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Sample records for uranium fission rate

  1. Study on the effect factor of the absolute fission rates measured by depleted uranium fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun; Wang Mei; Lin Jufang; Wen Zhongwei

    2003-01-01

    The absolute fission rates was measured by the depleted uranium fission chamber. The efficiency of the fission fragments recorded in the fission chamber was analyzed. The factor influencing absolute fission rates was studied in the experiment, including the disturbing effect between detectors and the effect of the structural of the fission chamber, etc

  2. The discovery of uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, P.

    1990-01-01

    Uranium was discovered 200 years ago. Its radioactive character was first demonstrated in 1896 and two years later radium was extracted from uranium minerals. In 1911 studies with alpha rays from radioactive decay led to the unexpected discovery of the atomic nucleus. Exposure of beryllium to alpha rays yielded neutrons, first detected in 1932. Starting in 1934, neutron irradiation of uranium produced radioactive substances erroneously attributed to transuranium elements but with confusing properties. Painstaking experiments by chemists left no doubt on 17 December 1938 that barium was produced by these irradiations: the neutrons had split some uranium nuclei. The physics of the fission process was understood two weeks later; after a few months, neutron multiplication was found to be probable. This review deals with the eminent scientists involved, their successes, errors and disappointments, and the unexpected insights which occurred on the paths and detours of scientific research. It is, therefore, instructive also to discuss how fission was not discovered. The momentous discovery must be considered inevitable; the great tragedy was that Germany started World War II just at the time when the possibility of nuclear chain reactions and bombs became known. The consequences and anxieties that remain after 50 years of nuclear fission demand that mankind act with reason and conscience to maintain peace. (author)

  3. Fission track method for uranium ore exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shilun; Deng Xinlu; Sun Shengfen; Meng Wu; Zhang Pengfa; Hao Xiuhong

    1986-01-01

    The uranium concentrations in natural water collected in the fields of uranium ore exploration with fission track method have been determined. It shows that the results of fission track method are consistent with that of fluoro-colorimetry and laser fluorometry for the same samples of water with uranium concentration in the region of 10 -4 to 10 -8 g/l. For water samples with lower uranium concentration (≤10 -8 g/l), the fission track method can still give accurate or referential results, but the other two methods failed. The reproducibility of fission track method was checked and discussed by using samples collected in the same fields of uranium ore exploration. The effects of the concentration of the impurities in natural water on determination of uranium concentration were analysed and discussed as well

  4. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  5. Uranium deposits obtention for fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artacho Saviron, E.

    1972-01-01

    The obtention of uranium deposits of the required quality for small cylindrical fission chambers presents some difficulties. With the method of electroplating here described the uniformity, reproducibility and adherence of the obtained deposits were satisfactory. (Author) 6 refs

  6. Investigation of (n, 2n) reaction and fission rates in iron-shielded uranium samples bombarded by 14.9 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, G.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of the thickness of iron shielding on the (n, 2n) reaction rate in a fusion reactor (hybrid) blanket is investigated. The results are compared with the fission rate-dependence. Samples of natural uranium are irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons, with iron slabs of various thickness between the neutron generator target and the samples. Both reactions are threshold reactions but the fact that the 238 U (n, 2n) reaction threshold is at 6 MeV and that of fission is at 2 MeV makes the ratio between the two very much geometry-dependent. Two geometrical effects take place, the 1/r 2 and the build-up. While the build-up affects the (n, 2n) reaction rate, the fission rate is affected more by the 1/r 2 effect. The reason is that both elastic and inelastic scattering end up with neutrons with energy above fission threshold, while only elastic scattering brings high energy neutrons to the sample and causes (n, 2n) reaction. A comparison is made with calculated results where the geometrical effects do not exist. (author)

  7. Fission blanket benchmark experiment on spherical assembly of uranium and PE with PE reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Tonghua; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Mei; Han, Zijie, E-mail: neutron_integral@aliyun.com; Jiang, Li; Wen, Zhongwei; Liu, Rong

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The fission rate distribution on two depleted uranium assemblies was measured with plate fission chambers. • We do calculations using MCNP code and ENDF/B-V.0 library. • The overestimation of calculations to the measured fission rates was found. • The observed discrepancy are discussed. - Abstract: New concept of fusion-fission hybrid for energy generation has been proposed. To validate the nuclear performance of fission blanket of hybrid, as part of series of validation experiment, two types of fission blanket assemblies were setup in this work and measurements were made of the reaction rate distribution for uranium fission in the spherical assembly of depleted uranium and polyethylene by Plate Fission Chamber (PFC). There are two PFCs in experiment, one is depleted uranium chamber and the other is enriched uranium chamber. The Monte-Carlo transport code MCNP5 and continuous energy cross sections library ENDF/BV.0 were used for the analysis of fission rate distribution in the two types of assemblies. The calculated results were compared with the experimental ones. The overestimation of fission rate for depleted uranium and enriched uranium were found in the inner boundary of the two assemblies. However, the C/E ratio tends to decrease for the distance from the core slightly and the results for enriched uranium are better than that for depleted uranium.

  8. Alpha and fission autoradiography of uranium rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copic, M.; Ilicj, R.; Najzher, M.; Rant, J.

    1977-01-01

    Macro and micro-distribution of uranium minerals in ore bodies are investigated by alpha autoradiography and by neutron induced fission autoradiography using LR 115 solid state track detector. Optimal conditions are determined experimentally for both methods and examples presented. For field applications the alpha autoradiography (author)

  9. Uranium content of petroleum by fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Mafra, O.Y.; Oliveira, C.A.N. de; Pinto, L.R.

    1981-03-01

    The feasibility of the fission track registration technique to investigate the natural uranium concentration in petroleum is examined. The application of this technique to petroleum is briefly described and discussed critically. The results obtained so far indicate uranium concentrations in samples of Brazilian petroleum which are over the detect ion limit of fission track technique. (Author) [pt

  10. Investigation of spatial distribution of fission-rate of natural uranium nuclei in the blanket of electronuclear setup 'Energy plus Transmutation' at Dubna Nuclotron proton beam at energy 1.5 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S.R.; Zhuk, I.V.; Kievets, M.; Krivopustov, M.I.; Sosnin, A.N.; Westmeier, W.; Brandt, R.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Energy plus Transmutation' experimental setup of the Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics within the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia, is a lead target (with a diameter of 8.4 cm and length of 45.6 cm) surrounded by a uranium blanket (weight 206.4 kg of natural uranium). A polyethylene plus cadmium shield is placed around the target-blanket assembly to modify the spallation and fission neutron spectra in the system. The setup was irradiated by a proton beam of energy 1.5 GeV using the Nuclotron accelerator. The spatial distribution of natural uranium fission-rate in the assembly and fission-rate in the blanket was determined experimentally and compared with Monte Carlo predictions using the MCNPX 2.6C code. Besides neutron-induced fission the calculations include the Nat U(p,f), Nat U(π,f) as well as Nat U(γ,f) reactions. Good agreement between the experimental and calculation results was obtained. The possible sources of errors in the experiment and calculations are discussed in detail

  11. Simple estimate of fission rate during JCO criticality accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro [Faculty of Studies on Contemporary Society, Aichi Shukutoku Univ., Nagakute, Aichi (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    The fission rate during JCO criticality accident is estimated from fission-product (FP) radioactivities in a uranium solution sample taken from the preparation basin 20 days after the accident. The FP radioactivity data are taken from a report by JAERI released in the Accident Investigation Committee. The total fission number is found quite dependent on the FP radioactivities and estimated to be about 4x10{sup 16} per liter, or 2x10{sup 18} per 16 kgU (assuming uranium concentration 278.9 g/liter). On the contrary, the time dependence of the fission rate is rather insensitive to the FP radioactivities. Hence, it is difficult to determine the fission number in the initial burst from the radioactivity data. (author)

  12. Simple estimate of fission rate during JCO criticality accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro

    2000-01-01

    The fission rate during JCO criticality accident is estimated from fission-product (FP) radioactivities in a uranium solution sample taken from the preparation basin 20 days after the accident. The FP radioactivity data are taken from a report by JAERI released in the Accident Investigation Committee. The total fission number is found quite dependent on the FP radioactivities and estimated to be about 4x10 16 per liter, or 2x10 18 per 16 kgU (assuming uranium concentration 278.9 g/liter). On the contrary, the time dependence of the fission rate is rather insensitive to the FP radioactivities. Hence, it is difficult to determine the fission number in the initial burst from the radioactivity data. (author)

  13. History of the discovery of uranium fission by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simane, C.

    1989-01-01

    The history is briefly described of the discovery of uranium fission by neutrons, based on the texts of original scientific studies, memories or biographies of those who participated in the discovery and of their contemporaries. Obstacles that stood in the way of the discovery are discussed. It is stated that only a few scientists contributed to the discovery of uranium fission. The fission process itself still remains subject of physical research which studies its detailed laws. (Z.M.). 2 tabs., 16 refs

  14. Ternary fission of spontaneously fissile uranium isomers excited by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, V.E.; Molchanov, Y.D.; Otroshchenko, G.A.; Yan'kov, G.B.

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneously fissile isomers (SFI) of uranium were excited in the reactions 236,238 U(n,n') at an average neutron energy 4.5 MeV. A pulsed electrostatic accelerator and time analysis of the fission events were used. Fission fragments were detected by the scintillation method, and long-range particles from fission were detected by an ionization method. The relative probability of fission of nuclei through a spontaneously fissile isomeric state was measured: (1.30±0.01)·10 -4 ( 236 U) and (1.48±0.02)·10 -4 ( 238 U). Half-lives of the isomers were determined: 121±2 nsec (the SFI 236 U) and 267±13 nsec (the SFI 238 U). In study of the ternary fission of spontaneously fissile isotopes of uranium it was established that the probability of the process amounts to one ternary fission per 163±44 binary fissions of the SFI 236 U and one ternary fission per 49±14 binary fissions of the SFI 238 U. The substantial increase of the probability of ternary fission of SFI of uranium in comparison with the case of ternary fission of nuclei which are not in an isomeric state may be related to a special nucleon configuration of the fissile isomers of uranium

  15. Fission-track studies of uranium distribution in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynard, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The standard method of studying uranium distribution in geological material by registration of fission tracks from the thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U has been adapted for utilisation in the SAFARI-1 reactor at Pelindaba. The theory of fission-track registration as well as practical problems are discussed. The method has been applied to study uranium distribution in a variety of rock types and the results are discussed in this paper. The method is very sensitive and uranium present in quantities far below the detection limit of the microprobe have been detected

  16. Uranium content of petroleum by Fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschaa, A.S.; Mafra, O.Y.; Oliveira, C.A.N.; Pinto, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the feasibility of the fission track registration technique to investigate the natural uranium concentration in petroleum. The application is briefly described and the results obtained indicate the presence of uranium concentrations in samples of Brazilian petroleum which are over the detection limit of the fission track technique. The irradiations were performed by using fluxes with predominance of thermal neutrons, which have a fission cross-section for U 235 equal to 579 barns. Since the neutron fluxes were not comp sed exclusively of thermal neutrons, fissions from fast neutrons would also be taken into account for U 238 and Th 232

  17. Measurement of fission track of uranium particle by solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S. C.; Pyo, H. W.; Ji, K. Y.; Kim, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we discussed results of the measurement of fission tracks for the uranium containing particles by solid state nuclear track detector. Uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were prepared by uranium sorption onto silica powder in weak acidic medium and laser ablation on uranium pellet, respectively. Fission tracks for the uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were detected on Lexan plastic detector. It was found that the fission track size and shapes depend on the particle size uranium content in particles. Correlation of uranium particle diameter with fission track radius was also discussed

  18. Utilisation of prompt fission neutron technology in Greenfields uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutz, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    Conventionally, gamma detection technology has been used in uranium exploration programs for the initial detection of uranium as well as for a determination of uranium concentration. Geophysical logging companies use wireline gamma probes to measure uranium within boreholes, and field technicians utilise hand held gamma meters to detect uranium in rock samples, drill cuttings and cores. Borehole geophysical logging equipment typically records the uranium concentration as %eU 3 O8, where e represents an equivalent determination of uranium concentration as opposed to a laboratory assay. This method of uranium determination is an indirect method, as it measures gamma radiation from uranium-238 (U-238) isotope decay chain progeny; principally the bismuth-214 (Bi-214) isotope. Consequently, the uranium determination can be inaccurate due to natural disequilibrium between the U-238 parent and the decay chain progeny. This is especially true in sedimentary hosted uranium deposits, where the uranium and daughter progeny may have been geochemically separated. The gamma detection method for uranium can also be rendered inaccurate by detecting the gamma signature from potassium in clays as well as from thorium; both of which can provide a false (enhanced) eU 3 O8 determination. Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) technology is a geophysical wireline logging technology used in the same manner as conventional gamma logging. The difference is that PFN provides a direct determination of uranium within a borehole, irrespective of natural disequilibrium or the presence of other radioactive elements. This paper provides a brief description of natural uranium and radioactivity as a basis for explaining the conventional use of gamma radiation detectors for the detection and determination of uranium concentration in exploration boreholes, including the potential pitfalls of this technology. A detailed description of prompt fission neutron technology is also presented, along with a discussion

  19. Studies on fission tracks and distributions of uranium and rare earths in granite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1987-01-01

    Many materials contain fossil records of the slow spontaneous fission of uranium they contain as an impurity. Fission fragments, heavy charged particles released in each fission event, produce microscopic trails of radiation damage that may persist over geological times and may be developed to a size observable under an optical microscope by a suitable etching treatment. Such tracks are also produced by fissions induced by thermal neutron irradiation of the uranium. When the material is heated sufficiently, it anneals and the the microscopic trails become shorter and narrower. The track density decreases, because the chemical etchant will not reach some of the shortened tracks. Measurements of track densities before and after annealing can be used, along with laboratory studies of annealing rates, to determine the annealing temperature. Also, the track density of induced fissions is related to the concentration of uranium and the fluence of neutrons to which it was exposed. If the track density due to induced fissions can be distinguished from that due to fossil tracks, estimates of either the concentration or the fluence can be made if the other is known. Two such materials (one a fragment of a granite paving stone, the other a piece of stained glass from a cathedral window) that had been exposed to the atomic bomb at Nagasaki were used in the present work. The fossil record in zircons in the granite was used to estimate the temperature to which it had been exposed in the bombing. Induced fissions were used to estimate the concentration of uranium in the zircons. Nonuniform heating and cooling and nearly uniform exposure to the neutrons make the granite sample unsuitable for determining the neutron fluence from the bomb. Induced fissions in the stained glass were used to estimate the concentration of uranium and the thermal neutron fluence from the A-bomb. Annealing of tracks in glass was also studied

  20. Compound Nucleus Reactions in LENR, Analogy to Uranium Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich; Miley, George; Philberth, Karl

    2008-03-01

    The discovery of nuclear fission by Hahn and Strassmann was based on a very rare microanalytical result that could not initially indicate the very complicated details of this most important process. A similarity is discussed for the low energy nuclear reactions (LENRs) with analogies to the yield structure found in measurements of uranium fission. The LENR product distribution measured earlier in a reproducible way in experiments with thin film electrodes and a high density deuteron concentration in palladium has several striking similarities with the uranium fission fragment yield curve.ootnotetextG.H. Miley and J.A. Patterson, J. New Energy 1, 11 (1996); G.H. Miley et al, Proc ICCF6, p. 629 (1997).This comparison is specifically focussed to the Maruhn-Greiner local maximum of the distribution within the large-scale minimum when the fission nuclei are excited. Implications for uranium fission are discussed in comparison with LENR relative to the identification of fission a hypothetical compound nuclear reaction via a element ^306X126 with double magic numbers.

  1. Fission decay properties of ultra neutron-rich uranium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in the chain of neutron-rich uranium isotopes is examined here. The neutron ... mean field theory, this nucleus is shown to undergo exotic decay mode of thermal neu- .... For 250U with a fission barrier of 4.3 MeV [5], we obtain the value of.

  2. Uranium borehole logging using delayed or prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, G.; Wuerz, H.

    1977-04-01

    The measurement of induced fission neutrons using Cf 252 and 14 MeV neutrons is a sensitive method for an in situ determination of Uranium. Applying this methods requires a unique relation between concentration of Uranium and intensity of induced fission neutrons. A discussion of parameters influencing the determination of concentration is given. A simple method is developed allowing an elemination of the geochemistry of the deposit and of the borehole configuration. Borehole probes using the methods described are of considerable help during the phase of detailed exploration of uranium ore deposits. These on-line tools allow an immediate determination of concentration. Thus avoiding the expensive and time consuming step of core drilling and subsequent chemical analysis. (orig./HP) [de

  3. SEPARATION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM, AND FISSION PRODUCTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, R.; Lister, M.W.

    1958-12-16

    Uranium and plutonium can be separated from neutron-lrradiated uranium by a process consisting of dissolvlng the lrradiated material in nitric acid, saturating the solution with a nitrate salt such as ammonium nitrate, rendering the solution substantially neutral with a base such as ammonia, adding a reducing agent such as hydroxylamine to change plutonium to the trivalent state, treating the solution with a substantially water immiscible organic solvent such as dibutoxy diethylether to selectively extract the uranium, maklng the residual aqueous solutlon acid with nitric acid, adding an oxidizing agent such as ammonlum bromate to oxidize the plutonium to the hexavalent state, and selectlvely extracting the plutonium by means of an immlscible solvent, such as dibutoxy dlethyletber.

  4. Assay of low-enriched uranium using spontaneous fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Fainberg, A.

    1980-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium oxide in bulk containers can be assayed for safeguards purposes, using the neutrons from spontaneous fission of 238 U as a signature, to complement enrichment and mass measurement. The penetrability of the fast fission neutrons allows the inner portion of bulk samples to register. The measurement may also be useful for measuring moisture content, of significance in process control. The apparatus used can be the same as for neutron correlation counting for Pu assay. The neutron multiplication observed in 238 U is of intrinsic interest

  5. Determination of {sup 90}Sr in uranium fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajo, S; Tobler, L [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-02-01

    A previously published radiochemical procedure for the determination of {sup 90}Sr in grass and soil has been successfully employed - with minor modifications - for the determination of this nuclide in a solution of uranium fission products. It is suitable for the determination of {sup 90}Sr in environmental materials following a nuclear accident. The procedure is based on tributylphosphate extraction of {sup 90}Y, precipitation of Y-oxalate, and counting in a proportional counter. (author) figs., tabs., 10 refs.

  6. The release of fission products from uranium metal: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minshall, P.C.

    1989-03-01

    The literature on the release of fission products as gaseous species from irradiated uranium metal in oxidising atmospheres has been reviewed. Release of actinides and of fission products as spalled particulate were not considered. Data is given on the release in air, carbon dioxide, steam and mixtures of steam and air. The majority of data discussed lie between 800 and 1200 0 C though some results for xenon, krypton and iodine releases below 800 0 C are given. Two measures of fission product release are discussed: the release fraction, F(tot), which is the ratio of the total release to the initial inventory, and the fractional release, F(ox), which is the fraction released from the oxidised metal. The effect of burn-up, atmosphere and temperature on F(tot) and F(ox) is examined and the conditions under which the release fraction, F(tot) is proportional to the extent of oxidation discussed. (author)

  7. Fission products stability in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Gupta, F.; Pasturel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fission product stability in nuclear fuels is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, incorporation and solution energies of He, Kr, Xe, I, Te, Ru, Sr and Ce in pre-existing trap sites of UO 2 (vacancies, interstitials, U-O divacancy, and Schottky trio defects) are calculated using the projector-augmented-wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package. Correlation effects are taken into account within the DFT+U approach. The stability of many binary and ternary compounds in comparison to soluted atoms is also explored. Finally the involvement of FP in the formation of metallic and oxide precipitates in oxide fuels is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  8. Pulsed neutron uranium borehole logging with prompt fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bivens, H.M.; Smith, G.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1976-01-01

    The gross count natural gamma log normally used for uranium borehole logging is seriously affected by disequilibrium. Methods for the direct measurement of uranium, such as neutron logging, which are not affected by disequilibrium have been the object of considerable effort in recent years. This paper describes a logging system for uranium which uses a small accelerator to generate pulses of 14 MeV neutrons to detect and assay uranium by the measurement of prompt fission neutrons in the epithermal energy range. After an initial feasibility study, a prototype logging probe was built for field evaluation which began in January 1976. Physical and operational characteristics of the prototype probe, the neutron tube-transformer assembly, and the neutron tube are described. In logging operations, only the epithermal prompt fission neutrons detected between 250 microseconds to 2500 microseconds following the excitation neutron pulse are counted. Comparison of corrected neutron logs with the conventional gross count natural gamma logs and the chemical assays of cores from boreholes are shown. The results obtained with this neutron probe clearly demonstrate its advantages over the gross count natural gamma log, although at this time the accuracy of the neutron log assay is not satisfactory under some conditions. The necessary correction factors for various borehole and formation parameters are being determined and, when applied, should improve the assay accuracy

  9. Fission track dating and estimation of uranium in some garnets of Rajasthan (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S; Virk, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-09-01

    The experimental procedure, involving the preparation, etching, thermal neutron irradiation and scanning of the garnet samples, is described. The calculated fission track ages and uranium concentration are tabulated.

  10. Calculation of energy transfer by fission fragments from plane uranium layer to thin wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikulev, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    Energy transfer from a flat fissile uranium slab to a fine wire via fission fragments is calculated. The rate of energy transfer versus the thicknesses of the slab and protecting aluminum film, as well as the wire-slab gap, is found. An expression for the absorption coefficient of the wire is derived, and the effect the thickness of the wire has on the energy transfer process is studied. The amount of the edge effect for a finite-size uranium slab is demonstrated with calculations for vacuum conditions and for argon under a pressure of 0.25 atm [ru

  11. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental neutron spectra, 115In(n,n') and fission rates, in the centre of three spherical natural uranium and iron shell configurations, located at BR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leeuw-Gierts, G.; De Leeuw, S.; Gilliam, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Three spherical configurations of iron and uranium shells have been studied. The configurations were a 1-cm thick natural uranium shell, a 1-cm thick natural uranium shell with an inner 7-cm thick iron shell and a 1-cm thick natural uranium shell with an inner iron shell of 14-cm thickness. For the measurements, the shells were located at the centre of a hollow cavity, 100-cm in diameter, in the vertical graphite thermal column of the BR1 reactor. The central neutron spectra were calculated by means of the DTF-IV code, using the 208-group KEDAK-3 library, and by means of the ANISN code, using the 171-group VITAMIN-C library. Central neutron spectra, measured by the proton-recoil and 6 Li(n,α)t spectrometry techniques, are compared to the theory between ∼ 100 keV and 5 MeV. Mean fission cross-sections of 240 Pu, 237 Np, 234 U, 235 U, 236 U and 238 U were deduced from the calculations. Their ratios with respect to 238 U are compared to measurements made with NBS dual fission chambers. (Auth.)

  12. Fission and activation of uranium by fashion-plasma neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Hochl, F.; McFarland, D.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disks of enriched and depleted uranium were irradiated by neutrons from the D-D fusions in a dense plasma-focus. A fission yield of 10 6 fissions-cm -3 in U 235 per pulse was determined with Ge(Li) gamme-ray spectrometry. Activation of U 238 caused increased beta activity after the plasma-neutron irradiation but alpha-particle spectrometry showed Pu 239 production was negligible. In addition, with a disk of lithium in the apparatus, 13.3 MeV neutrons from 7 Li(d,n) 8 Be was observed with a 80-m time-of-flight neutron detector. Dense plasma focuses are now operated not only in a single coaxial gun, but also in improved geometries, such as the hypocycloidal pinch and the staged plasma focus, from which a multiple plasma-focus array suitable for experimental verification of, and eventuel development into a fusion-fission hybrid reactor could be produced. (orig.) [de

  13. Aqueous dissolution rates of uranium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, S.A.; Mones, E.T.

    1994-10-01

    An understanding of the long-term dissolution of waste forms in groundwater is required for the safe disposal of high level nuclear waste in an underground repository. The main routes by which radionuclides could be released from a geological repository are the dissolution and transport processes in groundwater flow. Because uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel, the dissolution of its matrix in spent fuel is considered the rate-limiting step for release of radioactive fission products. The purpose of our work has been to measure the intrinsic dissolution rates of uranium oxides under a variety of well-controlled conditions that are relevant to a repository and allow for modeling. The intermediate oxide phase U 3 O 8 , triuranium octaoxide, is quite stable and known to be present in oxidized spent fuel. The trioxide, UO 3 , has been shown to exist in drip tests on spent fuel. Here we compare the results of essentially identical dissolution experiments performed on depleted U 3 O 8 and dehyrated schoepite or uranium trioxide monohydrate (UO 3 ·H 2 O). These are compared with earlier work on spent fuel and UO 2 under similar conditions

  14. Dosimetric measurement of the disintegration rate of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solymosi, J.; Nagy, L.G.; Zagyvai, P.

    1992-01-01

    Investigations on the disintegration rate of fission products of 238 U and 239 Pu are presented. The intensity of the β-and γ-radiation of fission products were measured continously in an interval of 1-1300 hours following the fission, offering the possibility for determining the general and specific characteristics of the individual fission products. A universal measuring procedure was elaborated for the rapid in situ determination of the dosimetric features of fission products, which is suitable for the accurate evaluation and prediction of external absorbed dose even in case of fission products of various origin and unknown composition. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  15. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  16. A new mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model for a uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geun

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model (MEGA) for uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel was developed. It was based upon the diffusional release of fission gases from inside the grain to the grain boundary and the release of fission gases from the grain boundary to the external surface by the interconnection of the fission gas bubbles in the grain boundary. The capability of the MEGA model was validated by a comparison with the fission gas release data base and the sensitivity analyses of the parameters. It was found that the MEGA model correctly predicts the fission gas release in the broad range of fuel burnups up to 98 MWd/kgU. Especially, the enhancement of fission gas release in a high-burnup fuel, and the reduction of fission gas release at a high burnup by increasing the UO 2 grain size were found to be correctly predicted by the MEGA model without using any artificial factor. (author)

  17. Process for separately recovering uranium, transuranium elements, and fission products of uranium from atomic reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balal, A.L.; Metscher, K.; Muehlig, B.; Reichmuth, C.; Schwarz, B.; Zimen, K.E.

    1976-01-01

    Spent reactor fuel elements are dissolved in dilute nitric acid. After addition of acetic acid as a complexing agent, the nitric acid is partly decomposed and the mixture subjected to electrolysis while a carrier liquid, which may be dilute acetic acid or a dilute mixture of acetic acid and nitric acid is caused to flow in the electric field between the electrodes either against the direction of ion migration or transversely thereto. The ions of uranium, plutonium, and other transuranium elements, and of fission products accumulate in discrete portions of the electrolyte and are separately withdrawn as at least three fractions after one or more stages of electrolysis

  18. The use of recoil for the separation of uranium fission products; Utilisation du recul pour la separation des produits de fission de l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, R; Herczec, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    The recoil distance of fission fragments in U{sub 3}O{sub 8} is about 8 microns. By using highly diluted suspensions of uranium oxide particles having dimension much smaller than this figure (mean diameter 0,5 micron), we were able to study the re-adsorption of fission products on uranium oxide. Separation results have been studied as a function of the nature of the irradiation medium (solid or liquid) and the separation medium, of particle size and of concentration of particles in the dispersing medium. Decay curves can be used to discriminate between {sup 239}Np and mixed fission products. Most of the {sup 239}Np is found in the U{sub 3}O{sub 8} particles. The location of fission products in solid dispersing media has been determined, fission products being found always inside the dispersing medium particles. The results obtained can be applied to the rapid separation of short-lived fission products from a uranium-free starting material. (author) [French] Le parcours de recul des fragments de fission est en moyenne de 8 microns dans l'U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. En prenant des suspensions d'oxyde d'uranium dont les particules, tres diluees, ont des dimensions nettement inferieures a cette valeur (diametre moyen 0,5 micron), on a pu etudier directement la readsorption des produits de fission sur l'oxyde d'uranium. Les resultats de separation ont ete etudies en fonction de la nature du milieu d'irradiation (solide ou liquide) et du milieu de separation, de la taille des particules d'oxyde et de leur concentration dans le milieu dispersant. Les courbes de decroissance permettent de determiner la perturbation apportee dans les mesures par le {sup 239}Np qui reste en majorite dans les grains d'U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. On a determine enfin l'emplacement des produits de fission dans le cas des melanges solides; ils se trouvent toujours a l'interieur des grains du milieu recepteur. Les resultats obtenus permettent d'envisager la separation rapide de produits de fission a periode courte a

  19. Disintegration constant of uranium-238 by spontaneous fission redetermined by glass track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Medeiros, E. de.

    1978-01-01

    The disintegration constant of U 238 by spontaneous fission using glass as fission fragment detector was redetermined. A film of natural uranium (UO 3 ) prepared by chemical methods on the glass lamina was used in a long time experience of exposure (about 16 years). The good conditions of sample preparation and storage allow to observe, after chemical etching, fission fragment tracks. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Dating by fission track method: study of neutron dosimetry with natural uranium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iunes, P.J.

    1990-06-01

    Fission track dating is described, focalizing the problem of the decay constant for spontaneous fission of 238 U and the use of neutron dosimetry in fission track analysis. Experimental procedures using thin films of natural uranium as neutron dosimeters and its results are presented. The author shows a intercomparison between different thin films and between the dosimetry with thin film and other dosimetries. (M.V.M.). 52 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs

  1. Influence of solvent radiolysis on extraction, scrubbing and stripping of uranium and some fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlowska, W.; Nowak, M.

    1978-01-01

    Radiolytically degraded TBP-n-paraffins solvent was used in the laboratory flow-sheet to study the influence of radiation exposure on decontamination of uranium. The influence of accumulated doses on extraction, scrubbing and stripping of uranium and some fission products has been discussed. (author)

  2. Chemical Separation of Fission Products in Uranium Metal Ingots from Electrolytic Reduction Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Heon; Kim, Min-Jae; Choi, Kwang-Soon; Jee, Kwang-Yong; Kim, Won-Ho

    2006-01-01

    Chemical characterization of various process materials is required for the optimization of the electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. In the uranium metal ingots of interest in this study, residual process materials and corrosion products as well as fission products are involved to some extent, which further adds difficulties to the determination of trace fission products. Besides it, direct inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) analysis of uranium bearing materials such as the uranium metal ingots is not possible because a severe spectral interference is found in the intensely complex atomic emission spectra of uranium. Thus an adequate separation procedure for the fission products should be employed prior to their determinations. In present study ion exchange and extraction chromatographic methods were adopted for selective separation of the fission products from residual process materials, corrosion products and uranium matrix. The sorption behaviour of anion and tri-nbutylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatographic resins for the metals in acidic solutions simulated for the uranium metal ingot solutions was investigated. Then the validity of the separation procedure for its reliability and applicability was evaluated by measuring recoveries of the metals added

  3. An alternate procedure in the recovery of no fissioned remainder uranium in the production of molybdenum 99 from fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Chavez, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    An effective modification of the chemical processes to dissolve the U-IV in the dissolver has been obtained, using its highly alkaline pH and extracting it as Uranyl Triperoxidate soluble anionic complex, in its experimental design without fission products. Even when the extraction of uranium is usually more complete through acidic dissolution, the characteristics for the dissolver used in production of fission Mo-99 do not allow this kind of extraction and alkaline option is more adecuate for this purpose. The dissolution of the insoluble residue, through the production of the anionic Triperoxidate Uranyl complexes, arises rapidly due to the presence of and oxidizing agent. The best results in the extraction of soluble Uranium were obtained with and organic solvent and a mixture of carbonate/bicarbonate. The concentrated Uranium in the aqueous alkaline solution was separated through fixation as an anion Tricarbonate of Uranyl in columns of anionic resin, moderately basic in dynamic conditions. The superiority of the resin used, over other exchangers, was evident in the elution with nitric acid that may be done for small volumes with a quite favorable separation of Uranium. The eluate contains the Uranium as an hexahydrated Uranyl Nitrate with a high degree of purity in reduced volume, in an average concentration of 90.2 % with respect to the initial concentration of Uranium (Author)

  4. Microscopic description of fission in odd-mass uranium and plutonium nuclei with the Gogny energy density functional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Guzman, R. [Kuwait University, Physics Department, Kuwait (Kuwait); Robledo, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Center for Computational Simulation, Boadilla del Monte (Spain)

    2017-12-15

    The parametrization D1M of the Gogny energy density functional is used to study fission in the odd-mass Uranium and Plutonium isotopes with A = 233,.., 249 within the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) Equal Filling Approximation (EFA). Ground state quantum numbers and deformations, pairing energies, one-neutron separation energies, barrier heights and fission isomer excitation energies are given. Fission paths, collective masses and zero point rotational and vibrational quantum corrections are used to compute the systematic of the spontaneous fission half-lives t{sub SF}, the masses and charges of the fission fragments as well as their intrinsic shapes. Although there exits a strong variance of the predicted fission rates with respect to the details involved in their computation, it is shown that both the specialization energy and the pairing quenching effects, taken into account fully variationally within the HFB-EFA blocking scheme, lead to larger spontaneous fission half-lives in odd-mass U and Pu nuclei as compared with the corresponding even-even neighbors. It is shown that modifications of a few percent in the strengths of the neutron and proton pairing fields can have a significant impact on the collective masses leading to uncertainties of several orders of magnitude in the predicted t{sub SF} values. Alpha-decay lifetimes have also been computed using a parametrization of the Viola-Seaborg formula. (orig.)

  5. Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or eqithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement

  6. A Very High Uranium Density Fission Mo Target Suitable for LEU Using atomization Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Ryu, H. J.; Woo, Y. M.; Jang, S. J.; Park, J. M.; Choi, S. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Currently HEU minimization efforts in fission Mo production are underway in connection with the global threat reduction policy. In order to convert HEU to LEU for the fission Mo target, higher uranium density material could be applied. The uranium aluminide targets used world widely for commercial {sup 99}Mo production are limited to 3.0 g-U/cc in uranium density of the target meat. A consideration of high uranium density using the uranium metal particles dispersion plate target is taken into account. The irradiation burnup of the fission Mo target are as low as 8 at.% and the irradiation period is shorter than 7 days. Pure uranium material has higher thermal conductivity than uranium compounds or alloys. It is considered that the degradation by irradiation would be almost negligible. In this study, using the computer code of the PLATE developed by ANL the irradiation behavior was estimated. Some considerations were taken into account to improve the irradiation performance further. It has been known that some alloying elements of Si, Cr, Fe, and Mo are beneficial for reducing the swelling by grain refinement. In the RERTR program recently the interaction problem could be solved by adding a small amount of Si to the aluminum matrix phase. The fabrication process and the separation process for the proposed atomized uranium particles dispersion target were reviewed

  7. BIG-10 fission product generation and reaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Fission product generation rates for high quality fission foils and reaction rates of nonfission foils have been measured by gamma ray activation analyses. These foils were irradiated in the BIG-10 facility and the activities were measured by NaI counting techniques

  8. Fission energy of uranium isotopes and transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemirovskij, P.Eh.; Manevich, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison is made between the prompt fission energy, Esub(pr), calculated from the mass and binding energy spectrum and the Esub(pr) value obtained from the experimental data on the kinetic energy of fragments, the energy of prompt neutrons and prompt γ-quanta. Basing on the data on β-decay chains of fission fragments, the energies of neutrinos, γ-quanta and β-electrons are obtained, which permits to calculate the actual energy released during fission. The calculations are performed for thermal neutron-induced fission, fast-neutron induced fission and for fission after bombardment with 14 MeV neutrons. The available experimental data on the fission fragment kinetic energy, prompt γ-quanta energy and fission neutron energy are presented. The comparison of the Esub(pr) values obtained experimentally for the thermal-neutron-induced fission with the calculated Esub(pr) value shows that for 233 U, 239 Pu, 241 Pu the agreement is rather favourable. For 235 U the agreement is within the error limits. As to the Esub(pr) values for the fast-neutron-induced fission, the agreement between the calculated and experimental data for all nuclides is quite good

  9. Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products on zirconium phosphate, Part 1 - Adsorption equilibria and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.; Ruvarac, A.

    1963-01-01

    The distribution coefficients of UO 2 ++ , PuO 2 ++ , Pu 3+ , Pu 4+ , Fe 3+ , 137 Cs + , 90 Sr ++ , 95 Zr + + 95 Nb 5+ , 106 Ru and 144 Ce 3+ were determined in the system zirconium phosphate-aqueous solution of HNO 3 . As for the exchange reation Cs + /H + and Sr ++ /2H + , it has been shown that the mass action law can be applied. For these reactions the corresponding equilibrium constants were calculated. The rates of adsorption of Cs + , Sr ++ , Fe 3+ and Pu 4+ from solutions of a fixed HNO 3 concentration were studied, and empirical rate equations were derived. The experimental data confirm that UO 2 ++ can be separated from Pu 4+ . Among the fission products, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 144 Ce mainly follow the fraction of uranium, while 137 Cs, 95 Zr and 95 Nb follow the plutonium fraction. Separations within the fractions are possible (author)

  10. Determination of trace uranium in atmospheric precipitation of the Xiangjiang river valley by fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Pengji; Kang Tiesheng

    1986-01-01

    In this work the uranium contents in atmospheric precipitations in the region of the Xiangjiang River valley have been measured by fission track method, which range from 0.008 to 1.5 ppb. The majority of them are below 0.1 ppb. The uranium contents in the samples form different geographical positions are obviously different. Sometimes the differences in uranium contents of the samples from the same area collected at different times are also great. A preliminary discussion is given on the sources of uranium in atmospheric precipitation and on the reason of the difference in contents

  11. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  12. Determination of the uranium concentration in soil solutions by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, G.P.

    1980-02-01

    The fission tracks registration technique was used to determine the uranium concentration in soil solutions. The Makrofol KG, a synthetic plastic manufactured by Bayer, was used as a detector and the wet method was applied. From the calibration curves obtained, it was possible to determine uranium concentrations in soil solutions, from 90 to 320 μg U/l, with an error between 9.4% and 4.0%, respectively. The method was applied to a few soil samples from Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais in Brazil. The uranium concentrations in the sample and residues were also determined by other methods to compare the results obtained; only one sample showed deviation from the results obtained by the fission tracks method. And this discrepancy was explained in a reasonable way. It was shown that the fission tracks technique can be used with sucess for application in soil solutions. (Author) [pt

  13. Development of the fission fragment track registration technique for the determination of the uranium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The Fission Fragment Track Registration Technique is developed to measure the uranium concentration about microgram of uranium per litre of liquid samples. The drying method of drops on the detector (Makrofol KG) and a special sampling procedure to avoid the cumbersome high density of tracks formation at the edge of the deposition surface as a 'ring' is adopted. The samples are irradiated by neutrons produced by the IEA-R1 Reactor (thermal neutron flux about 10 12 neutrons/cm 2 .s) inducing the uranium fission. The tracks registered by the fission fragments in the detector are chemically enlarged and counted by an automatic couting system. By this method the uranium concentrations ranging from 0,9 to 7,6 microgram of uranium per litre, can be determined with precisions between 2,7% the greater and 23% to the lower concentration. The uranium concentration measurements in human hair and urine are made showing that this method is very useful to control and detect eventual uranium contamination [pt

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  15. Ejection of Uranium Atoms from UO{sub 2} by Fission Fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Goesta

    1964-02-15

    The numbers of uranium atoms ejected from the surface of sintered plates of UO{sub 2} by fission fragments have been measured over the fission density range 5x10{sup 15} to 7x10{sup 16} fissions/cm{sup 3}. The number of uranium atoms ejected per escaping fragment was about 9. The measurements were performed by irradiating the plates in vacuum and collecting a fraction of the uranium atoms ejected on catcher foils. The amount collected was determined by fission counting. Saturation of the amount collected, as reported by Rogers and Adam, was not observed. The numbers of uranium atoms ejected as knock-ons under the same experimental conditions have been calculated. The reasonably close agreement between the experimental and theoretical values indicates that, under the prevailing experimental conditions, mainly knock-ons are ejected. Other ejection mechanisms, e. g. evaporation of material in thermal spikes, are probably insignificant; this is in contrast to the usual interpretation of the ejection process. The mean range in UO{sub 2}, of fission products of mass number 140 was found to be 7.37 {+-} 0. 05 mg/cm{sup 2} by direct gamma spectrometric, determination of the fraction of {sup 140}La escaping from the surface of the plates.

  16. Fission dynamics of superheavy nuclei formed in uranium induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurjit Kaur; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-01-01

    The compound nuclear system follows symmetric fission if the competing processes such as quasi-elastic, deep inelastic, quasi-fission etc are absent. The contribution of quasi fission events towards the fusion-fission mechanism depends on the entrance channel asymmetry of reaction partners, deformations and orientations of colliding nuclei beside the dependence on energy and angular momentum. Usually the 209 Bi and 208 Pb targets are opted for the production of superheavy nuclei with Z CN =104-113. The nuclei in same mass/charge range can also be synthesized using actinide targets + light projectiles (i.e. asymmetric reaction partners) via hot fusion interactions. These actinide targets are prolate deformed which prefer the compact configurations at above barrier energies, indicating the occurrence of symmetric fission events. Here an attempt is made to address the dynamics of light superheavy system (Z CN =104-106), formed via hot fusion interactions involving actinide targets

  17. Determination in soils of soluble uranium fraction in acid medium by fission tracks registration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    The fission tracks registration technique was used to determine the concentration of uranium in soil solutions. The Makrofol KG, a synthetic plastic manufactured by Bayer, was used as a detector and the wet method was applied. The method was applied to a few samples of soils from Pocos de Caldas, Minas Gerais in Brazil. The concentrations of uranium in the samples and residues were also determined by other methods to compare the results obtained; only one sample showed deviation among the results obtained by the fission tracks method. (author)

  18. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, J.L.; Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A.; Chichester, D.L.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.

    2014-01-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and 235 U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators

  19. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, J.L., E-mail: jldolan@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and {sup 235}U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators.

  20. Rate phenomena in uranium extraction by amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, C.F.; McDowell, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics studies and other rate measurements are reviewed in the amine extraction of uranium and of some other related and associated metal ions. Equilibration is relatively fast in the uranium sulfate systems most important to uranium hydrometallurgy. Significantly slow equilibration has been encountered in some other systems. Most of the recorded rate information, both qualitative and quantitative, has come from exploratory and process-development work, while some kinetics studies have been directed specifically toward elucidation of extraction mechanisms. 71 references

  1. Contribution to the study of the diffusion of fission products in uranium; Contribution a l'etude de la diffusion des produits de fission dans l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournier, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-10-15

    In this work we have developed a simple method for determining the diffusion constants and the solid-state solubilities of a metal which is volatile and only slightly soluble in second metal. This method has been applied to the behaviour of certain fission products in {gamma} uranium: strontium, barium, lanthanum, samarium and cerium. This work has made it possible to show the effect of the atomic radius of the solute on the diffusion constants. (author) [French] Dans ce travail nous avons mis au point une methode simple permettant de determiner les constantes de diffusion ainsi que les solubilites a l'etat solide d'un metal volatil et peu soluble dans un autre. Cette methode a ete appliquee au comportement de certains produits de fission dans l'uranium {gamma}: strontium, baryum, lanthane, samarium et cerium. Cette etude a permis de mettre en evidence le role du rayon atomique du solute sur les constantes de diffusion. (auteur)

  2. Fission track ages and uranium concentration of apatites of different rocks of South India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nand Lal; Nagpaul, K.K.; Nagpal, M.K.

    1975-01-01

    The uranium concentration and ages of apatite grains of various rocks of South India have been measured by fission track technique. The ages range from 100 m.y. to 730 m.y. whereas uranium concentrations vary from 0.5 to 23.8 atom/million atoms of the apatite mineral. The ages agree well with the Deccan volcanic and Ocean Cycle activities. (author)

  3. Fission track dating and uranium estimation in pegmatitic minerals of Rajasthan state (India)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S; Virk, H S [Punjabi Univ., Patiala (India). Dept. of Physics

    1978-12-01

    Fission track geochronology of muscovite samples collected from some pegmatitic mines of Bhilwara and Ajmer districts of Rajasthan state (India) has been discussed. The ages obtained suggest the occurrence of Delhi Orogenic Cycle as the last major metamorphic activity in the region. The atomic fraction of uranium in muscovite samples is less than 1 p.p.b.

  4. A cluster dynamics study of fission gases in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek, Richard

    2013-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation of nuclear fuels a lot of rare gases are produced, mainly xenon and krypton. The behaviour of these highly insoluble fission gases may lead to an additional load of the cladding, which may have detrimental safety consequences. For these reasons, fission gas behaviour (diffusion and clustering) has been extensively studied for years.In this work, we present an application of Cluster Dynamics to address the behaviour of fission gases in UO_2 which simultaneously describes changes in rare gas atom and point defect concentrations in addition to the bubble size distribution. This technique, applied to Kr implanted and annealed samples, yields a precise interpretation of the release curves and helps justifying the estimation of the Kr diffusion coefficient, which is a data very difficult to obtain due to the insolubility of the gas. (author) [fr

  5. Distribution of uranium in dental porcelains by means of the fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Masami; Noguchi, Kunikazu; Moriwaki, Kazunari; Sairenji, Eiko

    1980-01-01

    Porcelain teeth, some of which contain uranium compounds for aesthetic purpose, have been widely used in dental clinics. Hazardous effects due to uranium radiation have been suggested by recent publications. In the previous study, the authors reported the uranium content of porcelain teeth and radiation dose by it. In this study, using the fission track method, the authors examined spatial distribution of uranium in dental porcelain teeth (4 brands) which were marketed in Japan. From each sample of porcelain tooth, a 1-mm-thick specimen was sliced, and uranium content was measured at every 0.19 mm from labial side to lingual side for making a uranium distribution chart. Higher uranium concentration was found in Trubyte Bioblend porcelain teeth (USA) and they showed almost uniform distribution of uranium, while those of the Japanese three brands indicated, in most case, comparatively lower concentration and found to be non-uniform distributions. Range of uranium concentration in these brands were N.D. -- 5.2 ppm (Shofu-Ace), N.D. -- 342 ppm (Shofu-Real), N.D. -- 47 ppm (G.C. Livdent) and N.D. -- 235 ppm (Trubyte Bioblend), respectively. (author)

  6. A review of selected aspects of the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, B.F.

    1994-04-01

    A selective review is presented of previous measurements and the analysis of experiments on the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide. Evidence for the time-dependent composition of the uranium oxycarbide fuel; the diffusional release of fission gas; and the initial, rapid and limited release of stored fission gas is discussed. In regard to the initial, rapid release of fission gas, clear restrictions on mechanistic hypotheses can be deduced from the experimental data. However, more fundamental experiments may be required to establish the mechanism of the rapid release

  7. The quantitative determination of uranium in human hair by fission track measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.J.; Bentley, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    Human hairs containing a uranium burden were placed in contact with a mica sheet as the recording matrix and irradiated in a thermal neutron flux. The fission fragment tracks penetrating the mica were etched and counted. Calculations have been made to show the losses due to the fission fragment range being less than the diameter of the hair and for the variation of track density with distance from the line of contact between the hair and the mica. Experimental data from 50 μm diameter hair and those derived by calculation were compared. (author)

  8. Determination of the uranium content in phosphate fertilizers by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.C.S. da.

    1983-01-01

    The application of fission track registration technique (SSNTD) to determine the uranium contents in phosphate fertilizers is dealt with. Samples were prepared by the wet method and the detector used was Makrofol Kg 10μm thick. The determination of uranium in phosphate fertilizer industry is of considerable interest in environmental control. The roots of vegetables tend to absorb and accumulate uranium form soil and so the human body could be contaminated. The phosphate fertilizers were originated from the phosphate-rich apatite deposits located in the high naturally radioactive areas of Araxa and Tapira in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The results obtained ranged from 11.1 to 100ppm of uranium with a total error from 8.2 to 15.7%. The thorium contributions to the total track counting were discounted, though the actual concentrations of thorium in the samples were not determined. (Author) [pt

  9. Uranium deposits obtention for fission chambers; Obtencion de depositos de uranio para fabricacion de camaras de fision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artacho Saviron, E

    1972-07-01

    The obtention of uranium deposits of the required quality for small cylindrical fission chambers presents some difficulties. With the method of electroplating here described the uniformity, reproducibility and adherence of the obtained deposits were satisfactory. (Author) 6 refs.

  10. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates; Mesures de sections efficaces de fission et du nombre de neutrons prompts emis par fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billaud, P; Clair, C; Gaudin, M; Genin, R; Joly, R; Leroy, J L; Michaudon, A; Ouvry, J; Signarbieux, C; Vendryes, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin {sup 10}B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of {sup 235}U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of {sup 235}U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF{sub 3} proportional counters. c) Mean number {nu} of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of {nu} for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) {alpha} reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author)Fren. [French] a) Mesures de sectionficaces de fission a basse energie. Nous avons mesure et analyse la variation de la section efficace de fission de divers isotopes fissiles pour des neutrons d'energie inferieure a 0,025 eV. Le monochromateur est constitue par un spectrometre a cristal auquel est associe un selecteur mecanique destine a eliminer les diffractions de Bragg d'ordre superieur au premier. Le materiau fissile est contenu dans une chambre a fission sous forme de depots realises par peinture; une chambre d'ionisation a depots minces de B{sub 10

  11. The Comparison Study of Neutron Activation Analysis and Fission Track Technique for Uranium Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirinuntavid, Alice; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    2007-08-01

    Full text: Comparison between Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) and fission track technique for uranium determination in solid samples was studied by use of standard reference materials, i.e., ore, coal fly ash, soil. For NAA, the epithermal neutron was applied for activated irradiation. Then, the 74.5 keV gamma from U-239 or 277.7 keV gamma from Np-239 was measured. For high Uranium content samples, NAA method with 74.5 keV gamma measurement, gave higher precision result than the 277.7 keV gamma measurement method. NAA method with 277.7 keV gamma measurement, gave higher sensitivity and precision result for low Uranium content samples and the uranium contained less than 10 ppm samples. Nevertheless, the latter procedure needed longer time for neutron irradiation and analysis procedure. In comparison the results of Uranium analysis between NAA and fission track, it was found that no significant difference within 95 % of confidence level

  12. Status report on the development of a prompt fission neutron uranium borehole logging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.W.

