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Sample records for uranium fill material

  1. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package fill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Depleted uranium dioxide fill inside the waste package creates the potential for significant improvements in package performance based on uranium geochemistry, reduces the potential for criticality in a repository, and consumes DU inventory. As a new concept, significant uncertainties exist: fill properties, impacts on package design, post- closure performance

  2. Retention of uranium(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, M.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Shon, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Retention of U(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite as investigated by conducting dynamic and batch sorption experiments in a love-box using a granite core with a natural fracture. The hydrodynamic properties of the granite core were obtained from the elution curve of a on-sorbing tracer, Br - . The elution curve of U(VI) showed a similar behavior to Br - . This reveals that the retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material was not significant when migrating through the fracture at a given condition. From the dynamic sorption experiment, the retardation factor R a and the distribution coefficient K a of U(VI) were obtained as about 2.9 and 0.16 cm, respectively. The distribution coefficient K d ) of U(VI) onto laumontite obtained by conducting a batch sorption experiment resulted in a small value of 2.3±0.5 mL/g. This low K d value greed with the result of the dynamic sorption experiment. For the distribution of uranium on the granite surface investigated by an X-ray image mapping, the fracture region filled with laumontite showed a relatively lower content of uranium compared to the surrounding granite surface. Thus, the low retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material can be explained by following two mechanisms. One is that U(VI) exists as anionic uranyl hydroxides or uranyl carbonates at a given groundwater condition and the other is the remarkably low sorption capacity of the laumontite for U(VI). author)

  3. Uranium material removing and recovering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, Shin-ichi.

    1997-01-01

    A uranium material removing and recovering device for use in removing surplus uranium heavy metal (UO 2 ) generated in a uranium handling facility comprises a uranium material removing device and a uranium material recovering device. The uranium material removing device comprises an adsorbing portion filled with a uranium adsorbent, a control portion for controlling the uranium adsorbent of the uranium adsorbing portion by a controlling agent, a uranium adsorbing device connected thereto and a jetting device for jetting the adsorbing liquid to equipments deposited with uranium. The recovering device comprises a recovering apparatus for recovering uranium materials deposited with the adsorbent liquid removed by the jetting device and a recovering tank for storing the recovered uranium materials. The device of the present invention can remove surplus uranium simply and safely, mitigate body's load upon removing and recovering operations, facilitate the processing for the exchange of the adsorbent and reduces the radioactive wastes. (T.M.)

  4. Radiopacity of root filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Olsen, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A method for measuring the radiopacity of root filling materials is described. Direct measurements were made of the optic density values of the materials in comparison with a standard curve relating optic density to the thickness of an aluminium step wedge exposed simultaneously. By proper selection of film and conditions for exposure and development, it was possible to obtain a near-linear standard curve which added to the safety and reproducibility of the method. The technique of radiographic assessment was modified from clinical procedures in evaluating the obturation in radiographs, and it was aimed at detecting slits or voids between the dental wall and the filling material. This radiographic assessment of potensial leakage was compared with actual in vitro lekage of dye (basic fuchsin) into the roots of filled teeth. The result of the investigation show that root filling materials display a very wide range of radiopacity, from less than 3 mm to more than 12 mm of aluminium. It also seem that tooth roots that appear to be well obturated by radiographic evaluation, stand a good chance of beeing resistant to leakage in vitro, and that the type of filling material rather than its radiographic appearance, determines the susceptibility of the filled tooth to leakage in vitro. As an appendix the report contains a survey of radiopaque additives in root filling materials

  5. Removal of root filling materials.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H.F. Chong, B.S.

    2011-05-01

    Safe, successful and effective removal of root filling materials is an integral component of non-surgical root canal re-treatment. Access to the root canal system must be achieved in order to negotiate to the canal terminus so that deficiencies in the original treatment can be rectified. Since a range of materials have been advocated for filling root canals, different techniques are required for their removal. The management of commonly encountered root filling materials during non-surgical re-treatment, including the clinical procedures necessary for removal and the associated risks, are reviewed. As gutta-percha is the most widely used and accepted root filling material, there is a greater emphasis on its removal in this review.

  6. Raw material uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, O.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper some aspects are being considered, in as far as they can contribute to a better understanding of uranium as a raw material and an energy carrier, and as they can indicate the possible ways and means open to the German Federal Republic for securing this highly desirable raw material, without becoming even more dependent on the economic and political views of the producing countries, than it is the case in respect of oil. (orig.) [de

  7. Uranium tailings reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Steger, H.F.; Bowman, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of uranium tailings from Bancroft and Elliot Lake, Ontario, and from Beaverlodge and Rabbit Lake, Saskatchewan, have been prepared as compositional reference materials at the request of the National Uranium Tailings Research Program. The four samples, UTS-1 to UTS-4, were ground to minus 104 μm, each mixed in one lot and bottled in 200-g units for UTS-1 to UTS-3 and in 100-g units for UTS-4. The materials were tested for homogeneity with respect to uranium by neutron activation analysis and to iron by an acid-decomposition atomic absorption procedure. In a free choice analytical program, 18 laboratories contributed results for one or more of total iron, titanium, aluminum, calcium, barium, uranium, thorium, total sulphur, and sulphate for all four samples, and for nickel and arsenic in UTS-4 only. Based on a statistical analysis of the data, recommended values were assigned to all elements/constituents, except for sulphate in UTS-3 and nickel in UTS-4. The radioactivity of thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210 in UTS-1 to UTS-4 and of thorium-232, radium-228, and thorium-228 in UTS-1 and UTS-2 was determined in a radioanalytical program composed of eight laboratories. Recommended values for the radioactivities and associated parameters were calculated by a statistical treatment of the results

  8. Uranium reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1987-07-01

    The Technical Measurements Center has prepared uranium mill tailings reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. Four materials were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides, using three tailings materials and a river-bottom soil diluent. All materials were ground, dried, and blended thoroughly to ensure homogeneity. The analyses on which the recommended values for nuclides in the reference materials are based were performed, using independent methods, by the UNC Geotech (UNC) Chemistry Laboratory, Grand Junction, Colorado, and by C.W. Sill (Sill), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. Several statistical tests were performed on the analytical data to characterize the reference materials. Results of these tests reveal that the four reference materials are homogeneous and that no large systematic bias exists between the analytical methods used by Sill and those used by TMC. The average values for radionuclides of the two data sets, representing an unbiased estimate, were used as the recommended values for concentrations of nuclides in the reference materials. The recommended concentrations of radionuclides in the four reference materials are provided. Use of these reference materials will aid in providing uniform standardization among measurements made by remedial action contractors. 11 refs., 9 tabs

  9. Fracture-filling minerals as uranium sinks and sources, a natural analogue study at Palmottu, Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleation of a mineral crystal and its growth in groundwater carrying fractures 300 m above the Palmottu uranium deposit provide an impressive example of geochemical selectivity of uranium. Fracture-filling material was collected from a 3 mm thick fracture at depth 74.8-75 m (drillcore R348). SEM and EDS analyses on a thin section of the original fracture-filling show that the fracture filling is heterogeneous, composing mineral crystal particles and very porous clay-rich aggregates. The results of INAA on millimetre-sized single mineral crystals and aggregates selected from grinded fracture-filling show that porous aggregates (composed of clays and micrometer sized mineral particles) contain up to 1000 ppm U, which is higher than the average of the whole fracture-filling (400 ppm) and host rock related millimetre sized mineral particles (18-100 ppm). 233 U/ 238 U isotope exchange proves that a large fraction of the uranium in the fracture-filling is not easily exchanged with uranium in the solution. The amount of 238 U released in the isotope exchange experiment is too high to be explained by reversible U(VI) sorption. Oxidation state analyses show that 30% of the uranium exists as U(IV). Laboratory batch experiment at anoxic conditions proved that pyrite can immobilise U(VI). (orig.)

  10. Raw material uranium; Rohstoff Uran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-03-15

    Uranium is an important raw material in human life. Mostly using nuclear fission uranium is used in nuclear medicine, industry and research. The most important application is the generation of electricity in nuclear power plants. Due to the global availability the worldwide uranium supply is guaranties for a long time. The contribution covers the issues medicine, neutron research, energy generation, occurrence, mining, processing, recycling and disposal.

  11. Microhardness of bulk-fill composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fil (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and ...

  12. Calculation of depleted uranium concentration in dental fillings samples using the nuclear track detector CR-39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi, K. H.; Subhi, A. T.; Tawfiq, N. F.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the concentration of depleted uranium in dental fillings samples, which were obtained some hospital and dental office, sale of materials deployed in Iraq. 8 samples were examined from two different fillings and lead-filling (amalgam) and composite filling (plastic). concentrations of depleted uranium were determined in these samples using a nuclear track detector CR-39 through the recording of the tracks left by of fragments of fission resulting from the reaction 2 38U (n, f). The samples are bombarded by neutrons emitted from the neutron source (2 41A m-Be) with flux of ( 10 5 n. cm- 2. s -1 ). The period of etching to show the track of fission fragments is 5 hours using NaOH solution with normalization (6.25N), and temperature (60 o C ). Concentration of depleted uranium were calculated by comparison with standard samples. The result that obtained showed that the value of the weighted average for concentration of uranium in the samples fillings (5.54± 1.05) ppm lead to thr filling (amalgam) and (5.33±0.6) ppm of the filling composite (plastic). The hazard- index, the absorbed dose and the effective dose for these concentration were determined. The obtained results of the effective dose for each of the surface of the bone and skin (as the areas most affected by this compensation industrial) is (0.56 mSv / y) for the batting lead (amalgam) and (0.54 mSv / y) for the filling composite (plastic). From the results of study it was that the highest rate is the effective dose to a specimen amalgam filling (0.68 mSv / y) which is less than the allowable limit for exposure of the general people set the World Health Organization (WHO), a (1 mSv / y). (Author)

  13. Characterization of low concentration uranium glass working materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wimpenny, J. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leever, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knight, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ryerson, F. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-22

    A series of uranium-doped silicate glasses were created at (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) LLNL, to be used as working reference material analogs for low uranium concentration research. Specifically, the aim of this effort was the generation of well-characterized glasses spanning a range of concentrations and compositions, and of sufficient homogeneity in uranium concentration and isotopic composition, for instrumentation research and development purposes. While the glasses produced here are not intended to replace or become standard materials for uranium concentration or uranium isotopic composition, it is hoped that they will help fill a current gap, providing low-level uranium glasses sufficient for methods development and method comparisons within the limitations of the produced glass suite. Glasses are available for research use by request.

  14. Topological materials discovery using electron filling constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ru; Po, Hoi Chun; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Vishwanath, Ashvin

    2018-01-01

    Nodal semimetals are classes of topological materials that have nodal-point or nodal-line Fermi surfaces, which give them novel transport and topological properties. Despite being highly sought after, there are currently very few experimental realizations, and identifying new materials candidates has mainly relied on exhaustive database searches. Here we show how recent studies on the interplay between electron filling and nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries can guide the search for filling-enforced nodal semimetals. We recast the previously derived constraints on the allowed band-insulator fillings in any space group into a new form, which enables effective screening of materials candidates based solely on their space group, electron count in the formula unit, and multiplicity of the formula unit. This criterion greatly reduces the computation load for discovering topological materials in a database of previously synthesized compounds. As a demonstration, we focus on a few selected nonsymmorphic space groups which are predicted to host filling-enforced Dirac semimetals. Of the more than 30,000 entires listed, our filling criterion alone eliminates 96% of the entries before they are passed on for further analysis. We discover a handful of candidates from this guided search; among them, the monoclinic crystal Ca2Pt2Ga is particularly promising.

  15. Uranium-lead shielding for nuclear material transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, E.C.; Miller, N.E.; Basham, S.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basis for the selection of shielding materials for spent fuel shipping containers is described with comments concerning the favorable and unfavorable aspects of steel, lead, and depleted uranium. A concept for a new type of material made of depleted uranium and lead is described which capitalizes on the best cask shielding characteristics of both materials. This cask shielding is made by filling the shielding cavity with pieces of depleted uranium and then backfilling the interstitial voids with lead. The lead would be bonded to the uranium and also to the cask shells if desired. Shielding density approaching 80 percent of that of solid uranium could be achieved, while a density of 65 percent is readily obtainable. This material should overcome the problems of the effect of lead melting in the fire accident, high thermal gradients at uranium-stainless steel interfaces and at a major reduction in cost over that of a solid uranium shielded cask. A development program is described to obtain information on the properties of the composite material to aid in design analysis and licensing and to define the fabrication techniques

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Leonhardt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNT filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology.

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Filled with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissker, Uhland; Hampel, Silke; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) filled with ferromagnetic metals like iron, cobalt or nickel are new and very interesting nanostructured materials with a number of unique properties. In this paper we give an overview about different chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods for their synthesis and discuss the influence of selected growth parameters. In addition we evaluate possible growth mechanisms involved in their formation. Moreover we show their identified structural and magnetic properties. On the basis of these properties we present different application possibilities. Some selected examples reveal the high potential of these materials in the field of medicine and nanotechnology. PMID:28883334

  18. Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, S.; Garcia-Garcia, S.; Jonsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials Susanna Wold*, Sandra García-García and Mats Jonsson KTH Chemical Science and Engineering Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden *Corresponding author: E-mail: wold@kth.se Phone: +46 8 790 6295 In colloid transport in water-bearing fractures, the retardation depends on interactions with the fracture surface by sorption or filtration. These mechanisms are difficult to separate. A rougher surface will give a larger area available for sorption, and also when a particle is physically hindered, it approaches the surface and enables further sorption. Sorption can be explained by electrostatics were the strongest sorption on minerals always is observed at pH below pHpzc (Filby et al., 2008). The adhesion of colloids to mineral surfaces is related to the surface roughness according to a recent study (Darbha et al., 2010). There is a large variation in the characteristics of water-bearing fractures in bedrock in terms of aperture distribution, flow velocity, surface roughness, mineral distributions, presence of fracture filling material, and biological and organic material, which is hard to implement in modeling. The aim of this work was to study the transport of negatively charged colloids in model fracture filling material in relation to flow, porosity, mineral type, colloid size, and surface charge distribution. In addition, the impact on transport of colloids of mixing model fracture filling materials with different retention and immobilization capacities, determined by batch sorption experiments, was investigated. The transport of Na-montmorillonite colloids and well-defined negatively charged latex microspheres of 50, 100, and 200 nm diameter were studied in either columns containing quartz or quartz mixed with biotite. The ionic strength in the solution was exclusively 0.001 and pH 6 or 8.5. The flow rates used were 0.002, 0.03, and 0.6 mL min-1. Sorption of the colloids on the model fracture

  19. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the...

  20. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, F F; Bracilović, D M; Krajincanić, B V; Lucić, J L

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid.

  1. Bacterial leaching of waste uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbic, F.F.; Bracilovic, D.M.; Krajincanic, B.V.; Lucic, J.L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria on the leaching of waste uranium materials from which 70-80% of uranium was previously leached by classical chemical hydrometallurgical procedure has been investigated. The bacteria used are found in the ore and the mine water of Zletovska River locality, Yugoslavia. Parameters of biological leaching were examined in the laboratory. Leaching conditions were changed with the aim of increasing the amount of uranium leached. The effect of pyrite added to the waste materials before the beginning of leaching has also been examined. Uranium leaching is directly proportional to the composition and number of ferrobacteria and thiobacteria, and increased by almost twice the value obtained from the same starting materials without using bacteria. Increased sulphuric acid concentrations stimulate considerably the rate of leaching. Uranium leaching is increased up to 20% while sulphuric acid consumption is simultaneously decreased by the addition of pyrite. Uranium concentrations in starting waste materials used for leaching were extremely low (0.0278 and 0.0372% U) but about 60% recovery of uranium was obtained, with relatively low consumption of sulphuric acid. (author)

  2. Uranium as Raw Material for Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.

    2006-01-01

    There is lot of information bringing our attention to the problem of limited raw material resources. Fortunately uranium for nuclear energy is very concentrated source and that is why its transport brings no problems and could be realized from anywhere. Second question is if overall resources are available for current nuclear energy development. Data documenting reasons for nowadays price growth are presenting and it is clearly shown that the most probable explanation is that there is gap in new uranium mines preparation and the lot of smaller mines were closed in the period of low uranium prices. Conclusion is that there is at least for the first half of this century even for thermal reactors enough uranium. Situation could be changed if there will massive production of liquid fuel using hydrogen, produced through nuclear heating. Public information about former military uranium resources are also included. Contemporary about one half of US nuclear power-stations is using high enriched uranium diluted with natural uranium - it is expected to continue this way up to 2012. Uranium is complicated market (Authors)

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  4. Sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Wang Bo; Bao Liangjin; Zhou Duo; Long Haoqi; Song Zhixin; Chen Xi

    2012-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of Np (Ⅴ) on the granite fracture filling materials were studied by batch experiments under anaerobic in Beishan groundwater. The impact of pH of groundwater, CO 3 2- , humic acid and different components of granite fracture filling materials on sorption of Np (Ⅴ) was investigated. The results show that the granite fracture filling materials have strong capacity of Np (Ⅴ) adsorption. The value of K d , for Np (Ⅴ) sorption on the granite fracture filling materials is 843 mL/g. With the increase of pH, the value of K d increases at first and then decreases. K d of Np sorption on granite fracture filling materials in the presence of CO 3 2- and humic acid decreases. The chlorite and feldspar are major contributors to the sorption of Np (Ⅴ) on Beishan granite fracture filling materials. (authors)

  5. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Saxena

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials.

