylene reflected cylinders and annuli. Of the hundreds of delayed critical experiments, experiments of uranium metal annuli with and without polyethylene reflectors and with the central void region either empty or filled with polyethylene were evaluated under ICSBEP Identifier HEU-MET-FAST-076. The outer diameter of the uranium annuli varied from 9 to 15 inches in two-inch increments. In addition, there were uranium metal cylinders with diameters varying from 7 to 15 inches with complete reflection and reflection on one flat surface to simulate floor reflection. Most of the experiments were performed between February 1964 and April 1964. Five partially reflected (reflected on the top only) experiments were assembled in November 1967, but are judged by the evaluators not to be of benchmark quality. Twenty-four of the twenty-five experiments have been determined to have fast spectra. The only exception has a mixed spectrum. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with five different parameters associated with the uranium parts and three associated with the polyethylene parts was evaluated. Included were uranium mass, height, diameter, isotopic content, and impurity content and polyethylene mass, diameter, and impurity content. There were additional uncertainties associated with assembly alignment, support structure, and the value

  1. Chlorination of uranium oxides in melts of alkali metal chlorides and their mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorobej, M.P.; Bevz, A.S.; Skiba, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    Chlorination of UO 2 , U 3 O 8 , and UO 3 in melts of chlorides of alkali metals and of their mixtures has been studied by thermogravimetric, X-ray phase, and spectrophotometric methods. The thermogravimetric method has been proposed for evaluating the state of uranylcation in the melt; the effect of the composition of the oxide being chlorinated and of the salt-solvent on the composition of the chlorination products has been studied. The effect of the composition of the chlorination products on the stoichiometry of the electrolytic uranium dioxide has been shown

  2. A study on oxidation treatment of uranium metal chip under controlling atmosphere for safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Ji, Chul Goo; Bae, Sang Oh; Woo, Yoon Myeoung; Kim, Jong Goo; Ha, Yeong Keong

    2011-01-01

    The U metal chips generated in developing nuclear fuel and a gamma radioisotope shield have been stored under immersion of water in KAERI. When the water of the storing vessels vaporizes or drains due to unexpected leaking, the U metal chips are able to open to air. A new oxidation treatment process was raised for a long time safe storage with concepts of drying under vacuum, evaporating the containing water and organic material with elevating temperature, and oxidizing the uranium metal chips at an appropriate high temperature under conditions of controlling the feeding rate of oxygen gas. In order to optimize the oxidation process the uranium metal chips were completely dried at higher temperature than 300 .deg. C and tested for oxidation at various temperatures, which are 300 .deg. C, 400 .deg. C, and 500 .deg. C. When the oxidation temperature was 400 .deg. C, the oxidized sample for 7 hours showed a temperature rise of 60 .deg. C in the self-ignition test. But the oxidized sample for 14 hours revealed a slight temperature rise of 7 .deg. C representing a stable behavior in the self-ignition test. When the temperature was 500 .deg. C, the shorter oxidation for 7 hours appeared to be enough because the self-ignition test represented no temperature rise. By using several chemical analyses such as carbon content determination, X-ray deflection (XRD), Infrared spectra (IR) and Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) on the oxidation treated samples, the results of self-ignition test of new oxidation treatment process for U metal chip were interpreted and supported

  3. Development of dissolution process for metal foil target containing low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Hutter, J.C.; Johnson, G.K.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    About six times more low enriched uranium (LEU) metal is needed to produce the same quantity of 99 Mo as from a high enriched uranium (HEU) oxide target, under similar conditions of neutron irradiation. In view of this, the post-irradiation processing procedures of the LEU target are likely to be different from the Cintichem process procedures now in use for the HEU target. The authors have begun a systematic study to develop modified procedures for LEU target dissolution and 99 Mo separation. The dissolution studies include determination of the dissolution rate, chemical state of uranium in the solution, and the heat evolved in the dissolution reaction. From these results the authors conclude that a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid is a suitable dissolver solution, albeit at higher concentration of nitric acid than in use for the HEU targets. Also, the dissolver vessel now in use for HEU targets is inadequate for the LEU target, since higher temperature and higher pressure will be encountered in the dissolution of LEU targets. The desire is to keep the modifications to the Cintichem process to a minimum, so that the switch from HEU to LEU can be achieved easily

  4. Standard guide for pyrophoricity/combustibility testing in support of pyrophoricity analyses of metallic uranium spent nuclear fuel

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers testing protocols for testing the pyrophoricity/combustibility characteristics of metallic uranium-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The testing will provide basic data for input into more detailed computer codes or analyses of thermal, chemical, and mechanical SNF responses. These analyses would support the engineered barrier system (EBS) design bases and safety assessment of extended interim storage facilities and final disposal in a geologic repository. The testing also could provide data related to licensing requirements for the design and operation of a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS) or independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI). 1.2 This guide describes testing of metallic uranium and metallic uranium-based SNF in support of transportation (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR71), interim storage (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR72), and geologic repository disposal (in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR60/63). The testing described ...

  5. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, S.D.; Li, S.X.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl - 1 wt% Li2O at 650 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  6. Assessment of heavy metal concentration in water around the proposed Mkuju river uranium project in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, F.P.; Msaki, P.K.; Mohammed, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effective verification for compliance with water quality standards in uranium mining in Tanzania requires data sensitive to monitor heavy metal concentration in water around the Mkuju River Uranium Project before mining commences. The area susceptible for pollution by the project was estimated using AERMOD dispersion model and found to cover about 1300 km"2. Thirty one surface and groundwater samples were collected and analysed for heavy metals and physicochemical properties using ICP-MS and standards techniques, respectively. The physicochemical properties for water samples analysed ranges from 5.7 to 7.8 for pH, 2.8 to 80.2 mg/L for TDS and 15 to 534.5 mS/cm for EC. These values show that the water in the vicinity of the Mkuju River Uranium Project is normal. The ranges of concentration of heavy metals (µgL"-"1) determined in water ranges were: Al(2 to 9049), Cr(0.2 to 19.96), Mn (0.1 to 1452), Fe(2 to 53890), Co(0.02 to 27.63), Ni(0.2 to 9.7), Cu(2 to 17), Zn(2 to 62.94), As(0.4 to 19.17), Cd(0.02 to 0.14), Pb (0.02 to 78.68), Th (0.002 to 1.73), U(0.002 to 29.76). These values are below the tolerance levels of concentrations set by different International organisations. Therefore heavy metal toxicity in the study area is marginal. The parameters that could serve as baseline data because of their enhanced sensitivity to pollution were (i) concentration of chromium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, cadmium and lead in water (ii) pH, TDS and EC for water, (iii) TDS ratio for surface to ground water values and (iv) correlation coefficients between the heavy metals. However, since TDS values are season dependent, this indicator can serve as baseline data when measured during the dry season as was the case in the study. (author)

  7. New ternary transition metal borides containing uranium and rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogl, P.; Delong, L.

    1983-01-01

    The new ternary actinide metal diborides U 2 MoB 6 , U 2 ReB 6 , U 2 OsB 6 , URuB 4 and UOsB 4 were prepared and found to crystallize with either the Y 2 ReB 6 or the ThMoB 4 type of structure. LuRuB 4 and LuOsB 4 crystallize with the YCrB 4 type of structure. In a ternary series of solid solutions YRh 3 Bsub(1-x) (0 0 C), boron was found to stabilize a Cu 3 Au type of structure. The superconductivity of the new uranium compounds and of a series of ternary transition metal borides was investigated; no superconductivity was observed for temperatures as low at 1.3-1.5 K. The cubic perovskite or filled Cu 3 Au structure is discussed as a type which is very unfavorable for the occurrence of superconductivity. (Auth.)

  8. The interaction of H2O with strained uranium metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiferet, E.; Mintz, M. H.; Zalkind, S.; Jacob, I.; Shamir, N.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of water vapor was studied on uranium metal surfaces, with various degrees of strain (relieved by different degrees of heating). The main features of dissociation, adsorption and initial oxidation for the studied surfaces will be presented. Common to all strained surfaces, on the metal surface a full dissociation occurs, while after oxidation only on most of them the water dissociation is full and on one of them, it is only partial. The oxygen dissociation product adsorbs (with sticking coefficient decreasing with strain relief), forming clusters, for all strains, while the hydrogen product clusters only on the strain relieved and recrystallized surface. The most interesting phenomenon, revealed for these surfaces, is the inhibition of hydrogen adsorption by traces of water vapor , changing from 10% for the mostly strained (defected) surface down to 1% for the strain relieved one. The suggested mechanism for this inhibition will be discussed

  9. Mineral transformations during the dissolution of uranium ore minerals by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasauer, S.; Weidler, P.; Fakra, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Shuh, D.

    2011-12-01

    Carnotite minerals [X2(UO2)2(VO4)2]; X = K, Ca, Ba, Mn, Na, Cu or Pb] form the major ore of uranium in the Colorado Plateau. These deposits are highly oxidized and contain U(VI) and V(IV). The biotransformation of U(VI) bound in carnotite by bacteria during dissimilatory metal reduction presents a complex puzzle in mineral chemistry. Both U(VI) and V(V) can be respired by metal reducing bacteria, and the mineral structure can change depending on the associated counterion. We incubated anaerobic cultures of S. putrefaciens CN32 with natural carnotite minerals from southeastern Utah in a nutrient-limited defined medium. Strain CN32 is a gram negative bacterium and a terrestrial isolate from New Mexico. The mineral and metal transformations were compared to a system that contained similar concentrations of soluble U(VI) and V(V). Electron (SEM, TEM) microscopies and x-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) were used in conjunction with XRD to track mineral changes, and bacterial survival was monitored throughout the incubations. Slow rates of metal reduction over 10 months for the treatment with carnotite minerals revealed distinct biotic and abiotic processes, providing insight on mineral transformation and bacteria-metal interactions. The bacteria existed as small flocs or individual cells attached to the mineral phase, but did not adsorb soluble U or V, and accumulated very little of the biominerals. Reduction of mineral V(V) necessarily led to a dismantling of the carnotite structure. Bioreduction of V(V) by CN32 contributed small but profound changes to the mineral system, resulting in new minerals. Abiotic cation exchange within the carnotite group minerals induced the rearrangement of the mineral structures, leading to further mineral transformation. In contrast, bacteria survival was poor for treatments with soluble U(VI) and V(V), although both metals were reduced completely and formed solid UO2 and VO2; we also detected V(III). For these treatments, the bacteria

  10. Metal Pollution of Forest Phytomass from Uranium Industry in Czech Republic and Its Ecological Management Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Juřička

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on the issue of metals migration within the forest environment affected by deep mining of metals and the possibility how to immobilize them using an environment-friendly method. First, the paper presents the information about metal content in the tree leaves in alluvial recipients polluted by metals from uranium deep mining at Dolní Rožínka, the Czech Republic. X-ray fluorescence analysis of dried leaves results showed the increased content of Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, Zn and U; it corresponds to the most seriously polluted areas in the world comparing with the scientific literature. However, statistically, we did not succeed to demonstrate in none of areas of interest the element heterogeneity between the upper, middle and lower streams segments. Element habitat homogeneity can be caused by current stand species composition where Picea abies L. dominates and this fact results in the negative impact on the soil pH since it is a primary factor of metals immobilization in the ecosystem and their transformation into toxic variations. Within the area of interest, there is demonstrated positive effect of reconstruction of forest stands, which are close to the dominating deciduous trees, especially Fagus silvatica L. This management change in the selected interested forest stands can result in Ca supply of up to 39 kg.ha-1 from strictly natural sources, which might be a perspective alternative to liming.

  11. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  12. Recovery of fluorine, uranium, and rare earth metal values from phosphoric acid by-product brine raffinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wamser, C.A.; Bruen, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    A method for recovering substantially all of the fluorine and uranium values and at least 90 percent of the rare earth metal values from brine raffinate obtained as by-product in the production of phosphoric acid by the hydrochloric acid decomposition of tricalcium phosphate minerals is described. A basically reacting compound is added to the brine raffinate to effect a pH 9 or greater, whereby fluorine, uranium and rare earth metal values are simultaneously precipitated. These values may then be separately recovered from the precipitate by known processes

  13. Physical and mathematical modelling of extrusion processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Gronostajski, Z.; Niechajowics, A.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of the work is to study the extrusion process using physical modelling and to compare the findings of the study with finite element predictions. The possibilities and advantages of the simultaneous application of both of these methods for the analysis of metal forming processes...

  14. A database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region uranium province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Che; Bollhöfer, Andreas

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a database of radionuclide activity and metal concentrations for the Alligator Rivers Region (ARR) uranium province in the Australian wet-dry tropics. The database contains 5060 sample records and 57,473 concentration values. The data are for animal, plant, soil, sediment and water samples collected by the Environmental Research Institute of the Supervising Scientist (ERISS) as part of its statutory role to undertake research and monitoring into the impacts of uranium mining on the environment of the ARR. Concentration values are provided in the database for 11 radionuclides ( 227 Ac, 40 K, 210 Pb, 210 Po, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 228 Th, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U, 238 U) and 26 metals (Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Sb, Se, Sr, Th, U, V, Zn). Potential uses of the database are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The origin of weld seam defects related to metal flow in the hot extrusion of aluminium alloys en AW-6060 and en AW-6082

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.J. den; Werkhoven, R.J.; Sillekens, W.H.; Katgerman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal weld seams are an intrinsic feature in hollow extrusions produced with porthole dies. As these joins occur along the entire extruded length, it is desirable that these weld seams have a minimal impact on the structural integrity of the extrudate. In particular, defects associated with

  16. An ICP-AES method for the determination of trace metals in uranium by solvent extraction using KSM-17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Mary; Radhakrishnan, K.; Dhami, P.S.; Kulkarni, V.T.; Joshi, M.V.; Patwardhan, A.B.; Ramanujam, A.; Mathur, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the studies carried out for the determination of trace metallic impurities in uranium solutions. Uranium matrix is separated from the impurity elements by its selective extraction using 2-ethylhexyl hydrogen 2-ethylhexyl phosphonate (KSM-17, equivalent to PC88A). The aqueous phase is analysed for trace impurities by inductively coupled argon plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The studies also include recovery of impurities at various acidities and spectral interferences of uranium over the analyte element channels. Based on the above studies, a method has been standardised for the analysis of nineteen elements in uranium solutions. The relative standard deviation of the method for various elements is in the range of +- 1-5%. (author). 7 refs., 8 tabs., 1 fig

  17. Study of interaction of uranium, plutonium and rare earth fluorides with some metal oxides in fluoric salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, V.F.; Novoselov, G.P.; Ulanov, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Interaction of plutonium, uranium, and rare-earth elements (REE) fluorides with aluminium and calcium oxides in melts of eutectic mixture LiF-NaF has been studied at 800 deg C by X-ray diffraction method. It has been shown that tetravalent uranium and plutonium are coprecipitated by oxides as a solid solution UO 2 -PuO 2 . Trivalent plutonium in fluorides melts in not precipitated in the presence of tetravalent uranium which can be used for their separation. REE are precipitated from a salt melt by calcium oxide and are not precipitated by aluminium oxide. Thus, aluminium oxide in a selective precipitator for uranium and plutonium in presence of REE. Addition of aluminium fluoride retains trivalent plutonium and REE in a salt melt in presence of Ca and Al oxides. The mechanism of interacting plutonium and REE trifluorides with metal oxides in fluoride melts has been considered

  18. An Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Concept Using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Burning Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuseong You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we designed and analyzed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor cores using uranium-free metallic fuels for maximizing burning rate of transuranics (TRU nuclides from PWR spent fuels. It is well known that the removal of fertile nuclides such as 238U from fuels in liquid metal cooled fast reactor leads to the degradation of important safety parameters such as the Doppler coefficient, coolant void worth, and delayed neutron fraction. To resolve the degradation of the Doppler coefficient, we considered adding resonant nuclides to the uranium-free metallic fuels. The analysis results showed that the cores using uranium-free fuels loaded with tungsten instead of uranium have a significantly lower burnup reactivity swing and more negative Doppler coefficients than the core using uranium-free fuels without resonant nuclides. In addition, we considered the use of axially central B4C absorber region and moderator rods to further improve safety parameters such as sodium void worth, burnup reactivity swing, and the Doppler coefficient. The results of the analysis showed that the final design core can consume ~353 kg per cycle and satisfies self-controllability under unprotected accidents. The fuel cycle analysis showed that the PWR–SFR coupling fuel cycle option drastically reduces the amount of waste going to repository and the SFR burner can consume the amount of TRUs discharged from 3.72 PWRs generating the same electricity.

  19. FY16 Status Report for the Uranium-Molybdenum Fuel Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Wendy D.; Doherty, Ann L.; Henager, Charles H.; Lavender, Curt A.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Smith, Mark T.; Webster, Ryan A.

    2016-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water Reactor industry with a melt-resistant, accident-tolerant fuel with improved safety response. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with extrusion development and performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of Uranium-Molybdenum fuel in both these areas. This report documents the results of the fiscal year 2016 effort to develop the Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel concept for light water reactors.

  20. FY16 Status Report for the Uranium-Molybdenum Fuel Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Wendy D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Doherty, Ann L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Omberg, Ronald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Mark T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webster, Ryan A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-22

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy has implemented a program to develop a Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel for light water reactors. Uranium-Molybdenum fuel has the potential to provide superior performance based on its thermo-physical properties. With sufficient development, it may be able to provide the Light Water Reactor industry with a melt-resistant, accident-tolerant fuel with improved safety response. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked with extrusion development and performing ex-reactor corrosion testing to characterize the performance of Uranium-Molybdenum fuel in both these areas. This report documents the results of the fiscal year 2016 effort to develop the Uranium-Molybdenum metal fuel concept for light water reactors.

  1. Metal bioaccumulation, genotoxicity and gene expression in the European wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) inhabiting an abandoned uranium mining area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lourenço, Joana, E-mail: joanalourenco@ua.pt [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM, Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [Departamento de Biologia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); CESAM, Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gonçalves, Fernando; Mendo, Sónia [Departamento de Biologia, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM, Centro de Estudos do Ambiente e do Mar, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2013-01-15

    Genotoxic effects caused by the exposure to wastes containing metals and radionuclides were investigated in the European wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus). The animals were captured in the surroundings of an abandoned uranium mining site. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay; gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed, respectively, by Real-Time PCR and melt curve analysis. The bioaccumulation of metals in the liver, kidney and bones was also determined to help clarify cause–effect relationships. Results confirmed the bioaccumulation of cadmium and uranium in organisms exposed to uranium mining wastes. P53 gene was found to be significantly up-regulated in the liver of those organisms and SNPs in the Rb gene were also detected in the kidney. Our results showed that uranium mining wastes caused serious DNA damage resulting in genomic instability, disclosed by the significant increase in DNA strand breaks and P53 gene expression disturbance. These effects can have severe consequences, since they may contribute for the emergence of serious genetic diseases. The fact that mice are often used as bioindicator species for the evaluation of risks of environmental exposure to humans, raises concerns on the risks for human populations living near uranium mining areas. - Highlights: ► Long term effects of chronic pollution in natural population of rodents. ► Bioaccumulation of cadmium and uranium by organisms exposed to uranium wastes. ► P53 upregulation in the liver and SNPs in the Rb gene detected in the kidney. ► Significant DNA damages detected by the comet assay. ► Concerns on the risks of human populations living nearby uranium mining areas.