    1977-05-01

    The prompt fission neutron (PFN) method of direct uranium measurement was studied. The PFN uranium logging technique measures the enhanced epithermal neutron population created by the prompt thermal fission of 235 U to assay uranium mineralization around a borehole. This neutron population exists for several hundred microseconds after a pulsed neutron source produces a burst of high energy (14 MeV) neutrons. A feasibility study established the basic relationship between the uranium concentration and the enhanced epithermal neutron count, and defined the major measurement perturbing factors. Following the feasibility study, development of a PFN prototype field probe was undertaken. A laboratory type neutron generator, the Controlatron, was modified for use in the probe. Field evaluation of the prototype system began in January 1976. Comparisons of neutron logs and natural gamma logs taken during this evaluation period clearly define many disequilibrium conditions as verified by ore grade estimates from core samples. The feasibility of the PFN logging technique to detect uranium in-situ has now been demonstrated

  13. Uranium content and fission track ages of some basalts from the FAMOUS area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storzer, Dieter; Selo, Madeleine

    1976-01-01

    The uranium contents of basalts from the rift valley in the Atlantic ocean near 37 deg N range between 75 ppb and 450 ppb. The fission track ages of these basalts range between 3x10 3 years and 6x10 5 years. They increase with distance from the axis of the median valley. Therefore, the locus of accretion of new crust seems to be restricted to a relatively narrow zone along the valley floor. In addition, the ages indicate that during the last 10 5 years the rate of accretion has been slower to the west than to the east. This indicates a migration of the active spreading center to the west by at least 1 km. the sea-floor spreading rates are high, up to 9cm/year, near the center of actual magmatic activity. They decrease with distance from the valley axis to 0.7 cm/year at about 2 km in the west respectively 1.5 cm/year at about 4 km in the east

  14. Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products on zirconium phosphate, Part 1 - Adsorption equilibria and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I; Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za hemiju visoke aktivnosti, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    The distribution coefficients of UO{sub 2}{sup ++}, PuO{sub 2}{sup ++}, Pu{sup 3+}, Pu{sup 4+}, Fe{sup 3+}, {sup 137}Cs{sup +}, {sup 90}Sr{sup ++}, {sup 95}Zr{sup +}+{sup 95}Nb{sup 5+}, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 144}Ce{sup 3+} were determined in the system zirconium phosphate-aqueous solution of HNO{sub 3}. As for the exchange reation Cs{sup +}/H{sup +} and Sr{sup ++}/2H{sup +}, it has been shown that the mass action law can be applied. For these reactions the corresponding equilibrium constants were calculated. The rates of adsorption of Cs{sup +}, Sr{sup ++}, Fe{sup 3+} and Pu{sup 4+} from solutions of a fixed HNO{sub 3} concentration were studied, and empirical rate equations were derived. The experimental data confirm that UO{sub 2}{sup ++} can be separated from Pu{sup 4+}. Among the fission products, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 106}Ru and {sup 144}Ce mainly follow the fraction of uranium, while {sup 137}Cs, {sup 95}Zr and {sup 95}Nb follow the plutonium fraction. Separations within the fractions are possible (author)

  15. The migration of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in irradiated uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.

    1977-05-01

    The mobility of intragranular fission gas bubbles in uranium dioxide irradiated at 1600-1800 0 C has been studied following isothermal annealing at temperatures below 1600 0 C. The intragranular fission gas bubbles, average diameter approximately 2nm, are virtually immobile at temperatures below 1500 0 C. The bubbles have clean surfaces with no solid fission product contamination and are faceted to the highest observed irradiation temperature of 1800 0 C. This bubble faceting is believed to be a major cause of bubble immobility. In fuel operating below 1500 0 C the predominant mechanism allowing the growth of intragranular bubbles and the subsequent gas release must be the diffusion of dissolved gas atoms rather than the movement of entire intragranular bubbles. (author)

  16. The separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products on zirconium phosphate columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I; Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-12-15

    In recent years special attention has been given to the ion-exchange properties of zirconium phosphate and similar compounds in aqueous solutions. These inorganic cation exchangers are stable in oxidizing media and at elevated temperatures. Their resistance to ionizing radiation makes them particularly suitable for work with radioactive solutions. On account of this we considered ir worthwhile to investigate the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products on zirconium phosphate columns. We were interested in nitric and solutions containing macro-amounts of uranium (a few grams per litre), and micro-amounts of plutonium and long-lived fission products. To obtain a better insight into the ion-exchange behaviour of the different ionic species towards zirconium phosphate, we first determined the dependence of the distribution coefficients of uranium, plutonium and fission product cations on the aqueous nitric acid concentration. Then, taking the distribution data as a guide, we separated plutonium on small glass columns filled with zirconium phosphate and calculated the decontamination factors (author)

  17. Analysis of trace uranium in human urine by using the fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huailu; Yang Huazhang; Zhao Dongzhi; Wang Kaixue

    1988-01-01

    In order to know the contents of uranium in human urine, urine samples from 10 healthy persons with different ages and sexes in Lanzhou area were analysed with the fisson track method. The results, in contrast with the contents of uranium in Yellow River water (in Lanzhou section), tap-water and rainwater, indicated that the content of uranium in human urine was lower than that in tap-water. From the ratio of uranium in human urine to that in tap-water, the maximum excreted rate of uranium from urine is evaluated to be 42.2%

  18. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinhua; Guo Haiping; Mou Yunfeng; Zheng Pu; Liu Rong; Yang Xiaofei; Yang Jian

    2013-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D + beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-Ⅵ data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors. (authors)

  19. Delayed neutron spectra from short pulse fission of uranium-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwater, H.F.; Goulding, C.A.; Moss, C.E.; Pederson, R.A.; Robba, A.A.; Wimett, T.F.; Reeder, P.; Warner, R.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed neutron spectra from individual short pulse (∼50 μs) fission of small 235 U samples (50 mg) were measured using a small (5 cm OD x 5 cm length) NE 213 neutron spectrometer. The irradiating fast neutron flux (∼10 13 neutrons/cm 2 ) for these measurements was provided by the Godiva fast burst reactor at the Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF). A high speed pneumatic transfer system was used to transfer the 50 mg 235 U samples from the irradiation position near the Godiva assembly to a remote shielded counting room containing the NE 213 spectrometer and associated electronics. Data were acquired in sixty-four 0.5 s time bins and over an energy range 1 to 7 MeV. Comparisons between these measurements and a detailed model calculation performed at Los Alamos is presented

  20. Fission-evaporation competition in excited uranium and fermium nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagajdak, R.N.; Chepigin, V.I.; Kabachenko, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    The production cross sections and excitation functions for the 223-226 U neutron deficient isotopes have been measured in the 20 Ne+ 208 Pb and 22 Ne+ 208 Pb reactions for (4,5)n and (4-7)n evaporation channels of the de-excitation of the compound nuclei 228 U* and 230 U*, respectively. The present study considers in addition the de-excitation via the (5,6)n evaporation channels of the 224 U* compound nucleus formed in the 27 Al+ 197 Au reaction. The production cross sections of 247g,246 Fm formed after evaporation of (5,6)n and (7,8)n from the 252 Fm* and 254 Fm* compound nuclei produced in the 20 Ne+ 232 Th and 22 Ne+ 232 Th reactions were also measured respectively. The evaporation residues emerging from the target were separated in-flight from the projectiles and background reaction products by the electrostatic recoil separator VASSILISSA [1]. The investigation regards the U and Fm compound nuclei in the 40-80 MeV excitation energy range. For the analysis of the (Hl, xn) evaporation cross sections the advanced statistical model [2] calculations were used. The angular momentum dependence of the shell correction to the fission barrier, and the effects of the nuclear viscosity and dynamical deformation for these fissile excited nuclei are considered. The n /Γ t > values at the initial steps of the de-excitation cascade for the U and Fm compound nuclei were derived from the measured excitation functions and discussed from the point of view of the consequences for the fission process dynamics

  1. On the use of thin natural uranium film dosimetry in mineral dating by the fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadler Neto, J.C.; Iunes, P.J.; Khouri, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    Three obsidian samples were irradiated in a neutron facility and their age was measured by the fission track method; using a thin uranium film dosemeter. The results were compared to others made previously on the same type of rock using conventional neutron dosimetry. The use of thin uranium film for age determination is discussed. (F.E.). 20 refs, 4 tabs

  2. Determination of the uranium concentration in water samples by the technique of fission track recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldo, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    The technique of fission track register was developed for the determination of micrograms of uranium. The Makrofol KG, a synthetic plastic made by Bayer, was used as the detector and the wet method was utilized. The detector calibration curve allows the determination of the uranium concentration in a sample within an interval from 8.0 to 0.4μgU/L, the total error ranging from 3.3% to 29.0% respectively. The method was used in the determination of the uranium content in various water samples, obtained from various sources like rivers, sea etc. in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Results were compared with those obtained by other authors using different methods. The average concentration found in sea waters (3.27 +- 9.12μgU/l) by this method is compatible with the international average accepted value of 3.3μgU/l, irrespective of site and depth. The determination of the uranium content by fission track counting has proved to be very convenient. (Author) [pt

  3. Concentration of uranium in human cancerous tissues of Southern Iraqi patients using fission track analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hamzawi, A.A.; Al-Qadisiyah University, Qadisiyah; Jaafar, M.S.; Tawfiq, N.F.

    2015-01-01

    The technique of nuclear fission track analysis with solid state nuclear track detectors CR-39 has been applied to determine concentrations of uranium in cancerous samples of human tissues that excised from patients in the three key southern Iraqi governorates namely, Basrah, Dhi-Qar, and Muthanna. These provinces were the sites of intensive military events during the Gulf Wars in 1991 and 2003. The investigation was based on the study of 24 abnormal samples and 12 normal samples for comparing the results. These samples include four types of soft tissues (kidney, breast, stomach and uterus). The results show that uranium concentrations in the normal tissues ranged between (1.42-4.76 μg kg -1 ), whereas in the cancerous tissues ranged between (3.37-7.22 μg kg -1 ). The uranium concentrations in the normal tissues were significantly lower than in the abnormal tissues (P < 0.001). (author)

  4. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  5. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  6. Membrane extraction in preconcentration of some uranium fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macasek, F.; Rajec, P.; Kopunec, R.; Mikulaj, V.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical comparison of the equilibria and kinetics of solvent extraction (SX) and emulsion liquid membrane extraction (MX) was performed using the distribution ratios at the outer inner boundaries of liquid membrane. Enhancement factors, pertraction factor (p) and mulitplication factor (N), were proposed to express efficiency of the MX technique. The extraction of cesium, strontium, cobalt(II), uranium(VI), cerium(III) and technetium(VII) was investigated from this point of view. The most perspective systems are those with chelating agents (e.g. di-2-ethylhexyl-phosporic acid and 8-hydroquinoline), especially at low concentrations (substioichiometric amounts), with which high enhancement factors can be achieved. The results with the ion-exchange systems (bis(1,2-dicarbollyl)-cobalt(III) and quaternary ammonium salts) may be interpreted as indicating some surface barriers which prevent the transport of ions. 20 references, 14 figures, 6 tables

  7. Development of industrial-scale fission {sup 99}Mo production process using low enriched uranium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Kon; Lee, Jun Sig [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Beyer, Gerd J. [Grunicke Strasse 15, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) is the most important isotope because its daughter isotope, technetium-99m ({sup 99}mTc), has been the most widely used medical radioisotope for more than 50 years, accounting for > 80% of total nuclear diagnostics worldwide. In this review, radiochemical routes for the production of {sup 99}Mo, and the aspects for selecting a suitable process strategy are discussed from the historical viewpoint of {sup 99}Mo technology developments. Most of the industrial-scale {sup 99}Mo processes have been based on the fission of {sup 235}U. Recently, important issues have been raised for the conversion of fission {sup 99}Mo targets from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium (LEU). The development of new LEU targets with higher density was requested to compensate for the loss of {sup 99}Mo yield, caused by a significant reduction of {sup 235}U enrichment, from the conversion. As the dramatic increment of intermediate level liquid waste is also expected from the conversion, an effective strategy to reduce the waste generation from the fission {sup 99}Mo production is required. The mitigation of radioxenon emission from medical radioisotope production facilities is discussed in relation with the monitoring of nuclear explosions and comprehensive nuclear test ban. Lastly, the {sup 99}Mo production process paired with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's own LEU target is proposed as one of the most suitable processes for the LEU target.

  8. Natural uranium impurities in fission track detectors and associated geocronological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, G.H.; Bovisio de Ricabarra, M.D.; Waisman, Dina; Faradjie de Turjanski, Rosa

    1981-01-01

    A technique, based in counting neutron induced fission tracks, has been developed for the measurement of uranium impurities in mica. Uranium concentrations of 10 -10 and 10 -9 (U atom/mica atom) have been measured. As a part of the development of this technique, the mica geological age was also measured, by fossil and induced track detection. The agreement obtained by this method, T = (472+-52) x 10 6 years with that of (450+-15) x 10 6 years obtained by the Ar-K technique is satisfactory and is an indirect test of the fission track technique used. A careful analysis of the neutron field parameters and nuclear data used in the age determination was made. This analysis is useful for applications in geocronology. According to this analysis a value of lambdasub(f)=(7.1+-0.1) x 10 -17 years -1 is recommended for the spontaneous fission of U238. However, in order to compare the results, the quoted age, T=(472+-52) x 10 6 years, was obtained with the generally accepted value of lambdasub(f)=(6.85-0.20) x 10 -17 years -1 (Fleischer and Price 1964). (author) [es

  9. Development of Industrial-Scale Fission 99Mo Production Process Using Low Enriched Uranium Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Kon Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum-99 (99Mo is the most important isotope because its daughter isotope, technetium-99m (99mTc, has been the most widely used medical radioisotope for more than 50 years, accounting for > 80% of total nuclear diagnostics worldwide. In this review, radiochemical routes for the production of 99Mo, and the aspects for selecting a suitable process strategy are discussed from the historical viewpoint of 99Mo technology developments. Most of the industrial-scale 99Mo processes have been based on the fission of 235U. Recently, important issues have been raised for the conversion of fission 99Mo targets from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium (LEU. The development of new LEU targets with higher density was requested to compensate for the loss of 99Mo yield, caused by a significant reduction of 235U enrichment, from the conversion. As the dramatic increment of intermediate level liquid waste is also expected from the conversion, an effective strategy to reduce the waste generation from the fission 99Mo production is required. The mitigation of radioxenon emission from medical radioisotope production facilities is discussed in relation with the monitoring of nuclear explosions and comprehensive nuclear test ban. Lastly, the 99Mo production process paired with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's own LEU target is proposed as one of the most suitable processes for the LEU target.

  10. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.B.

    1964-04-01

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might he reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  11. How much of the rocks and the oceans for power? Exploiting the uranium-thorium fission cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1964-04-15

    Even at quite low costs there appear to be many routes available to supply the world population of the future with its power for electricity, heat, energy storage, portable fuel, desalting water and local climate control. For example, sufficient power could come from nuclear fission in thermal neutron reactors. When rich uranium ores have become scarce, the price will rise from the current $13/kg U, but with improved techniques of extraction and the choice of an economical fuel cycle, abundant uranium for many centuries appears to be available in the rocks and the oceans. Even from reactors already developed to the stage of engineering design it is possible to choose a fuel cycle to which uranium at $250/kg U would contribute no more than 2 mill/kWh. Without suggesting when such a high cost might be reached, its implications are examined. The optimum fuel cycle would balance the financing charges on the fuel inventory and the costs of fuel make-up supply and reprocessing. By using uranium and thorium in combination at least 50,000 MWd can be derived per tonne of uranium. At a current low net conversion efficiency of 30% and an overall rating of 6 thermal kW/kg, the natural uranium inventory would cost at the suggested high price $250/(6 x 0.3) $139/ekW and for 7000 hr/yr at 7% annual charges would contribute 1.4 mill/ekWh. At 50 MWd/kg U the make-up supply contributes 250/(50 x 24 x 0.3) = 0.7 mill/ekWh. Probably higher efficiency and possibly higher specific power ratings would be used to lower such costs. The value of uranium is related to its content of the fissile U-235, and even though most power may be derived from thorium, its value will not rise comparably with that of uranium. In the course of time a ceiling will be set on the value of fissile material by the introduction of processes other than the thermal neutron fission chain reaction for producing power or neutrons. The total cost of nuclear power includes also contributions from the cost of equipment

  12. Study of uranium mineralization in rock samples from marwat range bannu basin by fission track analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, A.Z.; Ullah, K.; Ullah, N.; Akram, M.

    2004-07-01

    The Geophysics Division, Atomic Energy Minerals Centre (AEMC), Lahore has planned a uranium exploration program in Marwat Range, Bannu Basin. In this connection 30 thin sections of rock samples, collected from four areas; namely, Darra Tang, Simukili, Karkanwal and Sheikhillah from Marwat Range, and one from Salt Range were provided to Nuclear Geology Group of Physics Research Division, PINSTECH for the study of nature and mechanism of uranium mineralization These studies are aimed to help in designing uranium exploration strategy by providing the loci of uranium sources in the Marwat and Salt Ranges. The samples have been studied using fission track analysis technique. (author)

  13. Measurement of uranium in human teeth and kidney stones with the fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of uranium in human teeth and in kidney stones was carried out using the fission track activation technique. In this determination 2759 and 2205 absolute counts of tracks for teeth samples and 1689 tracks for kidney stone samples were performed, respectively. The results are as follows: xsub(tooth) (1)=(0.227+-0.006) ppm, xsub(tooth) (2)=(0.143+-0.007) ppm and xsub(kidney)=(0.568+-0.020) ppm. The experimental method is described and the results are discussed. (author)

  14. Application of fission track technique for estimation of uranium concentration in drinking waters of Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, S.P.; Sawant, P.D.; Raj, S.S.; Kumar, A.; Sarkar, P.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Drinking water samples were collected from four different districts, namely Bhatinda, Mansa, Faridkot and Firozpur, of Punjab for ascertaining the U(nat.) concentrations. All samples were preserved, processed and analyzed by laser fluorimetry (LF). To ensure accuracy of the data obtained by LF, few samples (10 nos) from each district were analyzed by alpha spectrometry as well as by fission track analysis (FTA) technique. For FTA technique few μl of water sample was transferred to polythene tube, lexan detector was immersed in it and the other end of the tube was also heat-sealed. Two samples and one uranium standard were irradiated in DHRUVA reactor. Irradiated detectors were chemically etched and tracks counted using an optical microscope. Uranium concentrations in samples ranged from 3.2 to 60.5 ppb and were comparable with those observed by LF. (author)

  15. Determination of the uranium concentration in apatite by the fission - track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Oliveira Cardoso, D.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using the fission-track registration technique to determine the uranium content in the phosphate rock beneficiation steps carried on by CompanhiA Arafertil, Araxa, Minas Gerais, Brazil is studied. This determination is of considerable interest to the environmental control of the Arafertil installations as well as of its surroundings or of the areas where these products will be used. The so called wet method was adopted and a 10 μm polycarbonate foil, fabricated by Bayer under the trade name Makrofol KG was used as detector. From the calibration curve obtained, it was possible to determine uranium contents in sample solutions ranging from 21 to 212 μg U/1 with an accuracy of 8 to 14.7%, respectively. The results obtained demonstrated that the technique used is appropriate to the purposes previously aimed at. (Author) [pt

  16. Reactor AQUILON. The hardening of neutron spectrum in natural uranium rods, with a computation of epithermal fissions (1961); Pile AQUILON. Durcissement du spectre des neutrons dans les barreaux d'uranium et calcul des fissions epithermiques (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand -Smet, R; Lourme, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    - Microscopic flux measurements in reactor Aquilon have allowed to investigate the thermal and epithermal flux distribution in natural uranium rods, then to obtain the neutron spectrum variations in uranium, Wescott '{beta}' term of the average spectrum in the rod, and the ratio of epithermal to therma fissions. A new definition for the infinite multiplication factor is proposed in annex, which takes into account epithermal parameters. (authors) [French] - Un certain nombre de mesures effectuees dans la pile Aquilon ont permis d'etablir la distribution fine des flux thermique et epithermique dans les barreaux d'uranium, et d'en deduire les variations du spectre des neutrons dans l'uranium, le terme {beta} du spectre de Wescott moyen dans le barreau et le nombre de fissions epithermiques. En annexe, il est propose une definition nouvelle du coefficient de multiplication infini, qui fait intervenir les parametres epithermiques. (auteurs)

  17. Trace uranium analysis in Indian coal samples using the fission track technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jojo, P.J.; Rawat, A.; Kumar, Ashavani; Prasad, Rajendra

    1993-01-01

    The ever-growing demand for energy has resulted in the extensive use of fossil fuels, especially coal, for power generation. Coal and its by-products often contain significant amounts of radionuclides, including uranium, which is the ultimate source of the radioactive gas Radon-222. The present study gives the concentration of uranium in coal samples of different collieries in India, collected from various thermal power plants in the state of Uttar Pradesh. The estimates were made using the fission track technique. Latent damage tracks were not found to be uniformly distributed but showed sun bursts and clusters. Non-uniform distributions of trace elements are a very common phenomenon in rocks. The levels of uranium in the coal samples were found to vary from 2.0 to 4.9 ppm in uniform distributions and from 21.3 to 41.0 ppm in non-uniform distributions. Measurements were also made on fly ash samples where the average uranium concentration was found to be 8.4 and 49.3 ppm in uniform and non-uniform distributions, respectively. (author)

  18. Experimental measurement of fission fragments paths in uranium gold, molybdenum, zirconium and silicon; Mesure experimentale des parcours des fragments de fission dans l'uranium, l'or, le molybdene, le zirconium et le silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, H; Garin-Bonnet, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The measurement of total number of fissiongments emerging from an homogeneous, thick alloy composed of uranium plus another element (the concentration of uranium being known) allows to obtain the range of the fragments in this alloy. By varying the concentration, the range of the fragments in uranium and in the other element can be deduced. (author)Fren. [French] La mesure du nombre total de fragments de fission sortant d'un alliage homogene epais d'uranium et d'un autre element, pour lequel la concentration en uranium est donnee, permet la mesure du parcours des fragments dans cet alliage. En faisant varier la concentration, on peut deduire de ces mesures le parcours des fragments dans l'uranium et dans l'autre element. (auteur)

  19. Determination of average fission fraction produced by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dalun; Li Benci; Wang Xiuchun; Li Yijun; Zhang Shaohua; He Yongwu

    1991-07-01

    The average fission fraction of 238 U caused by 14 MeV neutrons in assemblies with large volume depleted uranium has been determined. The measured value of p f 238U (R ∞ depleted ) 14 was 0.897 ± 0.036. Measurements were also completed for neutron flux distribution and average fission fraction of 235 U isotope in depleted uranium sphere. Values of p f 238U (R depleted ) have been obtained by using a series of uranium spheres. For a sphere with Φ 600 the p f 23 '8 U (R 300 depleted ) is 0.823 ± 0.041, the density of depleted uranium assembly is 18.8g/cm 3 and total weight of assembly is about 2.8t

  20. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium. Part I: literature review on experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    This review compiles the available data on the solubility of the most important non-volatile fission products in the carbides, nitrides, and carbonitrides of uranium and plutonium. It includes some elements which are not fission products, but belong to a group of the Periodic Table which contains one or more fission products elements

  1. Standard method of test for atom percent fission in uranium fuel - radiochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    The determination of the U at. % fission that has occurred in U fuel from an analysis of the 137 Cs ratio to U ratio after irradiation is described. The method is applicable to high-density, clad U fuels (metal, alloys, or ceramic compounds) in which no separation of U and Cs has occurred. The fuels are best aged for several months after irradiation in order to reduce the 13-day 136 Cs activity. The fuel is dissolved and diluted to produce a solution containing a final concentration of U of 100 to 1000 mg U/l. The 137 Cs concentration is determined by ASTM method E 320, for Radiochemical Determination of Cesium-137 in Nuclear Fuel Solutions, and the U concentration is determined by ASTM method E 267, for Determination of Uranium and Plutonium Concentrations and Isotopic Abundances, ASTM method E 318, for Colorimetric Determination of Uranium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry. Calculations are given for correcting the 137 Cs concentration for decay during and after irradiation. The accuracy of this method is limited, not only by the experimental errors with which the fission yield and the half-life of 137 Cs are known

  2. Separation of cesium-137 from uranium fission products via a NeoflonR column supporting tetraphenylboron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, C.D.; Landsberger, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cesium is a member of the Group I alkali metals, very reactive earth metals that react vigorously with both air and water. The chemistry of cesium is much like the chemistry of neighboring elements on the periodic table, potassium and rubidium. This close relation creates many problems in plant-life exposed to cesium because it is so easily confused for potassium, an essential nutrient to plants. Radioactive 134 Cs and 137 Cs are also chemically akin to potassium and stable cesium. Uptake of these radioactive isotopes from groundwater by plant-life destroys the plant-life and can potentially expose humans to the radioactive affects of 134 Cs and 137 Cs. Much experimental work has been focused on the separation of 137 Cs from uranium fission products. In previous experimental work performed a column consisting of Kel-F supporting tetraphenylboron (TPB) was utilized to separate 137 Cs from uranium fission products. It is of interest at this time to attempt the separation of 134 Cs from 0.01M EDTA using the same method and Neoflon in the place of Kel-F as the inert support. The results of this experiment give a separation efficiency of 88% and show a linear relationship between the column bed length and the separation efficiency obtained. (author)

  3. Inorganic oxides as alternative in the separation of non fissioned residual uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baca G, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 and SnO 2 as well as vegetable carbon have been studied for its possible use as sorbent in the concentration and separation of non fissioned residual uranium of some fission products such as: 141 Ce, 134 Cs, 125 Sb, 103 Ru, 95 Zr, 95 Nb of alkaline aqueous systems. The separation efficiency has been evaluated using natural uranium and radionuclides in static and dynamic processes, through liquid scintillation and gamma spectrometry. Therefore Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , SnO 2 and carbon were pre-treated thermic and chemically and characterized through the technique of Nitrogen absorption analysis, X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. By means of the p H determination and the aqueous system potential the present hydrolysis products were determined. The inorganic oxides show structural and surface changes due to the treatment. The adsorption process is realized by different mechanism depending of the sorbent. The results show that the retention capacity is a dependence of the oxides pre-treatment and of the hydrolysis products in the aqueous system, as well as of the experimental conditions. Not in this way for carbon in which the results show the treatment and the experimental conditions significantly have not influence in its adsorption capacity. (Author)

  4. Fission neutron damage rates and efficiencies in several metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    Initial rates of resistivity-measured low-temperature damage production by fission-spectrum fast neutrons have been determined for 14 metals in the same very well characterized irradiation facility. Six of these metals were fcc, 5 bcc, and 3 hcp. Most were of quite high purity. Observed damage rates, after correction for all known extraneous resistivity-producing effects, were compared with rates predicted by the damage calculation code RECOIL, using parameters chosen from the literature. These parameters, effective displacement threshold energy, E/sub d/, and Frenkel-pair resistivity, rho/sub F/, were in many cases only best estimates, the further refinement of which may be aided by the present results. Damage efficiencies (measured/predicted rates) follow the same trends by crystal classes as seen in other fast-neutron studies

  5. Uranium fission track length distribution modelling for retracing chronothermometrical history of minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebetez, M.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous fission of uranium 238 isotope contained in certain minerals creates damage zones called latent tracks, that can be etched chemically. The observation of these etched tracks and the measurement of their characteristics using an optical microscope are the basis of several applications in the domain of the earth sciences. First, the determination of their densities permits dating a mineral and establishing uranium mapping of rocks. Second, the measurement of their lengths can be a good source of information for retracing the thermal and tectonic history of the sample. The study of the partial annealing of tracks in apatite appears to be the ideal indicator for the evaluation of petroleum potential of a sedimentary basin. To allow the development of this application, it is necessary to devise a theoretical model of track length distributions. The model which is proposed takes into account the most realistic hypotheses concerning registration, etching and observation of tracks. The characteristics of surface tracks (projected lengths, depths, inclination angles, real lengths) and confined tracks (Track IN Track and Track IN Cleavage) are calculated. Surface tracks and confined tracks are perfectly complementary for chrono-thermometric interpretation of complex geological histories. The method is applied to the case of two samples with different tectonic history, issued from the cretaceous alcalin magmatism from the Pyrenees (Bilbao, Spain). A graphic method of distribution deconvolution is proposed. Finally, the uranium migration, depending on the hydrothermal alteration, is studied on the granite from Auriat (France) [fr

  6. Some studies on the fission of uranium with the help of a self-controlled wilson chamber; Quelques etudes sur la fission de l'uranium a l'aide d'une chambre de wilson autocommandee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laboulaye, H de; Tzara, C; Olkowsky, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay(France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1953-07-01

    The authors applied the method of Wilson's chamber self intern control to the survey of the uranium fission with neutrons of the core. This method allowed them: 1) - to establish a distribution of the courses of the fission fragments in argon on a big number of events. 2) - to search for the probability of production of tri-partitions to third fragment of short course. The authors succeed to the conclusion that in relation to ordinary fission, this, probability is lower to (1 {+-} 3)/1000, what permits to doubt the existence of the phenomenon. (author) [French] Les auteurs ont applique la methode de la chambre de Wilson a autocommande interne a l'etude de la fission de l'uranium par neutrons de pile. Cette methode leur a permis: 1) - d'etablir une distribution des parcours des fragments de fission dans l'argon portant sur un grand nombre d'evenements. 2) - de rechercher la probabilite de production de tripartitions a troisieme fragment de court parcours. Les auteurs aboutissent a la conclusion que par rapport a la fission ordinaire, cette probabilite est inferieure a (1 {+-} 3)/1000, ce qui permet de douter de l'existence du phenomene. (auteur)

  7. Development of windowless liquid lithium targets for fragmentation and fission of 400-kW uranium beams

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J A; Hassanein, A; Novick, V J; Plotkin, P; Specht, J R

    2003-01-01

    The driver linac of the proposed rare isotope accelerator facility is designed to deliver 2x10 sup 1 sup 3 uranium ions per second at 400 MeV/u on target for radionuclide production via the fission and fragmentation mechanisms. The ion optics of the large acceptance, high-resolution fragment separators that follow the production target require primary beam spot widths of 1 mm. To cope with the resulting high power densities, windowless liquid lithium targets are being developed. The present designs build on existing experience with liquid lithium and liquid sodium systems that have been used for fusion and fission applications. However, no completely windowless systems have been developed or tested to date. For the beam power indicated above (400 kW), the flow requirements are up to about 20 m/s and 10 l/s linear and volume flow rates, respectively. The required target thickness is 1-1.5 g/cm sup 2 (2-3 cm lithium thickness). At this time a prototype windowless system with a lithium thickness of 1-2 cm is und...

  8. The Oklo natural nuclear reactors: neutron parameters, age and duration of the reactions, uranium and fission products migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffenach, J.-C.

    1979-09-01

    Mass spectrometry and isotopic dilution technique are used in order to carry out, on various samples from the fossil nuclear reactors at Oklo, Gabon, isotopic and chemical analyses of some particular elements involved in the nuclear reactions: uranium, lead, bismuth, thorium, rare gases (krypton, xenon), rare earths (neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, dysprosium), ruthenium and palladium. Interpretations of these analyses lead to the determination of many neutron parameters such as the neutron fluence received by the samples, the spectrum index, the conversion coefficient, and also the percentages of fissions due to uranium-238 and plutonium-239 and the total number of fissions relative to uranium. All these results make it possible to determine the age of the nuclear reactions by measuring the amounts of fission rare earths formed, i.e. 1.97 billion years. This study brings some informations to the general problem of radioactive wastes storage in deep geological formations, the storage of uranium, plutonium and many fission products having been carried out naturally, and for about two billion years [fr

  9. The usage of electron beam to produce radio isotopes through the uranium fission by γ-rays and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunatyan, G.G.; Nikolenko, V.G.; Popov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We treat the production of desirable radio isotopes due to the 238 U photo-fission by the bremsstrahlung induced in converter by an initial electron beam provided by a linear electron accelerator. We consider as well the radio isotope production through the 238 U fission by the neutrons that stem in the 238 U sample irradiated by that bremsstrahlung. The yield of the most applicable radio isotope 99 Mo is calculated. We correlate the findings acquired in the work presented with those obtained by treating the nuclear photo-neutron reaction. Menace of the plutonium contamination of an irradiated uranium sample because of the neutron capture by 238 U is considered. As we get convinced, the photo-neutron production of radio isotopes proves to be more practicable than the production by the uranium photo- and neutron-fission. Both methods are certain to be brought into action due to usage of the electron beam provided by modern linear accelerators

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  11. Measurement of 237Np fission rate ratio relative to 235U fission rate in cores with various thermal neutron spectrum at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, Hironobu; Shiroya, Seiji; Iwasaki, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Kitada, Takanori; Kuroda, Mitsuo; Kohashi, Akio; Kato, Takeshi; Ikeuchi, Yoshitaka

    2000-01-01

    Integral measurements of 237 Np fission rate ratio relative to 235 U fission rate have been performed at Kyoto University Citrical Assembly. The fission rates have been measured using the back-to back type double fission chamber at five thermal cores with different H/ 235 U ratio so that the neutron spectra of the cores were systematically varied. The measured fission rate ratio per atom was 0.00439 to 0.0298, with a typical uncertainty of 2 to 3%. The measured data were compared with the calculated results using SRAC/TWOTRAN and MVP based on JENDL-3.2, which gave the averaged C/E values of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. Obtained results of C/E using 237 Np cross sections from JENDL-3/2, ENDF/B-VI.5 and JEF2.2 show that the latter two gave smaller results than JENDL-3.2 by about 4%, which clearly reflects the discrepancy in the evaluated cross section among the libraries. This difference arises from both fast fission and resonance region. Although further improvement is recommended, 237 Np fission cross section in JENDL-3.2 is considered to be superior to those in the other libraries and can be adopted for use in design calculations for minor actinide transmutation system using thermal reactors with prediction precision of 237 Np fission rate with in 10%. (author)

  12. Measurements of fission cross-sections and of neutron production rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billaud, P.; Clair, C.; Gaudin, M.; Genin, R.; Joly, R.; Leroy, J.L.; Michaudon, A.; Ouvry, J.; Signarbieux, C.; Vendryes, G.

    1958-01-01

    a) Measurements of neutron induced fission cross-sections in the low energy region. The variation of the fission cross sections of several fissile isotopes has been measured and analysed, for neutron energies below 0,025 eV. The monochromator was a crystal spectrometer used in conjunction with a mechanical velocity selector removing higher order Bragg reflections. The fissile material was laid down on the plates of a fission chamber by painting technic. An ionization chamber, having its plates coated with thin 10 B layers, was used as the neutron flux monitor. b) Measurement of the fission cross section of 235 U. We intend to measure the variation of the neutron induced fission cross section of 235 U over the neutron energy range from 1 keV by the time of flight method. The neutron source is the uranium target of a pulsed 28 MeV electron linear accelerator. The detector is a large fission chamber, with parallel plates, containing about 10 g of 235 U (20 deposits of 25 cm diameter). The relative fission data were corrected for the neutron spectrum measured with a set of BF 3 proportional counters. c) Mean number ν of neutrons emitted in neutron induced fission. We measured the value of ν for several fissile isotopes in the case of fission induced by 14 MeV neutrons. The 14 MeV neutrons were produced by D (t, n) α reaction by means of a 300 kV Cockcroft Walton generator. (author) [fr

  13. Application of fission track technique for estimation of uranium concentration in drinking waters of Punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, S.P.; Raj, Sanu S.; Sawant, P.D.; Kumar, Ajay; Sarkar, P.K.; Tripathi, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Drinking water samples were collected from four different districts, namely Bhatinda, Mansa, Faridkot and Firozpur, of Punjab for ascertaining the U(nat.) concentrations. The samples were collected from bore wells, hand pumps, tube wells and treated municipal water supply. All these samples (235 nos.) collected were preserved and processed by following the international standard protocol and analyzed by Laser Fluorimetry. Results of analysis by laser fluorimetry have been already reported. To ensure accuracy of the data obtained by laser fluorimetry, few samples (10 nos) from each district were analyzed by alpha spectrometry as well as by fission track analysis (FTA) technique. FTA in solution media for uranium has been already standardized in Bioassay laboratory of Health Physics Division. Few of drinking water sample was directly transferred to polythene tube sealed at one end. Lexan detector with proper identification mark was immersed in the samples and the other open end of the tube was also heat-sealed. Two tubes containing samples and one containing uranium standard (80 ppb) were irradiated in the Pneumatic Carrier Facility (PCF) of DHRUVA reactor. The Lexan detectors were then chemically etched and tracks were counted under an optical microscope at 400X magnification. Concentration of uranium in sample was determined by comparison technique. Quality assurance was carried out by replicate analysis and by analysis of standard reference materials. Uranium concentration in these samples ranged from 3.2 to 60.5 ppb with an average of 28.8 ppb. A t-test analysis for paired data was done to compare the results obtained by FTA and those obtained by laser fluorimeter. The calculated value for t is -1.19, which is greater than the tabulated value of t for 40 observations (-2.02 at 95% confidence level). This shows that the results of the measurements carried out by the FTA and laser fluorimetry are not significantly different. The preliminary studies

  14. First-principles study of defects and fission product behavior in uranium diboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossou, Ericmoore; Oladimeji, Dotun; Malakkal, Linu; Middleburgh, Simon; Szpunar, Barbara; Szpunar, Jerzy

    2017-10-01

    A Systematic study of defects and incorporation of xenon (Xe) and zirconium (Zr) fission products in uranium diboride (UB2) has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations as implemented in Quantum ESPRESSO code. The incorporation and solution energies show that both FPs (Xe and Zr) are most stable in U vacancies with Zr being more stable than Xe. A volume expansion is observed as the concentration of Xe increases in the fuel matrix while Zr incorporation leads to a contraction. Bader charge analysis is used to establish the formation of Zr-B ionic/covalent bond due to large electron transfer observed while there is only a weak electronic interaction between Xe and the UB2 lattice. Finally, using climbing-image nudged elastic band calculation, we found that the energy barrier of U in UB2 is 0.08 eV higher than B migration energy.

  15. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Ken; Uno, Masayoshi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke

    1999-01-01

    The chemical states of fission products (FPs) in irradiated uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for the light water reactor (LWR) were estimated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations on system of fuel and FPs by using ChemSage program. A stoichiometric MOX containing 6.1 wt. percent PuO 2 was taken as a loading fuel. The variation of chemical states of FPs was calculated as a function of oxygen potential. Some pieces of information obtained by the calculation were compared with the results of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) of UO 2 fuel. It was confirmed that the multicomponent and multiphase thermodynamic equilibrium calculation between fuel and FPs system was an effective tool for understanding the behavior of FPs in fuel. (author)

  16. Separation and purification of short lived fission products from irradiated uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, K.R.; Rao, K.L.N.; Mathai, C.; Varma, R.N.; Dhiwar, V.I.; Saxena, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Fission produced radioisotopes like 95 Zr, 140 Ba, 103 Ru, 89 Sr and 91 Y whose half lives are less than 1 year find a wide variety of applications in the fields of industry, medicine and research. Isotope Division, BARC has been supplying these isotopes in hudreds of mCi amounts during the past several years. A new method for the sequential separation of these isotopes from irradiated uranium has been developed based on synthetic inorganic exchangers like stannic phosphate, polyphospho antimonic acid, hydrous manganese dioxide, etc. This report describes the new flow sheet worked out and adopted for the regular processing of these isotopes at hundreds of milli curie amounts. (author). 19 refs., 4 tabs. , 1 fig

  17. Trace uranium determination in beverages and mineral water using fission track techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.L.; Lin, J.Y.; Hao, X.H.

    1993-01-01

    The uranium contents of beverages and mineral water have been estimated using the technique of fission track analysis with polycarbonate detector. The U contents in beverages have been found to vary from 0.26 ± 0.03 to 1.65 ± 0.07 ppb, the average value is 0.93 ± 0.05 ppb. The mean U content in mineral water is 9.20 ± 0.16 ppb, which is ∼ 10 times higher than the mean U content of beverages. The present study shows the high U content in mineral water, indicating need for further investigation of U content in mineral water for the studies of radiation health hazards. (Author)

  18. Study of the behaviour of cesium fission product in uranium dioxide by the ab initio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Florence

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of the behaviour of fission products in the nuclear fuel is very important for safety considerations and for understanding the evolution of the fuel properties under irradiation. In this work, we focussed mainly on the behaviour of caesium in UO 2 through ab initio studies of its solubility at point defects in the matrix, its diffusion and its contribution to the formation of solid phases in the fuel. The role of electronic correlation effects of the f electrons of uranium on these properties and on the description of the defect free crystal, is assessed. The formation energies of the main point defects are calculated and their concentration as a function of fuel stoichiometry and temperature is estimated. The migration barriers and migration paths for the self-diffusion of oxygen and uranium vacancies and oxygen interstitials in UO 2 are discussed. The solubility of Cs is found to be very low in UO 2 in agreement with experimental findings. The most favourable trapping sites are determined as a function of oxygen concentration in the fuel. Our results show that in the hyper-stoichiometric regime, the diffusion of Cs from its most favourable trapping site is limited by the uranium vacancy diffusion mechanism. We also considered the formation of the main solid phases of caesium resulting from its oxidation (Cs 2 O, Cs 2 O 2 , CsO 2 ) and from its interaction with the fuel (Cs 2 UO 4 ), with molybdenum (Cs 2 MoO 4 ) and with the zirconium of the clad (Cs 2 ZrO 3 ), since the formation of such phases, their solubility and their interdependence will affect the release of caesium. (author)

  19. Sequential separation of transuranic elements and fission products from uranium metal ingots in electrolytic reduction process of spent PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Heon Lee; Kih Soo Joe; Won Ho Kim; Euo Chang Jung; Kwang Yong Jee

    2009-01-01

    A sequential separation procedure has been developed for the determination of transuranic elements and fission products in uranium metal ingot samples from an electrolytic reduction process for a metallization of uranium dioxide to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt at 650 deg C. Pu, Np and U were separated using anion-exchange and tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) extraction chromatography. Cs, Sr, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Zr and Mo were separated in several groups from Am and Cm using TBP and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) extraction chromatography. Effect of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg, which were corrosion products formed through the process, on the separation of the analytes was investigated in detail. The validity of the separation procedure was evaluated by measuring the recovery of the stable metals and 239 Pu, 237 Np, 241 Am and 244 Cm added to a synthetic uranium metal ingot dissolved solution. (author)

  20. Decay rate in a multi-dimensional fission problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, D M; Canto, L F

    1986-06-01

    The multi-dimensional diffusion approach of Zhang Jing Shang and Weidenmueller (1983 Phys. Rev. C28, 2190) is used to study a simplified model for induced fission. In this model it is shown that the coupling of the fission coordinate to the intrinsic degrees of freedom is equivalent to an extra friction and a mass correction in the corresponding one-dimensional problem.

  1. Criticality accident in uranium fuel processing plant. The estimation of the total number of fissions with related reactor physics parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishina, Kojiro; Oyamatsu, Kazuhiro; Kondo, Shunsuke; Sekimoto, Hiroshi; Ishitani, Kazuki; Yamane, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2000-01-01

    This accident occurred when workers were pouring a uranium solution into a precipitation tank with handy operation against the established procedure and both the cylindrical diameter and the total mass exceeded the limited values. As a result, nuclear fission chain reactor in the solution reached not only a 'criticality' state continuing it independently but also an instantly forming criticality state exceed the criticality and increasing further nuclear fission number. The place occurring the accident at this time was not reactor but a place having not to form 'criticality' called by a processing process of uranium fuel. In such place, as because of relating to mechanism of chain reaction, it is required naturally for knowledge on the reactor physics, it is also necessary to understand chemical reaction in chemical process, and functions of tanks, valves and pumps mounted at the processes. For this purpose, some information on uranium concentration ratio, atomic density of nuclides largely affecting to chain reaction such as uranium, hydrogen, and so forth in the solution, shape, inner structure and size of container for the solution, and its temperature and total volume, were necessary for determining criticality volume of the accident uranium solution by using nuclear physics procedures. Here were described on estimation of energy emission in the JCO accident, estimation from analytical results on neutron and solution, calculation of various nuclear physics property estimation on the JCO precipitation tank at JAERI. (G.K.)

  2. Natural Transmutation of Actinides via the Fission Reaction in the Closed Thorium-Uranium-Plutonium Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshalkin, V. Ye.; Povyshev, V. M.

    2017-12-01

    It is shown for a closed thorium-uranium-plutonium fuel cycle that, upon processing of one metric ton of irradiated fuel after each four-year campaign, the radioactive wastes contain 54 kg of fission products, 0.8 kg of thorium, 0.10 kg of uranium isotopes, 0.005 kg of plutonium isotopes, 0.002 kg of neptunium, and "trace" amounts of americium and curium isotopes. This qualitatively simplifies the handling of high-level wastes in nuclear power engineering.

  3. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  4. Calculation of gamma ray exposure rates from uranium ore bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.E.; Wilson, O.J.

    1980-02-01

    The planning of operations associated with uranium mines often requires that estimates be made of the exposure rates from various ore bodies. A straight-forward method of calculating the exposure rate from an arbitrarily shaped body is presented. Parameters for the calculation are evaluated under the assumption of secular equilibrium of uranium with its daughters and that the uranium is uniformly distributed throughout an average soil mixture. The spectral distribution of the emitted gamma rays and the effect of air attenuation are discussed. Worked examples are given of typical situations encountered in uranium mines

  5. Analytical definition of fission chain reaction parameters for cylindrical uranium bar and energy release evaluations for HIF hybrid targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imshennik, V.S.

    2006-01-01

    Within the conditions of Heavy-Ion Fusion (HIF) arises a possibility to obtain the fission chain reaction for a cylindrical HIF target. The paper contains the solution interpolated with the diffusion approximation in order to receive the general approximation expressions for the bar critical radius as well as for over-critical state. The obtained critical parameters generalized for uranium envelope are used for rough evaluation of the energy release in HIF hybrid targets [ru

  6. METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM VALUES, PLUTONIUM VALUES AND FISSION PRODUCTS BY CHLORINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H.S.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1959-02-24

    The separation of plutonium and uranium from each other and from other substances is described. In general, the method comprises the steps of contacting the uranium with chlorine in the presence of a holdback material selected from the group consisting of lanthanum oxide and thorium oxide to form a uranium chloride higher than uranium tetrachloride, and thereafter heating the uranium chloride thus formed to a temperature at which the uranium chloride is volatilized off but below the volatilizalion temperature of plutonium chloride.

  7. Determination Of Uranium Concentration In Teeth Female Samples Using Fission Tracks In CR-39 From Different Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummadi, S.S

    2010-01-01

    The present study was under taken to measure the uranium concentration in female teeth samples collected from different nationalities.The determination of uranium concentration in these samples has been done by using CR-39 track detector.The nuclear reaction is used as a source of nuclear fission fragments is (n, f) obtained by the bombardment of U-235 with thermal neutrons with flux (5*10 3 n/cm 2 .s) was used from (Am-Be) neutron source.The obtained results show the concentration is ranging from (0.58±0.7ppm) in Oman and Uae to (0.35±0.03ppm)in Iraqi for male, the uranium concentration was the highest in Oman and Uae for female

  8. 75 years ago. The discovery of nuclear fission during the neutron irradiation of uranium on 17 December 1938 in Berlin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A ground-breaking, scientific discovery made in the Berlin experiments of the year 1938 on neutron irradiation of uranium, was that atom nuclei can be fissured and, during the fission energy, so-called nuclear energy, is released. If further U-235 atoms are in the immediate vicinity, the released neutrons can trigger a chain reaction of the nuclear fission. The story of this ground-breaking discovery that led to the worldwide civil utilisation of nuclear energy is outlined here. The discovery of neutrons and their implementation in radiation experiments occurred in the 1930s. The research work followed the model of the Stockholm citizen Niels Bohr on the configuration of an atom. In 1930, Walther Bothe reported on the occurrence of a high-energy radiation when beryllium was irradiated with alpha-particles. James Chadwick could prove experimentally in 1932 that this is a current of high-energy, electrically neutral particles. He called these particles neutrons. In Berlin, the radio-chemist Otto Hahn is the Director at the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute for Chemistry and head of the chemical-radioactive department. In the years 1935 to 1938, the radiation experiments of uranium with neutrons were at the centre of the research in Berlin. In October 1938, Hahn and Strassmann responded with their own experiments to the scientific challenge of Irene Curie and Paul Savitch of 3.5-hours of activity when uranium was radiated with neutrons. The decisive discovery for the neutron radiation of uranium was made by Hahn and Strassmann on 17 December 1938. From the results of different experiments, they conclude: 'Our radium isotopes have the properties of barium.' On 19 December, Hahn informs Lise Meitner and speaking on the issue of 'Where does the barium come from?' addresses a possible 'bursting' of the uranium nucleus. That is Hahn's 'Heureka.' moment: He recognises that the neutron radiation does not only effect radiochemical transformations, but can also cause the uranium

  9. Reaction Rate Benchmark Experiments with Miniature Fission Chambers at the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štancar, Žiga; Kaiba, Tanja; Snoj, Luka; Barbot, Loïc; Destouches, Christophe; Fourmentel, Damien; Villard, Jean-François AD(; )

    2018-01-01

    A series of fission rate profile measurements with miniature fission chambers, developed by the Commisariat á l'énergie atomique et auxénergies alternatives, were performed at the Jožef Stefan Institute's TRIGA research reactor. Two types of fission chambers with different fissionable coating (235U and 238U) were used to perform axial fission rate profile measurements at various radial positions and several control rod configurations. The experimental campaign was supported by an extensive set of computations, based on a validated Monte Carlo computational model of the TRIGA reactor. The computing effort included neutron transport calculations to support the planning and design of the experiments as well as calculations to aid the evaluation of experimental and computational uncertainties and major biases. The evaluation of uncertainties was performed by employing various types of sensitivity analyses such as experimental parameter perturbation and core reaction rate gradient calculations. It has been found that the experimental uncertainty of the measurements is sufficiently low, i.e. the total relative fission rate uncertainty being approximately 5 %, in order for the experiments to serve as benchmark experiments for validation of fission rate profiles. The effect of the neutron flux redistribution due to the control rod movement was studied by performing measurements and calculations of fission rates and fission chamber responses in different axial and radial positions at different control rod configurations. It was confirmed that the control rod movement affects the position of the maximum in the axial fission rate distribution, as well as the height of the local maxima. The optimal detector position, in which the redistributions would have minimum effect on its signal, was determined.