  6. Mechanical behaviour of dental composite filling materials using digital holography

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, J.M.; Lopes, H.; Vaz, M.A.P.; Campos, J.C. Reis

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common clinical problems in dentistry is tooth decay. Among the dental filling materials used to repair tooth structure that has been destroyed by decay are dental amalgam and composite materials based on acrylics. Dental amalgam has been used by dentists for the past 150 years as a dental restorative material due to its low cost, ease of application, strength, durability, and bacteriostatic effects. However its safety as a filling material has been questioned due to th...

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF FLORIDA FILL MATERIALS AND SOILS 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of laboratory work by the University of Florida in support of the Foundation Fill Data Base project of the Foundation Fill Materials Specifications Task Area of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). Work included determination of radon concentrations...

  8. Effect of Different Filling Materials in Anammox Bacteria Enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek ÖZGÜN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox is a process that ammonium as electron donor is oxidized to nitrogen gas using nitrite as electron acceptor. Compared to conventional nitrification-denitrification processes, this process is used less oxygen and no organic material (methanol, glucose. However, the slow growth rate of Anammox bacteria (11-30 days is disadvantages. Therefore, batch reactors have been carried out in these bacteria enrichment. In this study continuously operated upflow anaerobic sludge reactor (UASB using different filling materials disposing of sensitive and slow-growing Anammox bacteria out of the system is purposed. Design and Methods: System is operated up-flow column reactor at 2 days hydraulic retention time (HRT in 45 days. In this study, ceramic stones and Linpor filling material are used. Using synthetic wastewater containing ammonium and nitrite, Ar/CO2 anaerobic conditions (95/5% supplied with gas. System is operated at a temperature 253 C in UASB. Temperature, pH, ammonia-nitrogen and nitrite nitrogen are measured. Results: Both filling material reactors are operated in 45 days. Ceramic stones filling reactor is observed quickly reaches 90% were used reactor ammonium removal. The ammonium nitrogen removal was slower in Linpor filling materials reactor. Nitrite removal is reached up to 90% in both the reactor. When compared to the stoichiometric equation in Linpor was composed of large amounts of nitrate. At the end of 25 days the results were similar to ceramic stone filling reactor with Linpor filling material reactors. Conclusions and Original Value: Anammox process as from nitrogen removal processes was discovered in 1995. Anammox bacteria that make up this process due to very low growth rates of microbial bacteria in the system must be kept in the system. Most of the studies in the literature, these bacteria enrichment stage is started instead of a continuous batch reactor system. In this study

  9. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksen, T E; Cui, Daqing [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemistry

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Experimental study of strontium sorption on fissure filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Cui, Daqing

    1994-12-01

    We have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated magnetic and size fractions of fissure filling material taken from natural fissures in granitic rock. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficients Rd. The sorption was found to be strongly pH dependent in the range 3-11. The pH effect can be accommodated in the sorption model by considering the surface areas and surface charges of the minerals in the fissure filling material. 20 refs, 9 figs, 3 tabs

  11. Experimental Study of Goaf Filling Materials Based on Red Mud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Mangen; Gao, Xiaozhen; Guo, Taoming; Hu, Xinping

    2018-01-01

    Red mud as soild waste is difficult to treatment. Goaf filling materials can make a large use of red mud. By the experimental study,we find that the red mud, fly ash, ground slag and desulfida-tion gypsum can be used to make goaf filling materials based on the principle of alkali excitation and metalion stability.Through the control variable method, we find that the optimal proportion of goaf filling materials based on red mud is red mud 55%, fly ash 30%, cement 7.5%, fly ash 2.5%, desulfurization gypsum 5%, admixture 1%, and water solid ratio=1:1.2.The 28days final material strength was 2.0 MPa,which achives the technical specification requirements.Through the test of SEM, XRD and IR, it is indicated that the strength formation of goaf filling material based on red mud is from the unformed linking hydration products of amorphous alkali excitation system. With curing time from 3 to 7 days, the unformed linking hydration products grown a lot of vitreous hydration products. When hydration reaction basicly finished after 28 days, the hydration products have developed into a large volume of massive vitreous with an extremely dense structure. The Ca2SiO3 mineral phase is significantly reduced, which is participate in hydration reactions. The decrease of Ca2SiO3 indicates that the Si-O bond in the system have been ruptured and reorganized.

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    concentration in peat bogs, deposits combined with marine phosphates, with coal and lignite, with black shales, with carbonate rocks, deposits in Precambrian quartz pebble conglomerates, basal-type deposits, deposits in sandstones (tabular, roll-type and tectono-lithologic deposits), breccia chimney filling deposits, deposits in metamorphic rocks, metasomatic deposits, deposits in intrusive rocks, deposits associated with hematite breccia complexes, deposits in granitic rocks, deposits in volcanic rocks, deposits in proterozoic discordances (Athabasca basin, Pine Creek geo-syncline); 4 - French uranium bearing areas and deposits: history of the French uranium mining industry, geological characteristics of French deposits (black shales, sandstones, granites), abroad success of French mining companies (Africa, North America, South America, Australia, Asia); 5 - exploration and exploitation; 6 - uranium economy: perspectives of uranium demand, present day production status, secondary resources, possible resources, market balances, prices and trends, future availability and nuclear perspectives. (J.S.)

  13. Certification of a uranium dioxide reference material for chemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Y.

    1984-01-01

    This report, issued by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM), describes the characterization of a uranium dioxide reference material with accurately determined uranium mass fraction for chemical analyses. The preparation, conditioning, homogeneity tests and the analyses performed on this material are described in Annex 1. The evaluation of the individual impurity results, total of impurities and uranium mass fraction are given in Annex 2. Information on a direct determination of uranium by titration is given in Annex 3. The uranium mass fraction (881.34+-0.13) g.kg -1 calculated in Annex 2 is given on the certificate

  14. Multifunctional composite material based on carbon-filled polyurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinovskaya, T; Melentyev, S; Pavlov, S

    2015-01-01

    The research paper deals with the performance of composite resistive material heating coatings based on the polyurethane binder, filled with colloidal-graphite preparation C- 1, which can be used in structures of electric heaters. Frequency dependences of transmission and reflection coefficients, dielectric permeability of composite materials with the various content of carbon fillers (technical carbon, graphite) in polyurethane varnish in ranges of frequencies 26-40 GHz and 110-260 GHz are experimentally investigated. (paper)

  15. Discrimination of high-Z materials in concrete-filled containers using muon scattering tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, L.; Velthuis, J.; Thomay, C.; Steer, C.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis method of identifying materials using muon scattering tomography is presented, which uses previous knowledge of the position of high-Z objects inside a container and distinguishes them from similar materials. In particular, simulations were performed in order to distinguish a block of Uranium from blocks of Lead and Tungsten of the same size, inside a concrete-filled drum. The results show that, knowing the shape and position from previous analysis, it is possible to distinguish 5 × 5 × 5 cm3 blocks of these materials with about 4h of muon exposure, down to 2 × 2 × 2 cm3 blocks with 70h of data using multivariate analysis (MVA). MVA uses several variables, but it does not benefit the discrimination over a simpler method using only the scatter angles. This indicates that the majority of discrimination is provided by the angular information. Momentum information is shown to provide no benefits in material discrimination.

  16. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  17. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  18. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  19. DOE's Stewardship of Government-Owned Uranium Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J. Dale; Donaldson, Dale E.

    2002-01-01

    Beginning in the 1980's, a significant number of Department of Energy facilities have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. The shutdown of additional facilities is planned. In addition, during the past several decades, the Department of Energy has loaned nuclear material to a wide variety of private and governmental institutions for research and educational purposes. Subsequent changes in the Department's priorities have reduced the need for nuclear materials to support the Department's programs. Similarly, there has been a reduction in the need for borrowed nuclear materials by organizations and institutions using nuclear materials 'on loan' from the Department. As a result, inventories of uranium material from the Department's facilities and 'on loan' must be removed and returned to the Department. This material is in the form of low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU) in various forms. This uranium material is located at over one hundred sites within the United States and overseas, including universities and laboratories. Much of this uranium is not needed to support national priorities and programs. The Department of Energy has assumed a stewardship role in managing nuclear materials throughout their life cycle, from acquisition to storage. Surplus uranium has created challenges for DOE in managing and storing the material as well as identifying opportunities for its further use. On behalf of the Department, the Oak Ridge Operations Office has been given the responsibility to implement the Department responsibilities in meeting these challenges and managing the Department's uranium materials. To support this effort, the Office of Nuclear Fuel Security and Uranium Technology within the ORO complex coordinates uranium management functions across the Department of Energy. This coordination provides DOE with a number of important benefits, among which are: consolidated management and storage of uranium; improved

  20. Contrast material filling of the peroneal tendon sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadravecz, Gy.; Grexa, E.

    1981-01-01

    In case of complaints after fracture of the calcaneus the common sheath of the peroneus tendons was filled up with contrast material. The tendon sheath was punctured Oehind the external ankle. The three-directional radiograms clearly showed the dislocation and compression of the tendons, caused by the exostosis of the calcaneus. The concomitant tendovaginitis caused the complaints. This alteration was observed in 11% of all the calcaneus fractures. (L.E.)

  1. Innovations in endodontic filling materials: guttapercha vs Resilon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Filho, Francisco José; Gallina, Giuseppe; Gallottini, Livio; Russo, Riccardo; Cumbo, Enzo Maria

    2012-01-01

    One of the goals of endodontic treatment is to achieve a complete, tridimensional, hermetic sealing of the root canal system to prevent the entry of microorganisms or their products through both the coronal and apical pathways. Gutta-percha is the most widely used material for root canal filling and despite its numerous properties, such as biocompatibility and thermoplasticity, it has however an important limit: the lack of adhesion to the canal walls. Attempts to address this problem have been made over the years by using endodontic cements capable of bonding to canal dentine but their tendency to resorption in time can compromise the quality of treatment. The first step towards a real adhesive endodontic filling(4) is rather recent; in fact, it goes back to 2003 when, on the occasion of the American Dental Association (ADA) Annual Session, Resilon Research LLC introduced a new canal filling adhesive system based on a thermoplastic synthetic resin material called Resilon™. The real innovation of this system is its capacity of creating a core made of Resilon™ bonded to the cement which adheres to dentine walls previously conditioned with a self-etching primer(4) so no changes in the techniques of canal preparation are required. The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of two filling materials (gutta-percha and Resilon) to adapt to the canal anatomy, especially on the apical third, using the continuous wave of condensation technique. Our data suggest that in the third apical the gutta-percha best shows rheological properties that are as important as the bond capability.

  2. Uranium - raw material reserves for coming generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1981-01-01

    Large uranium occurences have been discovered in the South of Mexico. The deposits are situated in the Sierra Mixteca. Reserves of 9.400 tons had been at Mexico's disposal even before these new discoveries. The quantitiy discovered recentyl amounts to 20.000 tons. The uranium reserves available apart from those in centrally controlled economic systems are presently estimated at five million tons. Meanwhile American scientists have found out that all the rivers of the world transport about 16.000 tons of uranium from the continents into the oceans per annum. The energy value of this washed out amount of uranium corresponds to the 25-fold world power demand of today. US scientists have discovered that the oceans can provide uranium for about seven million years of the present world energy demand. While the petroleum reserves decrease worldwide it seems that the exploration of uranium has just been started. (orig.) [de

  3. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyeon [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jeters, Robert T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gill, Gary A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonheyo, George T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  4. The existence state of uranium(VI) in portland cement matrix material immobilization body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Li Yuxiang

    2005-01-01

    The basis of Portland cement material reaction with uranium, the corrosion of uranium minerals in nature and the state of study on immobilization of uranium by Portland cement matrix material are introduced, and some considerations are presented. (authors)

  5. Exploration for uranium and other nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.C.

    1975-05-01

    Prospecting and exploration for uranium and other nuclear minerals have one advantage over prospecting for other metals because of their inherent radioactivity. Radioactivity in the earth is not confined solely to these elements but also to radiations coming from cosmic rays and from fallouts from large-scale atomic and nuclear explosions. The primary uranium mineral is uranimite, however, concentrations of other uranium minerals may also lead to an economic deposit. Thorium is about three times more abundant than uranium in the earth's crust. Uranium is practically found in many types of geologic environment it being ubiquitous and very mobile. Uranium deposits are classified in a descriptive manner, owing to lack of basic information as to its origin. These classifications are peneconcordant, for deposits as conglomerates and sandstones, discordant for vein pegmatite and contact metamorphic deposits, concordant for deposits in shales and phosphate rocks, and miscellaneous for deposits in beach and placer sands containing mostly thorium minerals. The different exploration techniques and their associated instrumentations are discussed from a regional scale survey to a detailed survey. To date, only the Larap copper-molybdenum-magnetite deposit at the Paracale district, Camarines Norte in the Philippines, has been found to contain uranium as discrete uraninite grains in the ore mineral assemblage of the deposit

  6. Measurement of enriched uranium and uranium-aluminum fuel materials with the AWCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.; Zick, J.; Ikonomou, P.

    1985-05-01

    The active well coincidence counter (AWCC) was calibrated at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) for the assay of 93%-enriched fuel materials in three categories: (1) uranium-aluminum billets, (2) uranium-aluminum fuel elements, and (3) uranium metal pieces. The AWCC was a standard instrument supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency under the International Safeguards Project Office Task A.51. Excellent agreement was obtained between the CRNL measurements and previous Los Alamos National Laboratory measurements on similar mockup fuel material. Calibration curves were obtained for each sample category. 2 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs

  7. IRIS Assessment Plan for Uranium (Scoping and Problem Formulation Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In January 2018, EPA released the IRIS Assessment Plan for Uranium (Oral Reference Dose) (Scoping and Problem Formulation Materials). An IRIS Assessment Plan (IAP) communicates to the public the plan for assessing each individual chemical and includes summary informatio...

  8. Comparative evaluation of low cost materials as constructed wetland filling media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Henrique J. O.; Vaz, Mafalda M.; Mateus, Dina M. R.

    2017-11-01

    Three waste materials from civil construction activities were assessed as low cost alternative filling materials used in Constructed Wetlands (CW). CW are green processes for wastewater treatment, whose design includes an appropriate selection of vegetation and filling material. The sustainability of such processes may be incremented using recovered wastes as filling materials. The abilities of the materials to support plant growth and to contribute to pollutants removal from wastewater were assessed and compared to expanded clay, a filling usually used in CW design. Statistical analysis, using one-way ANOVA and Welch's ANOVA, demonstrate that limestone fragments are a better choice of filling material than brick fragments and basalt gravel.

  9. Uranium isotopic composition and uranium concentration in special reference material SRM A (uranium in KCl/LiCl salt matrix)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Essling, A.M.; Sabau, C.S.; Smith, F.P.; Bowers, D.L.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    To help assure that analysis data of known quality will be produced in support of demonstration programs at the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (Idaho Falls, ID), a special reference material has been prepared and characterized. Designated SRM A, the material consists of individual units of LiCl/KCl eutectic salt containing a nominal concentration of 2.5 wt. % enriched uranium. Analyses were performed at Argonne National Laboratory-East (Argonne, IL) to determine the uniformity of the material and to establish reference values for the uranium concentration and uranium isotopic composition. Ten units from a batch of approximately 190 units were analyzed by the mass spectrometric isotope dilution technique to determine their uranium concentration. These measurements provided a mean value of 2.5058 ± 0.0052 wt. % U, where the uncertainty includes estimated limits to both random and systematic errors that might have affected the measurements. Evidence was found of a small, apparently random, non-uniformity in uranium content of the individual SRM A units, which exhibits a standard deviation of 0.078% of the mean uranium concentration. Isotopic analysis of the uranium from three units, by means of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a special, internal-standard procedure, indicated that the uranium isotopy is uniform among the pellets with a composition corresponding to 0.1115 ± 0.0006 wt. % 234 U, 19.8336 ± 0.0059 wt. % 235 U, 0.1337 ± 0.0006 wt. % 236 U, and 79.9171 ± 0.0057 wt. % 238 U

  10. Uranium fluoride and metallic uranium as target materials for heavy-element experiments at SHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindler, Birgit [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: b.kindler@gsi.de; Ackermann, Dieter; Hartmann, Willi; Hessberger, Fritz Peter; Hofmann, Sigurd; Huebner, Annett; Lommel, Bettina; Mann, Rido; Steiner, Jutta [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-06-01

    In this contribution we describe the production and application of uranium targets for synthesis of heavy elements. The targets are prepared from uranium fluoride (UF{sub 4}) and from metallic uranium with thin carbon foils as backing. Targets of UF{sub 4} were produced by thermal evaporation in a similar way as the frequently applied targets out of Bi, Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pb, PbS, SmF{sub 3}, and NdF{sub 3,} prepared mostly from isotopically enriched material [Birgit Kindler, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 107; Bettina Lommel, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 100]. In order to use more intensive beams and to avoid scattering of the reaction products in the target, metallic uranium is favorable. However, evaporation of metallic uranium is not feasible at a sustainable yield. Therefore, we established magnetron sputtering of metallic uranium. We describe production and properties of these targets. First irradiation tests show promising results.