  2. Possibilities of using metal uranium fuel in heavy water reactors; Mogucnosti upotrebe metalnog urana kao goriva za teskovodne reaktore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djuric, B; Mihajlovic, A; Drobnjak, Dj [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    There are serious economic reasons for using metal uranium in heavy water reactors, because of its high density, i.e. high conversion factor, and low cost of fuel elements production. Most important disadvantages are swelling at high burnup and corrosion risk. Some design concepts and application of improved uranium obtained by alloying are promising for achievement of satisfactory stability of metal uranium under reactor operation conditions. Postoje ozbiljni ekonomski razlozi za primenu metalnog urana u teskovodnim reaktorima, pre svega zbog njegove velike gustine, odnosno visokog konverzionog faktora, i zbog niskih troskova proizvodnje gorivnih elemenata. Glavne prepreke su bubrenje pri velikim stepenima sagorevanja i opasnost od korozije. Postoje veliki izgledi da se primenom odredjenih projektnih koncepcija i upotrebom legiranjem poboljsanog urana postigne zadovoljavajuca stabilnost metalnog urana u uslovima rada reaktora (author)

  3. Assay of uranium in fused salt cake generated at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.C.; Bhanu, A.U.; Sahoo, S.; Iyer, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A passive gamma-ray spectroscopic method is employed for the assay of uranium in fused salt cake, a scrap produced at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants. The method makes use of NaI(TI) detector coupled with a multichannel analyser. The 1 MeV gamma-ray of 238 U was used for the calibration. The calibration curve was made by counting synthetic mixtures made of U 3 O 8 powder, the heat treatment salt and iron in the form of fine powder. The uranium content in these synthetic mixtures was kept in the range of 1-11 per cent. 23 lots of the fused salt cake taken from three different batches of the salt cake were then analysed by this method. The uranium content of fused salt cake was found to be in the range of 1.70-11.43 per cent. To compare the gamma spectrometric results with a completely independent method, chemical analysis of all the fused salt cakes were also carried out. The NDA results were found to agree within ± 17 per cent with the chemical analysis results. (author)

  4. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the B ampersand T Metals Company site, Columbus, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, Mm.; Yu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil were derived for the B ampersand T Metals Company site in Columbus, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that following remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose limit of 100 n-mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three scenarios were considered; each assumed that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site would be used without radiological restrictions. The three scenarios varied with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food and water consumed. The evaluations indicate that the dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of total uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the B ampersand T Metals site did not exceed 1, I 00 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker, current use) or 300 pCi/g for Scenario B (resident with municipal water supply, a likely future use). The dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded at the site if the total uranium concentration of the soil did not exceed 880 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident with an on-site water well, a plausible but unlikely future use)

  5. Direct reduction of uranium oxide(U3O8) by Li metal and U-metal(Fe, Ni) alloy formation in molten LiCl medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Hwan; Kim, Tack Jin; Choi, In Kyu; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2004-01-01

    Molten salt based electrochemical processes are proposed as a promising method for the future nuclear programs and more specifically for spent fuel processing. The lithium reduction has been introduced to convert actinide oxides into corresponding actinide metal by using lithium metal as a reductant in molten LiCl medium. We have applied similar lab-scale experiments to reduce uranium oxide in an effort to gain additional information on rates and mechanisms

  6. Metal electrodeposition and electron transfer studies of uranium compounds in room temperature ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoll, M.E.; Oldham, W.J.; Costa, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL's) comprised of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium or quaternary ammonium cations and one of several anions such as PF 6 - , BF 4 - , or - N(SO 2 CF 3 ) 2 , represent a class of solvents that possess great potential for use in applications employing electrochemical procedures. Part of the intrigue with RTIL's stems from some of their inherent solvent properties including negligible vapor pressure, good conductivity, high chemical and thermal stability, and non-flammability. Additionally, a substantial number of RTIL's can be envisioned simply by combining different cation and anion pairs, thereby making them attractive for specific application needs. We are interested in learning more about the possible use of RTIL's within the nuclear industry. In this regard our research team has been exploring the electron transfer behavior of simple metal ions in addition to coordination and organometallic complexes in these novel solvents. Results from our research have also provided us with insight into the bonding interactions between our current anion of choice, bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide = NTf 2 , and open coordination sites on actinide and transition metal fragments. This presentation will focus on recent results in two areas: the electrodeposition of electropositive metal ions from RTIL solutions and the electron transfer behavior for several uranium complexes. Details concerning the cathodic electrodeposition and anodic stripping of alkali metals (Na, K) from various working electrode surfaces (Pt, Au, W, Glassy Carbon) will be discussed. Figure 1 displays typical behavior for the electrodeposition of potassium metal from an RTIL containing potassium ions produced through the reaction of KH with H[NTf 2 ]. Our efforts with other metal ions, including our results to date with uranium electrodeposition, will be covered during the presentation. The electron transfer behavior for a number of uranium complexes have been studied with various

  7. Selenide Mineralization in the Příbram Uranium and Base-Metal District (Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Škácha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Selenium mineralization in the Příbram uranium and base-metal district (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic bound to uraninite occurrences in calcite hydrothermal veins is extremely diverse. The selenides antimonselite, athabascaite, bellidoite, berzelianite, brodtkorbite, bukovite, bytízite, cadmoselite, chaméanite, clausthalite, crookesite, dzharkenite, eskebornite, eucairite, ferroselite, giraudite, hakite, klockmannite, naumannite, permingeatite, příbramite, sabatierite, tiemannite, and umangite were found here, including two new mineral phases: Hg-Cu-Sb and Cu-As selenides. Those selenides—and in some cases their sulphidic equivalents—are characterized using wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, reflected light, powder X-ray diffraction, single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron backscatter diffraction. The selenide mineralization in the Příbram uranium district is bound to the border of the carbonate-uraninite and subsequent carbonate-sulphidic stages. Selenides crystallized there at temperatures near 100 °C in the neutral-to-weakly-alkaline environment from solutions with high oxygen fugacity and a high Se2/S2 fugacity ratio.

  8. The friction influence on stress in micro extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piwnik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing of metallic parts by forming methods is industrially widespread due to high production rate, high accuracy, dimension’s and shape’s repeatability and good surface quality. The application of metal extrusion methods for the production of micro parts is possible, but there are some technological problems caused by small dimensions. Size effect is appearing. One of size effect symptom in micro extrusion, is a significant influence of rough contact between workpiece and tool while processing. In the case of rough contact without friction, material flows in the vicinity of the die surface. In order to explain more accurately a friction distribution in this area, the plastic wave friction model is proposed. This paper analyses specifications of a metal extrusion in micro scale. Using the friction model, a substitute friction shear factor mz and its influence on extrusion loading curves is determined in relationship to size of asperities.

  9. Accumulation of thorium and uranium by microbes. The effect of pH, concentration of metals, and time course on the accumulation of both elements using streptomyces levoris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takehiko

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation of thorium and uranium by various microorganisms from a solution containing both metals at pH 3.5 was examined. Among the tested species, a high accumulation ability for thorium was exhibited by strains of gram-positive bacteria, such as Arthrobacter nicotianae, Bacillus megaterium, B. subtilis, Micrococcus luteus, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Streptomyces levoris. Though uranium was accumulated in small amounts by most of microorganisms. A. nicotianae, S. flavoviridis, and S. levoris had relatively high uranium accumulation abilities. In these high performance thorium- and uranium-accumulating microorganisms, S. levoris, which accumulated the largest amount of uranium from the solution containing only uranium at pH 3.5, accumulated about 300 μmol thorium and 133 μmol uranium per gram dry weight of microbial cells from a solution containing both thorium and uranium at pH 3.5. The amount and time course of the thorium accumulation were almost unaffected by the co-existing uranium, while those of uranium were strongly affected by the co-existing thorium. The effects of pH, the thorium and uranium concentrations, and time course on both metal accumulations were also evaluated by numerical formulas. (author)

  10. Metal bioaccumulation, genotoxicity and gene expression in the European wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus) inhabiting an abandoned uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Joana; Pereira, Ruth; Gonçalves, Fernando; Mendo, Sónia

    2013-01-15

    Genotoxic effects caused by the exposure to wastes containing metals and radionuclides were investigated in the European wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus). The animals were captured in the surroundings of an abandoned uranium mining site. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay; gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were assessed, respectively, by Real-Time PCR and melt curve analysis. The bioaccumulation of metals in the liver, kidney and bones was also determined to help clarify cause-effect relationships. Results confirmed the bioaccumulation of cadmium and uranium in organisms exposed to uranium mining wastes. P53 gene was found to be significantly up-regulated in the liver of those organisms and SNPs in the Rb gene were also detected in the kidney. Our results showed that uranium mining wastes caused serious DNA damage resulting in genomic instability, disclosed by the significant increase in DNA strand breaks and P53 gene expression disturbance. These effects can have severe consequences, since they may contribute for the emergence of serious genetic diseases. The fact that mice are often used as bioindicator species for the evaluation of risks of environmental exposure to humans, raises concerns on the risks for human populations living near uranium mining areas. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extraction of uranium and lead from mixed waste debris using a variety of metal/ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needham, D.A.; Duran, B.L.; Ehler, D.S.; Sauer, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    To ensure the safety of our Nation's nuclear stockpile, Los Alamos National Laboratory is in the process of constructing the DARHT (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) facility. DARHT will examine the effects of aging and the stability of our stockpile. Contained testing will be phased in to reduce the impact of these tests, which contain depleted uranium, on our environment. The main focus of this research is to develop a treatment scheme for the recovery of depleted uranium and lead from shot debris that will result from these tests. The goals of this research are to optimize the conditions on a bench scale using a commercially available water soluble polymer to bind the lead and a variety of metal/ligand complexes such as 4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene-disulfonic acid, dithionite, sodium carbonate/bicarbonate, and sodium hypochlorite to bind the uranium. Studies were conducted on a mixture of debris, such as wood, cable, paper towels, and tubing that contained both uranium and lead ranging in concentration from 10-1000's of ppm of contaminants. Experiments were done varying combinations and successions of extractant solutions as well as a number of sequential extractions. Studies show that a mixture of sodium hypochlorite and carbonate removed 90+% of both uranium and lead. We then focused on a separation scheme for the lead and uranium

  12. Criticality evaluations with moderators other than water for uranium metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toffer, H.; Tollefson, D.A.; Finfrock, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    Occasionally, nuclear criticality safety analyses of fissile material handling operations or transport situations require consideration of moderation other than water. Such moderators could be oils, plastics, wood, concrete, carbon, or even wet sand. All of these materials contain either hydrogen, carbon, or mixtures of the two elements as the principal moderators. Other elements as part of the compounds or mixtures contribute less to the neutron slowing down process and can possibly be significant parasitic neutron absorbers. Results of a series of calculations are presented illustrating the impact of various moderators on critical masses or critical parameters as a function of lattice pitch for different uranium metal fuel elements at low 235 U enrichments. Several nuclear criticality safety analyses performed at the Hanford N Reactor, operated by UNC Nuclear Industries for the US Department of Energy, have considered alternative moderators to assure that water moderation represented the most limiting case

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel structure containing uranium alloy wires embedded in a metallic matrix plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear fuel-containing plate structure for a nuclear reactor is described; such structure comprising a pair of malleable metallic non-fissionable matrix plates having confronting surfaces which are pressure bonded together and fully united to form a bonded surface, and elongated malleable wire-like fissionable fuel members separately confined and fully enclosed between the matrix plates along the interface to afford a high fuel density as well as structural integrity and effective retention of fission products. The plates have separate recesses formed in the confronting surfaces for closely receiving the wire-like fissionable fuel members. The wire-like fissionable fuel members are made of a maleable uranium alloy capable of being formed into elongated wire-like members and capable of withstanding pressure bonding. The wire-like fissionable fuel members are completely separated and isolated by fully united portions of the interface

  14. Ductile iron cask with encapsulated uranium, tungsten or other dense metal shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, V.J.; Anderson, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    In a cask for the transportation and storage of radioactive materials, an improvement in the shielding means which achieves significant savings in weight and increases in payload by the use of pipes of depleted uranium, tungsten or other dense metal, encapsulating polyethylene cores, dispersed in two to four rows of concentric boreholes around the periphery of the cask body which is preferably made of ductile iron. Alternatively, rods or small balls of these same shielding materials, alone or in combination, are placed in these bore holes. The thickness, number and arrangement of these shielding pipes or rods is varied to provide optimum protection against the neutrons and gamma radiation emitted by the particular radioactive material being transported or stored. (author) 4 figs

  15. Application of insoluble tannin to recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metals elements form radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kazuhiko; Shirato, Wataru; Nakamura, Yasuo; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Takeshita, Kenji; Nakano, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    Mitsubishi Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. (MNF) has developed a new adsorbent, TANNIX (tread mark), for the recovery of uranium, TRU and heavy metal elements in the liquid waste, in which TANNIX derived from a natural tannin polymer. TANNIX has same advantages that handling is easier than that of standard IX-resin, and that the volume of secondary waste is reduced by burning the used TANNIX. We have replaced its radioactive liquid waste treatment system from the conventional co-precipitation process to adsorption process by using TANNIX. TANNIX was founded to be more effective for the recovery of Pu, TRU, and hexavalent chromium Cr-(VI) as well as Uranium. (author)

  16. Chapter 3: Exponential experiments on graphite-moderated lattices fuelled with near-natural uranium metal rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Clarke, W.G.; Ashworth, F.P.O.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Exponential experiments have been carried out on graphite lattices fuelled by 1.2 in. diameter uranium metal rods at three near-natural U 235 compositions, 0.6 Co, 1.3 Co and 1.6 Co. The results, together with those already existing from earlier exponential or critical measurements on these and similar natural uranium rods, have been correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) and also with the modified form of this theory given in Vol.1, Ch. 7. (author)

  17. Research on evolutionary laws of Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes of uranium metallization and volcanic rocks in south china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying Junlong

    1998-01-01

    According to research on evolutionary tracer of Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes, the author proposes that isotopic evolution of Mesozoic volcanics in south China is controlled by regionally metamorphic rocks of ancient land basement, early reformed derivates and recycled continental crust. Isotopic composition of uranium metallization shows the characteristics of crust sources, and Yanshanian accretion of continental margin caused the crust movement such as magmatic activity in lower crust within continent, extension-down-faulting, etc., promoting the migration, enrichment and ore formation of uranium

  18. Development and fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned clad tubes for metallic uranium fuel rods for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Jayachandran, N.K.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium metal or its alloy is used as fuel in nuclear reactors. Usually fuel is clad with compatible material to prevent its direct contact with coolant which prevents spread of activity. One of the methods of producing fuel for nuclear reactor is by co-drawing finished uranium rods with aluminum clad tube to develop intimate contact for effective heat removal during reactor operation. Presently seam welded Aluminium tubes are used as clad for Research Reactor fuel. The paper will highlight entire fabrication process followed for the fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned tubes along with relevant characterisation results

  19. Disposition of Uranium -233 (sup 233U) in Plutonium Metal and Oxide at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiboth, Cameron J.; Gibbs, Frank E.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the position that the concentration of Uranium-233 ( 233 U) in plutonium metal and oxide currently stored at the DOE Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is well below the maximum permissible stabilization, packaging, shipping and storage limits. The 233 U stabilization, packaging and storage limit is 0.5 weight percent (wt%), which is also the shipping limit maximum. These two plutonium products (metal and oxide) are scheduled for processing through the Building 371 Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (PuSPS). This justification is supported by written technical reports, personnel interviews, and nuclear material inventories, as compiled in the ''History of Uranium-233 ( 233 U) Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant In Support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program'' RS-090-056, April 1, 1999. Relevant data from this report is summarized for application to the PuSPS metal and oxide processing campaigns

  20. Embedded Multimaterial Extrusion Bioprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rocca, Marco; Fragasso, Alessio; Liu, Wanjun; Heinrich, Marcel A.; Zhang, Yu Shrike

    Embedded extrusion bioprinting allows for the generation of complex structures that otherwise cannot be achieved with conventional layer-by-layer deposition from the bottom, by overcoming the limits imposed by gravitational force. By taking advantage of a hydrogel bath, serving as a sacrificial

  1. Morphology and adsorption of chromium ion on uranium 1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid metal organic framework (MOF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vala Remy M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the synthesis of metal organic framework of uranium 1,2,4,5-benzene tetracarboxylic acid (U-H4btec MOF by solvothermal method. The obtained MOF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD, Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, thermogravimetric and differential thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTA. The morphology of the uranium 1,2,4,5-benzene tetracarboxylic acid MOF observed by SEM, revealed the presence of flaky porous structure. Adsorption of Cr3+ from aqueous solution onto the uranium 1,2,4,5-benzene tetracarboxylic acid MOF was systematically studied. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to determine the adsorption capacity of the MOF to form a monolayer. Kinetic determination of the adsorption of Cr3+ suggested both chemisorption and physisorption probably due to the presence of carbonyl groups within the MOF and its porous structure.

  2. Removing uranium from drinking water by metal hydroxides and anion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of bench-scale testing on uranium removal from a natural water that was chosen as a good representative of uranium-bearing waters indicated that conventional coagulant and lime softening treatment removes more than 85 percent of dissolved uranium (83 μg U/L) when an optimum pH and dosage were provided. A strong base anion-exchange column is a recommended option for the treatment of private well waters containing uranium at higher than desirable levels

  3. Criticality safety studies for plutonium–uranium metal fuel pin fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, Neethu Hanna; Reddy, C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Criticality safety limits for PUMP-F facility is identified. ► The fissile mass which can be handled safely during alloy preparation is 10.5 kg. ► The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely during injection casting is 53. ► The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely after fuel fabrication is 71. - Abstract: This study focuses on the criticality safety during the fabrication of fast reactor metal fuel pins comprising of the fuel type U–15Pu, U–19Pu and U–19Pu–6Zr in the Plutonium–Uranium Metal fuel Pin fabrication Facility (PUMP-F). Maximum amount of fissile mass which can be handled safely during master alloy preparation, Injection casting and fuel slug preparation following fuel pin fabrication were identified and fixed based on this study. In the induction melting furnace, the fissile mass can be limited to 10.5 kg. During fuel slug preparation and fuel pin fabrication, fuel slugs and pins were arranged in hexagonal and square lattices to identify the most reactive configuration. The number of fuel slugs which can be handled safely after injection casting can be fixed to be 53, whereas after fuel fabrication it is 71

  4. Sulfide precipitation method of separating uranium from Group II and Group III metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundar, P.S.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium is separated from analytical Group II and Group III metal ions in an aqueous liquor containing uranyl ions. The liquor is extracted with a non-interfering, water-immiscible, organic solvent containing a reagent which will react with the uranyl ions to form a complex soluble in the solvent. If the liquor is acidic, the solvent is washed with water. Then to the solvent is added an aqueous solution containing about 0.5 to 1.0 mole per liter of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions and sufficient sulfide ions to precipitate the metal ions as sulfides. The solvent and the aqueous solution are separated and the sulfides filtered from the aqueous solution. The ammonium-uranyl-tricarbonate in the aqueous solution can then be precipitated by increasing the concentration of (NH 4 ) 2 CO 3 or NH 4 HCO 3 ions to about 1.5 to 2.5 moles per liter. The precipitate is filtered and calcined to obtain U 3 O 8 or UO 2 . 21 claims, 1 figure

  5. Reverse transcriptase-real time PCR analysis of heavy metal stress response in a uranium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from Jaduguda uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-01-01

    A multimetal resistant Pseudomonas strain isolated from a uranium mine waste site of Jaduguda, India, was characterized for its potential application in bioremediation. Nearly complete 16 Sr RNA gene sequence and fatty acid methyl ester analyses confirmed the identity of this bacterium as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium exhibited high U-resistance i.e. up to an exposure of 6 h in 100 mg UL -1 solution (pH 4.0) and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg Ug -1 cell dry wt.) properties. Microcosm studies further proved the ability of the strain to remove soluble uranium (99%) from U-mine effluent and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. Considering the survival of this strain in U-mine site co-contaminated with other heavy metals, genetic basis of metal resistance was investigated. The bacterium was resistant to 3, 2 or 6 mM of Cu, Cd, or Zn, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction based detection followed by sequence identity and phylogenetic analysis revealed presence of specific metal resistance genes copA (copper resistance determinant) and czcA (RND type heavy metal efflux) in this isolate. Real-time PCR expression studies of these genes indicated significantly increased expression of both the genes in response to Cu, Cd, or Zn. Maximum up regulation of copA and czcA genes was observed following exposure (30 mm) to 25 μm of Cu or 10 μm Cd respectively. High levels of mRNA transcripts of copA and czcA genes in response to specific metals suggest that these resistance systems have important role in conferring metal resistance to the bacterium. Response of sodA an antioxidant Mn-cofactored superoxide dismutase gene to metal stress revealed that induction of this stress gene was not evident at lower concentration(s) of metals, the concentration(s) that cause maximum up- regulation of metal resistance genes. Higher test metal concentration or extended period of exposure, however, resulted in expression of sodA gene. The

  6. FEM analysis of hollow hub forming in rolling extrusion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bartnicki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the results of numerical calculations of rolling extrusion process of a hollow hub. As the flanges manufacturing at both sides of the product is required, in the analyzed process of rolling extrusion, a rear bumper was implemented as additional tool limiting axial metal flow. Numerical calculations of the hub forming process were conducted basing on finite element method, applying software Deform3D and Simufact in conditions of three dimensional state of strain. The obtained satisfactory results show that it is possible to conduct the further research works of experimental character, with the application of a modernized aggregate for the rolling extrusion process PO-2.

  7. Determination of metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds by electrothermal spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry, with electrothermal atomization, has been used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn and Ni in uranium oxide standards. The analysis were performed without sample dissolution and without uranium chemical separation. This technique is adequate for the qualification of nuclearly pure uranium, according to the standard specifications. (Author) [pt

  8. Spatial Variation and Assessment of Heavy Metal and Radioactive Risk in Farmland around a Retired Uranium Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Shi, Chen-hao; Zeng, Guang-ming; Zhong, Min-zhou; Yuan, Yu-jie

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, heavy metal contamination in the environment has been attracted worldwide attention due to their toxicity, persistence,extensive sources and non-biodegradable properties. We herein investigate variation trend and risk of heavy metal and radiation distribution in the former mine stope, former mineral ore stockyard, and mine road with surface soils of a retired uranium mine in the mid-south of China. The mean concentrations (mg/kg) of Pb,Cd,Cu,Zn,As,Hg,Cr,Mn,Ni,U, and 232Th were analyzed according to the corresponding background values in Hunan, China. The Geo-accumulation index (Igeo ) were used for the assessment of pollution level of heavy metals and the radioactive elements of U and 232Th. Then, Pollution load index (PLI) and GIS techniquewere integrated to assess spatial distribution of heavy metal contamination and radioactive contamination. Results confirmed that three areas in the retired uranium mine was a primary source of pollution, which showed anthropogenic origin mainly from agricultural runoff, hydrometallurgy from chemical industries, radioactive tailings, and electroplating industriesfinally drained into Zishui River and Xiangjiang River. Based on the actual situation, some suggestions were put forward for the treatment of the retired uranium mine in conclusion.

  9. Manhattan Project Technical Series The Chemistry of Uranium (I) Chapters 1-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitch, E. I.; Katz, J. J.

    1946-01-01

    This constitutes Chapters 1 through 10. inclusive, of The Survey Volume on Uranium Chemistry prepared for the Manhattan Project Technical Series. Chapters are titled: Nuclear Properties of Uranium; Properties of the Uranium Atom; Uranium in Nature; Extraction of Uranium from Ores and Preparation of Uranium Metal; Physical Properties of Uranium Metal; Chemical Properties of Uranium Metal; Intermetallic Compounds and Alloy systems of Uranium; the Uranium-Hydrogen System; Uranium Borides, Carbides, and Silicides; Uranium Nitrides, Phosphides, Arsenides, and Antimonides.