  10. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.br, E-mail: lararapls@hotmail.com, E-mail: Ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br, E-mail: marqueslopes@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil (COMAP.N/FCN/INB), Resende RJ (Brazil). Fábrica de Combustível Nuclear. Coordenação de Meio Ambiente e Proteção Radiológica Ambiental; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil). Laboratório de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h{sup -1}, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month{sup -1}, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h{sup -1} associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h{sup -1} with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h{sup -1}). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h{sup -1}, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h{sup -1}. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h{sup -1}. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h{sup -1} (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month{sup -1}), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h{sup -1}. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all

  11. Dose rate in a deactivated uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Kelecom, Alphonse G.A.C.; Silva, Ademir X.; Marques, José M.; Carmo, Alessander S. do; Dias, Ayandra O.; Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia

    2017-01-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit is a deactivated uranium mine and milling situated in Caldas, MG, BR. Although disabled, there are still areas considered controlled and supervised from the radiological point of view. In these areas, it is necessary to keep an occupational monitoring program to ensure the workers' safety and to prevent the dispersion of radioactive material. For area monitoring, the dose rate, in μSv∙h"-"1, was measured with Geiger Müller (GM) area monitors or personal electronic monitors type GM and thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD), in mSv∙month"-"1, along the years 2013 to 2016. For area monitoring, 577 samples were recorded; for personal dosimeters monitoring, 2,656; and for TLD monitoring type, 5,657. The area monitoring showed a mean dose rate of 6.42 μSv∙h"-"1 associated to a standard deviation of 48 μSv∙h"-"1 with a maximum recorded value of 685 μSv∙h"-"1. 96 % of the samples were below the derived limit per hour for workers (10 μSv∙h"-"1). For the personal electronic monitoring, the average of the data sampled was 15.86 μSv∙h"-"1, associated to a standard deviation of 61.74 μSv∙h"-"1. 80 % of the samples were below the derived limit and the maximum recorded was 1,220 μSv∙h"-"1. Finally, the TLD showed a mean of 0.01 mSv∙h"-"1 (TLD detection limit is 0.2 mSv∙month"-"1), associated to a standard deviation of 0.08 mSv∙h"-"1. 98% of the registered values were below 0.2 mSv and less than 2 % of the measurements had values above the limit of detection. The samples show areas with low risk of external exposure, as can be seen by the TLD evaluation. Specific areas with greater risk of contamination have already been identified, as well as operations at higher risks. In these cases, the use of the individual electronic dosimeter is justified for a more effective monitoring. Radioprotection identified all risks and was able to extend individual electronic monitoring to all risk operations, even with the use of the TLD

  12. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  13. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  14. Cumulative fission yield of Ce-148 produced by thermal-neutron fission of U-235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, A.A.

    1984-12-01

    Cumulative fission yield of 148 cesium isotopes and some other fission products produced by thermal-neutron fission of 235 uranium is determined by Germanium/Lithium spectroscopic methods. The measuremets were done at Tsing-Hua open pool reactor using 3 to 4 mg of 93.15% enriched 235 uranium samples. Gamma rays are assigned to the responsible fission products by matching gamma rays energies and half lives. Fission rate is calculated by fission track method. Cumulative fission yields of 148 cesium, 90 krypton, 130 iodine, 144 lanthanum, 89 krypton, 136 xenon, 137 xenon and 140 cesium are calculated. This values are compared with previously predicted values and showed good agreement. 21 Ref

  15. Heated uranium tetrafluoride target system to release non-rare gas fission products for the TRISTAN isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, R.L.

    1977-10-01

    Off-line experiments indicated that fluorides of As, Se, Br, Kr, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Sb, Te, I and Xe could be volatilized, but except for Br, Kr, I and Xe, none of these elements were observed after mass separation in the on-line experiments. The results of the on-line experiments indicated a very low level of hydride contamination at ambient temperature and consequently, uranium tetrafluoride replaced uranyl stearate as the primary gaseous fission product target. Possible reasons for the failure of the heated target system to yield non-rare gas activities are discussed and suggestions for designing a new heated target system are presented

  16. HLW disposal by fission reactors; calculation of trans-mutation rate and recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulyanto

    1997-01-01

    Transmutation of MA (Minor actinide) and LLFPS (long-lived fission products) into stable nuclide or short-lived isotopes by fission reactors seem to become an alternative technology for HLW disposal. in this study, transmutation rate and recycle calculation were developed in order to evaluate transmutation characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the fission reactors. inventory of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors were determined by solving of criticality equation with 1-D cylindrical geometry of multigroup diffusion equations at the beginning of cycle (BOC). transmutation rate and burn-up was determined by solving of depletion equation. inventory of MA and LLFPs was calculated for 40 years recycle. From this study, it was concluded that characteristics of MA and LLFPs in the transmutation reactors can be evaluated by recycle calculation. by calculation of transmutation rate, performance of fission reactor for transmutation of MA or LLFPs can be discussed

  17. Uranium content of coal ashes from Southern Brazil coal fueled power stations, by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of the application of the fission track registration technique for the determination of uranium in coal ashes was shown. The wet method was employed using as detector the Makrofol KG=10 μm, manufactured by Bayer. The coal ashes were originated from coal-fueled power stations localized in Southern Brazil. The results obtained ranged from 10 to 27 mg U/kg. Since the total error variation was from 18,4% to 23,8%, the method used was considered excellent. The determination of the uranium content in coal ashes is of considerable interest in environmental control in power stations, in their vicinity and wherever these ashes are used or stored. The technique used is the work proved to be very appropriate for the purpose aimed at. (Author) [pt

  18. Imprints left by natural radioactivity in geological materials: uranium fission tracks and thermoluminescence applications in earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broquet, P.; Chambaudet, A.; Rebetez, M.; Charlet, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In a rock, all minerals which contain uranium are host to a number of spontaneous fission phenomena forming a single damaged area called a ''latent track'', observations of which may lead to dating, uranium mapping and finding paleo-geo-thermometers (thermal history, used in oil exploration). The radioactive elements during the decay process release energy which is trapped as electrons into the physical or chemical defects of the crystalline lattice; this energy can be later released by heating the mineral (thermic stimulated luminescence); the thermoluminescence is characterized by a glow which spectrum constitutes a typical feature of the mineral, its crystallization conditions and the subsequent evolution of the material. Natural and induced glow curve may be produced. 6 figs., 52 refs

  19. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission

  20. Impact of exchange rates on the world uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulton, M.E.; Combs, G.F. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the relationship between exchange rates and US uranium prices and product ion is presented. This analysis supplements the discussions on the broader topic of fuel prices, exchange rates and other international economic phenomena scheduled during the 1985 EPRI Fuel Supply Seminar. By varying exchange rate assumptions in the recently developed Uranium Market Model, estimates of the magnitude and timing of price and production effects were obtained. These effects do indeed appear to be large and have implications in procurement, fuel planning and commodity policy. While analysts may differ on details, the inescapable conclusion is that exchange rates matter a great deal in the uranium market. The case described is for a scenario of exchange rates with other currencies returning to their 1980 levels. A second case, an across the board weakening of the dollar by 25%, the results of which are somewhat less dramatic is also examined

  1. Uranium resources and their implications for fission breeder and fusion hybrid development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Present estimates of uranium resources and reserves in the US and the non-Communist world are reviewed. The resulting implications are considered for two proposed breeder technologies: the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) and the fusion hybrid reactor. Using both simple arguments and detailed scenarios from the published literature, conditions are explored under which the LMFBR and fusion hybrid could respectively have the most impact, considering both fuel-supply and economic factors. The conclusions emphasize strong potential advantages of the fusion hybrid, due to its inherently large breeding rate. A discussion is presented of proposed US development strategies for the fusion hybrid, which at present is far behind the LMFBR in its practical application and maturity

  2. Heat treatments of irradiated uranium oxide in a pressurised water reactor (P.W.R.): swelling and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharie, I.

    1997-01-01

    In order to keep pressurised water reactors at a top level of safety, it is necessary to understand the chemical and mechanical interaction between the cladding and the fuel pellet due to a temperature increase during a rapid change in reactor. In this process, the swelling of uranium oxide plays an important role. It comes from a bubble precipitation of fission gases which are released when they are in contact with the outside. Therefore, the aim of this thesis consists in acquiring a better understanding of the mechanisms which come into play. Uranium oxide samples, from a two cycles irradiated fuel, first have been thermal treated between 1000 deg C and 1700 deg C for 5 minutes to ten hours. The gas release amount related to time has been measured for each treatment. The comparison of the experimental results with a numerical model has proved satisfactory: it seems that the gases release, after the formation of intergranular tunnels, is controlled by the diffusion phenomena. Afterwards, the swelling was measured on the samples. The microscopic examination shows that the bubbles are located in the grain boundaries and have a lenticular shape. The swelling can be explained by the bubbles coalescence and a model was developed based on this observation. An equation allows to calculate the intergranular swelling in function of time and temperature. The study gives the opportunity to predict the fission gases behaviour during a fuel temperature increase. (author)

  3. Emission of light charged particles from fragments produced on fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovitzky, G.E.; Shteingrad, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of light charged particles (LCP) with Z = 1, 2 from fragments produced in fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions was studied. It was found that LCP accompanying the fission by pions are emitted from non-accelerated fragments immediately after the fission, whereas in the case of 153 MeV protons, the LCP are emitted from the accelerated heavy fragments. The number of LCP emitted in the course of pion-induced fission is 0.7 per fission event, which exceeds by a factor of 30 the corresponding number for 153 MeV protons [ru

  4. Comparison of Thermal Neutron Flux Measured by Uranium 235 Fission Chamber and Rhodium Self-Powered Neutron Detector in MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lyoussi, A.; Geslot, B.; Malo, J.-Y.; Carcreff, H.; Reynard-Carette, C.

    2013-06-01

    Thermal neutron flux is one of the most important nuclear parameter to be measured on-line in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). In particular two types of sensors with different physical operating principles are commonly used: self-powered neutron detectors (SPND) and fission chambers with uranium 235 coating. This work aims to compare on one hand the thermal neutron flux evaluation given by these two types of sensors and on the other hand to compare these evaluations with activation dosimeter measurements, which are considered as the reference for absolute neutron flux assessment. This study was conducted in an irradiation experiment, called CARMEN-1, performed during 2012 in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France). The CARMEN-1 experiment aims to improve the neutron and photon flux and nuclear heating measurements in MTRs. In this paper we focus on the thermal neutron flux measurements performed in CARMEN-1 experiment. The use of fission chambers to measure the absolute thermal neutron flux in MTRs is not very usual. An innovative calibration method for fission chambers operated in Campbell mode has been developed at the CEA Cadarache (France) and tested for the first time in the CARMEN-1 experiment. The results of these measurements are discussed, with the objective to measure with the best accuracy the thermal neutron flux in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor. (authors)

  5. Reaction rate constant for uranium in water and water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRIMBLE, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    The literature on uranium oxidation in water and oxygen free water vapor was reviewed. Arrhenius rate equations were developed from the review data. These data and equations will be used as a baseline from which to compare reaction rates measured for K Basin fuel.

  6. Separation and purification of 99Mo from uranium and fission products using Cintichem process, our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manolkar, R.B.; Mathakar, A.R.; Kumar, Yogendra; Kumar, Manoj; Dash, A.; Venkatesh, Meera; Pillai, K.T.; Singh, Sarbjit; Venugopal, V.

    2009-01-01

    A pilot study was carried out to assess the feasibility of producing 99 Mo by fission of Unat following the Cintichem method. U-Mo alloy was irradiated for one week at Dhruva reactor and processed for the separation of 99 Mo from fission products. The irradiated targets were chemically processed to separate and purify the 99 Mo. Recovery of ∼70% and the purity of 99 Mo was > 99%. (author)

  7. Uranium occurrence in major rock types by fission-track mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledger, E.G.; Bomber, B.J.; Schaftenaar, W.E.; Tieh, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Microscopic occurrence of uranium has been determined in about 50 igneous rocks from various location, and in a genetically unrelated sandstone from south Texas. Precambrian granites from the Llano uplift of central Texas contain from a few ppm uranium (considered normal) to over 100 ppm on a whole-rock basis. In granite, uranium is concentrated in: (1) accessory minerals including zircon, biotite, allanite, Fe-Ti oxides, and altered sphene, (2) along grain boundaries and in microfractures by precipitation from deuteric fluids, and (3) as point sources (small inclusions) in quartz and feldspars. Tertiary volcanic rocks from the Davis Mountains of west Texas include diverse rock types from basalt to rhyolite. Average uranium contents increase from 1 ppm in basalts to 7 ppm in rhyolites. Concentration occurs: (1) in iron-titanium-oxides, zircon, and rutile, (2) in the fine-grained groundmass as uniform and point-source concentrations, and (3) as late uranium in cavities associated with banded, silica-rich material. Uranium in ore-grade sandstone is concentrated to more than 3%. Specific occurrences include (1) leucoxene and/or anatase, (2) opaline and calcite cements, (3) mud clasts and altered volcanic rock fragments, and (4) in a few samples, as silt-size uranium- and molybdenum-rich spheres. Uranium content is quite low in pyrite, marcasite, and zeolites

  8. Uranium distribution and age pattern of some deep-sea basalts from the Entrecasteaux area, South-western Pacific: a fission-track analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selo, M.; Storzer, D.

    1981-01-01

    The eight glass samples analysed by means of the fission-track method were recovered from deep-sea dredge sites 314D, 316D, 323D and 325D in the SW Pacific. The bulk uranium contents of the fresh remnants of unweathered glasses range between 51 ppb and 108 ppb. One glass from site 316D with a U-content of 227 ppb might be part of a dike intrusion. The basalts from all four sites are altered to various extents. Ambient temperatures prevailing during these alteration processes are estimated to have been 1 to 5 0 C at sites 314D and 325D; about 10 0 C at site 323D; but 40 to 110 0 C at site 316D. The measured fission-track ages of sites 314D, 323D and 325D scatter between 34 Ma in the north and 20 Ma in the south. At site 316D, they are exceedingly low, being from 4.4 to =< 0.7 Ma. All these ages are thermally lowered and required correction. The ages corrected for thermally induced partial track-loss are given. From these ages and the site positions, a spreading rate is deduced for the northern part of the North Loyalty Plateau, which comes close to values estimated for slow-spreading ridges. (author)

  9. Radioactive Waste Issues related to Production of Fission-based Mo-99 by using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Muhmood ul; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In order to produce fission-based Mo-99 from research reactors, two types of targets are being used and they are highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment more than 90wt% of {sup 235}U and low enriched uranium (LEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment less than 20wt% of {sup 235}U. It is worth noting that medium enriched uranium i.e. 36wt% of {sup 235}U as being used in South Africa is also regarded as non-LEU from a nuclear security point of view. In order to cope with the proliferation issues, international nuclear security policy is promoting the use of LEU targets in order to minimize the civilian use of HEU. It is noteworthy that Mo-99 yield of the LEU target is less than 20% of the HEU target, which requires approximately five times more LEU targets to be irradiated and consequently results in increased volume of waste. The waste generated from fission Mo-99 production can be mainly due to: target fabrication, assembling of target, irradiation in reactor and processing of irradiated targets. During the fission of U-235 in a reactor, a large number of radionuclides with different chemical and physical properties are formed. The waste produced from these practices may be a combination of low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) comprised of all three types, i.e., solid, liquid and gas. Handling and treatment of the generated waste are dependent on its form and activity. In case of the large production facility, waste storage facility should be constructed in order to limit the radiation exposures of the workers and the environment. In this study, we discuss and compare mainly the radioactive waste generated by alkaline digestion of both HEU and LEU targets to assist in planning and deciding the choice of the technology with better arrangements for proper handling and disposal of generated waste. With the use of the LEU targets in Mo-99 production facility, significant increase in liquid and solid waste has been expected.

  10. A delayed neutron technique for measuring induced fission rates in fresh and burnt LWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, K.A., E-mail: kajordan@gmail.co [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Laboratory for Reactor Physics and System Behaviour, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-04-01

    The LIFE-PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institut is being undertaken to characterize the interfaces between burnt and fresh fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Techniques are being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel following re-irradiation in the zero-power PROTEUS research reactor. One such technique utilizes the measurement of delayed neutrons. To demonstrate the feasibility of the delayed neutron technique, fresh and burnt UO{sub 2} fuel samples were irradiated in different positions in the PROTEUS reactor, and their neutron outputs were recorded shortly after irradiation. Fission rate ratios of the same sample irradiated in two different positions (inter-positional) and of two different samples irradiated in the same position (inter-sample) were derived from the measurements and compared with Monte Carlo predictions. Derivation of fission rate ratios from the delayed neutron measured signal requires correcting the signal for the delayed neutron source properties, the efficiency of the measurement setup, and the time dependency of the signal. In particular, delayed neutron source properties strongly depend on the fissile and fertile isotopes present in the irradiated sample and must be accounted for when deriving inter-sample fission rate ratios. Measured inter-positional fission rate ratios generally agree within 1{sigma} uncertainty (on the order of 1.0%) with the calculation predictions. For a particular irradiation position, however, a bias of about 2% is observed and is currently under investigation. Calculated and measured inter-sample fission rate ratios have C/E values deviating from unity by less than 1% and within 2{sigma} of the statistical uncertainties. Uncertainty arising from delayed neutron data is also assessed, and is found to give an additional 3% uncertainty factor. The measurement data indicate that uncertainty is overestimated.

  11. An improved model of fission gas atom transport in irradiated uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    The hitherto standard approach to predicting fission gas release has been a pure diffusion gas atom transport model based upon Fick's law. An additional mechanism has subsequently been identified from experimental data at high burnup and has been summarised in an empirical model that is considered to embody a so-called fuel matrix 'saturation' phenomenon whereby the fuel matrix has become saturated with fission gas so that the continued addition of extra fission gas atoms results in their expulsion from the fuel matrix into the fuel rod plenum. The present paper proposes a different approach by constructing an enhanced fission gas transport law consisting of two components: 1) Fick's law and 2) a so-called drift term. The new transport law can be shown to be effectively identical in its predictions to the 'saturation' approach and is more readily physically justifiable. The method introduces a generalisation of the standard diffusion equation which is dubbed the Drift Diffusion Equation. According to the magnitude of a dimensionless Péclet number, P, the new equation can vary from pure diffusion to pure drift, which latter represents a collective motion of the fission gas atoms through the fuel matrix at a translational velocity. Comparison is made between the saturation and enhanced transport approaches. Because of its dependence on P, the Drift Diffusion Equation is shown to be more effective at managing the transition from one type of limiting transport phenomenon to the other. Thus it can adapt appropriately according to the reactor operation.

  12. Benchmark experiments at ASTRA facility on definition of space distribution of 235U fission reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobrov, A. A.; Boyarinov, V. F.; Glushkov, A. E.; Glushkov, E. S.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Moroz, N. P.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Nosov, V. I.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Zimin, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    Results of critical experiments performed at five ASTRA facility configurations modeling the high-temperature helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactors are presented. Results of experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate performed at four from these five configurations are presented more detail. Analysis of available information showed that all experiments on criticality at these five configurations are acceptable for use them as critical benchmark experiments. All experiments on definition of space distribution of 235 U fission reaction rate are acceptable for use them as physical benchmark experiments. (authors)

  13. A Model to Reproduce the Response of the Gaseous Fission Product Monitor (GFPM) in a CANDU{sup R} 6 Reactor (An Estimate of Tramp Uranium Mass in a Candu Core)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostofian, Sara; Boss, Charles [AECL Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga Ontario L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    In a Canada Deuterium Uranium (Candu) reactor, the fuel bundles produce gaseous and volatile fission products that are contained within the fuel matrix and the welded zircaloy sheath. Sometimes a fuel sheath can develop a defect and release the fission products into the circulating coolant. To detect fuel defects, a Gaseous Fission Product Monitoring (GFPM) system is provided in Candu reactors. The (GFPM) is a gamma ray spectrometer that measures fission products in the coolant and alerts the operator to the presence of defected fuel through an increase in measured fission product concentration. A background fission product concentration in the coolant also arises from tramp uranium. The sources of the tramp uranium are small quantities of uranium contamination on the surfaces of fuel bundles and traces of uranium on the pressure tubes, arising from the rare defected fuel element that released uranium into the core. This paper presents a dynamic model that reproduces the behaviour of a GFPM in a Candu 6 plant. The model predicts the fission product concentrations in the coolant from the chronic concentration of tramp uranium on the inner surface of the pressure tubes (PT) and the surface of the fuel bundles (FB) taking into account the on-power refuelling system. (authors)

  14. Study on uranium metallization yield of spent Pressurized Water Reactor fuels and oxidation behavior of fission products in uranium metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ke Chon; Lee, Chang Heon; Kim, Won Ho

    2003-01-01

    Metallization yield of uranium oxide to uranium metal from lithium reduction process of spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuels was measured using thermogravimetric analyzer. A reduced metal produced in the process was divided into a solid and a powder part, and each metallization yield was measured. Metallization yield of the solid part was 90.7∼95.9 wt%, and the powder being 77.8∼71.5 wt% individually. Oxidation behaviour of the quarternary alloy was investigated to take data on the thermal oxidation stability necessary for the study on dry storage of the reduced metal. At 600∼700 .deg. C, weight increments of allow of No, Ru, Rh and Pd was 0.40∼0.55 wt%. Phase change on the surface of the allow was started at 750 .deg. C. In particular, Mo was rapidly oxidized and then the alloy lost 0.76∼25.22 wt% in weight

  15. Fission cross sections of some thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes relative to /sup 235/U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J W

    1983-10-01

    Earlier results from the measurements, at this Laboratory, of the fission cross sections of /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu relative to /sup 235/U are reviewed with revisions to include changes in data processing procedures, alpha half lives and thermal fission cross sections. Some new data have also been included. The current experimental methods and procedures and the sample assay methods are described in detail and the sources of error are presented in a systematic manner. 38 references.

  16. Neutron-induced fission cross sections of uraniums up to 40 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, V.M. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk-Sosny (Belarus); Hasegawa, A.

    1998-11-01

    Statistical theory of nuclear reactions, well-proved below 20 MeV, is applied for {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U fission data analysis up to {approx}40 MeV. It is shown that measured data could be reproduced. Chance structure of measured fission cross section is provided, it`s validity is supported by description of data for competing (n,xn)-reactions. Role of fissility of target nucleus is addressed. It seems that gap in incident neutron energy interval of 20 MeV - 50 MeV, below which evaluation approaches are well-developed, and above which simplified statistical approaches are valid, could be covered. (author)

  17. Investigation of applications for high-power, self-critical fissioning uranium plasma reactors. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.J.; Latham, T.S.; Krascella, N.L.

    1976-09-01

    Analytical studies were conducted to investigate potentially attractive applications for gaseous nuclear cavity reactors fueled by uranium hexafluoride and its decomposition products at temperatures of 2000 to 6000 K and total pressures of a few hundred atmospheres. Approximate operating conditions and performance levels for a class of nuclear reactors in which fission energy removal is accomplished principally by radiant heat transfer from the high temperature gaseous nuclear fuel to surrounding absorbing media were determined. The results show the radiant energy deposited in the absorbing media may be efficiently utilized in energy conversion system applications which include (1) a primary energy source for high thrust, high specific impulse space propulsion, (2) an energy source for highly efficient generation of electricity, and (3) a source of high intensity photon flux for heating working fluid gases for hydrogen production or MHD power extraction. (Author)

  18. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, Part VI - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from HNO3 solution on the zirconium phosphate (part I), Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.; Ruvarac, A.

    1961-12-01

    Separation of uranium, plutonium and long-lived fission products was investigated on a inorganic ion exchanger. Zirconium phospate was chosen for this purpose because its ion exchanger properties were well known. This report deals with the study of equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption

  19. Radiochemical studies on fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1973-07-01

    Research progress is reported on nuclear chemistry; topics considered include: recoil range and kinetic energy distribution in the thermal neutron ftssion of /sup 245/Cm; mass distribution and recoil range measurements in the reactor neutron-induced fission of /sup 232/U; fission yields in the thermal neutron fission of /sup 241/PU highly asymmetric binary fission of uranium induced by reactor neutrons; and nuclear charge distribution in low energy fission. ( DHM)

  20. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Analysis of Barium-140 From Fission Dosimeters

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes two procedures for the measurement of reaction rates by determining the amount of the fission product 140Ba produced by the non-threshold reactions 235U(n,f), 241Am(n,f), and 239Pu(n,f), and by the threshold reactions 238U(n,f), 237Np(n,f), and 232Th(n,f). 1.2 These reactions produce many fission products, among which is 140Ba, having a half-life of 12.752 days. 140Ba emits gamma rays of several energies; however, these are not easily detected in the presence of other fission products. Competing activity from other fission products requires that a chemical separation be employed or that the 140Ba activity be determined indirectly by counting its daughter product 140La. This test method describes both procedure (a), the nondestructive determination of 140Ba by the direct counting of 140La several days after irradiation, and procedure (b), the chemical separation of 140Ba and the subsequent counting of 140Ba or its daughter 140La. 1.3 With suitable techniques, fission neutron fl...

  1. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements at high neutron fluence and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.

    1985-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorder (SSTR) techniques have been used to measure 239-Pu, 235-U, and 237-Np fission rates for total neutron fluences approaching 5 x 10 17 n/cm 2 at temperatures in the range 680 to 830 0 F. Natural quartz crystal SSTRs were used to withstand the high temperature environment and ultra low-mass fissionable deposits of the three isotopes were required to yield scannable track densities at the high neutron fluences. The results of these high temperature, high neutron fluence measurements are reported

  2. Analysis for In-situ Fission Rate Measurements using 4He Gas Scintillation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Jason M.; Raetz, Dominik; Jordan, Kelly A.; Murer, David

    2013-06-01

    Active neutron interrogation is a powerful NDA technique that relies on detecting and analyzing fission neutrons produced in a fuel sample by an interrogating high neutron flux. 4 He scintillation gas fast neutron detectors are investigated in this paper for use in a novel fission rate measurement technique The He-4 detectors have excellent gamma rejection, a fast response time, and give significant information on incident neutron energy allowing for energy cuts to be applied to the detected signal. These features are shown in this work to allow for the detection of prompt fission neutrons in-situ during active neutron interrogation of a 238 U sample. The energy spectrum from three different neutrons sources ( 252 Cf, AmBe, AmLi) is measured using the 4 He detection system and analyzed. An initial response matrix for the detector is determined using these measurements and the kinematic interaction properties of the elastic scattering with the 4 He. (authors)

  3. Converting targets and processes for fission-product molybdenum-99 from high- to low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Aase, S.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99 Mo is produced by the fissioning of 235 U in high-enriched uranium targets (HEU, generally 93% 235 U). To reduce nuclear-proliferation concerns, the U.S. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor Program is working to convert the current HEU targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU, 235 U). Switching to LEU targets also requires modifying the separation processes. Current HEU processes can be classified into two main groups based on whether the irradiated target is dissolved in acid or base. Our program has been working on both fronts, with development of targets for acid-side processes being the furthest along. However, using an LEU metal foil target may allow the facile replacement of HEU for both acid and basic dissolution processes. Demonstration of the irradiation and 99 Mo separation processes for the LEU metal-foil targets is being done in cooperation with researchers at the Indonesian PUSPIPTEK facility. We are also developing LEU UO 2 /Al dispersion plates as substitutes for HEU UA1 x /A1 dispersion plates for base-side processes. Results show that conversion to LEU is technically feasible; working with producers is essential to lowering any economic penalty associated with conversion. (author)

  4. Trace quantities of uranium in some indian chewing tobaccos as determined by fission track analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, N.P.S.; Singh, P.; Azam, A.; Naqvi, A.H.; Srivastava, D.S.

    1996-01-01

    The sandwiched pellet technique using Makrofol-E plastic track detectors has been employed to determine trace quantities of uranium in nine brands of flavored chewing tobaccos consumed by the Indian population. In this technique the nuclear reaction, 235 U(n,f), is used for the quantitative estimation of uranium. The maximum value of uranium (1.88 ppm) has been found in raw tobacco leaves (Surti), while the minimum (0.13 ppm) in Tulsi (Double Zero brand). Other seven brands showed intermediate values of U-contents which are also reported in this paper. These values are compared with the U-contents reported in the literature for other forms of tobaccos. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  5. Characterization of a facility for the measurement of fission fragment transport effects: experimental determination of the fission rates for fissile and fissionable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benetti, P.; Raselli, G.L.; Tigliole, A. Borio di; Cagnazzo, M.; Cesana, A.; Mongelli, S.; Terrani, M.

    2002-01-01

    The transfer facility of the LENA laboratory allows the direct neutron irradiation of fissionable material in the D channel of the TRIGA reactor. A test measurement carried out with a ionization chamber and a 239 Pu sample shows the possibility to use this tool for the study of the transport effects of the fission fragment emerging from thin layers of fissile materials. (author)

  6. Production of Fission Product 99Mo using High-Enriched Uranium Plates in Polish Nuclear Research Reactor MARIA: Technology and Neutronic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroszewicz Janusz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of 235U irradiation is to obtain the 99mTc isotope, which is widely used in the domain of medical diagnostics. The decisive factor determining its availability, despite its short lifetime, is a reaction of radioactive decay of 99Mo into 99mTc. One of the possible sources of molybdenum can be achieved in course of the 235U fission reaction. The paper presents activities and the calculation results obtained upon the feasibility study on irradiation of 235U targets for production of 99Mo in the MARIA research reactor. Neutronic calculations and analyses were performed to estimate the fission products activity for uranium plates irradiated in the reactor. Results of dummy targets irradiation as well as irradiation uranium plates have been presented. The new technology obtaining 99Mo is based on irradiation of high-enriched uranium plates in standard reactor fuel channel and calculation of the current fission power generation. Measurements of temperatures and the coolant flow in the molybdenum installation carried out in reactor SAREMA system give online information about the current fission power generated in uranium targets. The corrective factors were taken into account as the heat generation from gamma radiation from neighbouring fuel elements as well as heat exchange between channels and the reactor pool. The factors were determined by calibration measurements conducted with aluminium mock-up of uranium plates. Calculations of fuel channel by means of REBUS code with fine mesh structure and libraries calculated by means of WIMS-ANL code were performed.

  7. Steady-state fission gas behavior in uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.G.; Wazzan, A.R.; Okrent, D.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of fission gas release and induced swelling in steady state irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels is developed and computer coded. The code is used to simulate, with fair success, some gas release and induced swelling data obtained under the IFR program. It is determined that fuel microstructural changes resulting from zirconium migration, anisotropic swelling, and thermal variations are major factors affecting swelling and gas release behavior. (orig.)

  8. Measurement of the fission ratio for several configurations of uranium oxide rod clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattenden, S.K.; Patterson, C.R.

    1962-02-01

    This report describes measurements of the fission ratio for a single fuel channel of oxide rod clusters in an essentially infinite block of graphite. The measurements were made using the 'catcher-foil' technique, the activities of the catcher foils being measured by β-counting. Results are given, for 37-rod; 18-rod; 7-rod and 3-rod clusters, and are compared with theoretical predictions. (author)

  9. Neutron-induced fission of uranium isotopes up to 100 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lestone, J.P.; Gavron, A.

    1994-01-01

    The statistical-model description of the neutron-induced fission of U isotopes has been developed using densities of intrinsic states and spin cutoff parameters obtained directly from appropriate Nilsson model single-particle levels. The first-chance fission cross sections are reproduced well when the rotational contributions to the nuclear level densities are taken into account. In order to fit the U(n,f) cross sections above the threshold of second-chance fission, we must: (1) assume that the triaxial level-density enhancement is washed out at an excitation energy of approximately 7 MeV above the triaxial barriers with a width of approximately 1 MeV, implying a γ deformation for the first barriers where 10<γ<20 degree, and (2) include preequilibrium particle emission in the calculations. Above an incoming-neutron kinetic energy of approximately 17 MeV, our statistical model U(n,f) of cross sections increasingly overestimates the experimental data. This is not surprising since, at these high energies, little data exist on the scattering of neutrons to help guide the choice of optical-model parameters. A satisfactory reproduction of all of the available U(n,f) cross sections above 17 MeV is obtained by scaling our calculated compound-nucleus formation cross sections. This scaling factor falls from 1.0 at 17 MeV to 0.82 at 100 MeV

  10. Recovery treatment for the non fissioned uranium in the production of Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Acosta C, A.L.; Lopez M, B.E.

    1991-09-01

    An effective modification of the chemical processes has been obtained to dissolve at the uranium-IV and to extract it as uranyl triperoxidate that facilitates its manipulation and final conversion to uranyl nitrate like a concentrate of high purity. (Author)

  11. Determination of uranium content in dental porcelains by means of the fission track method and estimation of radiation dose to oral mucosa by radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sairenji, E.; Moriwaki, K.; Shimizu, M.; Noguchi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Porcelain teeth, some of which contain uranium compounds for aesthetic purpose, have been widely used in dental clinics. Hazardous effects due to uranium radiation have been suggested in recent publications. In the present study uranium concentrations were determined in four major brands of porcelain teeth marketed in Japan using the fission track method, and the absorbed doses to oral tissued were calculated. Average uranium concentrations of the brands studied were determined to be 3.6 ppm (0.33-10 ppm, Japan), 18 ppm (0.69-81 ppm, Japan), 9.4 ppm (2.5-14 ppm, Japan) and 82 ppm (11-205 ppm, U.S.), respectively. The corresponding dose equivalents at the surface of oral mucosal membrane were 2.9 rem yr -1 . 14 rem yr -1 , 7.6 rem yr -1 and 66 rem yr -1 . (author)

  12. Determination of uranium content in dental porcelains by means of the fission track method and estimation of radiation dose to oral mucosa by radioactive elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sairenji, Eiko; Moriwaki, Kazunari; Shimizu, Masami; Noguchi, Kunikazu; Anzai, Ikuro.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain teeth, some of which contained uranium compounds for aesthetic purpose, have been widely used in dental clinics. Recently, the hazardous effects by uranium radiation were suggested. In the present study, the authors carried out the determination of uranium concentrations of four major brands of porcelain teeth marketed in Japan using the fission track method, and the absorbed doses of oral tissues were calculated by the authors' introduced formula for calculation of alpha radiation. Average uranium concentrations of the brands studied were determined 3.6 ppm (0.33 - 10 ppm, Japan), 18 ppm (0.69 - 81 ppm, Japan), 9.4 ppm (2.5 - 14 ppm, Japan) and 82 ppm (11 - 205 ppm, U.S.A.), respectively. The corresponding dose equivalents at the surface of oral mucosal membrane were 2.9 rem y -1 , 14 rem y -1 , 7.6 rem y -1 and 66 rem y -1 . (author)

  13. Uranium ores of Kazakhstan as the most technologic source of a fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berikbolov, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Kazakhstan as is known has unique deposits of uranium. Its resources composed a third part of the world resources. The most important part of resources having a practical value, is related with depression in southern regions of the Republic. By now more than 15 deposits are discovered and partially explored. These deposits from three uranium provinces - Shu-Sarysu, Syr-Darya and Ili. The ores occur in friable water-bearing sandy horizons of Cretaceous and Paleogene age between waterproof agrillaceous sediments at depth from 100 up to 600 m. Ore bodies thickness changes from 5 to 10 m at uranian average-grade 0.03-0.1 %. Width of band shaped ore bodies changes from tens meters to the one kilometers and extent changes from one kilometer up to many tens kilometers. The important feature of deposits is their suitability for development by progressive in situ leaching (ISL) method. It was demonstrated, that uranium ores are comprehensive and, that is important, a lot of commercially important elements, containing in ores, gives in to extraction at development by the ISL method. The preliminary calculation of expenditures for the extraction of useful byproducts from ordinary sulphate solution have demonstrated rather high profitableness for rhenium, scandium, selenium, rare earth even at the very low contents in solution. It was pointed out, that whole technological chain applied now at industrial scale is oriented to mono-metallic uranium ores, therefore present technology of leaching and recovery of industrial solution does not allow ti extract all valuable components containing in ores. The development of new improved technological chain. beginning with a composition of leaching out reagent and up to applying of miscellaneous sorbing materials, can create new mineral-raw base of rare and dissipated elements and to lower considerably the price of uranium mining from sandstone deposits

  14. Contribution to the study of the desorption of fission gases formed in irradiated uranium oxide; Contribution a l'etude de la desorption des gaz de fission formes dans l'oxyde d'uranium irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J -L; Darras, R; Roger, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-09-01

    The release of {sup 133}Xe from irradiated UO{sub 2} has been studied in the temperature range 1300 to 1900 deg C, using various monocrystalline or sintered samples. Up to 1600 deg C, this release is proportional to the square root of the time and thus occurs essentially by diffusion. The apparent diffusion constant D' decreases and the activation energy of the corresponding process increases as the integrated neutron flux received by the fuel increases. As the density of the sintered samples decreases however, the activation energy of the release also decreases, so that the difference between D' values for sintered samples of different densities decreases as the temperature rises. Finally, above 1600 deg C, the fission gas release phenomenon is governed by UO{sub 2} evaporation, and all the different types of oxide studied have similar behaviors, characterized by poor retention of these gases. (authors) [French] La desorption du xenon 133 forme dans le bioxyde d'uranium irradie a ete etudiee dans l'intervalle de 1300 a 1900 C, a l'aide de differents echantillons monocristallins ou frittes. Jusqu'a 1600 C, elle s'effectue proportionnellement a la racine carree du temps, donc essentiellement par diffusion. La pseudo-constante de desorption D' decroit et l'energie d'activation du processus correspondant croit lorsque le flux de neutrons integre recu par le combustible augmente. Cependant, lorsque la densite des frittes diminue, l'energie d'activation de desorption diminue egalement, de sorte que l'ecart entre les valeurs de D' relatives a des frittes de densites differentes se restreint lorsque, la temperature s'eleve. Finalement, au-dessus de 1600 C, l'evaporation de l'UO{sub 2} regit le phenomene de liberation des gaz de fission, et toutes les qualites d'oxyde etudiees presentent alors des comportements voisins a cet egard, caracterises par une mediocre retention de ces gaz. (auteurs)

  15. Fission rates measured using high-energy gamma-rays from short half-life fission products in fresh and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroehnert, H.

    2011-02-01

    In recent years, higher discharge burn-ups and initial fuel enrichments have led to more and more heterogeneous core configurations in light water reactors (LWRs), especially at the beginning of cycle when fresh fuel assemblies are loaded next to highly burnt ones. As this trend is expected to continue in the future, the Paul Scherrer Institute has, in collaboration with the Swiss Association of Nuclear Utilities, swissnuclear, launched the experimental programme LIFE(at)PROTEUS. The LIFE(at)PROTEUS programme aims to better characterise interfaces between burnt and fresh UO 2 fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Thereby, a novel experimental database is to be made available for enabling the validation of neutronics calculations of strongly heterogeneous LWR core configurations. During the programme, mixed fresh and highly burnt UO 2 fuel lattices will be investigated in the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. One of the main types of investigations will be to irradiate the fuel in PROTEUS and measure the resulting fission rate distributions across the interface between fresh and burnt fuel zones. The measurement of fission rates in burnt fuel re-irradiated in a zero-power reactor requires, however, the development of new experimental techniques which are able to discriminate against the high intrinsic activity of the fuel. The principal goal of the present research work has been to develop such a new measurement technique. The selected approach is based on the detection of high-energy gamma-ray lines above the intrinsic background (i.e. above 2200 keV), which are emitted by short-lived fission products freshly created in the fuel. The fission products 88 Kr, 142 La, 138 Cs, 84 Br, 89 Rb, 95 Y, 90m Rb and 90 Rb, with half-lives between 2.6 min and 2.8 h, have been identified as potential candidates. During the present research work, the gamma-ray activity of short-lived fission products has, for the first time, been measured and quantitatively evaluated for re

  16. Fission rates measured using high-energy gamma-rays from short half-life fission products in fresh and spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroehnert, H.

    2011-02-15

    In recent years, higher discharge burn-ups and initial fuel enrichments have led to more and more heterogeneous core configurations in light water reactors (LWRs), especially at the beginning of cycle when fresh fuel assemblies are loaded next to highly burnt ones. As this trend is expected to continue in the future, the Paul Scherrer Institute has, in collaboration with the Swiss Association of Nuclear Utilities, swissnuclear, launched the experimental programme LIFE(at)PROTEUS. The LIFE(at)PROTEUS programme aims to better characterise interfaces between burnt and fresh UO{sub 2} fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. Thereby, a novel experimental database is to be made available for enabling the validation of neutronics calculations of strongly heterogeneous LWR core configurations. During the programme, mixed fresh and highly burnt UO{sub 2} fuel lattices will be investigated in the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. One of the main types of investigations will be to irradiate the fuel in PROTEUS and measure the resulting fission rate distributions across the interface between fresh and burnt fuel zones. The measurement of fission rates in burnt fuel re-irradiated in a zero-power reactor requires, however, the development of new experimental techniques which are able to discriminate against the high intrinsic activity of the fuel. The principal goal of the present research work has been to develop such a new measurement technique. The selected approach is based on the detection of high-energy gamma-ray lines above the intrinsic background (i.e. above 2200 keV), which are emitted by short-lived fission products freshly created in the fuel. The fission products {sup 88}Kr, {sup 142}La, {sup 138}Cs, {sup 84}Br, {sup 89}Rb, {sup 95}Y, {sup 90m}Rb and {sup 90}Rb, with half-lives between 2.6 min and 2.8 h, have been identified as potential candidates. During the present research work, the gamma-ray activity of short-lived fission products has, for the first time, been

  17. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  18. Determination of the uranium concentration in samples of raw, retorted and spent shale from Irati, Parana-Brazil, by the fission track registration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, R.G.

    1981-02-01

    The feasibility of the determination of uranium in oil shale, by the fission track registration technique is studied. The wet and dry methods were employed, using a Bayer policarbonate, Makrofol KG, as detector. It was created a new variant of the dry method. The fission track registration technique was used in samples of raw, retorted and spent shale from Irati, Parana in Brazil, 16 μg U/g, 20 μg U/g and 20μg U/g were found, respectively, with a total error ranging from 19% to 20%. Some experimental results were included for illustration and comparison. The feasibility of the determination of uranium in oil shale from Irati was verified. (Author) [pt

  19. Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution and its relation to sandstone-type uranium mineralization in northern Tarim area--Evidence from apatite fission track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongxu; Dong Wenming; Liu Zhangyue; Chen Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    The apatite fission track dating and inversion result of geological thermal history of four rock specimens from Sawafuqi area and Talike area in northern Tarim Basin show that two areas uplifted at different ages. The apatite fission track ages of Sawafuqi range from 3.5 to 3.9 Ma, while the ages of Talike range from 53 to 59 Ma. The thermal history recorded by rock samples reveals that there are at least three prominent cooling phases since Late Cretaceous epoch. Detailed study was made on the division of uplifting stages during Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution with the existing data in northern Tarim area. And new ideas on tectonic evolution and sandstone-type uranium mineralization have been put forward by combining with the sandstone-type uranium mineralization ages in this area.(authors)

  20. Dating by fission track method: study of neutron dosimetry with natural uranium thin films; Datacao com o metodo dos tracos de fissao: estudo da dosimetria de neutrons com filmes finos de uranio natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iunes, P J

    1990-06-01

    Fission track dating is described, focalizing the problem of the decay constant for spontaneous fission of {sup 238} U and the use of neutron dosimetry in fission track analysis. Experimental procedures using thin films of natural uranium as neutron dosimeters and its results are presented. The author shows a intercomparison between different thin films and between the dosimetry with thin film and other dosimetries. (M.V.M.). 52 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs.

  1. Analysis of reaction cross-section production in neutron induced fission reactions on uranium isotope using computer code COMPLET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asres, Yihunie Hibstie; Mathuthu, Manny; Birhane, Marelgn Derso

    2018-04-22

    This study provides current evidence about cross-section production processes in the theoretical and experimental results of neutron induced reaction of uranium isotope on projectile energy range of 1-100 MeV in order to improve the reliability of nuclear stimulation. In such fission reactions of 235 U within nuclear reactors, much amount of energy would be released as a product that able to satisfy the needs of energy to the world wide without polluting processes as compared to other sources. The main objective of this work is to transform a related knowledge in the neutron-induced fission reactions on 235 U through describing, analyzing and interpreting the theoretical results of the cross sections obtained from computer code COMPLET by comparing with the experimental data obtained from EXFOR. The cross section value of 235 U(n,2n) 234 U, 235 U(n,3n) 233 U, 235 U(n,γ) 236 U, 235 U(n,f) are obtained using computer code COMPLET and the corresponding experimental values were browsed by EXFOR, IAEA. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR Data Bank. Computer code COMPLET has been used for the analysis with the same set of input parameters and the graphs were plotted by the help of spreadsheet & Origin-8 software. The quantification of uncertainties stemming from both experimental data and computer code calculation plays a significant role in the final evaluated results. The calculated results for total cross sections were compared with the experimental data taken from EXFOR in the literature, and good agreement was found between the experimental and theoretical data. This comparison of the calculated data was analyzed and interpreted with tabulation and graphical descriptions, and the results were briefly discussed within the text of this research work. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Reactor physics and reactor strategy investigations into the fissionable material economy of the thorium and uranium cycle in fast breeder reactors and high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    In this work the properties governing the fissionable material economy of the uranium and thorium cycles are investigated for the advanced reactor types currently under development - the fast breeder reactor (FBR) and the high temperature reactor (HTR) - from the point of view of the optimum utilization of the available nuclear fuel reserves and the continuance of supply of these reserves. For this purpose, the two reactor types are first of all considered individually and are subsequently discussed as a complementary overall system

  3. Analysis of C/E results of fission rate ratio measurements in several fast lead VENUS-F cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetkov, Anatoly; Krása, Antonín; Baeten, Peter; Vittiglio, Guido; Wagemans, Jan; Bécares, Vicente; Bianchini, Giancarlo; Fabrizio, Valentina; Carta, Mario; Firpo, Gabriele; Fridman, Emil; Sarotto, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    During the GUINEVERE FP6 European project (2006-2011), the zero-power VENUS water-moderated reactor was modified into VENUS-F, a mock-up of a lead cooled fast spectrum system with solid components that can be operated in both critical and subcritical mode. The Fast Reactor Experiments for hybrid Applications (FREYA) FP7 project was launched in 2011 to support the designs of the MYRRHA Accelerator Driven System (ADS) and the ALFRED Lead Fast Reactor (LFR). Three VENUS-F critical core configurations, simulating the complex MYRRHA core design and one configuration devoted to the LFR ALFRED core conditions were investigated in 2015. The MYRRHA related cores simulated step by step design peculiarities like the BeO reflector and in pile sections. For all of these cores the fuel assemblies were of a simple design consisting of 30% enriched metallic uranium, lead rodlets to simulate the coolant and Al2O3 rodlets to simulate the oxide fuel. Fission rate ratios of minor actinides such as Np-237, Am-241 as well as Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242 and U-238 to U-235 were measured in these VENUS-F critical assemblies with small fission chambers in specially designed locations, to determine the spectral indices in the different neutron spectrum conditions. The measurements have been analyzed using advanced computational tools including deterministic and stochastic codes and different nuclear data sets like JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, ENDF/B7.1 and JENDL-4.0. The analysis of the C/E discrepancies will help to improve the nuclear data in the specific energy region of fast neutron reactor spectra.

  4. Exact Solution of Fractional Diffusion Model with Source Term used in Study of Concentration of Fission Product in Uranium Dioxide Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao; Cao Jianzhu; Sun Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    The exact solution of fractional diffusion model with a location-independent source term used in the study of the concentration of fission product in spherical uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) particle is built. The adsorption effect of the fission product on the surface of the UO 2 particle and the delayed decay effect are also considered. The solution is given in terms of Mittag-Leffler function with finite Hankel integral transformation and Laplace transformation. At last, the reduced forms of the solution under some special physical conditions, which is used in nuclear engineering, are obtained and corresponding remarks are given to provide significant exact results to the concentration analysis of nuclear fission products in nuclear reactor. (nuclear physics)

  5. GGA+U study of uranium mononitride: A comparison of the U-ramping and occupation matrix schemes and incorporation energies of fission products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claisse, Antoine, E-mail: claisse@kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Klipfel, Marco [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Lindbom, Niclas [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Freyss, Michel [CEA, DEN, DEC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Olsson, Pär [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Reactor Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-09-15

    Uranium mononitride is studied in the DFT + U framework. Its ground state is investigated and a study of the incorporation of diverse fission products in the crystal is conducted. The U-ramping and occupation matrix control (OMC) schemes are used to eliminate metastable states. Beyond a certain amount of introduced correlation, the OMC scheme starts to find a lower total energy. The OMC scheme is chosen for the second part of this study. Furthermore, the influence of the magnetic ordering is studied using the U-ramping method, showing that antiferromagnetic order is the most stable one when the U parameter is larger than 1.75 eV. The effect on the density of states is investigated and elastic constants are provided for comparison with other methods and experiments. The incorporation energies of fission products in different defect configurations are calculated and these energies are corrected to take into account the limited size of the supercell. - Highlights: • We studied bulk uranium nitride with means of DFT+U with the U-ramping scheme and the OMC scheme. • We produces a density of states plot and calculated the elastic constants of UN. • We calculated the incorporation energy of many fission products in UN, and corrected them to take into account the elastic interactions. • The OMC scheme should be used over the U-ramping scheme. • Fission products go to larger crystal sites.