  11. Potential benefits and impacts on the CRWMS transportation system of filling spent fuel shipping casks with depleted uranium silicate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Forsberg, C.W.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    A new technology, the Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Fill System (DUSCOFS), is proposed to improve the performance and reduce the uncertainties of geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), thus reducing both radionuclide release rates from the waste package and the potential for repository nuclear criticality events. DUSCOFS may also provide benefits for SNF storage and transport if it is loaded into the container early in the waste management cycle. Assessments have been made of the benefits to be derived by placing depleted uranium silicate (DUS) glass into SNF containers for enhancing repository performance assessment and controlling criticality over geologic times in the repository. Also, the performance, benefits, and impacts which can be derived if the SNF is loaded into a multi-purpose canister with DUS glass at a reactor site have been assessed. The DUSCOFS concept and the benefits to the waste management cycle of implementing DUSCOFS early in the cycle are discussed in this paper

  12. Material control and accounting requirements for uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has defined material control and accounting (MC and A) requirement for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants licensed under 10 CFR parts 40 and 70. Following detailed assessment of potential safeguards issues relevant to these facilities, a new MC and A rule was developed. The primary safeguards considerations are detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of clandestine production of special nuclear material of low strategic significance for unauthorized use or distribution, and detection of unauthorized production of uranium enriched to ≥10 wt % U-235. The primary safeguards concerns identified were the large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, the inability to shutdown some uranium enrichment technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and the flexibility of some of these technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could circumvent the detection of the production and removal of 5 kilograms of U-235 as high-enriched uranium through conventional material control and accounting programs. Safeguards techniques, including the use of production and process control information, measurements, and technical surveillance, were identified to compensate for these concerns

  13. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE 00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The application of waste fly ash and construction-waste in cement filling material in goaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W. X.; Xiao, F. K.; Guan, X. H.; Cheng, Y.; Shi, X. P.; Liu, S. M.; Wang, W. W.

    2018-01-01

    As the process of urbanization accelerated, resulting in a large number of abandoned fly ash and construction waste, which have occupied the farmland and polluted the environment. In this paper, a large number of construction waste and abandoned fly ash are mixed into the filling material in goaf, the best formula of the filling material which containing a large amount of abandoned fly ash and construction waste is obtained, and the performance of the filling material is analyzed. The experimental results show that the cost of filling material is very low while the performance is very good, which have a good prospect in goaf.

  15. Exploration on relationship between uranium and organic materials in carbonate-siliceous pelite type uranium ore deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yongjie

    1996-01-01

    The author determines the content of uranium and organic carbon of part specimen of surrounding rocks and ores, which sampled from carbonate and black shale type uranium deposits in Xiushui, Jiangxi Province, and Tongcheng, Hubei Province. According to the analytical operation regulations of organic materials, extraction and separation of chloroform pitch is carried out. Internal relationships between uranium and organic derivative is discussed. The conclusion shows that: (1) certain co-relationship between U and organic carbon and chloroform extract is detected; (2) evolutionary processes of organic materials in the exogenetic uranium deposits are not all the same; (3) non-hydrocarbon is closely related to uranium, so it can be regarded as indicator of uranium gathering in exogenetic uranium deposits

  16. Soiled-based uranium disequilibrium and mixed uranium-thorium series radionuclide reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donivan, S.; Chessmore, R.

    1988-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology has assigned the Technical Measurements Center (TMC), located at the DOE Grand Junction Colorado, Projects Office and operated by UNC Geotech (UNC), the task of supporting ongoing remedial action programs by providing both technical guidance and assistance in making the various measurements required in all phases of remedial action work. Pursuant to this task, the Technical Measurements Center prepared two sets of radionuclide reference materials for use by remedial action contractors and cognizant federal and state agencies. A total of six reference materials, two sets comprising three reference materials each, were prepared with varying concentrations of radionuclides using mill tailings materials, ores, and a river-bottom soil diluent. One set (disequilibrium set) contains varying amounts of uranium with nominal amounts of radium-226. The other set (mixed-nuclide set) contains varying amounts of uranium-238 and thorium-232 decay series nuclides. 14 refs., 10 tabs

  17. Computed tomography assessment of the efficiency of different techniques for removal of root canal filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall'agnol, Cristina; Barletta, Fernando Branco; Hartmann, Mateus Silveira Martins

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficiency of different techniques for removal of filling material from root canals, using computed tomography (CT). Sixty mesial roots from extracted human mandibular molars were used. Root canals were filled and, after 6 months, the teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups, according to the root-filling removal technique: Group A - hand instrumentation with K-type files; Group B - reciprocating instrumentation with engine-driven K-type files; and Group C rotary instrumentation with engine-driven ProTaper system. CT scans were used to assess the volume of filling material inside the root canals before and after the removal procedure. In both moments, the area of filling material was outlined by an experienced radiologist and the volume of filling material was automatically calculated by the CT software program. Based on the volume of initial and residual filling material of each specimen, the percentage of filling material removed from the root canals by the different techniques was calculated. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and chi-square test for linear trend (α=0.05). No statistically significant difference (p=0.36) was found among the groups regarding the percent means of removed filling material. The analysis of the association between the percentage of filling material removal (high or low) and the proposed techniques by chi-square test showed statistically significant difference (p=0.015), as most cases in group B (reciprocating technique) presented less than 50% of filling material removed (low percent removal). In conclusion, none of the techniques evaluated in this study was effective in providing complete removal of filling material from the root canals. (author)

  18. Computed tomography assessment of the efficiency of different techniques for removal of root canal filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' agnol, Cristina; Barletta, Fernando Branco [Lutheran University of Brazil, Canoas, RS (Brazil). Dental School. Dept. of Dentistry and Endodontics]. E-mail: fbarletta@terra.com.br; Hartmann, Mateus Silveira Martins [Uninga Dental School, Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil). Postgraduate Program in Dentistry

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the efficiency of different techniques for removal of filling material from root canals, using computed tomography (CT). Sixty mesial roots from extracted human mandibular molars were used. Root canals were filled and, after 6 months, the teeth were randomly assigned to 3 groups, according to the root-filling removal technique: Group A - hand instrumentation with K-type files; Group B - reciprocating instrumentation with engine-driven K-type files; and Group C rotary instrumentation with engine-driven ProTaper system. CT scans were used to assess the volume of filling material inside the root canals before and after the removal procedure. In both moments, the area of filling material was outlined by an experienced radiologist and the volume of filling material was automatically calculated by the CT software program. Based on the volume of initial and residual filling material of each specimen, the percentage of filling material removed from the root canals by the different techniques was calculated. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and chi-square test for linear trend ({alpha}=0.05). No statistically significant difference (p=0.36) was found among the groups regarding the percent means of removed filling material. The analysis of the association between the percentage of filling material removal (high or low) and the proposed techniques by chi-square test showed statistically significant difference (p=0.015), as most cases in group B (reciprocating technique) presented less than 50% of filling material removed (low percent removal). In conclusion, none of the techniques evaluated in this study was effective in providing complete removal of filling material from the root canals. (author)

  19. Density of loose-fill insulation material exposed to cyclic humidity conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    the granulated loose-fill material is exposed to a climate that is characterised as cyclic humidity conditions (a constant temperature and a relative humidity alternating between two predetermined constant relative humidity levels). A better understanding of the behaviour of granulated loose-fill material...

  20. Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio-Agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...of Cincinnati Project Title: Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation...fire ball, where they will not effectively interact with any viable bio -aerosol. 1.1.4. Conclusions Cryo-milling is necessary to achieve a

  1. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Department of Technology, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  2. Highly Enriched Uranium Metal Cylinders Surrounded by Various Reflector Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard Jones; J. Blair Briggs; Leland Monteirth

    2007-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1958 to determine critical masses of cylinders of Oralloy (Oy) reflected by a number of materials. The experiments were all performed on the Comet Universal Critical Assembly Machine, and consisted of discs of highly enriched uranium (93.3 wt.% 235U) reflected by half-inch and one-inch-thick cylindrical shells of various reflector materials. The experiments were performed by members of Group N-2, particularly K. W. Gallup, G. E. Hansen, H. C. Paxton, and R. H. White. This experiment was intended to ascertain critical masses for criticality safety purposes, as well as to compare neutron transport cross sections to those obtained from danger coefficient measurements with the Topsy Oralloy-Tuballoy reflected and Godiva unreflected critical assemblies. The reflector materials examined in this series of experiments are as follows: magnesium, titanium, aluminum, graphite, mild steel, nickel, copper, cobalt, molybdenum, natural uranium, tungsten, beryllium, aluminum oxide, molybdenum carbide, and polythene (polyethylene). Also included are two special configurations of composite beryllium and iron reflectors. Analyses were performed in which uncertainty associated with six different parameters was evaluated; namely, extrapolation to the uranium critical mass, uranium density, 235U enrichment, reflector density, reflector thickness, and reflector impurities. In addition to the idealizations made by the experimenters (removal of the platen and diaphragm), two simplifications were also made to the benchmark models that resulted in a small bias and additional uncertainty. First of all, since impurities in core and reflector materials are only estimated, they are not included in the benchmark models. Secondly, the room, support structure, and other possible surrounding equipment were not included in the model. Bias values that result from these two simplifications were determined and associated

  3. Dissolution of uranium oxide materials in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Soderholm, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) oxide aerosols prepared in the laboratory and collected in the field were tested to characterize their dissolution in simulated lung fluid and to determine how dissolution is affected by aerosol preparation. DU, a by-product of the uranium fuel cycle, has been selected by the US military for use in several types of munitions. During development, manufacture, testing, and use of these munitions, opportunities exist for inhalation exposure to various (usually oxide) aerosol forms of DU. The hazard potential associated with such exposures is closely related to the chemical form, the size of the DU aerosol material, and its dissolution properties. Five DU sample materials produced by exposing uranium alloy penetrators to certain controlled oxidation atmospheres were studied (oxidation temperatures ranged from 500 to 900 0 C). In addition, two DU sample materials collected in the field were provided by the US Air Force. All sample materials were generated as aerosols and the respirable fraction was separated and collected. Data suggest that under some conditions a rapidly dissolving U 3 O 8 fraction may be formed concurrent with the production of UO 2

  4. Materials for a uranium enrichment device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masayuki; Okamoto, Jiro; Machi, Sueo; Shirayama, Kenzo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide packing or lining materials or vibration resisting materials, possessing superior characteristics of both elasticity and corrosion resistance against UF 6 , made from ethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymers. Method: Ethylene-hexafluoropropylene copolymers, containing hexafluoropropylene by 10 - 50 mol %, are prepared by means of various methods. The copolymer is cross-linked in the form of powder or sheet or after it has been moulded into appropriate product forms. Crosslinking is achieved by either heating the raw copolymer mixed with t-butylperoxybenzoate by 3 to 100 at about 150 0 C, or irradiating with ionizing radiation, i.e., an electron beam by 12 Mrad under air-free atmosphere. The obtained cross-linked copolymer shows strong resistance against UF 6 gas even at 100 0 C and keeps high mechanical strength

  5. 77 FR 60482 - Regulatory Guide 5.67, Material Control and Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized To Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... Accounting for Uranium Enrichment Facilities Authorized to Produce Special Nuclear Material of Low Strategic... and is applicable to the Paducah GDP and other uranium enrichment facilities that have been licensed...

  6. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  7. Radiological assessment of an area with uranium residual material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl; Cancio, David; Alvarez, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decays series as 230 Th, 226 Ra and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirm their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modelling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of outdoor radon ( 222 Rn). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of 226 Ra in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g-1 , the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (author)

  8. Uranium in phosphorus-bearing raw materials and technological problems of its recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorecki, H; Gorecka, H [Politechnika Wroclawska (Poland)

    1981-01-01

    A problem of uranium recovery from phosphorus-bearinq raw materials is discussed. The different methods of uranium recovery from extractive phosphoric acid are briefly described. The information on their applications in the industry is also given.

  9. International transport of uranium materials from China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Chizhi; Long Xiuaowei; Achilles, G.

    1993-01-01

    An example of international cooperation is given on the transport of frontend materials from China to Europe. With the assistance of NCS, CNEIC entered into discussions and negotiations with COSCO, the national Chinese shipping line in order to make much cheaper sea transport possible. One of the difficulties to overcome was the passage through the Suez canal but CNEIC, NCS and the port authorities were present to assure smooth operation, during the first passage through the canal, CNEIC key personnels had training at the NCS office in Germany in relation to transport regulations and practice on the job. In turn, NCS personnels were introduced into site specific conditions in China by CNEIC. In the meantime, about 150 containers loaded with yellow cake and about 120 cylinders with low enriched UF6 have been smoothly transported by sea from Shanghai through the Suez canal to European ports. (E.Y.)

  10. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-23

    Aug 23, 2015 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Abstract ... one of the latest trends in dental materials research is the ..... Geneva: International Organisation for Standardization; 2000. 13.

  11. Process evaluations for uranium recovery from scrap material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphal, B.R.; Benedict, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept being developed by Argonne National Laboratory is based on pyrometallurgical processing of spent nuclear metallic fuel with subsequent fabrication into new reactor fuel by an injection casting sequence. During fabrication, a dilute scrap stream containing uranium alloy fines and broken quartz (Vycor) molds in produced. Waste characterization of this stream, developed by using present operating data and chemical analysis was used to evaluate different uranium recovery methods and possible process variations for the return of the recovered metal. Two methods, comminution with size separation and electrostatic separation, have been tested and can recover over 95% of the metal. Recycling the metal to either the electrochemical process or the injection casting was evaluated for the different economic and process impacts. The physical waste parameters and the important separation process variables are discussed with their effects on the viability of recycling the material. In this paper criteria used to establish the acceptable operating limits is discussed

  12. The presence of antimony in various dental filling materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molokhia, Anat; Combe, E.C.; Lilley, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Antimony was determined in a number of non-metallic dental materials currently used for tooth restoration. The method applied was instrumental neutron activation analysis. The concentration of antimony in some of the brands tested was found to be as high as 900 fold that in the normal hard dental tissues. (author)

  13. Thorium and Uranium in the Rock Raw Materials Used For the Production of Building Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    Thorium and uranium are constant components of all soils and most minerals thereby rock raw materials. They belong to the particularly dangerous elements because of their natural radioactivity. Evaluation of the content of the radioactive elements in the rock raw materials seems to be necessary in the early stage of the raw material evaluation. The rock formations operated from deposits often are accumulated in landfills and slag heaps where the concentration of the radioactive elements can be many times higher than under natural conditions. In addition, this phenomenon may refer to buildings where rock raw materials are often the main components of the construction materials. The global control system of construction products draws particular attention to the elimination of used construction products containing excessive quantities of the natural radioactive elements. In the presented study were determined the content of thorium and uranium in rock raw materials coming from the Bełachatów lignite deposit. The Bełchatów lignite deposit extracts mainly lignite and secondary numerous accompanying minerals with the raw material importance. In the course of the field works within the framework of the carried out work has been tested 92 samples of rocks of varied petrographic composition. There were carried out analyses of the content of the radioactive elements for 50 samples of limestone of the Jurassic age, 18 samples of kaolinite clays, and 24 samples of siliceous raw materials, represented by opoka-rocks, diatomites, gaizes and clastic rocks. The measurement of content of the natural radioactive elements thorium and uranium based on measuring the frequency counts of gamma quantum, recorded separately in measuring channels. At the same time performed measurements on volume patterns radioactive: thorium and uranium. The studies were carried out in Mazar spectrometer on the powdered material. Standardly performed ten measuring cycles, after which were calculated

  14. Uranium refining in South Africa. The production of uranium trioxide, considering raw material properties and nuclear purity requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colborn, R.P.; Bayne, D.L.G.; Slabber, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    Conventional practice results in raw materials being delivered to the uranium refineries in a form more suitable for transportation than for processing, and therefore the refineries are required to treat these raw materials to produce an acceptable intermediate feed stock. During this treatment, it is advantageous to include a purification step to ensure that the feed stock is of the required purity for nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride production, and this usually results in ammonium diuranate slurries of the required quality being produced as the intermediate feed stock. All subsequent processing steps can therefore be standardized and are effectively independent of the origin of the raw materials. It is established practice in South Africa to transport uranium as an ammonium diuranate slurry from the various mines to the Nufcor central processing plant for UOC production, and therefore the process for the production of uranium hexafluoride in South Africa was designed to take cognizance of existing transport techniques and to accept ammonium diuranate slurries as the raw material. The South African refinery will be able to process these slurries directly to uranium trioxide. This paper discusses the conditions under which the various ammonium diuranate raw materials, exhibiting a wide range of properties, can be effectively processed to produce a uranium trioxide of acceptably consistent properties. Mention is also made of the uranium hexafluoride distillation process adopted

  15. Chemical properties of gutta-percha endodontic filling material: investigation of five commercial brands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, Joao Batista A.; Paula, Regina C.M.; Feitosa, Judith P.A.; Gurgel Filho, Eduardo; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2001-01-01

    Chemical composition e thermal stability of five brands of gutta-percha endodontic filling material were investigated. Samples with higher amount of organic materials possess higher thermal stability. Investigation of gutta-percha polymer extracted from the endodontic filling by IR and NMR shows that the polymer is predominantly trans-polyisoprene. The thermal stability and molar mass were similar for four brands, however the 'Tanari' brand has got lower molar mass value than the other ones. (author)

  16. Designing strip footing foundations using expanded polystyrene (EPS) as fill material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Psarropoulos, Prodromos; Zania, Varvara; Spyrakos, Konstantinos

    2010-01-01

    One of the modern uses of expanded polystyrene (EPS) is in strip footings as fill material. The current study investigates the effect of the geofoam filling in the static and seismic design of the base slab founded on strip footings. For this purpose the finite element method is employed, and three......-dimensional as well as two-dimensional parametric analyses are conducted taking into account static and seismic loading conditions. The interaction of the soil–geofoam–foundation system is taken into consideration. The use of EPS as fill material in foundation systems is proven to be not only technically but also...