  10. Properties of uranium and thorium in host rocks of multi-metal (Ag, Pb, U, Cu, Bi, Z, F) Big Kanimansur deposit (Tajikistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayziev, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-metal Big Kanimansur Deposit host rocks contain high averages of uranium and thorium which are more than clark averages by 7 and 2.5 times accordingly. The second property of radio-active elements distribution are low ratio of thorium to uranium. That criteria can be used as prospecting sings for flanks and depth of know ore fields as well as for new squares of multi-metal mineralisation

  11. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  12. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE and AFTER IRRADIATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-01-01

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k eff = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can supply useful

  13. In situ effects of metal contamination from former uranium mining sites on the health of the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guernic, Antoine; Sanchez, Wilfried; Bado-Nilles, Anne; Palluel, Olivier; Turies, Cyril; Chadili, Edith; Cavalié, Isabelle; Delahaut, Laurence; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Geffard, Alain; Betoulle, Stéphane; Gagnaire, Béatrice

    2016-08-01

    Human activities have led to increased levels of various pollutants including metals in aquatic ecosystems. Increase of metallic concentrations in aquatic environments represents a potential risk to exposed organisms, including fish. The aim of this study was to characterize the environmental risk to fish health linked to a polymetallic contamination from former uranium mines in France. This contamination is characterized by metals naturally present in the areas (manganese and iron), uranium, and metals (aluminum and barium) added to precipitate uranium and its decay products. Effects from mine releases in two contaminated ponds (Pontabrier for Haute-Vienne Department and Saint-Pierre for Cantal Department) were compared to those assessed at four other ponds outside the influence of mine tailings (two reference ponds/department). In this way, 360 adult three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) were caged for 28 days in these six ponds before biomarker analyses (immune system, antioxidant system, biometry, histology, DNA integrity, etc.). Ponds receiving uranium mine tailings presented higher concentrations of uranium, manganese and aluminum, especially for the Haute-Vienne Department. This uranium contamination could explain the higher bioaccumulation of this metal in fish caged in Pontabrier and Saint-Pierre Ponds. In the same way, many fish biomarkers (antioxidant and immune systems, acetylcholinesterase activity and biometric parameters) were impacted by this environmental exposure to mine tailings. This study shows the interest of caging and the use of a multi-biomarker approach in the study of a complex metallic contamination.

  14. Multi-metal contamination with uranium trend impact on aquatic environment and consequences for fish immune system and adaptive responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guernic, A.; Gagnaire, B. [IRSN/PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO (France); Sanchez, W. [Institut national de l' environnement industriel et des risques - INERIS (France); Betoulle, S. [Champagne Ardenne University (France)

    2014-07-01

    Human activities have conducted to an increase of concentrations of various metals in aquatic ecosystems, including uranium. Its extraction and use have been rapidly magnified because of its role in the nuclear fuel cycle. These activities have led to high concentrations of uranium in the aquatic environment and thus a potential risk to exposed organisms, including fish. Consequences can be observed through metabolic and physiological responses, called biomarkers. Some biomarkers are interesting in order to evaluate the effects of metal contamination, among other immunotoxicity markers, antioxidant defenses and genotoxicity. The aims of this study are: i) to investigate the effects of a multi-metal contamination on a fish, the three-spined stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, and ii) to observe the adaptive capacity of fish due to a combination of stress (chemical stress and biological stress). To meet the first objective, six water bodies (ponds and lakes) located in two departments (Cantal and Haute-Vienne, France) were chosen according to their proximity to old uranium mines and to their levels of metal contamination related to chemical processes appeared during extraction. 240 three-spined sticklebacks were caged for 28 days in the six selected sites. A battery of biomarkers was measured in fish sampled after 14 and 28 of caging. The results for the Haute-Vienne department showed that caged fish in the pond with the highest uranium concentration (20 μg.L{sup -1}) presented the most DNA damage after 14 days of caging. Leukocyte phagocytosis (marker of immunotoxicity) of caged fish in this pond was lower at 14 days and greater at 28 days compared to other ponds without uranium. The multi-metal contamination negatively affected other parameters such as the condition index, oxidative activity, viability of lysosomal membrane and leukocytes distribution. In order to study the response of fish to a combined stress (chemical + biological) (objective ii), a second

  15. Application of a chronoamperometric measurement to the on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction for uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tack-Jin; Cho, Young-Hwan; Choi, In-Kyu; Kang, Jun-Gill; Song, Kyuseok; Jee, Kwang-Yong

    2008-01-01

    Both a potentiometric and a chronoamperometric electrochemical technique have been applied in an attempt to develop an efficient method for an on-line monitoring of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at a high-temperature in a molten salt medium. As a result of this study, it was concluded that the chronoamperometric method provided a simple and effective way for a direct on-line monitoring measurement of a lithium metal reduction process of uranium oxides at 650 o C by the measuring electrical currents dependency on a variation of the reduction time for the reaction. A potentiometric method, by adopting a homemade oxide ion selective electrode made of ZrO 2 stabilized by a Y 2 O 3 doping, however, was found to be inappropriate for an on-line monitoring of the reduction reaction of uranium oxide in the presence of lithium metal due to an abnormal behavior of the adopted electrodes. The observed experimental results were discussed in detail by comparing them with previously published experimental data

  16. Emergence of Uranium as a Distinct Metal Center for Building Intrinsic X-ray Scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxing; Yin, Xuemiao; Liu, Wei; Xie, Jian; Chen, Junfeng; Silver, Mark A; Sheng, Daopeng; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Liu, Ning; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2018-06-25

    The combination of high atomic number and high oxidation state in U VI materials gives rise to both high X-ray attenuation efficiency and intense green luminescence originating from ligand-to-metal charge transfer. These two features suggest that U VI materials might act as superior X-ray scintillators, but this postulate has remained substantially untested. Now the first observation of intense X-ray scintillation in a uranyl-organic framework (SCU-9) that is observable by the naked eye is reported. Combining the advantage in minimizing the non-radiative relaxation during the X-ray excitation process over those of inorganic salts of uranium, SCU-9 exhibits a very efficient X-ray to green light luminescence conversion. The luminescence intensity shows an essentially linear correlation with the received X-ray intensity, and is comparable with that of commercially available CsI:Tl. SCU-9 possesses an improved X-ray attenuation efficiency (E>20 keV) as well as enhanced radiation resistance and decreased hygroscopy compared to CsI:Tl. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Compacted and Sintered Microstructure Depending on Uranium Powder Size in Zr-U Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Chang Gun; Jun, Hyun-Joon; Ju, Jung Hwan; Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, Chong-Tak; Kim, Hyung Lae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In case of the uranium (U) and zirconium (Zr) powders which have been utilized for the production of a metallic fuel in the various nuclear applications, the homogenous distribution of U powders in the Zr-U pellet has influenced significantly on the nuclear fuel performance. The inhomogeneity in a powder process was changed by various intricate factors, e.g. powder size, shape, distribution and so on. Particularly, the U inhomogeneity in the Zr-U pellets occurs by segregation derived from the great gaps of densities between Zr and U during compaction of the mixed powders. In this study, the relationship between powder size and homogeneity was investigated by using the different-sized U powders. The microstructure in Zr-U pellets reveals more homogeneity when the weight ration of Zr and U powders are close to 1. In addition, homogeneous pellets which were produced by fine U powders have higher density because the homogeneity affects the alloying reaction during sintering and the densification behavior of pore induced by powder size.

  18. U(IV) chalcogenolates synthesized via oxidation of uranium metal by dichalcogenides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Andrew J; Scott, Brian L; Neu, Mary P

    2006-09-04

    Treatment of uranium metal with dichalcogenides in the presence of a catalytic amount of iodine in pyridine affords molecular U(IV) chalcogenolates that do not require stabilizing ancillary ligands. Oxidation of U(0) by PhEEPh yields monomeric seven-coordinate U(EPh)4(py)3 (E = S(1), Se(2)). The dimeric eight-coordinate complexes [U(EPh)2(mu2-EPh)2(CH3CN)2]2 (E = S(3), Se(4)) are obtained by crystallization from solutions of 1 and 2 dissolved in acetonitrile. Oxidation of U(0) by pySSpy and crystallization from thf yields nine-coordinate U(Spy)4(thf) (5). Incorporation of elemental selenium into the oxidation of U(0) by PhSeSePh results in the isolation of [U(py)2(SePh)(mu3-Se)(mu2-SePh)]4.4py (6), a tetrameric cluster in which each U(IV) ion is eight-coordinate and the U4Se4 core forms a distorted cube. The compounds were analyzed spectroscopically and the single-crystal X-ray structures of 1 and 3-6 were determined. The isolation of 1-6 represents six new examples of actinide chalcogenolates and allows insight into the nature of "hard" actinide ion-"soft" chalcogen donor interactions.

  19. The influence of alkali metal impurities on the uranium dioxide hydrofluorination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponelis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect alkali metal impurities (sodium and potassium) in the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) feed material have on the conversion to uraniumtetrafluoride (UF 4 ) was examined. A direct correlation exists between impurity level and sintering with concomitant reduced conversion. The sintering mechanism is attributable to decreased specific surface area. The typical 'die-off' of reaction or conversion can be explained in terms of increased particle growth rather than an arbitray zero porosity function. Hydrofluorination temperatures varied from 250 to 650 degrees C using pellets varying in size from 0.42 mm to 10 mm. Scanning electron microscope photographs show clearly the particle or grain growth in the pellet as well as the increased size with impurity level. A new dimensionless constant, N KP , is defined to facilitate explanation of the reaction as a function of pellet radius. N KP is defined as the ratio of pellet diffusion resistance to particle diffusion resistance of the reacting HF gas. At high values of this number (N KP >40) the conversion is limited to the outer periphery of the pellet while at low values (N KP KP at higher reaction temperatures which means that the particle diffusion resistance increases with increasing impurity level and results in easier sintering of these materials. 53 refs., 206 figs., 94 tabs

  20. Impaired microbial activity caused by metal pollution: A field study in a deactivated uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sara Cristina; Pereira, Ruth; Marques, Sérgio Miguel; Castro, Bruno Branco; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    European frameworks for the ecological risk assessment (ERA) of contaminated sites integrate information from three lines of evidence: chemical, ecotoxicological, and ecological. Regarding the last one, field observations at the contaminated sites are compared to reference site(s) and the differences recorded are analysed at the light of a cause-effect relationship, taking into account the site-specific contamination. Thus, included in the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment that is being carried out in an deactivated uranium mining area, a battery of soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenases, urease, arysulphatase, cellulase, acid phosphate) and potential nitrification were assessed in seven sampling sites (A-D-E-F-G-H-I) at different distances from the mine pit. These parameters have been considered good indicators of impacts on soil microbial communities and, subsequently, on soil functions. Soil enzyme activities were impaired in the most contaminated site (A, near the mine pit), for which a higher degree of risk was determined in the tier 1 of ERA. Three other sites within the mining area (F, G, and D) were discriminated on the basis of their low microbial activity, using uni- and multivariate approaches, and validating what had been previously found with chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence. We observed considerable among-site heterogeneity in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, combined with seasonal differences in enzyme activities. Still, the correlation between microbial parameters and soil general physical and chemical parameters was weak. In opposition, significant and negative correlations were found between soil enzyme activities and several metallic elements (Al, Be, Cu, U). These findings suggest a clear correlation between compromised soil function (nutrient recycling) and metal contamination. Such information reinforces the evidence of risks for some sites within the mining area and is an important contribution for the

  1. Sublethal effects of a metal contamination due to uranium mine tailings in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.). Implication in the susceptibility to a biological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guernic, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Uranium extraction has resulted in a remobilization of this actinide into mine surrounding ecosystems. Uses of metal salts during mining site rehabilitation, and the natural presence of metals have increased the metal contamination in hydro systems submitted to mine tailings. In situ experiments were conducted in two former French uranium mining sites. Three-spined stickleback caging was used to determine the sublethal effects of this metal mixture on this freshwater fish, as well as its effects on fish susceptibility to a sudden biological stress. This pollution, characterised by higher metal concentrations (especially for uranium), has led to an oxidative stress in sticklebacks visible through several bio-markers, and other effects dependent on the study site. The polymetallic contamination has modified the stickleback responses to the biological stress, by preventing their phagocytic and antioxidant responses. This work has reinforced the interest of the caging technique during environmental studies and that of immuno-markers in a multi-bio-marker approach. (author)

  2. Assessment of Radioactive Materials and Heavy Metals in the Surface Soil around the Bayanwula Prospective Uranium Mining Area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Bao, Shanhu; Sai, Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Yuhong

    2017-03-14

    The present work is the first systematic and large scale study on radioactive materials and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area in China. In this work, both natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and heavy metals in 48 surface soil samples were analyzed using High Purity Germanium (HPGe) γ spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The obtained mean activity concentrations of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K, and 137 Cs were 25.81 ± 9.58, 24.85 ± 2.77, 29.40 ± 3.14, 923.0 ± 47.2, and 5.64 ± 4.56 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose rate were 76.7 ± 3.1 nGy/h and 83.1 ± 3.8 μ Sv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, and internal hazard index were also calculated, and their mean values were within the acceptable limits. The estimated lifetime cancer risk was 3.2 × 10 -4 /Sv. The heavy metal contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb from the surface soil samples were measured and their health risks were then assessed. The concentrations of all heavy metals were much lower than the average backgrounds in China except for lead which was about three times higher than that of China's mean. The non-cancer and cancer risks from the heavy metals were estimated, which are all within the acceptable ranges. In addition, the correlations between the radionuclides and the heavy metals in surface soil samples were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. Strong positive correlations between radionuclides and the heavy metals at the 0.01 significance level were found. In conclusion, the contents of radionuclides and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area are at a normal level.

  3. The oxidative corrosion of carbide inclusions at the surface of uranium metal during exposure to water vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, T B; Petherbridge, J R; Harker, N J; Ball, R J; Heard, P J; Glascott, J; Allen, G C

    2011-11-15

    The reaction between uranium and water vapour has been well investigated, however discrepancies exist between the described kinetic laws, pressure dependence of the reaction rate constant and activation energies. Here this problem is looked at by examining the influence of impurities in the form of carbide inclusions on the reaction. Samples of uranium containing 600 ppm carbon were analysed during and after exposure to water vapour at 19 mbar pressure, in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) system. After water exposure, samples were analysed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), focused ion beam (FIB) imaging and sectioning and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with X-ray diffraction (micro-XRD). The results of the current study indicate that carbide particles on the surface of uranium readily react with water vapour to form voluminous UO(3) · xH(2)O growths at rates significantly faster than that of the metal. The observation may also have implications for previous experimental studies of uranium-water interactions, where the presence of differing levels of undetected carbide may partly account for the discrepancies observed between datasets. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Industrial realities: Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiron, H.

    1990-01-01

    In this special issue are examined ores and metals in France and in the world for 1988. The chapter on uranium gives statistical data on the uranium market: Demand, production, prices and reserves [fr

  5. Impaired microbial activity caused by metal pollution: A field study in a deactivated uranium mining area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Sara Cristina; Pereira, Ruth; Marques, Sérgio Miguel; Castro, Bruno Branco; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    European frameworks for the ecological risk assessment (ERA) of contaminated sites integrate information from three lines of evidence: chemical, ecotoxicological, and ecological. Regarding the last one, field observations at the contaminated sites are compared to reference site(s) and the differences recorded are analysed at the light of a cause-effect relationship, taking into account the site-specific contamination. Thus, included in the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment that is being carried out in an deactivated uranium mining area, a battery of soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenases, urease, arysulphatase, cellulase, acid phosphate) and potential nitrification were assessed in seven sampling sites (A–D–E–F–G–H–I) at different distances from the mine pit. These parameters have been considered good indicators of impacts on soil microbial communities and, subsequently, on soil functions. Soil enzyme activities were impaired in the most contaminated site (A, near the mine pit), for which a higher degree of risk was determined in the tier 1 of ERA. Three other sites within the mining area (F, G, and D) were discriminated on the basis of their low microbial activity, using uni- and multivariate approaches, and validating what had been previously found with chemical and ecotoxicological lines of evidence. We observed considerable among-site heterogeneity in terms of soil physical and chemical properties, combined with seasonal differences in enzyme activities. Still, the correlation between microbial parameters and soil general physical and chemical parameters was weak. In opposition, significant and negative correlations were found between soil enzyme activities and several metallic elements (Al, Be, Cu, U). These findings suggest a clear correlation between compromised soil function (nutrient recycling) and metal contamination. Such information reinforces the evidence of risks for some sites within the mining area and is an important

  6. Characterization of a metal resistant Pseudomonas sp. isolated from uranium mine for its potential in heavy metal (Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, and Cd2+) sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2009-05-01

    Heavy metal sequestration by a multimetal resistant Pseudomonas strain isolated from a uranium mine was characterized for its potential application in metal bioremediation. 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed phylogenetic relatedness of this isolate to Pseudomonas fluorescens. Metal uptake by this bacterium was monophasic, fast saturating, concentration and pH dependent with maximum loading of 1048 nmol Ni(2+) followed by 845 nmol Co(2+), 828 nmol Cu(2+) and 700 nmol Cd(2+)mg(-1) dry wt. Preferential metal deposition in cell envelope was confirmed by TEM and cell fractionation. FTIR spectroscopy and EDX analysis revealed a major role of carboxyl and phosphoryl groups along with a possible ion exchange mechanism in cation binding. Binary system demonstrated selective metal binding affinity in the order of Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Co(2+)>Cd(2+). A comparison with similar metal uptake reports considering live bacteria strongly indicated the superiority of this strain in metal sequestration, which could be useful for developing efficient metal removal system.

  7. The collection of uranium from sea water with hydrous metal oxide, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hisao; Nakajima, Fumito; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Murata, Toshifumi.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of diverse ions present in sea water on the uranium adsorption is elucidated in the present paper. The uranium-adsorption experiments were conducted using sea water and a solution containing 0.72 mol dm -3 NaCl and 2.3 x 10 -3 mol dm -3 NaHCO 3 . The uranium uptake was about ten times larger from the NaCl-NaHCO 3 solution than from sea water. The ions which depressed the uranium uptake were the calcium, magnesium, and fluoride present in sea water. Among these ions, calcium had the largest effect on the uranium uptake. The analysis of calcium and carbonate in the adsorbent after the adsorption experiment has revealed that the molar ratio between calcium and carbonate was about one. It was considered that calcium carbonate was deposited on the adsorbent during the uranium adsorption. The specific surface area and the pore volume decreased after the deposition of calcium carbonate. It was supposed that the decrease in the uranium uptake was caused by the coverage of the surface of hydrous titanium(IV) oxide with calcium carbonate. Magnesium ions depressed the uranium uptake in the same manner as calcium ions. The effect of the magnesium ions, however, was relatively small compared with that of the calcium ions. (author)

  8. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  9. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  10. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base; Contribution a l'etude des materiaux combustibles nucleaires a base d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englander, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-11-15

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the {gamma} phase. (author) [French] Dans un reacteur de puissance destine a fournir de l'energie thermique industriellement recuperable, la source de chaleur la plus economique reste constituee par de l'uranium metallique naturel. Or, le materiau combustible nucleaire, employe le plus souvent sous forme de barreaux de 20 a 40 mm de diametre, se trouve soumis a un ensemble de contraintes qui provoque des deformations irreversibles, le plus souvent incompatibles avec l'infrastructure du reacteur. Par consequent, le materiau combustible doit presenter a l'origine un certain nombre de qualites qu'il est necessaire de determiner. Aussi a-t-on d'abord etudie les caracteres technologiques propres a chacune des trois phases allotropiques de l'uranium-metal pur et leurs interactions sur la stabilisation du materiau constitue soit par de l'uranium coule, soit par de l'uranium traite en pile en phase {gamma}. (auteur)

  11. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  12. Extrapolated experimental critical parameters of unreflected and steel-reflected massive enriched uranium metal spherical and hemispherical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-12-01

    Sixty-nine critical configurations of up to 186 kg of uranium are reported from very early experiments (1960s) performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory near Denver, Colorado. Enriched (93%) uranium metal spherical and hemispherical configurations were studied. All were thick-walled shells except for two solid hemispheres. Experiments were essentially unreflected; or they included central and/or external regions of mild steel. No liquids were involved. Critical parameters are derived from extrapolations beyond subcritical data. Extrapolations, rather than more precise interpolations between slightly supercritical and slightly subcritical configurations, were necessary because experiments involved manually assembled configurations. Many extrapolations were quite long; but the general lack of curvature in the subcritical region lends credibility to their validity. In addition to delayed critical parameters, a procedure is offered which might permit the determination of prompt critical parameters as well for the same cases. This conjectured procedure is not based on any strong physical arguments

  13. Heavy metal uranium affects the brain cholinergic system in rat following sub-chronic and chronic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, Helene; Grancolas, Line; Dhieux-Lestaevel, Bernadette; Delissen, Olivia; Vacher, Claire-Marie; Dublineau, Isabelle; Voisin, Philippe; Gourmelon, Patrick; Taouis, Mohammed; Lestaevel, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Uranium is a heavy metal naturally present in the environment that may be chronically ingested by the population. Previous studies have shown that uranium is present in the brain and alters behaviour, notably locomotor activity, sensorimotor ability, sleep/wake cycle and the memory process, but also metabolism of neurotransmitters. The cholinergic system mediates many cognitive systems, including those disturbed after chronic exposure to uranium i.e., spatial memory, sleep/wake cycle and locomotor activity. The objective of this study was to assess whether these disorders follow uranium-induced alteration of the cholinergic system. In comparison with 40 control rats, 40 rats drank 40 mg/L uranyl nitrate for 1.5 or 9 months. Cortex and hippocampus were removed and gene expression and protein level were analysed to determine potential changes in cholinergic receptors and acetylcholine levels. The expression of genes showed various alterations in the two brain areas after short- and long-term exposure. Nevertheless, protein levels of the choline acetyltransferase enzyme (ChAT), the vesicular transporter of acetylcholine (VAChT) and the nicotinic receptor β2 sub-unit (nAChRβ2) were unmodified in all cases of the experiment and muscarinic receptor type 1 (m1AChR) protein level was disturbed only after 9 months of exposure in the cortex (-30%). Acetylcholine levels were unchanged in the hippocampus after 1.5 and 9 months, but were decreased in the cortex after 1.5 months only (-22%). Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was also unchanged in the hippocampus but decreased in the cortex after 1.5 and 9 months (-16% and -18%, respectively). Taken together, these data indicate that the cholinergic system is a target of uranium exposure in a structure-dependent and time-dependent manner. These cholinergic alterations could participate in behavioural impairments.