  6. Miniaturization of uranium/plutonium/fission products separation: design of a 'lab-on-CD' micro-system and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruchet, A.

    2012-01-01

    The chemical analysis of spent nuclear fuels is essential to design future nuclear fuels cycle and reprocessing methods but also for waste management. The analysis cycle consists of several chemical separation steps which are time consuming and difficult to implement due to confinement in glove boxes. It is required that the separation steps be automated and that the volume of radioactive waste generated be reduced. The design of automated, miniaturized and disposable analytical platforms should fulfill these requirements. This project aims to provide an alternative to the first analytical step of the spent fuels analysis: the chromatographic separation of Uranium and Plutonium from the minor actinides and fission products. The goal is to design a miniaturized platform showing analytical performances equivalent to the current process, and to reduce both the exposure of workers through automation, and the volume of waste produced at the end of the analysis cycle. Thus, the separation has been implemented on a disposable plastic micro-system (COC), specifically designed for automation: a lab on a Compact Disk or lab-on-CD. The developed prototype incorporates an anion-exchange monolithic micro-column whose in-situ synthesis as well as surface functionalization have been optimized specifically for the desired separation. The development of an adapted separation protocol was carried out using a simulation tool modeling the elution of the various elements of interest. This tool is able to predict the column geometry (length and cross section) suited to obtain pure fractions of Uranium and Plutonium as a function of the sample composition. Finally, the prototype is able to automatically carry out four separations simultaneously reducing the number of manipulations, the analysis time and reducing the volume of liquid waste by a factor of 1000. (author) [fr

  7. Determination of the effective range of fission fragments in UO2 and of the disintegration constant for the spontaneous fission of Uranium 238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaggiari, E.R.V.

    1980-01-01

    Results are presented of measurements realized aiming to determine the disintegration constant of spontaneous fission of U-238, with a discussion of the method utilized in the detection of fission tracks in muscovite. Several blades of mica were placed between two cylinders of Uo 2 to be irradiated with the fragments of spontaneous fission of U-238, and the fission tracks duly enlarged after a convenient chemical action were observed with a projection optical microscope. The effective thickness of UO 2 contributing to the observed tracks was measured through the irradiation of mica samples juxtaposed to the UO 2 cylinder, with 14,0 MeV neutrons from the (d,t 2 ) reaction. The detection efficiency of fission tracks originated in that thickness is practically 100% [pt

  8. The measurement of the uranium content of crystals, glasses and meteorites with the fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vartanian, R.

    1977-04-01

    In the present investigation, work has been carried out regarding the measurement of the uranium content of minerals, crystals and meteoritic samples from different parts of Iran. In this paper the method of inducing tracks from the 235 U indigenous to the Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDS) is described and new results have been attained. These are summarized as follows: Apatite between (4.16+-0.27) and (10.54+-0.84) ppm, Wulfnite=(4.90+-0.37) ppm, Quartz=(0.15+-0.02) ppm and Meteorite=(0.026+-0.003) ppm. (author)

  9. Cyclotron production of molybdenum-99 via proton-induced uranium-238 fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Zeng, N.X.; Mirshad, I.; Castaneda, C.M.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc; 6.02 h) is the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine worldwide. It is currently supplied from elutions of a 99 Mo → 99m Tc generator and used for regional distribution or locally for institutional use. The parent 99 Mo (66.02 h) radioactivities are being produced commercially in reactors using the 235 U(n, fission) 99 Mo (preferred method) or the 98 Mo(n,γ) 99 Mo (less desirable) methods. The production of 99 Mo is based on the operation of a small number of nuclear reactors, most of which have reached decommissioning age. Two new reactors to be dedicated to radioisotope production are now being planned in Canada. Accelerator-based methods for producing 99 Mo and/or 99m Tc would then provide new alternatives to the current reliance on reactor-based technologies

  10. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  11. Extraction of hexavalent uranium, tetravalent plutonium and fission products by N, N'-tetraalkyldiamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonnel, M.C.

    1988-10-01

    This study deals with the extractive properties of N, N'-tetraalkylglutaramides of generic formula R 2 NC(0)(CH 2 ) 3 C(0)NR 2 . These molecules were considered as alternative extractants to tributylphosphate in nuclear fuels reprocessing. They are selective extractants of uranium and plutonium as far as trivalent actinides and lanthanides remain in aqueous nitric solutions. Distribution ratios measurements and F.T. Infra-Red investigations show that HN0 3 extraction takes place via the formation of the following species: 2L.HN0 3 , L.HN0 3 and L.2HN0 3 in the organic phase (L: glutaramide). Distribution ratios of actinide ions followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and Infra-Red investigations agree with formation of the following neutral organometallic complexes in low nitric acidity conditions: L.U0 2 (N0 3 ) 2 and L.Pu(N0 3 ) 4 and the anionic species at higher acidities: L.U0 2 (N0 3 ) 3 H and L.Pu(N0 3 ) 6 H 2 . Interactions occur through neutral complexes and free molecules of diamides which explain the non ideality of the organic phase. Degradation products of these molecules don't seem to alter the extractive properties of these extractants towards uranium and plutonium [fr

  12. Potentialities and practical limitations of absolute neutron dosimetry using thin films of uranium and thorium applied to the fission track dating

    CERN Document Server

    Bigazzi, G; Hadler-Neto, J C; Iunes, P J; Paulo, S R; Oddone, M; Osorio, A M A; Zúñiga, A G

    1999-01-01

    Neutron dosimetry using natural uranium and thorium thin films makes possible that mineral dating by the fission-track method can be accomplished, even when poor thermalized neutron facilities are employed. In this case, the contributions of the fissions of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th induced by thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons to the population of tracks produced during irradiation are quantified through the combined use of natural uranium and thorium films. If the Th/U ratio of the sample is known, only one irradiation (where the sample and the films of uranium and thorium are present) is necessary to perform the dating. However, if that ratio is unknown, it can be determined through another irradiation where the mineral to be dated and both films are placed inside a cadmium box. Problems related with film manufacturing and calibration are discussed. Special attention is given to the utilization of thin films having very low uranium content. The problems faced sugg...

  13. Simulation of time variation of Uranium, Plutonium and fission product hold up in mixer settler contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dionisi, M.; D'Agostino, F.; Remetti, R.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation model of PUREX process extraction phase for a contactors (mixer-settlers) battery has been developed. This model has been implemented in a FORTRAN code tailored both for mainframe and PC. The main goal of the code is to determine Uranium and Plutonium hold-ups vs.time within contactors in order to implement a NRTA project for a reprocessing plant. These results are extremely important for a complete analysis of NRTA system perfomance particularly to overcome the difficulty of executing physical inventory within liquid-liquid contactors of extraction lines. The chemical process simulation has been carried out conventional theoretical models with the exeption of hydrodynamic simulation which has been developed utilizing a model based on experimental results

  14. Experiments for separation and purification of Mo-99 from uranium solution with fission products as tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, Gabriela Elena; Matei, Ana

    2007-01-01

    Technetium-99 m ( 99m Tc, T 1/2 = 6 hours), one of the most utilised radioisotopes in nuclear medicine, is generated through the beta decay of 99 Mo (T 1/2 = 66 hours) and which will decay through isomer transition to 99 Tc ( T 1/2 = 2.10 5 years) through the emission of a gamma radiation with the energy of 0.140 MeV. The work presents the phases of the process of Mo separation and purification at a tracer level. The tests performed in the laboratory have established the optimum conditions for the separation and purification of Molybdenum. To establish the separation and purification parameters, a synthetic solution which contains the elements which result following the irradiation of a low enriched Uranium foil weighing 10 g (∼20 % 235 U). To mark this solution, about 13 mg of UO 2 10% 235 U was irradiated for 2000 s, at a flux of about 7x10 12 n/cm 2 s. This amount of UO 2 will be added to the above-mentioned solution after dissolution. The method for separating the Molybdenum from irradiated Uranium solution is one of selective precipitation of Mo with α-benzoin-oxyme (α- BO). To purify the Molybdenum solution, two purification columns were utilised. Their role was to absorb the impurities remained in the mass of the precipitate. They and the Molybdenum have passed into the solution simultaneously, allowing the Molybdenum to pass. These columns are: the column with active charcoal (AC)+ active charcoal covered with silver (AgAC); active charcoal column (AC)+active charcoal covered with silver (AgAC)+hydrated zirconium oxide (HZO). Although all the phases of the process are performed with high yields, the final yields of recovery of Mo from U solutions are higher than 80%. (authors)

  15. A small flat fission chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yijun; Wang Dalun; Chen Suhe

    1999-01-01

    With fission materials of depleted uranium, natural uranium, enriched uranium, 239 Pu, and 237 Np, the authors have designed and made a series of small flat fission chamber. The authors narrated the construction of the fission chamber and its technological process of manufacture, and furthermore, the authors have measured and discussed the follow correct factor, self-absorption, boundary effect, threshold loss factor, bottom scatter and or so

  16. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  17. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rest, J. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: jrest@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L.; Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than {approx}7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  18. Analysis of intergranular fission-gas bubble-size distributions in irradiated uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rest, J.; Hofman, G. L.; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2009-04-01

    An analytical model for the nucleation and growth of intra and intergranular fission-gas bubbles is used to characterize fission-gas bubble development in low-enriched U-Mo alloy fuel irradiated in the advanced test reactor in Idaho as part of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program. Fuel burnup was limited to less than ˜7.8 at.% U in order to capture the fuel-swelling stage prior to irradiation-induced recrystallization. The model couples the calculation of the time evolution of the average intergranular bubble radius and number density to the calculation of the intergranular bubble-size distribution based on differential growth rate and sputtering coalescence processes. Recent results on TEM analysis of intragranular bubbles in U-Mo were used to set the irradiation-induced diffusivity and re-solution rate in the bubble-swelling model. Using these values, good agreement was obtained for intergranular bubble distribution compared against measured post-irradiation examination (PIE) data using grain-boundary diffusion enhancement factors of 15-125, depending on the Mo concentration. This range of enhancement factors is consistent with values obtained in the literature.

  19. Production of a pulseable fission-like neutron flux using a monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltick, D.; McConchie, S.; Sword, E.

    2008-04-01

    The design and performance of a pulseable neutron source utilizing a D-T neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector are presented. Approximately half the generator's 14 MeV neutron flux is used to produce a fission-like neutron spectrum similar to 252Cf. For every 14 MeV neutron entering the reflector, more than one fission-like neutron is reflected back across the surface of the reflector. Because delayed neutron production is more than two orders of magnitude below the prompt neutron production, the source takes full advantage of the generator's pulsed mode capability. Applications include all elemental characterization systems using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy. The source simultaneously emits 14 MeV neutrons optimal to excite fast neutron-induced gamma-ray signals, such as from carbon and oxygen, and fission-like neutrons optimal to induce neutron capture gamma-ray signals, such as from hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine. Experiments were performed, which compare well to Monte Carlo simulations, showing that the uranium reflector enhances capture signals by up to a factor of 15 compared to the absence of a reflector.

  20. Release of fission products during and after oxidation of trace-irradiated uranium dioxide at 300-900 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, P; Bannister, G H [Central Electricity Generating Board, Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories (United Kingdom)

    1985-07-01

    Should defected UO{sub 2} fuel pins come into contact with air then oxidation of the fuel may occur, the rate and consequences of which are dependent upon temperature and oxygen partial pressure. At CEGB-BNL an experimental programme is underway investigating the kinetics, and extent, of release of fission products during and after oxidation of trace-irradiated UO{sub 2} to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and reduction of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to UO{sub 2}. This paper presents preliminary results and analysis of experiments performed at 300-900 deg. C. Dense sintered UO{sub 2} has been oxidised at 300-500 deg. C using a thermo balance with simultaneous counting of released {sup 85}Kr. The kinetics of the {sup 85}Kr release are shown to correlate with the kinetics of oxidation, and the extent of release has been determined as 3-8% of that in the UO{sub 2} converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The release of {sup 106}Ru and {sup 137}Cs during this oxidation has been estimated by {gamma}-counting of the fuel sample, before and after oxidation, and of glassware in the vicinity of the sample. This indicates slight release of ruthenium and caesium. Greater fission product release is caused by oxidation at higher temperatures or by heating of the oxidation product. U{sub 3}O{sub 8} produced at 400 deg. C has been heated at 800 and 900 deg. C in air for 20 hours. This results in near total release of {sup 85}Kr and {sup 106}Ru, but still only slight release of {sup 137}Cs. The kinetics of the {sup 85}Kr release have been analysed and found to follow the Booth diffusion equation at 900 deg. C, but not at 800 deg. C. The fuel burn-up level may also have an effect. Some results of fission product release during reduction of the oxidation product U{sub 3}O{sub 8} are presented, and the influence of chemical effects upon the release of individual fission products is discussed. The future programme is outlined. (author)

  1. Evolution of uranium fission-fragment charge yields with neutron number. Strong effect of multi-chance fission on yield asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Theoretical Division, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schmitt, Christelle [CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, Caen (France)

    2017-01-15

    We use the Brownian shape-motion model, with its recent extensions, which allow modeling of odd-even staggering, to calculate the evolution of fission-fragment charge distributions with neutron number for the compound-system sequence {sup 234}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 240}U. We compare to experimental data where available, for neutron- and electromagnetic-induced fission over a compound-nucleus excitation energy range from about 6 to 20 MeV. A notable result of the study is that the evolution of the location of the peak charge yield from Z = 54 in {sup 234}U towards Z = 52 in heavier isotopes, seen in the experimental data, is present also in the calculated yields. We further show that to describe yields at higher compound-nucleus excitation energies, then, already at 20 MeV, it is necessary to take multi-chance fission into account. (orig.)

  2. Fission cross sections of plutonium-239 and plutonium-242 relative to uranium-285 from 0. 1 to 10 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1978-12-01

    Measurement of the ratio of the fission cross sections of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 242/Pu to that of /sup 235/U is reported. The sources of neutrons were the /sup 7/Li(p,n)/sup 7/Be and D(d,n)/sup 3/He reactions. The ratio of the masses of the samples was determined by low geometry alpha counting and from relative thermal fission rates. The results are compared with other measurements. 19 references.

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  4. Effects of solid fission products forming dissolved oxide (Nd) and metallic precipitate (Ru) on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hun; Rhee, Young-Woo; Kang, Ki-Won; Kim, Keon-Sik; Song, Kun-Woo

    2007-01-01

    The effects of solid fission products on the thermal conductivity of uranium base oxide nuclear fuel were experimentally investigated. Neodymium (Nd) and ruthenium (Ru) were added to represent the physical states of solid fission products such as 'dissolved oxide' and 'metallic precipitate', respectively. Thermal conductivity was determined on the basis of the thermal diffusivity, density and specific heat values. The effects of the additives on the thermal conductivity were quantified in the form of the thermal resistivity equation - the reciprocal of the phonon conduction equation - which was determined from the measured data. It is concluded that the thermal conductivity of the irradiated nuclear fuel is affected by both the 'dissolved oxide' and the 'metallic precipitate', however, the effects are in the opposite direction and the 'dissolved oxide' influences the thermal conductivity more significantly than that of the 'metallic precipitate'

  5. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, IV Deo IV - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from the irradiated fuel of the reactor in Vinca; Prerada ozracenog urana. Zavrsni izvestaj - I-VI, IV Deo - Odvajanje urana, plutonijuma i fisionih produkata iz isluzenog goriva reaktora u Vinci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    This study describes the technology for separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from the radioactive water solution which is obtained by dissolving the spent uranium fuel from the reactor in Vinca. The procedure should be completed in a hot cell, with the maximum permitted activity of 10 Ci.

  6. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  7. Estimating contaminant discharge rates from stabilized uranium tailings embankments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    Estimates of contaminant discharge rates from stabilized uranium tailings embankments are essential in evaluating long-term impacts of tailings disposal on groundwater resources. Contaminant discharge rates are a function of water flux through tailings covers, the mass and distribution of tailings, and the concentrations of contaminants in percolating pore fluids. Simple calculations, laboratory and field testing, and analytical and numerical modeling may be used to estimate water flux through variably-saturated tailings under steady-state conditions, which develop after consolidation and dewatering have essentially ceased. Contaminant concentrations in water discharging from the tailings depend on tailings composition, leachability and solubility of contaminants, geochemical conditions within the embankment, tailings-water interactions, and flux of water through the embankment. These concentrations may be estimated based on maximum reported concentrations, pore water concentrations, extrapolations of column leaching data, or geochemical equilibria and reaction pathway modeling. Attempts to estimate contaminant discharge rates should begin with simple, conservative calculations and progress to more-complicated approaches, as necessary

  8. Separation Of Uranium From Fission Products Zr And Ru With 30% TBP (Tri Butyl Phosphate) Dodecane In Nitric Acid Medium As An Extract Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herdady, R. Didiek; Masduki, Busron; Sigit

    2000-01-01

    Separation of uranium from fission products Zr and Ru in batch process with Tbp 30% - dodecane in nitric acid medium has been investigated. The extraction was carried out on various acidity of 1,006 M, 1.990 M, 2,980 M, 4,006 M, and 5,006 M, and uranium concentration in feed of 100.30 g/l; 149.96 g/l, 250.30 g/l and 300.7 g/l. The results showed that equilibrium of extraction was achieved at 25 minutes, enhancement factor of ruthenium increased and of zirconium decreased Utilization of grand concentration of uranium in feed caused decreasing of distribution coefficient, zirconium and ruthenium. The better contribution of experiments was obtained at the acidity of 2 M and uranium concentration in feed of 149.9 g/l with the decontamination factor of zirconium, FD zr-u was 1,65 and of ruthenium, FD ru-u was 1,52

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia induction in CBA/H mice by irradiation with fission neutrons as a function of exposure rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huiskamp, R.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in male CBA/H mice was used as a model for investigation of the effect of reduced fast fission neutron exposure rates on radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Groups of about 90 male CBA/H mice were irradiated or sham-irradiated at the age of 15-20 weeks. The animals were exposed to 400 mGy fast fission neutrons at exposure rates of 2, 10 or 100 mGy/min. The investigation clearly showed that reducing the exposure rate of high-LET fast fission neutrons had no influence on the incidence of AML or on the survival of the irradiated mice. In contrast, a higher incidence of lymphosarcomas was observed in mice irradiated with higher exposure rates. (orig./MG)

  10. Acute myeloid leukemia induction in CBA/H mice by irradiation with fission neutrons as a function of exposure rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huiskamp, R [Stichting Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland, Petten (Netherlands). Radiobiology and Radio-Ecology Unit

    1991-06-01

    Radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in male CBA/H mice was used as a model for investigation of the effect of reduced fast fission neutron exposure rates on radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Groups of about 90 male CBA/H mice were irradiated or sham-irradiated at the age of 15-20 weeks. The animals were exposed to 400 mGy fast fission neutrons at exposure rates of 2, 10 or 100 mGy/min. The investigation clearly showed that reducing the exposure rate of high-LET fast fission neutrons had no influence on the incidence of AML or on the survival of the irradiated mice. In contrast, a higher incidence of lymphosarcomas was observed in mice irradiated with higher exposure rates. (orig./MG).

  11. Role of effective distance in the fission mechanism study by the double-energy measurement for uranium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    Fission product kinetic energies were measured by the double-energy method for thermal-neutron fission of {sup 235,233}U and proton-induced fission of {sup 238}U at the 15.8-MeV excitation. From the obtained energy-mass correlation data, the kinetic-energy distribution was constructed from each mass bin to evaluate the first moment of the kinetic energy for a given fragment mass. The resulting kinetic energy was then converted to the effective distance between the charge centers at the moment of scission. The effective distances deduced for the proton-induced fission was concluded to be classified into two constant values, one for asymmetric and the other for symmetric mode, irrespective of the mass though an additional component was further extracted in the asymmetric mass region. This indicates that the fission takes place via two well-defined saddles, followed by the random neck rupture. On the contrary, the effective distances obtained for thermal-neutron induced fission turned out to lie along the contour line at the same level as the equilibrium deformation in the two-dimensional potential map. This strongly suggests that it is essentially a barrier-penetrating type of fission rather than the over-barrier fission. (author). 73 refs.

  12. Role of effective distance in the fission mechanism study by the double-energy measurement for uranium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Saito, Tadashi; Takahashi, Naruto

    1997-01-01

    Fission product kinetic energies were measured by the double-energy method for thermal-neutron fission of 235,233 U and proton-induced fission of 238 U at the 15.8-MeV excitation. From the obtained energy-mass correlation data, the kinetic-energy distribution was constructed from each mass bin to evaluate the first moment of the kinetic energy for a given fragment mass. The resulting kinetic energy was then converted to the effective distance between the charge centers at the moment of scission. The effective distances deduced for the proton-induced fission was concluded to be classified into two constant values, one for asymmetric and the other for symmetric mode, irrespective of the mass though an additional component was further extracted in the asymmetric mass region. This indicates that the fission takes place via two well-defined saddles, followed by the random neck rupture. On the contrary, the effective distances obtained for thermal-neutron induced fission turned out to lie along the contour line at the same level as the equilibrium deformation in the two-dimensional potential map. This strongly suggests that it is essentially a barrier-penetrating type of fission rather than the over-barrier fission. (author). 73 refs

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  16. Heat release rate from the combustion of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fuel treatment is planned at the Argonne National Laboratory on EBR-II spent fuel. The electrochemical treatment process is carried out in a cell with an argon atmosphere to prevent any reaction. The amount of fuel processed at any time is limited by the amount of energy which could be released by metal combustion if air is inadvertently allowed into the cell since the heat release would increase the cell pressure. The cell pressure is required to be below atmospheric even if combustion occurs to ensure no cell gas/aerosol is released to the environment. Metal fires can release large amounts of heat. In certain configurations such as fine particulate, metal can be pyrophoric at room temperature. When the metal is a nuclear fuel, it is important to be able to predict the reaction/heat release rate if the metal is inadvertently exposed to air. A realistic combustion model is needed to predict heat release rates for the many different flow and transport configurations which exist in the various fuel processing steps. A model for the combustion of uranium is developed here which compares satisfactorily to experimental data

  17. Measurement and analysis of thorium fission rate in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Lei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang, Yiwei, E-mail: winfield1920@126.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu, Zhujun [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065,China (China); Liu, Rong, E-mail: liurongzy@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Jiang, Li; Wang, Mei [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Associated angular dependencies of the source neutron energy and intensity was given. • Two sets of fission yields from evaluated libraries were considered and applied. • Calculated results employing ENDF/B-VII.0 agreed with the experimental ones best. • Small discrepancies exist between thorium fission cross section evaluated libraries. - Abstract: In order to validate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section, an integral experiment was carried out using the activation method in a polyethylene shell with a D-T neutron source. Thorium samples were arranged in the 0° direction to the incident D{sup +} beam. The {sup 232}Th fission rate was determined by measuring the 151.195 keV characteristic γ ray emitted from the fission fragment {sup 85m}Kr, and the experimental uncertainties were about 5.3%. MCNP calculation results employing ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-3.3, JENDL-4.0 libraries are in good agreement with that of experiments within uncertainties except that employing ENDF/B-VII.1 (∼6.5%). The experiment results can be used to re-evaluate the {sup 232}Th fission cross section.

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  20. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-09-20

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project.

  1. Uranium Oxide Rate Summary for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project (OCRWM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to summarize the uranium oxidation reaction rate information developed by the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project and describe the basis for selecting reaction rate correlations used in system design. The selection basis considers the conditions of practical interest to the fuel removal processes and the reaction rate application during design studies. Since the reaction rate correlations are potentially used over a range of conditions, depending of the type of evaluation being performed, a method for transitioning between oxidation reactions is also documented. The document scope is limited to uranium oxidation reactions of primary interest to the SNF Project processes. The reactions influencing fuel removal processes, and supporting accident analyses, are: uranium-water vapor, uranium-liquid water, uranium-moist air, and uranium-dry air. The correlation selection basis will consider input from all available sources that indicate the oxidation rate of uranium fuel, including the literature data, confirmatory experimental studies, and fuel element observations. Trimble (2000) summarizes literature data and the results of laboratory scale experimental studies. This document combines the information in Trimble (2000) with larger scale reaction observations to describe uranium oxidation rate correlations applicable to conditions of interest to the SNF Project

  2. Inorganic oxides as alternative in the separation of non fissioned residual uranium; Oxidos inorganicos como alternativa en la separacion del uranio residual no fisionado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baca G, A

    1997-07-01

    The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2} as well as vegetable carbon have been studied for its possible use as sorbent in the concentration and separation of non fissioned residual uranium of some fission products such as: {sup 141} Ce, {sup 134} Cs, {sup 125} Sb, {sup 103} Ru, {sup 95} Zr, {sup 95} Nb of alkaline aqueous systems. The separation efficiency has been evaluated using natural uranium and radionuclides in static and dynamic processes, through liquid scintillation and gamma spectrometry. Therefore Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2} and carbon were pre-treated thermic and chemically and characterized through the technique of Nitrogen absorption analysis, X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. By means of the p H determination and the aqueous system potential the present hydrolysis products were determined. The inorganic oxides show structural and surface changes due to the treatment. The adsorption process is realized by different mechanism depending of the sorbent. The results show that the retention capacity is a dependence of the oxides pre-treatment and of the hydrolysis products in the aqueous system, as well as of the experimental conditions. Not in this way for carbon in which the results show the treatment and the experimental conditions significantly have not influence in its adsorption capacity. (Author)

  3. Effect of fission rate on the microstructure of coated UMo dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaers, A.; Parthoens, Y.; Cornelis, G.; Kuzminov, V.; Koonen, E.; Van den Berghe, S.; Ye, B.; Hofman, G. L.; Schulthess, Jason

    2017-10-01

    Compared to previous irradiation experiments containing UMo/Al dispersion fuel plates, the SELENIUM irradiation experiment performed at the SCK.CEN BR2 reactor in 2012 showed an improved plate swelling behavior. However, in the high burn-up area of the plates a significant increase in meat thickness was still measured. The origin of this increase is currently not firmly established, but it is clear from the observed microstructure that the swelling rate still is too high for practical purposes and needs to be reduced. It was stipulated that the swelling occurred at the high burnup areas which are also the high power zones at beginning of life. For that reason, an experiment was proposed to investigate the influence of fission rate (i.e. power) on some of the observed phenomena. For this purpose, a sibling plate to a high power (BOL>470 W/cm(2)) SELENIUM plate was irradiated during four BR2 cycles. The SELENIUM 1a fuel plate was submitted to a local maximum heat flux below 350 W/cm(2), throughout the full irradiation. At the end of the last cycle, the SELENIUM 1a fuel plate reached a maximum local burnup value of close to 75%U-235 compared to 70%U-235 for the SELENIUM high power plates. When comparing to the results on the SELENIUM plates, the non-destructive tests clearly show a continued linear swelling behavior of the low power irradiated fuel plate SELENIUM 1a in the high burn-up region. The influence of the fission rate is also evidenced in the microstructural examination of the fuel showing that there is no formation of interaction layer at the high burn-up region.

  4. Effect of fission rate on the microstructure of coated UMo dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Parthoens, Y.; Cornelis, G.; Kuzminov, V.; Koonen, E.; Van den Berghe, S.; Ye, B.; Hofman, G. L.; Schulthess, Jason

    2017-10-01

    Compared to previous irradiation experiments containing UMo/Al dispersion fuel plates, the SELENIUM irradiation experiment performed at the SCK·CEN BR2 reactor in 2012 showed an improved plate swelling behavior. However, in the high burn-up area of the plates a significant increase in meat thickness was still measured. The origin of this increase is currently not firmly established, but it is clear from the observed microstructure that the swelling rate still is too high for practical purposes and needs to be reduced. It was stipulated that the swelling occurred at the high burnup areas which are also the high power zones at beginning of life. For that reason, an experiment was proposed to investigate the influence of fission rate (i.e. power) on some of the observed phenomena. For this purpose, a sibling plate to a high power (BOL>470 W/cm2) SELENIUM plate was irradiated during four BR2 cycles. The SELENIUM 1a fuel plate was submitted to a local maximum heat flux below 350 W/cm2, throughout the full irradiation. At the end of the last cycle, the SELENIUM 1a fuel plate reached a maximum local burnup value of close to 75%235U compared to 70%235U for the SELENIUM high power plates. When comparing to the results on the SELENIUM plates, the non-destructive tests clearly show a continued linear swelling behavior of the low power irradiated fuel plate SELENIUM 1a in the high burn-up region. The influence of the fission rate is also evidenced in the microstructural examination of the fuel showing that there is no formation of interaction layer at the high burn-up region.

  5. Variational RRKM calculation of thermal rate constant for C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Taghva Manesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides quantitative results for the rate constants of unimolecular C–H bond fission reactions in the nitro methane at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. In fact, there are three different hydrogen atoms in the nitro methane. The potential energy surface for each C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C–H bond fission channel is a barrierless reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate coefficients. By means of calculated rate coefficients at different temperatures, the Arrhenius expression of the channel over the temperature range of 100–2000 K is k(T = 5.9E19∗exp(−56274.6/T.

  6. Fission rate distribution at the 84-pin radial section of a SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Gregory; Murphy, Michael F.; Jatuff, Fabian [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Westinghouse boiling water reactor SVEA-96 Optima2 assemblies were studied during the LWRPROTEUS program at the PROTEUS facility in the Paul Scherrer Institute. Measured radial fission rate distributions at the 84-pin elevation are compared with MCNPX predictions using both ENDF/B-VI (Release 2) and JEFF-3.1 data libraries. Predicted fission rates agree within +-4.5% using both libraries. Fission rates were over-predicted in UO{sub 2} pins close to the missing 1/3 pins and under-predicted in UO{sub 2} pins close to the missing 2/3 pins. Recurrent under-estimations were observed in the UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pins, for both libraries, which might be explained by over-estimated thermal cross-sections of {sup 157}Gd, as suggested in a recent work of G. Leinweber et al. (2006). (authors)

  7. New results from isochronous mass measurements of neutron-rich uranium fission fragments with the FRS-ESR-facility at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, Yu.A.; Weick, H.; Bosch, F.; Boutin, D.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dolinskii, A.; Franczak, B.; Franzke, B.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, S.A.; Matos, M.; Mazzocco, M.; Muenzenberg, G.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Stadlmann, J.; Steck, M.; Winkler, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Diwisch, M. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Geissel, H.; Plass, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Chen, L. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Patyk, Z. [National Centre for Nuclear Research - NCBJ Swierk, Warszawa (Poland); Sun, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Beihang University, School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beijing (China); Hausmann, M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Nakajima, S.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T. [Saitama University, Department of Physics, Saitama (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Niigata University, Department of Physics, Niigata (Japan); Ozawa, A. [University of Tsukuba, Institute of Physics, Ibaraki (Japan); Walker, P.M. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Masses of uranium fission fragments have been measured with the FRagment Separator (FRS) combined with the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. A 410-415 MeV/u {sup 238}U projectile beam was fast extracted from the synchrotron SIS-18 with an average intensity of 10{sup 9}/spill. The projectiles were focused on a 1g/cm{sup 2} beryllium target at the entrance of the FRS to create neutron-rich isotopes via abrasion-fission. The fission fragments were spatially separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for fast mass measurements without applying cooling. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B ρ-tagging at the high-resolution dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. The evaluation has been done for the combined data sets from both experiments with a new method of data analysis. The use of a correlation matrix has provided experimental mass values for 23 different neutron-rich isotopes for the first time and 6 masses with improved values. The new masses were obtained for nuclides in the element range from Se to Ce. The applied analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with an intensity of a few atoms per week. The novel data analysis and systematic error determination are described and the results are compared with extrapolations of experimental values and theoretical models. (orig.)

  8. Post irradiation examinations of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels irradiated at low linear power rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Atsushi; Sasayama, Tatsuo; Iwai, Takashi; Aizawa, Sakuei; Ohwada, Isao; Aizawa, Masao; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Handa, Muneo

    1988-11-01

    Two pins containing uranium-plutonium carbide fuels which are different in stoichiometry, i.e. (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 , were constructed into a capsule, ICF-37H, and were irradiated in JRR-2 up to 1.0 at % burnup at the linear heat rate of 420 W/cm. After being cooled for about one year, the irradiated capsule was transferred to the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility where the non-destructive examinations of the fuel pins in the β-γ cells and the destructive ones in two α-γ inert gas atmosphere cells were carried out. The release rates of fission gas were low enough, 0.44 % from (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel pin and 0.09% from (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel pin, which is reasonable because of the low central temperature of fuel pellets, about 1000 deg C and is estimated that the release is mainly governed by recoil and knock-out mechanisms. Volume swelling of the fuels was observed to be in the range of 1.3 ∼ 1.6 % for carbide fuels below 1000 deg C. Respective open porosities of (U,Pu)C 1.0 and (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel were 1.3 % and 0.45 %, being in accordance with the release behavior of fission gas. Metallographic observation of the radial sections of pellets showed the increase of pore size and crystal grain size in the center and middle region of (U,Pu)C 1.0 pellets. The chemical interaction between fuel pellets and claddings in the carbide fuels is the penetration of carbon in the fuels to stainless steel tubes. The depth of corrosion layer in inner sides of cladding tubes ranged 10 ∼ 15 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.0 fuel and 15 #approx #25 μm in the (U,Pu)C 1.1 fuel, which is correlative with the carbon potential of fuels posibly affecting the amount of carbon penetration. (author)

  9. Dependence of adsorption rate for uranium on porous property of hydrophilic amidoxime type adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirotsu, Takahiro; Takagi, Norio; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko; Takai, Nobuharu; Seno, Manabu; Itagaki, Takaharu; Ouchi, Hidenaga.

    1984-01-01

    Dependence of macro- and microporous properties of the amidoxime chelating resins was investigated on the rate of adsorption for uranium from sea water. These resins, which were cross-linked with hydrophilic monomers at the degree of cross-linking of 40 wt%, were macroreticular type porous ones. The rate of adsorption increased as the macropore volume increased. In addition, it depended on the length of the cross-linking agent: the resin cross-linked with tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate showed the maximum rate of adsorption for uranium. These results suggested that the diffusion of uranyl ions in the resin was responsible for the rate of adsorption for uranium. (author)

  10. A solvent proceed for the extraction of the irradiate uranium and plutonium in the reactor core; Un procede par solvant pour l'extraction du plutonium de l'uranium irradie dans les piles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B; Regnaut, P; Prevot, I [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    Description of the conditions of plutonium, fission products and of uranium separation by selective extraction of the nitrates by organic solvent, containing a simultaneous extraction of plutonium and uranium, followed by a plutonium re-extraction after reduction, and an uranium re-extraction. The rates of decontamination being insufficient in this first stage, we also describes the processes of decontamination permitting separately to get the rates wanted for uranium and plutonium. Finally, we describes the beginning of the operation that consists in a nitric dissolution of the active uranium while capturing the products of gaseous fission, as well as the final concentration of the products of fission in a concentrated solution. (authors) [French] Description des conditions de separation du plutonium, des produits de fission et de l'uranium au moyen d'une extraction selective des nitrates par solvant organique, comprenant une extraction simultanee du plutonium et de l'uranium, suivie d'une reextraction du plutonium apres reduction, et d'une reextraction de l'uranium. Les taux de decontamination etant insuffisants dans ce premier stade, on decrit egalement les processus de decontamination permettant separement d'obtenir les taux desires pour l'uranium et le plutonium. Enfin, on decrit aussi le debut de l'operation qui consiste en une dissolution nitrique de l'uranium actif en captant les produits de fission gazeux, ainsi que la concentration finale des produits de fission sous forme de solution concentree. (auteurs)

  11. On the Potential of Nuclear Fission Energy for Effective Reduction of Carbon Emission under the Constraint of Uranium Resources Use without Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.; Pevec, D.; Matijevic, M.

    2010-01-01

    Urgency to stop further increase of greenhouse gases emissions and reverse the trends, as stated in the Fourth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPPC) Report and in Copenhagen discussions, limits the realistic choice of energy technologies to those available now or in the near future of few decades. In the coming fifty years neither nuclear fusion nor carbon capture and storage (CCS) can be expected to give a significant contribution to world energy production. Two perspective intermittent sources such as wind and solar together with nuclear fission energy covering the base load consumption appears to be a combination with a potential to produce a large share of carbon free energy in the total world energy production. This contribution considers the issues, associated with required large scale deployment of nuclear fission energy. A serious question associated with nuclear energy is nuclear proliferation. Spread of uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing installations in many new countries constructing nuclear reactors would be a major concern in present political environment. We investigate whether uranium resources would be sufficient to support nuclear build-up in next 50-60 years sufficiently large to significantly reduce carbon emission without reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. A positive answer would mean that 50-60 years can be available to develop effective international control of nuclear fuel cycle installations. Our results show that a maximum nuclear build-up which would consume currently estimated uranium resources by 2065 without reprocessing could reduce by 2065 carbon emission by 39.6% of the total reduction needed to bring the WEO 2009 Reference Scenario prediction of total GHG emissions in 2065 to the level of the WEO 450 Scenario limiting global temperature increase to 2 degrees of C. The less demanding strategy of the nuclear replacement of all non-CCS coal power plants retiring during the 2025-2065 period would reduce emission

  12. Dissolution rates of airborne uranium in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thein, M.; Maitz, A.H.; Austin, M.A.; Rao, G.R.; Gur, D.

    1982-01-01

    The airborne uranium, collected on three sets of air filter samples at different times, near a uranium fuel fabrication plant, was classified to assess the potential radiological and toxicological hazards of respirable particles with aerodynamic equivalent diameters of less than 15 μm. A model was developed to calculate radiation dose from radionuclides deposited in the lung by inhalation. Knowing the solubility category and dissolution half-time, the likely doses to residents near such plants can be assessed. (U.K.)

  13. Study of hypernuclei fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, F.

    1990-01-01

    This work is about PS177 experience made on LEAR machine at CERN in 1988. The annihilation reaction of anti protons on a target of Bismuth or Uranium is studied. Lambda particles are produced by this reaction, in the nucleus in 2% of cases 7.1 10 -3 hypernuclei by stopped antiproton in the target are produced. The prompt hypernucleus fission probability of uranium is 75% and that of Bismuth 10%. The mass distribution of fission fragments is symmetrical ((≡ the excitation energy of the nucleus is very high). If the nucleus hasn't fissioned, the non-mesonic lambda decay, gives it an energy of 100 MeV, what allows to fission later. This fission is delayed because the hypernucleus lifetime is 1.3 +0.25 -0.21 10 -10 sec for Bismuth [fr

  14. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  16. EURISOL-DS Multi-MWatt Hg Target: Neutron flux and fission rate calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Vaz, P; Herrera-Martinez, A; Kadi, Y; Kharoua, C; Lettry, J; Lindroos, M

    The EURISOL (The EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) project aims at producing high intensity radioactive ion beams produced by neutron induced fission on a fissile target (235U) surrounding a liquid mercury converter. A proton beam of 1 GeV and 4 MW impinges on the Hg converter generating by spallation reactions high neutron fluxes. In this work the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA were used to assess the neutronics performance of the system which geometry, inspired from the MAFF concept, allows a versatile manipulation of the fission targets. The objective of the study was to optimize the geometry of the system and the materials used in the fuel and reflector elements of the system, in order to achieve the highest possible fission rate.

  17. Measurement of the fission cross section of uranium-235 between 4 eV and 20 keV; Mesure de la section efficace de fission de l'uranium-235 entre 4 eV et 20 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A; Genin, R; Joly, R; Vendryes, G

    1959-01-01

    The neutron fission cross section of uranium-235 has been measured between 4 ev and 20 kev by the time of flight method with the Saclay electron linear accelerator as a pulsed neutron source. After a brief description of the experimental apparatus and the conditions of work during the experiment, the curve {sigma}{sub F} {radical}E in the energy range studied is shown. This curve is then analyzed by the ''area'' method and a set of {sigma}{sub 0} {gamma}{sub F} values is obtained. With {sigma}{sub 0} {gamma} values measured in other laboratories, it is possible to compute fission widths for several resonances and to study their distribution. This distribution is then compared to Porter-Thomas distributions with different values of the number of exit channels. (authors) [French] La section efficace de fission de l'uranium--235 a ete mesuree entre 4 eV et 20 KeV par la methode du temps de vol en utilisant l'accelerateur lineaire a electrons de Saclay comme source pulses de neutrons. Apres une rapide description de l'appareillage experimental et des conditions de fonctionnement au cours de l'experience, on presente la courbe {sigma}{sub F} {radical}E obtenue dans la game d'energie etudiee. Cette courbe est ensuite analysee par la methode de surface des resonances et un lot de valeurs de {sigma}{sub 0} {gamma}{sub F} est obtenue. Conjuguee avec les valeurs de {sigma}{sub 0} {gamma} obtenues dans d'autres laboratoires, cette analyse permet de calculer les largeurs de fission pour plusieurs resonances et d'etudier leur distribution. Cette distribution est ensuite comparee aux distributions de Porter et Thomas correspondant a differentes valeurs du nombre de voies de sortie. (auteurs)

  18. Optimization of operating parameters and rate of uranium bioleaching from a low-grade ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, A.; Roosta-Azad, R.; Safdari, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study the bioleaching of a low-grade uranium ore containing 480 ppm uranium has been reported. The studies involved extraction of uranium using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans derived from the uranium mine samples. The maximum specific growth rate (μ max ) and doubling time (t d ) were obtained 0.08 h -1 and 8.66 h, respectively. Parameters such as Fe 2+ concentration, particle size, temperature and pH were optimized. The effect of pulp density (PD) was also studied. Maximum uranium bio-dissolution of 100 ± 5 % was achieved under the conditions of pH 2.0, 5 % PD and 35 deg C in 48 h with the particles of d 80 = 100 μm. The optimum concentration of supplementary Fe 2+ was dependent to the PD. This value was 0 and 10 g of FeSO 4 ·7H 2 O/l at the PD of 5 and 15 %, respectively. The effects of time, pH and PD on the bioleaching process were studied using central composite design. New rate equation was improved for the uranium leaching rate. The rate of leaching is controlled with the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions in solution. This study shows that uranium bioleaching may be an important process for the Saghand U mine at Yazd (Iran). (author)

  19. Comparison of reconstructed radial pin total fission rates with experimental results in full scale BWR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giust, Flavio [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG, Parkstrasse 23, CH-5401 Baden (Switzerland); Grimm, Peter; Jatuff, Fabian [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Chawla, Rakesh [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2008-07-01

    Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96+ in the zero power reactor PROTEUS at the Paul Scherrer Institute. This work presents comparisons of reconstructed 2D pin fission rates in two configurations, I-1A and I-2A. Both configurations contain, in the central test zone, an array of 3x3 SVEA-96+ fuel elements moderated with light water at 20 deg. C. In configuration I-2A, an L-shaped hafnium control blade (half of a real cruciform blade) is inserted adjacent to the NW corner of the central fuel element. To minimize the impact of the surroundings, all measurements were done in fuel pins belonging to the central assembly. The 3x3 experimental configuration was modeled using the core monitoring and design tools that are applied at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). These are the 2D transport code HELIOS, used for the cross-section generation, and the 3D, 2-group nodal diffusion code PRESTO-2. The exterior is represented, in the axial and radial directions, by 2-group albedos calculated at the test zone boundary using a full-core 3D MCNPX model. The calculated-to-experimental (C/E) ratios of the total fission rates have a standard deviation of 1.3% in configuration I-1A (uncontrolled) and 3.2% in configuration I-2A (controlled). Sensitivity cases are analyzed to show the impact of certain parameters on the calculated fission rate distribution and reactivity. It is shown that the relative pin fission rate is only weakly dependent on these parameters. In cases without a control blade, the pin power reconstruction methodology delivers the same level of accuracy as 2D transport calculations. On the other hand, significant deviations, that are inherent to the use of reflected geometry in the lattice calculations, are observed in cases when the control blade is inserted. (authors)

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  1. A spike of 4298Mo in yields of uranium spontaneous fission an extension of shell structure effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Akimasa; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kawashima, Atsumichi.

    1993-01-01

    The investigations of the isotopic abundance ratios of molybdenum in zircon have shown that the molybdenum isotopic composition obtained reflects two effects: (1) spontaneous fission of 92 238 U contained in the zircon and (2) double beta decay of 40 96 Zr. Interestingly, however, the products due to the spontaneous fission appear to have a strange large excess (spike) of 42 98 Mo. It intrigues us that 92 minus 42 leaves 50, one of the outstanding magic numbers. It is suggested in the present communication that the strange spike of 42 98 Mo in question can result from a special type of spontaneous fission having essential bearings on the magic number 50 of protons and the 'magical' numbers 58 and 92 of neutrons. (author)

  2. Measurement of the uranium-235 fission cross section over the neutron energy range 1 to 6 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, D.M.; Diven, B.C.; Hansen, G.E.; Jarvis, G.A.; Koontz, P.G.; Smith, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The ratio of the fission cross section of 235 U to the scattering cross section of 1 H was measured in the 1- to 6-MeV range using monoenergetic neutrons from a pulsed 3 H(p,n) 3 He source. In this measurement, solid-state detectors determined fission fragment and recoil proton emissions from back-to-back U(99.7%) and polyethylene disks. Timing permitted discrimination against room-scattered neutron backgrounds. Absolute values for 235 U(n,f) are obtained using the Hopkins-Breit evaluation of the hydrogen-scattering cross section

  3. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) - a Nu Plasma HR - equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the 235 U/ 238 U, 236 U/ 238 U, 145 Nd/ 143 Nd, 146 Nd/ 143 Nd, 101 Ru/( 99 Ru+ 99 Tc) and 102 Ru/( 99 Ru+ 99 Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred μm to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The 101 Ru/( 99 Ru+ 99 Tc) and 102 Ru/( 99 Ru+ 99 Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in 146 Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The 235 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously published results from the bulk analysis of contaminated samples originating from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Thus

  4. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS)--a Nu Plasma HR--equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the 235U/238U, 236U/238U, 145Nd/143Nd, 146Nd/143Nd, 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred mum to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The 101Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) and 102Ru/(99Ru+99Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in 146Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The 235U/238U and 236U/238U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously published results from the bulk analysis of contaminated samples originating from the vicinity of Chernobyl. Thus, the 235U/238U ratios measured in ten

  5. Effects of the radiation gamma on the activity and selectivity of the Al2 O3 in the retention of uranium and fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran B, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The study that here comes constitute a contribution for the treatment of based on waste the properties of retention of the inorganic oxides. The effect induced of the radiation has been determined gamma of the 60 Co in the Al 2 O 3 and their influence in their capacity of retention of uranium and products of fission of watery solutions strongly alkaline. In order to obtain useful information it made the superficial characterizations, structural, crystalline and of retention by means of the techniques of superficial adsorption, spectroscopy infrared, rays-X diffraction, liquid twinkling and γ- spectrometry. The obtained results show that the treatment of the Al 2 O 3 this associated with slight changes in their structural characteristics and superficialities concluding that the molecular water present in the crystalline net of the oxide was not displaced radiolytic for effect, but rather, this spread in the volume of the oxide, blocking the change in the contribution to crystalline of the oxide. (Author)

  6. Fission Detection Using the Associated Particle Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.P. Keegan; J.P. Hurley; J.R. Tinsley; R. Trainham; S.C. Wilde

    2008-01-01

    A beam of tagged 14 MeV neutrons from the deuterium-tritium (DT) reaction is used to induce fission in a target composed of depleted uranium. The generator yield is 10 7 neutrons/second radiated into a 4 x 4 in. NaI detectors are used for gamma-ray detection. The fission process is known to produce multiple gamma-rays and neutrons. Triple coincidences (α-γ-γ) are measured as a function of neutron flight time up to 90 ns after fission, where the α-particle arises from the DT reaction. A sudden increase in the triple coincidence rate at the location of the material is used to localize and detect fission in the interrogated target. Comparisons are made with experiment runs where lead, tungsten, and iron were used as target materials. The triple coincidence response profile from depleted uranium is noted to be different to those observed from the other target materials. The response from interrogation targets composed of fissile material is anticipated to be even more unique than that observed from depleted uranium

  7. Maruhn-Greiner Maximum of Uranium Fission for Confirmation of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions LENR via a Compound Nucleus with Double Magic Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, H.; Miley, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    One of the most convincing facts about LENR due to deuterons of very high concentration in host metals as palladium is the measurement of the large scale minimum of the reaction probability depending on the nucleon number A of generated elements at A = 153 where a local maximum was measured. This is similar to the fission of uranium at A = 119 where the local maximum follows from the Maruhn-Greiner theory if the splitting nuclei are excited to about MeV energy. The LENR generated elements can be documented any time after the reaction by SIMS or K-shell X-ray excitation to show the very unique distribution with the local maximum. An explanation is based on the strong Debye screening of the Maxwellian deuterons within the degenerate rigid electron background especially within the swimming electron layer at the metal surface or at interfaces. The deuterons behave like neutrals at distances of about 2 picometers. They may form clusters due to soft attraction in the range above thermal energy. Clusters of 10 pm diameter may react over long time probabilities (megaseconds) with Pd nuclei leading to a double magic number compound nucleus which splits like in fission to the A = 153 element distribution.