  17. Portland cement versus MTA as a root-end filling material. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sérgio Ribeiro; da Silva Neto, José Dias; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-02-01

    To assess periradicular lesions clinically and by computed tomography (CT) after endodontic surgery using either Portland cement or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root-end filling material. Three patients diagnosed with periradicular lesions by cone-beam CT underwent endodontic surgery with root-end filling. Patient A was treated with MTA as the root-end filling material, patient B was treated with Portland cement and patient C had two teeth treated, one with MTA and the other with Portland cement. Six months after surgery, the patients were assessed clinically and by CT scan and the obtained results were compared. Periradicular tissue regeneration was observed in all cases, with no significant differences in bone formation when comparing the use of MTA and Portland cement as root-end filling materials. Both mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement were successful in the treatment of periradicular lesions.

  18. Differences in in vitro dissolution properties of settled and airborne uranium material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Crist, K.C.; Tillery, M.I.; Soderholm, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution behavior of settled and airborne uranium material produced by firing of depleted uranium munitions was studied using an in vitro dissolution technique. Differences in the composition of bulk and respirable fraction samples of these materials were observed. Dissolution analysis results suggest that under some conditions a rapidly dissolving uranium fraction may be formed. This fraction may play an important role in determining hazard potential associated with inhalation exposure to uranium materials. The fact that a larger rapidly dissolving fraction was observed in the airborne material than in the settled material indicates that dissolution analysis should be performed on appropriate size fraction samples. 20 references, 3 figures, 4 tables

  19. DISPERSION AND SORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF URANIUM IN THE ZEOLITE-QUARTZ MIXTURE AS BACKFILL MATERIAL IN THE RADIOACTIVE WASTE REPOSITORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Poernomo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiment of sorption and dispersion characteristics of uranium in the zeolite-quartz mixture as candidate of raw material of backfill material in the radioactive waste repository has been performed. The objective is to know the effect of zeolite and quartz grain size on the zeolite-to-quartz weight ratio that gives porosity (ε, permeability (K, and dispersivity (α of uranium in the zeolite-quartz mixture as backfill material. The experiment was carried out by fixed bed method in the column filled by the zeolite-quartz mixture with zeolite-to-quartz weight percent ratio of 100/0, 80/20, 60/40, 40/60, 20/80, 0/100 wt. % in the water saturated condition flowed by uranyl nitrate solution of 500 ppm concentration (Co as uranium simulation which was leached from immobilized radioactive waste in the repository. The concentration of uranium in the effluents represented as Ct were analyzed by spectrophotometer Corning Colorimeter 253 every 15 minutes, then using Co and Ct uranium dispersivity (α in the backfill material was determined. The experiment data shown that 0.196 mm particle size of zeolite and 0.116 mm particle size of quartz on the zeolite-to-quartz weight ratio of 60/40 wt. % with ε = 0.678, K = 3.345x10-4 cm/second, and α = 0.759 cm can be proposed as candidate of raw material of backfill material in the radioactive waste repository.   Keywords: backfill material, quartz, radioactive waste, zeolite

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  1. 3D Analysis of D-RaCe and Self-Adjusting File in Removing Filling Materials from Curved Root Canals Instrumented and Filled with Different Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Simsek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of D-RaCe files and a self-adjusting file (SAF system in removing filling material from curved root canals instrumented and filled with different techniques by using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT. The mesial roots of 20 extracted mandibular first molars were used. Root canals (mesiobuccal and mesiolingual were instrumented with SAF or Revo-S. The canals were then filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer using cold lateral compaction or thermoplasticized injectable techniques. The root fillings were first removed with D-RaCe (Step 1, followed by Step 2, in which a SAF system was used to remove the residual fillings in all groups. Micro-CT scans were used to measure the volume of residual filling after root canal filling, reinstrumentation with D-RaCe (Step 1, and reinstrumentation with SAF (Step 2. Data were analyzed using Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. There were no statistically significant differences between filling techniques in the canals instrumented with SAF (P=0.292 and Revo-S (P=0.306. The amount of remaining filling material was similar in all groups (P=0.363; all of the instrumentation techniques left filling residue inside the canals. However, the additional use of SAF was more effective than using D-RaCe alone.

  2. Effectiveness of rotatory and reciprocating movements in root canal filling material removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal SILVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of reciprocating and rotary techniques for removing gutta-percha and sealer from root canals. Forty straight and oval single-rooted premolars were prepared up to size 30, filled with gutta-percha and sealer, and then randomly allocated to two experimental retreatment groups: ProTaper Retreatment System (PTRS and WaveOne System (WS. Procedural errors, time of retreatment and apically extruded material were recorded for all the roots. The roots were radiographed after retreatment. The percentage of residual material was calculated using image analysis software. The data were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and t tests, with a significance level set at 5%. No system completely removed the root filling material from the root canal. No significant differences were observed between the systems, in terms of residual filling material in any tested third (p > 0.05. WS was faster in removing filling material than PTRS (p< 0.05. Extrusion was observed in 4 cases in PTRS and in 5 cases in WS. No procedural errors were observed in either group. It can be concluded that although no differences were observed in the efficacy of PTRS and WS for removing root filling material, WS was faster than PTRS.

  3. Miscellaneous radioactive materials detected during uranium mill tailings surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management directed the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pollutant Assessments Group in the conduct of radiological surveys on properties in Monticello, Utah, associated with the Mendaciously millsite National Priority List site. During these surveys, various radioactive materials were detected that were unrelated to the Monticello millsite. The existence and descriptions of these materials were recorded in survey reports and are condensed in this report. The radioactive materials detected are either naturally occurring radioactive material, such as rock and mineral collections, uranium ore, and radioactive coal or manmade radioactive material consisting of tailings from other millsites, mining equipment, radium dials, mill building scraps, building materials, such as brick and cinderblock, and other miscellaneous sources. Awareness of the miscellaneous and naturally occurring material is essential to allow DOE to forecast the additional costs and schedule changes associated with remediation activities. Also, material that may pose a health hazard to the public should be revealed to other regulatory agencies for consideration

  4. Technology of hardening fills for mined spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simek, P.; Holas, M.; Chyla, A.; Pech, P.

    1985-01-01

    The technology is described of hardening fills for mined spaces of uranium deposits in North Bohemian chalk. A special equipment was developed for the controlled preparation of a hardening mixture. The composition of the fill is determined by the strength of the filled rock, expecially by the standard strength, i.e., the minimal strength of the filling under uniaxial pressure. The said parameter determines the consumption of binding materials and thereby the total costs of the filling. A description is presented of the filling technology, including rabbit tube transport of the mixture and quality control. (Pu)

  5. Efficacy of ProTaper universal retreatment files in removing filling materials during root canal retreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Valentina; Cocchetti, Roberto; Pagavino, Gabriella

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the ProTaper Universal System rotary retreatment system and of Profile 0.06 and hand instruments (K-file) in the removal of root filling materials. Forty-two extracted single-rooted anterior teeth were selected. The root canals were enlarged with nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary files, filled with gutta-percha and sealer, and randomly divided into 3 experimental groups. The filling materials were removed with solvent in conjunction with one of the following devices and techniques: the ProTaper Universal System for retreatment, ProFile 0.06, and hand instruments (K-file). The roots were longitudinally sectioned, and the image of the root surface was photographed. The images were captured in JPEG format; the areas of the remaining filling materials and the time required for removing the gutta-percha and sealer were calculated by using the nonparametric one-way Kruskal-Wallis test and Tukey-Kramer tests, respectively. The group that showed better results for removing filling materials was the ProTaper Universal System for retreatment files, whereas the group of ProFile rotary instruments yielded better root canal cleanliness than the hand instruments, even though there was no statistically significant difference. The ProTaper Universal System for retreatment and ProFile rotary instruments worked significantly faster than the K-file. The ProTaper Universal System for retreatment files left cleaner root canal walls than the K-file hand instruments and the ProFile Rotary instruments, although none of the devices used guaranteed complete removal of the filling materials. The rotary NiTi system proved to be faster than hand instruments in removing root filling materials.

  6. Study of uranium oxidation states in geological material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidchenko, I; Salminen-Paatero, S; Rothe, J; Suksi, J

    2013-10-01

    A wet chemical method to determine uranium (U) oxidation states in geological material has been developed and tested. The problem faced in oxidation state determinations with wet chemical methods is that U redox state may change when extracted from the sample material, thereby leading to erroneous results. In order to quantify and monitor U redox behavior during the acidic extraction in the procedure, an analysis of added isotopic redox tracers, (236)U(VI) and (232)U(IV), and of variations in natural uranium isotope ratio ((234)U/(238)U) of indigenous U(IV) and U(VI) fractions was performed. Two sample materials with varying redox activity, U bearing rock and U-rich clayey lignite sediment, were used for the tests. The Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox-pair of the mineral phases was postulated as a potentially disturbing redox agent. The impact of Fe(III) on U was studied by reducing Fe(III) with ascorbic acid, which was added to the extraction solution. We observed that ascorbic acid protected most of the U from oxidation. The measured (234)U/(238)U ratio in U(IV) and U(VI) fractions in the sediment samples provided a unique tool to quantify U oxidation caused by Fe(III). Annealing (sample heating) to temperatures above 500 °C was supposed to heal ionizing radiation induced defects in the material that can disturb U redox state during extraction. Good agreement between two independent methods was obtained for DL-1a material: an average 38% of U(IV) determined by redox tracer corrected wet chemistry and 45% for XANES. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. RECOMMENDED FOUNDATION FILL MATERIALS CONSTRUCTION STANDARD OF THE FLORIDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report summarizes the technical basis for a recommended foundation fill materials standard for new construction houses in Florida. he radon-control construction standard was developed by the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP). ill material standards are formulated for: (1)...

  8. Reference materials for nondestructive assay of special nuclear material. Volume 1. Uranium oxide plus graphite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K.; Likes, R.N.; Parker, J.L.; Smith, H.A.

    1983-10-01

    This manual describes the fabrication of reference materials for use in gamma-ray-based nondestructive assay of low-density uranium-bearing samples. The sample containers are 2-l bottles. The reference materials consist of small amounts of UO 2 spread throughout a graphite matrix. The 235 U content ranges from 0 to 100 g. The manual also describes the far-field assay procedure used with low-resolution detectors

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  10. Setting of loose-fill insulation materials in walls; Saetningsfri indblaesning af loesfyldsisolering i vaegge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, T.V.

    2001-07-01

    The report describes material behaviour, which significantly influences the settling of loose-fill insulation materials. The specific application presented here is loose-fill insulation material injected in walls as thermal insulation. The physical formulation of the issue to be discussed is that the mass is kept in position in the cavity by frictional forces, which counteracts the settling but complicates injection. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether there is a possibility that decreased friction will be able to release settling. Cellulose loose-fill material injected in a 0.1 m thick and 1 m wide gypsum wall with a minimum density of 48 kg/m3 was found not to settle if kept at a constant relative humidity, RH 50 %. A minimum density of 53 kg/m3 is necessary if the thickness of the wall is increased from 0.1 m to 0.3 m. If changing the constant environment from RH 50 % to RH 80 % a minimum density of 63 kg/m3 is necessary. Furthermore, results so far show that cellulose loose-fill material spread on the attic floor will have a density after settling of 48 kg /M3 for a constant RH 50 %, corresponding to 43 kg/m3 dry material. The results were found by using a model and tests. (au)

  11. The choice of iron-containing filling for composite radioprotective material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyukhin, P. V.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the data the composition of modern composite building materials including materials which in addition to high physical-mechanical have radio-protective properties. The article presents infrared researches and differential thermal data of fine-grained magnetite and hematite beneficiated iron-ore concentrates. The choice of the most suitable filling for new composite radio-protective building material engineering and development was made basing on the magnetite and hematite data presented in the paper.

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  14. Rheology of Emulsion-Filled Gels Applied to the Development of Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana M. Geremias-Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Emulsion-filled gels are classified as soft solid materials and are complex colloids formed by matrices of polymeric gels into which emulsion droplets are incorporated. Several structural aspects of these gels have been studied in the past few years, including their applications in food, which is the focus of this review. Knowledge of the rheological behavior of emulsion-filled gels is extremely important because it can measure interferences promoted by droplets or particle inclusion on the textural properties of the gelled systems. Dynamic oscillatory tests, more specifically, small amplitude oscillatory shear, creep-recovery tests, and large deformation experiments, are discussed in this review as techniques present in the literature to characterize rheological behavior of emulsion-filled gels. Moreover, the correlation of mechanical properties with sensory aspects of emulsion-filled gels appearing in recent studies is discussed, demonstrating the applicability of these parameters in understanding mastication processes.

  15. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  17. Uranium in soil, forest litter and living plant material above three uranium mineralizations in Northern Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, John

    1982-01-01

    In order to investigate the feasibility of biogeochemical sampling media in uranium exploration, samples from the most common trees and low bushes together with forest litter were collected over the areas of three uranium mineralizations in Northern Sweden and analyzed for uranium. The results were compared with uranium content of the till and its radioactivity. The average uranium content was low for all sample types and considerably lower in the ash of the organic sample types compared to that of the till. No sample type showed any tendency of having higher uranium concentration above mineralizations compared to background areas. These results suggest that, under conditions prevailing in Sweden, the investigated sample types are not suitable for uranium exploration

  18. Construction of a test embankment using a sand-tire shred mixture as fill material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sungmin; Prezzi, Monica; Siddiki, Nayyar Zia; Kim, Bumjoo

    2006-01-01

    Use of tire shreds in construction projects, such as highway embankments, is becoming an accepted way of beneficially recycling scrap tires. However, in the last decade there was a decline in the use of pure tire shreds as fill materials in embankment construction, as they are susceptible to fire hazards due to the development of exothermic reactions. Tire shred-sand mixtures, on the other hand, were found to be effective in inhibiting exothermic reactions. When compared with pure tire shreds, tire shred-sand mixtures are less compressible and have higher shear strength. However, the literature contains limited information on the use of tire shred-soil mixtures as a fill material. The objectives of this paper are to discuss and evaluate the feasibility of using tire shred-sand mixtures as a fill material in embankment construction. A test embankment constructed using a 50/50 mixture, by volume, of tire shreds and sand was instrumented and monitored to: (a) determine total and differential settlements; (b) evaluate the environmental impact of the embankment construction on the groundwater quality due to leaching of fill material; and (c) study the temperature variation inside the embankment. The findings in this research indicate that mixtures of tire shreds and sand are viable materials for embankment construction.