  14. A study on the electrolytic reduction of U3O8 to uranium metal in LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, J. S.; Heo, J. M.; Hong, S. S.; Kang, D. S.; Park, S. W.

    2002-01-01

    New electrolytic reduction technology was proposed that is based on the intregration of metallization of U 3 O 8 and Li 2 O electrowinning. In this electrolytic reduction reaction, electrolytically reduced Li deposits on cathode and simultaneously reacts with uranium oxide to produce uranium metal showing more than 99% conversion. For the verification of process feasibility, the experiments to obtain basic data on the metallization of uranium oxide, materials for cathode and anode electrode, the characteristics of closed recycle of Li 2 O and mass transfer were carried out. This evolutionary electrolytic reduction technology would give benefits over the conventional Li-reduction process improving economic viability such as: avoidance of handling of chemically active Li-LiCl molten salt, increase of metallization yield, and simplification of process

  15. The Evolution of Depleted Uranium as an Environmental Risk Factor: Lessons from Other Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briner, Wayne E.

    2006-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is used in both civilian and military applications. Civilian uses are primarily limited to ballast and counterweights in ships and aircraft with limited risk of environmental release. The very nature of the military use of DU releases DU into the environment. DU released into the environment from military use takes the form of large fragments that are chemically unchanged and dust in the form of oxides. DU dust is nearly insoluble, respirable and shows little mobility in the soil. Exposure to DU occurs primarily from inhalation of dust and possible hand to mouth activity. Toxicity of DU is believed to be primarily chemical in nature with radiological activity being a lesser problem. DU has been shown to have a variety of behavioral and neurological effects in experimental animals. DU has been used the Balkans, Afghanistan, and both Iraq wars and there is a high probability of its use in future conflicts. Further, other nations are developing DU weaponry; some of these nations may use DU with a greater radiological risk than those currently in use. The toxicity of DU has been studied mostly as an issue of the health of military personnel. However, many tons of DU have been left in the former theater of war and indigenous populations continue to be exposed to DU, primarily in the form of dust. Little epidemiological data exists concerning the impact of DU on these groups. It may be possible to extrapolate what the effects of DU may be on indigenous groups by examining the data on similar metals. DU has many similarities to lead in its route of exposure, chemistry, metabolic fate, target organs, and effect of experimental animals. Studies should be conducted on indigenous groups using lead as a model when ascertaining if DU has an adverse effect. PMID:16823086

  16. Application of Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge to Removal of Uranium Dioxide from Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Saber, Hamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that radio-frequency (rf) plasma glow discharge using NF 3 gas is an effective technique for the removal of uranium oxide from metal surfaces. The results of these experiments are analyzed to explain the measured dependence of the UO 2 removal or etch rate on the NF 3 gas pressure and the absorbed power in the plasma. The NF 3 gas pressure in the experiments was varied from 10.8 to 40 Pa, and the deposited power in the plasma was varied from 25 to 210 W. The UO 2 etch rate was strongly dependent on the absorbed power and, to a lesser extent, on the NF 3 pressure and decreased exponentially with immersion time. At 210 W and 17 Pa, all detectable UO 2 in the samples (∼10.6 mg each) was removed at the endpoint, whereas the initial etch rate was ∼3.11 μm/min. When the absorbed power was ≤50 W, however, the etch rate was initially ∼0.5 μg/min and almost zero at the endpoint, with UO 2 only partially etched. This self-limiting etching of UO 2 at low power is attributed to the formation of nonvolatile intermediates UF 2 , UF 3 , UF 4 , UF 5 , UO 2 F, and UO 2 F 2 on the surface. Analysis indicated that the accumulation of UF 6 and, to a lesser extent, O 2 near the surface partially contributed to the exponential decrease in the UO 2 etch rate with immersion time. Unlike fluorination with F 2 gas, etching of UO 2 using rf glow discharge is possible below 663 K. The average etch rates of the amorphous UO 2 in the NF 3 experiments are comparable to the peak values reported in other studies for crystalline UO 2 using CF 4 /O 2 glow discharge performed at ∼150 to 250 K higher sample temperatures

  17. The Evolution of Depleted Uranium as an Environmental Risk Factor: Lessons from Other Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne E. Briner

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is used in both civilian and military applications. Civilian uses are primarily limited to ballast and counterweights in ships and aircraft with limited risk of environmental release. The very nature of the military use of DU releases DU into the environment. DU released into the environment from military use takes the form of large fragments that are chemically unchanged and dust in the form of oxides. DU dust is nearly insoluble, respirable and shows little mobility in the soil. Exposure to DU occurs primarily from inhalation of dust and possible hand to mouth activity. Toxicity of DU is believed to be primarily chemical in nature with radiological activity being a lesser problem. DU has been shown to have a variety of behavioral and neurological effects in experimental animals. DU has been used the Balkans, Afghanistan, and both Iraq wars and there is a high probability of its use in future conflicts. Further, other nations are developing DU weaponry; some of these nations may use DU with a greater radiological risk than those currently in use. The toxicity of DU has been studied mostly as an issue of the health of military personnel. However, many tons of DU have been left in the former theater of war and indigenous populations continue to be exposed to DU, primarily in the form of dust. Little epidemiological data exists concerning the impact of DU on these groups. It may be possible to extrapolate what the effects of DU may be on indigenous groups by examining the data on similar metals. DU has many similarities to lead in its route of exposure, chemistry, metabolic fate, target organs, and effect of experimental animals. Studies should be conducted on indigenous groups using lead as a model when ascertaining if DU has an adverse effect.

  18. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D ampersand D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D ampersand D Focus Area's approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D ampersand D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD's awarded by the D ampersand D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP's selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP's Plant 1 D ampersand D Project which was an ongoing D ampersand D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D ampersand D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D ampersand D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D ampersand D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of open-quotes winners.close quotes All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP's baseline D ampersand D

  19. The collection of uranium from sea water with hydrous metal oxide, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Hisao; Nakajima, Fumito; Ozawa, Yoshihiro; Murata, Toshifumi.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium adsorption from sea water by hydrous titanium(IV) oxide was investigated. The uranium adsorption experiments were conducted using a solution containing NaCl, NaHCO 3 , and uranium. Thermochemical calculation showed that the tris(carbonato)dioxouranate(VI) ion (UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- found in sea water existed in the solution at pH 8 and 25 0 C. The uranium uptake varied with the pH of the solution, exhibiting a minimum value at pH 8. The enthalpy change, delta H, and the activation energy, E, of the uranium adsorption were found to be 23.6 kJ mol -1 and 52.7 kJ mol -1 respectively. The analysis of carbonate in the adsorbent showed that the carbonate ion in(UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ) 4- was released into the solution during the uranium adsorption. On the basis of the present experimental results, the mechanism of uranium adsorption was discussed. (author)

  20. Innovative Elution Processes for Recovering Uranium and Transition Metals from Amidoxime-based Adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Chien M. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-04-18

    Amidoxime-based polymer fibers are considered one of the most promising materials for sequestering uranium from seawater. The high-surface-area polymer fibers containing amidoxime and carboxylate groups synthesized by Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL-AF1) show very high uranium adsorption capacities known in the literature. Effective elution of uranium and repeated use of the adsorbent are important factors affecting the cost of producing uranium from seawater using this material. Traditional acid leaching of uranium followed by KOH conditioning of the fiber causes chemical changes and physical damage to the ORNL-AF1 adsorbent. Two alkaline solution leaching methods were developed by this project, one uses a highly concentrated (3 M) potassium bicarbonate solution at pH 8.3 and 40 °C; the other uses a mixture of sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide at pH 10.4. Both elution methods do not require KOH conditioning prior to reusing the fiber adsorbent. The conditions of eluting uranium from the amidoxime-based adsorbent using these alkaline solutions are confirmed by thermodynamic calculations. The bicarbonate elution method is selective for uranium recovery compared to other elution methods and causes no chemical change to the fiber material based on FTIR spectroscopy

  1. All heavy metals closed-cycle analysis on water-cooled reactors of uranium and thorium fuel cycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Waris, Abdul; Takaki, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Uranium and Thorium fuels as the basis fuel of nuclear energy utilization has been used for several reactor types which produce trans-uranium or trans-thorium as 'by product' nuclear reaction with higher mass number and the remaining uranium and thorium fuels. The utilization of recycled spent fuel as world wide concerns are spent fuel of uranium and plutonium and in some cases using recycled minor actinide (MA). Those fuel schemes are used for improving an optimum nuclear fuel utilization as well to reduce the radioactive waste from spent fuels. A closed-cycle analysis of all heavy metals on water-cooled cases for both uranium and thorium fuel cycles has been investigated to evaluate the criticality condition, breeding performances, uranium or thorium utilization capability and void reactivity condition. Water-cooled reactor is used for the basic design study including light water and heavy water-cooled as an established technology as well as commercialized nuclear technologies. A developed coupling code of equilibrium fuel cycle burnup code and cell calculation of SRAC code are used for optimization analysis with JENDL 3.3 as nuclear data library. An equilibrium burnup calculation is adopted for estimating an equilibrium state condition of nuclide composition and cell calculation is performed for calculating microscopic neutron cross-sections and fluxes in relation to the effect of different fuel compositions, different fuel pin types and moderation ratios. The sensitivity analysis such as criticality, breeding performance, and void reactivity are strongly depends on moderation ratio and each fuel case has its trend as a function of moderation ratio. Heavy water coolant shows better breeding performance compared with light water coolant, however, it obtains less negative or more positive void reactivity. Equilibrium nuclide compositions are also evaluated to show the production of main nuclides and also to analyze the isotopic composition pattern especially

  2. The action of uranium hexafluoride on some metallic fluorides (1962); Action de l'hexafluorure d'uranium sur quelques fluorures metalliques (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michallet, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-12-15

    A metallic difluoride is inert to UF{sub 6} unless the metal can exist in a higher valency state. In this case, UF{sub 6} acts as an oxidising agent and is transformed into UF{sub 4}. The fluorides of tri- and tetra-valent metals give rise to new compounds when they are maintained at a high temperature (500 deg. C) in the presence of uranium hexachloride vapour. The products obtained are characterized by their X-ray diffraction diagrams. The distributions of the lines of the powder diagrams are very similar to that of U{sub 4}F{sub 17}. Assuming that this resemblance is due to a stacking of identical fluorine atoms, it can be calculated that the corresponding structure is given by the theoretical formulae: MeF{sub 3}, 0,562 UF{sub 6}; MeF{sub 4}, 0,396 UF{sub 6} which are in good agreement with chemical measurements. (author) [French] Un di-fluorure metallique est inerte vis-a-vis de UF{sub 6}, sauf si le metal est susceptible d'exister a une valence plus elevee. Dans ce cas, UF{sub 6} joue le role d'un oxydant et se transforme en UF{sub 4}. Les fluorures de metaux tri et tetravalents donnent naissance a des composes nouveaux quand ils sont maintenus a haute temperature (500 deg. C) en presence de vapeur d'hexafluorure d'uranium. Les produits obtenus sont caracterises par leurs diagrammes de diffraction X. Les distributions de raies des diagrammes de poudre sont tres voisines de celles de U{sub 4}F{sub 17}. En supposant que cette analogie resulte d'un empilement d'ions fluor identique, le calcul conduit aux formules theoriques suivantes: MeF{sub 3}, 0,562 UF{sub 6}; MeF{sub 4}, 0,396 UF{sub 6} en bon accord avec les resultats des dosages chimiques. (auteur)

  3. Embedded Multimaterial Extrusion Bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Marco; Fragasso, Alessio; Liu, Wanjun; Heinrich, Marcel A; Zhang, Yu Shrike

    2018-04-01

    Embedded extrusion bioprinting allows for the generation of complex structures that otherwise cannot be achieved with conventional layer-by-layer deposition from the bottom, by overcoming the limits imposed by gravitational force. By taking advantage of a hydrogel bath, serving as a sacrificial printing environment, it is feasible to extrude a bioink in freeform until the entire structure is deposited and crosslinked. The bioprinted structure can be subsequently released from the supporting hydrogel and used for further applications. Combining this advanced three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technique with a multimaterial extrusion printhead setup enables the fabrication of complex volumetric structures built from multiple bioinks. The work described in this paper focuses on the optimization of the experimental setup and proposes a workflow to automate the bioprinting process, resulting in a fast and efficient conversion of a virtual 3D model into a physical, extruded structure in freeform using the multimaterial embedded bioprinting system. It is anticipated that further development of this technology will likely lead to widespread applications in areas such as tissue engineering, pharmaceutical testing, and organs-on-chips.

  4. How extrusion shapes food processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    This month's column will explore food extrusion. Extrusion is one of the most commonly used food manufacturing processes. Its versatility enables production of a diverse array of food products. This column will review the basic principles and provide an overview of applications. I would like to ...

  5. Hydrostatic extrusion of magnesium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillekens, W.H.; Bohlen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter deals with the capabilities and limitations of the hydrostatic extrusion process for the manufacturing of magnesium alloy sections. Firstly, the process basics for the hydrostatic extrusion of materials in general and of magnesium in particular are introduced. Next, some recent research

  6. Use of a high temperature hydrostatic extrusion technique for powders strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, J.; Gavinet, J.; Weisz, M.

    1975-01-01

    A conventional 575 tonnes extrusion press has been modified by a device permitting the extrusion process by hydrostatic pression through a leakless mechanical set (13,000 bars maximum), from room temperature to 1,200 deg C. This new device allows: the high temperature hydrostatic extrusion for strengthening of powders, the isostatic compression of powders. Examples of realisations obtained by this process are described, including the influence of different parameters: pressure, temperature, extrusion ratio and for different materials: pure metals (iron, nickel, niobium, etc...) and alloys (stainless steel, molybdenum, niobium nickel alloys, etc...). Then, the advantages of the process are emphasized [fr

  7. 75 FR 22109 - Aluminum Extrusions from the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... Aluminium, Ltd., a producer of aluminum extrusions, for the 2008 2009 fiscal year. See Volume II of the..., produced by an extrusion process, made from aluminum alloys having metallic elements corresponding to the alloy series designations published by The Aluminum Association commencing with the numbers 1, 3, and 6...

  8. Evaluation of methods for cleaning low carbon uranium metal and alloy samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, K.; Dixon, M.

    1979-01-01

    Several methods for cleaning uranium samples prior to carbon analysis, using a Leco Carbon Analyzer, were evaluated. Use of Oakite Aluminum NST Cleaner followed by water and acetone rinse was found to be the best overall technique

  9. Considerations on the analytic control of sulphide tracks in metal uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Gasco Sanchez, C.

    1956-01-01

    Volumetric and colorimetric determinations of sulphur (sulphide) in uranium have been carried out by acid treatment and evaluation of SH 2 . According to the experimental results a discussion of both methods has been made. (Author)

  10. Kinetic and thermodynamic bases to resolve issues regarding conditioning of uranium metal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.; Ballinger, R.G.; Simpson, K.A.

    1994-12-01

    Numerous uranium - bearing fuels are corroding in fuel storage pools in several countries. At facilities where reprocessing is no longer available, dry storage is being evaluated to preclude aqueous corrosion that is ongoing. It is essential that thermodynamic and kinetic factors are accounted for in transitions of corroding uranium-bearing fuels to dry storage. This paper addresses a process that has been proposed to move Hanford N-Reactor fuel from wet storage to dry storage

  11. 133Xe release during post-irradiation annealing of uranium metal in the presence of a constant volume of air Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marei, S.A.; El-Garhy, M.; El-Bayoumy, S.; Muenze, R.; Hladik, O.

    1978-01-01

    The fractional release of 133 Xe at different temperatures was studied as a function of time in the presence of air during post-irradiation annealing of uranium metal. The relation between the fractional release and tsup(1/2) was found to be irregular. There is an initial step in the annealing curves (at the temperature range of 400-710 deg C) which decreases by increasing temperature and totally disappears at the high temperature of 800-1000 deg C. The initial step was found to be due to the surface oxidation of uranium metal. The other two parts of the release curves are normal for 133 Xe release from uranium metal. Since in this work the irradiation temperature is low ( 133 Xe. (T.G.)

  12. A Metal Stable Isotope Approach to Understanding Uranium Mobility Across Roll Front Redox Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. T.; Basu, A.; Christensen, J. N.; DePaolo, D. J.; Heikoop, J. M.; Reimus, P. W.; Maher, K.; Weaver, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary roll-front uranium (U) ore deposits are the principal source of U for nuclear fuel in the USA and an important part of the current all-of-the-above energy strategy. Mining of roll-front U ore in the USA is primarily by in situ alkaline oxidative dissolution of U minerals. There are significant environmental benefits to in situ mining including no mine tailings or radioactive dust, however, the long-term immobilization of U in the aquifer after the completion of mining remains uncertain. We have utilized the metal stable isotopes U, Se and Mo in groundwater from roll-front mines in Texas and Wyoming to quantify the aquifer redox conditions and predict the onset of U reduction after post mining aquifer restoration. Supporting information from the geochemistry of groundwater and aquifer sediments are used to understand the transport of U prior to and after in situ mining. Groundwater was collected across 4 mining units at the Rosita mine in the Texas coastal plain and 2 mining units at the Smith Ranch mine in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. In general, the sampled waters are moderately reducing and ore zone wells contain the highest aqueous U concentrations. The lowest U concentrations occur in monitoring wells downgradient of the ore zone. 238U/235U is lowest in downgradient wells and is correlated with aqueous U concentrations. Rayleigh distillation models of the 238U/235U are consistent with U isotope fractionation factors of 1.0004-1.001, similar to lab-based studies. Based on these results we conclude that redox reactions continue to affect U distribution in the ore zone and downgradient regions. We also measured aqueous selenium isotope (δ82Se) and molybdenum isotope (δ98Mo) compositions in the Rosita groundwater. Se(VI) primarily occurs in the upgradient wells and is absent in most ore zone and downgradient wells. Rayleigh distillation models suggest reduction of Se(VI) along the groundwater flow path and when superimposed on the U isotope data

  13. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  14. Assessment of Radioactive Materials and Heavy Metals in the Surface Soil around the Bayanwula Prospective Uranium Mining Area in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haribala Bai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work is the first systematic and large scale study on radioactive materials and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area in China. In this work, both natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and heavy metals in 48 surface soil samples were analyzed using High Purity Germanium (HPGe γ spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The obtained mean activity concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs were 25.81 ± 9.58, 24.85 ± 2.77, 29.40 ± 3.14, 923.0 ± 47.2, and 5.64 ± 4.56 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose rate were 76.7 ± 3.1 nGy/h and 83.1 ± 3.8 μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, and internal hazard index were also calculated, and their mean values were within the acceptable limits. The estimated lifetime cancer risk was 3.2 × 10−4/Sv. The heavy metal contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb from the surface soil samples were measured and their health risks were then assessed. The concentrations of all heavy metals were much lower than the average backgrounds in China except for lead which was about three times higher than that of China’s mean. The non-cancer and cancer risks from the heavy metals were estimated, which are all within the acceptable ranges. In addition, the correlations between the radionuclides and the heavy metals in surface soil samples were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. Strong positive correlations between radionuclides and the heavy metals at the 0.01 significance level were found. In conclusion, the contents of radionuclides and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area are at a normal level.

  15. Ultrastructural observations of target-organs of the crayfish Orconectes limosus exposed to metallic pollutants: application to uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasset, G.; Simon, O.; Floriani, M.

    2004-01-01

    Using electron microscopy associated with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAXTEM), ultrastructure and elemental analysis in subcellular micro-localization can bring understanding to both metabolic cycle of a metallic pollutant and its potential effects at the subcellular scale. The approach consists in comparing both structures and micro-localization in various tissues/organs ultrathin sections (70-140 nm thickness) obtained from control organisms (i.e. not exposed to a given metal) and exposed organisms. However, the observations of ultrastructural effects of metal exposure involved robust comparison to reference subcellular and cellular organization. Consequently, preliminary developments presented in this poster have been performed from the non-contaminated freshwater crayfish Orconectes limosus (adult at inter-moult state). Studies of ultrastructural images and elemental composition of subcellular mineral deposits were carried out on target organs of uranium accumulation such as the digestive gland, the gills, the intestine and the antennal gland, organs participating in the detoxification, primary accumulation and depuration mechanisms. Observations indicated cell-specific architecture (identification of main organelles, frequency, length of cells), the range of natural variation of the cell organisation between individuals and identification of cellular types. Information will allow then to focus on these identified specific organization after metallic exposure. These ultrastructural observations performed on reference organisms constitute necessarily a first set of data for the cellular metallic effects analysis. (author)

  16. Validation of ion chromatography for the determination of transition metal ions along with alkali, alkaline earth metal elements for uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Prakash, Amrit; Afzal, Mohd.; Panakkal, J.P.