  8. Barium 139 as Fission Indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, E.

    1943-07-01

    This report is based on a measurement performed at the Cavendish Laboratory (Cambridge) by E. Broda in December 1943 where a technique has been worked out for measuring the fission density in a uranium containing medium in relative units by determining the amount of a suitable fission product formed. Generally a given fission product will be formed in natural uranium by slow neutron fission of U235 or by fast neutron fission of either U235 or U238. It is intended to translate the relative units into absolute units by comparison of the Ba yield with the indication of UF6 fission chamber in the same medium. This has to be done separately for fast and slow neutron fission as the yields may be different. Another application of the technique developed is the measurement of thermal neutron density in an uraniferous medium without using a detector subject to variations of sensitivity according to the properties of the medium. (nowak)

  9. Experimental study of the thermal fission of uranium 235 in the region of symmetrical masses; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la fission thermique de l'uranium 235 dans la region des masses symetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribrag, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    Energy correlation experiments with fission fragments are strongly perturbed, in the symmetric region, by the detection of spurious events caused by the apparatus. We show that the measurement of an additional parameter, namely the difference in time-of-flight between the fragments, enables us to eliminate these difficulties. In this work we show also an original method of calibration of the time-of-flight set-up. For thermal fission of {sup 235}U, values of mass yields in the symmetric region are found to agree quantitatively with radiochemical values. Moreover, the average total kinetic energy distribution as a function of the pre-neutron emission masses of the fragments has been calculated. This curve presents in the symmetric region a large dip, the value of which takes on the value 21.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV. This value is smaller than previously published results. (author) [French] Les mesures correlees des energies cinetiques des fragments de fission sont fortement perturbees, dans la region symetrique, par la detection d'evenements aberrants d'origine instrumentale. Nous montrons que la mesure d'un parametre supplementaire, a savoir, la difference des temps de vol des deux fragments, nous permet d'eliminer ces difficultes. Dans ce travail, nous indiquons egalement une methode originale de calibration du dispositif de mesure des temps de vol. Dans le cas de la fission thermique de {sup 235}U, nous avons trouve, dans la region symetrique, une courbe de rendement des masses, en accord quantitatif avec les donnees radiochimiques. De plus, nous avons calcule la distribution de l'energie cinetique totale moyenne en fonction de la masse des fragments, avant emission neutronique. Cette courbe presente, dans la region symetrique, un creux important, dont la valeur atteint 21,2 {+-} 0,8 MeV. Cette valeur est inferieure aux resultats precedemment publies. (auteur)

  10. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  11. Heat treatments of irradiated uranium oxide in a pressurised water reactor (P.W.R.): swelling and fission gas release; Traitements thermiques de l`oxyde d`uranium irradie dans un reacteur a eau pressurisee (R.E.P.): gonflement et relachement des gaz de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharie, I

    1997-03-27

    In order to keep pressurised water reactors at a top level of safety, it is necessary to understand the chemical and mechanical interaction between the cladding and the fuel pellet due to a temperature increase during a rapid change in reactor. In this process, the swelling of uranium oxide plays an important role. It comes from a bubble precipitation of fission gases which are released when they are in contact with the outside. Therefore, the aim of this thesis consists in acquiring a better understanding of the mechanisms which come into play. Uranium oxide samples, from a two cycles irradiated fuel, first have been thermal treated between 1000 deg C and 1700 deg C for 5 minutes to ten hours. The gas release amount related to time has been measured for each treatment. The comparison of the experimental results with a numerical model has proved satisfactory: it seems that the gases release, after the formation of intergranular tunnels, is controlled by the diffusion phenomena. Afterwards, the swelling was measured on the samples. The microscopic examination shows that the bubbles are located in the grain boundaries and have a lenticular shape. The swelling can be explained by the bubbles coalescence and a model was developed based on this observation. An equation allows to calculate the intergranular swelling in function of time and temperature. The study gives the opportunity to predict the fission gases behaviour during a fuel temperature increase. (author) 56 refs.

  12. Reducing uranium and thorium level in Zircon: effect of heat treatment on rate of leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2002-01-01

    Considerable amount of uranium and thorium are found in Malaysian zircon and the level is much higher than the minimum value adopted by many importing countries. Selective leaching had been applied as an important technique to reduce these elements. An initial study was carried out using hydrochloric acid leaching system but the result was not favourable. The rate of uranium and thorium leached can be further improved by introducing a heat pretreatment process prior to leaching (Author)

  13. A review of the rates of reaction of unirradiated uranium in gaseous atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, R.J.

    1989-10-01

    The review collates available quantitative rate data for the reaction of unirradiated uranium in dry and moist air, steam and carbon dioxide based atmospheres at temperatures ranging from room temperature to above the melting point of uranium. Reactions in nitrogen and carbon monoxide are also considered. The aim of the review is to provide a compilation of base data for the hazard analysis of fault conditions relating to Magnox fuel. (author)

  14. Experiments to determine the rate of beta energy release following fission of Pu239 andU235 in a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, M.F.; Taylor, W.H.; Sweet, D.W.; March, M.R.

    1979-02-01

    Measurements have been made of the rate of beta energy release from Pu239 and U235 fission fragments over a period of 107 seconds following a 105 second irradiation in the zero-power fast reactor Zebra. Results are compared with predictions using the UKFPDD-1 decay data file and two different sets of fission product yield data. (author)

  15. Coupled reaction-diffusion equations to model the fission gas release in the irradiation of the uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyano, Edgardo A.; Scarpettini, Alberto F.

    2003-01-01

    A semi linear model of weakly coupled parabolic p.d.e. with reaction-diffusion is investigated. The system describes fission gas transfer from grain interior of UO 2 to grain boundaries. The problem is studied in a bounded domain. Using the upper-lower solutions method, two monotone sequences for the finite differences equations are constructed. Reasons are mentioned that allow to affirm that in the proposed functional sector the algorithm converges to the unique solution of the differential system. (author)

  16. Rate theory scenarios study on fission gas behavior of U 3 Si 2 under LOCA conditions in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinbin; Gamble, Kyle A.; Andersson, David; Mei, Zhi-Gang; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2018-01-01

    Fission gas behavior of U3Si2 under various loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions in light water reactors (LWRs) was simulated using rate theory. A rate theory model for U3Si2 that covers both steady-state operation and power transients was developed for the GRASS-SST code based on existing research reactor/ion irradiation experimental data and theoretical predictions of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The steady-state and LOCA condition parameters were either directly provided or inspired by BISON simulations. Due to the absence of in-pile experiment data for U3Si2's fuel performance under LWR conditions at this stage of accident tolerant fuel (ATF) development, a variety of LOCA scenarios were taken into consideration to comprehensively and conservatively evaluate the fission gas behavior of U3Si2 during a LOCA.

  17. Assessment of pin-by-pin fission rate distribution within MOX/UO{sub 2} fuel assembly using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Heba Kareem; Amin, Esmat [Nuclear and Radiological Regulation Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the present paper is to assess the calculations of pin-by-pin group integrated fission rates within MOX/UO{sub 2} Fuel assemblies using the Monte Carlo code MCNP2.7c with two sets of the available latest nuclear data libraries used for calculating MOX-fueled systems. The data that are used in this paper are based on the benchmark by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The k{sub ∞} and absorption/fission reaction rates per isotope, k{sub eff} and pin-by-pin group integrated fission rates on 1/8 fraction of the geometry are determined. To assess the overall pin-by-pin fission rate distribution, the collective per cent error measures were investigated. The results of AVG, MRE and RMS error measures were less than 1 % error. The present results are compared with other participants using other Monte Carlo codes and with CEA results that were taken in the benchmark as reference. The results with ENDF/B-VI.6 are close to the results received by MVP (JENDL3.2) and SCALE 4.2 (JEF2.2). The results with ENDF/BVII.1 give higher values of k{sub ∞} reflecting the changes in the newer evaluations. In almost all results presented here, the MCNP calculated results with ENDF/B VII.1 should be considered more than those obtained by using other Monte Carlo codes and nuclear data libraries. The present calculations may be consider a reference for evaluating the numerical schemes in production code systems, as well as the global performance including cross-section data reduction methods as the calculations used continuous energy and no geometrical approximations.

  18. Irradiated uranium reprocessing, Final report I-VI, Part VI - Separation of uranium, plutonium and fission products from HNO{sub 3} solution on the zirconium phosphate (part I), Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics; Prerada ozracenog urana. Zavrani izvestaj - I-VI, VI Deo - Odvajanje urana, plutonijuma i fisionih produkata iz rastvora HNO{sub 3} na cirkonijum fosfatu (deo I.), Ravnoteza i kinetika adsorpcije

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I; Ruvarac, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Odeljenje za eksploataciju nuklearnog goriva, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Separation of uranium, plutonium and long-lived fission products was investigated on a inorganic ion exchanger. Zirconium phospate was chosen for this purpose because its ion exchanger properties were well known. This report deals with the study of equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption.

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  1. Reevaluation of the average prompt neutron emission multiplicity (nubar) values from fission of uranium and transuranium nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.; Zucker, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    In response to a need of the safeguards community, we have begun an evaluation effort to upgrade the recommended values of the prompt neutron emission multiplicity distribution, P/sub nu/ and its average value, nubar. This paper will report on progress achieved thus far. The evaluation of the uranium, plutonium, americium and curium nuclide's nubar values will be presented. The recommended values will be given and discussed. 61 references

  2. A method for the measurement of fission rates in fast neutron fields using solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.; Vogel, W.

    1984-04-01

    Solid state track detectors (SSTDs) are increasingly used for the registration of radiation in different fields of nuclear physics. Because of their small sizes and masses and the absence of any electronics during exposure SSTDs do not cause distortions in the system to be investigated and are useful for measurements at such places being difficult of access. The elaboration of a method is described for fission rate measurements in fast neutron fields applying SSTDs and different fissionable isotopes which were electrodeposited on stainless steel backings. Experiences of the electrodeposition and results of quality checks are presented. The evaluation of the etched tracks is performed with spark counter technique. The dependence of the counting result on essential influence parameters is discussed. (author)

  3. Fission fragment angular distributions and fission cross section validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, Lou Sai

    2013-01-01

    sphere was surrounded by enriched uranium 235 U so as to approach criticality with fast neutrons. The simulation predicts a multiplication factor k eff in better agreement with the experiment (the deviation of 750 pcm is reduced to 250 pcm) when we replace the ENDF/B- VII.0 evaluation of the 237 Np fission cross section by the n-TOF data. We also explore the hypothesis of deficiencies of the inelastic cross section in 235 U which has been invoked by some authors to explain the deviation of 750 pcm. The large distortion that should be applied to the inelastic cross sections in order to reconcile the critical experiment with its simulation is incompatible with existing measurements. Also we show that the ν-bar of 237 Np can hardly be incriminated because of the high accuracy of the existing data. Fission rate ratios or averaged fission cross sections measured in several fast neutron fields seem to give contradictory results on the validation of the 237 Np cross section but at least one of the benchmark experiments, where the active deposits have been well calibrated for the number of atoms, favors the n-TOF data set. These outcomes support the hypothesis of a higher fission cross section of 237 Np. (author)

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  6. Occupational safety data and casualty rates for the uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Hoy, H.C.

    1981-10-01

    Occupational casualty (injuries, illnesses, fatalities, and lost workdays) and production data are presented and used to calculate occupational casualty incidence rates for technologies that make up the uranium fuel cycle, including: mining, milling, conversion, and enrichment of uranium; fabrication of reactor fuel; transportation of uranium and fuel elements; generation of electric power; and transmission of electric power. Each technology is treated in a separate chapter. All data sources are referenced. All steps used to calculate normalized occupational casualty incidence rates from the data are presented. Rates given include fatalities, serious cases, and lost workdays per 100 man-years worked, per 10 12 Btu of energy output, and per other appropriate units of output

  7. Fission fragment driven neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lowell G.; Young, Robert C.; Brugger, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    Fissionable uranium formed into a foil is bombarded with thermal neutrons in the presence of deuterium-tritium gas. The resulting fission fragments impart energy to accelerate deuterium and tritium particles which in turn provide approximately 14 MeV neutrons by the reactions t(d,n).sup.4 He and d(t,n).sup.4 He.

  8. Oklo natural reactor. Study of uranium and rare earths migration on a core drilled through a reaction zone. Application to determination of the date of the nuclear reaction by measurement of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffenach, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Isotopic and chemical analysis of uranium and five rare earths: neodymium, samarium, europium, gadolinium and dysprosium were effected on fourteen samples taken in the same core drilled through a reaction zone of the Oklo uranium deposit. This study points out the general stability of uranium and fission rare earths; spatial distributions of these elements are quite analogous. Migrations have affected about 5% only of fission neodymium in the core of the reaction zone; corresponding values for samarium and gadolinium are slightly higher. These migration phenomena have carried rare earths to no more than 80 cm out of the core. By study of the europium it is shown that nuclear reactions have stayed in the ground since the time of reactions. On the other hand it is shown by analysis of the dysprosium that rare earths have not undergone an important movement. This study allow also the datation of nuclear reactions from the measurement of the quantity of fission neodymium produced. A value of 1.98x10 9 years is obtained slightly higher than the value obtained by geochronology [fr

  9. Determining the isotopic compositions of uranium and fission products in radioactive environmental microsamples using laser ablation ICP-MS with multiple ion counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Division of Analytical Chemistry-VIRIS Laboratory, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15

    This paper presents the application of a multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) - a Nu Plasma HR - equipped with three ion-counting multipliers and coupled to a laser ablation system (LA) for the rapid and sensitive determination of the {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U, {sup 145}Nd/{sup 143}Nd, {sup 146}Nd/{sup 143}Nd, {sup 101}Ru/({sup 99}Ru+{sup 99}Tc) and {sup 102}Ru/({sup 99}Ru+{sup 99}Tc) isotope ratios in microsamples collected in the vicinity of Chernobyl. Microsamples with dimensions ranging from a hundred {mu}m to about 1 mm and with surface alpha activities of 3-38 mBq were first identified using nuclear track radiography. U, Nd and Ru isotope systems were then measured sequentially for the same microsample by LA-MC-ICP-MS. The application of a zoom ion optic for aligning the ion beams into the ion counters allows fast switching between different isotope systems, which enables all of the abovementioned isotope ratios to be measured for the same microsample within a total analysis time of 15-20 min (excluding MC-ICP-MS optimization and calibration). The {sup 101}Ru/({sup 99}Ru+{sup 99}Tc) and {sup 102}Ru/({sup 99}Ru+{sup 99}Tc) isotope ratios were measured for four microsamples and were found to be significantly lower than the natural ratios, indicating that the microsamples were contaminated with the corresponding fission products (Ru and Tc). A slight depletion in {sup 146}Nd of about 3-5% was observed in the contaminated samples, but the Nd isotopic ratios measured in the contaminated samples coincided with natural isotopic composition within the measurement uncertainty, as most of the Nd in the analyzed samples originates from the natural soil load of this element. The {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U and {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratios were the most sensitive indicators of irradiated uranium. The present work yielded a significant variation in uranium isotope ratios in microsamples, in contrast with previously

  10. Irradiated uranium reprocessing; Prerada ozracenog urana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorijaza visoku aktivnost, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products.

  11. Influence of the cosmic-ray induced fission tracks on the fission track of extraterrestric minerals via the 238U spontaneous fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damm, G.; Thiel, K.

    1977-01-01

    The age determined by counting fission tracks of lunar and meteorite materials is obviously falsified by additional fission track parts not to be accounted for by the spontaneous fission of uranium 238. For this p and n induced fissions of U, Th and other hreavy elements through the cosmic radiation come into consideration. In order to determine the possible part of such interference factors, a simulation experiment at the proton synchrocycloton (CERN, Geneva) has been carried out and independently of this, the production rates for the p and n induced U, Th, Bi, Pb and Au in the surface-near regolith layers of the moon were calculated. It could be seen that the irradiation age as well as the spacial distribution of the heavy metals in the samples to be dated must be considered. (RB) [de

  12. Fractal characters and hurst exponent of radon exhalation rate from uranium Tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Hanqiao; Tan Kaixuan; Li Chunguang; Lv Junwen; Liu Dong

    2010-01-01

    The uranium tailings radon exhalation is an important environmental problem. The change of the radon exhalation rate of uranium tailings with the time through laboratory experiments is measured, and the results show that the radon exhalation rate of the tailings change obviously with time in non-periodic oscillations. Applying fractal analysis to the radon exhalation rate time-series data by R/S method, the Hurst exponent of the entire time series data is 0.83, the fractal dimension is 1.17. Mobile Hurst exponent is between 0.5 and 0.8 in most cases. The Hurst exponent of the experiments in the later part are below 0.5. The exhalation rate of uranium tailings radon does not meet the long-term trend of random walk theory, the radon exhalation rate has long-term memory, but the short-term memory is not distinct. The radon exhalation from uranium tailings is a deterministic chaotic dynamics. (authors)

  13. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors - Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnden, A.M.C.

    1995-09-01

    The results of an investigation into the release of fission products from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium alloy core are detailed in Volume 1. This data report (Volume 2) contains plots of the activity concentrations of the fission products observed in the reactor container at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and the Kanata Isotope Production Facility. Release rates from the reactor container water to the gas headspace are also included. (author)

  14. Etching of fission tracks in silicate glasses by means of deionized water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.; Petit, J.C.

    1985-09-01

    Fission tracks have been revealed in silicate glasses with deionized water. Their sharp conical shape implies a marked enhancement of the dissolution rate along their core and consequently a cone angle and an etching efficiency (close to 100%) much higher than previously reported for glasses. We show that etching of fission tracks in natural environments has generally very limited geochemical implications except in specific cases such as that found in the Oklo uranium ores

  15. Quantification of Kinetic Rate Law Parameters of Uranium Release from Sodium Autunite as a Function of Aqueous Bicarbonate Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudavalli, Ravi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-09-05

    ABSTRACT: Hydrogen carbonate is one of the most significant components within the uranium geochemical cycle. In aqueous solutions, hydrogen carbonate forms strong complexes with uranium. As such, aqueous bicarbonate may significantly increase the rate of uranium release from uranium minerals. Quantifying the relationship of aqueous hydrogen carbonate solutions to the rate of uranium release during dissolution is critical to understanding the long-term fate of uranium within the environment. Single-pass flow-through (SPTF) experiments were conducted to estimate the rate of uranium release from Na meta-autunite as a function of bicarbonate solutions (0.0005-0.003 M) under the pH range of 6-11 and temperatures of 5-60oC. Consistent with the results of previous investigation, the rate of uranium release from sodium autunite exhibited minimal dependency on temperature; but were strongly dependent on pH and increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions. Most notably at pH 7, the rate of uranium release exhibited 370 fold increases relative to the rate of uranium release in the absence of bicarbonate. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions on the release of uranium was significantly less under higher pH conditions. It is postulated that at high pH values, surface sites are saturated with carbonate, thus the addition of more bicarbonate would have less effect on uranium release. Results indicate the activation energies were unaffected by temperature and bicarbonate concentration variations, but were strongly dependent on pH conditions. As pH increased from 6 to 11, activation energy values were observed to decrease from 29.94 kJ mol-1 to 13.07 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energies suggest a surface controlled dissolution mechanism.

  16. Effects of low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the lymphocyte subpopulations of peripheral blood in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Yifang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on lymphocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood of rats. Methods: Ninety-six rats were randomly divided into control group and irradiated group exposed to low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf,0.35 mGy/h) for 20.5 h every day. At days 14,28,42,56 and 70 d after irradiation and 35 d after stopping irradiation, After 8 rats of each group were killed, WBC and lymphocyte subpopulations of CD4 + CD3 + , CD8 + CD3 + and CD45RA + /CD161α + in peripheral blood were estimated respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, WBC was reduced significantly at dose of 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy (P + CD3 - was evidently higher compared with control group at doses of 0.1,0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation (P + CD3 - was obviously higher compared with control group at dose of 0.2 and 0.3 Gy (P + CD3 + at dose of 0.1 Gy (P + CD3 + at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 Gy (P + CD45RA - ) was increased significantly at doses of 0.2-0.3 Gy, and peripheral blood B cells(CD161α - CD45RA + ) was reduced remarkably at doses of 0.1-0.5 Gy and 35 d after stopping irradiation compared with the control group. Conclusions: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could make TCR (T-cell-receptor) mutant, therefore, WBC, B cells in peripheral blood significantly reduced and NK cells increased. These changes may could not recover at 35 d after Stopping irradiation. (authors)

  17. Effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Dingwen; Lei Chengxiang; Shen Xianrong; Ma Li; Yang Xufang; Peng Wulin; Dai Shourong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of long-term, low dose rate fission neutron irradiation on the peripheral hematological cells in rats. Methods: 96 rats were randomly divided into the control group and the irradiation group with low dose rate fission neutron ( 252 Cf, 0.35 mGy/h) irradiation 20.5 h every day. 8 rats of each group were killed at 14 d, 28 d, 42d, 56d, 70d after irradiation and 35d after the irradiation, and their peripheral hematological cells were tested respectively. Results: Compared with the control group, peripheral blood WBC was reduced significantly at the dose of 0.3Gy and 0.4Gy (P < 0.05), and was reduced remarkably at dose of 0.5Gy (P<0.01) and 35d after stopping irradiation(P<0.01). At dose of 0.2Gy, Peripheral blood RBC was abnormally higher comparing with the control group (P<0.01), accompanying with higher HCT and HGB, which suggests condensed blood. At the other point, RBC tend to become lower, but only at dose 0.5Gy, and the difference is significant comparing with control group(P <0.05). At dose of 0.3Gy, 0.4Gy and 0.5Gy, HCT were significantly lower comparing with control group. Comparing with control group, MCV was higher at 35d after stopping irradiation, and PLT was significantly lower in dose of 0.2Gy. Conclusion: Long-term irradiation with low dose rate fission neutron could significantly reduce peripheral blood WBC, with less effects on RBC and PLT. The reduced WBC could not recover at 35d after stopping irradiation. (authors)

  18. Contribution to the study of the thermal fission process for uranium 235 (1964); Contribution a l'etude du processus de la fission thermique de l'uranium 235 (1964)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chahrtache, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-12-15

    This report deals with the study of the distribution of the masses of the fragments produced by the disintegration of the U-236 nucleus, formed when a U-235 nucleus captures a thermal neutron. The experimental method chosen consists in the simultaneous measurement using p-n silicon junction detectors of the energies of the two fragments emitted in coincidence. This measurement is first made by a conditioned analysis of the energy of one of the fragments and then by a two dimensional analysis of the energies of the two fragments. Systematic results, are obtained concerning the distribution of the masses for different values of the total kinetic energy. The five structures appearing both for the mass distributions and for the energies of the fragments are studied and discussed. Generally speaking, our results are in agreement with those obtained by the time-of-flight method. (author) [French] Le present rapport a pour objet t'etude de la distribution des masses des fragments emis lors de la fission du noyau U-236, forme par capture d'un neutron thermique par un noyau d'U-235. La methode experimentale choisie consiste en la mesure simultanee - a l'aide de detecteurs a jonction p-n au silicium des energies des deux fragments emis en coincidence. Cette mesure est d'abord effectuee par analyse conditionnee de l'energie de l'un des fragments puis par analyse bidimensionnelle des energies des deux fragments. Des resultats systematiques sont obtenus sur les distributions des masses pour differentes valeurs de l'energie cinetique totale. Les 'structures fines' apparaissant tant sur les distributions des masses que sur celles des energies des fragments sont egalement etudiees et discutees. D'une facon generale, nos resultats sont en accord avec ceux obtenus par la methode du temps de vol. (auteur)

  19. Neutronic analysis for the fission Mo99 production by irradiation of leu targets in TRIGA 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulugeac, S. D.; Mladin, M.; Budriman, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum production can be a solution for the future in the utilization of the Romanian TRIGA, taking into account the international market supply needs. Generally, two different techniques are available for Mo 99 production for use in medical Tc 99 generation.The first one is based on neutron irradiation of molybdenum targets of natural isotopic composition or enriched in Mo 98 . In a second process, Mo 99 is obtained as a result of the neutron induced fission of U 235 according to U 235 (n,f) Mo 99 . The objectives of the paper are related to Mo 99 production as a result of fission. Neutron physics parameters are determined and presented, such as: thermal flux axial distribution for the critical reactor at 10 MW inside the irradiation location; reactivity introduced by three Uranium foil containers; neutron fluxes and fission rates in the Uranium foils; released and deposited power in the Uranium foils; Mo 99 activity in the Uranium foils. (authors)

  20. Nonlinear estimation of weathering rate parameters for uranium in surface soil near a nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killough, G.G.; Rope, S.K.; Shleien, B.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1999-01-01

    A dynamic mass-balance model has been calibrated by a nonlinear parameter estimation method, using time-series measurements of uranium in surface soil near the former Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near Fernald, Ohio, USA. The time-series data, taken at six locations near the site boundary since 1971, show a statistically significant downtrend of above-background uranium concentration in surface soil for all six locations. The dynamic model is based on first-order kinetics in a surface-soil compartment 10 cm in depth. Median estimates of weathering rate coefficients for insoluble uranium in this soil compartment range from about 0.065-0.14 year -1 , corresponding to mean transit times of about 7-15 years, depending on the location sampled. The model, calibrated by methods similar to those discussed in this paper, has been used to simulate surface soil kinetics of uranium for a dose reconstruction study. It was also applied, along with other data, to make confirmatory estimates of airborne releases of uranium from the FMPC between 1951 and 1988. Two soil-column models (one diffusive and one advective, the latter similar to a catenary first-order kinetic box model) were calibrated to profile data taken at one of the six locations in 1976. The temporal predictions of the advective model approximate the trend of the time series data for that location. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  1. Fission product release from fuel of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.; Marks, P.; Klisinska, M.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains a review of theoretical models and experimental works of gaseous and volatile fission products from uranium dioxide fuel. The experimental results of activity release at low burnup and the model of fission gas behaviour at initial stage of fuel operational cycle are presented. Empirical models as well as measured results of transient fission products release rate in the temperature up to UO 2 melting point, with consideration of their chemical reactions with fuel and cladding, are collected. The theoretical and experimental data were used for calculations of gaseous and volatile fission products release, especially iodine and caesium, to the gas volume of WWER-1000 and WWER-440 type fuel rods at low and high burnup and their further release from defected rods at the assumed loss-of-coolant accident. (author)

  2. Identification of Fissionable Materials Using the Tagged Neutron Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keegan, R.P.; Hurley, J.P.; Tinsley, J.R.; Trainham, R.

    2009-01-01

    This summary describes experiments to detect and identify fissionable materials using the tagged neutron technique. The objective of this work is to enhance homeland security capability to find fissionable material that may be smuggled inside shipping boxes, containers, or vehicles. The technique distinguishes depleted uranium from lead, steel, and tungsten. Future work involves optimizing the technique to increase the count rate by many orders of magnitude and to build in the additional capability to image hidden fissionable materials. The tagged neutron approach is very different to other techniques based on neutron die-away or photo-fission. This work builds on the development of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique at the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL). Similar investigations have been performed by teams at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia, and by the EURITRACK collaboration in the European Union

  3. Solid solubility of fission product and other transition elements in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1979-01-01

    Solubility studies were made in some MX-Me systems (M:U or Pu; X: C or N; Me: fission product or other transition element) by X-ray diffraction and partly by microprobe determination of solute concentrations. Up to 23 m/o ZrC and 17 m/o TaC dissolved in the PuC phases of sintered PuC-ZrC and PuC-TaC samples; the lattice parameter/concentration relationships were derived. The relative lattice parameter difference (RLPD) between MXy and MeXy (y: ratio X/(M+Me)) was used as a solubility criterion. NaCl type monocarbides with RLPD's from -10.2% to +7.8% are completely miscible with UC and PuC. NaCl type mononitrides with RLPD's from -7.5% to 8.5% are completely miscible with UN and PuN. The solubility in the sesquicarbides increases with decreasing RLPD and becomes complete in Pu 2 C 3 at RLPD =+4%, and in U 2 C 3 at RLPD ca. +1.5%. Solubilities are predicted on the basis of these rules for the cases where no experimental results are available. A general review on the experimental and predicted solubilities is given. (orig.) [de

  4. Kinetics of the chain uranium decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.; Khariton, Yu.B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of chain reaction in uranium mass, when passing through the mass critical value, is studied. It is shown that thermal expanson is a powerful regulating factor, making the limit passing quite safe. The case of convergence of two uranium masses of precritical dimensions is considered in particular. The critical mass value is assessed and it is shown that its gradual increase above the critical value results in the reaction vibrational regime with the period inversely proportional to the square root of uranium supply rate. The role of delaying neutrons in the fission chain reaction development is pointed out

  5. Research of the Mass Spectra of the Fission Products and Yields of (n, gamma) and (n, 2n) Reactions in a Model Subcritical Uranium Blanket of the Electronuclear System "Energy Plus Transmutation" on Proton Beam of the Dubna Synchrophasotron at 1.5 Ge

    CERN Document Server

    Chultem, D; Krivopustov, M I; Gerbish, S; Tumendemberel, B; Pavlyuk, A B; Zaveryukha, O S

    2002-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the research of the spatial distributions of the yields of (n, f), (n, gamma) and (n, 2n) reactions in a two-section model of the uranium blanket electronuclear installation constructed at the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR (Dubna) for experiments according to the program "Research of physical aspects of the electronuclear method of energy production and of radioactive waste transmutation in atomic power-engineering on beams of the synchrophasotron and nuclotron" - project "Energy plus Transmutation". The mass spectrum of the fission products and yields of above reactions in uranium activation detectors placed on the radii of the so-called detector plates is determined. The experimental results testify that the fission of nuclei in the uranium blanket is made by fast neutrons. This conclusion coincides with the result obtained with track integrators of uranium fission.

  6. Investigation of aeration rate on Uranium bio leaching in internal airlift bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolala, M. R.; Safdari, S. J.; Haghighi Asl, A.; Rashidi, A.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium is leached from the uranium ore of the second anomaly of Saghand by the Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans bacteria in an internal airlift bio-reactor. This study has been made to find the effect of aeration rate as well as its optimal value. The experiments have been carried out at 4 aeration rates to find the best recovery results in the least possible time duration. The results showed that the most percentage of the uranium recovery is in the superficial gas velocity of 0.010 m/s. The recovery at this aeration rate has an efficiency of more than 95 p ercent i n 11 days. Also, the best range for aeration study in the airlift bio-reactor is calculated with a minimum value of 0.0065 m/s which is the critical value of the uranium particle suspension as well as the maximum value of 0.015 m/s. The stress on the bacteria increases the recovery time process in velocities of more than 0.015 m/s.

  7. Fission meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA

    2012-04-10

    A neutron detector system for discriminating fissile material from non-fissile material wherein a digital data acquisition unit collects data at high rate, and in real-time processes large volumes of data directly into information that a first responder can use to discriminate materials. The system comprises counting neutrons from the unknown source and detecting excess grouped neutrons to identify fission in the unknown source.

  8. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  9. A Model for High-Strain-Rate Deformation of Uranium-Niobium Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F.L.Addessio; Q.H.Zuo; T.A.Mason; L.C.Brinson

    2003-05-01

    A thermodynamic approach is used to develop a framework for modeling uranium-niobium alloys under the conditions of high strain rate. Using this framework, a three-dimensional phenomenological model, which includes nonlinear elasticity (equation of state), phase transformation, crystal reorientation, rate-dependent plasticity, and porosity growth is presented. An implicit numerical technique is used to solve the evolution equations for the material state. Comparisons are made between the model and data for low-strain-rate loading and unloading as well as for heating and cooling experiments. Comparisons of the model and data also are made for low- and high-strain-rate uniaxial stress and uniaxial strain experiments. A uranium-6 weight percent niobium alloy is used in the comparisons of model and experiment.

  10. Intelligent uranium fission converter for neutron production on the periphery of the nuclear reactor core (MARIA reactor in Swierk - Poland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzinski, M.A.; Wielgosz, M. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja Soltana 7, 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    The multipurpose, high flux research reactor MARIA in Otwock - Swierk is an open-pool type, water and beryllium moderated and graphite reflected. There are two not occupied experimental H1 and H2 horizontal channels with complex of empty rooms beside them. Making use of these two channels is not in conflict with other research or commercial employing channels. They can work simultaneously, moreover commercial channels covers the cost of reactor working. Such conditions give beneficial possibility of creating epithermal neutron stand for researches in various field at the horizontal channel H2 of MARIA reactor (co-organization of research at H1 channel is additionally planned). At the front of experimental channels the neutron flux is strongly thermalized - neutrons with energies above 0.625 eV constitute only ∼2% of the total flux. This thermalized neutron flux will be used to achieve high flux of epithermal neutrons at the level of 2x10{sup 9} n cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} by uranium neutron converter (fast neutron production - conversion of reactor core thermal neutrons to fast neutrons - and then filtering, moderating and finally cutting of unwanted gamma radiation). The intelligent converter will be placed in the reactor pool, near the front of the H2 channel. It will replace one graphite block at the periphery of MARIA graphite reflector. The converter will consist of 20 fuel elements - low enriched uranium plates. A fuel plate will be a part which will measure 110 mm wide by 380 mm long and will consist of a thin layer of uranium sealed between two aluminium plates. These plates, once assembled, form the fuel element used in converter. The plates will be positioned vertically. There are several important requirements which should be taken into account at the converter design stage: -maximum efficiency of the converter for neutrons conversion, -cooling of the converter need to be integrated with the cooling circuit of the reactor pool and if needed equipped with

  11. Comparison of uranium dissolution rates from spent fuel and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, S.A.; Gray, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    Two similar sets of dissolution experiments, resulting from a statistical experimental design were performed in order to examine systematically the effects of temperature (25--75 degree C), dissolved oxygen (0.002-0.2 atm overpressure), pH (8--10) and carbonate concentrations (2--200 x 10 -4 molar) on aqueous dissolution of UO 2 and spent fuel. The average dissolution rate was 8.6 mg/m 2 ·day for UO 2 and 3.1 mg/m 2 ·day for spent fuel. This is considered to be an insignificant difference; thus, unirradiated UO 2 and irradiated spent fuel dissolved at about the same rate. Moreover, regression analyses indicated that the dissolution rates of UO 2 and spent fuel responded similarly to changes in pH, temperature, and carbonate concentration. However, the two materials responded very differently to dissolved oxygen concentration. Approximately half-order reaction rates with respect to oxygen concentration were found for UO 2 at all conditions tested. At room temperature, spent fuel dissolution (reaction) rates were nearly independent of oxygen concentration. At 75 degree C, reaction orders of 0.35 and 0.73 were observed for spent fuel, and there was some indication that the reaction order with respect to oxygen concentration might be dependent on pH and/or carbonate concentration as well as on temperature

  12. Standard Test Method for Measuring Reaction Rates by Radioactivation of Uranium-238

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for measuring reaction rates by assaying a fission product (F.P.) from the fission reaction 238U(n,f)F.P. 1.2 The reaction is useful for measuring neutrons with energies from approximately 1.5 to 7 MeV and for irradiation times up to 30 to 40 years. 1.3 Equivalent fission neutron fluence rates as defined in Practice E 261 can be determined. 1.4 Detailed procedures for other fast-neutron detectors are referenced in Practice E 261. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other unites of measurement are included in this standard. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Pilot experiments with relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments thermalized in a cryogenic gas-filled stopping cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Moritz Pascal

    2015-07-01

    High precision experiments and decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei are of great interest for nuclear structure and nuclear astro-physics. They allow for studies of the nuclear structure far from stability, test of fundamental interactions and symmetries and give important input for the understanding of the nuclear synthesis in the universe. In the context of this work a second generation stopping cell for the low energy branch of the Super-FRS was commissioned at the FRS at GSI and significant improvements were made to the device. The prototype stopping cell is designed as a cryogenic stopping cell (CSC), featuring enhanced cleanliness and high area density. The CSC was brought into full operation and its performance characteristics were investigated including the maximal area density, extraction times, cleanliness and extraction efficiencies. In three commissioning experiments at the current GSI FRS facility in 2011, 2012 and 2014 up to 22 isotopes from 14 elements produced by in-flight projectile fragmentation and fission of {sup 238}U could be thermalized and extracted with high efficiency. For the first time projectile and fission fragmentation produced at 1000 MeV/u could be thermalized in a stopping cell and provided as a low-energy beam of high brilliance for high precision experiments. The technical improvements of the CSC, such as an improved RF carpet, new cryocooler-based cooling system, a monitoring system of the cleanliness and the high density operation, made it possible to thermalize heavy {sup 238}U projectile fragments with total efficiencies of about 20% in the 2014 experiment. In addition the improvements lead to an increase in the stability and reliability of the CSC and the performance of the CSC during online experiments at the FRS Ion Catcher showed that the utilized techniques are ready for the final CSC for the low-energy branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR. The CSC was operated with an area density of up to 6.3 mg/cm{sup 2} helium during

  14. Pilot experiments with relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments thermalized in a cryogenic gas-filled stopping cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Moritz Pascal

    2015-01-01

    High precision experiments and decay spectroscopy of exotic nuclei are of great interest for nuclear structure and nuclear astro-physics. They allow for studies of the nuclear structure far from stability, test of fundamental interactions and symmetries and give important input for the understanding of the nuclear synthesis in the universe. In the context of this work a second generation stopping cell for the low energy branch of the Super-FRS was commissioned at the FRS at GSI and significant improvements were made to the device. The prototype stopping cell is designed as a cryogenic stopping cell (CSC), featuring enhanced cleanliness and high area density. The CSC was brought into full operation and its performance characteristics were investigated including the maximal area density, extraction times, cleanliness and extraction efficiencies. In three commissioning experiments at the current GSI FRS facility in 2011, 2012 and 2014 up to 22 isotopes from 14 elements produced by in-flight projectile fragmentation and fission of "2"3"8U could be thermalized and extracted with high efficiency. For the first time projectile and fission fragmentation produced at 1000 MeV/u could be thermalized in a stopping cell and provided as a low-energy beam of high brilliance for high precision experiments. The technical improvements of the CSC, such as an improved RF carpet, new cryocooler-based cooling system, a monitoring system of the cleanliness and the high density operation, made it possible to thermalize heavy "2"3"8U projectile fragments with total efficiencies of about 20% in the 2014 experiment. In addition the improvements lead to an increase in the stability and reliability of the CSC and the performance of the CSC during online experiments at the FRS Ion Catcher showed that the utilized techniques are ready for the final CSC for the low-energy branch of the Super-FRS at FAIR. The CSC was operated with an area density of up to 6.3 mg/cm"2 helium during online

  15. Organ burdens and excretion rates of inhaled uranium - computations using ICRP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abani, M.C.; Murthy, K.B.S.; Sunta, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium being a highly toxic material, proper estimation of the body burden is very important. During manufacture of uranium fuel, it is likely to enter the body by inhalation. By the body burden and excretion measurements, one should be able to assess whether the intake is within the safe limits or not. This is possible if one performs theoretical calculations and estimates the amount of uranium which builds up in the body as a function of time. Similarly theoretical estimates in case of excretion have to be made. For this purpose, a computer programme has been developed to find out organ burdens and excretion rates resulting from exposure to a radioactive nuclide. ICRP-30 lung model has been used and cases of single instantaneous inhalation of 1 ALI as well as inhalation at a steady rate of ALI/365 per day have been considered. Using this programme, results for uranium aerosols of classes D, W and Y and sizes 0.2, 1 and 5 microns are generated by ND computers in tabular as well as graphical forms. These will be useful in conjunction with body burden measurements by direct counting or excretion analysis. (author). 7 tabs., 56 figs

  16. Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, G.L.; Ryu, Woo-Seog

    1991-01-01

    Swelling of U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and micro structural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide dispersion fuel. (orig.)

  17. Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.; Ryu, Woo-Seog.

    1989-01-01

    Swelling of U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and microstructural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide disperson fuel. 5 refs., 10 figs

  18. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99 Mo, 95 Zr, 137 Cs, 140 Ba, 141,143 Ce, and 147 Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147 Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ∼5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except

  19. High precision mass measurements of thermalized relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayet San Andres, Samuel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus Liebig Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: FRS Ion Catcher-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, a relativistic beam of {sup 238}U at 1GeV/u was used to produce fission and projectile fragments on a beryllium target. The ions were separated in-flight at the FRS, thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell and transferred to a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) where high precision mass measurements were performed. The masses of several fission and projectile fragments were measured (including short-lived nuclei with half-lives down to 18 ms) and the possibility of tailoring an isomerically clean beam for other experiments was demonstrated. With the demonstrated performance of the MR-TOF-MS and the expected production rates of exotic nuclei far from stability at the next-generation facilities such as FAIR, novel mass measurements of nuclei close to the neutron drip line will be possible and key information for understanding the r-process will be available. The results from the last experiment and an outlook of possible future mass measurements close to the neutron drip line at FAIR with the MR-TOF-MS are presented.

  20. Feasibility of Producing Molybdenum-99 on a Small Scale Using Fission of Low Enriched Uranium or Neutron Activation of Natural Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication documents the work performed within the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Developing Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation. The project allowed participating institutions to receive training and information on aspects necessary for starting production of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) on a small scale, that is, to become national level producers of this medical isotope. Stable production of 99Mo is one of the most pressing issues facing the nuclear community at present, because the medical isotope technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), which decays from 99 Mo, is one of the most widely used radionuclides in diagnostic imaging and treatment around the world. In the past five years, there have been widespread shortages of 99 Mo owing to the limited number of producers, many of which use ageing facilities. To assist in stabilizing the production of 99Mo, and to promote the use of production methods that do not rely on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the IAEA initiated the abovementioned CRP on small scale 99Mo production using low enriched uranium (LEU) fission or neutron activation methods. The intention was to enable participating institutions to gain the knowledge necessary to become national level producers of 99Mo in the event of further global shortages. Some of the institutions that participated in the CRP have continued their work on 99 Mo production, and are enlisting the assistance of other CRP members and the IAEA’s technical cooperation programme to set up a small scale production capability. In total, the CRP was active for six years, and concluded in December 2011. During the CRP, fourteen IAEA Member States took part; four research coordination meetings were held, and four workshops were held on operational aspects of 99 Mo production, LEU target fabrication and waste management. Most participants carried out work related to the entire production process, from target

  1. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide; Etude de la structure electronique des actinides et de leurs dioxydes. Application aux defauts ponctuels et aux gaz de fission dans le dioxyde d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique

    1996-09-28

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author). 256 refs.

  2. Plastic Flow Characteristics of Uranium-Niobium as a Function of Strain Rate and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T. III; Hecker, S.S; Thoma, D.J.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Patterson, R.A.; Dunn, P.S.; Bingert, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    The stress-strain response of uranium-niobium alloys as a function of temperature, strain-rate and stress-state was investigated. The yield and flow stresses of the U-Nb alloys were found to exhibit a pronounced strain rate sensitivity, while the hardening rates were found to be insensitive to strain rate and temperature. The overall stress-strain response of the U-6Nb exhibits a sinusoidal hardening response, which is consistent with multiple deformation modes and is thought to be related to shape-memory behavior

  3. The use of laser diodes for control of uranium vaporization rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagans, K.; Galkowski, J.

    1993-09-01

    Within the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program we have successfully used the laser absorption spectroscopy technique (LAS) to diagnose process physics performance and control vaporization rate. In the LAS technique, a narrow line-width laser is tuned to an absorption line of the species to be measured. The laser light that is propagated through the sample is and, from this data, the density of the species can be calculated. These laser systems have exclusively consisted of expensive, cumbersome, and difficult to maintain argon-ion-pumped ring dye lasers. While the wavelength flexibility of dye lasers is very useful in a laboratory environment, these laser systems are not well suited for the industrial process control system under development for an AVLIS plant. Diode-lasers offer lower system costs, reduced man power requirements, reduced space requirements, higher system availability, and improved operator safety. We report the. successful deployment and test of a prototype laser diode based uranium vapor rate control system. Diode-laser generated LAS data was used to control the uranium vaporization rate in a hands-off mode for greater than 50 hours. With one minor adjustment the system successfully controlled the vaporization rate for greater than 147 hours. We report excellent agreement with ring dye laser diagnostics and uranium weigh-back measurements

  4. Gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of fission rate ratios between fresh and burnt fuel following irradiation in a zero-power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kröhnert, H., E-mail: hanna.kroehnert@ensi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Perret, G.; Murphy, M.F. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-01-11

    The gamma-ray activity from short-lived fission products has been measured in fresh and burnt UO{sub 2} fuel samples after irradiation in a zero-power reactor. For the first time, short-lived gamma-ray activity from fresh and burnt fuel has been compared and fresh-to-burnt fuel fission rate ratios have been derived. For the measurements, well characterized fresh and burnt fuel samples, with burn-ups up to 46 GWd/t, were irradiated in the zero-power research reactor PROTEUS. Fission rate ratios were derived based on the counting of high-energy gamma-rays above 2200 keV, in order to discriminate against the high intrinsic activity of the burnt fuel. This paper presents the measured fresh-to-burnt fuel fission rate ratios based on the {sup 142}La (2542 keV), {sup 89}Rb (2570 keV), {sup 138}Cs (2640 keV) and {sup 95}Y (3576 keV) high-energy gamma-ray lines. Comparisons are made with the results of Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental configuration, carried out using the MCNPX code. The measured fission rate ratios have 1σ uncertainties of 1.7–3.4%. The comparisons with calculated predictions show an agreement within 1–3σ, although there appears to be a slight bias (∼3%).

  5. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables

  6. Effect of cooling rate on achieving thermodynamic equilibrium in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauchy, Romain; Belin, Renaud C.; Robisson, Anne-Charlotte; Hodaj, Fiqiri

    2016-02-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the structural changes occurring in uranium-plutonium mixed oxides U1-yPuyO2-x with y = 0.15; 0.28 and 0.45 during cooling from 1773 K to room-temperature under He + 5% H2 atmosphere. We compare the fastest and slowest cooling rates allowed by our apparatus i.e. 2 K s-1 and 0.005 K s-1, respectively. The promptly cooled samples evidenced a phase separation whereas samples cooled slowly did not due to their complete oxidation in contact with the atmosphere during cooling. Besides the composition of the annealing gas mixture, the cooling rate plays a major role on the control of the Oxygen/Metal ratio (O/M) and then on the crystallographic properties of the U1-yPuyO2-x uranium-plutonium mixed oxides.

  7. Comparison of two lung clearance models based on the dissolution rates of oxidized depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crist, K.C.

    1984-10-01

    An in-vitro dissolution study was conducted on two respirable oxidized depleted uranium samples. The dissolution rates generated from this study were then utilized in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group lung clearance model and a lung clearance model proposed by Cuddihy. Predictions from both models based on the dissolution rates of the amount of oxidized depleted uranium that would be cleared to blood from the pulmonary region following an inhalation exposure were compared. It was found that the predictions made by both models differed considerably. The difference between the predictions was attributed to the differences in the way each model perceives the clearance from the pulmonary region. 33 references, 11 figures, 9 tables.

  8. Potentials of fissioning plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlheinz, Thom.

    1979-01-01

    Successful experiments with the nuclear pumping of lasers have demonstrated that in gaseous medium the kinetic energy of fission fragments can be converted directly into non-equilibrium optical radiation. This confirms the concept that the fissioning medium in a gas-phase nuclear reactor shows an internal structure such as a plasma in nearly thermal equilibrium varying up to a state of extreme-non-equilibrium. The accompanying variations of temperatures, pressure and radiative spectrum suggest wide ranges of applications. For example, in the gas-phase fission reactor concept enriched uranium hexafluoride or an uranium plasma replaces conventional fuel elements and permits operation above the melting point of solid materials. This potential has been motivation for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to conduct relevant research for high specific impulse propulsion in space. The need to separate the high temperature gaseous fuel from the surfaces of a containing vessel and to protect them against thermal radiation has led to the concept of an externally moderated reactor in which the fissioning gaseous material is suspended by fluid dynamic means and the flow of opaque buffer gas removes the power. The gaseous nuclear fuel can slowly be circulated through the reactor for continuous on-site reprocessing including the annihilation of transuranium actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides at fission when being fed back into the reactor. An equilibrium of the generation and destruction of such actinides can thus be achieved. These characteristics and the unique radiative properties led to the expectation that the gas-phase fission reactor could feature improved safety, safeguarding and economy, in addition to new technologies such as processing, photochemistry and the transmission of power over large distances in space

  9. Inverse method for determining radon diffusion coefficient and free radon production rate of fragmented uranium ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Yong-jun; Wang, Li-heng; Ding, De-xin; Zhao, Ya-li; Fan, Nan-bin

    2014-01-01

    The radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate are important parameters for describing radon migration in the fragmented uranium ore. In order to determine the two parameters, the pure diffusion migration equation for radon was firstly established and its analytic solution with the two parameters to be determined was derived. Then, a self manufactured experimental column was used to simulate the pure diffusion of the radon, the improved scintillation cell method was used to measure the pore radon concentrations at different depths of the column loaded with the fragmented uranium ore, and the nonlinear least square algorithm was used to inversely determine the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate. Finally, the solution with the two inversely determined parameters was used to predict the pore radon concentrations at some depths of the column, and the predicted results were compared with the measured results. The results show that the predicted results are in good agreement with the measured results and the numerical inverse method is applicable to the determination of the radon diffusion coefficient and the free radon production rate for the fragmented uranium ore. - Highlights: • Inverse method for determining two transport parameters of radon is proposed. • A self-made experimental apparatus is used to simulate radon diffusion process. • Sampling volume and position for measuring radon concentration are optimized. • The inverse results of an experimental sample are verified

  10. Finite element simulation of fission gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.

    1999-01-01

    A fission gas release model is presented, which solves the atomic diffusion problem with xenon and krypton elements tramps produced by uranium fission during UO 2 nuclear fuel irradiation. The model considers intra and intergranular precipitation bubbles, its re dissolution owing to highly energetic fission products impact, interconnection of intergranular bubbles and gas sweeping by grain border in movement because of grain growth. In the model, the existence of a thermal gradient in the fuel pellet is considered, as well as temporal variations of fission rate owing to changes in the operation lineal power. The diffusion equation is solved by the finite element method and results of gas release and swelling calculation owing to gas fission are compared with experimental data. (author)

  11. Yields of some fragments on 235U, 238U and 239Pu fission due to the neutrons of the SBR-1 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurova, L.N.; Bushuev, A.V.; Ozerkov, V.N.; Chachin, V.V.; Zvonarev, A.V.; Liforov, Yu.G.; Koleganov, Yu.V.; Miller, V.V.; Gorbatyuk, O.V.

    1979-01-01

    Determined are the values of the yields of fission fragments in spectrum close to that of the neutron fission using the data on yields at fission by thermal neutrons. The relation between the activities of fragments in samples irradiated in the BR-1 center and in the thermal colomn of the same reactor was measured with the help of the Ge(Li). The relative rate of fissions in uranium and plutonium samples in the center or in thermal colomn were measured by track detectors. The comparison of the yields obtained and the data of other authors is being made

  12. Sustainable, Full-Scope Nuclear Fission Energy at Planetary Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Petroski; Lowell Wood

    2012-01-01

    A nuclear fission-based energy system is described that is capable of supplying the energy needs of all of human civilization for a full range of human energy use scenarios, including both very high rates of energy use and strikingly-large amounts of total energy-utilized. To achieve such “planetary scale sustainability”, this nuclear energy system integrates three nascent technologies: uranium extraction from seawater, manifestly safe breeder reactors, and deep borehole d...