  19. Preparation, characterization and certification of uranium isotope reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Junior, Olivio Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and certification of a set of uranium isotope reference materials ranging from 0.5 to 20.0 % of 235 U in mass. The most important concepts of metrology in chemical measurements were applied so that the certified quantities in these materials could be directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). As a consequence of this approach, these materials can be used in the instruments calibration, estimation of measurement uncertainty, method validation, assessment of performance of analysts, quality control routines and interlaboratory comparison programmes. The most advanced methods and techniques in mass spectrometry, that is, gas source mass spectrometry (GSMS), thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) were investigated to identify which are the dominant components in the uncertainty and to quantify its contribution to the final value of the measurement uncertainty of the isotopic ratio. The results obtained were then compared to verify which are the methods and techniques associated to the lowest measurement uncertainty values. The isotope amount ratio n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) was certified in the materials produced to expanded uncertainties ranging from 0.02 to 0.10 % and the ratios n( 234 U)/n( 238 U) and n( 236 U)/n( 238 U), to uncertainties ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 %. These values fully comply to the requirements of the isotopic characterization of nuclear fuel as well as the analysis of environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. (author)

  20. Processing Uranium-Bearing Materials Containing Coal and Loam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civin, V; Prochazka, J [Research and Development Laboratory No. 3 of the Uranium Industry, Prague, Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic)

    1967-06-15

    Among the ores which are classified as low-grade in the CSSR are mixtures of coal and bentonitic loam of tertiary origin, containing approximately 0.1% U and with a moisture content at times well above 20-30%. The uranium is held mainly by the carbonaceous component. Conventional processing of these materials presents various difficulties which are not easily overcome. During leaching the pulp thickens and frequently becomes pasty, due to the presence of montmorillonites. Further complications arise from the high sorption capacity of the materials (again primarily due to montmorillonites) and poor sedimentation of the viscous pulps. In addition, the materials are highly refractory to the leaching agents. The paper presents experience gained in solving the problems of processing these ores. The following basic routes were explored: (1) separation of the carbonaceous and loamy components: The organic component appears to be the main activity carrier. Processing the concentrated material upon separation of the inactive or less active loam may not only remove the thixotropic behaviour but also substantially reduce the cost of the ore treatment; (2) 'liquifying' the pulps or preventing the thickening of the pulp by addition of suitable agents; (3) joint acid or carbonate processing of the materials in question with current ore types; (4) removal or suppression of thixotropic behaviour by thermal pretreatment of the material; and (5) application of the 'acid cure' method. The first method appears to be the most effective, but it presents considerable difficulties due to the extreme dispersion of the carbonaceous phase and further research is being carried out. Methods 2 and 3 proved to be unacceptable. Method 4, which includes roasting at 300-400{sup o}C, is now being operated on an industrial scale. The final method has also shown definite advantages for particular deposits of high montmorillonite content material. (author)

  1. Cleaning efficacy of reciprocal and rotary systems in the removal of root canal filling material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Koçak, Sibel; Türker, Sevinç Aktemur; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of hand file, nickel titanium rotary instrument, and two reciprocating instruments for removing gutta-percha and sealer from the root canals. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight mandibular premolar teeth were used. The root canals were shaped and filled with gutta-percha and a resin-based sealer. The specimens were divided into four groups according to the technique by which the root filling material was removed: Group 1 — Wave One; Group 2 — Reciproc; Group 3 — ProTaper; and Group 4 — Gates-Glidden burs and stainless steel hand file. Then teeth were split longitudinally and photographed. The images were transferred to a computer. The ratio of remaining filling material to the root canal periphery was calculated with the aid of ImageJ software. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: A significant difference was found among all groups (P hand file. Conclusion: The reciprocating files were found to be significantly more effective in removing the filling material from the canal walls compared to the rotational file and hand file. PMID:27099429

  2. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Henrique Stefaneli Marques

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10: MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80 was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01. MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  3. Push-out bond strength of different tricalcium silicate-based filling materials to root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaneli Marques, Jorge Henrique; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues de; Mazzi-Chaves, Jardel Francisco; Camilleri, Josette; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2018-03-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of different triccalcium silicate cements to retrograde cavity using a push out test. Thirty maxillary central incisors were shaped using #80 hand files and sectioned transversally. Root slices were obtained from the apical 4 mm after eliminating the apical extremity. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin and positioned at 45° to the horizontal plane for preparation of root-end cavities with a diamond ultrasonic retrotip. The samples were divided into three groups according to the root-end filling material (n = 10): MTA Angelus, ProRoot MTA and Biodentine. A gutta-percha cone (#80) was tugged-back at the limit between the canal and the root-end cavity. The root-end cavity was filled and the gutta-percha cone was removed after complete setting of the materials. The specimens were placed in an Instron machine with the root-end filling turned downwards. The push-out shaft was inserted in the space previously occupied by the gutta-percha cone and push out testing was performed at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. There was no statistically significant difference in resistance to push out by the materials tested (p > 0.01). MTA Angelus and ProRoot MTA showed predominantly mixed failure while Biodentine exhibited mixed and cohesive failures. The tricalcium silicate-based root-end filling materials showed similar bond strength retrograde cavity.

  4. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Shpack site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Monette, F.; Jones, L.

    1991-08-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Shpack site in Norton, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Shpack site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of combined uranium (uranium-234 and uranium-238) at the Shpack site does not exceed the following levels: 2500 pCi/g for Scenario A (recreationist: the expected scenario); 1100 pCi/g for Scenario B (industrial worker: a plausible scenario); and 53 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using a well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guidelines derived in this report apply to the combined activity concentration of uranium-234 and uranium-238 and were calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guidelines for the Shpack site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 8 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs

  5. Dental Glass Ionomer Cements as Permanent Filling Materials? – Properties, Limitations and Future Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lohbauer

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Glass ionomer cements (GICs are clinically attractive dental materials that have certain unique properties that make them useful as restorative and luting materials. This includes adhesion to moist tooth structures and base metals, anticariogenic properties due to release of fluoride, thermal compatibility with tooth enamel, biocompatibility and low toxicity. The use of GICs in a mechanically loaded situation, however, has been hampered by their low mechanical performance. Poor mechanical properties, such as low fracture strength, toughness and wear, limit their extensive use in dentistry as a filling material in stress-bearing applications. In the posterior dental region, glass ionomer cements are mostly used as a temporary filling material. The requirement to strengthen those cements has lead to an ever increasing research effort into reinforcement or strengthening concepts.

  6. 75 FR 62153 - Notice of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuance of Materials License SUA-1596 for Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-07

    ... Commission Issuance of Materials License SUA-1596 for Uranium One Americas, Inc. Moore Ranch In Situ Recovery.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a license to Uranium One Americas, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Moore Ranch uranium in situ recovery (ISR) facility in Campbell County...

  7. Certification of a uranium-238 dioxide reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 501)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, J.; Lievens, F.; Ingelbrecht, C.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium-238 oxide of 99.999% isotopic and 99.98% chemical purity was transformed into dioxide spheres of nominal 0.5 and 1.0 mm diameter by gel precipitation and subsequent calcination under carbon dioxide and under argon containing 5% hydrogen at 1 125 K. The spheres were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, including isotope dilution, by gravimetry and by potentiometric titration. On the basis of these analyses, the uranium mass fraction was certified at 879.4 ± 2.8 g.kg -1 , and the 235 U/U - and 238 U/U abundances at 10.4 ± 0.5 mg.kg -1 and 999.9896 ± 0.0005 g.kg -1 , respectively. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron metrology

  8. Characteristics of novel root-end filling material using epoxy resin and Portland cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Chung, Jin; Na, Hee-Sam; Park, Eun-Joo; Jeon, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical properties and cytotoxicity of a novel root-end filling material (EPC) which is made from epoxy resin and Portland cement as a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) substitute. EPC, developed as a root-end filling material, was compared with MTA and a mixture of AH Plus sealer and MTA (AMTA) with regard to the setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage. Setting times were evaluated using Vicat apparatus. Digital radiographs were taken to evaluate the aluminium equivalent radio-opacity using an aluminium step wedge. Extracted single-rooted teeth were used for leakage test using methylene blue dye. After canal shaping and obturation, the apical 3-mm root was resected, and a root-end cavity with a depth of 3 mm was prepared. The root-end cavities were filled with MTA, AMTA, and EPC for 15 specimens in each of three groups. After setting in humid conditions for 24 h, the specimens were tested for apical leakage. For evaluation of the biocompatibility of EPC, cell (human gingival fibroblast) viability was compared for MTA and Portland cement by MTT assay, and cell morphological changes were compared for MTA and AH Plus by fluorescence microscopy using DAPI and F-actin staining. The setting time, radio-opacity, and microleakage were compared using one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc comparison, and the cytotoxicity was compared using the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test. Statistical significance was set at 95%. EPC had a shorter setting time and less microleakage compared with MTA (p Portland cement, was found to be a useful material for root-end filling, with favourable radio-opacity, short setting time, low microleakage, and clinically acceptable low cytotoxicity. The novel root-end filling material would be a potentially useful material for a surgical endodontic procedure with favourable properties.

  9. Preliminary concepts: coordinated safeguards for materials management in a thorium--uranium fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkila, E.A.; Barnes, J.W.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Shipley, J.P.

    1978-10-01

    This report addresses preliminary concepts for coordinated safeguards materials management in a typical generic thorium--uranium-fueled light-water reactor (LWR) fuels reprocessing plant. The reference facility is designed to recover thorium and uranium from first-generation (denatured 235 U) startup fuels, first-recycle and equilibrium (denatured 233 U) thorium--uranium LWR fuels, and to recover the plutonium generated in the 238 U denaturant as well. 12 figures, 3 tables

  10. Electrochemical investigation of tetravalent uranium β-diketones for active materials of all-uranium redox flow battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tomoo; Shiokawa, Yoshinobu; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2002-01-01

    For active materials of the all-uranium redox flow battery for the power storage, tetravalent uranium β-diketones were investigated. The electrode reactions of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 were examined in comparison with that of U(acac) 4 , where ba denotes benzoylacetone, btfa benzoyltrifluoroacetone and acac acetylacetone. The cyclic voltammograms of U(ba) 4 and U(btfa) 4 solutions indicate that there are two series of redox reactions corresponding to the complexes with different coordination numbers of four and three. The electrode kinetics of the U(IV)/U(III) redox reactions for btfa complexes is examined. The obtained result supports that the uranium β-diketone complexes examined in the present study will serve as excellent active materials for negative electrolyte in the redox flow battery. (author)

  11. Low grade uranium ores as potential sources of raw material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venzlaff, H.

    1976-01-01

    Reports on the uranium requirement and the uranium reserves show that, even if the demand were to be stretched out slightly, the rate of new discoveries of uranium would have to be doubled or even tripled within a few years in order to ensure supply. Despite some spectacular discoveries of large scale deposits in Australia it must be said that only very few truly new uranium provinces have been discovered over the past twenty years. In this situation more attention is now being devoted to low grade uranium depositis, to findings whose concentration does not exceed 1,000 ppm. These deposits contain quantities of uranium many times larger than the deposits that can now be mined at prices up to 30/lb of U 3 O 8 . Even now low grade uranium ore is being mined as a byproduct, with the actual valuable mineral producing most of the income from mining activities. However, if one strikes a balance in this situation, one finds that only part of the requirement can be met in this way. Hence, all possibilities must be exhausted to mine uranium as a byproduct, new techniques of uranium production from low grade ores must be developed, and also conventional prospection must be intensified, if the continuity of supply of the nuclear power stations in the eighties and nineties is to be guaranteed. (orig.) [de

  12. Thermal properties of lauric acid filled in carbon nanotubes as shape-stabilized phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yanhui; Wei, Runzhi; Huang, Zhi; Zhang, Xinxin; Wang, Ge

    2018-03-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled with lauric acid (LA) as a kind of shape-stabilized phase change material were prepared and their structures and phase change properties were characterized. The results showed that the melting point and latent heat of LA confined in carbon nanotubes were lower than those of the bulk material, and both decrease as the diameters of CNTs and the filling ratios of LA decrease. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicated that LA molecules form a liquid layer near pore walls and crystallize at the pore center. When the LA filling ratio was reduced to a certain value, all LA molecules were attached to the inner walls of CNTs, hindering their crystallization. A linear relationship between the melting temperature shift and structural properties was obtained based on the modified Gibbs-Thomson equation, which gives a reliable interpretation of the size effect of nanochannels in phase change materials. We also found that the thermal conductivity of the composite CNTs/LA was four times larger than that of pure LA. This study will provide insights into the design of novel composite phase change materials with better thermal properties by the selection of suitable porous materials and tailoring their pore structures.

  13. Experimental Study and Application of Inorganic Solidified Foam Filling Material for Coal Mines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous combustion of residual coal in a gob due to air leakage poses a major risk to mining safety. Building an airtight wall is an effective measure for controlling air leakage. A new type of inorganic solidified foam-filled material was developed and its physical and chemical properties were analyzed experimentally. The compressive strength of this material increased with the amount of sulphoaluminate cement. With an increasing water–cement ratio, the initial setting time was gradually extended while the final setting time firstly shortened and then extended. The change in compressive strength had the opposite tendency. Additionally, as the foam expansion ratio increased, the solidification time tended to decrease but the compressive strength remained approximately constant. With an increase in foam production, the solidification time increased and the compressive strength decreased exponentially. The results can be used to determine the optimal material ratios of inorganic solidified foam-filled material for coal mines, and filling technology for an airtight wall was designed. A field application of the new material demonstrated that it seals crossheadings tightly, leaves no fissures, suppresses air leakage to the gob, and narrows the width of the spontaneous combustion and heat accumulation zone.

  14. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems.

  15. Gravimetric determination of carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanaugh, H.J.; Dahlby, J.W.; Lovell, A.P.

    1979-12-01

    A gravimetric method for determining carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials was developed to analyze six samples simultaneously. The samples are burned slowly in an oxygen atmosphere at approximately 900 0 C, and the gases generated are passed through Schuetze's oxidizing reagent (iodine pentoxide on silica gel) to assure quantitative oxidation of the CO to CO 2 . The CO 2 is collected on Ascarite and weighed. This method was tested using a tungsten carbide reference material (NBS-SRM-276) and a (U,Pu)C sample. For 42 analyses of the tungsten carbide, which has a certified carbon content of 6.09%, an average value of 6.09% was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.01 7 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.28%. For 17 analyses of the (U,Pu)C sample, an average carbon content of 4.97% was found with a standard deviation of 0.01 2 % or a relative standard deviation of 0.24%

  16. Uranium determination in phosphatized materials by drop electrode polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sequeira, F.M.C. de; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    An uranium determination procedure in phosphate rocks and crude phosphoric acid is outlined polarography is used. Uranium is previously separedted by extraction with tri-n-byte phosphate 10%-petroleum ether using aluminium nitrate as salting out agent. (M.L.J.) [pt

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  18. Preliminary Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Uranium on Environmental Swipe Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, Chang-Sik; Jeong, Youn-Joong; Ryu, Jong-Sik; Shin, Hyung-Seon; Cha, Hyun-Ju; Ahn, Gil-Hoon; Park, Il-Jin; Min, Gyung-Sik

    2006-01-01

    It is well-known that uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions of safeguards samples are very useful to investigate the history of nuclear activities. To strengthen the capabilities of environmental sampling analysis in the ROK through MOST/DOE collaboration, round robin test for uranium and plutonium was designed in 2003. As the first round robin test, a set of dried uranium-containing solutions (∼35ng and (∼300ng) was distributed to the participating laboratories in November of 2003, with results reported in April of 2004. The KBSI (Korea Basic Science Institute) and ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) are currently in the process of analyzing uranium on cotton swipes for the second round robin test. As a preliminary test for the second round, KBSI intends to analyze home-made swipe samples into which international uranium standards are added. Here we describe technical steps of sample preparation and mass spectrometry at KBSI, and report some results of the preliminary test

  19. Comparison of Endoflas and Zinc oxide Eugenol as root canal filling materials in primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Rewal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Zinc oxide eugenol has long been the material of choice of pediatric dentists worldwide, although it fails to meet the ideal requirements of root canal filling material for primary teeth. Endoflas, a mixture of zinc oxide eugenol, calcium hydroxide, and iodoform, can be considered to be an effective root canal filling material in primary teeth as compared with zinc oxide eugenol. This study was carried out to compare zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for pulpectomy in primary dentition. Aim: The objective of the study was to compare clinically and radiographically success rates of zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for the root canal filling of primary teeth at 3, 6, and 9 months. Design: Fifty primary molars were included in the study with 26 teeth in Group I (Endoflas and 24 in Group II (zinc oxide eugenol. A single visit pulpectomy was carried out. Results: The overall success rate of zinc oxide eugenol was 83% whereas 100% success was found in the case of endoflas. The obtained results were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis using the chi-square test. The difference in the success rate between the two was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Endoflas has shown to have better results than zinc oxide eugenol. It should therefore be the material of choice for root canal treatment in deciduous dentition.

  20. Air-Filled Nanopore Based High-Performance Thermal Insulation Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Gangåssæter, Haakon Fossen; Jelle, Bjørn Petter; Alex Mofid, Sohrab; Gao, Tao

    2017-01-01

    State-of-the-art thermal insulation solutions like vacuum insulation panels (VIP) and aerogels have low thermal conductivity, but their drawbacks may make them unable to be the thermal insulation solutions that will revolutionize the building industry regarding energy-efficient building envelopes. Nevertheless, learning from these materials may be crucial to make new and novel high-performance thermal insulation products. This study presents a review on the state-of-the-art air-filled thermal...