    2009-02-01

    The present report describes the use of Ion chromatography (IC) methods with spectrophotometric and direct conductivity detection for the determination of transition metal elements and alkali alkaline earth metal ions in UO 2 pellets. Transmet analytical column and Metrosep- cation 1-2 column were used for the separation of transition metal elements and alkali and alkaline earth metal elements respectively. Oxalic acid and mixture of pyridine 2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), Na 2 SO 4 and NaCl were used as mobile phase for the separation of transition metal ions and monitored after post - column reaction with 4,2-pyridylazo resorcinol (PAR) at 520nm spectrophotometrically. In the determination of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions the interference of transition metals are removed by complexing them with PDCA. Mixture of tartaric acid and PDCA employed in the separation of alkali and alkaline earth metal ions and monitored on direct conductivity detector. Mobile phase composition was optimised for the base line separation. Calibration plots of Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Co 2+ , Cd 2+ , Mn 2+ , Li + , Na + , K + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and Sr 2+ were linear over a wide dynamic range with regression coefficient better than 0.999. Detection limit of above ions were between 5-30ppb. To prevent the overloading of the cation exchange column, uranium matrix was removed from UO 2 sample by solvent extraction with 30% TBP - TOPO/CCl 4 . Ten sintered UO2 pellets of same lot were analysed and R.S.D. ±10% was obtained. These methods were validated by analysis of ILCE standards of UO 2 . (author)

  17. Thermal Analysis of Pure Uranium Metal, UMo and UMoSi Alloys Using a Differential Thermal Analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanlinastuti; Sutri Indaryati; Rahmiati

    2010-01-01

    Thermal analysis of pure uranium metal, U-7%Mo and U-7%Mo-1%Si alloys have been done using a Differential Thermal Analyzer (DTA). The experiments are conducted in order to measure the thermal stability, thermochemical properties of elevated temperature and enthalpy of the specimens. From the analysis results it is showed that uranium metal will transform from α to β phases at temperature of 667.16°C and enthalpy of 2.3034 cal/g and from β to γ phases at temperature of 773.05 °C and enthalpy of 2.8725 cal/g and start melting at temperature of 1125.26 °C and enthalpy of 2.1316 cal/g. The U-7%Mo shows its thermal stability up to temperature of 650 °C and its thermal changes at temperature of 673.75 °C indicated by the formation of an endothermic peak and enthalpy of 0.0257 cal/g. The U-7%Mo-1%Si alloys shows its thermal stability up to temperature of 550 °C and its thermal changes at temperature of 574.18 °C indicated by the formation of an endothermic peak and enthalpy of 0.613 cal/g. From the three specimens it is showed that they have a good thermal stability at temperature up to 550 °C. (author)

  18. Antioxidant response and metal accumulation in tissues of Iberian green frogs (Pelophylax perezi) inhabiting a deactivated uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Sérgio M; Antunes, Sara C; Nunes, Bruno; Gonçalves, Fernando; Pereira, Ruth

    2011-08-01

    Human mining activities tend often to generate greatly impacted areas which remain contaminated for long periods of time, giving rise to extreme habitats. Mining sites are usually characterized for the production of metal rich effluents with very low pH. In this work we analyzed physical and chemical parameters of water from a deactivated uranium mine pond (M) and a reference site (REF) as well as their metal content. Furthermore, we determined and compared metal accumulation in liver, kidney, bones, muscle and skin of Pelophylax perezi from REF with P. perezi from M. We also determined the enzymatic activities of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (Gred), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx; both selenium-dependent and selenium-independent) in liver, kidney, lung and heart. Additionally, lipoperoxidation (LPO) was also assessed in the same tissues via thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined in muscle. Our results revealed that the majority of metals were in higher concentrations in tissues of organisms from M. This trend was especially evident for U whose content reached a difference of 1350 fold between REF and M organisms. None of the organs tested for antioxidant defenses revealed LPO, nonetheless, with exception for liver, all organs from the M frogs presented increased total GPx activity and selenium-dependent GPx. However, this response was significant only for the lung, probably as a consequence of the significant inhibition of CAT upstream and to cope with the subsequent increase in H(2)O(2). Lungs were the organs displaying greater responsiveness of the anti-oxidant stress system in frogs from the uranium mine area.

  19. Measurement of surface temperature profiles on liquid uranium metal during electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohba, Hironori; Shibata, Takemasa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    Surface temperature distributions of liquid uranium in a water-cooled copper crucible during electron beam evaporation were measured. Evaporation surface was imaged by a lens through a band-path filter (650{+-}5 nm) and a double mirror system on a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. The video signals of the recorded image were connected to an image processor and converted to two-dimensional spectral radiance profiles. The surface temperatures were obtained from the spectral radiation intensity ratio of the evaporation surface and a freezing point of uranium and/or a reference light source using Planck`s law of radiation. The maximum temperature exceeded 3000 K and had saturation tendency with increasing electron beam input. The measured surface temperatures agreed with those estimated from deposition rates and data of saturated vapor pressure of uranium. (author)

  20. Selection of lixiviant System for the alkaline in-situ Leaching of uranium from an arkosic type of sandstone and measuring the dissolution behaviour of some metals and non-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Y.; Shah, S.S.; Siddiq, M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory simulation study was carried out to check the possibility of alkaline in-situ leaching of uranium from an arkosic type of sandstone recovered from a specific location at a depth of 300-500 m. The ore body was overlaying impervious clay shale below the water table. Different CO/sub 3/ containing soluble salts were tested as complexing agent of the UO/sup +2/ ions along with H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ as oxidizing agent. The lixiviant system, comprising NH/sub 4/HCO/sub 3/ as complexing agent along with H/Sub 2/O/sub 2/ as oxidizing agent in concentrations of 5 g/L and 0.5 g/L respectively, was found to be the most efficient for the leaching of uranium among the 25 different compositions employed. Along with uranium, the dissolution behaviour of 15 other metals, non-metals and radicals, including eight transition metals, was also observed in the lixiviant employed. These were Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, SO/sub 4/, CO/sub 3/, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Mo. It was found that the leaching of uranium compared to non-transition et als/radicals followed the trend Cl > SO > U > Na > K > Mg > Ca > CO. The comparison of uranium leaching to the transition metals was in the order U > Cr > Mo > V > Ti > Cu > Zn > Mn > Fe. Physical parameters like pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and conductivity were also measured for the fresh and pregnant lixiviants. It was found that the leaching of uranium is directly related to the concentration of native soluble hexavalent uranium, contact time of the lixiviant and ore and to some extent with the total concentration of uranium as well as the porosity and permeability of the ore. (author)

  1. Source-driven noise analysis measurements with neptunium metal reflected by high enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentine, Timothy E.; Mattingly, John K.

    2003-01-01

    Subcritical noise analysis measurements have been performed with neptunium ( 237 Np) sphere reflected by highly enriched uranium. These measurements were performed at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility in December 2002 to provide an estimate of the subcriticality of 237 Np reflected by various amounts of high-enriched uranium. This paper provides a description of the measurements and presents some preliminary results of the analysis of the measurements. The measured and calculated spectral ratios differ by 15% whereas the 'interpreted' and calculated k eff values differ by approximately 1%. (author)

  2. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  3. Rapid Continuous Multimaterial Extrusion Bioprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wanjun; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Heinrich, Marcel A.; De Ferrari, F; Jang, HL; Bakht, SM; Alvarez, MM; Yang, J; Li, YC; Trujillo-de Stantiago, G; Miri, AK; Zhu, K; Khoshakhlagh, P; Prakash, G; Cheng, H; Guan, X; Zhong, Z; Ju, J; Zhu, GH; Jin, X; Ryon Shin, Su; Dokmeci, M.R.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    The development of a multimaterial extrusion bioprinting platform is reported. This platform is capable of depositing multiple coded bioinks in a continuous manner with fast and smooth switching among different reservoirs for rapid fabrication of complex constructs, through digitally controlled

  4. Direct reduction of uranium dioxide and few other metal oxides to corresponding metals by high temperature molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohandas, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Molten salt based electro-reduction processes, capable of directly converting solid metal oxides to metals with minimum intermediate steps, are being studied worldwide. Production of metals apart, the process assumes importance in nuclear technology in the context of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent oxide fuels, for it serves as an intermediate step to convert spent oxide fuel to a metal alloy, which in turn can be processed by molten salt electro-refining method to gain the actinides present in it. In the context of future metal fuel fast reactor programme, the electrochemical process was studied for conversion of solid UO_2 to U metal in LiCl-1wt.% Li_2O melt at 650 °C with platinum anode at the Metal Processing Studies Section, PMPD, IGCAR. A brief overview of the work is presented in the paper

  5. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monado, F.; Permana, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8 % HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance. (author)

  6. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik; Aziz, Ferhat; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance

  7. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  8. A Point Kinetics Model for Estimating Neutron Multiplication of Bare Uranium Metal in Tagged Neutron Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweardy, Matthew C.; McConchie, Seth; Hayward, Jason P.

    2017-01-01

    An extension of the point kinetics model is developed in this paper to describe the neutron multiplicity response of a bare uranium object under interrogation by an associated particle imaging deuterium-tritium (D-T) measurement system. This extended model is used to estimate the total neutron multiplication of the uranium. Both MCNPX-PoliMi simulations and data from active interrogation measurements of highly enriched and depleted uranium geometries are used to evaluate the potential of this method and to identify the sources of systematic error. The detection efficiency correction for measured coincidence response is identified as a large source of systematic error. If the detection process is not considered, results suggest that the method can estimate total multiplication to within 13% of the simulated value. Values for multiplicity constants in the point kinetics equations are sensitive to enrichment due to (n, xn) interactions by D-T neutrons and can introduce another significant source of systematic bias. This can theoretically be corrected if isotopic composition is known a priori. Finally, the spatial dependence of multiplication is also suspected of introducing further systematic bias for high multiplication uranium objects.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy in intermetallic compounds containing both uranium and 3d-metal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, Alexander V.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Gorbunov, Denis; Šantavá, Eva; Šebek, Josef; Žáček, Martin; Homma, Y.; Shiokawa, Y.; Satoh, I.; Yamamura, Y.; Komatsubara, T.; Watanabe, K.; Koyama, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 9 (2013), s. 727-733 ISSN 0031-918X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0150 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranium intermetallics * magnetic anisotropy * ferromagnetism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.605, year: 2013

  10. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  11. Anodic dissolution polarography used for the direct determination of metals in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno, L.A.O.; Abrao, A.

    1976-01-01

    An electrochemical method of analysis, consisting of pre-concentration and determination of the elements Cd, Pb, Tl, Bi and Cu, present as impurities in uranium salts has been developed. The anodic stripping polarography has been employed using a dropping mercury electrode. The interference of uranium itself in the determination of these elements was eliminated by changing its reduction potential to - 1,0V (with respect to the Ag/AgCl electrode), thus making possible the analysis of the elements that are reduced at more positive potentials. This was achieved by the addition of sufficient amount of K 2 CO 3 to the uranyl chloride solution (in the 4:1 carbonate to uranyl ratio) so as to form the uranyl tricarbonate ([UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 ] 4- ) complex anion. The supporting electrolyte was the uranyl complex in K 2 CO 3 0,1M. The final concentration of uranium ranged from 2 to 5 g/l. The detection limits for the studied elements varied from 0,08 to 1,27 ppm (μg of the element/gU). This technique has proved to be very convenient since provides sensitivity and precision. The method makes possible the determination of mentioned elements directly in uranium solutions, avoiding any previous chemical separations [pt

  12. A Point Kinetics Model for Estimating Neutron Multiplication of Bare Uranium Metal in Tagged Neutron Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweardy, Matthew C.; McConchie, Seth; Hayward, Jason P.

    2017-07-01

    An extension of the point kinetics model is developed to describe the neutron multiplicity response of a bare uranium object under interrogation by an associated particle imaging deuterium-tritium (D-T) measurement system. This extended model is used to estimate the total neutron multiplication of the uranium. Both MCNPX-PoliMi simulations and data from active interrogation measurements of highly enriched and depleted uranium geometries are used to evaluate the potential of this method and to identify the sources of systematic error. The detection efficiency correction for measured coincidence response is identified as a large source of systematic error. If the detection process is not considered, results suggest that the method can estimate total multiplication to within 13% of the simulated value. Values for multiplicity constants in the point kinetics equations are sensitive to enrichment due to (n, xn) interactions by D-T neutrons and can introduce another significant source of systematic bias. This can theoretically be corrected if isotopic composition is known a priori. The spatial dependence of multiplication is also suspected of introducing further systematic bias for high multiplication uranium objects.

  13. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  14. High-sensitive detection by direct interrogation of 14 MeV Acc neutrons, (1). Uranium-contained metal matrix in a waste dram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haruyama, Mitsuo; Takase, Misao; Tobita, Hiroshi; Mori, Takamasa

    2004-01-01

    Previously, authors reported that the 14 MeV-neutron direct interrogation method has made possible measure for the discrimination of clearance levels of concrete solidification uranium waste. In this paper, applicability of the method to metal waste matrix is discussed based on the results of simulation experiments by the continuation energy Monte Carlo calculation code (MVP). The problem is that self-neutron moderation effect in a waste cannot be expected when a waste matrix is metal. To solve this, a moderator is adopted so as to surround a metal waste drum and to slow down suitably a 14 MeV neutrons. The simulation calculation showed that this effect is satisfactorily large. The detection limit of radioactivity concentration to 4.5% enriched uranium has been found to be 0.0973 Bq/g in the metal waste model of 215.59 kg gross weight, in which 61 pipes are stuffed into its drum. Moreover, the position-dependent sensitivity difference in a metal waste drum can be settled as small as to ±13.5%. In conclusion, it can be said that 14 MeV-neutron direct interrogation method can be applied to the waste of a metal system: the detection sensitivity is high enough and the position-dependent sensitivity difference is small admittedly. Hence the method can be applied also to discrimination measurement of the clearance level of metal uranium waste. (author)

  15. Preliminary report on the geology of the Lakeview uranium area, Lake County, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    This study was directed partly toward determining uranium resources, but, more specifically toward establishing the geochemical relations of uranium and other metals with rhyolite bodies in the Lakeview uranium area and to compare these bodies with similar rhyolitic bodies outside the area. The ultimate goal of this work was to determine, if possible, the uranium resource potential of these kinds of rocks over an area of several thousand square kilometers and to apply knowledge gained from this resource assessment to similar terranes within the Northern Basin and Range Province. The regional evaluation is still in progress, and its results will be reported at some appropriate time in the future. To these ends a review was made of previous geologic studies of the area and of the uranium deposits themselves, and some regional geologic mapping was done at a scale of 1:24,000. A geologic map was prepared of an area covering about 450 km 2 (approx. 170 mi 2 ), more or less centered on the White King and Lucky Lass mines and on the major cluster of uranium-bearing rhyolites, and some geologic reconnaissance and attendant sampling of rhyolite intrusives and extrusives well outside the Lakeview uranium area were completed. Isotopic dates were obtained on some units and magnetic polarity characteristics were determined on many units in order to more firmly establish age and stratigraphic relations of the diverse volcanic and volcaniclastic units of the region. Major oxide chemistry and selected trace-element chemistry were obtained on those rhyolitic units suitable for analysis in order to establish distribution patterns for uranium, as well as several other metals, in the rhyolitic rocks of the Lakeview uranium area and to make regional correlations with other analyzed rhyolitic rocks

  16. Field-portable and automated immunosensors for hexavalent uranium, other heavy metals and chelators. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.

    2009-01-01

    This is the final technical report for this 10-year project. A better understanding of in situ bioremediation processes and the development of strategies to enhance bacterial remediation of contaminated sites depend either directly or indirectly upon accurate detection and measurement of organics, metal and other toxic elements prior to, during and following the remediation process. Detection and measurement costs are presently high due to the complex methodologies required for analysis. Remediation costs could be significantly reduced through the use of rapid, simple on-site methods. The cost of laboratory analysis continues to climb and the outlay for the assessment of a single site can frequently reach hundreds of thousands of dollars. One estimate suggests that the use of low cost field methods (defined as less than $100/test) with 5-20% standard laboratory confirmation could reduce analytical costs by greater than 70%. Perhaps as important as the cost of analysis is ability to obtain data about the remediation process in near real-time. The instruments normally used for environmental analysis of uranium (atomic absorption spectrophotometer, inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer, IC-MS and kinetic phosphorescence analyzer) or can be quite expensive; these instruments are thus usually located only in centralized facilities. Environmental samples must therefore be transported to these facilities and often wait in a queue before they can be analyzed. Both sample transport and time-in-queue lead to long turn-around times (days to weeks). Such long turn-around times are especially worrisome during site remediation, especially when an unexpected finding might dictate a change in the methodologies being employed at the site. The goal of this project was to develop sensors that could yield reliable data in near realtime (< 1 hour) be field-ready (ie, simple, durable and accurate) and present low costs (<< $100/assay and <$5,000 for the initial equipment

  17. Nuclear criticality safety for warehousing of 55-gal drums containing highly enriched uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.C.; Dodds, H.L.

    1989-01-01

    Subcritical data for six separate arrays of 55-gal 17H steel shipping/storage containers is calculated and used to determine safe storage limits for U(97.5)-metal in a warehouse environment at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Results are presented for three different forms of fissile material: 97.5 wt% 235 U enriched metal (ρ 0 = 18.76 g/cm 3 ) cylinders, metal spheres, and low density (ρ = 0.25 ρ 0 ) metal cylinders

  18. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of a nitric acid/argon ion cleaned uranium metal surface at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.J.; Sherwood, P.M.A.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to study the surface of uranium metal cleaned by nitric acid treatment and argon ion etching, followed by heating in a high vacuum. The surface is shown to contain UOsub(2-x) species over the entire temperature range studied. Heating to temperatures in the range 400-600 0 C generates a mixture of this oxide, the metal and a carbide and/or oxycarbide species. (author)

  19. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  20. Direct isotope ratio measurement of uranium metal by emission spectrometry on a laser-produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietsch, W.; Petit, A.; Briand, A.

    1995-01-01

    The method of Optical Emission Spectrometry on a Laser-Produced Plasma (OES/LPP) at reduced pressure has been studied for the determination of the uranium isotope ratio ( 235 U/ 238 U). Spectral profiles of the investigated transition U-II 424.437 nm show the possibility to obtain an isotopic spectral resolution in a laser-produced plasma under exactly defined experimental conditions. Spectroscopic data and results are presented. (author)

  1. Enhanced phytoextraction of uranium and selected heavy metals by Indian mustard and ryegrass using biodegradable soil amendments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duquene, L. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vandenhove, H. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.be; Tack, F.; Meers, E. [Ghent University, Laboratory for Analytical Chemistry and Applied Ecochemistry, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baeten, J. [Katholieke Hogeschool Kempen, Department of Health-Care and Chemistry, Kleinhoefstraat 4, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Wannijn, J. [SCK-CEN, Biosphere Impact Studies, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2009-02-15

    The applicability of biodegradable amendments in phytoremediation to increase the uptake of uranium (U), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) was tested in a greenhouse experiment. Plants were cultivated during one month on two soils with naturally or industrially increased contaminant levels of U. Treatments with citric acid, NH{sub 4}-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at a rate of 5 mmol kg{sup -1} dry soil caused increases in soil solution concentrations that were up to 18 times higher for U and up to 1570 times higher for other heavy metals, compared to the controls. Shoot concentrations increased to a much smaller extent. With EDDS, 19-, 34-, and 37-fold increases were achieved in shoots of Indian mustard for U, Pb and Cu, respectively. The increases in plant uptake of Cd, Cr and Zn were limited to a factor of four at most. Ryegrass generally extracted less U and metals than Indian mustard. Despite a marked increase of U and metal concentrations in shoots after addition of amendments, the estimated time required to obtain an acceptable reduction in soil contaminant concentrations was impractically long. Only for Cu and Zn in one of the studied soils, could the Flemish standards for clean soil theoretically be attained in less than 100 years.

  2. Enhanced phytoextraction of uranium and selected heavy metals by Indian mustard and ryegrass using biodegradable soil amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquene, L.; Vandenhove, H.; Tack, F.; Meers, E.; Baeten, J.; Wannijn, J.

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of biodegradable amendments in phytoremediation to increase the uptake of uranium (U), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) was tested in a greenhouse experiment. Plants were cultivated during one month on two soils with naturally or industrially increased contaminant levels of U. Treatments with citric acid, NH 4 -citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at a rate of 5 mmol kg -1 dry soil caused increases in soil solution concentrations that were up to 18 times higher for U and up to 1570 times higher for other heavy metals, compared to the controls. Shoot concentrations increased to a much smaller extent. With EDDS, 19-, 34-, and 37-fold increases were achieved in shoots of Indian mustard for U, Pb and Cu, respectively. The increases in plant uptake of Cd, Cr and Zn were limited to a factor of four at most. Ryegrass generally extracted less U and metals than Indian mustard. Despite a marked increase of U and metal concentrations in shoots after addition of amendments, the estimated time required to obtain an acceptable reduction in soil contaminant concentrations was impractically long. Only for Cu and Zn in one of the studied soils, could the Flemish standards for clean soil theoretically be attained in less than 100 years

  3. Enhanced phytoextraction of uranium and selected heavy metals by Indian mustard and ryegrass using biodegradable soil amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquène, L; Vandenhove, H; Tack, F; Meers, E; Baeten, J; Wannijn, J

    2009-02-15

    The applicability of biodegradable amendments in phytoremediation to increase the uptake of uranium (U), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) was tested in a greenhouse experiment. Plants were cultivated during one month on two soils with naturally or industrially increased contaminant levels of U. Treatments with citric acid, NH4-citrate/citric acid, oxalic acid, S,S-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) or nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) at a rate of 5 mmol kg(-1) dry soil caused increases in soil solution concentrations that were up to 18 times higher for U and up to 1570 times higher for other heavy metals, compared to the controls. Shoot concentrations increased to a much smaller extent. With EDDS, 19-, 34-, and 37-fold increases were achieved in shoots of Indian mustard for U, Pb and Cu, respectively. The increases in plant uptake of Cd, Cr and Zn were limited to a factor of four at most. Ryegrass generally extracted less U and metals than Indian mustard. Despite a marked increase of U and metal concentrations in shoots after addition of amendments, the estimated time required to obtain an acceptable reduction in soil contaminant concentrations was impractically long. Only for Cu and Zn in one of the studied soils, could the Flemish standards for clean soil theoretically be attained in less than 100 years.