  13. Gamma-Dose rate above uranium mineralization areas in western sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sam, A.K; Sirelkhatim, D.A; Hassona, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    Absorbed dose rate received from natural external irradiation in uranium mineralisation areas at Uro, Kurun and Jebel Mun was evaluated from the measured activity concentrations of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K in rock samples.The analyses were performed using alpha-spectrometry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A great spatial variability was observed in activity concentration of the primordial radionuclides indicating complexity in geological features. Converses to Jebel Mun, Uro and Kurun deposits exhibit very high U:Th mass ratio. The resulting absorbed dose rate in air as estimated using DRCF's fall within the range of 70-522 (Mun), 569-349 (Uro) and 84-320 n Gy/h (Kurun). At maximum, they correspond to annual effective dose of 0.64, 7.78 and 0.39 mSv, respectively. Uranium is the principal producer of the surface radioactivity at Uro and Kurun as it contributes 99.6% and 95% of the total absorbed dose whereas, in Jebel Mun the cause of radioactive anomaly is due to 40 K and 232 Th. In Uro and Kurun deposits, daughter/parent activity ratios along uranium series, Viz. 234 U: 238 U, 230 Th:U, 210 Po:U, are not differ from the equilibrium value of unity.(Author)

  14. Fission induced swelling and creep of U–Mo alloy fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo, E-mail: yskim@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cheon, J.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Robinson, A.B.; Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Tapering of U–Mo alloy fuel at the end of plates is attributed to lateral mass transfer by fission induced creep, by which fuel mass is relocated away from the fuel end region where fission product induced fuel swelling is in fact the highest. This mechanism permits U–Mo fuel to achieve high burnup by effectively relieving stresses at the fuel end region, where peak stresses are otherwise expected because peak fission product induced fuel swelling occurs there. ABAQUS FEA was employed to examine whether the observed phenomenon can be simulated using physical–mechanical data available in the literature. The simulation results obtained for several plates with different fuel fabrication and loading scheme showed that the measured data were able to be simulated with a reasonable creep rate coefficient. The obtained creep rate constant lies between values for pure uranium and MOX, and is greater than all other ceramic uranium fuels.

  15. Fission gas release of MOX with heterogeneous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, N.; Akiyama, H.; Kamimura, K; Delville, R.; Jutier, F.; Verwerft, M.; Miura, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-01-01

    It is very useful for fuel integrity evaluation to accumulate knowledge base on fuel behavior of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission gas release is one of fuel behaviors which have an impact on fuel integrity evaluation. Fission gas release behavior of MOX fuels having heterogeneous structure is focused in this study. MOX fuel rods with a heterogeneous fuel microstructure were irradiated in Halden reactor (IFA-702) and the BR-3/BR-2 CALLISTO Loop (CHIPS program). The 85 Kr gamma spectrometry measurements were carried out in specific cycles in order to examine the concerned LHR (Linear Heat Rate) for fission gas release in the CHIPS program. The concerned LHR is defined in this paper to be the LHR at which a certain additional fission gas release thermally occurs. Post-irradiation examination was performed to understand the fission gas release behavior in connection with the pellet microstructure. The followings conclusions can be made from this study. First, the concerned LHR for fission gas release is estimated to be in the range of 20-23 kW/m with burnup over 37 GWd/tM. It is moreover guessed that the concerned LHR for fission gas release tends to decrease with increasing burnup. Secondly It is observed that FGR (fission gas release rate) is positively correlated with LHR when the LHR exceeds the concerned value. Thirdly, when burnup dependence of fission gas release is discussed, effective burnup should be taken into account. The effective burnup is defined as the burnup at which the LHR should be exceed the concerned value at the last time during all the irradiation period. And fourthly, it appears that FGR inside Pu spots is higher than outside and that retained (not released) fission gases mainly exist in the fission gas bubbles. Since fission gases in bubbles are considered to be easily released during fuel temperature increase, this information is very important to estimate fission gas release behavior

  16. Nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, T.

    1981-01-01

    The nuclear fission process is pedagogically reviewed from a macroscopic-microscopic point of view. The Droplet model is considered. The fission dynamics is discussed utilizing path integrals and semiclassical methods. (L.C.) [pt

  17. Determination of gamma-ray exposure rate from short-lived fission products under criticality accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi; Ohno, Akio; Aizawa, Eijyu

    2002-01-01

    For the assessment of γ-ray doses from short-lived fission products (FPs) under criticality accident conditions, γ-ray exposure rates varying with time were experimentally determined in the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY). The data were obtained by reactivity insertion in the range of 1.50 to 2.93$. It was clarified from the experiments that the contribution of γ-ray from short-lived FPs to total exposure during the experiments was evaluated to be 15 to 17%. Hence, the contribution cannot be neglected for the assessment of γ-ray doses under criticality accident conditions. Computational analyses also indicated that γ-ray exposure rates from short-lived FPs calculated with the Monte Carlo code, MCNP4B, and photon sources based on the latest FP decay data, the JENDL FP Decay Data File 2000, well agreed with the experimental results. The exposure rates were, however, extremely underestimated when the photon sources were obtained by the ORIGEN2 code. The underestimation is due to lack of energy-dependent photon emission data for major short-lived FP nuclides in the photon database attached to the ORIGEN2 code. It was also confirmed that the underestimation arose in 1,000 or less of time lapse after an initial power burst. (author)

  18. "UCx fission targets oxidation test stand"

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    "Set up a rig dedicated to the oxidation of UCx and define a procedure for repeatable, reliable and safe method for converting UC2 fission targets into an acceptable uranium carbide oxide waste for subsequent disposal by the Swiss Authorities."

  19. Grain boundary sweeping and dissolution effects on fission product behaviour under severe fuel damage accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, tellurium, and cesium release from severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho. A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles, gas bubble behavior during fuel liquefaction (destruction of grain boundaries due to formation of a U-rich melt phase), and during U-Zr eutectic melting has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. The grain-boundary-sweeping theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges. The theory of the effects of fuel liquefaction and U-Zr eutectic melting on fission product behaviour considers the migration and coalescence of fission gas bubbles in either molten uranium, or a Zircaloy-Uranium eutectic melt. Results of the analyses demonstrate that intragranular fission product behavior during the tests can be interpreted in terms of a grain-growth/grain-boundary-sweeping mechanism that enhances the flow of fission products from within the grains to the grain boundaries. Whereas fuel liquefaction leads to an enhanced release of fission products in trace-irradiated fuel, the occurrence of fuel liquefaction in normally-irradiated fuel can degrade fission product release. This phenomenon is due in part to reduced gas-bubble mobilities in a viscous medium as compared to vapor transport, and in part to a degradation of grain growth rates and the subsequent decrease in grain-boundary sweeping of intragranular fission products into the liquified lamina. The analysis shows that total UO 2 dissolution due to eutectic melting leads to increased release for both trace-irradiated and normally-irradiated fuel. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in normally

  20. Influence of dose rate on the transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by fission-spectrum neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, C.A.; Sedita, B.A.; Hill, C.K.; Elkind, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several explanations for this neutron dose-rate effect have been proposed, but further investigation is necessary to determine the mechanisms involved. In all cell transformation studies to date the immortalized, aneuploid 10T1/2 cell-line has been used. These cells may be premalignant; thus their response characteristics and, in particular, the nature of the transformation event, might differ from that in a normal, fibroblast cell. One reason for the present study was to determine whether the low-dose-rate effect of fission neutrons could be demonstrated in normal cells. If so, a normal cell system, which would more closely resemble a normal in vivo system, could be used for mechanistic studies. We chose Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts which are normal, diploid cells with a limited life span in culture. Upon exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation, the fraction of the cells that are transformed can be identified in a standard 8--10 day colony assay by examining their clonal morphology. Transformed cells form colonies with a dense, criss-crossed or piled-up structure. A high percentage of the transformed colonies can be further propagated and will acquire additional neoplastic characteristics; i.e., anchorage independence, immortality, altered proteolytic activity, karyotype alterations, and finally, tumorigenicity

  1. Influence of dose rate on the transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by fission-spectrum neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.A.; Sedita, B.A.; Hill, C.K.; Elkind, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several explanations for this neutron dose-rate effect have been proposed, but further investigation is necessary to determine the mechanisms involved. In all cell transformation studies to date the immortalized, aneuploid 10T1/2 cell-line has been used. These cells may be premalignant; thus their response characteristics and, in particular, the nature of the transformation event, might differ from that in a normal, fibroblast cell. One reason for the present study was to determine whether the low-dose-rate effect of fission neutrons could be demonstrated in normal cells. If so, a normal cell system, which would more closely resemble a normal in vivo system, could be used for mechanistic studies. We chose Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts which are normal, diploid cells with a limited life span in culture. Upon exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation, the fraction of the cells that are transformed can be identified in a standard 8--10 day colony assay by examining their clonal morphology. Transformed cells form colonies with a dense, criss-crossed or piled-up structure. A high percentage of the transformed colonies can be further propagated and will acquire additional neoplastic characteristics; i.e., anchorage independence, immortality, altered proteolytic activity, karyotype alterations, and finally, tumorigenicity.

  2. Low-energy rate enhancement in recombination processes of electrons into bare uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Yong; Zeng Siliang; Duan Bin; Yan Jun; Wang Jianguo; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou; Dong Chenzhong; Ma Xinwen

    2007-01-01

    Based on the Dirac-Fork-Slater method combined with the multichannel quantum defect theory, the recombination processes of electrons into bare uranium ions (U 92+ ) are investigated in the relative energy range close to zero, and the x-ray spectrum emitted in the direct radiative recombination and cascades processes are simulated. Compared with the recent measurement, it is found that the rate enhancement comes from the additional populations on high Rydberg states. These additional populations may be produced by other recombination mechanisms, such as the external electric-magnetic effects and the many-body correlation effects, which still remains an open problem. (authors)

  3. Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Vogel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available of Geochemical Exploration 66 (1999) 269?276 www.elsevier.com/locate/jgeoexp Evaluating the rate of migration of an uranium deposition front within the Uitenhage Aquifer J.C. Vogel a,A.S.Talmaa, T.H.E. Heaton b, J. Kronfeld c,* a Quaternary Dating Research Unit... stream_source_info vogel_1999.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 18078 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name vogel_1999.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ELSEVIER Journal...

  4. Enrico Fermi and uranium fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, O.

    1962-01-01

    The author describes the part of his scientific work connected to the research made by Enrico Fermi in the field of nuclear reactions. He said that 'Our gratitude to Fermi today is therefore due less perhaps for his reactor than for his experiments using uncharged neutrons in order to bring about artificial nuclear processes'

  5. How fission was discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, S.

    1989-01-01

    After the great survey of neutron induced radioactivity by Fermi and co-workers, the laboratories in Paris and Berlin-Dahlen tried to disentangle the complex results found in uranium. At that time neutron sources were small, activities low, and equipment very simple. Chemistry beyond uranium still was unknown. Hahn and Meitner believed to have observed three transuranic isomeric chains, a doubtful result even then. Early in 1938, Curie and Savic in Paris found an activity interpreted to be actinium, and Hahn and Meitner another to be radium. Both interpretations seemed impossible from energy considerations. Hahn and Strassmann, therefore, continued this work and succeeded to separate the new activity from radium. There remained no doubt that a barium isotope had been produced, the uranium nucleus splitting in the yet-unknown process we now call fission

  6. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  7. Freshly induced short-lived gamma-ray activity as a measure of fission rates in lightly re-irradiated spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroehnert, H., E-mail: hanna.kroehnert@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), OPRA-E07, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Perret, G., E-mail: gregory.perret@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), OPRA-E07, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Murphy, M.F., E-mail: mike.murphy@psi.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), OPRA-E07, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Chawla, R., E-mail: rakesh.chawla@epfl.c [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), OPRA-E07, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-12-01

    A new measurement technique has been developed to determine fission rates in burnt fuel, following re-irradiation in a zero-power research reactor. The development has been made in the frame of the LIFE-PROTEUS program at the Paul Scherrer Institute, which aims at characterizing the interfaces between fresh and highly burnt fuel assemblies in modern LWRs. To discriminate against the high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the burnt fuel, the proposed measurement technique uses high-energy gamma-rays, above 2000 keV, emitted by short-lived fission products freshly produced in the fuel. To demonstrate the feasibility of this technique, a fresh UO{sub 2} sample and a 36 GWd/t burnt UO{sub 2} sample were irradiated in the PROTEUS reactor and their gamma-ray activities were recorded directly after irradiation. For both fresh and the burnt fuel samples, relative fission rates were derived for different core positions, based on the short-lived {sup 142}La (2542 keV), {sup 89}Rb (2570 keV), {sup 138}Cs (2640 keV) and {sup 95}Y (3576 keV) gamma-ray lines. Uncertainties on the inter-position fission rate ratios were mainly due to the uncertainties on the net-area of the gamma-ray peaks and were about 1-3% for the fresh sample, and 3-6% for the burnt one. Thus, for the first time, it has been shown that the short-lived gamma-ray activity, induced in burnt fuel by irradiation in a zero-power reactor, can be used as a quantitative measure of the fission rate. For both fresh and burnt fuel, the measured results agreed, within the uncertainties, with Monte Carlo (MCNPX) predictions.

  8. Utilization of freshly induced high-energy gamma-ray activity as a measure of fission rates in re-irradiated burnt UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. F.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Krohnert, H.; Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    In the frame of the LIFE-PROTEUS (Large-scale Irradiation Fuel Experiments at PROTEUS) program, a measurement technique is being developed to measure fission rates in burnt fuel, following re-irradiation in a zero-power research reactor. In the presented approach, the fission rates are estimated by measuring high energy gamma-rays (above 2000 keV) emitted by short-lived fission products freshly produced in the fuel. Due to their high energies, these gamma-rays can be discriminated against the high intrinsic gamma-ray activity of the burnt fuel, which reaches energies up to 2000 keV. To demonstrate the feasibility of this approach, fresh and burnt fuel samples (with burn-ups varying from 36 to 64 MWd/kg) were irradiated in the PROTEUS reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institut, and their emitted gamma-ray spectra were recorded shortly after irradiation. It was possible, for the first time, to detect the short-lived gamma-ray activity in the high-energy region, even in the presence of the intrinsic gamma-ray background of the burnt fuel samples. Using the short-lived gamma-ray lines {sup 142}La (2542 keV), {sup 89}Rb (2570 keV), 95Y (2632 keV), {sup 138}Cs (2640 keV) and {sup 95}Y (3576 keV), relative fission rates between different core positions were derived for a fresh sample as well as for a burnt sample with a burn-up of 36 MWd/kg. It was shown that, for both the fresh and burnt fuel samples, the measured fission rate ratios agreed well, i.e. within the statistical uncertainties, with calculation results obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. (authors)

  9. Effects of organic carbon supply rates on uranium mobility in a previously bioreduced contaminated sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiamin; Tokunaga, Tetsu K; Kim, Yongman; Brodie, Eoin; Daly, Rebecca; Hazen, Terry C; Firestone, Mary K

    2008-10-15

    Bioreduction-based strategies for remediating uranium (U)-contaminated sediments face the challenge of maintaining the reduced status of U for long times. Because groundwater influxes continuously bring in oxidizing terminal electron acceptors (O2, NO3(-)), it is necessary to continue supplying organic carbon (OC) to maintain the reducing environment after U bioreduction is achieved. We tested the influence of OC supply rates on mobility of previously microbial reduced uranium U(IV) in contaminated sediments. We found that high degrees of U mobilization occurred when OC supply rates were high, and when the sediment still contained abundant Fe(III). Although 900 days with low levels of OC supply minimized U mobilization, the sediment redox potential increased with time as did extractable U(VI) fractions. Molecular analyses of total microbial activity demonstrated a positive correlation with OC supply and analyses of Geobacteraceae activity (RT-qPCR of 16S rRNA) indicated continued activity even when the effluent Fe(II) became undetectable. These data support our hypothesis on the mechanisms responsible for remobilization of U under reducing conditions; that microbial respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentration and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes, thereby shifted U(IV)/U(VI) equilibrium to more reducing potentials. The data also suggested that low OC concentrations could not sustain the reducing condition of the sediment for much longer time. Bioreduced U(IV) is not sustainable in an oxidizing environment for a very long time.

  10. Uranium: do leave it in the ground!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyard, P.

    1990-01-01

    A previous author has argued that it would be best in the long run to consume uranium as much as possible in reactors rather than leave it in the ground in order to save the earth and generations into the far distant future from the evils of radiation. The argument is based on a comparison between the radioactive decay processes of fissioned uranium and uranium left in the earth to decay in its own time. It can be shown that from 300 days after reactor shut down onwards, the spent fuel will generate barely 1% of the radioactive energy that it would were it left untouched in the ground. Counter arguments are presented based largely on the risks to human health and life presented by uranium mining and disasters at nuclear plants such as that at Chernobyl. Illustrations are given of the suffering of people living near uranium mines arising from soil contamination by uranium tailings; the widespread radioactive contamination of the surrounding area and increased cancer mortality rates due to the Chernobyl accident are described. Finally, it is pointed out that uranium serves as a radioactive heat source in the gigantic recycling of rocks and the regeneration of the planet. All these arguments lead to the conclusion that uranium is best left in the earth. (UK)

  11. Fission distribution measurements of Atucha's fuel pellets with solid state track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricabarra, M.D. Bovisio de; Waisman, Dina.

    1979-08-01

    Distribution of fissions in a UO 2 rod has been measured by means of solid state detectors. Mica muscovite and Makrofol-N detectors were used in the experiment. The merits of mica muscovite relative to the Makrofol-N for the detection of fission fragments have been verified. However both fission track detectors closely agree (0,5%) in the final fission distribution of the UO 2 rod. Sensitivity of the detectors shows to be linear in the range between 50.000and 360.000 fission tracks per square centimeter. Due to the high spatial resolution this method is better than any other technique. Determination were made in UO 2 pellets similar to the fuel element of the Atucha reactor. The average fission rate in the rod has been measured within 0,8% error, and provides an accurate determination for the distribution of fissions in the rod wich is needed for the determination of energy liberated per fission in the natural uranium rod.(author) [es

  12. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchopár M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  13. Monte carlo simulations of Yttrium reaction rates in Quinta uranium target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchopár, M.; Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Tichý, P.; Kugler, A.; Adam, J.; Závorka, L.; Baldin, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Bielewicz, M.; Kilim, S.; Strugalska-Gola, E.; Szuta, M.

    2017-03-01

    The international collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste (E&T RAW) performed intensive studies of several simple accelerator-driven system (ADS) setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite which were irradiated by relativistic proton and deuteron beams in the past years at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. The most recent setup called Quinta, consisting of natural uranium target-blanket and lead shielding, was irradiated by deuteron beams in the energy range between 1 and 8 GeV in three accelerator runs at JINR Nuclotron in 2011 and 2012 with yttrium samples among others inserted inside the setup to measure the neutron flux in various places. Suitable activation detectors serve as one of possible tools for monitoring of proton and deuteron beams and for measurements of neutron field distribution in ADS studies. Yttrium is one of such suitable materials for monitoring of high energy neutrons. Various threshold reactions can be observed in yttrium samples. The yields of isotopes produced in the samples were determined using the activation method. Monte Carlo simulations of the reaction rates leading to production of different isotopes were performed in the MCNPX transport code and compared with the experimental results obtained from the yttrium samples.

  14. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, D.H.; Gibson, M.; King, D.C.; Marshall, J.; Puckett, B.J.; Richards, A.E.; Wass, T.; Wilson, D.J.

    1965-07-01

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO 2 /UO 2 fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author)

  15. Buckling and reaction rate measurements in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium-uranium oxide clusters at temperatures up to 400 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Gibson, M; King, D C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Richards, A E; Wass, T; Wilson, D J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1965-07-15

    The Report describes a series of experiments carried out in SCORPIO I and II on sub-critical graphite moderated lattices fuelled with 21-rod clusters of PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel. Three fuel batches with nominal plutonium: uranium ratios of 0.25%, 0.8% and 1.2% were investigated at temperatures between 20 deg. C and 400 deg. C. Because of the limited amounts of the three fuels, exponential measurements were made in 2-zone stacks, the outer regions of which were loaded with suitably matched 'reference fuel'. Fine structure distributions in the lattice cell were obtained with manganese and indium foils. Pu239/U235 fission ratios were determined both by fission chambers and by fission-product counting techniques. (author) 14 refs, 30 figs, 18 tabs

  16. Experimental validation of CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M for radial fission rate distributions in a westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, P.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    Measured and calculated radial total fission rate distributions are compared for the three axial sections of a Westinghouse SVEA-96 Optima2 BWR fuel assembly, comprising 96, 92 and 84 fuel rods, respectively. The measurements were performed on a full-size fuel assembly in the PROTEUS zero-power experimental facility. The measured fission rates are compared to the results of the CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M fuel assembly codes. Detailed measured geometrical data were used in the models, and effects of the surrounding zones of the reactor were taken into account by correction factors derived from MCNPX calculations. The results of the calculations agree well with those of the experiments, with root-mean-square deviations between 1.2% and 1.5% and maximum deviations of 3-4%. The quality of the predictions by CASMO-4E and CASMO-5M is comparable. (authors)

  17. Simulated production rates of exotic nuclei from the ion guide for neutron-induced fission at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Kaj; Al-Adili, Ali; Nilsson, Nicklas; Norlin, Martin; Solders, Andreas [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2017-12-15

    An investigation of the stopping efficiency of fission products, in the new ion guide designed for ion production through neutron-induced fission at IGISOL in Jyvaeskylae, Finland, has been conducted. Our simulations take into account the new neutron converter, enabling measurements of neutron-induced fission yields, and thereby provide estimates of the obtained yields as a function of primary proton beam current. Different geometries, targets, and pressures, as well as models for the effective charge of the stopped ions were tested, and optimisations to the setup for higher yields are suggested. The predicted number of ions stopped in the gas lets us estimate the survival probability of the ions reaching the downstream measurements stations. (orig.)

  18. Transmutation of uranium and thorium in the particle field of the Quinta sub-critical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Asquith, N. L.; Voronko, V. A.; Sotnikov, V. V.; Zhadan, Alina; Zhuk, I. V.; Potapenko, A.; Husak, Krystsina; Chilap, V.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A.; Berlev, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kudashkin, I.; Mar'in, I.; Paraipan, M.; Pronskih, V.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.

    2018-03-01

    The fission rates of natural uranium and thorium were measured in the particle field of Quinta, a 512 kg natural uranium target-blanket sub-critical assembly. The Quinta assembly was irradiated with deuterons of energy 4 GeV from the Nuclotron accelerator of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia. Fission rates of uranium and thorium were measured using Gamma spectroscopy and fission track techniques. The production rate of 239Np was also measured. The obtained experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo predictions using the MCNPX 2.7 code employing the physics and fission-evaporation models of INCL4-ABLA, CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. Some of the neutronic characteristics of the Quinta are compared with the "Energy plus Transmutation (EpT)" subcritical assembly, which is composed of a lead target and natU blanket. This comparison clearly demonstrates the importance of target material, neutron moderator and reflector types on the performance of a spallation neutron driven subcritical system. As the dimensions of the Quinta are very close to those of an optimal multi-rod-uranium target, the experimental and Monte Carlo calculation results presented in this paper provide insights on the particle field within a uranium target as well as in Accelerator Driven Systems in general.

  19. The fast fission effect in a cylindrical fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlvik, I; Pershagen, B

    1959-06-15

    A new formula for the fast fission factor is derived, which takes proper account to fast capture. The fission neutron spectrum is divided into two groups with constant fission cross section in one group and zero fission cross section in the other. The average total, elastic, inelastic and capture cross sections in the two groups are calculated. Different assumptions regarding anisotropic and inelastic scattering are investigated. The effects of backscattering from the moderator and fast fission in neighbouring fuel elements are pointed out. Formulas for the fast fission ratio and for the fast conversion ratio are derived. The calculated fast fission ratios are compared with experimental values. Curves are given for the fast fission factor in uranium metal and uranium oxide.

  20. Chemical effects of fission recoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisels, G.G.; Freeman, J.P.; Gregory, J.P.; Richardson, W.C.; Sroka, G.J.

    1978-01-01

    The production of nitrogen from nitrous oxide at high density was employed to investigate the energy deposition efficiency of fission recoils produced from fission of U 235 in uranium-palladium foils clad with platinum. Nitrogen production varied linearly with fission recoil dose from 1.1 x 10 20 to 9.0 x 10 20 eV, and was independent of density between 12.5 and 127.5 g l -1 N 2 O. 16.2 +- 0.8% of the fission recoil energy was deposited external to the foil. Electron microprobe analysis showed some unevenness of new foil and polymer buildup on the surface after irradiation of ethylene-oxygen mixtures. Subsequent irradiation in the presence of nitrous oxide restored some of the original efficiency. This is ascribed to chemical oxidation of the polymer induced by reactive intermediates produced from nitrous oxide. (author)

  1. Nuclear data and measurements series: Ratio of the prompt-fission-neutron spectrum of plutonium 239 to that of uranium 235

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, M.; Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1986-09-01

    The prompt-fission-neutron spectrum resulting from 239 Pu fission induced by 0.55 MeV incident neutrons is measured from 1.0 to 10.0 MeV relative to that of 235 U fission induced by the same incident-energy neutrons. The measurements employ the time-of-flight technique. Energy-dependent ratios of the two spectra are deduced from the measured values over the energy range 1.0 to 10.0 MeV. The experimentally-derived ratio results are compared with those calculated from ENDF/B-V, revision-2, and with results of recent microscopic measurements. Using the ENDF/B-V 235 U Watt parameters for the 235 U spectrum, the experimental measurements imply a ratio of average fission-spectrum energies of 239 Pu/ 235 U = 1.045 +- 0.003, compared to the value 1.046 calculated from ENDF/B-V, revision 2. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  2. Radiation Re-solution Calculation in Uranium-Silicide Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Christopher; Andersson, Anders David Ragnar; Unal, Cetin

    2017-01-01

    The release of fission gas from nuclear fuels is of primary concern for safe operation of nuclear power plants. Although the production of fission gas atoms can be easily calculated from the fission rate in the fuel and the average yield of fission gas, the actual diffusion, behavior, and ultimate escape of fission gas from nuclear fuel depends on many other variables. As fission gas diffuses through the fuel grain, it tends to collect into intra-granular bubbles, as portrayed in Figure 1.1. These bubbles continue to grow due to absorption of single gas atoms. Simultaneously, passing fission fragments can cause collisions in the bubble that result in gas atoms being knocked back into the grain. This so called ''re-solution'' event results in a transient equilibrium of single gas atoms within the grain. As single gas atoms progress through the grain, they will eventually collect along grain boundaries, creating inter-granular bubbles. As the inter-granular bubbles grow over time, they will interconnect with other grain-face bubbles until a pathway is created to the outside of the fuel surface, at which point the highly pressurized inter-granular bubbles will expel their contents into the fuel plenum. This last process is the primary cause of fission gas release. From the simple description above, it is clear there are several parameters that ultimately affect fission gas release, including the diffusivity of single gas atoms, the absorption and knockout rate of single gas atoms in intra-granular bubbles, and the growth and interlinkage of intergranular bubbles. Of these, the knockout, or re-solution rate has an particularly important role in determining the transient concentration of single gas atoms in the grain. The re-solution rate will be explored in the following sections with regards to uranium-silicide fuels in order to support future models of fission gas bubble behavior.

  3. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Spectra from Slightly-Irradiated Uranium and Plutonium between 400-830 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R S; Ronqvist, N

    1966-08-15

    Previously published studies of the short-cooled fission product spectra of irradiated uranium have been severely restricted by the poor energy resolution of the sodium iodide detectors used. In this report are presented fission product spectra of irradiated uranium and plutonium obtained by means of a lithium-drifted germanium detector. The resolved gamma peaks have been assigned to various fission products by correlation of measured energy and half-life values with published data. By simultaneous study of the spectra of two irradiated mixtures of plutonium and uranium, the possibility of using the activities of Ru-103 and Ru-106 as a measure of the relative fission rate in U-235 and Pu-239 has been briefly examined.

  4. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Spectra from Slightly-Irradiated Uranium and Plutonium between 400-830 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Ronqvist, N.

    1966-08-01

    Previously published studies of the short-cooled fission product spectra of irradiated uranium have been severely restricted by the poor energy resolution of the sodium iodide detectors used. In this report are presented fission product spectra of irradiated uranium and plutonium obtained by means of a lithium-drifted germanium detector. The resolved gamma peaks have been assigned to various fission products by correlation of measured energy and half-life values with published data. By simultaneous study of the spectra of two irradiated mixtures of plutonium and uranium, the possibility of using the activities of Ru-103 and Ru-106 as a measure of the relative fission rate in U-235 and Pu-239 has been briefly examined

  5. Analysis of uranium intake, risk assessments uranium content in blood and urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukesh Kumar; Prasher, Sangeeta; Singh, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    Bathinda district of Punjab is in light since the last few years because of the high mortality rate due to cancer. In order to explore the possibility of uranium as one of the causes for cancer an attempt has been made to estimate the level of uranium in the environmental samples viz. soil, water, food items and to correlate it with that in the blood and urine of the cancer patients and the normal persons of the area. The fission track technique has been employed for such studies. Though the uranium content in soil is normal and close to the world average, the uranium values in most of the water samples exceed the recommended safe limits. The cancer risk estimate from drinking of uranium contaminated water during the life time of sixty year is very high. The daily intake of Uranium for the population of these villages including the drinking water has also been estimated using the daily intake of these foodstuffs recommended by WHO and is found to exceed the typical world wide dietary intake of 0.9-4.5 μg/day. The concentration of uranium in urine and blood is found higher in cancer patients, whereas the urine excretion of uranium is lower in the cancer patients compared to the normal persons. (author)

  6. Determination of the fission products yields, lanthanide and yttrium, in the fission of 238U with neutrons of fission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicoli, I.G.

    1981-06-01

    A radiochemical investigation is performed to measure the cumulative fission product yields of several lantanides and yttrium nuclides in the 238 U by fission neutron spectra. Natural and depleted uranium are irradiated under the same experimental conditions in order to find a way to subtract the contribution of the 235 U fission. 235 U percentage in the natural uranium was 3.5 times higher than in the depleted uranium. Uranium oxides samples are irradiated inside the core of the Argonaut Reactor, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, and the lantanides and yttrium are chemically separated. The fission products gamma activities were detected, counted and analysed in a system constituted by a high resolution Ge(Li) detector, 4096 multichannel analyser and a PDP-11 computer. Cumulative yields for fission products with half-lives between 1 to 33 hours are measured: 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd. The chain total yields are calculated. The cumulative fission yields measured for 93 Y, 141 La, 142 La, 143 Ce and 149 Nd are 4,49%, 4,54%, 4,95%, 4,16% and 1,37% respectively and they are in good agreement with the values found in the literature. (Author) [pt

  7. Ternary fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagemans, C.

    1991-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1946, light (charged) particle accompanied fission (ternary fission) has been extensively studied, for spontaneous as well as for induced fission reactions. The reason for this interest was twofold: the ternary particles being emitted in space and time close to the scission point were expected to supply information on the scission point configuration and the ternary fission process was an important source of helium, tritium, and hydrogen production in nuclear reactors, for which data were requested by the nuclear industry. Significant experimental progress has been realized with the advent of high-resolution detectors, powerful multiparameter data acquisition systems, and intense neutron and photon beams. As far as theory is concerned, the trajectory calculations (in which scission point parameters are deduced from the experimental observations) have been very much improved. An attempt was made to explain ternary particle emission in terms of a Plateau-Rayleigh hydrodynamical instability of a relatively long cylindrical neck or cylindrical nucleus. New results have also been obtained on the so-called open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission (fission in three about-equal fragments). The spontaneous emission of charged particles has also clearly been demonstrated in recent years. This chapter discusses the main characteristics of ternary fission, theoretical models, light particle emission probabilities, the dependence of the emission probabilities on experimental variables, light particle energy distributions, light particle angular distributions, correlations between light particle accompanied fission observables, open-quotes trueclose quotes ternary fission, and spontaneous emission of heavy ions. 143 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Estimation of uranium resources by life-cycle or discovery-rate models: a critique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.P.

    1976-10-01

    This report was motivated primarily by M. A. Lieberman's ''United States Uranium Resources: An Analysis of Historical Data'' (Science, April 30). His conclusion that only 87,000 tons of U 3 O 8 resources recoverable at a forward cost of $8/lb remain to be discovered is criticized. It is shown that there is no theoretical basis for selecting the exponential or any other function for the discovery rate. Some of the economic (productivity, inflation) and data issues involved in the analysis of undiscovered, recoverable U 3 O 8 resources on discovery rates of $8 reserves are discussed. The problem of the ratio of undiscovered $30 resources to undiscovered $8 resources is considered. It is concluded that: all methods for the estimation of unknown resources must employ a model of some form of the endowment-exploration-production complex, but every model is a simplification of the real world, and every estimate is intrinsically uncertain. The life-cycle model is useless for the appraisal of undiscovered, recoverable U 3 O 8 , and the discovery rate model underestimates these resources

  9. An Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Concept Using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Burning Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuseong You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we designed and analyzed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor cores using uranium-free metallic fuels for maximizing burning rate of transuranics (TRU nuclides from PWR spent fuels. It is well known that the removal of fertile nuclides such as 238U from fuels in liquid metal cooled fast reactor leads to the degradation of important safety parameters such as the Doppler coefficient, coolant void worth, and delayed neutron fraction. To resolve the degradation of the Doppler coefficient, we considered adding resonant nuclides to the uranium-free metallic fuels. The analysis results showed that the cores using uranium-free fuels loaded with tungsten instead of uranium have a significantly lower burnup reactivity swing and more negative Doppler coefficients than the core using uranium-free fuels without resonant nuclides. In addition, we considered the use of axially central B4C absorber region and moderator rods to further improve safety parameters such as sodium void worth, burnup reactivity swing, and the Doppler coefficient. The results of the analysis showed that the final design core can consume ~353 kg per cycle and satisfies self-controllability under unprotected accidents. The fuel cycle analysis showed that the PWR–SFR coupling fuel cycle option drastically reduces the amount of waste going to repository and the SFR burner can consume the amount of TRUs discharged from 3.72 PWRs generating the same electricity.

  10. Determination of uranium fission products interference factors in neutron activation analysis; Determinacao de fatores de interferencia de produtos de fissao de uranio na analise por ativacao neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro Junior, Ibere Souza

    2014-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis is a method used in the determination of several elements in different kinds of matrices. However, when the sample contains high U levels the problem of {sup 235}U fission interference occurs. A way to solve this problem is to perform the correction using the interference factor due to U fission for the radionuclides used on elemental analysis. In this study was determined the interference factor due to U fission for the radioisotopes {sup 141}Ce, {sup 143}Ce, {sup 140}La, {sup 99}Mo, {sup 147}Nd, {sup 153}Sm and {sup 95}Zr in the research nuclear reactor IEA-R1 on IPEN-CNEN/SP. These interference factors were determined experimentally, by irradiation of synthetic standards for 8 hours in a selected position in the reactor, and theoretically, determining the epithermal to neutron fluxes ratio in the same position where synthetic standards were irradiated and using reported nuclear parameters on the literature. The obtained interference factors were compared with values reported by other works. To evaluate the reliability of these factors they were applied in the analysis of studied elements in the certified reference materials NIST 8704 Buffalo River Sediment, IRMM BCR- 667 Estuarine Sediment e IAEA-SL-1 Lake Sediment. (author)

  11. Recovery treatment for the non fissioned uranium in the production of Mo-99; Tratamiento de recuperacion del uranio no fisionado en la produccion de Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Acosta C, A.L.; Lopez M, B.E

    1991-09-15

    An effective modification of the chemical processes has been obtained to dissolve at the uranium-IV and to extract it as uranyl triperoxidate that facilitates its manipulation and final conversion to uranyl nitrate like a concentrate of high purity. (Author)

  12. Uranium-bearing francolites present in organic-rich limestones of NW Greece: a preliminary study using synchrotron radiation and fission track techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzifas, I. T.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Misaelides, P.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation techniques (μ-XRF and μ-XANES) were applied to the study of organic-rich phosphatized limestones of NW Greece (Epirus). The results revealed uranium accumulation in areas of the material containing, among others, carbonate apatite (francolite) and organic matter. The UL3-edge...

  13. Plutonium in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Aguilar, R.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Roensch, F.

    1992-01-01

    Plutonium-239 (t 1/2 , 24,100 yr) is one of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors. Effective containment of such a long-lived constituent will rely heavily upon its containment by the geologic environment of a repository. Uranium ore deposits offer a means to evaluate the geochemical properties of plutonium under natural conditions. In this paper, analyses of natural plutonium in several ores are compared to calculated plutonium production rates in order to evaluate the degree of retention of plutonium by the ore. The authors find that current methods for estimating production rates are neither sufficiently accurate nor precise to provide unambiguous measures of plutonium retention. However, alternative methods for evaluating plutonium mobility are being investigated, including its measurement in natural ground waters. Preliminary results are reported and establish the foundation for a comprehensive characterization of plutonium geochemistry in other natural environments

  14. Logging technique for assaying for uranium in earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.; Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a source of fast neutrons, an epithermal neutron flux detector, and a thermal neutron flux detector. A count rate meter is connected to each detector. A ratio detector provides a signal indicative of the ratio of the count rates of the two detectors obtained during the time that prompt neutrons are emitted from neutron fission of uranium in the formation

  15. Fission 99Mo production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Zengxing; Luo Zhifu; Ma Huimin; Liang Yufu; Yu Ningwen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a production technology of fission 99 Mo in the Department Isotope, CIAE. The irradiation target is tubular U-Al alloy containing highly enriched uranium. The target is irradiated in the swimming pool reactor core. The neutron flux is about 4x10 13 /cm 2 .sec. The production scale is 3.7-7.4 TBq (100-200Ci) of fission 99 Mo per batch. Total recovery of 99 Mo is more than 70%. The production practice proves that the process and equipment are safe and reliable. (author)

  16. Uranium concentration in fossils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, J.; Uyeda, C.

    1988-01-01

    Recently it is known that fossil bones tend to accumulate uranium. The uranium concentration, C u in fossils has been measured so far by γ ray spectroscopy or by fission track method. The authors applied secondary ion mass spectrometry, SIMS, to detect the uranium in fossil samples. The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of semi-quantitative analyses of uranium in fossils, and to study the correlation between C u and the age of fossil bones. The further purpose of this work is to apply SIMS to measure the distribution of C u in fossil teeth

  17. Determination of radon flux rates in a uranium mine (Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board contracted SENES Consultants Limited to design and implement a field program at Amok Limited's Cluff Lake uranium mine, with the overall objective of obtaining reliable radon flux data applicable for use in the VENTRAD computer model. The VENTRAD model was developed to model underground mine ventilation systems. To avoid the uncertainties inherent in localized flux measurements made on small surfaces, radon flux measurements were determined through measurement of incremental changes in the concentration of radon between the incoming and outgoing air in selected areas of the underground workings. The locations were selected throughout the mine in both ore and sterile rock. Average radon flux rates measured during three field campaigns were as follows: sterile rock decline 4 pCi/m 2 .second; sterile rock mainway 25 pCi/m 2 .second; worked-out stope 100 pCi/m 2 .second; active work stope 240 pCi/m 2 .second; and work face 14,000 pCi/m 2 .second. Data collected during the three field programs were used to validate the VENTRAD computer model. The results of the validation exercise suggest close agreement between predicted and measured air flow rates and radon concentrations were overestimated for areas immediately impacted by auxiliary ventilation fans and ore transfer mill holes which connect the ore extraction and haulage levels of the mine

  18. Comparison of the Economic Aspects of the Treatment and Storage of Fission Products from Installations Processing Irradiated Natural Uranium; Aspects Economiques Compares du Traitement et du Stockage des Produits de Fission Issus des Usines de Traitement de l'Uranium Naturel Irradie; Sravnitel'nye ehkonomicheskie aspekty obrabotki i khraneniya produktov deleniya, poluchaemykh na zavodakh po pererabotke obluchennogo prirodnogo urana; Aspectos Economicos Comparados del Tratamiento y del Almacenamiento de los Productos de Fision que Salen de las Plantas de Tratamiento de Uranio Natural Irradiado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiriet, L.; Lesur, P.; Giraud, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Paris (France); Wanlin, J. [Societe Saint-Gobain Techniques Nouvelles, Paris (France)

    1966-02-15

    The paper summarizes the main policies adopted for the management of fission product effluents and briefly describes the essential technical features of the stainless steel storage installations (in acid medium) used in France, giving a breakdown of the costs involved. The dependence of these costs on the activity of the solutions stored and on their heat release is shown. The second part of the paper discusses the cost of storage in terms of feasible tank size. The optimum size for such tanks and the rate at which they are placed in service are determined in relation to the characteristics of the fission products to be stored and to the respective capacities of the installations for processing irradiated natural uranium. It is shown that although storage costs depend on the assumptions made regarding the useful life of installations, rates of interest and operating costs, optimum policy decisions (as to size and rate of entry into service) are independent of these assumptions, being determined solely by the variation in the cost of tanks, according to size. These are the factors which enter into the optimized cost of storing these effluents indefinitely. In the third part, this method of indefinite storage is compared with other possibilities of fission product management, e.g. vitrification and separation of Cs and Sr. The paper discusses the economics of the various methods and summarizes some possible long-term solutions. (author) [French] Apres avoir rappele les principales politiques de gestion le plus souvent envisagees pour les produits de fission, le memoire decrit sommairement les caracteristiques techniques essentielles des installations de stockage en acier inoxydable (en milieu acide) utilisees en France et la structure des couts de ces installations. U montre la sensibilite de ces couts a l'activite des solutions stockees et a leur degagement de chaleur. Dans une deuxieme partie, les auteurs examinent leur cout de stockage, selon la taille des

  19. Separation and purification of uranium by ion exchange on stannic phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayankutty, P.C.; Nadkarni, M.N.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1977-01-01

    Exchange of uranium, plutonium and some fission product elements was investigated on stannic phosphate (SnP) exchanger from nitric acid solutions. Batch equilibration studies exhibited stronger absorption of plutonium (IV) and some of the fission products on the exchanger than uranium. This indicated the possibility of separation and purification of uranium from plutonium and fission products. Breakthrough studies were carried out to determine the effects of flow-rates and uranium, plutonium and free nitric acid concentrations in the feed to establish the optimum conditions for this separation. Several reagents were also tested to find suitable eluting agents to desorb plutonium from the exchanger. The results indicate that traces of plutonium and fission products present as impurities in the uranium product of the purex process stream can be removed by ion exchange method using SnP. 1 M nitric acid solution containing low concentrations of reducing agents such as ferrous sulfamate or ascorbic acid was found to be an effective eluting agent for plutonium. (author)

  20. Nuclear fission as a macroscopic quantum tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, N.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss nuclear fission from the point of view of a macroscopic quantum tunneling, one of whose major interests is to study the effects of environments on the tunneling rate of a macroscopic variable. We show that a vibrational excitation of the fissioning nucleus significantly enhances the fission rate. We show this effect by two different methods. The one is to treat the vibrational excitation as an environmental degree of freedom, the other treats the fission as a two dimensional quantum tunneling. (author)

  1. Micro plate fission chamber development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mei; Wen Zhongwei; Lin Jufang; Jiang Li; Liu Rong; Wang Dalun

    2014-01-01

    To conduct the measurement of neutron flux and the fission rate distribution at several position in assemblies, the micro plate fission chamber was designed and fabricated. Since the requirement of smaller volume and less structure material was taken into consideration, it is convinient, commercial and practical to use fission chamber to measure neutron flux in specific condition. In this paper, the structure of fission chamber and process of fabrication were introduced and performance test result was presented. The detection efficiency is 91.7%. (authors)

  2. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  3. Radioactivity and the French uranium bearing minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guiollard, P.Ch.; Boisson, J.M.; Leydet, J.C.; Meisser, N.

    1998-01-01

    This special issue of Regne Mineral journal is entirely devoted to the French uranium mining industry. It comprises 4 parts dealing with: the uranium mining industry in France (history, uranium rush, deposits, geologic setting, prosperity and recession, situation in 1998, ore processing); radioactivity and the uranium and its descendants (discovery, first French uranium bearing ores, discovery of radioactivity, radium and other uranium descendants, radium mines, uranium mines, atoms, elements and isotopes, uranium genesis, uranium decay, isotopes in an uranium ore, spontaneous fission, selective migration of radionuclides, radon in mines and houses, radioactivity units, radioprotection standards, new standards and controversies, natural and artificial radioactivity, hazards linked with the handling and collecting of uranium ores, conformability with radioprotection standards, radioactivity of natural uranium minerals); the French uranium bearing minerals (composition, crystal structure, reference, etymology, fluorescence). (J.S.)

  4. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  5. Separation of short-lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Tadaharu; Ohyoshi, Emiko; Ohyoshi, Akira; Kiso, Yoshiyuki; Shinagawa, Mutsuaki.

    1976-01-01

    A rbief review is presented on the various methods of separation available for both gaseous and liquid states, for the separation of short-lived fission products formed by binary fission of neutron irradiated uranium. The means available for gaseous state are the hot atom reaction, the hydride method and on-line mass separation. For liquid state, use can be made of precipitation, ionic or atomic exchange, solvent extraction and paper electrophoresis. Particular reference is made to electrophoretic separation of ions produced by fission in aqueous solution of uranium. The principle of electrophoretic separation and the procedures for separating the element of interest from the other fission products are outlined, with reference made to the results obtained with the method by the present authors. The elements in question are alkalines, alkaline earths, rare earths, halogens, selenium and

  6. A fission track technique used for hydrogeochemical prospecting in Northern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.P.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    A fission track technique is employed to determine the uranium content of water samples collected from different locations of the middle and outer Himalayas. The regional threshold for the uranium content is determined for water samples of different areas. The identification of anomalies in an area of uranium mineralization confirmed that the hydrogeochemical technique could successfully be used for uranium exploration. (author)

  7. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  8. The fission cross section ratios and error analysis for ten thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes at 14. 74 MeV neutron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    The error information from the recent measurements of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes, /sup 230/Th, /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 237/Np, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 242/Pu, relative to /sup 235/U at 14.74 MeV neutron energy was used to calculate their correlations. The remaining 36 non-trivial and non-reciprocal cross section ratios and their errors were determined and compared to evaluated (ENDF/B-V) values. There are serious differences but it was concluded that the reduction of three of the evaluated cross sections would remove most of them. The cross sections to be reduced are /sup 230/Th - 13%, /sup 237/Np - 9.6% and /sup 239/Pu - 7.6%. 5 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section of Uranium, Americium and Curium Isotopes. Progress report - Research Contract 14485, Coordinated Research Project on Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.A.; Bergman, A.A.; Berlev, A.I.; Koptelov, E.A.; Samylin, B.F.; Trufanov, A.M.; Fursov, B.I.; Shorin, V.S.

    2009-12-01

    This report contains brief description of the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer and results of measurements of neutron-induced fission cross sections for 236 U, 242m Am, 243 Cm, 244 Cm, 245 Cm and 246 Cm done at this spectrometer. The work was partially supported through the IAEA research contract RC-14485-RD in the framework of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project 'Minor Actinide Neutron Reaction Data (MANREAD)'. The detailed description of the experimental set up, measurements procedure and data treatment can be found in the JIA-1182 (2007) and JIA-1212 (2009) reports from the Institute of Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Science published in Russian. Part 1 contains the first year report of the research contract and part 2 the second year report. (author)

  10. The fission cross section ratios and error analysis for ten thorium, uranium, neptunium and plutonium isotopes at 14.74 MeV neutron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, J.W.

    1987-03-01

    The error information from the recent measurements of the fission cross section ratios of nine isotopes, 230 Th, 232 Th, 233 U, 234 U, 236 U, 238 U, 237 Np, 239 Pu, and 242 Pu, relative to 235 U at 14.74 MeV neutron energy was used to calculate their correlations. The remaining 36 non-trivial and non-reciprocal cross section ratios and their errors were determined and compared to evaluated (ENDF/B-V) values. There are serious differences but it was concluded that the reduction of three of the evaluated cross sections would remove most of them. The cross sections to be reduced are 230 Th - 13%, 237 Np - 9.6% and 239 Pu - 7.6%. 5 refs., 6 tabs

  11. Calculations of fission rate distribution in the core of WWER-1000 mock-up on the LR-0 reactor using alternative methods and comparison with results of measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaritskiy, S.; Kovalishin, A.; Tsvetkov, T.; Rypar, V.; Svadlenkova, M.

    2011-01-01

    General review of experimental and calculation researches on WWER-440 and WWER-1000 mock-ups on the reactor LR-0 was introduced on the twentieth Symposium AER. The experimental core fission rate distribution was obtained by means of gamma-scanning of the fuel pins - 140La single peak (1596 keV) measurements and wide energy range (approximately 600-900 keV) measurements. Altogether from 260 to 500 fuel pins were scanned in different experiments. The measurements were arranged in the middle of the fuel (the active part of pin). Pin-to-pin calculations of the WWER-1000 mock-up core fission rate distribution were performed with several codes: Monte Carlo codes MCU-REA/2 and MCNPX with different nuclear data libraries, diffusion code RADAR (63 energy groups library) and code SVL based on Surface Harmonics Method (69 energy groups). Calculated data are compared with experimental ones. The obtained results allow developing the benchmark for core calculations methodologies, evaluating and validating source reliability for the out-of-core (inside and outside pressure vessel) neutron transport calculations. (Authors)

  12. Uranium's scientific history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    The bicentenary of the discovery of uranium coincides with the fiftieth anniversary of the discovery of fission, an event of worldwide significance and the last episode in the uranium -radium saga which is the main theme of this paper. Uranium was first identified by the German chemist Martin Klaproth in 1789. He extracted uranium oxide from the ore pitchblende which was a by-product of the silver mines at Joachimsthal in Bohemia. For over a century after its discovery, the main application for uranium derived from the vivid colours of its oxides and salts which are used in glazes for ceramics, and porcelain. In 1896, however, Becquerel discovered that uranium emitted ionizing radiation. The extraction by Pierre and Marie Curie of the more radioactive radium from uranium in the early years of the twentieth century and its application to the treatment of cancer shifted the chief interest to radium production. In the 1930s the discovery of the neutron and of artificial radioactivity stimulated research in a number of European laboratories which culminated in the demonstration of fission by Otto Frisch in January 1939. The new found use of uranium for the production of recoverable energy, and the creation of artificial radioelements in nuclear reactors, eliminated the radium industry. (author)

  13. Ternary fission

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the energy minimization of all possible ternary breakups of a heavy radioactive nucleus. Further, within the TCM we have analysed the competition between different geometries as well as different positioning of the fragments. Also, an attempt was made to calculate the mass distribution of ternary fission process within the ...