  1. Effect of bulk-fill base material on fracture strength of root-filled teeth restored with laminate resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Ghannam, A S; Palamara, J E

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of using a bulk-fill flowable base material on fracture strength and fracture patterns of root-filled maxillary premolars with MOD preparations restored with laminate restorations. Fifty extracted maxillary premolars were selected for the study. Standardized MOD cavities with endodontic treatment were prepared for all teeth, except for intact control. The teeth were divided randomly into five groups (n=10); (Group 1) sound teeth, (Group 2) unrestored teeth; (Group 3) MOD cavities with Vitrebond base and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal); (Group 4) MOD cavities with 2mm GIC base (Fuji IX GP) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal) open laminate, (Group 5) MOD cavities were restored with 4mm of bulk-fill flowable base material (SDR) and resin-based composite (Ceram. X One Universal). All teeth were thermocycled and subjected to a 45° ramped oblique load in a universal testing machine. Fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 test. Restoration in general increased the fracture strength compared to unrestored teeth. The fracture strength of group 5 (bulk-fill) was significantly higher than the fracture strength of the GIC laminate groups and not significantly different from the intact teeth (355±112N, P=0.118). The type of failure was unfavorable for most of the groups, with the majority being mixed failures. The use of a bulk-fill flowable base material significantly increased the fracture strength of extracted root-filled teeth with MOD cavities; however it did not improve fracture patterns to more favorable ones. Investigating restorative techniques that may improve the longevity of root-filled premolar teeth restored with direct resin restorations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of a novel filling technique. Loading bulk particulate materials into tankers or processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnish, R.J.; Berry, R.; Bradley, M. [Greenwich Univ., Chatham Maritime, Kent (United Kingdom). Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology

    2008-07-01

    The majority of industrial dosing or filling operations demand high filling rates and often good repeatability of discharges. For coarse, free-flowing materials the issues of obtaining a high degree of filling efficiency are substantially less challenging than for less free-flowing or cohesive bulk particulates. Typical equipment arrangements for achieving a controlled (often dual rate) discharge of particles into a relatively small capacity container (flask, sack or big bag) often rely on either a mechanical extraction of material from a buffer (screw feeders) or the manipulation of a constricting arrangement to achieve a turn down in discharge rate. Where less freeflowing or very fine particles are being handled, the introduction of air into the powder is invariably used to modify the bulk condition of the material to a condition where discharge can be initiated and supported (typical examples being powder feed to an impeller packer, or discharge of powder into a rail or road wagon). This article will therefore report on some recent research that has been undertaken by The Wolfson Centre for Bulk Solids Handling Technology, University of Greenwich. (orig.)

  3. 76 FR 41308 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ..., Inc., Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project, Crook County, WY; Notice of Materials License Application...-4737, or by e-mail to [email protected] . The Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project License... source and byproduct materials license at its Ross In Situ Recovery Uranium Project site located in Crook...

  4. Simulation of water flow and retention in earthen-cover materials overlying uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    The water retention characteristics of a multilayer earthen cover for uranium mill tailings were simulated under arid weather conditions common to Grand Junction, Colorado. The multilayer system described in this report consists of a layer of wet clay/gravel (radon barrier), which is separated from a surface covering of fill soil by a washed rock material used as a capillary barrier. The capillary barrier is designed to prevent the upward migration of water and salt from the tailings to the soil surface and subsequent loss of water from the wet clay. The flow model, UNSATV, described in this report uses hydraulic properties of the layered materials and historical climatic data for two years (1976 and 1979) to simulate long-term hydrologic response of the multilayer system. Application of this model to simulate the processes of infiltration, evaporation and drainage is described in detail. Simulations over a trial period of one relatively wet and two dry years indicated that the clay-gravel layer remained near saturation, and hence, that the layer was an effective radon barrier. Estimates show that the clay-gravel layer would not dry out (i.e., revert to drying dominated by isothermal vapor-flow conditions) for at least 20 years, provided that the modeled dry-climate period continues

  5. Dark localized structures in a cavity filled with a left-handed material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlidi, Mustapha; Kockaert, Pascal; Gelens, Lendert

    2011-01-01

    We consider a nonlinear passive optical cavity filled with left-handed and right-handed materials and driven by a coherent injected beam. We assume that both left-handed and right-handed materials possess a Kerr focusing type of nonlinearity. We show that close to the zero-diffraction regime, high-order diffraction allows us to stabilize dark localized structures in this device. These structures consist of dips in the transverse profile of the intracavity field and do not exist without high-order diffraction. We analyze the snaking bifurcation diagram associated with these structures. Finally, a realistic estimation of the model parameters is provided.

  6. Soft Chemistry, Coloring and Polytypism in Filled Tetrahedral Semiconductors: Toward Enhanced Thermoelectric and Battery Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Miles A; Medina-Gonzalez, Alan M; Vela, Javier

    2018-03-12

    Filled tetrahedral semiconductors are a rich family of compounds with tunable electronic structure, making them ideal for applications in thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, and battery anodes. Furthermore, these materials crystallize in a plethora of related structures that are very close in energy, giving rise to polytypism through the manipulation of synthetic parameters. This Minireview highlights recent advances in the solution-phase synthesis and nanostructuring of these materials. These methods enable the synthesis of metastable phases and polytypes that were previously unobtainable. Additionally, samples synthesized in solution phase have enhanced thermoelectric performance due to their decreased grain size. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Introduction. Physicochemical aspects of uranium concentrates obtaining from the wastes and raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, I.U.

    2014-01-01

    The uranium deposits of Tajikistan played an immensely significant role in the practical solution of a radioactive raw materials problem which appeared during the post-World War II years in the USSR. The pioneer in this field became complex №6 (currently known as 'Vostokredmet'). The first soviet uranium was produced from the ores extracted from the republic's deposits. For 50 years (1945-1995 y.), uranium bearing raw materials from all over the former USSR were delivered to Tajikistan, and uranium oxide was produced, which was later delivered back to Russia for further production of enriched uranium. The total volume of uranium produced in Tajikistan plants was approximately 100 thousands tons. In Sughd region, during that period, more than 55 million tons of uranium waste was accumulated. The total activity of the waste, according to different calculations, is approximately 240-285 TBq. The total amount of waste in dumps and tailings piles is estimated to be more than 170 million tons, most of which are located in the neighborhoods of hydrometallurgical plants and heap leaching locations. Uranium industry wastes in Northern Tajikistan have become attractive for different investors and commercial companies, from secondary reprocessing of mines and tailings' point of view, since the uranium price is increasing. In this regard, research on developing uranium extraction methods from wastes is broadening. The study of the possibility and economic reasonability of reprocessing former year's dumps requires comprehensive examination, and relates not only to uranium extraction but to safe extraction of dumps from tailings as well.

  8. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  9. Influence of the reduction-crucible material on the uranium properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, F.J.C.; Bose, A.; Freitas, C.T. de

    1979-01-01

    The uranium obtained by UF 4 reduction using Mg in bombs coated with different materials such as alumina, blast furnace slag, Zirconia and graphite was studied. The reduction process involves a reaction that altains temperatures of the order of 1600 0 C at tightly closed enclosure environment. Assuming in this process that the only possible influencial agent on the reaction main product, i.e., metallic uranium is the own bomb coaling, different properties, mechanical-metallurgical and phase-transformation characteristics were examined and the influences of the coating materials were compared. The comparison of these properties was also studied in uranium refined by arc fusion. (Author) [pt

  10. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Brajkovic, Denis [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia); Ilic, Dragan [Department of Restorative Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany); Rakocevic, Zlatko [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute for Nuclear Science “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Busse, Björn, E-mail: b.busse@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different irrigation solutions and disinfectants were used for treatment of root canal dentine and gutta-percha points. • Materials surface characteristics were assessed using quantitative backscattered electron imaging, reference point indentation, and contact angle analyzer. • The most significant differences in mineralization, indentation, and adhesive outcomes were observed after ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment. • Irrigation solutions confer to superior sealing ability of endodontic filling materials. • Micromechanical characteristics of dentine after irrigation are considerable reduced. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples’ microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  11. Hybrid waste filler filled bio-polymer foam composites for sound absorbent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Anika Zafiah M.; Azahari, M. Shafiq M.; Kormin, Shaharuddin; Soon, Leong Bong; Zaliran, M. Taufiq; Ahraz Sadrina M. F., L.

    2017-09-01

    Sound absorption materials are one of the major requirements in many industries with regards to the sound insulation developed should be efficient to reduce sound. This is also important to contribute in economically ways of producing sound absorbing materials which is cheaper and user friendly. Thus, in this research, the sound absorbent properties of bio-polymer foam filled with hybrid fillers of wood dust and waste tire rubber has been investigated. Waste cooking oil from crisp industries was converted into bio-monomer, filled with different proportion ratio of fillers and fabricated into bio-polymer foam composite. Two fabrication methods is applied which is the Close Mold Method (CMM) and Open Mold Method (OMM). A total of four bio-polymer foam composite samples were produce for each method used. The percentage of hybrid fillers; mixture of wood dust and waste tire rubber of 2.5 %, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10% weight to weight ration with bio-monomer. The sound absorption of the bio-polymer foam composites samples were tested by using the impedance tube test according to the ASTM E-1050 and Scanning Electron Microscope to determine the morphology and porosity of the samples. The sound absorption coefficient (α) at different frequency range revealed that the polymer foam of 10.0 % hybrid fillers shows highest α of 0.963. The highest hybrid filler loading contributing to smallest pore sizes but highest interconnected pores. This also revealed that when highly porous material is exposed to incident sound waves, the air molecules at the surface of the material and within the pores of the material are forced to vibrate and loses some of their original energy. This is concluded that the suitability of bio-polymer foam filled with hybrid fillers to be used in acoustic application of automotive components such as dashboards, door panels, cushion and etc.

  12. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar; Brajkovic, Denis; Ilic, Dragan; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Rakocevic, Zlatko; Djuric, Marija; Busse, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different irrigation solutions and disinfectants were used for treatment of root canal dentine and gutta-percha points. • Materials surface characteristics were assessed using quantitative backscattered electron imaging, reference point indentation, and contact angle analyzer. • The most significant differences in mineralization, indentation, and adhesive outcomes were observed after ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment. • Irrigation solutions confer to superior sealing ability of endodontic filling materials. • Micromechanical characteristics of dentine after irrigation are considerable reduced. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples’ microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  13. Recycling and disposal of FUSRAP materials from the Ashland 2 site at a licensed uranium mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.; Conboy, D.; Rehmann, M.; Roberts, H.

    1999-01-01

    During World War II the Manhattan Engineering District (MED) used facilities near Buffalo, N.Y. to extract natural uranium from ores. Some of the byproduct material left from the ores (MED byproduct), containing low levels of uranium, thorium, and radium, was deposited on a disposal site known as Ashland 2, located in Tonawanda, NY. On behalf of the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE, or the Corps), ICF Kaiser Engineers (ICFKE) was tasked to provide the best value clean-up results that meet all of the criteria established in the Record of Decision for the site. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUC), the operator of the White Mesa Uranium Mill, a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed mill near Blanding, Utah, was selected to perform uranium extraction on the excavated materials, therefore giving the best value as it provided beneficial use of the material consistent with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) intent to encourage recycling and recovery, while also providing the most cost-effective means of disposal. Challenges overcome to complete this project included (1) identifying the best-value location to accept the material; (2) meeting regulatory requirements with IUC obtaining an NRC license amendment to accept and process the material as an alternate feed; (3) excavating and preparing the material for shipment, then shipping the material to the Mill for uranium recovery; and (4) processing the material, followed by disposal of tailings from the process in the Mill's licensed uranium tailings facility. Excavation from Ashland 2 and processing of the Ashland 2 material at the White Mesa Mill resulted in a cleaner environment at Tonawanda, a cost avoidance of up to $16 million, beneficial recovery of source material, and environmentally protective disposal of byproduct material. (author)

  14. Reactive transport of Sr, Cs and Tc through a column packed with fracture-filling material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The migration behaviour of the fission products 90 Sr, 137 Cs and 99 Tc in a granite fracture-groundwater system was studied in column experiments using crushed Stripa granite fracture-filling material (125-250 μm) as a sorbent. Based on breakthrough curves of Sr 2+ , Cs + , TcO 4 - and anthraquinonsulphonate, the distribution ratio K d (cm 3 /g) values for Sr 2+ and Cs + were estimated to be 1.5 and 2 respectively; non-sorbing behaviour of TcO 4 - under oxic conditions was observed. The diffusion of Sr 2+ in the material is shown to be a kinetic-controlling step in the desorption process that followed the initial leaching. Under reducing conditions, it was found that TcO 4 - was reduced to TcO 2 .nH 2 O(s) by the Fe(II)-containing fracture-filling material and Tc(IV) aq was rapidly sorbed by the material. This observation proves that the migration of technetium under reducing conditions in deep groundwater systems will not only be controlled by the solubility of TcO 2 . nH 2 O(s) and the speed of groundwater flow but also by the rapid sorption of Tc(IV) aq on all available mineral surfaces. (orig.)

  15. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Englander, M.

    1957-11-01

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the γ phase. (author) [fr

  16. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum elements from gebel gattar raw material, eastern desert, Egypt. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hazek, N.T.; Mahdy, M.A.; Mahmoud, H.M.K.

    1996-01-01

    G. Gatter uranium mineralizations are located along the faults and fracture zones crossing G.Gattar granitic pluton and long the contact of the pluton with the hammamat sediments. Also, molybdenum id presented in more than one mode of occurrence. The molybdenum mineralization treated in this work is the dessimenated type. The uranium and molybdenum raw material was subjected to series of leaching experiments including acid and alkaline agitation, alkaline percolation, and acid heap leaching techniques. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum was achieved by anion-exchange method followed by their elution by acidified sodium chloride. Uranium precipitation was performed in the form of ammonium diuranate (Yellow Cake). On the other hand molybdenum was precipitated in the form of molybdenum oxide. A tentative flowsheet for the extraction of both uranium and molybdenum is proposed and discussed. 13 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum elements from gebel gattar raw material, eastern desert, Egypt. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Hazek, N T; Mahdy, M A; Mahmoud, H M.K. [Nuclear Materials Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    G. Gatter uranium mineralizations are located along the faults and fracture zones crossing G.Gattar granitic pluton and long the contact of the pluton with the hammamat sediments. Also, molybdenum id presented in more than one mode of occurrence. The molybdenum mineralization treated in this work is the dessimenated type. The uranium and molybdenum raw material was subjected to series of leaching experiments including acid and alkaline agitation, alkaline percolation, and acid heap leaching techniques. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum was achieved by anion-exchange method followed by their elution by acidified sodium chloride. Uranium precipitation was performed in the form of ammonium diuranate (Yellow Cake). On the other hand molybdenum was precipitated in the form of molybdenum oxide. A tentative flowsheet for the extraction of both uranium and molybdenum is proposed and discussed. 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Opportunities of influence of plasma streams formed in IKA with continuos nor king gas filling en the surface of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Useinov, B.M.; Useinova, A.M.; Amrenova, A.U.; Pusankov, S.A.; Sartin, S.A.; Virko, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    The results of the investigation of influence of plasma stream formed in IKA with continuous working gas filling on the surface of stainless steel 12X18H10T and aluminum are given in this article. It is shown here that the effect of influence of plasma stream on the surface of materials depends on the way of working gas filling. There is the comparison of influence of plasma stream formed in plasma accelerator with impulse and continuous working gas filling

  19. Filling the gaps in SCWR materials research: advanced nuclear corrosion research facilities in Hamilton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausher, J.L.; Zheng, W.; Li, J.; Guzonas, D.; Botton, G.

    2011-01-01

    Research efforts on materials selection and development in support of the design of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) have produced a considerable amount of data on corrosion, creep and other related properties. Summaries of the data on corrosion [1] and stress corrosion cracking [2] have recently been produced. As research on the SCWR advances, gaps and limitations in the published data are being identified. In terms of corrosion properties, these gaps can be seen in several areas, including: 1) the test environment, 2) the physical and chemical severity of the tests conducted as compared with likely reactor service/operating conditions, and 3) the test methods used. While some of these gaps can be filled readily using existing facilities, others require the availability of advanced test facilities for specific tests and assessments. In this paper, highlights of the new materials research facilities jointly established in Hamilton by CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory and McMaster University are presented. (author)

  20. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  2. Development and Sliding Wear Response of Epoxy Composites Filled with Coal Mine Overburden Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prithika; Satapathy, Alok; Mishra, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on development and characterization of epoxy based composites filled with micro-sized mine overburden material. Coal mine overburden material is typically highly heterogeneous and is considered as waste material. For excavating each ton of coal, roughly 5 tons of overburden materials are removed and is dumped nearby occupying large space. Gainful utilization of this waste is a major challenge. In the present work, this material is used as filler materials in making a new class of epoxy matrix composites. Composites with different weight proportions of fillers (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40) wt. % are prepared by hand layup technique. Compression tests are performed as per corresponding ASTM standards to assess the compressive strength of these composites. Further, dry sliding tests are performed following ASTM G99 standards using a pin on disk machine. A design of experiment approach based on Taguchi’s L16 orthogonal arrays is adopted. Tests are performed at different sliding velocities for multiple sliding distances under varying normal loads. Specific wear rates of the composites under different test conditions are obtained. The analysis of the test results revealed that the filler content and the sliding velocity are the most predominant control factors affecting the wear rate. This work thus, opens up a new avenue for the value added utilization of coal mine overburden material.

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory materials in inventory natural and enriched uranium management and storage costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebeker, R.L.