  4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the initial oxidation of uranium metal in oxygen+water-vapour mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, G.C.; Tucker, P.M.; Lewis, R.A. (Central Electricity Generating Board, Berkeley (UK). Berkeley Nuclear Labs.)

    1984-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (X.p.s.) has been used to study the chemical nature of the oxide film initially produced on clean uranium metal in oxygen + water-vapour atmospheres. The rate of reaction has been monitored and the nature of the surface film determined. From a consideration of the O 1s and U 4f X.p. spectra it has been possible to advance a mechanism which explains the complex nature of the surface oxide and the lack of satellite structure in the spectra. This is postulated to be a consequence of the way in which OH/sup -/ is involved in the growth of the oxide and the presence of hydrogen in the surface film. The presence of oxygen retards the water oxidation reaction by inhibiting the decomposition of water vapour at the gas/oxide interface.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the initial oxidation of uranium metal in oxygen+water-vapour mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Tucker, P.M.; Lewis, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (X.p.s.) has been used to study the chemical nature of the oxide film initially produced on clean uranium metal in oxygen + water-vapour atmospheres. The rate of reaction has been monitored and the nature of the surface film determined. From a consideration of the O 1s and U 4f X.p. spectra it has been possible to advance a mechanism which explains the complex nature of the surface oxide and the lack of satellite structure in the spectra. This is postulated to be a consequence of the way in which OH - is involved in the growth of the oxide and the presence of hydrogen in the surface film. The presence of oxygen retards the water oxidation reaction by inhibiting the decomposition of water vapour at the gas/oxide interface. (author)

  6. Trace metals in vegetables and fruits cultivated around the surroundings of Tummalapalle uranium mining site, Andhra Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allabaksh Murad Basha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables (Tomato – Solanum lycopersicum, green chilli – Capsicum annum and bitter gourd – Momordica charantia and fruits (Banana – Musa acuminata colla, papaya – Carica papaya and mosambi – Citrus limetta from the cultivated areas around the Tummalapalle uranium mining site were analyzed for trace metals (Al, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, Be, V, Co, Cd and U using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS. As per the estimated data, the concentrations of trace metals in vegetables and fruits are found in the range of 47.5–7.8 mg/kg for Al, 9.7–1.0 mg/kg for Cr, 3.8–1.0 mg/kg for Mn, 75.5–13.9 mg/kg for Fe, 1.4–0.2 mg/kg for Ni, 2.3–0.8 mg/kg for Cu, 9.2–3.1 mg/kg for Zn, 0.2–1.4 mg/kg for Pb, 19.2–1.9 μg/kg for Be, 96.1–15.8 μg/kg for V, 48.2–12.9 μg/kg for Co, 46.5–2.3 μg/kg for Cd and 16.4–2.7 μg/kg for U. The trace metals observed are compared to the literature reported values. Trace elemental data were subjected to statistical analysis to examine the interrelationship between the investigated trace elements and possible source identification of the trace metal contamination in vegetable and fruits. Daily intake of trace metals through ingestion of vegetables and fruits are also calculated.

  7. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  8. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate's beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ∼60 C, 80 C, and 95 C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  9. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  10. Extrusion processing : effects on dry canine diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, Q.D.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: Extrusion, Canine diet, Protein, Lysine, Starch gelatinization, Palatability, Drying.

    Extrusion cooking is a useful and economical tool for processing animal feed. This high temperature, short time processing technology causes chemical and physical changes that alter the

  11. High loading uranium plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    Two embodiments of a high uranium fuel plate are disclosed which contain a meat comprising structured uranium compound confined between a pari of diffusion bonded ductile metal cladding plates uniformly covering the meat, the meat hiving a uniform high fuel loading comprising a content of uranium compound greater than about 45 Vol. % at a porosity not greater than about 10 Vol. %. In a first embodiment, the meat is a plurality of parallel wires of uranium compound. In a second embodiment, the meat is a dispersion compact containing uranium compound. The fuel plates are fabricated by a hot isostatic pressing process

  12. PROCESS OF RECOVERING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, J.M.; Larson, C.E.

    1958-10-01

    A process is presented for recovering uranium values from calutron deposits. The process consists in treating such deposits to produce an oxidlzed acidic solution containing uranium together with the following imparities: Cu, Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Zn. The uranium is recovered from such an impurity-bearing solution by adjusting the pH of the solution to the range 1.5 to 3.0 and then treating the solution with hydrogen peroxide. This results in the precipitation of uranium peroxide which is substantially free of the metal impurities in the solution. The peroxide precipitate is then separated from the solution, washed, and calcined to produce uranium trioxide.

  13. Radium and heavy metal transport beneath an abandoned uranium tailings dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffery, J.J.; Sinclair, G.; Lowson, R.T.

    1988-09-01

    An abandoned uranium tailings dam at Moline in the Northern Territory of Australia was the site of a study to assess the movement of potentially toxic elements from tailings into subsoil. The tailings at Moline were first laid down in 1959 and have since been leached by prevailing rainfall. Sixteen sampling sites were selected to give a good representation of the dam. At each site, a trench was excavated through the tailings and into the subsoil, then samples of subsoil were taken at 10 cm intervals down to a depth of 50 cm. A sample of the tailings overlying the tailings-subsoil interface was also taken. Samples were analysed for radium, uranium, copper, zinc, and lead. At most sites there was only minor accumulation of these elements in the 0-10 cm subsoil layer immediately below the interface, with concentrations typically one or two orders of magnitude less than the concentrations in overlying tailings. Below 10 cm, the concentrations were typically at or close to background concentrations

  14. Detection of certain minerals of uranium, zinc, lead and other metals using photoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigel, H.O.; Robbins, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    We have discovered that certain photoluminescent minerals of uranium, lead, zinc, fluorine, tungsten and other elements which may naturally occur at the surface of the earth can be selectively detected in the presence of most other photoluminescent minerals and organic materials which are likely to occur at the earth's surface. The base of selective ldetection is the discovery that the lifetimes of photoluminescent emission of materials in the latter class are much shorter than the lifetimes of photoluminescent emission of materials in the former class. This invention utilizes this discovery in the detection of minerals of uranium, zinc, lead, flourine, tungsten, molybdenum, mercury and other elements. In one embodiment of the invention, using a laser or other short duration source of optical excitation, measurements of the photoluminescent response of the earth are made at times sufficiently long for the photoluminescence of other common and unwanted sources to have substantially decayed, thereby selectively detection and identifying certain minerals of potiential economic interest. In another embodiment a source of light is modulated at a predetermined frequency and the photoluminescent response of the earth which is out-of-phase with the source is measured. In a third embodiment this source of light may be incident solar radiation after passage through asuitable modulator

  15. The reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Vincent Wilhelmus Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to increase the understanding of the reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane. Overall, several issues were identified: • Using a relative simple extrusion model, the reactive extrusion process can be described. This model can be used to further investigate

  16. 75 FR 80527 - Aluminum Extrusions From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ...)] Aluminum Extrusions From China AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Scheduling of... of subsidized and less-than-fair-value imports from China of aluminum extrusions, primarily provided... contained in Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Preliminary Determination of...

  17. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  18. Uranium material removing and recovering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, Shin-ichi.

    1997-01-01

    A uranium material removing and recovering device for use in removing surplus uranium heavy metal (UO 2 ) generated in a uranium handling facility comprises a uranium material removing device and a uranium material recovering device. The uranium material removing device comprises an adsorbing portion filled with a uranium adsorbent, a control portion for controlling the uranium adsorbent of the uranium adsorbing portion by a controlling agent, a uranium adsorbing device connected thereto and a jetting device for jetting the adsorbing liquid to equipments deposited with uranium. The recovering device comprises a recovering apparatus for recovering uranium materials deposited with the adsorbent liquid removed by the jetting device and a recovering tank for storing the recovered uranium materials. The device of the present invention can remove surplus uranium simply and safely, mitigate body's load upon removing and recovering operations, facilitate the processing for the exchange of the adsorbent and reduces the radioactive wastes. (T.M.)

  19. Development of a pneumatic transport system for bulk transfer of metal grade uranium oxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manna, S.; Satpati, S.K.; Roy, S.B.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium oxide powder is a commonly handled ceramic powder in nuclear industries. Design of the powder transfer system is an important aspect because of some of its typical characteristics. Pneumatic transport system has been widely used in transferring powder from one place to another. A pneumatic transport system using vacuum has been presented in the paper. This is used for bulk transfer of UO 3 powder. The system consists of a cyclone separator and filter cloth at the top of the cyclone separator. The pneumatic transfer system provides high efficiency with sustainable performance and it is a compact, robust, handy and moveable unit. No degradation of the powder quality has been observed during transfer. The system provides highly efficient, easy and safe transfer of radioactive powder, better working environment for the operator. (author)

  20. Laboratory-scale catalysis studies of uranium and plutonium fluorination reactions by solid metal-fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Various catalysts were evaluated for their effect on the rate of fluorination of the tetrafluorides of uranium and plutonium to produce the hexafluorides. Results of this work show that CoF 3 and AgF 2 are more effective than NiF 2 for UF 4 fluorination, producing rate increases in the range of 150 to 300 compared to UF 4 and fluorine alone. The use of these three catalysts was also found effective in the fluorinations of PuO 2 /PuF 4 and pure PuF 4 . However, enhancements were less. NiF 2 produced the best increases which were 8.1 for PuO 2 /PuF 4 and 3.6 for PuF 4 . Experiments were conducted in a simple flow-loop. Even larger enhancements might be obtained with fluidized beds. Details of the apparatus, experiments, methods, and a discussion of results are presented

  1. Determination of trace metals in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.; Imakuma, K.

    1988-04-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of low concentrations of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the use of chemical treatment. The lower limits of detection range from 2 μg g -1 for nickel and manganese to 5 μg g -1 for copper. Samples are prepared in the form of double-layer pellets with boric acid as a binding agent. Standards are prepared in a U 3 O 8 matrix, which is more chemically stable than UO 2 and has similar matrix behaviour. The correlation coefficients for calibration curves are better than 0.999. Erros range from 2.4 % for chromium to 6.8 % for nickel. (author) [pt

  2. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDeavitt, Sean M

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metalExtrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich

  3. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDeavitt, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500 C to 600 C) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: (1) Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion - Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment - Extrusion database on DU metal - Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys - Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys - Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals (2) Low-temperature sintering of U alloys - Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment - Sintering database on DU metal - Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys - Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR and D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the

  4. Contribution to the study of gaseous Carburization of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban Hernandez, J. A.; Jimenez Moreno, J. M.; Villota Ruiz, P. de

    1966-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of uranium hydride powder obtained by hydrogenation of uranium turnings is studied on the first part of this paper. Carburization of the uranium hydride or metallic uranium powder with methane is studied in the second part. A method of uranium monocarbide fabrication under static atmosphere is described. On this method hydrogen is removed by means of an uranium getter. (Author) 6 refs

  5. Assessment of radioactive materials and heavy metals in the surface soil around uranium mining area of Tongliao, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Bao, Shanhu; Li, Yuhong

    2016-08-01

    Natural and artificial radionuclides and heavy metals in the surface soil of the uranium mining area of Tongliao, China, were measured using gamma spectrometry, flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry and microwave dissolution atomic fluorescence spectrometry respectively. The estimated average activity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (40)K and (137)Cs are 27.53±16.01, 15.89±5.20, 12.64±4.27, 746.84±38.24 and 4.23±4.76Bq/kg respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate in the air and annual effective dose rate are 46.58±5.26nGy/h and 57.13±6.45μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external and internal hazard indices were also calculated and their mean values are within the acceptable limits. The heavy metal concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Hg and As from the surface soil were measured and their health risks were then determined. Although the content of Cd is much higher than the average background in China, its non-cancer and cancer risk indices are all within the acceptable ranges. These calculated hazard indices to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rate are well below their permissible limit. In addition the correlations between the radioactivity concentrations of the radionuclides and the heavy metals in soil were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Improvements made in the methods of purifying uranium compounds and in the production of uranium metal at the Bouchet plant; Ameliorations apportees aux procedes de purification des composes d'uranium et a la fabrication de l'uranium metal a l'usine du Bouchet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decrop, J; Delange, M; Holder, J; Huet, H; Sauteron, J; Vertes, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    We intend to chart the development of the techniques used at the Bouchet plant since the First International Conference held in Geneva in 1955. During that Conference, the methods adopted at that time were described by B. GOLDSCHMIDT and P. VERTES. Generally speaking, the development since that time has been governed by the following factors: 1- Conversion to a mass-production scale: The metal output, which amounted to approximately 10 tons in 1952, practically doubled each year, reaching successive figures of 80 tons in 1955, 160 tons in 1956 and 300 tons in 1957. At this very moment the output capacity of the plant is approaching its maximum, set at 500 tons/year, which it will reach at the end of the year. Beyond this output figure, the work will be carried on by the second French uranium production plant, which is now being erected at Narbonne. 2- Gradual abandoning of ore treatment, resulting from the decentralization of the duties performed by the CEA; The Bouchet Plant had, as a matter of fact, the first French treatment facilities, operating on the basis of 10 to 20 tons of ore per day. This ore, first concentrated at the production site proper by means of physical or physico-chemical methods to at least a 2 per cent uranium content, was sufficiently valuable to warrant quite well the cost involved in shipping it. However, the increase in the production schedules led to the treatment of ores of lower and lower grades, and it became more profitable to proceed with the chemicalating of these low-grade ores at the site after more or less thorough grading and, if necessary, preconcentration. As a result, the Bouchet plant scarcely ever receives uranium ores; on the contrary, the mining companies send their chemical concentrates, uranous phosphate and then sodium uranate from the Gueugnon Works in Saone-et-Loire since 1955; magnesium uranate from the Ecarpiere Works in Vendee since the beginning of 1957 and, very soon, products from the works which are now being

  7. Study and development of refractory coatings for metallic uranium fusion and evaporation; Estudo e desenvolvimento de suportes refratarios para a fusao e a evaporacao de uranio metalico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Getulio de

    2004-07-01

    In melting process or evaporation of metallic uranium, the reaction with the crucible and the possible contamination of the molten metal should be avoided. This effect can be reduced using an inert and protective coating on the crucible walls. The selection of the coating should be based on the chemical inertia and the kinetic of the reaction products. By avoiding chemical reactions, the amount of impurities in the molten metal can be reduced, leading to an increased crucible lifetime. This work presents a comparative study among different crucible coatings used in the melting process of metallic uranium, at temperatures above its melting point. Samples of metallic uranium are melted in contact with different materials in a vacuum furnace. The reactions occur at a given temperature during a certain time interval; samples are then cooled down to room temperature. Finally, samples are characterized by optical and electronic microscopy, dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, surface roughness and X-ray diffraction. Samples preparation consists of polishing selected areas, and milling the reaction products originated from the corroded interfaces. The extent of the reactions is determined as a function of the temperature by optical microscopy and roughness analyses. The compositions of the reacted products are determined by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, and the phase changes by X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that alumina presented higher activation energy (39 kcal.mol{sup -1}) than magnesia (12 kcal.mol{sup -1}), otherwise, it is corroded faster. On the other hand, the alumina could be protected by a thick coating of titanium nitride, because no rection between titanium nitride and uranium was observed at temperatures near to 1700 K. After cooling to the room temperature, there is stress concentration between the graphite and the TiN layer, generating a compressive stress of 0,5 GPa. When uranium is deposited on the TiN, a tensile stress is generated in this new

  8. Effects of long-term radionuclide and heavy metal contamination on the activity of microbial communities, inhabiting uranium mining impacted soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteva, Silvena; Radeva, Galina; Traykov, Ivan; Kenarova, Anelia

    2016-03-01

    Ore mining and processing have greatly altered ecosystems, often limiting their capacity to provide ecosystem services critical to our survival. The soil environments of two abandoned uranium mines were chosen to analyze the effects of long-term uranium and heavy metal contamination on soil microbial communities using dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities as indicators of metal stress. The levels of soil contamination were low, ranging from 'precaution' to 'moderate', calculated as Nemerow index. Multivariate analyses of enzyme activities revealed the following: (i) spatial pattern of microbial endpoints where the more contaminated soils had higher dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, (ii) biological grouping of soils depended on both the level of soil contamination and management practice, (iii) significant correlations between both dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities and soil organic matter and metals (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn, but not U), and (iv) multiple relationships between the alkaline than the acid phosphatase and the environmental factors. The results showed an evidence of microbial tolerance and adaptation to the soil contamination established during the long-term metal exposure and the key role of soil organic matter in maintaining high microbial enzyme activities and mitigating the metal toxicity. Additionally, the results suggested that the soil microbial communities are able to reduce the metal stress by intensive phosphatase synthesis, benefiting a passive environmental remediation and provision of vital ecosystem services.

  9. Corrosion of metallic materials by uranium hexafluoride at high temperatures (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, G.

    1963-01-01

    The corrosion of the following metals or alloys by UF 6 : nickel, monel, Inconel, gold, platinum, stainless steel, is studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1000 deg. C. The test method, designed to avoid heating the apparatus containing the corrosive fluid to a high temperature, consists in using threadlike samples heated by the Joule effect, the rest of the apparatus being maintained close to room temperature. This technique makes it possible also to determine continuously the penetration of the corrosion by measuring the electrical resistance of the sample with a double Thomson bridge. A series of rapid comparison tests shows that stainless steel, precious metals and Inconel are attacked far too rapidly to be used above 500 deg. C; only monel and especially nickel appear capable of resisting at high temperatures. The detailed examination of the behaviour of nickel shows that the metallic fluoride is volatilized and that this influences the corrosion rate. It shows also the existence of a temperature zone situated between 550 and 700 deg. C in which occurs A strong intergranular corrosion the cause of which appears to be the presence of impurities in the metal. (author) [fr

  10. Pyrophoric behaviour of uranium hydride and uranium powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guyadec, F.; Génin, X.; Bayle, J. P.; Dugne, O.; Duhart-Barone, A.; Ablitzer, C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal stability and spontaneous ignition conditions of uranium hydride and uranium metal fine powders have been studied and observed in an original and dedicated experimental device placed inside a glove box under flowing pure argon. Pure uranium hydride powder with low amount of oxide (Oxidation mechanisms are proposed.

  11. Polonium (²¹⁰Po), uranium (²³⁴U, ²³⁸U) isotopes and trace metals in mosses from Sobieszewo Island, northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boryło, Alicja; Nowicki, Waldemar; Olszewski, Grzegorz; Skwarzec, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The activity of polonium (210)Po and uranium (234)U, (238)U radionuclides, as well as trace metals in mosses, collected from Sobieszewo Island area (northern Poland), were determined using the alpha spectrometry, AAS (atomic absorption spectrometry) and OES-ICP (atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma). The concentrations of mercury (directly from the solid sample) were determined by the cold vapor technique of CV AAS. The obtained results revealed that the concentrations of (210)Po, (234)U, and (238)U in the two analyzed kinds of mosses: schrebers big red stem moss (Pleurozium schreberi) and broom moss (Dicranum scoparium) were similar. The higher polonium concentrations were found in broom moss (Dicranum scoparium), but uranium concentrations were relatively low for both species of analyzed mosses. Among the analyzed trace metals the highest concentration in mosses was recorded for iron, while the lowest for nickel, cadmium and mercury. The obtained studies showed that the sources of polonium and uranium isotopes, as well as trace metals in analyzed mosses are air city contaminations transported from Gdańsk and from existing in the vicinity the phosphogypsum waste heap in Wiślinka (near Gdańsk).

  12. Methodology of simulation of underground working in metal mines. Application to a uranium deposit in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deraisme, J.; de Fouquet, C.; Fraisse, H.

    1983-01-01

    For the Ben Lomond (Northern Queensland Australia) underground uranium mining project, studies were carried out to compare the feasibility of different mining methods according to their cost per ton and selectivity, i.e. cut and fill, sublevel stopping and both mixed. First, a geostatistical orebody model was built. The ore grade variability of this model results from the drillhole structural analysis. Working on two dimensional vertical cross sections, the usual hand drawing stope reserve estimate obtained with computer assisted design for each of the three different mining methods is compared with the results obtained with automatic algorithms allocated to the characteristics of each mining method. These algorithms use mathematical morphology to reproduce the geometrical constraints connected with each mining method and/or dynamic programmation. These techniques lead to fully automatic of optimal economical stope design. Comparison is positive: automatic stopes designs are in agreement with hand made drawings, but they can be defined faster through interactive questionning of the computer, and the total maximum profit obtained is a least as high as the best profit found through hand designed projects [fr

  13. Characterization of heavy metals in a uranium ore region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Jairo Dias; dos Santos Amaral, Romilton; dos Santos Júnior, José Araújo; Genezini, Frederico Antonio; Menezes, Rômulo Simões Cezar; de Oliveira, Iane Andrade

    2014-03-01

    The concentrations of As, Zn, Co, Cr, and Ba were determined in soil samples from an anomalous uranium ore region in the countryside of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. The main land use system in this region is dairy farming, and there is a need to evaluate the potential risk of milk contamination. Twenty-three soil samples were activated with neutrons and analyzed using a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer system. The results, recorded in mg kg(-1), varied from 0.4 to 6.7 for As, from 17.0 to 110.0 for Zn, from 2.8 to 38.4 for Co, from 12.1 to 65.5 for Cr, and from 443.0 to 1,497.0 for Ba. All of the Ba concentrations were higher than the intervention value adopted by the Brazilian National Environmental Board. This finding justifies research in other environmental areas to predict the toxicological risks to the local population.