  14. Determination of irradiated reactor uranium in soil samples in Belarus using 236U as irradiated uranium tracer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, Vladislav P; Matusevich, Janna L; Kudrjashov, Vladimir P; Boulyga, Sergei F; Becker, J Sabine

    2002-12-01

    This work presents experimental results on the distribution of irradiated reactor uranium from fallout after the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in comparison to natural uranium distribution in different soil types. Oxidation processes and vertical migration of irradiated uranium in soils typical of the 30 km relocation area around Chernobyl NPP were studied using 236U as the tracer for irradiated reactor uranium and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as the analytical method for uranium isotope ratio measurements. Measurements of natural uranium yielded significant variations of its concentration in upper soil layers from 2 x 10(-7) g g(-1) to 3.4 x 10(-6) g g(-1). Concentrations of irradiated uranium in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers at the investigated sampling sites varied from 5 x 10(-12) g g(-1) to 2 x 10(-6) g g(-1) depending on the distance from Chernobyl NPP. In the majority of investigated soil profiles 78% to 97% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still contained in the upper 0-10 cm soil layers. The physical and chemical characteristics of the soil do not have any significant influence on processes of fuel particle destruction. Results obtained using carbonate leaching of 236U confirmed that more than 60% of irradiated "Chernobyl" uranium is still in a tetravalent form, ie. it is included in the fuel matrix (non-oxidized fuel UO2). The average value of the destruction rate of fuel particles determined for the Western radioactive trace (k = 0.030 +/- 0.005 yr(-1)) and for the Northern radioactive trace (k = 0.035 + 0.009 yr(-1)) coincide within experimental errors. Use of leaching of fission products in comparison to leaching of uranium for study of the destruction rate of fuel particles yielded poor coincidence due to the fact that use of fission products does not take into account differences in the chemical properties of fission products and fuel matrix (uranium).

  15. Successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of He-Ar-Xe (2.03 μm) and Ar-Xe (1.73 μm) mixtures by uranium fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikulev, A A; Tsvetkov, V M; Sosnin, P V; Sinyanskii, A A

    2009-01-01

    The operation efficiency of the scheme with successive composition of two laser channels upon excitation of the active medium by uranium-235 fission fragments is studied experimentally and numerically. For the He:Ar:Xe = 380:380:1 mixture (at a pressure of 1 atm and the lasing wavelength λ = 2.03 μm) the maximum lasing power of a double channel (1 kW) is almost twice that of a single channel (540 W). Calculations show that in the case of ideal composition (without losses on mirrors) the lasing power of the double channel can be increased to 1.2 kW. For the Ar:Xe = 380:1 mixture (the pressure is 0.5 atm, λ = 1.73 μm) the maximum lasing power of the double channel (620 W) is slightly above that of the single channel (520 W), which is caused by the losses on aluminum mirrors employed for channel doubling and by a negative effect of optical inhomogeneities. In the case of ideal composition, the lasing power can be increased to 830 W. (lasers)

  16. Fission gas behaviour in water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    During irradiation, nuclear fuel changes volume, primarily through swelling. This swelling is caused by the fission products and in particular by the volatile ones such as krypton and xenon, called fission gas. Fission gas behaviour needs to be reliably predicted in order to make better use of nuclear fuel, a factor which can help to achieve the economic competitiveness required by today's markets. These proceedings communicate the results of an international seminar which reviewed recent progress in the field of fission gas behaviour in light water reactor fuel and sought to improve the models used in computer codes predicting fission gas release. State-of-the-art knowledge is presented for both uranium-oxide and mixed-oxide fuels loaded in water reactors. (author)

  17. Grain boundary sweeping and dissolution effects on fission product behavior under severe fuel damage accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.

    1985-10-01

    The theoretical FASTGRASS-VFP model has been used in the interpretation of fission gas, iodine, tellurium, and cesium release from severe-fuel-damage (SFD) tests performed in the PBF reactor in Idaho. A theory of grain boundary sweeping of gas bubbles, gas bubble behavior during fuel liquefaction (destruction of grain boundaries due to formation of a U-rich melt phase), and during U-Zr eutectic melting has been included within the FASTGRASS-VFP formalism. The grain-boundary-sweeping theory considers the interaction between the moving grain boundary and two distinct size classes of bubbles, those on grain faces and on grain edges. The theory of the effects of fuel liquefaction and U-Zr eutectic melting on fission product behavior considers the migration and coalescence of fission gas bubbles in either molten uranium, or a zircaloy-uranium eutectic melt. The FASTGRASS-VFP predictions, measured release rates from the above tests, and previously published release rates are compared and differences between fission product behavior in trace-irradiated and in normally irradiated fuel are highlighted

  18. Impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalick, S.; Jansen, P.; Kessler, G.; Klumpp, P.

    1980-08-01

    An investigation has been conducted to examine the impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future. The primary objectives of this investigation have been: (1) to determine whether hybrids can allow us to meet the projected nuclear component of the world energy demand within current estimates of uranium resources without fast breeders, and (2) to identify the preferred hybrid concept from a resource standpoint. The results indicate that hybrids have the potential to lower the world uranium demand to values well below the resource base. However, the time window for hybrid introduction is quite near and narrow (2000-2020). If historical market penetration rates are assumed, the demand will not be met within the resource base unless hybrids are coupled to the breeders. The results also indicate that from a resource standpoint hybrids which breed their own tritium and have a low blanket energy multiplication are preferable. (orig.) [de

  19. Impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to examine the impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future. The primary objectives of this investigation have been (1) to determine whether hybrids can allow us to meet the projected nuclear component of the world energy demand within current estimates of uranium resources with or without fast breeders, and (2) to identify the preferred hybrid concept from a resource standpoint. The results indicate that hybrids have the potential to lower the world uranium demand to values well below the resource base. However, the time window for hybrid introduction is quite near and narrow (2000-2020). If historical market penetration rates are assumed, the demand will not be met within the resource base unless hybrides are coupled to the breeders. The results also indicate that from a resource standpaint hybrids which breed their own tritium and have a low blanket energy multiplication are preferable. (orig.) [de

  20. Impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Jansen, P.; Kessler, G.; Klumpp, P.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to examine the impact of fusion-fission hybrids on world nuclear future. The primary objectives of this investigation have been: (1) to determine whether hybrids can allow us to meet the projected nuclear component of the world energy demand within current estimates of uranium resources with or without fast breeders, and (2) to identify the preferred hybrid concept from a resource standpoint. The results indicate that hybrids have the potential to lower the world uranium demand to values well below the resource base. However, the time window for hybrid introduction is quite near and narrow (2000-2020). If historical market penetration rates are assumed, the demand will not be met within the resource base unless hybrids are coupled to the breeders. The results also indicate that from a resource standpoint hybrids which breed their own tritium and have a low blanket energy multiplication are preferable. (orig.) [de

  1. Raw material uranium; Rohstoff Uran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-03-15

    Uranium is an important raw material in human life. Mostly using nuclear fission uranium is used in nuclear medicine, industry and research. The most important application is the generation of electricity in nuclear power plants. Due to the global availability the worldwide uranium supply is guaranties for a long time. The contribution covers the issues medicine, neutron research, energy generation, occurrence, mining, processing, recycling and disposal.

  2. Measurement of mass distribution of U-235 fission products in the intermediate neutron region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagomi, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Shohei; Yamamoto, Shuji; Kanno, Ikuo; Wakabayashi, Hiroaki.

    1982-01-01

    The mass distribution and the momentum distribution of U-235 fission products in the intermediate neutron region were measured by using a combination system of the Yayoi intermediate neutron column and an electron linear accelerator. The double energy measurement method was applied. A fission chamber, which consists of an enriched uranium target and two Si surface barrier detectors, was used for the measurement of the neutrons with energy above 1.3 eV. The linear accelerator was operated at the repetition rate of 100 Hz and the pulse width of 10 ns. The data obtained by the two-dimensional pulse height analysis were analyzed by the Schmitt's method. The preliminary results of the mass distribution and the momentum distribution of fission fragments were obtained. (Kato, T.)

  3. Vaporization of low-volatile fission products under severe CANDU reactor accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.J.; Corse, B.J.; Thompson, W.T.; Kaye, M.H.; Iglesias, F.C.; Elder, P.; Dickson, R.; Liu, Z.

    1997-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the release behaviour of low-volatile fission products from uranium dioxide fuel under severe reactor accident conditions. The effect of the oxygen potential on the chemical form and volatility of fission products is determined by Gibbs-energy minimization. The release kinetics are calculated according to the rate-controlling step of diffusional transport in the fuel matrix or fission product vaporization from the fuel surface. The effect of fuel volatilization (i.e., matrix stripping) on the release behaviour is also considered. The model has been compared to data from an out-of-pile annealing experiment performed in steam at the Chalk River Laboratories. (author)

  4. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  5. Physics and chemistry of fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Full text: In the pleasant and hospitable atmosphere of the Kernforschungsanlage Juelich in the Federal Republic of Germany, the IAEA symposium on the Physics and Chemistry of Fission took place. Almost 200 scientists attended, 154 abstracts were submitted, and 57 papers presented, but more important than the numbers was the quality of the contributions and the progress reported at the symposium. The neutron was discovered almost 50 years ago; 40 years ago the idea of nuclear fission was born. Since then, a number of laboratories have worked hard to explain the phenomenon of fission One would expect that by now scientists would know exactly what happens in a nucleus before and during the process of fission, particularly as there are hundreds of power and research reactors in operation, and fission of uranium isotopes is the basis of their functioning. At first glance, fission seems a simple process: a neutron hits and penetrates the uranium nucleus which becomes excited, i.e. has a surplus of energy. One way to get rid of this energy is for the nucleus to split into two parts; additional products of this process are energy and more neutrons. Nature, however, seems to dislike such straightforward explanations. In the case of fission, scientists have observed a number of phenomena which disagree with a simple model. Sometimes, a nucleus will split into two parts without being 'attacked' by a neutron; this spontaneous fission opens up a new line of fission research and several contributions at the symposium reported on sophisticated experiments designed to unravel some of its specific details. Sometimes, a fissioning nucleus will emit another particle: ternary fission has become a powerful tool for studying the properties of nuclei during the fission process. For the scientist, it is fascinating to observe how the nucleus behaves during fission. They invent models which are supposed to reproduce the most probable course of events leading to fission. In one of these

  6. The solubility of solid fission products in carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium: Pt.2. Solubility rules based on lattice parameter differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, U.

    1977-01-01

    The Relative Lattice Parameter Difference (RLPD) is defined for a solute element with respect to cubic carbides and nitrides of uranium and plutonium as solvents. Rules are given for the relationship between the solubility and the RLPD. NaCl type monocarbides with RLPD's from -10.2% to +7.8% are completely miscible with UC and PuC. NaCl type mononitrides with RLPD's from -7.5% to +8.5% are completely miscible with UN and PuN. The solubility in the sesquicarbides increases with decreasing RPLD and becomes complete in Pu 2 C 3 at RLPD = +4%, and in U 2 C 3 at RLPD approximately +1.5%. Solubilities are predicted on the basis of these rules for the cases where no experimental results are available

  7. Nuclear molecules in low energy fission of actinides?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkov, Yu.V.; Pashkevich, V.V.; Tishchenko, V.G.; Unzhakova, A.V.; )

    2000-01-01

    A comparison is presented of the fine structure (FS) of the both energy-mass and energy-charge distributions of the fission fragments of thermal neutron induced fission of uranium in the data obtained at different spectrometers. Some peculiarities of the FS observed can be treated as a manifestation of two different types of collective vibrations of the fissioning system on its way to scission [ru

  8. Migration of fission products in UO2. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prussin, S.G.; Olander, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    Results of an experimental and calculational effort to examine the fundamental mechanisms of fission product migration in and release from polycrystalline uranium dioxide are reported. The experiments were designed to provide diffusion parameters for the representative fission products tellurium, iodine, xenon, molybdenum and ruthenium under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. The calculational effort applied a new model of fission product release from reactor fuel that incorporates grain growth as well as grain boundary and lattice diffusion

  9. Capture and Fission rate of 232-Th, 238-U, 237-Np and 239-Pu from spallation neutrons in a huge block of lead.

    CERN Document Server

    Vlachoudis, Vasilis

    2000-01-01

    The study is centered on the research of the incineration possibility of nuclear waste, by the association of a particle accelerator with a multiplying medium of neutrons, in the project "Energy Amplifier" of C. Rubbia. It consists of the experimental determination of the rates of capture and fission of certain elements (232-Th, 238-U, 237-Np and 239-Pu) subjected to a fluence of fast spallation neutrons. These neutrons are produced by the interaction of high kinetic energy protons (several GeV) provided by the CERN-PS accelerator, on a large lead solid volume. The measurement techniques used in this work, are based on the activation of elements in the lead volume and the subsequent gamma spectroscopy of the activated elements, and also by the detection of fission fragment traces. The development, of a Monte Carlo code makes it possible, on one hand, to better understand the relevant processes, and on the other hand, to validate the code, by comparison with measurements, for the design and the construction of...

  10. Unexpected rates of chromosomal instabilities and alterations of hormone levels in Namibian uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaire, R.; Notter, M.; Thiel, E.

    1997-01-01

    A common problem in determining the health consequences of radiation exposure is factoring out other carcinogenic influences. The conditions in Namibia provide a test case for distinguishing the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to uranium from the other environmental factors because of good air quality and the lack of other industries with negative health effects. Present records indicate a much higher prevalence of cancer among male workers in the open-pit uranium mine in Namibia compared with the general population. The objective of the present study was to determine whether long-term exposure to low doses of uranium increases the risk of a biological radiation damage which would lead to malignant diseases and to derive a dose-response model for these miners. To investigate this risk, we measured uranium excretion in urine, neutrophil counts and the serum level of FSH, LH and testosterone and analyzed chromosome aberrations in whole blood cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A representative cohort of 75 non-smoking, HIV-negative miners was compared to a control group of 31 individuals with no occupational history in mining. A sixfold increase in uranium excretion among the miners compared to the controls was recorded (P < 0.001). Furthermore, we determined a significant reduction in testosterone levels (P < 0.008) and neutrophil count (P < 0.0001). Most remarkably, cells with multiple aberrations such as open-quotes rogueclose quotes cells were observed for the first time in miners; these cells had previously been found only after short-term high-dose radiation exposure, e.g. from the Hiroshima atomic bomb or the Chernobyl accident. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Alkaline glass as induced fission fragment detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, A.M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The slide glass, registered trade marks INLAB, INVICT and PERFECTA were compared. For the three kinds of glasses the following studies were done: chemical composition; general dissolution rate for hydrofluoric acid solutions of concentrations between 1 and 10M, at 30 0 C and ultrasound shaking; relative efficiency for recording fission fragment tracks from 252 Cf. The INLAB glass was selected due to the better quality of its surface after chemical etching. The HF concentration 2.5M was determined for chemical etching of INLAB glass, and the optimum etching time was chosen between 8 and 10 minutes. The thermal attenuation of latent tracks in the environmental temperature was observed for intervals uo to 31 days between the detector exposure to the fission fragment source and etching of tracks. Several methods were used for determining the detector parameters, such as: critical angle, angle of the cone and efficiency of etching. The effects of gamma irradiation from 60 Co and reactor neutrons in material properties as track detector were studied. Attenuation of latent tracks and saturation of color centers were observed for doses over 100M Rad. Since this kind of material contains uranium as impurity, uniformely distributed, slide glass were calibrated to be applied as a monitor of thermal neutron flux in nuclear reactor. (Author) [pt

  12. Fission modelling with FIFRELIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litaize, Olivier; Serot, Olivier; Berge, Leonie

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear fission process gives rise to the formation of fission fragments and emission of particles (n,γ, e - ). The particle emission from fragments can be prompt and delayed. We present here the methods used in the FIFRELIN code, which simulates the prompt component of the de-excitation process. The methods are based on phenomenological models associated with macroscopic and/or microscopic ingredients. Input data can be provided by experiment as well as by theory. The fission fragment de-excitation can be performed within Weisskopf (uncoupled neutron and gamma emission) or a Hauser-Feshbach (coupled neutron/gamma emission) statistical theory. We usually consider five free parameters that cannot be provided by theory or experiments in order to describe the initial distributions required by the code. In a first step this set of parameters is chosen to reproduce a very limited set of target observables. In a second step we can increase the statistics to predict all other fission observables such as prompt neutron, gamma and conversion electron spectra but also their distributions as a function of any kind of parameters such as, for instance, the neutron, gamma and electron number distributions, the average prompt neutron multiplicity as a function of fission fragment mass, charge or kinetic energy, and so on. Several results related to different fissioning systems are presented in this work. The goal in the next decade will be i) to replace some macroscopic ingredients or phenomenological models by microscopic calculations when available and reliable, ii) to be a support for experimentalists in the design of detection systems or in the prediction of necessary beam time or count rates with associated statistics when measuring fragments and emitted particle in coincidence iii) extend the model to be able to run a calculation when no experimental input data are available, iv) account for multiple chance fission and gamma emission before fission, v) account for the

  13. Glances on uranium. From uranium in the earth to electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsardieu, C.

    1995-01-01

    This book is a technical, scientific and historical analysis of the nuclear fuel cycle from the origin of uranium in the earth and the exploitation of uranium ores to the ultimate storage of radioactive wastes. It comprises 6 chapters dealing with: 1) the different steps of uranium history (discovery, history of uranium chemistry, the radium era, the physicists and the structure of matter, the military uses, the nuclear power, the uranium industry and economics), 2) the uranium in nature (nuclear structure, physical-chemical properties, radioactivity, ores, resources, cycle, deposits), 3) the sidelights on uranium history (mining, prospecting, experience, ore processing, resources, reserves, costs), 4) the uranium in the fuel cycle, energy source and industrial product (fuel cycle, fission, refining, enrichment, fuel processing and reprocessing, nuclear reactors, wastes management), 5) the other energies in competition and the uranium market (other uranium uses, fossil fuels and renewable energies, uranium market), and 6) the future of uranium (forecasting, ecology, economics). (J.S.)

  14. Chemical and technological investigations to establish the production of 99Mo/sup(99m)Tc-Generators from uranium fission in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munze, R.; El-Bayoumy, S.; Mosaad, K.; Hallaba, E.

    1980-01-01

    Different possibilities to meet the current estimated demand of sup(99m)Tc for medical uses in the Arab Republic of Egypt have been investigated using irradiation and separation experiments and theoretical calculations. The investigation includes the evaluation of the real present irradiation capability of the Egyptian Research Reactor as well as pilot runs suitable technological schemes for target design and chemical processing of irradiated uranium targets. The suitability of the produced 99 Mo for the preparation of 99 Mo/sup(99m)Tc-generators has been confirmed. Separation yield (80%) as well as the radiochemical and radionuclidic purity of the sup(99m)Tc (TcO 4 98%, sup(99m)Tc 99,9%) corresponds to comparable results for similar processes cited in recent literature. The necessary requirements, related to the irradiation capability of the reactor and the demands of the radiochemical facilities, have been derived. The present work is the fruit of three months cooperation between the Agency expert and the Egyptian Counterpart

  15. Consideration on intake of uranium through smoking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Y.; Yamakawa, A.; Oki, Y.; Seki, R.; Ikeda, N.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium in Japanese tobacco leaves and human hair was determined by the fission track method. It was found that the uranium content in smokers' hair was higher than in non-smokers'. Furthermore, a part of uranium was lost from tobacco leaves by ashing at 500-700 deg C. These two results suggest that uranium would be inhaled through smoking. (author) 12 refs.; 2 tabs

  16. The effect of time-dependent ventilation and radon (thoron) gas emanation rates in underground uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical radiation mine model, suitable for underground uranium mines, has been investigated. In this model, the rate of ventilation and/or the radon (thoron) gas emanation from mine walls are time-dependent. Several cases of practical interest have been investigated including sinusoidal, linear, exponential, stepwise, or a combination of two or more of the above. Analytical solutions were obtained for the time-dependent radon (thoron) gas emanation rate. However, because of the extreme analytical complexity of the solutions corresponding to the time-dependent ventilation rate case, numerical solutions were found using a special Runge-Kutta procedure and the Hamming's modified predictor-corrector method for the solution of linear initial-value problems. The mine model makes provisions for losses of radioactivity, other than by ventilation and radioactive decay, by, say, plate-out on mine walls, and by other mechanisms. Radioactivity data, i.e., radon, thoron, and their progeny, obtained with the above mine model for a number of ventilation and emanation conditions, are presented. Experimental data obtained in an inactive stope of an underground uranium mine for a time-dependent air flow case are shown. Air flow conditions (ventilation rate) were determined by tracer gas techniques using SF 6

  17. Uranium, Thorium and Potassium concentrations and volumetric heat production rates at the eastern border of the Parana basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Telma C.Q.; Ribeiro, Fernando B.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations were measured and volumetric heat production rates were calculated for rocks from the exposed basement at the eastern-southeastern border of the Parana Basin between 23 deg S and 32 deg S. Heat generating element concentration data available in the literature were also used when possible, for volumetric heat production calculations. The uranium concentrations vary from below determination limit (0.51 ppm) and 16 ppm whereas the thorium concentrations vary from below the determination limit (1.26 ppm) and 68 ppm, and K concentrations vary between 0.08% and 5.6%. Volumetric heat production rates vary between 0.07 μW/m 3 to 6.2 μW/m 3 , and the obtained results show a variable heat generation rate with high heat producing bodies scattered along this Parana Basin border. The higher observed values concentrate in the Ribeira fold belt at about 23 deg S and between 30 deg S and 32 deg S in the Down Feliciano fold belt. Isolated high heat production rates can also be observed between 26 deg S and 28 deg S. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  18. Recycling of nuclear matters. Myths and realities. Calculation of recycling rate of the plutonium and uranium produced by the French channel of spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coeytaux, X.; Schneider, M.

    2000-05-01

    The recycling rate of plutonium and uranium are: from the whole of the plutonium separated from the spent fuel ( inferior to 1% of the nuclear matter content) attributed to France is under 50% (under 42 tons on 84 tons); from the whole of plutonium produced in the French reactors is less than 20% (42 tons on 224 tons); from the whole of the uranium separated from spent fuels attributed to France is about 10 % (1600 tons on 16000 tons); from the whole of the uranium contained in the spent fuel is slightly over 5%. (N.C.)

  19. Measurement of fission gas release, internal pressure and cladding creep rate in the fuel pins of PHWR bundle of normal discharge burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, U.K. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sah, D.N., E-mail: dnsah@barc.gov.i [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rath, B.N.; Anantharaman, S. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-08-01

    Fuel pins of a Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle discharged from Narora Atomic Power Station unit no. 1 after attaining a fuel burnup of 7528 MWd/tU have been subjected to two types of studies, namely (i) puncture test to estimate extent of fission gas release and internal pressure in the fuel pin and (ii) localized heating of the irradiated fuel pin to measure the creep rate of the cladding in temperature range 800 deg. C - 900 deg. C. The fission gas release in the fuel pins from the outer ring of the bundle was found to be about 8%. However, only marginal release was found in fuel pins from the middle ring and the central fuel pin. The internal gas pressure in the outer fuel pin was measured to be 0.55 +- 0.05 MPa at room temperature. In-cell isothermal heating of a small portion of the outer fuel pins was carried out at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for 10 min and the increase in diameter of the fuel pin was measured after heat treatment. Creep rates of the cladding obtained from the measurement of the diameter change of the cladding due to heating at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C were found respectively to be 2.4 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, 24.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and 45.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}.

  20. Search for other natural fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apt, K.E.; Balagna, J.P.; Bryant, E.A.; Cowan, G.A.; Daniels, W.R.; Vidale, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Precambrian uranium ores have been surveyed for evidence of other natural fission reactors. The requirements for formation of a natural reactor direct investigations to uranium deposits with large, high-grade ore zones. Massive zones with volumes approximately greater than 1 m 3 and concentrations approximately greater than 20 percent uranium are likely places for a fossil reactor if they are approximately greater than 0.6 b.a. old and if they contained sufficient water but lacked neutron-absorbing impurities. While uranium deposits of northern Canada and northern Australia have received most attention, ore samples have been obtained from the following worldwide locations: the Shinkolobwe and Katanga regions of Zaire; Southwest Africa; Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; the Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Ranger, and El Sharana ore bodies of the Northern Territory, Australia; the Beaverlodge, Maurice Bay, Key Lake, Cluff Lake, and Rabbit Lake ore bodies and the Great Bear Lake region, Canada. The ore samples were tested for isotopic variations in uranium, neodymium, samarium, and ruthenium which would indicate natural fission. Isotopic anomalies were not detected. Criticality was not achieved in these deposits because they did not have sufficient 235 U content (a function of age and total uranium content) and/or because they had significant impurities and insufficient moderation. A uranium mill monitoring technique has been considered where the ''yellowcake'' output from appropriate mills would be monitored for isotopic alterations indicative of the exhumation and processing of a natural reactor

  1. A position sensitive parallel plate avalanche fission detector for use in particle induced fission coincidence measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plicht, J. van der

    1980-01-01

    A parallel plate avalanche detector developed for the detection of fission fragments in particle induced fission reactions is described. The active area is 6 × 10 cm2; it is position sensitive in one dimension with a resolution of 2.5 mm. The detector can withstand a count rate of 25000 fission

  2. Determination of the fission barrier height in fission of heavy radioactive beams induced by the (d,p)-transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    A theoretical framework is described, allowing to determine the fission barrier height using the observed cross sections of fission induced by the (d,p)-transfer with accuracy, which is not achievable in another type of low-energy fission of neutron-deficient nuclei, the $\\beta$-delayed fission. The primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission of...

  3. Transient fission gas release from UO2 fuel for high temperature and high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper it is assumed that the fission gas release kinetics from an irradiated UO 2 fuel for high temperature is determined by the kinetics of grain growth. A well founded assumption that Vitanza curve describes the change of uranium dioxide re-crystallization temperature and the experimental results referring to the limiting grain size presented in the literature are used to modify the grain growth model. Algorithms of fission gas release due to re-crystallization of uranium dioxide grains are worked out. The defect trap model of fission gas behaviour described in the earlier papers is supplemented with the algorithms. Calculations of fission gas release in function of time, temperature, burn-up and initial grain sizes are obtained. Computation of transient fission gas release in the paper is limited to the case where steady state of irradiation to accumulate a desired burn-up is performed below the temperature of re-crystallization then the subsequent step temperature increase follows. There are considered two kinds of step temperature increase for different burn-up: the final temperature of the step increase is below and above the re-crystallization temperature. Calculations show that bursts of fission gas are predicted in both kinds. The release rate of gas liberated for the final temperature above the re-crystallization temperature is much higher than for final temperature below the re-crystallization temperature. The time required for the burst to subside is longer due to grain growth than due to diffusion of bubbles and knock-out release. The theoretical results explain qualitatively the experimental data but some of them need to be verified since this sort of experimental data are not found in the available literature. (author)

  4. On the reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Diyu

    1997-01-01

    Form the concepts of slow neutrons, the binding energy and the excitation energy of complex nuclei, and the activation energy in nuclear fission, the four reasons for bombarding uranium with slow neutrons are summed up. Not only the reasons for uranium fission are brought in light, but also the micromechanism is dealt with

  5. Diagnosis of In Situ Metabolic State and Rates of Microbial Metabolism During In Situ Uranium Bioremediation with Molecular Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovley, Derek R. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    2012-11-28

    The goal of these projects was to develop molecule tools to tract the metabolic activity and physiological status of microorganisms during in situ uranium bioremediation. Such information is important in able to design improved bioremediation strategies. As summarized below, the research was highly successful with new strategies developed for estimating in situ rates of metabolism and diagnosing the physiological status of the predominant subsurface microorganisms. This is a first not only for groundwater bioremediation studies, but also for subsurface microbiology in general. The tools and approaches developed in these studies should be applicable to the study of microbial communities in a diversity of soils and sediments.

  6. Ideological Fission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Steen Ledet

    ; it is a materialisation of an ideological fission which attempts to excise certain ideological constructions, yet paradoxically casting them in a form that is recognizable and familiar. The monstrous metonomy which is used shows us glimpses of a horrid being, intended to vilify the attack on New York City. However......, it is a being which is reminiscent of earlier monsters - from Godzilla to The Blob. It is evident that the Cloverfield monster is a paradoxical construction which attempts to articulate fear and loathing about terrorism, but ends up trapped in an ideological dead-end maze, unable to do anything other than...

  7. A stochastic approach to fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out. A strong friction coefficient, calculated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. Fission was described as a diffusion over a barrier of a collective variable, and a Langevin Equation (LE) was used to study the phenomenon. A study of the stationary flow over the saddle point with a Fokker-Planck Equation (FPE), equivalent to the LE was used to give formula for the stationary fission rate (or reaction rate for the chemistry applications). More recently, a complete study of the fission process was performed numerically with both FPE and LE. A long transient time, that could allow more pre-scission neutrons to evaporate, was pointed out. The derivation of this new LE is recalled, followed by the description of the memory dependence and by the effect of a large friction coefficient on the fission rate. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  8. Mica fission detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.; Anderson, J.D.; Hansen, L.; Lehn, A.V.; Williamson, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The present development status of the mica fission detectors is summarized. It is concluded that the techniques have been refined and developed to a state such that the mica fission counters are a reliable and reproducible detector for fission events

  9. Nuclear fission with a Langevin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boilley, D.; Suraud, E.; Abe, Yasuhisa

    1992-01-01

    A microscopically derived Langevin equation is applied to thermally induced nuclear fission. An important memory effect is pointed out and discussed. A strong friction coefficient, estimated from microscopic quantities, tends to decrease the stationary limit of the fission rate and to increase the transient time. The calculations are performed with a collective mass depending on the collective variable and with a constant mass. Fission rates calculated at different temperatures are shown and compared with previous available results. (author) 23 refs.; 7 figs

  10. Evaluation of fission spectra and cross sections by zero-leakage core experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, T.; Mukaiyama, T.

    1979-01-01

    A series of unit k-infinity core experiments were performed in FCA of JAERI to obtain the information on the equivalence of 239 Pu to 235 U in fast reactors, and to examine the inelastic slowing down cross section of 238 U. Three assemblies were built. Each assembly consists of a test zone (about 44l) of nearly unit k-infinity, a 20% enriched uranium driver and a natural uranium blanket. Assembly IV-1 (first built in 1969 and rebuilt in 1972) is an all uranium system, and Assemblies IV-1-P, IV-1-P' have a plutonium/natural uranium test zone. Three assemblies are nearly the same from the view-point of the slowing down cross section in the main energy region of the neutron spectrum, since 238 U occupies the most part of the composition. The main difference between Assembly IV-1 and the latter two is the difference in the fissile material. Fission rate ratios and k-infinity values were measured to obtain knowledge of the fission spectra and cross sections important for the criticality. In order to evaluate the inelastic slowing down cross section of 238 U, neutron spectra were measured with various methods. The analysis was done with four cross section sets. The agreement of k-infinity values between the experiment and the calculation is unsatisfactory, especially for Pu/NU systems

  11. Monte Carlo analysis of the long-lived fission product neutron capture rates at the Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abánades, A.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; González-Romero, E.M.; Ismailov, K.; Lafuente, A.; Nishihara, K.; Saito, M.; Stanculescu, A.; Sugawara, T.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► TARC experiment benchmark capture rates results. ► Utilization of updated databases, included ADSLib. ► Self-shielding effect in reactor design for transmutation. ► Effect of Lead nuclear data. - Abstract: The design of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) requires the development of simulation tools that are able to describe in a realistic way their nuclear performance and transmutation rate capability. In this publication, we present an evaluation of state of the art Monte Carlo design tools to assess their performance concerning transmutation of long-lived fission products. This work, performed under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency, analyses two important aspects for transmutation systems: moderation on Lead and neutron captures of 99 Tc, 127 I and 129 I. The analysis of the results shows how shielding effects due to the resonances at epithermal energies of these nuclides affects strongly their transmutation rate. The results suggest that some research effort should be undertaken to improve the quality of Iodine nuclear data at epithermal and fast neutron energy to obtain a reliable transmutation estimation.

  12. Craving Ravens: Individual ‘haa’ Call Rates at Feeding Sites as Cues to Personality and Levels of Fission-Fusion Dynamics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgine Szipl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Common ravens aggregate in large non-breeder flocks for roosting and foraging until they achieve the status of territorial breeders. When discovering food, they produce far-reaching yells or ‘haa’ calls, which attract conspecifics. Due to the high levels of fission-fusion dynamics in non-breeders’ flocks, assemblies of feeding ravens were long thought to represent anonymous aggregations. Yet, non-breeders vary in their degree of vagrancy, and ‘haa’ calls convey individually distinct acoustic features, which are perceived by conspecifics. These findings give rise to the assumption that raven societies are based on differential social relationships on an individual level. We investigated the occurrence of ‘haa’ calling and individual call rates in a group of individually marked free-ranging ravens. Calling mainly occurred in subadult and adult females, which showed low levels of vagrancy. Call rates differed significantly between individuals and with residency status, and were correlated with calling frequency and landing frequency. Local ravens called more often and at higher rates, and were less likely to land at the feeding site than vagrant birds. The results are discussed with respect to individual degrees of vagrancy, which may have an impact on social knowledge and communication in this species.

  13. Monte Carlo analysis of the long-lived fission product neutron capture rates at the Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing (TARC) experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.M. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense, 40, Ed. 17, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ismailov, K. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Lafuente, A. [Grupo de Modelizacion de Sistemas Termoenergeticos, ETSII, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Ramiro de Maeztu, 7, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Nishihara, K. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Saito, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Stanculescu, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Sugawara, T. [Transmutation Section, J-PARC Center, JAEA, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TARC experiment benchmark capture rates results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Utilization of updated databases, included ADSLib. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Self-shielding effect in reactor design for transmutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of Lead nuclear data. - Abstract: The design of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) requires the development of simulation tools that are able to describe in a realistic way their nuclear performance and transmutation rate capability. In this publication, we present an evaluation of state of the art Monte Carlo design tools to assess their performance concerning transmutation of long-lived fission products. This work, performed under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency, analyses two important aspects for transmutation systems: moderation on Lead and neutron captures of {sup 99}Tc, {sup 127}I and {sup 129}I. The analysis of the results shows how shielding effects due to the resonances at epithermal energies of these nuclides affects strongly their transmutation rate. The results suggest that some research effort should be undertaken to improve the quality of Iodine nuclear data at epithermal and fast neutron energy to obtain a reliable transmutation estimation.

  14. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission γ-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T ∼ 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k red ∼ 0.45 ± 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  15. The fusion-fission hybrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teller, E.

    1985-01-01

    As the history of the development of fusion energy shows, a sustained controlled fusion reaction is much more difficult to produce than rapid uncontrolled release of fusion energy. Currently, the ''magnetic bottle'' technique shows sufficient progress that it might applied for the commercial fuel production of /sup 233/U, suitable for use in fission reactors, by developing a fusion-fission hybrid. Such a device would consist of a fusion chamber core surrounded by a region containing cladded uranium pellets cooled by helium, with lithium salts also present to produce tritium to refuel the fusion process. Successful development of this hybrid might be possible within 10 y, and would provide both experience and funds for further development of controlled fusion energy

  16. Methods to Collect, Compile, and Analyze Observed Short-lived Fission Product Gamma Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, Erin C.; Metz, Lori A.; Payne, Rosara F.; Friese, Judah I.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy D.; Pierson, Bruce D.; Ellis, Tere A.

    2011-09-29

    A unique set of fission product gamma spectra was collected at short times (4 minutes to 1 week) on various fissionable materials. Gamma spectra were collected from the neutron-induced fission of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium isotopes at thermal, epithermal, fission spectrum, and 14-MeV neutron energies. This report describes the experimental methods used to produce and collect the gamma data, defines the experimental parameters for each method, and demonstrates the consistency of the measurements.

  17. Review of fission-fusion pellet designs and inertial confinement system studies at EIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifriz, W [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1978-01-01

    The article summarizes the work done so far at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) in the field of the inertial confinement fusion technique. The following subjects are reviewed: a) fission fusion pellet designs using fissionable triggers, b) uranium tampered pellets, c) tampered pellets recycling unwanted actinide wastes from fission reactors in beam-driven micro-explosion reactors, and d) symbiotic fusion/fission reactor studies.

  18. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  19. Uranium in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1979-01-01

    When fission fragments pass through certain solids they leave trails of radiation damage which can be observed by transmission electron microscopy. If the solid can be chemically etched these tracks are 'developed' and brought within the resolving power of the light optical microscope. Since its introduction the etching technique has been used to reveal tracks formed due to the thermal neutron induced fission of U 235 atoms in many uranium bearing materials of both terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin. Successful experiments have been performed in determining the distribution of uranium in selected botanical species. On the basis of this most recent work it was decided to make a feasibility study of a determination of the concentration in human blood. This short report produces evidence not only that the fission track etching technique is useful for this purpose but that there are significant uranium concentration differences in blood taken from leukemia patients compared with samples taken from healthy norms. Whilst experiments of this kind generally employ direct registration of the fission fragments in the material itself, as with minerals, an alternative procedure is to employ some overlay, such as thin sheets of muscovite mica, or of a suitable plastic. In the present investigations the plastic Lexan polycarbonate (C 6 H 15 O 3 ) was selected as an overlay since it is easy to etch chemically. (author)

  20. Effect of heating and cooling rate on the kinetics of allotropic phase changes in uranium: A differential scanning calorimetry study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Arun Kumar; Raju, S.; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mohandas, E.; Sudha, R.; Ganesan, V.

    2009-01-01

    The kinetic aspects of allotropic phase changes in uranium are studied as a function of heating/cooling rate in the range 10 0 -10 2 K min -1 by isochronal differential scanning calorimetry. The transformation arrest temperatures revealed a remarkable degree of sensitivity to variations of heating and cooling rate, and this is especially more so for the transformation finish (T f ) temperatures. The results obtained for the α → β and β → γ transformations during heating confirm to the standard Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) model for a nucleation and growth mediated process. The apparent activation energy Q eff for the overall transformation showed a mild increase with increasing heating rate. In fact, the heating rate normalised Arrhenius rate constant, k/β reveals a smooth power law decay with increasing heating rate (β). For the α → β phase change, the observed DSC peak profile for slower heating rates contained a distinct shoulder like feature, which however is absent in the corresponding profiles found for higher heating rates. The kinetics of γ → β phase change on the other hand, is best described by the two-parameter Koistinen-Marburger empirical relation for the martensitic transformation

  1. Influence of temperature, strain rate and thermal aging on the structure/property behavior of uranium 6 wt% Nb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cady, C.M.; Gray, G.T.; Chen, S.R.; Lopez, M.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., MST-8, MS G-755, NM (United States); Field, R.D.; Korzekwa, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., MST-6, MS G-770, NM (United States); Hixson, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab, DX-9, MS P-952, NM (United States)

    2006-08-15

    A rigorous experimentation and validation program is being undertaken to create constitutive models that elucidate the fundamental mechanisms controlling plasticity in uranium-6 wt% niobium alloys (U-6Nb). These models should accurately predict high-strain-rate large-strain plasticity, damage evolution and failure. The goal is a physically-based constitutive model that captures 1) an understanding of how strain rate, temperature, and aging affects the mechanical response of a material, and 2) an understanding of the operative deformation mechanisms. The stress-strain response of U-6Nb has been studied as a function of temperature, strain-rate, and thermal aging. U-6Nb specimens in a solution-treated and quenched condition and after subsequent aging at 473 K for 2 hours were studied. The constitutive behavior was evaluated over the range of strain rates from quasi-static (0.001 s{sup -1}) to dynamic ({approx} 2000 s{sup -1}) and temperatures ranging from 77 to 773 K. The yield stress of U-6Nb was exhibited pronounced temperature sensitivity. The strain hardening rate is seen to be less sensitive to strain rate and temperature beyond plastic strains of 0.10. The yield strength of the aged material is less significantly affected by temperature and the work hardening rate shows adiabatic heating at lower strains rates (1/s). (authors)

  2. Fission - track age of the Marjalahti Pallasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondar, Yu.V.; Perelygin, V.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Investigation of fossil charged-particle tracks in various mineral phases of extraterrestrial samples is a powerful method for research the early stages of the solar system. Over geological time, meteorites crystals have accumulated a record of tracks produced by heavily charged energetic particles from both internal (spontaneous fission of 238U and some other extinct isotopes) and external sources (galactic cosmic rays with Z>20). The fortunate fact that meteorite grains can accumulate latent and very long-lived tracks since soon after the end of nucleosynthesis in the solar nebula enables one to decode their radiation history and to detect any thermal events in the meteorite cosmic history by revealing these tracks through suitable etching procedures. Only a few minerals in meteorites (mainly phosphates) contain small amount of uranium; the fact that 238 U undergoes fission with fission-decay constant λ f ∼ 8.2x10 -17 yr -1 allows one to use this isotope as a chronometer. By measuring the U concentration in the crystals (by reactor irradiation) and the density of the spontaneous-fission tracks it is relatively easy to calculate the 'fission-track age' if 238 U is the main source of fission tracks. However the fission-track dating of extraterrestrial samples compared with the terrestrial ones has some peculiar features due to presence of a number of other potential track sources except the spontaneous fission of 238 U, such as the spontaneous fission of presently extinct 244 Pu, heavy nuclei of cosmic rays and induced fission by cosmic ray primaries. Only tracks from the spontaneous fission of U and Pu are suitable for fission-track dating. The competing effects of these fissioning elements, whose half-lives differ by a factor of ∼50, form a basis for a fission-track chronology for samples older than ∼ 4.0 Gyr. Over small intervals in time (∼ few x10 8 yr ) the track density from spontaneous fission of 238 U is nearly constant. However, the

  3. (d,p)-transfer induced fission of heavy radioactive beams

    CERN Document Server

    Veselsky, Martin

    2012-01-01

    (d,p)-transfer induced fission is proposed as a tool to study low energy fission of exotic heavy nuclei. Primary goal is to directly determine the fission barrier height of proton-rich fissile nuclei, preferably using the radio-active beams of isotopes of odd elements, and thus confirm or exclude the low values of fission barrier heights, typically extracted using statistical calculations in the compound nucleus reactions at higher excitation energies. Calculated fission cross sections in transfer reactions of the radioactive beams show sufficient sensitivity to fission barrier height. In the probable case that fission rates will be high enough, mass asymmetry of fission fragments can be determined. Results will be relevant for nuclear astrophysics and for production of super-heavy nuclei. Transfer induced fission offers a possibility for systematic study the low energy fission of heavy exotic nuclei at the ISOLDE.

  4. Fission tracks diameters in glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon Ruiperez, L.; Veiguela, J.

    1974-01-01

    Standard glass microscope slides have been irradiated with fission fragments from the uranium. The etching track conditions have been the same for the series, having changed the etching time only for each specimen. For each glass, a minimum of 250 measurements of the tracks diameters have been made, the distributions of which are the bimodal type. Diameters-etching dependence with time is roughly lineal. Energy determinations have been made with the help of the diameters-energy relations. The calculated values agree very well with the know ones. (author) [es

  5. Hefei experimental hybrid fusion-fission reactor conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Lijian; Luan Guishi; Xu Qiang

    1992-03-01

    A new concept of hybrid reactor is introduced. It uses JET-like(Joint European Tokamak) device worked at sub-breakeven conditions, as a source of high energy neutrons to induce a blanket fission of depleted uranium. The solid breeding material and helium cooling technique are also used. It can produce 100 kg of 239 Pu per year by partial fission suppressed. The energy self-sustained of the fusion core is not necessary. Plasma temperature is maintained by external 20 MW ICRF (ion cyclotron resonance frequency) and 10 MW ECRF (electron cyclotron resonance frequency) heating. A steady state plasma current at 1.5 Ma is driven by 10 MW LHCD (lower hybrid current driven). Plasma density will be kept by pellet injection. ICRF can produce a high energy tail in ion distribution function and lead to significant enhancement of D-T reaction rate by 2 ∼ 5 times so that the neutron source strength reaches to the level of 1 x 10 19 n/s. This system is a passive system. It's power density is 10 W/cm 3 and the wall loading is 0.6 W/cm 2 that is the lower limitation of fusion and fission technology. From the calculation of neutrons it could always be in sub-critical and has intrinsic safety. The radiation damage and neutron flux distribution on the first wall are also analyzed. According to the conceptual design the application of this type hybrid reactor earlier is feasible

  6. Fission theory and actinide fission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaudon, A.

    1975-06-01

    The understanding of the fission process has made great progress recently, as a result of the calculation of fission barriers, using the Strutinsky prescription. Double-humped shapes were obtained for nuclei in the actinide region. Such shapes could explain, in a coherent manner, many different phenomena: fission isomers, structure in near-threshold fission cross sections, intermediate structure in subthreshold fission cross sections and anisotropy in the emission of the fission fragments. A brief review of fission barrier calculations and relevant experimental data is presented. Calculations of fission cross sections, using double-humped barrier shapes and fission channel properties, as obtained from the data discussed previously, are given for some U and Pu isotopes. The fission channel theory of A. Bohr has greatly influenced the study of low-energy fission. However, recent investigation of the yields of prompt neutrons and γ rays emitted in the resonances of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, together with the spin determination for many resonances of these two nuclei cannot be explained purely in terms of the Bohr theory. Variation in the prompt neutron and γ-ray yields from resonance to resonance does not seem to be due to such fission channels, as was thought previously, but to the effect of the (n,γf) reaction. The number of prompt fission neutrons and the kinetic energy of the fission fragments are affected by the energy balance and damping or viscosity effects in the last stage of the fission process, from saddle point to scission. These effects are discussed for some nuclei, especially for {sup 240}Pu.

  7. Study of oxygen mass transfer coefficient and oxygen uptake rate in a stirred tank reactor for uranium ore bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zokaei-Kadijani, S.; Safdari, J.; Mousavian, M.A.; Rashidi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mass transfer coefficient does not depend on biomass concentration. ► The pulp density has a negative effect on mass transfer coefficient. ► The pulp density is the unique factor that affects maximum OUR. ► In this work, Neale’s correlation is corrected for prediction of mass transfer coefficient. ► Biochemical reaction is a limiting factor in the uranium bioleaching process. - Abstract: In this work, the volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) were studied for uranium ore bioleaching process by Acidthiobacillus ferrooxidans in a stirred tank reactor. The Box-Bohnken design method was used to study the effect of operating parameters on the oxygen mass transfer coefficient. The investigated factors were agitation speed (rpm), aeration rate (vvm) and pulp density (% weight/volume) of the stirred tank reactor. Analysis of experimental results showed that the oxygen mass transfer coefficient had low dependence on biomass concentration but had higher dependence on the agitation speed, aeration rate and pulp density. The obtained biological enhancement factors were equal to ones in experiments. On the other hand, the obtained values for Damkohler number (Da < 0.468) indicated that the process was limited by the biochemical reaction rate. Experimental results obtained for oxygen mass transfer coefficient were correlated with the empirical relations proposed by Garcia-Ochoa and Gomez (2009) and Neale and Pinches (1994). Due to the high relative error in the correlation of Neale and Pinches, that correlation was corrected and the coefficient of determination was calculated to be 89%. The modified correlation has been obtained based on a wide range of operating conditions, which can be used to determine the mass transfer coefficient in a bioreactor

  8. Joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners: lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladislav Tomasek; Agnes Rogel; Margot Tirmarche; Dominique Laurier

    2006-01-01

    The present analysis was conducted in the frame of European project 'Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiologic and experimental data'. The overall goal of the project related to uranium miners was the evaluation of lung cancer dose-response relationship and of dose rate effects among European uranium miners exposed to low doses and low dose rates of radon decay products. In addition, modifying factors like attained age, age at exposure and time since exposure were investigated. The joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners was conducted mainly in order to increase the statistical power and to allow a more detailed description of the variation of dose-response relationship in time. (N.C.)

  9. Joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners: lung cancer risk at low radon exposure rates and modifying effects of time since exposure and age at exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladislav Tomasek [National Radiation Protection Institute, Prague (Czech Republic); Agnes Rogel; Margot Tirmarche; Dominique Laurier [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2006-07-01

    The present analysis was conducted in the frame of European project 'Quantification of lung cancer risk after low radon exposure and low exposure rate: synthesis from epidemiologic and experimental data'. The overall goal of the project related to uranium miners was the evaluation of lung cancer dose-response relationship and of dose rate effects among European uranium miners exposed to low doses and low dose rates of radon decay products. In addition, modifying factors like attained age, age at exposure and time since exposure were investigated. The joint analysis of French and Czech uranium miners was conducted mainly in order to increase the statistical power and to allow a more detailed description of the variation of dose-response relationship in time. (N.C.)