    1995-11-01

    On July 13, 1994, the Office of Environmental Management (EM) was requested to develop a planning process that would result in management policies for dealing with nuclear materials in inventory. In response to this request, EM launched the Materials In Inventory (MIN) Initiative. A Headquarters Working Group was established to develop the broad policy framework for developing MIN management policies. MIN activities cover essentially all nuclear materials within the DOE complex, including such items as spent nuclear fuel, depleted uranium, plutonium, natural and enriched uranium, and other materials. In August 1995, a report discussing the natural and enriched uranium portion of the Initiative for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) was published. That report, 'Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Materials-in-Inventory, Natural and Enriched Uranium'.' identified MIN under the control of Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company at the INEL. Later, additional information related to the costs associated with the storage of MIN materials was requested to supplement this report. This report provides the cost information for storing, disposing, or consolidating the natural and enriched uranium portion of the MIN materials at the INEL. The information consists of eight specific tables which detail present management costs and estimated costs of future activities

  4. Ex vivo evaluation of coronal and apical microbial leakage of root canal - Filled with gutta-percha or Resilon/Epiphany root canal filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Almeida-Gomes Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This ex vivo study compared coronal and apical microleakage of root canals filled with Resilon/Epiphany (RE or gutta-percha/Grossman sealer (GP, using either lateral condensation (LC or System B (SB technique. Materials and Methods: Specimens in eight experimental groups were obturated using the following materials and techniques: Groups 1 and 3 - GP and LC; groups 2 and 4 - GP and SB; groups 5 and 7 - RE and LC; groups 6 and 8 - RE and SB. Apical and coronal leakages were tested using bacterial methods. For coronal analysis, the number of days required for complete contamination of the root canals was recorded according to observation of the brain heart infusion broth turbidity for 15 weeks. For apical analysis, the teeth were cleaved and the leakage was measured at 30 days. Data were collected for each sample and analyzed statistically with the Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results: Leakage was found in all groups. The difference between filling materials, obturation techniques, and median time of leakage was not statistically significant for coronal ( P=0.847 and apical ( P=0.5789 leakages. Conclusion: There were no differences between the different filling materials (gutta-percha/Grossman sealer and Resilon/Epiphany and obturation techniques (lateral condensation and system B technique in coronal or apical leakages.

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  7. Adjustable Polyurethane Foam as Filling Material for a Novel Spondyloplasty: Biomechanics and Biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongzhen; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim Hakan; Reinshagen, Clemens; Molcanyi, Marek; Zivcak, Jozef; Hudak, Radovan; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Weisser, Jürgen; Schäfer, Ute; Pinzer, Thomas; Schackert, Gabriele; Zhang, Xifeng; Wähler, Mario; Brautferger, Uta; Rieger, Bernhard

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the biomechanics and biocompatibility of polyurethane (PU) foam with adjustable stiffness as a filling material for a novel spondyloplasty that is designed to reduce the risk of postoperative adjacent level fractures. Sixty individual porcine lumbar vertebrae were randomly split into 4 groups: A, B, C, and D. Group A served as unmodified vertebral body controls. Groups B, C, and D consisted of hollowed vertebral bodies. Vertebrae of groups C and D were filled with adjustable PU foams of different stiffness. The compressive strength and stiffness of vertebrae from groups A-D were recorded and analyzed. 3T3 mouse fibroblasts were cultured with preformed PU foams for 4 days to test biocompatibility. The strength and stiffness of the hollowed groups were lower than in group A. However, the differences were not statistically significant between group A and group C (P > 0.05), and were obviously different between group A and group B or group D (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively). Moreover, the strength and stiffness after filling foams in group C or group D were significantly greater than in group B (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively). Live/dead staining of 3T3 cells confirmed the biocompatibility of the PU foam. The new PU foam shows adaptability regarding its stiffness and excellent cytocompatibility in vitro. The results support the clinical translation of the new PU foams as augmentation material in the development of a novel spondyloplasty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of Uranium Concentrations in Water and Organic Material from Streams in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, J.

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of the investigation has been to study how uranium concentrations in stream water and organic material are related to various geological parameters such as rock types, average uranium content and radioactivity, fracturing, leachability of uranium from the bedrock, occurrence of uranium mineralisations and thickness and type of Quarternary deposits. The investigation has also taken account of the effects of environmental factors such as climate , precipitation, height above sea level and topography. The background concentration of uranium in organic stream sediment varies from 1 ppm to 45 ppm, with a background value of 10 ppm for all 14 areas considered together. The threshold value for organic stream material varies from 3 ppm U to 303 ppm U with a threshold value of 133 ppm U for all 14 areas considered together. For water, the background concentration varies between the 5 areas from 0.2 ppb U to 0.7 ppb U with a background value of 0.4 ppb U for all 5 areas together. The threshold value varies from 0.3 ppb U to 5.2 ppb U with a threshold value of 2.9 ppb U for all 5 areas together. An investigation of the correlation between uranium concentrations in water and organic stream material from one and the same sampling point shows a positive correlation for high concentrations, but the correlation becomes successively less significant with lower concentrations. Uranium concentrations in organic stream material and water are positively correlated with the following geological parameters:1) Background concentrations of uranium in the bedrock. 2) Abundance of fractures in the bedrock. 3) Leachability of uranium from the bedrock. 4) Presence of uranium mineralisations. For organic stream material, this positive correlation is obtained for both high and low uranium concentrations whereas for water it occurs only with high concentrations. In areas of broken topography and high relief, there is a more clearly defined correlation to the bedrock than in areas of

  9. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  10. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-01-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  11. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  12. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  13. Comparative evaluation of microleakage of various retrograde filling materials: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galhotra, Virat; Sofat, Anjali; Pandit, Inder K; Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj

    2013-07-01

    The present study is envisaged to evaluate and compare the microleakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) with commonly used retrograde filling materials, like light-cured composite with dentin-bonding agents, light-cured glass ionomer cement (LC GIC) and resin-modified zinc oxide eugenol. Ninety freshly extracted non-carious single-rooted human anterior teeth were used in the study. They were randomly divided into four experimental groups and two control groups of 15 each. Following the biomechanical preparation, all teeth were obturated and then the apices of the obturated teeth were resected by removing 3 mm of each apex at 90° to the long axis of the tooth with a straight fissure bur in a high-speed air-rotor handpiece with water coolant. A 3-mm-deep root end cavity was prepared and the root end fillings were placed as per the manufacturer's instructions and according to the groups divided. The samples were then immersed in 1% methylene blue at room temperature for 72 h, 96 h and 1 week and the dye penetration was measured. All the four materials used in the study showed some microleakage throughout the experimental period. The sealing ability in terms of microleakage can be summarized as: MTA > Composite resin with dentin bonding agent > LC GIC > Resin modified zinc oxide eugenol.

  14. Broadband giant-refractive-index material based on mesoscopic space-filling curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Taeyong; Kim, Jong Uk; Kang, Seung Kyu; Kim, Hyowook; Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Yong-Hee; Shin, Jonghwa

    2016-08-01

    The refractive index is the fundamental property of all optical materials and dictates Snell's law, propagation speed, wavelength, diffraction, energy density, absorption and emission of light in materials. Experimentally realized broadband refractive indices remain 1,800 resulting from a mesoscopic crystal with a dielectric constant greater than three million. This gigantic enhancement effect originates from the space-filling curve concept from mathematics. The principle is inherently very broad band, the enhancement being nearly constant from zero up to the frequency of interest. This broadband giant-refractive-index medium promises not only enhanced resolution in imaging and raised fundamental absorption limits in solar energy devices, but also compact, power-efficient components for optical communication and increased performance in many other applications.

  15. Three-dimensional evaluation of effectiveness of hand and rotary instrumentation for retreatment of canals filled with different materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Mohammad; Qualtrough, Alison; Silikas, Nick

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the remaining filling volume of different obturation materials from root-filled extracted teeth by using 2 removal techniques. Eighty single-rooted teeth were collected and decoronated, and the root canal was prepared by using the ProTaper nickel-titanium rotary files. The teeth were randomly allocated into 4 groups, and each group was obturated by using a different material. Group 1 was filled with gutta-percha and TubliSeal sealer, group 2 was filled with EndoRez points and EndoRez sealer, group 3 was filled with RealSeal points and RealSeal sealer, and Group 4 was filled with a gutta-percha point and GuttaFlow sealer. Teeth were scanned with a micro-computed tomography scan, and then root fillings were removed by using ProTaper retreatment files or hand K-files. Teeth were scanned again, and volume measurements were carried out with micro-computed tomography software. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the 2 removal techniques for gutta-percha and for both techniques between gutta-percha and the other groups. The present study showed that all tested filling materials were not completely removed during retreatment by using hand or rotary files. Gutta-percha was more efficiently removed by using hand K-files.

  16. Synthesis of partial stabilized cement-gypsum as new dental retrograde filling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadhasivam, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jung-Chih [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Medical Device Innovation Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan,Taiwan (China); Savitha, S. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ming-Xiang; Hsu, Chung-King [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Pin [School of Dentistry and Graduate Institute of Clinical Dentistry, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Feng-Huei, E-mail: double@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Division of Medical Engineering Research, National Health Research Institute, Zhunan, Miaoli County, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    The study describes the sol-gel synthesis of a new dental retrograde filling material partial stabilized cement (PSC)-gypsum by adding different weight percentage of gypsum (25% PSC + 75% gypsum, 50% PSC + 50% gypsum and 75% PSC + 25% gypsum) to the PSC. The crystalline phase and hydration products of PSC-gypsum were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The handling properties such as setting time, viscosity, tensile strength, porosity and pH, were also studied. The XRD and microstructure analysis demonstrated the formation of hydroxyapatite and removal of calcium dihydrate during its immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on day 10 for 75% PSC + 25% gypsum. The developed PSC-gypsum not only improved the setting time but also greatly reduced the viscosity, which is very essential for endodontic surgery. The cytotoxic and cell proliferation studies indicated that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible. The increased alkaline pH of the PSC-gypsum also had a remarkable antibacterial activity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new dental retrograde filling material PSC-gypsum was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PSC-gypsum cement has shown excellent initial and final setting time as 15-35 min. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It not only improved the setting time but also retain the viscosity, 2 Pa{center_dot}s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High alkaline pH of the cement had a remarkable antibacterial activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity studies revealed that the synthesized material is highly biocompatible.

  17. Characterization of Uranium-Bearing Material by Passive Non-Destructive Gamma Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakosi, L.; Zsigrai, J.; Nguyen, C.T.

    2009-01-01

    Characterization of nuclear materials is equally important in nuclear safeguards (inventory verification) and in nuclear security (revealing illicit trafficking). Analysis of materials is a key issue in both fields. Natural (NU), depleted (DU), low-enriched (LEU), and high-enriched uranium (HEU) samples were analysed by high resolution gamma spectrometry (HRGS). Isotopic composition and total U-content of reactor fuel pellets and powder were determined. A unique HRGS method was developed for the first time for determining the production date of the material of unknown origin. Identifying reprocessed uranium proved to be possible by HRGS as well.

  18. Radiopacity evaluation of new root canal filling materials by digitalization of images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomaru-Filho, Mário; Jorge, Erica Gouveia; Guerreiro Tanomaru, Juliane Maria; Gonçalves, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of five root canal filling materials (AH Plus, Intrafill, Roeko Seal, Epiphany, and EndoRez). Following the International Organization of Standardization 6876/2001, five circular specimens (10 x 1 mm) were made from each material. After the material set, radiographs were made using occlusal film and a graduated aluminum step-wedge varying in thickness from 2 to 16 mm. The dental X-ray unit (GE1000) was set at 50 Kvp, 10 mA, 18 pulses/second, and distance of 33.5 cm. The radiographs were digitized, and the radiopacity was compared with the aluminum step-wedge, using WIXWIN-2000 software (Gendex). Data (mm Al) were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey tests. AH Plus and Epiphany were the most radiopaque materials (9.8 and 8.8 mm Al, respectively), followed by EndoRez (7.2 mm Al). Roeko Seal and Intrafill presented the lowest radiopacity values (5.7 and 6.1 mm Al, respectively). Although the materials evaluated demonstrated different radiopacities, all had values above the minimum recommended by the International Organization of Standardization.

  19. Nd:YAG laser in endodontics: filling-material edge bordering on a root channel laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikov, Andrei V.; Sinelnik, Yuri A.; Moroz, Boris T.; Pavlovskaya, Irina V.

    1997-12-01

    For the very first time it is represented a study of filling material edge bordering upon root channel cavity modified with a laser. As a filling material it is used a glass ionomer cement. It is demonstrated that Nd:YAG laser radiation effects on increase of grade of edge bordering on the average of 20 - 30% at temperature rise of no more than 2 - 3 degrees in periodontium area in a period of operation.

  20. Study on filling materials suitable for seawater piping trench closure work at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Shuji; Hibi, Yasuki; Nishikori, Kazumasa; Sato, Keita

    2016-01-01

    Highly contaminated water leaking from the reactor buildings and turbine buildings damaged by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake has accumulated in the seawater piping trenches of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Units 2, 3, and 4. In November 2014, work commenced to replace and remove this contaminated water by filling the trenches with filling materials, and this work was completed in December 2015. This paper summarizes the contents of this study on various filling materials, including special fillers with long-distance underwater flowability applied to the horizontal tunnel parts of the trenches. (author)

  1. Investigation on migration of Uranium in solidified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yun; Zhu Xiaohong; Yang Guangwen; Liao Junsheng; Shuai Zhenqing

    2011-01-01

    The sorption and migration behaviors of uranium in soils and cement were studied by column test. The results show that the sorption ratio of soil is bigger than that of cement. Specific radioactivity of 235 U in the soil and cement samples is basically the same as that of environmental soil, and specific radioactivity of 235 U varies little with the sampling depth. The results should provide valuable information to nuclear facility decommissioning. (authors)

  2. Recovering uranium and/or aluminium from refractory silico-aluminous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey-Goldblatt, E.; Nagy, I.F.; Tunley, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    A process for recovering uranium and/or aluminium from a refractory silico-aluminous material comprises leaching the material in one or more stages, obtaining a pregnant solution which contains little or no acid and recovering the desired metal from the solution

  3. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided; if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly

  4. Use of highly enriched uranium in the material testing reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1979-05-01

    In the material testing reactor BR2, the use of highly enriched uranium is determined by the consideration of the fast, epithermal and thermal neutron flux effectively available for the experimental devices. The choice of the core configuration is defined by combining the localisation of the experimental devices and of fuel elements of various burnup, such as to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the experimental load, compatible with an economic use of the fuel elements and safe operation of the reactor. Taking into account the present manufacturing technology for MTR fuels (37 Wt % uranium density in the fuel meat) the highly enriched uranium cannot be avoided: if higher concentration of uranium could be realised by some new manufacturing technology, the 235 U density of fuel elements at elimination should be kept at the required level and the enrichment could be reduced accordingly. (author)

  5. Uranium geochemistry of Orca Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, F.F. Jr.; Sackett, W.M.

    1981-01-01

    Orca Basin, an anoxic, brine-filled depression at a depth of 2200 m in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope, has been studied with respect to its uranium geochemistry. Uranium concentration profiles for four cores from within the basin were determined by delayed-neutron counting. Uranium concentrations ranged from 2.1 to 4.1 ppm on a salt-free and carbonate-corrected basis. The highest uranium concentrations were associated with the lowest percentage and delta 13 C organic carbon values. For comparison, cores from the brine-filled Suakin and Atlantis II Deeps, both in the Red Sea, were also analyzed. Uranium concentrations ranged from 1.2 to 2.6 ppm in the Suakin Deep and from 8.0 to 11.0 ppm in the Atlantis II Deep. No significant correlation was found between uranium concentrations and organic carbon concentrations and delta 13 C values for these cores. Although anoxic conditions are necessary for significant uranium uptake by non-carbonate marine sediments, other factors such as dilution by rapidly depositing materials and uranium supply via mixing and diffusion across density gradients may be as important in determining uranium concentrations in hypersaline basin sediments. (author)

  6. Recovery of fissile materials from plutonium residues, miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and uranium fissile wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new process is proposed that converts complex feeds containing fissile materials into a chemical form that allows the use of existing technologies (such as PUREX and ion exchange) to recover the fissile materials and convert the resultant wastes to glass. Potential feed materials include (1) plutonium scrap and residue, (2) miscellaneous spent nuclear fuel, and (3) uranium fissile wastes. The initial feed materials may contain mixtures of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, halides, and organics. 14 refs., 4 figs

  7. Gamma-spectrometric determination of {sup 232}U in uranium-bearing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zsigrai, Jozsef [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), 76125 Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 2340 (Germany); Nguyen, Tam Cong [Centre for Energy Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (EK), 1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Berlizov, Andrey [European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), 76125 Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 2340 (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The {sup 232}U content of various uranium-bearing items was measured using low-background gamma spectrometry. The method is independent of the measurement geometry, sample form and chemical composition. Since {sup 232}U is an artificially produced isotope, it carries information about previous irradiation of the material, which is relevant for nuclear forensics, nuclear safeguards and for nuclear reactor operations. A correlation between the {sup 232}U content and {sup 235}U enrichment of the investigated samples has been established, which is consistent with theoretical predictions. It is also shown how the correlation of the mass ratio {sup 232}U/{sup 235}U vs. {sup 235}U content can be used to distinguish materials contaminated with reprocessed uranium from materials made of reprocessed uranium.