  14. Steady-state fission gas behavior in uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.G.; Wazzan, A.R.; Okrent, D.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of fission gas release and induced swelling in steady state irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels is developed and computer coded. The code is used to simulate, with fair success, some gas release and induced swelling data obtained under the IFR program. It is determined that fuel microstructural changes resulting from zirconium migration, anisotropic swelling, and thermal variations are major factors affecting swelling and gas release behavior. (orig.)

  15. Structure and physical properties of ternary uranium transition-metal antimonides U3MSb5 (M = Zr, Hf, Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachuk, Andriy V.; Muirhead, Craig P.T.; Mar, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The ternary uranium transition-metal antimonides U 3 MSb 5 (M = Zr, Hf, Nb) were prepared by arc-melting reactions followed by annealing at 800 deg. C, or by use of a Sn flux. These compounds extend the previously known series U 3 MSb 5 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mn) and RE 3 MSb 5 (RE = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm; M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb). The crystal structures of U 3 MSb 5 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (Pearson symbol hP18, hexagonal, space group P6 3 /mcm, Z = 2; U 3 ZrSb 5 , a = 9.2223(3) A, c = 6.1690(2) A; U 3 HfSb 5 , a = 9.2084(4) A, c = 6.1629(3) A; U 3 NbSb 5 , a = 9.1378(4) A, c 6.0909(6) A). U 3 TaSb 5 has also been identified in microcrystalline form (a = 9.233(3) A, c = 6.142(3) A). Four-probe electrical resistivity measurements on single crystals and dc magnetic susceptibility measurements on powders indicated prominent transitions that are attributed to ferromagnetic ordering. The Curie temperatures, T C , located from ac magnetic susceptibility curves, are 135 K for U 3 ZrSb 5 , 141 K for U 3 HfSb 5 , and 107 K for U 3 NbSb 5

  16. Uranium and Associated Heavy Metals in Ovis aries in a Mining Impacted Area in Northwestern New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel-Nakamura, Christine; Robbins, Wendie A; Hodge, Felicia S

    2017-07-28

    The objective of this study was to determine uranium (U) and other heavy metal (HM) concentrations (As, Cd, Pb, Mo, and Se) in tissue samples collected from sheep ( Ovis aries ), the primary meat staple on the Navajo reservation in northwestern New Mexico. The study setting was a prime target of U mining, where more than 1100 unreclaimed abandoned U mines and structures remain. The forage and water sources for the sheep in this study were located within 3.2 km of abandoned U mines and structures. Tissue samples from sheep ( n = 3), their local forage grasses ( n = 24), soil ( n = 24), and drinking water ( n = 14) sources were collected. The samples were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Results: In general, HMs concentrated more in the roots of forage compared to the above ground parts. The sheep forage samples fell below the National Research Council maximum tolerable concentration (5 mg/kg). The bioaccumulation factor ratio was >1 in several forage samples, ranging from 1.12 to 16.86 for Mo, Cd, and Se. The study findings showed that the concentrations of HMs were greatest in the liver and kidneys. Of the calculated human intake, Se Reference Dietary Intake and Mo Recommended Dietary Allowance were exceeded, but the tolerable upper limits for both were not exceeded. Food intake recommendations informed by research are needed for individuals especially those that may be more sensitive to HMs. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to explore other impacted communities across the reservation.

  17. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cells are highly dependent on metal speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milgram, S.; Carriere, M.; Thiebault, C.; Malaval, L.; Gouget, B.

    2008-01-01

    Bone is one of the main retention organs for uranium (U) and lead (Pb). The clinical effects of U or Pb poisoning are well known: acute and chronic intoxications impair bone formation. However, only few studies dealt with the cellular and molecular mechanisms of their toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate acute cytotoxicity of U and Pb and their phenotypic effects on rat and human osteoblasts, the cells responsible for bone formation. The most likely species of the toxicants in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. Results showed that the cytotoxic effect of U and Pb is highly dependent on their speciation. Thus, Pb was cytotoxic when left free in the exposure medium or when complexed with carbonate, cystein or citrate, but not when complexed with albumin or phosphate, under an insoluble form. U was cytotoxic whatever its speciation, but differences in sensitivity were observed as a function of speciation. Population growth recovery could be obtained after exposure to low doses of U or Pb, except for some U-carbonate complexes which had irreversible effects whatever the dose. The activation of two markers of bone formation and mineralization, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein (BSP), was observed after exposure to non-toxic doses or non-toxic species of U or Pb while their inhibition was observed after toxic exposure to both metals. This work provides new elements to better understand the complex mechanisms of U and Pb toxicity to osteoblasts. Our results also illustrate the importance of a strictly controlled speciation of the metals in toxicological studies

  18. Development of metal fuel and study of construction materials (I-IV), Part V, Vol. II, Project of the device for irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; 2. Construction of the loop for uranium radiation creep testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.; Pavlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This volume includes the design description for construction of the loop for testing uranium radiation creep. It covers the following: construction of the loop head, protection closure; system for pressure regulation and uranium temperature regulation; system for recording samples dilatation and temperature. Testing of components and the loop on the whole is described as well as the safety reports

  19. Galvanic corrosion of metals and coatings when coupled to uranium in severe environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkle, J.R.; Childs, E.L.

    1982-01-01

    The results of galvanic testing were varied in each environment. The position of metals in the galvanic series was not fixed, but changed with environment. In all cases where high general and galvanic corrosion rates were observed, the conditions of potential, pH, and impurity content could be correlated with regions of oxide surface film instability outlined by Pourbaix Diagrams. The majority of the severe corrosion reactions were observed in the acidic environment, although a few were noted in the caustic environment. The presence of chlorides tended to enhance galvanic corrosion rates at the neutral environment. 10 tables

  20. Colorimetric determination of the fluoride ion - application to uranium metal and to uranous fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hering, H.; Hure, J.; Legrand, S.

    1949-12-01

    In the determination described for fluoride in U metal, the U is brought into H 2 SO 4 solution by anodic oxidation, the fluo-silicic acid is distilled by entrainment in water vapor, and the F ion is determined in the distillate by using the fact that it complexes Zr and thus prevents the formation of the Zr-alizarin S lake. For F ion in UF 4 , the compound is dissolved in a Na 2 CO 3 -H 2 O 2 mixture, and F is determined in the solution by the colorimetric method described. (author)

  1. Highly efficient extraction and selective separation of uranium (VI) from transition metals using new class of undiluted ionic liquids based on H-phosphonate anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrougui, Ramzi; Mdimagh, Raouf; Raouafi, Nourreddine

    2018-01-15

    In this paper, we report the development of an environmental friendly process to decontaminate uranium-containing ores and nuclear wastes by using non-fluorinated ionic liquids (ILs). The main advantages of this extraction process are the absence of any organic diluent and extra extraction agents added to the organic phase. Moreover, the process is cost-effective and maybe applied as a sustainable hydrometallurgical method to recover uranium. The distribution ratio (D U ) and the extraction efficiency (%E) of uranium(VI) (UO 2 2+ ) were found to be dependent on the acidity of the aqueous phase, the extraction time, the alkyl chain length in the ILs, the concentration of the aqueous feed and molar quantity of ILs. The D U value is higher than 600 and the %E is equal to 98.6% when [HNO 3 ]=7M. The extraction reactions follows a neutral partition or ionic exchange mechanism depending on nitric acid concentration. The nature of bonding in the extracted complexes was investigated by spectroscopic techniques. The potential use of Mor 1-8 -OP for the separation of UO 2 2+ from a mixture containing transition metal ions M n+ was also examined. The UO 2 2+ ions were separated and extracted efficiently. These ILs are promising candidates for the recovery and separation of uranium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  3. METHOD OF ROLLING URANIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.S.

    1959-08-01

    A method is described for rolling uranium metal at relatively low temperatures and under non-oxidizing conditions. The method involves the steps of heating the uranium to 200 deg C in an oil bath, withdrawing the uranium and permitting the oil to drain so that only a thin protective coating remains and rolling the oil coated uranium at a temperature of 200 deg C to give about a 15% reduction in thickness at each pass. The operation may be repeated to accomplish about a 90% reduction without edge cracking, checking or any appreciable increase in brittleness.

  4. Accumulations and sources of uranium, of its daughters and of metallic trace elements in wetlands located around old uranium mining sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuvier, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Uranium mining and uranium ore processing increase the environmental activity of U and Th decay products and trace elements, in particular in case of releases to the adjacent rivers. Contaminants accumulate then preferentially in sedimentation areas (such as ponds or lakes) or in wetlands (peat lands, marshes or riverbanks) located downstream to the mine. Wetlands - generally located at the head of watershed - are particularly sensitive to environmental changes and anthropogenic pressure. This poses a risk of release of contaminants from these accumulation areas. The objective of the present study is to propose an easily reproducible methodology - in particular for the orphan mining sites - to identify and characterize accumulation areas. This study also aims to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of accumulation and release, in these areas. This study was performed around the former mining site of Bertholene (France). Standing and mobile in situ gamma spectrometry is used to accurately locate the accumulation areas. Soils, sediments, vegetation, water and peat are also sampled upstream and downstream of the mine, in order to (a) characterize the activities and the disequilibria of the U-Th decay chains and the associated trace elements according to the scale of observation, (b) understand the mechanisms of accumulation and release and (c) identify the potential sources using geochemical proxies and isotopic analyses. The results obtained show that radionuclides are mainly accumulated in a flooding area located downstream the mine. Strong U-238 activities (≥ 20000 Bq.kg"-"1) and strong Ra-226/U-238 and Th-230/Ra-226 activity ratios are recorded, involving preferential inputs of U-238 and Th-230 during flooding events. Trace element contamination is low, except for Mn, Ba and S. Such contaminations are potentially explained by the geochemical composition of the uranium ore and by the past and current processes of ore and water mine. Sequential extractions

  5. Stripping potentiometric analysis: application to determination of metallic cations in presence of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira-Ramos, J.P.; Chivot, J.; Sarantopoulos, F.; Godard, R.

    1984-01-01

    Potentiometric stripping analysis consists of a potentiostatic deposition step of trace elements and a subsequent stripping step. The trace metals are simultaneously reduced at a rotating electrode, the working electrode being a mercury film coated glassy carbon electrode; the amalgamated metals are then re-oxidized with an oxidizing agent. The analytical signal of this method is the time required for complete re-oxidation. Influence of different parameters on the analytical signal is studied by using mercury (II) ions as oxidizing agent in 5.10 -4 M H 2 SO 4 aqueous solution. Here, we point out the main characteristics of the potentiometric stripping analysis under the same experimental conditions. The reproductibility ranges are comprised between 0.5% to 1.5% and the detection limit for cadmium (II) is estimated to be 2.10 -10 M with a plating time of 300 seconds. Small quantities, as 10 -7 M Cd 2+ , Pb 2+ and Zn 2+ are simultaneously determined in presence of U (VI) ions (UO 2 2+ ) with an accuracy of 0.5% for Cd 2+ and Zn 2+ , and 4.5% for Pb 2+ . Compared to well-known electrochemical techniques, potentiometric stripping analysis appears to be a performing method for trace analysis in a wide range of media: this method permits the analysis of elements in presence of species more concentrated and being able to oxidize the trace elements [fr

  6. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  7. Apple snails and their endosymbionts bioconcentrate heavy metals and uranium from contaminated drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Israel A; Arribére, María A; Almonacid, Andrea V; Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2012-09-01

    The differential ability of apple snail tissues, endosymbionts, and eggs to bioaccumulate several metals (Sb, As, Ba, Br, Zn, Cr, Fe, Hg, Se, and U) was investigated. Metal concentrations were determined by neutron activation analysis in several tissues, endosymbionts, and eggs from mature apple snails cultured in either drinking water or reconstituted water (prepared with American Society for Testing and Materials type I water). The highest bioconcentration factors (BCFs) in the midgut gland were found for Ba, Zn, Se, As, U, Br, and Hg (in decreasing order), while the highest in the kidney were for Ba, Br, and Hg. The foot showed the highest BCFs for Ba, Hg, Br, and Se (in decreasing order). Calcified tissues (uterus, shell) and eggs showed low BCFs, except for Ba. Both C corpuscles and gland tissue showed statistically higher BCFs than K corpuscles for Ba, Fe, U, Br, and Sb. The concentration of most of the studied elements was significantly lower in tissues and endosymbionts obtained from snails cultured in reconstituted water instead of drinking water. Snails cultured in reconstituted water and then exposed or not to Hg, As, and U (at the maximum contaminant level allowed by the US Environmental Protection Agency) also resulted in high levels accumulated in midgut gland, endosymbionts and kidney. Our findings suggest that the midgut gland (and the symbionts contained therein), the kidney, and the foot of Pomacea canaliculata may be useful bioindicators of Hg, As and U pollution in freshwater bodies and that the unrestricted use of ampullariid snails as human and animal food must be considered with caution.

  8. Forward impact extrusion of surface textured steel blanks using coated tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Rafael; Feuerhack, Andreas; Trauth, Daniel; Arghavani, Mostafa; Kruppe, Nathan C.; Brögelmann, Tobias; Bobzin, Kirsten; Klocke, Fritz

    2017-10-01

    A method to enable dry metal forming by the means of a self-lubricating coating and surface textures was researched using an innovative Pin-On-Cylinder-Tribometer. The experimental analysis was complemented by a numerical model of the complex contact conditions between coated tools and the surface textured specimen at the micro-level. Based on the results, the explanation of the tribological interactions between surface textured specimens and the tool in dry full forward extrusion is the objective of this work. Therefore, experimental dry extrusion tests were performed using a tool system. The extruded specimens were evaluated regarding their geometry as well as by the required punch force. Thereby, the effectiveness and the feasibility of dry metal forming on the example of full forward extrusion was evaluated. Thus, one more step towards the technical realization of dry metal forming of low alloy steels under industrial conditions was realized.

  9. Biosorption of metal and salt tolerant microbial isolates from a former uranium mining area. Their impact on changes in rare earth element patterns in acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferburg, Götz; Merten, Dirk; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2007-12-01

    The concentration of metals in microbial habitats influenced by mining operations can reach enormous values. Worldwide, much emphasis is placed on the research of resistance and biosorptive capacities of microorganisms suitable for bioremediation purposes. Using a collection of isolates from a former uranium mining area in Eastern Thuringia, Germany, this study presents three Gram-positive bacterial strains with distinct metal tolerances. These strains were identified as members of the genera Bacillus, Micrococcus and Streptomyces. Acid mine drainage (AMD) originating from the same mining area is characterized by high metal concentrations of a broad range of elements and a very low pH. AMD was analyzed and used as incubation solution. The sorption of rare earth elements (REE), aluminum, cobalt, copper, manganese, nickel, strontium, and uranium through selected strains was studied during a time course of four weeks. Biosorption was investigated after one hour, one week and four weeks by analyzing the concentrations of metals in supernatant and biomass. Additionally, dead biomass was investigated after four weeks of incubation. The maximum of metal removal was reached after one week. Up to 80% of both Al and Cu, and more than 60% of U was shown to be removed from the solution. High concentrations of metals could be bound to the biomass, as for example 2.2 mg/g U. The strains could survive four weeks of incubation. Distinct and different patterns of rare earth elements of the inoculated and non-inoculated AMD water were observed. Changes in REE patterns hint at different binding types of heavy metals regarding incubation time and metabolic activity of the cells. (c) 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  11. Uranium chemistry research unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The initial field of research of this Unit, established in 1973, was the basic co-ordination chemistry of uranium, thorium, copper, cobalt and nickel. Subsequently the interest of the Unit extended to extractive metallurgy relating to these metals. Under the term 'co-ordination chemistry' is understood the interaction of the central transition metal ion with surrounding atoms in its immediate vicinity (within bonding distance) and the influence they have on each other - for example, structural studies for determining the number and arrangement of co-ordinated atoms and spectrophotometric studies to establish how the f electron energy levels of uranium are influenced by the environment. New types of uranium compounds have been synthesized and studied, and the behaviour of uranium ions in non-aqueous systems has also received attention. This work can be applied to the development and study of extractants and new extractive processes for uranium

  12. Thermal reactions of uranium metal, UO 2, U 3O 8, UF 4, and UO 2F 2 with NF 3 to produce UF 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Bruce; Scheele, Randall; Kozelisky, Anne; Edwards, Matthew

    2009-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that NF 3 fluorinates uranium metal, UO 2, UF 4, UO 3, U 3O 8, and UO 2F 2·2H 2O to produce the volatile UF 6 at temperatures between 100 and 550 °C. Thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis reaction profiles are described that reflect changes in the uranium fluorination/oxidation state, physiochemical effects, and instances of discrete chemical speciation. Large differences in the onset temperatures for each system investigated implicate changes in mode of the NF 3 gas-solid surface interaction. These studies also demonstrate that NF 3 is a potential replacement fluorinating agent in the existing nuclear fuel cycle and in actinide volatility reprocessing.

  13. Annex 3 - Testing the microstructure of the fuel element with metal uranium with aluminium cladding; Prilog 3 - Ispitivanje mikrostrukture gorivnog elementa na bazi metalnog urana sa aluminijumskom kosuljicom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosevic, S; Momcilovic, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Based on the uranium microstructure in the fuel element, i.e. grain size, presence of other phases, porosity and the position of metal connections, some data could be obtained about the mechanical and thermal treatment of the uranium during fuel element fabrication. The mentioned characteristics could indicate the behaviour of the fuel under reactor operating conditions taking into account its stable dimensions and roughness of its surfaces. Na osnovu mikrostrukture urana u gorivnom elementu, odnosno velicine i oblika njegovih kristalnih zrna, prisustva drugih faza, pozoziteta kao i rasporeda metalnih ukljucaka, mogu se dobiti izvesni podaci o tome koje je postupke mehanickog i termickog tretiranja pretrpeo uran u pripremi za gorivni elemenat. Prethodne karakteristike takodje mogu da daju predstavu o tome kako ce se gorivo ponasati u uslovima rada reaktora, s obzirom na njegovu dimenzionu stabilnost i ogrubljivanje njegove povrsine (author)

  14. Design and synthesis of a water-stable anionic uranium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) with ultra large pores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peng; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A.; Gong, Xirui; Malliakas, Christos D.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Hupp, Joseph T. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Farha, Omar K. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-08-22

    Ionic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a subclass of porous materials that have the ability to incorporate different charged species in confined nanospace by ion-exchange. To date, however, very few examples combining mesoporosity and water stability have been realized in ionic MOF chemistry. Herein, we report the rational design and synthesis of a water-stable anionic mesoporous MOF based on uranium and featuring tbo-type topology. The resulting tbo MOF exhibits exceptionally large open cavities (3.9 nm) exceeding those of all known anionic MOFs. By supercritical CO{sub 2} activation, a record-high Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area (2100 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}) for actinide-based MOFs has been obtained. Most importantly, however, this new uranium-based MOF is water-stable and able to absorb positively charged ions selectively over negatively charged ones, enabling the efficient separation of organic dyes and biomolecules.

  15. Radionuclides and trace metals in Canadian moose near uranium mines: comparison of radiation doses and food chain transfer with cattle and caribou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Patricia; Irvine, James; Lyster, Jane; Beaulieu, Rhys

    2005-05-01

    Tissues from 45 moose and 4 cattle were collected to assess the health of country foods near uranium mines in northern Saskatchewan. Bone, liver, kidney, muscle and rumen contents were analyzed for uranium, radium-226 (226Ra), lead-210 (210Pb), and polonium-210 (210Po). Cesium-137 (137Cs), potassium-40 (40K), and 27 trace metals were also measured in some tissues. Within the most active mining area, Po in liver and muscle declined significantly with distance from tailings, possibly influenced by nearby natural uranium outcrops. Moose from this area had significantly higher 226Ra, 210Pb, 210Po, and 137Cs in some edible soft tissues vs. one control area. However, soil type and diet may influence concentrations as much as uranium mining activities, given that a) liver levels of uranium, 226Ra, and 210Po were similar to a second positive control area with mineral-rich shale hills and b) 210Po was higher in cattle kidneys than in all moose. Enhanced food chain transfer from rumen contents to liver was found for selenium in the main mining area and for copper, molybdenum and cadmium in moose vs. cattle. Although radiological doses to moose in the main mining area were 2.6 times higher than doses to control moose or cattle, low moose intakes yielded low human doses (0.0068 mSv y(-1)), a mere 0.3% of the dose from intake of caribou (2.4 mSv y(-1)), the dietary staple in the area.

  16. Uranium and Associated Heavy Metals in Ovis aries in a Mining Impacted Area in Northwestern New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Samuel-Nakamura

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine uranium (U and other heavy metal (HM concentrations (As, Cd, Pb, Mo, and Se in tissue samples collected from sheep (Ovis aries, the primary meat staple on the Navajo reservation in northwestern New Mexico. The study setting was a prime target of U mining, where more than 1100 unreclaimed abandoned U mines and structures remain. The forage and water sources for the sheep in this study were located within 3.2 km of abandoned U mines and structures. Tissue samples from sheep (n = 3, their local forage grasses (n = 24, soil (n = 24, and drinking water (n = 14 sources were collected. The samples were analyzed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry. Results: In general, HMs concentrated more in the roots of forage compared to the above ground parts. The sheep forage samples fell below the National Research Council maximum tolerable concentration (5 mg/kg. The bioaccumulation factor ratio was >1 in several forage samples, ranging from 1.12 to 16.86 for Mo, Cd, and Se. The study findings showed that the concentrations of HMs were greatest in the liver and kidneys. Of the calculated human intake, Se Reference Dietary Intake and Mo Recommended Dietary Allowance were exceeded, but the tolerable upper limits for both were not exceeded. Food intake recommendations informed by research are needed for individuals especially those that may be more sensitive to HMs. Further study with larger sample sizes is needed to explore other impacted communities across the reservation.