  10. Fission track dating of kimberlitic zircons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggerty, S.E.

    1983-01-01

    The only reliable method for dating kimberlites at present is the lengthy and specialized hydrothermal procedure that extracts 206 Pb and 238 U from low-uranium zircons. This paper describes a second successful method by fission track dating of large single-crystal zircons, 1.0-1.5 cm in dimension. The use of large crystals overcomes the limitations imposed in conventional fission track analysis which utilizes crushed fragments. Low track densities, optical track dispersion, and the random orientation of polished surfaces in the etch and irradiation cycle are effectively overcome. Fission track ages of zircons from five African kimberlites are reported, from the Kimberley Pool (90.0 +- 6.5 m.y.), Orapa (87.4 +- 5.7 and 92.4 +- 6.1 m.y.), Nzega (51.1 +- 3.8 m.y.), Koffiefontein (90.9 +- 8.2 m.y.), and Val do Queve (133.4 +- 11.5 m.y.). In addition we report the first radiometric ages (707.9 +- 59.6 and 705.5 +- 61.0 m.y.) of crustal zircons from kimberlites in northwest Liberia. The fission track ages agree well with earlier age estimates. Most of the zircons examined in this study are zoned with respect to uranium but linear correlations are established (by regression analysis) between zones of variable uranium content, and within zones of constant uranium content (by analysis of variance). Concordance between the fission track method and the U/Pb technique is established and we concluded that track fading from thermal annealing has not taken place. Kimberlitic zircons dated in this study, therefore, record the time of eruption. (orig.)

  11. Radiation damage of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarevic, Dj.

    1966-11-01

    Study of radiation damage covered the following: Kinetics of electric resistance of uranium and uranium alloy with 1% of molybdenum dependent on the second phase and burnup rate; Study of gas precipitation and diffusion of bubbles by transmission electron microscopy; Numerical analysis of the influence of defects distribution and concentration on the rare gas precipitation in uranium; study of thermal sedimentation of uranium alloy with molybdenum; diffusion of rare gas in metal by gas chromatography method

  12. An improved technique for fission track dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yunlong; Wu Zhaohui; Xia Yuliang

    1996-01-01

    The necessity of improving the fission track dating (FTD) technique both at home and abroad is illustrated. The ways of making such improvement are also proposed. It is suggested to calibrate the constant b value of the uranium standard glass by using the method of fission products activity. The 3 kinds of uranium standard glass which have been calibrated are NBS SRM962a, UB 1 and UB 2 . An established new method σ·Φ ρ d /b, to measure neutron fluence, avoids the influence of the varying neutron spectrum on measuring neutron fluence. The improved etching technique for fission tracks in zircon adopted a two-step method which includes the molten alkali system etching using NaOH + KOH and the mixed acid system etching using HNO 3 + HF; this technique results in adequate track etching, increased track clarity and less interference. In this way the intensity of tracks is authentically reflected. Dividing angular zone in accordance with the angular distribution of spontaneous fission track on the crystal surface of minerals to count the tracks and using the improved etching technique to remove the non-uniform angular distribution of spontaneous fission tracks in zircon, ensure the accuracy of tracks count. The improved FTD techniques were used to finish Laboratory Standardized Calibration. The tests using international FTD age standards samples have proved that above mentioned techniques are reliable and practical in obtaining the accurate FTD data. (8 tabs.; 3 figs.)

  13. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium - 2sup(w)/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  14. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, J.; Boyd, G.A.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the uniaxial tensile behaviour of uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy over a wide range of temperature and strain rate. Specimen blanks taken from co-reduced and extruded U 2 w/o Mo rods were given one of two heat treatments. Longitudinal tensile test pieces, taken from these blanks at near surface locations were tested in the temperature range -150 deg C to +100 deg C at strain rates from quasistatic (10 -4 s -1 ) to 10 3 s -1 . To achieve this range of testing rates three machines were required: an Instron screw driven machine for rates up to 0.1 s -1 , a second specially constructed hydraulic machine for the range 0.1 s -1 to 50 s -1 and a drop weight machine for the highest strain rates. The ways in which the mechanical properties - elongation to fracture, flow stresses and ultimate tensile stress - vary with both temperature and strain rate are presented and discussed for material in both heat treatment conditions. (author)

  15. Nuclear fission and reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear fission research programs are designed to elucidate basic features of the fission process. Specifically, (1) factors determining how nucleons of a fissioning nucleus are distributed between two fission fragments, (2) factors determining kinetic energy and excitation energies of fragments, and (3) factors controlling fission lifetimes. To these ends, fission studies are reported for several heavy elements and include investigations of spontaneous and neutron-induced fission, heavy ion reactions, and high energy proton reactions. The status of theoretical research is also discussed. (U.S.)

  16. Trends in uranium supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, M [International Atomic Energy Agency, Division of Nuclear Power and Reactors, Nuclear Materials and Fuel Cycle Section, Vienna (Austria)

    1976-07-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  17. Trends in uranium supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, M.

    1976-01-01

    Prior to the development of nuclear power, uranium ores were used to a very limited extent as a ceramic colouring agent, as a source of radium and in some places as a source of vanadium. Perhaps before that, because of the bright orange and yellow colours of its secondary ores, it was probably used as ceremonial paint by primitive man. After the discovery of nuclear fission a whole new industry emerged, complete with its problems of demand, resources and supply. Spurred by special incentives in the early years of this new nuclear industry, prospectors discovered over 20 000 occurrences of uranium in North America alone, and by 1959 total world production reached a peak of 34 000 tonnes uranium from mines in South Africa, Canada and United States. This rapid growth also led to new problems. As purchases for military purposes ended, government procurement contracts were not renewed, and the large reserves developed as a result of government purchase incentives, in combination with lack of substantial commercial market, resulted in an over-supply of uranium. Typically, an over-supply of uranium together with national stockpiling at low prices resulted in depression of prices to less than $5 per pound by 1971. Although forecasts made in the early 1970's increased confidence in the future of nuclear power, and consequently the demand for uranium, prices remained low until the end of 1973 when OPEC announced a very large increase in oil prices and quite naturally, prices for coal also rose substantially. The economics of nuclear fuel immediately improved and prices for uranium began to climb in 1974. But the world-wide impact of the OPEC decision also produced negative effects on the uranium industry. Uranium production costs rose dramatically, as did capital costs, and money for investment in new uranium ventures became more scarce and more expensive. However, the uranium supply picture today offers hope of satisfactory development in spite of the many problems to be

  18. Measurements of fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, H.O.

    2000-01-01

    After some historical introductory remarks on the discovery of nuclear fission and early fission yield determinations, the present status of knowledge on fission yields is briefly reviewed. Practical and fundamental reasons motivating the pursuit of fission yield measurements in the coming century are pointed out. Recent results and novel techniques are described that promise to provide new interesting insights into the fission process during the next century. (author)

  19. On the rate determining step in fission gas release from high burn-up water reactor fuel during power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Mogensen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The radial distribution of grain boundary gas in a PWR and a BWR fuel is reported. The measurements were made using a new approach involving X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron probe microanalysis. In both fuels the concentration of grain boundary gas was much higher than hitherto suspected. The gas was mainly contained in the bubble/pore structure. The factors that determined the fraction of gas released from the grains and the level of gas retention on the grain boundaries are identified and discussed. The variables involved are the local fuel stoichiometry, the amount of open porosity, the magnitude of the local compressive hydrostatic stress and the interaction of metallic precipitates with gas bubbles on the grain faces. It is concluded that under transient conditions the interlinkage of gas bubbles on the grain faces and the subsequent formation of grain edge tunnels is the rate determining step for gas release; at least when high burn-up fuel is involved. (orig.)

  20. Influence of radon-daughter exposure rate and uranium ore dust concentration on occurrence of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Busch, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Groups of male SPF Wistar rats were exposed concurrently to several levels of radon daughters and uranium ore dust to study the effect of these variables on pulmonary disease states. Clinical pathology data at 1 yr postexposure indicate no significant differences among exposed animals when compared with controls. Preliminary histopathologic data suggest a trend toward increasing lung tumor risk as the exposure rate is decreased (constant total dose), but the differences are not statistically significant at the 0.05 level. A similar trend occurs with decrease in ore dust concentration (except for the 2560-WLM exposure group), but these differences are also not significant at the 0.05 level. The tumor risk is significantly (0.05 level) increased as the exposure level increases from approximately 320 and 640 WLM to 2560 WLM at the high ore dust concentration

  1. Characteristic pathological changes of main organs of rates after inhalation of depleted uranium aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Zhu Maoxiang; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Li Yuanmin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathological and morphometric alteration of main organs of rat after inhalation of depleted uranium (DU) aerosole in order to provide information for medical protection against DU weapons. Methods: Routine pathological technique and morphometric measurements were used to observe histopathological and morphological changes in lung, kidney, spleen, liver, brain of rats 1-14 months after inhalation of DU aerosol. Results: After inhalation of DU aerosol, lymphocytic infiltration in the pulmonary parenchyma, serious bronchitis, pulmonary hemorrhage and abscess formation were seen in some of the rats; distinct dilatation of tubules in renal cortex and papillae, casts in some tubules of the cortex, medulla and papillae, and interstitial hemorrhage were found in some other rats; diminution of the area of splenic white pulp, reduction of megakaryocytic mitosis were also observed, the incidence and severity of above changes in the lung and kidney, but not in the liver and brain, showed dependance on the length of time after inhalation or the dose of DU inhaled. Conclusion There are evident injurious effects on rat lung, kidney and spleen by inhalation of DU aerosol. (authors)

  2. History of the use of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium was found 200 years ago, though the first use for it - in colouring glass yellow, orange or green - was only found 40 years later. When its radioactivity was discovered in 1896, interest in research into uranium increased and for a brief period it was used for improving the ductility of steel. The isolation of radium from uranium ore in 1904 caused a boom for uranium mining for radium. It found use in healing skin cancer, for various 'health' preparations like radon-containing water, and for making self-luminous paints. The discovery of fission 50 years ago increased the use of uranium into large industrial-scale applications. For fission weapons highly enriched U-235 and Pu-239 were needed. Today the main use is for uranium enriched to about 3 per cent U-235 for light water power reactors. Other important uses are for submarines, icebreakers and satellites

  3. The effect of cooling rate from the γ-phase on the strain-rate sensitivity of a uranium 2 sup(w)/o molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, G.A.C.; Harding, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile tests have been performed at strain rates from 10 -4 to about 2000/s and temperatures from -150 deg C to +250 deg C on a uranium 2 w/o molybdenum alloy which had been aged for 2 hours at 500 deg C after a fast gas cool from the γ-phase at a controlled rate of 40 deg C/minute. The results are compared with those for standard as-extruded material which had received the same aging treatment. Stress-strain curves are presented and the effect of strain rate and temperature on the flow stress, the ultimate tensile stress and the elongation to fracture is determined. A thorough structural characterisation of the specimen materials, using X-ray analysis and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, allows the different mechanical responses to be related to the corresponding microstructural state of the material. Flow stress data at different temperatures and strain rates are analysed in terms of the theory of thermally-activated flow and estimates made of the various activation parameters. (author)

  4. Fission products collecting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fission products trap with no contamination to coolants and cover gas by the provision of a fission products trap above the upper part of a nuclear power plant. Constitution: Upon fuel failures in a reactor core, nuclear fission products leak into coolants and move along the flow of the coolants to the coolants above the reactor core. The fission products are collected in a trap container and guided along a pipeline into fission products detector. The fission products detector monitors the concentration of the fission products and opens the downstream valve of the detector when a predetermined concentration of the fission products is detected to introduce the fission products into a waste gas processing device and release them through the exhaust pipe. (Seki, T.)

  5. Energy released in fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, M.F.

    1969-05-01

    The effective energy released in and following the fission of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 by thermal neutrons, and of U-238 by fission spectrum neutrons, is discussed. The recommended values are: U-235 ... 192.9 ± 0.5 MeV/fission; U-238 ... 193.9 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-239 ... 198.5 ± 0.8 MeV/fission; Pu-241 ... 200.3 ± 0.8 MeV/fission. These values include all contributions except from antineutrinos and very long-lived fission products. The detailed contributions are discussed, and inconsistencies in the experimental data are pointed out. In Appendix A, the contribution to the total useful energy release in a reactor from reactions other than fission are discussed briefly, and in Appendix B there is a discussion of the variations in effective energy from fission with incident neutron energy. (author)

  6. Health and environmental impact of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furitsu, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is 'nuclear waste' produced from the enrichment process and is mostly made up of 238 U and is depleted in the fissionable isotope 235 U compared to natural uranium (NU). Depleted uranium has about 60% of the radioactivity of natural uranium. Depleted uranium and natural uranium are identical in terms of the chemical toxicity. Uranium's high density gives depleted uranium shells increased range and penetrative power. This density, combined with uranium's pyrophoric nature, results in a high-energy kinetic weapon that can punch and burn through armour plating. Striking a hard target, depleted uranium munitions create extremely high temperatures. The uranium immediately burns and vaporizes into an aerosol, which is easily diffused in the environment. People can inhale the micro-particles of uranium oxide in an aerosol and absorb them mainly from lung. Depleted uranium has both aspects of radiological toxicity and chemical toxicity. The possible synergistic effect of both kinds of toxicities is also pointed out. Animal and cellular studies have been reported the carcinogenic, neurotoxic, immuno-toxic and some other effects of depleted uranium including the damage on reproductive system and foetus. In addition, the health effects of micro/ nano-particles, similar in size of depleted uranium aerosols produced by uranium weapons, have been reported. Aerosolized DU dust can easily spread over the battlefield spreading over civilian areas, sometimes even crossing international borders. Therefore, not only the military personnel but also the civilians can be exposed. The contamination continues after the cessation of hostilities. Taking these aspects into account, DU weapon is illegal under international humanitarian laws and is considered as one of the inhumane weapons of 'indiscriminate destruction'. The international society is now discussing the prohibition of DU weapons based on 'precautionary principle'. The 1991 Gulf War is reportedly the first

  7. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  8. Uranium in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koul, S.L.; Chadderton, L.T.

    1979-01-01

    The authors conduct a feasibility study of a determination of the concentration of uranium in human blood. Smples of blood from six individuals were taken, predivided into two groups of three. One group was of healthy males and used as a norm. The other group was of patients with certified leukemia. The samples were irradiated by thermal neutrons and fission fragments detected using Lexan polycarbonate discs. (G.T.H.)

  9. Status of fission power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenson, M.

    1977-01-01

    Fission energy is reviewed from the viewpoints of technology, economics, politics, manufacturers, consumers, and foreign countries. Technically, the reactor program is operating and the light water reactor industry shows signs of maturing, although recent business has been disappointing. Marketing of gas-cooled reactors depends, not on technical, but economic and political issues. Liquid metal fast breeder reactors have been demonstrated worldwide, while the gas-cooled fast breeder remains an undemonstrated option. Nuclear plants, currently costing the same as coal plants with scrubbers, are the cheapest option for utilities because most of the cost is imbedded. The defeat of nuclear initiatives in seven states indicates that public feeling is not as anti-nuclear as opponents to nuclear power claim. The harshness of last winter demonstrated the advantages of a power source that is not so sensitive to the weather for reliable operation and transport, as well as low cost energy. Other nations are proceeding to build a nuclear capability, which the U.S. may jeopardize because of concerns about the fuel cycle, nuclear waste disposal, uranium reserves, and nuclear proliferation

  10. HAC and fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, I.; Moriyama, H.; Tachikawa, E.

    1984-01-01

    In the fission process, newly formed fission products undergo hot atom reactions due to their energetic recoil and abnormal positive charge. The hot atom reactions of the fission products are usually accompanied by secondary effects such as radiation damage, especially in condensed phase. For reactor safety it is valuable to know the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of these radioactive fission products. Here, the authors study the chemical behaviour and the release behaviour of the fission products from the viewpoint of hot atom chemistry (HAC). They analyze the experimental results concerning fission product behaviour with the help of the theories in HAC and other neighboring fields such as radiation chemistry. (Auth.)

  11. Taoshan uranium ore fields in situ blasting heap leaching rate influence factors to investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wangnan; Dong Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Taoshan ore field ore in situ blasting heap leaching out build industrial test and production process, stope leaching rate and leaching cycle is large than that, after analysis, blasting method and cloth liquid way is to affect leaching rate and leaching cycle of the main factors. This paper holds that as far as possible using stratified deep hole blasting of squeezing up ways to reduce the building pile of in-situ leaching ore block rate; Adopting effective cloth tube way, increase the leaching agent and ore contact comprehensive; Introduction of bacterial leaching, and other means to improve leaching rate, shorten production cycle, etc to solve it. (authors)

  12. Fission product release from SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harnden-Gillis, A M.C. [Queen` s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Increasing radiation fields at several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with highly enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel have begun to interfere with the daily operation of these reactors. To investigate this phenomenon, samples of reactor container water and gas from the headspace were obtained at four SLOWPOKE-2 reactor facilities and examined by gamma ray spectroscopy methods. These radiation fields are due to the circulation of fission products within the reactor container vessel. The most likely source of the fission product release is an area of uranium-bearing material exposed to the coolant at the end weld line which originated at the time of fuel fabrication. The results of this study are compared with observations from an underwater visual examination of one core and the metallographic examination of archived fuel elements. 19 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  13. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  14. Fission, fusion and the energy crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, S E [Aston Univ., Birmingham (UK)

    1980-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: living on capital (energy reserves and consumption forecasts); the atom and its nucleus, mass and energy; fission and the bomb; the natural uranium reactor; enriched reactors; control and safety; long-term economics (the breeder reactions and nuclear fuel reserves); short-term economics (cost per kilowatt hour); national nuclear power programmes; nuclear power and the environment (including reprocessing, radioactive waste management, public relations); renewable energy sources; the fusion programme; summary and comment.

  15. From nuclear fission to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pocock, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Otto Hahn, a German chemist, demonstrated the fission of the uranium nucleus in December 1938. Ten months later, basic physical theory had been modified to account for this phenomenon. It is suggested here that this great advance in radio-chemistry and physics was influenced considerably by political considerations. By the outbreak of the European War in September 1939, all the major scientific principles involved in the production of atomic weapons were well-known and were available in all industrial countries. (author)

  16. Attachment of gaseous fission products to aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyrme, G.

    1985-01-01

    Accidents may occur in which the integrity of fuel cladding is breached and volatile fission products are released to the containment atmosphere. In order to assess the magnitude of the subsequent radiological hazard it is necessary to know the transport behaviour of such fission products. It is frequently assumed that the fission products remain in the gaseous phase. There is a possibility, however, that they may attach themselves to particles and hence substantially modify their transport properties. This paper provides a theoretical assessment of the conditions under which gaseous fission products may be attached to aerosol particles. Specific topics discussed are: the mass transfer of a gaseous fission product to an isolated aerosol particle in an infinite medium; the rate at which the concentration of fission products in the gas phase diminishes within a container as a result of deposition on a population of particles; and the distribution of deposited fission product between different particle sizes in a log-normal distribution. It is shown that, for a given mass, small particles are more efficient for fission product attachment, and that only small concentrations of such particles may be necessary to achieve rapid attachment. Conditions under which gaseous fission products are not attached to particles are also considered, viz, the competing processes of deposition onto the containment walls and onto aerosol particles, and the possibility of the removal of aerosols from the containment by various deposition processes, or agglomeration, before attachment takes place. (author)

  17. Uranium concentrations in human bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlenker, R.A.; Oltman, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium concentration in bone from an individual injected with 239 Pu has been determined, using the fission-track method. The data are consistent with those reported about 10 years ago by Welford and Baird for New York City area residents and by Hamilton in England. They are at variance with the more recent data of Welford et al

  18. Uranium mine ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katam, K.; Sudarsono

    1982-01-01

    Uranium mine ventilation system aimed basically to control and decreasing the air radioactivity in mine caused by the radon emanating from uranium ore. The control and decreasing the air ''age'' in mine, with adding the air consumption volume, increasing the air rate consumption, closing the mine-out area; using closed drainage system. Air consumption should be 60m 3 /minute for each 9m 2 uranium ore surfaces with ventilation rate of 15m/minute. (author)

  19. Enhanced fuel production in thorium/lithium hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitulski, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    A consistent neutronics analysis is performed to determine the effectiveness of uranium bearing neutron multiplier zones on increasing the production of U/sup 233/ in thorium/lithium blankets for use in a tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor. The nuclear performance of these blankets is evaluated as a function of zone thicknesses and exposure by using the coupled transport burnup code ANISN-CINDER-HIC. Various parameters such as U/sup 233/, Pu/sup 239/, and H/sup 3/ production rates, the blanket energy multiplication, isotopic composition of the fuels, and neutron leakages into the various zones are evaluated during a 5 year (6 MW.y.m/sup -2/) exposure period. Although the results of this study were obtained for a tokomak magnetic fusion device, the qualitative behavior associated with the use of the uranium bearing neutron multiplier should be applicable to all fusion-fission hybrids.

  20. Enhanced fuel production in thorium/lithium hybrid blankets utilizing uranium multipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitulski, R.H.

    1979-10-01

    A consistent neutronics analysis is performed to determine the effectiveness of uranium bearing neutron multiplier zones on increasing the production of U 233 in thorium/lithium blankets for use in a tokamak fusion-fission hybrid reactor. The nuclear performance of these blankets is evaluated as a function of zone thicknesses and exposure by using the coupled transport burnup code ANISN-CINDER-HIC. Various parameters such as U 233 , Pu 239 , and H 3 production rates, the blanket energy multiplication, isotopic composition of the fuels, and neutron leakages into the various zones are evaluated during a 5 year (6 MW.y.m -2 ) exposure period. Although the results of this study were obtained for a tokomak magnetic fusion device, the qualitative behavior associated with the use of the uranium bearing neutron multiplier should be applicable to all fusion-fission hybrids

  1. PROCESSING OF URANIUM-METAL-CONTAINING FUEL ELEMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-10-01

    A process is given for recovering uranium from neutronbombarded uranium- aluminum alloys. The alloy is dissolved in an aluminum halide--alkali metal halide mixture in which the halide is a mixture of chloride and bromide, the aluminum halide is present in about stoichiometric quantity as to uranium and fission products and the alkali metal halide in a predominant quantity; the uranium- and electropositive fission-products-containing salt phase is separated from the electronegative-containing metal phase; more aluminum halide is added to the salt phase to obtain equimolarity as to the alkali metal halide; adding an excess of aluminum metal whereby uranium metal is formed and alloyed with the excess aluminum; and separating the uranium-aluminum alloy from the fission- productscontaining salt phase. (AEC)

  2. Fission Research at IRMM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Adili A.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Fission Research at JRC-IRMM has a longstanding tradition. The present paper is discussing recent investigations of fission fragment properties of 238 U(n,f, 234 U(n,f, prompt neutron emission in fission of 252 Cf(SF as well as the prompt fission neutron spectrum of 235 U(n,f and is presenting the most important results.

  3. Mo-99 production by fission and future projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carranza, E.C.; Novello, A.; Bronca, M.; Cestau, D.; Bavaro, R.; Centurion, R.; Bravo, C.; Bronca, P.; Gualda, E.; Fraguas, F.; Giomi, A.; Ivaldi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Description of the I-131 and Mo-99 production process: The process starts with the irradiation of uranium-aluminum mini plates in the RA-3, Argentinean Reactor No.3, Ezeiza Atomic Center. In a nuclear reactor there is a constant flow of neutrons and when a neutron with proper energy impacts on a nucleus of U-235, it is absorbed at the same time generate an unstable configuration nuclear. For this reason, the nucleus formed is fission, getting two different atoms. Approximately 6% of the fissions produce Mo-99 and 3% produce I-131; the percentage remaining corresponds to formation of atoms without interest for use in medicine. In conclusion, the objective of the process developed in the Fission Plant, is starting from uranium mini plates, separate the Mo-99 and I-131 generated, the remaining elements formed. - Evolution of Mo-99 Production in the last 10 years: The Fission Mo-99 Plant Production begins routine production of Mo-99 in 1985, using targets made of uranium enriched at 90% U-235. In the 1990s, global concern regarding the use of highly enriched uranium, due to non-proliferation issues, caused the interruption of supply of nuclear material (HEU enriched at 90% of U-235). Following this, Argentina developed target based on low-enriched uranium (less than 20% U-235), becoming in 2002 the first country in the world to produce Mo-99 with LEU targets. From 2002 to date, the activity produced of Mo-99 has been tripled annually (author)

  4. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  5. NECTAR-A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecherl, T., E-mail: thomas.buecherl@radiochemie.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie (RCM), Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F.M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  6. NECTAR—A fission neutron radiography and tomography facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch.; Breitkreutz, H.; Jungwirth, M.; Wagner, F. M.

    2011-09-01

    NECTAR (Neutron Computerized Tomography and Radiography) is a versatile facility for radiographic and tomographic investigations as well as for neutron activation experiments using fission neutrons. The radiation sources for this facility are two plates of highly enriched uranium situated in the moderator vessel in FRM II. Thermal neutrons originating from the main fuel element of the reactor generate in these plates fast neutrons. These can escape through a horizontal beam tube without moderation. The beam can be filtered and manipulated in order to reduce the accompanying gamma radiation and to match the specific experimental tasks. A summary of the main parameters required for experimental set-up and (quantitative) data evaluation is presented. The (measured) spectra of the neutron and gamma radiations are shown along with the effect of different filters on their behavior. The neutron and gamma fluxes, dose rates, L/ D-ratios, etc. and the main parameters of the actually used detection systems for neutron imaging are given, too.

  7. Morbidity rate among adults and children residing in the vicinity of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chobanova, N.; Shtereva, V.

    1994-01-01

    This retrospective study comprises the residents of the villages of Dolni Bogrov and Gorni Bogrov and is carried out on the base of official medical statistics for the period 1985-1989. The data obtained are compared with those on a nation-wide scale and the control village of German. A higher morbidity rate among children is established for the diseases of nervous, respiratory and digestive system, infections and parasitic diseases. The morbidity rate (general and by classes of diseases) is lower than the one on a nation-wide scale, and higher compared to the control village for: diseases of cardiovascular, nervous and digestive system, infections, neoplasms, injuries, poisonings, parasitic, skeletal and skin diseases. Morbidity rate by classes of diseases connected with radiation exposure is lower than the one for the country and comparable to that of the control village. 2 tabs., 6 refs. (orig.)

  8. Measurement test on creep strain rate of uranium-zirconium solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Takanari; Akabori, Mitsuo; Ogawa, Toru

    1996-11-01

    In order to measure creep strain rate of a small specimen of U-Zr solid solution, authors proposed an estimation method which was based upon the stress relaxation after compression. It was applied to measurement test on creep strain rate of the U-10wt%Zr specimen in the temperature range of 757 to 911degC. It may be concluded that the proposed method is valid, provided that the strain is within the appropriate range and that sufficient amount of the load decrement is observed. The obtained creep rate of U-10wt%Zr alloy indicated significantly smaller value, compared to the experimental data for pure U metal and evaluated data for U-Pu-Zr alloy. However, more careful measurement is desired in future since the present data are thought to be influenced by the precipitations included in the specimen. (author)

  9. Finite fission chain length and symmetry around prompt-criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Qilin; Yin Yanpeng; Gao Hui; Huang Po; Fang Xiaoqiang

    2012-01-01

    Probability distribution of finite fission chain length was derived by assuming that all neutrons behave identically. Finite fission chain length was also calculated using a zero-dimension Monte-Carlo method based on point kinetics. Then symmetry of finite fission chain length probability distribution around prompt-criticality was deduced, which helps understanding the emission rate of delayed neutrons and initiation of fission chain in super-prompt-critical system. (authors)

  10. Equilibrium fission model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckerman, M.; Blann, M.

    1976-01-01

    In order to aid in understanding the systematics of heavy ion fission and fission-like reactions in terms of the target-projectile system, bombarding energy and angular momentum, fission widths are calculated using an angular momentum dependent extension of the Bohr-Wheeler theory and particle emission widths using angular momentum coupling

  11. Radiation hazards in the neighbourhood of uranium reactors; Dangers des rayonnements aupres des piles a uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joffre, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1956-07-01

    Radiation hazards near uranium reactors may be divided in two groups. Hazards when the reactor is normally operating: {gamma} radiation from hot uranium or air contamination by fission gases, {gamma} radiation or contamination by the coolant (air, nitrogen, heavy-water), {gamma} radiation from radioisotopes. Hazards in the case of an accident: presence of hot uranium in the atmosphere, soil contamination. (author) [French] Les dangers d'irradiation aupres des piles a uranium sont a classer essentiellement en deux groupes. Les dangers existant aupres d'une pile exploitee normalement: irradiation {gamma} par l'uranium irradie ou contamination de l'air par des gaz de fission, irradiation {gamma} ou contamination par les fluides de refroidissement (air, azote, eau lourde), irradiation {gamma} par les radioelements fabriques. Les dangers en cas d'accident survenant a un reacteur en fonctionnement, ayant pour consequence : la presence dans l'air d'uranium irradie, la contamination du sol. (auteur)

  12. Uranium market and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capus, G.; Arnold, T.

    2005-01-01

    Under the combined effect of various factors, such as interrogations related to facing the climatic changes, the increasing prices of oil versus announced decrease of its resources, the major geopolitical evolution and the remarkable development of Asia, we live nowadays a revival of nuclear power in the very front of stage. In tis context, the following question is posed: could the nuclear fission be a sustainable source of energy when taking into consideration the availability of uranium resources? The article aims at pinpointing the knowledge we have about the world uranium resources, their limits of uncertainty and the relation between knowledge resources and market evolution. To conclude, some susceptible tracks are proposed to improve the using process of uranium resources particularly in softening the impact of high prices

  13. Radionuclide migration around uranium ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers region of the Northern Territory, Australia - analogue of radioactive waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airey, P.L.; Roman, D.; Golian, C.; Short, S.; Nightingale, T.; Lowson, R.T.; Davey, B.G.; Gray, D.

    1984-01-01

    Appropriate geochemical analogues may be used to reduce the uncertainties in predicting the long-term transport of actinides, radium and fission products from laboratory adsorption and hydrological data. In this study the migration of uranium series nuclides within, and down-gradient of ore bodies in the Alligator Rivers uranium province of the Northern Territory of Australia is described. A mathematical framework was developed to permit calculation of the rate of leaching or deposition of uranium and radium between defined zones of the ore bodies, and the rate of loss of the nuclides due to groundwater transport and surface erosion. A detailed study was made of the distribution of uranium, thorium and radium isotopes within various minerals comprising the weathered ore assemblage. Uranium and thorium concentrate principally in the iron minerals and radium in the clay-quartz phases. Substantial disequilibria are observed, which are attributed to a combination of α-recoil and chemical effects. Evidence of the relative lability of iron phases is presented. The transport of uranium series nuclides in groundwater intersecting the deposits was investigated. Down-gradient of the Ranger One deposit, the maximum retardation factor of uranium is 250. The role of colloids in groundwater transport is being studied. Uranium is transported principally in solution. There appears to be an equilibrium between solute and articulate uranium

  14. On the safety of conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Okrent, D.; Badham, V.; Caspi, S.; Chan, C.K.; Ferrell, W.J.; Frederking, T.H.K.; Grzesik, J.; Lee, J.Y.; McKone, T.E.; Pomraning, G.C.; Ullman, A.Z.; Ting, T.D.; Kim, Y.I.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary examination of some potential safety questions for conceptual fusion-fission hybrid reactors is presented in this paper. The study and subsequent analysis was largely based upon one design, a conceptual mirror fusion-fission reactor, operating on the deuterium-tritium plasma fusion fuel cycle and the uranium-plutonium fission fuel cycle. The major potential hazards were found to be: (a) fission products, (b) actinide elements, (c) induced radioactivity, and (d) tritium. As a result of these studies, it appears that highly reliable and even redundent decay heat removal must be provided. Loss of the ability to remove decay heat results in melting of fuel, with ultimate release of fission products and actinides to the containment. In addition, the studies indicate that blankets can be designed which will remain subcritical under extensive changes in both composition and geometry. Magnet safety and the effects of magnetic fields on thermal parameters were also considered. (Auth.)

  15. Comparison of fission probabilities with emission of long range particles under the action of slow and fast neutrons on various materials; Probabilites comparees de fission avec emission de particules de long parcours pour divers materiaux sous l'action des neutrons lents et rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netter, F; Faraggi, H; Garin-Bonnet, A; Julien, J; Corge, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Turkiewicz, J [Institut de Recherches Nucleaire de Varsovie (Poland)

    1958-07-01

    The authors describe relative cross-section measurements of fission of the isotopes of uranium and plutonium (more particularly {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu), with emission of long range particles, under the action of neutrons of various energies: thermal neutrons, pile neutrons, neutrons produced with the Van de Graaff accelerator by reaction of protons on tritium. The measurements are carried out: 1) with the aid of photographic plates, by submitting to the action of the neutrons a layer of fissile material coupled with an Ilford nuclear emulsion of 200 microns; a tin sheet laying between the plate and the layer stops the {alpha} particles and the fission fragments. By an appropriate development the tracks of the long range particles can be distinguished in the emulsion, from the tracks of the recoil protons resulting of fission neutrons, or of the last primary neutrons. For neutrons of energy under 1 MeV, the compared frequency of the tracks of long range particles and of the recoils caused by the fission neutrons gives a measurement of the fission cross-section with emission of long range particles relative to the product of the fission cross-section by the mean number of neutrons emitted by fission. For neutrons of higher energy, one measures only the frequency of the tracks of long range particles, comparatively with the flux of primary neutrons. Some precautions are taken to eliminate the action of thermal neutrons in the measurements with fast neutrons. 2) with the aid of a system of ionization chamber and proportional counter, the rate of coincidence between the impulsions caused by the long range particles and the impulsions provided by one of the fission fragments is measured comparatively with the counting rate of fission fragme (author) [French] Les auteurs decrivent des mesures relatives a la section efficace de fission des isotopes de l'uranium et du plutonium (notamment {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu) avec emission de particules de long

  16. Fission mass yields of excited medium heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandulescu, A.; Depta, K.; Herrmann, R.; Greiner, W.; Scheid, W.

    1985-01-01

    The mass distributions resulting from the fission of excited medium mass nuclei are discussed on the basis of the fragmentation theory. It is shown that very asymmetric fission events can be expected with rates which are only a few orders of magnitude smaller than the rates for symmetric fission. As an example a calculation of the fission mass distribution of the excited 172 Yb compound nucleus is presented. This mass distribution reveals observable structures over the entire range of the mass asymmetry due to valleys in the potential energy surface for fission fragments with closed proton and neutron shells

  17. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  18. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Uranium in soil and gamma dose rate as proxies for the indoor radon risk: situation in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondeur, F.; Cinelli, G.; Dehandschutter, B.

    2017-01-01

    Radon risk maps are usually based either on indoor radon data, or on measurements of soil gas radon and soil permeability. If these data are not available or not sufficient, it was suggested that other data could be used as an approximate substitute (a proxy) to the missing information, like the concentration of 238 U or 226 Ra in soils or the terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR). We examine here the correlation between airborne measurements of soil U and indoor radon, and between airborne U and TGDR, and their link with affected/unaffected areas. No clear correlation is found between airborne U and affected areas, as strongly affected areas are not characterised by a higher U level. Only the moderately affected area of Condroz can be connected to a higher U level, related to a few U anomalies. TGDR shows a rather good correlation with airborne U, but its relation with radon risk is less clear. Soil uranium and TGDR may help to screen out areas with very low U and very low TGDR, which have a low indoor radon risk, but they cannot be considered as good proxies for predicting radon-affected areas in Belgium. (authors)

  20. Fusion-Fission hybrid reactors and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-09-01

    New options for the development of the nuclear energy economy which might become available by a successful development of fusion-breeders or fusion-fission hybrid power reactors, identified and their nonproliferative attributes are discussed. The more promising proliferation-resistance ettributes identified include: (1) Justification for a significant delay in the initiation of fuel processing, (2) Denaturing the plutonium with 238 Pu before its use in power reactors of any kind, and (3) Making practical the development of denatured uranium fuel cycles and, in particular, denaturing the uranium with 232 U. Fuel resource utilization, time-table and economic considerations associated with the use of fusion-breeders are also discussed. It is concluded that hybrid reactors may enable developing a nuclear energy economy which is more proliferation resistant than possible otherwise, whileat the same time, assuring high utilization of t he uranium and thorium resources in an economically acceptable way. (author)

  1. Determination of microamounts of uranium in waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birringer, K.J.; Netzer, S.; Kuhn, E.; Groll, P.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of microamounts of uranium in presence of high amounts of fission and corrosion products is described. Uranium is separated by reversed-phase chromatography on a small column, packed with Voltalef micro and impregnated with TOPO. For the direct photometric determination uranium is eluted by TAM dissolved in ethanol/pyridine. The efficiency of the separation, using a suitable scrub-solution, was tested with solutions of simulated inactive fission and corrosion products. The reproducibility of the method, with 24 μg of uranium, is +- 2,5%. (orig.) [de

  2. Clay minerals in sandstone uranium deposits: radwaste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Clay minerals play an important role in the genesis of uranium deposits in sandstones. They incorporate the rate earths (REE), U, Sb, Th, Cs, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and even small amounts of chalcophiles. These minerals possess analog elements for many of the radwaste fission products as well as actinides and some actinide daughters. In sandstone uranium deposits, clay minerals are also associated with sulfide minerals, usually pyrite, and organic carbonaceous matter. The primary clay minerals are usually smectites, illites, chlorites and mixed layer varieties. The integrity of these clay minerals is demonstrated by their retention of formational-mineralization ages determined by Rb-Sr geochronologic investigation of the Grants Mineral Belt of the United States. The importance of the clay minerals as analog for parts of the multi-barrier concept in radwaste disposal is their ability to impede water penetration into - and movement of key elements out of uranium rich zones. The clay minerals further sorb and in other ways incorporate into their structures many fission products and actinide analogs from man-made nuclear wastes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  3. Dating by fission tracks in archaeology. 1. Principles and experimental methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poupeau, G.; Zuleta, E.

    1984-01-01

    The principles of dating method by uranium fission tracks are shortly exposed. The conditions of application to the archaeology are discussed, in particular for the volcanic glasses, where the fossil fission tracks are often affected of a beginning of effacement. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Thermo chronology by the fission track method of a passive marge (Ponta Grossa dome in south-eastern Brazil) and within a collision chain (external zone of the alpine arch in France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros Vignol Lelarge, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The dating method by counting fission tracks on apatite (this rock is a geo-thermometer sensitive to weak temperature changes below 150 Celsius degrees) is an efficient tool for the thermal history of rocks. We have used this method in 2 different geological contexts: the Ponta Grossa dome in south-eastern Brazil and the alpine mountain in France. This dating method is based on the fact that some rocks like mica keep fossil remains of the passage of the fission products emitted during the simultaneous fission of uranium 238 present in the rock. This method requires the irradiation in a slow neutron flux of the sample because the initial quantity of uranium is unknown. The age t of the sample is given by the formula: t=(1/l 1 )*ln[1+(r s /r i )*(l 2 /l 1 )*F*σ*I] where: l 1 is the alpha decay constant of U 238 ; l 2 is the simultaneous fission decay constant of U 238 , r s is the number of fission tracks in the sample before the irradiation; r i is the number of fission tracks induced by the irradiation; F is the thermal neutron flux; σ is the thermal fission cross-section of U 235 ; and I is the isotopic rate U 235 /U 238 . This document is divided into 4 chapters. The first chapter presents the general principle of the method, the mechanisms capable of producing fission tracks and the techniques used to make these tracks visible with an optical microscope. The second chapter deals with the conditions of the irradiation and the calibration of the method. The 2 last chapters are dedicated to the applications to the 2 geological contexts. (A.C.)

  5. Overview of tritium fast-fission yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    Tritium production rates are very important to the development of fast reactors because tritium may be produced at a greater rate in fast reactors than in light water reactors. This report focuses on tritium production and does not evaluate the transport and eventual release of the tritium in a fast reactor system. However, if an order-of-magnitude increase in fast fission yields for tritium is confirmed, fission will become the dominant production source of tritium in fast reactors

  6. Laser driven fusion fission hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, L.F.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-11-01

    The role of the fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FFHR) as a fissile fuel and/or power producer is discussed. As long range options to supply the world energy needs, hybrid-fueled thermal-burner reactors are compared to liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). A discussion of different fuel cycles (thorium, depleted uranium, and spent fuel) is presented in order to compare the energy multiplication, the production of fissile fuel, the laser efficiency and pellet gain requirements of the hybrid reactor. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) has collaborated with Bechtel Corporation and with Westinghouse in two engineering design studies of laser fusion driven hybrid power plants. The hybrid designs which have resulted from these two studies are briefly described and analyzed by considering operational parameters, such as energy multiplication, power density, burn-up and plutonium production as a function time

  7. Geology behind nuclear fission technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhana Raju, R.

    2005-01-01

    Geology appears to have played an important role of a precursor to Nuclear Fission Technology (NFT), in the latter's both birth from the nucleus of an atom of and most important application as nuclear power extracted from Uranium (U), present in its minerals. NFT critically depends upon the availability of its basic raw material, viz., nuclear fuel as U and/ or Th, extracted from U-Th minerals of specific rock types in the earth's crust. Research and Development of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (NFC) depends heavily on 'Geology'. In this paper, a brief review of the major branches of geology and their contributions during different stages of NFC, in the Indian scenario, is presented so as to demonstrate the important role played by 'Geology' behind the development of NFT, in general, and NFC, in particular. (author)

  8. Variation in the price of the energy in function of the rate of return applied at the cost of the uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, Douglas Borges; Kosoka, Nanami; Maio, Mireia

    2009-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Plan (BNP) forecasts the construction of, at least, four nuclear power plant besides Angra-3 till 2030. It also contemplates the possibility of other eight 1000 MWe nuclear power plants being built. Brazil holds the 6th largest uranium reserves in the world. Considering that only about one third of the territory has been prospected to date, fuel supply for those nuclear plants, as far as uranium ore reserves are concerned, is already assured. Fuel cycle technology dominance also guarantees to the country a position in an exclusive group of nations. The BNP outlooks the expansion of the nuclear fuel cycle looking for independence of foreign sources of supply. Estimating the nuclear fuel cost from national fuel cycle cost is still difficult due to lack of real cost data. Based on these facts it is presented a sensibility analysis of the nuclear fuel cost, taking into consideration exchange rate variation and the investment in internal rate of return. (author)

  9. Detection of fission products in carbon dioxide by instantaneous ion collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, R.; Lorin, A.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes a fission product detector with instantaneous electric collection, capable of analyzing carbon dioxide up to a pressure of 60 bars and at a temperature of 200 C. In contrast to delayed collection detectors, this apparatus makes it possible to collect rubidium and cesium ions as soon as they are formed; this avoids losses due to recombination. The detector has been tested with a fission product source made up of a uranium oxide sample subjected to a neutron flux. The activity of the ions collected as a function of an electric field has been measured for different parameters: pressure, temperature, CO 2 gas flow rate, and the volume of the ion-formation chamber. The sensitivity of this apparatus is compared to that of other fission product detectors. For a low volume-flow rate, e.g. 100 cm 3 sec -1 , its sensitivity for krypton 88 is better than that of a delayed collection detector. An apparatus of this type could be used as a can rupture detector on a reactor with a large number of channels, with a low gas sampling rate per channel. The equipment will be included in the can rupture detector installations in the Fessenheim reactor. (authors) [fr

  10. Retrospective - the beginnings of the uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    This article is a historical perspective of the uranium industry, from the discovery of uranium in 1789 to the discovery of fission in 1939. It is the first in a series of articles. In this part of the series, the initial discovery of uranium is mentioned. Early ore discoveries, especially in the USA, are also noted, and the market conditions at the end of the 19th century are reviewed. Shortly after the discovery of radium in 1898 and natural radioactivity, the connection between uranium and radium was noted, and this is outlined in the article. Due to the intimate relationship between the two elements, radium product and radium markets are also reviewed

  11. Fission level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, V.M.

    1998-01-01

    Fission level densities (or fissioning nucleus level densities at fission saddle deformations) are required for statistical model calculations of actinide fission cross sections. Back-shifted Fermi-Gas Model, Constant Temperature Model and Generalized Superfluid Model (GSM) are widely used for the description of level densities at stable deformations. These models provide approximately identical level density description at excitations close to the neutron binding energy. It is at low excitation energies that they are discrepant, while this energy region is crucial for fission cross section calculations. A drawback of back-shifted Fermi gas model and traditional constant temperature model approaches is that it is difficult to include in a consistent way pair correlations, collective effects and shell effects. Pair, shell and collective properties of nucleus do not reduce just to the renormalization of level density parameter a, but influence the energy dependence of level densities. These effects turn out to be important because they seem to depend upon deformation of either equilibrium or saddle-point. These effects are easily introduced within GSM approach. Fission barriers are another key ingredients involved in the fission cross section calculations. Fission level density and barrier parameters are strongly interdependent. This is the reason for including fission barrier parameters along with the fission level densities in the Starter File. The recommended file is maslov.dat - fission barrier parameters. Recent version of actinide fission barrier data obtained in Obninsk (obninsk.dat) should only be considered as a guide for selection of initial parameters. These data are included in the Starter File, together with the fission barrier parameters recommended by CNDC (beijing.dat), for completeness. (author)

  12. Determination of relative krypton fission product yields from 14 MeV neutron induced fission of 238U at the National Ignition Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, E R; Cassata, W S; Velsko, C A; Yeamans, C B; Shaughnessy, D A

    2016-11-01

    Precisely-known fission yield distributions are needed to determine a fissioning isotope and the incident neutron energy in nuclear security applications. 14 MeV neutrons from DT fusion at the National Ignition Facility induce fission in depleted uranium contained in the target assembly hohlraum. The fission yields of Kr isotopes (85m, 87, 88, and 89) are measured relative to the cumulative yield of 88 Kr and compared to previously tabulated values. The results from this experiment and England and Rider are in agreement, except for the 85m Kr/ 88 Kr ratio, which may be the result of incorrect nuclear data.

  13. p- and n-induced U-fission tracks as possible error sources in the fission track dating of extraterrestric samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, K.

    1975-01-01

    Using the fission track dating method by means of uranium fission tracks in meteorites and moon samples (according to the successful Apollo and Luna missions), special problems arise, as the samples frequently have a very great age and were subjected to the inmediate effect of primary cosmic radiation. To determine the share of induced fission tracks, an extended 'cosmic ray' simulation experiment was carried out on the p-synchrocyclotron in CERN, Geneva; the performance and results of the test with the proton flux and U fission track measurements are dealt with in detail. (HK/LH) [de

  14. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  15. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetité, Bahia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Kelecom, Alphonse; Py Júnior, Delcy de Azevedo

    2008-08-01

    The uranium mining at Caetité (Uranium Concentrate Unit—URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5×103 μGy y-1 has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51×100 μGy y-1, that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  17. Absorbed Dose Rate Due to Intake of Natural Radionuclides by Tilapia Fish (Tilapia nilotica,Linnaeus, 1758) Estimated Near Uranium Mining at Caetite, Bahia, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S; Kelecom, Alphonse; Azevedo Py Junior, Delcy de

    2008-01-01

    The uranium mining at Caetite (Uranium Concentrate Unit--URA) is in its operational phase. Aiming to estimate the radiological environmental impact of the URA, a monitoring program is underway. In order to preserve the biota of the deleterious effects from radiation and to act in a pro-active way as expected from a licensing body, the present work aims to use an environmental protection methodology based on the calculation of absorbed dose rate in biota. Thus, selected target organism was the Tilapia fish (Tilapia nilotica, Linnaeus, 1758) and the radionuclides were: uranium (U-238), thorium (Th-232), radium (Ra-226 and Ra-228) and lead (Pb-210). As, in Brazil there are no radiation exposure limits adopted for biota the value proposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of 3.5x10 3 μGy y -1 has been used. The derived absorbed dose rate calculated for Tilapia was 2.51x10 0 μGy y -1 , that is less than 0.1% of the dose limit established by DOE. The critical radionuclide was Ra-226, with 56% of the absorbed dose rate, followed by U-238 with 34% and Th-232 with 9%. This value of 0.1% of the limit allows to state that, in the operational conditions analyzed, natural radionuclides do not represent a radiological problem to biota

  18. Radiation effects in fuel materials for fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, H.

    1983-01-01

    Physical and chemical changes that occur in fuel materials during fission are described. Emphasis is placed on the fuels used today, or those foreseen for the future, hence oxides and carbides of uranium and plutonium. Examples are given to illustrate the most interesting neutron effects. (author)

  19. Fission product release from TRIGA-LEU reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, N.L.; Foushee, F.C.; Greenwood, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    Due to present international concerns over nuclear proliferation, TRIGA reactor fuels will utilize only low-enriched uranium (LEU) (enrichment <20%). This requires increased total uranium loading per unit volume of fuel in order to maintain the appropriate fissile loading. Tests were conducted to determine the fractional release of gaseous and metallic fission products from typical uranium-zirconium hydride TRIGA fuels containing up to 45 wt-% uranium. These tests, performed in late 1977 and early 1978, were similar to those conducted earlier on TRIGA fuels with 8.5 wt-% U. Fission gas release measurements were made on prototypic specimens from room temperature to 1100 deg. C in the TRIGA King Furnace Facility. The fuel specimens were irradiated in the TRIGA reactor at a low power level. The fractional releases of the gaseous nuclides of krypton and xenon were measured under steady-state operating conditions. Clean helium was used to sweep the fission gases released during irradiation from the furnace into a standard gas collection trap for gamma counting. The results of these tests on TRIGA-LEU fuel agree well with data from the similar, earlier tests on TRIGA fuel. The correlation used to calculate the release of fission products from 8.5 wt-% U TRIGA fuel applies equally well for U contents up to 45 wt-%. (author)

  20. 50 years with nuclear fission, April 25-28, 1989. A prelude to fission: France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savic, P.

    1989-01-01

    A personal account of the events leading to the 1938 discovery, by Irene Joliot-Curie and the author, of the unidentified element R 3.5h will be presented, as well as the experimental methods proving the R 3.5h had chemical properties similar to lanthanum which in turn led Hahn and Strassmann to the discovery of fission in 1939. The author points out that Irene Curie's intuition indicated the path towards the solution of the problem of uranium irradiated by neutrons, which made possible the discovery of fission by Hahn and Strassmann. Further applications of fission became possible by tremendous efforts and excellent contributions of scientists in the USA