  17. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  18. Trace metal distribution and mobility in drill cuttings and produced waters from Marcellus Shale gas extraction: Uranium, arsenic, barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Graney, Joseph R.; Johnson, Jason D.; Sharma, Shikha; Toro, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Distributions of U, As, and Ba in Marcellus Shale were determined. • As is primarily associated with sulfide minerals, Ba with exchange sites. • Most U is in the silicate minerals, but up to 20% is partitioned into carbonate. • Low [U] and [As] in produced water are consistent with reducing downhole conditions. • Proper waste management should account for potential mobilization of U and As. - Abstract: Development of unconventional shale gas wells can generate significant quantities of drilling waste, including trace metal-rich black shale from the lateral portion of the drillhole. We carried out sequential extractions on 15 samples of dry-drilled cuttings and core material from the gas-producing Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale and surrounding units to identify the host phases and evaluate the mobility of selected trace elements during cuttings disposal. Maximum whole rock concentrations of uranium (U), arsenic (As), and barium (Ba) were 47, 90, and 3333 mg kg −1 , respectively. Sequential chemical extractions suggest that although silicate minerals are the primary host for U, as much as 20% can be present in carbonate minerals. Up to 74% of the Ba in shale was extracted from exchangeable sites in the shale, while As is primarily associated with organic matter and sulfide minerals that could be mobilized by oxidation. For comparison, U and As concentrations were also measured in 43 produced water samples returned from Marcellus Shale gas wells. Low U concentrations in produced water (<0.084–3.26 μg L −1 ) are consistent with low-oxygen conditions in the wellbore, in which U would be in its reduced, immobile form. Arsenic was below detection in all produced water samples, which is also consistent with reducing conditions in the wellbore minimizing oxidation of As-bearing sulfide minerals. Geochemical modeling to determine mobility under surface storage and disposal conditions indicates that oxidation and/or dissolution of U

  19. NMR shielding calculations across the periodic table: diamagnetic uranium compounds. 2. Ligand and metal NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreckenbach, Georg

    2002-12-16

    In this and a previous article (J. Phys. Chem. A 2000, 104, 8244), the range of application for relativistic density functional theory (DFT) is extended to the calculation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shieldings and chemical shifts in diamagnetic actinide compounds. Two relativistic DFT methods are used, ZORA ("zeroth-order regular approximation") and the quasirelativistic (QR) method. In the given second paper, NMR shieldings and chemical shifts are calculated and discussed for a wide range of compounds. The molecules studied comprise uranyl complexes, [UO(2)L(n)](+/-)(q); UF(6); inorganic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)Cl(n), n = 0-6; and organometallic UF(6) derivatives, UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n), n = 0-5. Uranyl complexes include [UO(2)F(4)](2-), [UO(2)Cl(4)](2-), [UO(2)(OH)(4)](2-), [UO(2)(CO(3))(3)](4-), and [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2+). For the ligand NMR, moderate (e.g., (19)F NMR chemical shifts in UF(6-n)Cl(n)) to excellent agreement [e.g., (19)F chemical shift tensor in UF(6) or (1)H NMR in UF(6-n)(OCH(3))(n)] has been found between theory and experiment. The methods have been used to calculate the experimentally unknown (235)U NMR chemical shifts. A large chemical shift range of at least 21,000 ppm has been predicted for the (235)U nucleus. ZORA spin-orbit appears to be the most accurate method for predicting actinide metal chemical shifts. Trends in the (235)U NMR chemical shifts of UF(6-n)L(n) molecules are analyzed and explained in terms of the calculated electronic structure. It is argued that the energy separation and interaction between occupied and virtual orbitals with f-character are the determining factors.

  20. A study of contaminated soils near Crucea-Botus, ana uranium mine (East Carpathians, Romania): metal distribution and partitioning of natural actinides with implications for vegetation uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, L.; Bilal, E.

    2012-04-01

    Between 1962 and 2009, National Company of Uranium - CNU, the former Romanian Rare Metals Mining Company, mined over 1,200,000 tones of pitchblende ore in the East Carpathians (Crucea-Botušana area, Bistrita Mountains). The exploration and mining facilities include 32 adits, situated between 780 and 1040 m above sea level. Radioactive waste resulted from mining are disposed next to the mining facilities. Mine dumps (32) cover an area of 364,000 square meters and consist of waste rock (rocks with sub-economic mineralization) and gangue minerals. Older dumps (18) have been already naturally reclaimed by forest vegetation, which played an important role in stabilizing the waste dump cover and in slowing down the uranium migration processes. The soils samples have been collected from different mine dumps in the Crucea-Botušana uranium deposit, mainly from 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 1/30 and 950 mine waste galleries. Soil samples were collected from the upper part and slope at each mine dump, from the vegetation root zones. Total uranium concentration in soils collected from Crucea-Botušana site ranged from 6.10 to 680.70 ppm, with a mean of 52.48 ppm (dry wt.). Total thorium varies between 7.70 and 115.30 ppm (dry wt.). This indicates that the adsorption of the radioactive elements by the soils is high and variable, influenced by the ore dump - sample relationship. The sequential extraction has emphasized the fact that the uranium is associated with all the mineral fractions present in the soil samples. A great percentage of U can be found in the carbonate (21.77%), organic (15.04%) and oxides fractions (15.88%) - in accordance with the high absorbed/adsorbed properties of this element. The percentage of uranium detected in the exchangeable fraction is rather small - 2.16%. It is also to be expected that the uranium should be irreversible adsorbed by the organic matter and by the clay minerals due to its ionic radius and to its positive charge. The fact that 21.77% of the

  1. The FEM simulation of continuous rotary extrusion (CRE) of aluminum alloy AA3003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Nijenthan; Valberg, Henry; Misiolek, Wojciech Z.

    2017-10-01

    Continuous Rotary Extrusion (CRE) process is also known in literature under Conform TM name and it is mainly used for the continuous extrusion of Aluminum and Copper alloys. CRE use a feedstock in the form of rod, powders and chips, which are fed into the groove of the rotating wheel. As the wheel rotates the feedstock moves along with it due to friction with the wheel. Once the feedstock reaches the abutment the material deforms plastically and it is extruded through the die. CRE has lot to offer when compared to other more conventional extrusion processes such as low energy input, no limit in billet length as it is a continuous process as well as improved material physical properties due to plastic deformation under constant parameters. In this work a FEM model has been developed using Deform TM 3D, to study the metal flow and state variables of AA3003 CRE extrusion. The effect of extrusion wheel velocity has been investigated. The results show that increase in wheel velocity will heat up the feedstock metal due to high shear deformation and higher friction, which significantly changes metal flow conditions at the die exit.

  2. Uranium recovery from AVLIS slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, A.E.; Mycroft, J.R.; Oliver, A.J.; Schneider, P.G.; Richardson, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium metal for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project was to have been produced by the magnesiothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. The other product from this reaction is a magnesium fluoride slag, which contains fine and entrained natural uranium as metal and oxide. Recovery of the uranium through conventional mill leaching would not give a magnesium residue free of uranium but to achieve more complete uranium recovery requires the destruction of the magnesium fluoride matrix and liberation of the entrapped uranium. Alternate methods of carrying out such treatments and the potential for recovery of other valuable byproducts were examined. Based on the process flowsheets, a number of economic assessments were performed, conclusions were drawn and the preferred processing alternatives were identified. (author)

  3. Mobility of Ra-226 and Heavy Metals (U, Th and Pb) from Pyritic Uranium Mine Tailings under Sub-aqueous Disposal Conditions - 59283

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, Nand K.

    2012-01-01

    All uranium mines in the Elliot Lake uranium mining district of north-central Ontario, Canada, have been closed due to low ore grade and prevailing market conditions. A majority of the waste management facilities have been rehabilitated and decommissioned with in-situ shallow water covers to minimize sulphide oxidation, and hence acid generation and release of metal enriched effluents. Laboratory lysimeter studies were undertaken to evaluate the leaching characteristics and mobility of Ra-226 and other heavy metals (U, Th and Pb) from pyritic uranium mine tailings under sub-aqueous disposal conditions for assessing the long-term radiological stability of such waste repositories. The experiments were conducted using three types of un-oxidized tailings: fine, coarse and gypsum depleted mill total tailings. Shallow water covers of depth ∼ 0.3 m were established using natural lake water. The leaching characteristics of radium and other major and trace metals were determined by monitoring both surface and pore water qualities as a function of time. The results showed that Ra-226 was leached from surface of the submerged tailings and released to both surface water and shallow zone pore water during initial low sulphate ion concentration of the surface water cover in all three cases. The release of Ra-226 was further enhanced with the onset of weak acidic conditions in the surface water covers of both coarse and gypsum depleted mill total tailings. With additional acid generation and increasing sulphate and iron concentrations, the dissolved Ra-226 concentrations in the water covers of these tailings gradually decreased back to low levels. Pb was also leached and mobilized with the development of moderate acidic conditions at the surface of the submerged coarse and gypsum deplete tailings. No leaching of U and Th was observed. (authors)

  4. Considerations on the analytic control of sulphide tracks in metal uranium; Consideraciones osbre el control analitico de trazas de azufre (sulfuro) en uranio metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Cellini, R; Gasco Sanchez, C

    1956-07-01

    Volumetric and colorimetric determinations of sulphur (sulphide) in uranium have been carried out by acid treatment and evaluation of SH{sub 2}. According to the experimental results a discussion of both methods has been made. (Author)

  5. Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzmann, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    The invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and alkaline earth metal oxide (e.g. CaO, MgO) in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. (author)

  6. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  7. Finite element analysis of the combined fine blanking and extrusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng-Fei

    The combined fine blanking and extrusion process is such a metal forming process that fine blanking and forward extrusion are carried out on sheet metal material at the same time. There are two typical characteristics in this process, one is the fine blanking whose deformation mechanism is different from conventional blanking; the other is the sheet metal extrusion, which is different from the conventional extrusion. Even though fine blanking has been used in industry for many years, only limited literature can be found which deals with the theoretical analysis of it. On the other hand, no publications on the theoretical analysis of the sheet metal extrusion have been found. Intensive work should be carried out to reveal the mechanism of both fine blanking process and sheet metal extrusion process, and further the combined fine blanking and extrusion process. The scope of this thesis is to study the mechanics of fine blanking, sheet metal extrusion, and combined fine blanking and extrusion process one by one with the rigid-plastic finite element method. All of above processes are typical unsteady ones, especially the fine blanking process in which extremely severe and localized deformation occurs. Therefore, commercial programs can not be used to solve these problems up till now. Owing to this reason, a rigid-plastic finite element program was developed for simulating these processes where remeshing and mesh tracing techniques as well as the golden section method were adopted according to the characteristics of these processes in this thesis. Moreover, a permissible kinematic velocity field was adopted as the initial velocity field for simulating extrusion process successfully. Results from the simulation included the distorted mesh, the field of material flow, the stress and the strain distributions at various moments of deformation. Results under different deformation conditions such as different blanking clearances, different diameters of the extrusion punch and

  8. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  9. Chemical thermodynamics of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenthe, I.; Fuger, J.; Lemire, R.J.; Muller, A.B.; Nguyen-Trung Cregu, C.; Wanner, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview on the chemical thermodynamics of those elements that are of particular importance in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal systems is provided. This is the first volume in a series of critical reviews to be published on this subject. The book provides an extensive compilation of chemical thermodynamic data for uranium. A description of procedures for activity corrections and uncertainty estimates is given. A critical discussion of data needed for nuclear waste management assessments, including areas where significant gaps of knowledge exist is presented. A detailed inventory of chemical thermodynamic data for inorganic compounds and complexes of uranium is listed. Data and their uncertainty limits are recommended for 74 aqueous complexes and 199 solid and 31 gaseous compounds containing uranium, and on 52 aqueous and 17 solid auxiliary species containing no uranium. The data are internally consistent and compatible with the CODATA Key Values. The book contains a detailed discussion of procedures used for activity factor corrections in aqueous solution, as well as including methods for making uncertainty estimates. The recommended data have been prepared for use in environmental geochemistry. Containing contributions written by experts the chapters cover various subject areas such a s: oxide and hydroxide compounds and complexes, the uranium nitrides, the solid uranium nitrates and the arsenic-containing uranium compounds, uranates, procedures for consistent estimation of entropies, gaseous and solid uranium halides, gaseous uranium oxides, solid phosphorous-containing uranium compounds, alkali metal uranates, uncertainties, standards and conventions, aqueous complexes, uranium minerals dealing with solubility products and ionic strength corrections. The book is intended for nuclear research establishments and consulting firms dealing with uranium mining and nuclear waste disposal, as well as academic and research institutes

  10. Joining uranium to steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1976-05-01

    A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected

  11. Extrusion and drawing of zircaloy 2. Production of pressure tubes for EL-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thevenet, J.

    1964-01-01

    The authors give briefly the physical mechanical and chemical properties of zircaloy 2, as far as the transformation of this alloy is concerned. Extrusion: After a few general remarks concerning the extrusion and co-extrusion, including a comparison of the deformation resistance of canning metals and of zircaloy 2, the following points are considered: - the difficulties occurring because of the use of this alloy: - atmosphere protection - adjustment on to the machine tools - low thermal conductivity - economy of the metal (price) - the factors affecting the quality of the extruded products extrusion under a copper can and under lubricant glass - fine grain structure - temperature homogeneity - working temperature The transformation cycle - '550 kg ingot - preliminary shape 'for drawing of EL-4 tubes (112 x 120 L 12 m)' - is described in detail (extrusion or forging of the φ = 340 ingot into φ = 220 billets, cutting into lengths and hot drilling at φ = 125, fixing into a copper can and rough extrusion). Drawing: The main difficulties are due to seizing of the tools and to the necessity of protecting the alloy from the atmosphere during annealings. A brief description is given of drawing out on a short mandrel, on a long mandrel, of laminating on a reducing machine and of the carrying out of an annealing, as well as of the production of EL-4 tubes (φ =107 x 113 L 430 m) by drawing out shapes having a size of 112 x 120 on long mandrels. Conclusion: It is possible by extrusion and drawing to produce zircaloy 2 tubes similar to those which may be obtained normally using stainless steel. (authors) [fr

  12. Advanced oxidative process with ozone of effluents contaminated by MN and other heavy metals originated in the acid drainage in uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mirna Marienne Suzin e

    2016-01-01

    During a mine exploration the environment can be affected by different ways being one of them the mine acid drainage(DAM), that is formed by the exposition of sulphated minerals to the atmospheric air, water and iron-oxidation microorganisms. This exposition results in oxidation reactions and formation of sulphuric acid that dissolves all kind of metals present at the mineral that will result in the contamination of the ground and waters. The object of this research work is to test a technological solution of the mine acid drainage problem applying ozone advanced oxidation of the heavy metals present at the mine drainage of a uranium mine with special focus in the manganese removal. This study is applied to the material from the uranium mine of the Brazilian Nuclear Industry - INB, at Caldas- MG. The INB Industry has serious DAM contamination being the main contaminants of the superficial waters the elements, aluminium (Al), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), sulfates(SO 4 +2 ), fluorides(F-), rare earth metals besides uranium (U) and thorium (Th). The Caldas unity is being used as research and testing field for the treatment of areas with environment degradation formed by the mining activity. The ozone testing showed a high efficiency for the removal of iron(Fe), manganese(Mn) and cerium (Ce) up to 99%. The manganese total concentration was reduced to values bellow the ones determined by CONAMA resolution. Elements as neodymium (Nd), zinc (Zn) and lanthanium (La) are also oxidated in presence of ozone but with lower efficiency. The aluminium remained unaffected by the ozone while Thorium and Uranium show an initial decay but at the end present only a concentration slight lower than the initial. The solid material formed after the ozone treatment consists mainly of manganese oxide (85%). In order to dispose, after the ozonization, the liquid effluent to the environment is necessary a pH correction in order to be within the CONAMA legislation, being used less

  13. Chemical changes of minerals trapped in the lichen Trapelia involuta. Implication for lichen effect on mobility of uranium and toxic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasama, Takeshi; Murakami, Takashi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate development of minerals trapped in a lichen, we examined the lichen Trapelia involuta growing directly on secondary uranyl minerals and U-enriched Fe oxide and hydroxide minerals. Sericite and other minerals in the underlying rock are trapped in the lichen T. involuta during its biological growth and chemically changed by lichen activities. The presence of chemically changed sericite accompanied by an Fe-bearing mineral in the lichen suggests that dissolution of sericite is promoted mainly by polysaccharides excreted by the lichen. Oxalic acid or lichen acids absent in the medulla may not play an important role in the dissolution. Our results suggest that lichens on metal-rich surface affect the mobility of uranium and other toxic metals through dissolution followed by trap of minerals from the underlying rock. (author)

  14. Impact of biostimulated redox processes on metal dynamics in an iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Akob, Denise M; Bischoff, Sebastian; Sitte, Jana; Kostka, Joel E; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Scheinost, Andreas C; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of metals and radionuclides in soil environments is necessary for evaluating risks to pristine sites. An iron-rich creek soil of a former uranium-mining district (Ronneburg, Germany) showed high porewater concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides. Thus, this study aims to (i) evaluate metal dynamics during terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) and (ii) characterize active microbial populations in biostimulated soil microcosms using a stable isotope probing (SIP) approach. In biostimulated soil slurries, concentrations of soluble Co, Ni, Zn, As, and unexpectedly U increased during Fe(III)-reduction. This suggests that there was a release of sorbed metals and As during reductive dissolution of Fe(III)-oxides. Subsequent sulfate-reduction was concurrent with a decrease of U, Co, Ni, and Zn concentrations. The relative contribution of U(IV) in the solid phase changed from 18.5 to 88.7% after incubation. The active Fe(III)-reducing population was dominated by delta-Proteobacteria (Geobacter) in (13)C-ethanol amended microcosms. A more diverse community was present in (13)C-lactate amended microcosms including taxa related to Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, delta-Proteobacteria, and beta-Proteobacteria. Our results suggested that biostimulated Fe(III)-reducing communities facilitated the release of metals including U to groundwater which is in contrast to other studies.

  15. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  16. Assessment of concentrations of trace and toxic heavy metals in soil and vegetables grown in the vicinity of Manyoni uranium deposit in Tanzania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapile, F.A.; Makundi, I.N.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on determination of concentrations of trace and toxic heavy metals in soil and vegetables grown near of Manyoni uranium deposit. Soil and vegetable samples were collected from five sites namely Mitoo Mbuga, farming area, Miyomboni, Tambukareli and near water pump. The concentrations of heavy metals in soil and edible vegetables samples were analyzed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF).All vegetable samples were found to have higher concentrations (in μg/g) of trace elements such as Ni (67.3) in pea leaves, Cu (14.9) in pumpkin leaves, Fe (478.6), (200.5) and (337.1) in pea, pumpkin and spinach leaves respectively, than the maximum tolerable limits recommended by WHO/FAO. Mean concentration of Pb (1.6 μg/g) in pumpkin leaves collected from Miyomboni (area D) were observed to be higher than the safe limit of (0.3μg/g) set by Codex 2006. Toxic elements concentrations (in μg/g) such as Cd (10.4), Pb (23.2),Hg (4.1), Th (31.5) and U (23.9) were observed to be high in soil collected from Mitoo Mbuga and farming area. Therefore, vegetables in the vicinity of Manyoni uranium deposit can expose people to toxic elements which are detrimental to their health.A more detailed study involving other foodstuffs is needed to establish conclusive results.

  17. DGT as a useful monitoring tool for radionuclides and trace metals in environments impacted by uranium mining: Case study of the Sagnes wetland in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leermakers, Martine; Phrommavanh, Vannapha; Drozdzak, Jagoda; Gao, Yue; Nos, Jérémy; Descostes, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT) technique was used to analyse U, (226)Ra and other trace metals in stream water and soil porewater in a wetland in France impacted by uranium mining. High resolution profiles of metals in soil porewater obtained by DGT could be measured for the first time up to a depth of 75 cm by the construction of a novel DGT holder. In stream water, the DGT technique was compared to speciation carried out by filtration (0.45 μm) and ultrafiltration (UF) (500 kDa/100 kDa/10 kDa) and DGT porewater profiles were compared with piezometer data obtained in a parallel study. An increase in the trace concentrations of dissolved (0.45 μm) and particulate U, (226)Ra, and elements such as Al, Fe, Mn and Ba was observed in the stream water as it passes through the bog as a results of mobilization from the wetland. The porewater results indicate DGT labile metals species to be present in porewater and mobilization of uranium and other elements linked to the presence of enriched clays. In stream water, colloids and particles govern the behavior of U, Al and Fe, whereas Mn, Ba and Ra are essentially transported as truly dissolved metal species with DGT labile concentrations accounting for 100% of the dissolved fraction. The combined approaches of DGT and UF allow us to obtain a better understanding on the biogeochemical processes involved in the retention and mobility of U and (226)Ra in the wetland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  19. Uranium thiolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverd, Pascal C.

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a new approach to the chemistry of uranium thiolate complexes as these compounds are very promising for various uses (in bio-inorganic chemistry, in some industrial processes like oil desulphurization). It more particularly addresses the U-S bond or more generally bonds between polarizable materials and hard metals. The author thus reports the study of uranium organometallic thiolates (tricyclo-penta-dienic and mono-cyclo-octa-tetraenylic complexes), and of uranium homoleptic thiolates (tetra-thiolate complexes, hexa-thiolate complexes, reactivity of homoleptic thiolate complexes) [fr

  20. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process