  8. Midfacial analysis and planning for midface augmentation with injectable filling materials: an anatomical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, A; Mansoori, P

    2012-06-01

      Midfacial augmentation improves the appearance of patients with flat or ptotic cheek.   To develop a simple method of preoperative delineating the location of the ideal malar prominence and determining the best area to augment with injectable filling materials.   We used detailed analysis of the facial features of some Caucasian men and women as the basis for this study.   We described a technique to locate the ideal malar prominence and proposed a classification of midfacial contour defects.   This method greatly simplifies the surgeon's task of determining the area to be augmented. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  9. Evaluation of a new nano-filled restorative material for bonding orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Samir E; Ajlouni, Raed; Soliman, Manal M; Oonsombat, Charuphan; Laffoon, John F; Warren, John

    2007-01-01

    To compare the shear bond strength of a nano-hybrid restorative material, Grandio (Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany), to that of a traditional adhesive material (Transbond XT; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) when bonding orthodontic brackets. Forty teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups: 20 teeth were bonded with the Transbond adhesive system and the other 20 teeth with the Grandio restorative system, following manufacturer's instructions. Student t test was used to compare the shear bond strength of the 2 systems. Significance was predetermined at P 5 .05. The t test comparisons (t = 0.55) of the shear bond strength between the 2 adhesives indicated the absence of a significant (P = .585) difference. The mean shear bond strength for Grandio was 4.1 +/- 2.6 MPa and that for Transbond XT was 4.6 +/- 3.2 MPa. During debonding, 3 of 20 brackets (15%) bonded with Grandio failed without registering any force on the Zwick recording. None of the brackets bonded with Transbond XT had a similar failure mode. The newly introduced nano-filled composite materials can potentially be used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth if its consistency can be more flowable to readily adhere to the bracket base.

  10. Potential of fish scales as a filling material in surface coating of cellulosic paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Elif; Kandirmaz, Emine A

    2018-01-01

    Paper is one of the important inputs for the printing industry, and the most important leading parameter in the printing process is its brightness. Brightness can be brought to paper using coatings and sizing. Desired surface properties and, most importantly, surface roughness can be achieved by changing the contents of the coating and sizing of the materials it contains. The use of biomaterials is becoming more important in the paper industry, as they represent substances with a lower carbon footprint. Fish scales are already used as a filling material, cosmetic material and fish food, as well as for determining the age of fish. Fish scales were brought to different sizes by a milling process. Paper formulations including different amounts of fish scales were prepared with fish scales, and coatings on raw paper were subjected to test printings in IGT-C1, with formulations and physical characteristics of coatings such as brightness, lightfastness, strength, adhesion etc. being determined. Regarding the value of yellowness, mixtures of 2.5%-10% can be used. The maximum value of brightness was obtained from a mixture of 10%. Aging visibly changed the colors. The coatings obtained were brighter than the initial coating compositions. The top quality formulation was the coating with 5% medium-sized fish scale particles.

  11. Uranium and thorium mining and milling: material security and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhaeusler, F.; Zaitseva, L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At present physical protection for the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle is typically at a significantly lower level than at any other part of the nuclear fuel cycle. In view of past experiences (Israel, South Africa, Pakistan, India) it is feasible to take into consideration some generic threat scenarios, potentially resulting in loss of control over uranium or thorium, respectively their concentrates, such as: illegal mining of an officially closed uranium- or thorium mine; covert diversion of uranium- or thorium ore whilst officially mining another ore; covert transport of radioactive ore or product, using means of public rail, road, ship, or air transport; covert en route diversion of an authorized uranium- or thorium transport; covert removal of uranium-or thorium ore or concentrate from an abandoned facility. The Stanford-Salzburg database on nuclear smuggling, theft, and orphan radiation sources (DSTO) contains information on trafficking incidents involving mostly uranium, but also some thorium, from 30 countries in five continents with altogether 113 incidents in the period 1991 to 2004. These activities range from uranium transported in backpacks by couriers in Afghanistan, to a terrorist organization purchasing land in order to mine covertly for uranium in Australia, and the clandestine shipment of almost two tons of uranium hexafluoride from Asia to Africa, using the services of a national airline. Potential participants in such illegal operations range from entrepreneurs to members of organized crime, depending on the level of sophistication of the operation. End-users and 'customers' of such illegal operations are suspected to be non-state actors, organizations or governments involved in a covert operation with the ultimate aim to acquire a sufficient amount of nuclear material for a nuclear device. The actual risk for these activities to succeed in the acquisition of an adequate amount of suitable radioactive material depends on one or

  12. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  13. Evaluation of physicochemical properties of root-end filling materials using conventional and Micro-CT tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ferrari Esteves TORRES

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To evaluate solubility, dimensional stability, filling ability and volumetric change of root-end filling materials using conventional tests and new Micro-CT-based methods. Material and Methods Solubility (loss of mass after 7 and 30 days, and dimensional stability (in mm were evaluated in accordance with Carvalho-Junior, et al. 7 (2007. The filling ability and volumetric change (in mm3 were evaluated by Micro-CT (Bruker-MicroCT, Kontich, Belgium using resin models with cavities 3 mm deep and 1 mm in diameter. The cavities were filled with materials to evaluate filling ability, and then scanned by Micro-CT. After 7 and 30 days immersed in distilled water, the filled cavities were scanned again to evaluate the volumetric change. MTA Angelus (MTA, Biodentine (BIO and zinc oxide-eugenol cement (ZOE were evaluated. Data were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey's test with 5% significance level. Results The results suggested correlated or complementary data between the proposed tests. At 7 days, BIO showed higher solubility and at 30 days, showed higher volumetric change in comparison with MTA (p0.05 at 7 days. At 30 days, they presented similar solubility. BIO and MTA showed higher dimensional stability than ZOE (p<0.05. ZOE and BIO showed higher filling ability (p<0.05. Conclusions ZOE presented a higher dimensional change, and BIO had greater solubility after 7 days. BIO presented filling ability and dimensional stability, but greater volumetric change than MTA after 30 days. Micro-CT can provide important data on the physicochemical properties of materials complementing conventional tests.

  14. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2008-09-01

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m 3 . Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m 3 . Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  15. Rock fill in a KBS-3 repository. Rock material for filling of shafts and ramps in a KBS-3V repository in the closure phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland (Geodevelopment International AB/SWECO AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2008-09-15

    The content of large blocks in blasted rock makes it impossible to fill and compact the material effectively unless those larger than about 500 mm are removed. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) muck gives flat chips, that are usually not longer than a couple of decimeters, and serves better as backfill. The granulometrical composition of both types can be more suitable for effective compaction by crushing, which is hence a preferable process. Use of unsorted, unprocessed blasted rock can only be accepted if the density and physical properties, like self-compaction, are not important. Crushing of blasted rock and TBM muck for backfilling can be made in one or two steps depending on the required gradation. Placement of rock fill is best made by use of tractors with blades that push the material forwards over already placed and compacted material. The dry density of well graded rock fill effectively compacted by very heavy vibratory rollers can be as high as 2,400 kg/m3. For road compaction by ordinary vibratory rollers common dry density values are in the interval 2,050 to 2,200 kg m3. Blasted rock dumped and moved on site by tractors can get an average dry density of 1,600-1,800 kg/m3 without compaction. Crushed, blasted rock and TBM muck placed by tractors in horizontal layers and compacted by 5-10 t vibrating rollers in the lower part of the rooms, and moved by tractors to form inclined layers compacted by vibrating plates in the upper part, would get a dry density of 1,900-2,000 kg/m3. Flushing water over the rock fill in conjunction with the compaction work gives more effective densification than dry compaction. Based on recorded settlement of Norwegian rock fill dams constructed with water flushing it is estimated that the self-compaction of a 5 m high backfill of crushed rock or TBM muck causes a settlement of the top of the backfill of about 8 mm while a 200 m high shaft fill would undergo compression by more than half a meter. Repeated, strong earthquakes may

  16. 33 CFR 336.1 - Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discharges of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S. 336.1 Section 336.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... ENGINEERS DREDGING PROJECTS INVOLVING THE DISCHARGE OF DREDGED MATERIAL INTO WATERS OF THE U.S. AND OCEAN...

  17. Uranium analysis in water flowing by the nuclear track detection method on solid dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arambula, H.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was threefold: to study the content of uranium in tap and spring water, to establish a technique for the quantitative analysis for the presence of uranium in liquids, and to test the qualities as detector fission fragments of three solid insulator materials using the nuclear tracks register method. The latter allows for the measurement of concentrations of fissile elements up to 10 -12 gr/gm employing (n, f.f.) reactions. The test samples were of tap water and of water from six fresh water springs located in San Luis Potosi and Guanajuato. Glass, lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica were the detector materials used. The technique consisted in evaporating the water from the test samples, which had been previously placed upon the detector materials, and in doing the same for the standard control sample solutions having known concentrations of uranium. All the samples were then irradiated with thermal neutrons, and the 235 U, present in the samples, fissioned. The fission fragments produced permanent damage on the detectors, known as latent tracks. A specific corroding chemical was then applied to each detector which caused the latent tracks to dissolve into grooves. Known as etching tracks, these grooves were microscopically visible and could be measured for track density (tracks/mm 2 ). The concentrations of uranium present in the test samples were measured by comparing the track densities of the test samples with those of the standard control samples. The concentration of uranium found in the spring water samples ranged from 0.09 to 0.89 μqr.U/1, and those of tap water, from 0.18 to 0.19 μqr U/1. Lexan polycarbonate and muscovite mica proved to be better, as detectors, than glass. Glass for quantitative analysis, we found not recommendable as a detector material because of its alterable composition in the presence of uranium. (author)

  18. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Anthony Irawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n=30 measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10: subgroup A (Opalescence PF, subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching, and subgroup C (distilled water serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer’s instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE L*, a*, b* system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM. Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE; P≤0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6 > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2 > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0. However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P>0.05.

  19. The apical leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as the retrograde filling material with various mixing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Mulyawati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA is relatively considered as a new material in endodontic. It even has been used as retrograde filling material due to its biocompatibility, antibacterial effect, sealing ability and anti-moist effect. Some materials have been used as mixing agent to achieve an appropiate setting of MTA. Purpose: The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the mixing agents of MTA towards the apical leakage when they are used together as retrograde filling materials. Method: The samples of this research consist of 30 human extracted upper central incisors. First, the crown of each tooth is sectioned. The root canals are prepared by using the conventional technique and then are obturated with gutta percha. After cutting the root apex, 2 mm from apical, class 1 cavities are prepared by using fissure bur with the depth of 3 mm. The samples then are divided into 3 groups with 10 teeth for each. Group I uses aquabidest as mixing agent of MTA (MTA-aquabidest, group II uses saline (MTA-saline, while group III uses 0.12% chlorhexidine (MTA-chlorhexidine. The apex of each group then is filled with the mixing MTA determined already. Afterwards, clearing method is used to evaluate the apical leakage. The apical leakage actually is determined by measuring the depth of methylene blue penetration with stereomicroscope. The statictical analyses of the linear dye penetration then are performed with analysis of varians ANOVA. Result: The dye penetration for both MTA-aquadest and MTA-saline groups indicates the lowest penetration, and there is even a significant difference compared with MTA-0.12% chlorhexidine group (p<0.005. Conclusion: It can be concluded that aquabidest and saline as mixing agents of MTA produce less apical leakage compared with 0.12% chlorhexidine.Latar belakang: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA merupakan bahan yang relatif baru dalam bidang endodontik. Bahan tersebut diindikasikan sebagai bahan pengisi

  20. Comparison of the sealing ability of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement used as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Shahriar; Yavari, Hamid R; Rahimi, Saeed; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Shakouei, Sahar; Unchi, Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Inadequate apical seal is the major cause of surgical endodontic failure. The root-end filling material used should prevent egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue. The purpose of this study was to compare the sealing ability of four root-end filling materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), gray MTA, white Portland cement (PC) and gray PC by dye leakage test. Ninety-six human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha. After resecting the apex, an apical cavity was prepared. The teeth were randomly divided into four experimental groups (A: white MTA, B: gray MTA, C: white PC and D: gray PC; n = 20) and two control groups (positive and negative control groups; n = 8). Root-end cavities in the experimental groups were filled with the experimental materials. The teeth were exposed to Indian ink for 72 hours. The extent of dye penetration was measured with a stereomicroscope at 16× magnification. The negative controls showed no dye penetration and dye penetration was seen in the entire root-end cavity of positive controls. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the four experimental groups (P > 0.05). All retrograde filling materials tested in this study showed the same microleakage in vitro. Given the low cost and apparently similar sealing ability of PC, PC could be considered as a substitute for MTA as a root-end filling material.

  1. Domestic round robin exercise on analysis of uranium for nuclear material handling facilities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yoshiyasu; Nagai, Kohta; Handa, Takamitsu; Inoue, Shin-ichi; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Interlaboratory comparison programme as well as internal quality control system is an effective tool for an analytical laboratory responsible to nuclear material accountancy of a nuclear facility to maintain and enhance its capability for analysis. However, it is a burden on nuclear material handling facilities in Japan to attend interlaboratory comparison programme run by overseas institutions because of high costs and complicated procedure for importing nuclear materials, and therefore facilities which can participate in such international programme would be limited. Nuclear Material Control Center has hence started and organised an annual domestic round robin exercise on analysis of uranium standard materials, funded by the Japan Safeguards Office of the Nuclear Regulation Authority, since 2008 to enhance analytical capability of Japanese Facilities. The outline of the round robin exercise will be given and the results of uranium isotopic and concentration analysis reported by participant facilities from 2008 to 2015 will be summarised in the presentation. (author)

  2. Nuclear material control and accounting system evaluation in uranium conversion operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Jose Pontes

    1994-01-01

    The Nuclear Material Control and Accounting Systems in uranium conversion operations are described. The conversion plant, uses ammonium diuranate (ADU), as starting material for the production of uranium hexafluoride. A combination of accountability and verification measurement is used to verify physical inventory quantities. Two types of inspection are used to minimize the measurements uncertainty of the Material Unaccounted For (MUF) : Attribute inspection and Variation inspection. The mass balance equation is the base of an evaluation of a Material Balance Area (MBA). Statistical inference is employed to facilitate rapid inventory taking and enhance material control of Safeguards. The calculation of one sampling plan for a MBA and the methodology of inspection evaluation are also described. We have two kinds of errors : no detection and false delation. (author)

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  4. The Davies-Gray titration for the assay of uranium in nuclear materials: a performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickel, M.

    1997-01-01

    An interlaboratory comparison in two phases was organized to assess the precision and accuracy concerning the assay of uranium in nuclear materials by the potentiometric titration method. This contribution presents the results of this exercise in terms of method performance. Variations to be expected between different laboratories and within a single laboratory are estimated. In general, the method proved again very reliable. (orig.)

  5. A rapid method for the separation and estimation of uranium in geological materials using ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Satya; Bangroo, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    Ion Chromatography is an elegant analytical technique which was primarily developed for the analysis of anionic species and over the years it has been used successfully to analyse various elements in different matrices. In this work the potential of Ion Chromatography has been used for the rapid separation and estimation of uranium in hydrogeochemical and other geological materials

  6. 76 FR 71082 - Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 40-9091; NRC-2011-0148] Strata Energy, Inc., Ross Uranium Recovery Project; New Source Material License Application; Notice of Intent To Prepare a... intent to prepare a supplemental environmental impact statement. SUMMARY: Strata Energy, Inc. (Strata...

  7. Uranium concentration in building materials used in the central region of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, R.H.; El-Tahawy, M.S.; Ghods, A.

    1997-01-01

    Within a radiological survey of the building materials used in the urban dwellings in the central region of Egypt, the uranium concentration in 80 representative samples of raw and fabricated building materials are determined using laser fluorimetry technique. For 40 samples from the studied raw building materials of sand, gravel, gypsum, lime-stone, granite and marble the determined uranium concentration values range between 0.3 and 3.6 ppm for all these samples except for one type of granite having the corresponding value of 7.8 ppm. For 37 samples from studied fabricated building materials of normal cement, clay brick, sand brick, tiles and ceramic plates the determined uranium concentration values range from 0.5 to 3.4 ppm. The corresponding values for three types of iron cement are 3.1, 6.1 and 9.3 ppm. The radium-226 content (of the uranium-238 series) in the same samples was determined using high resolution gamma-ray spectrometers based on HP Ge-detectors. The data obtained by the two techniques are in good agreement for the majority of the studied samples. (author)

  8. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Elza Gate Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, J.J.; Yu, C.; Devgun, J.S.

    1991-02-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for a large, homogeneously contaminated area at the Elza Gate Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The derivation of the single-nuclide and total uranium guidelines was based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Elza Gate Site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following decontamination. The DOE residual radioactive guideline computer code RESRAD was used in this evaluation. Four potential scenarios were considered for the site; the scenarios vary with regard to time spent at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for uranium within 1000 years, provided that the soil concentration of uranium at the Elza Gate Site does not exceed the following levels: 1800 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario); 4000 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario); 470 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer using pond water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario); and 120 pCi/g for Scenario D (resident farmer using well water as the only water source: a possible but unlikely scenario). The uranium guideline applies to the total activity concentration of uranium isotopes in their natural activity concentration ratio of 1:1: 0.046. These guidelines are calculated on the basis of a dose of 100 mrem/yr. In setting the actual uranium guideline for the Elza Gate Site, the DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors, such as determining whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate. 10 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  9. A study of the material accountancy procedure at the uranium enrichment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirahashi, J.; Akiba, M.; Omae, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of material accountancy based on total uranium (U element MUF) to detect diversions of significant quantity in the uranium enrichment facility operating at a stated maximum enrichment level of 5%. Verification that material production is within the declared enrichment can be achieved by the inspection activities associated with limited - frequency unannounced access (LFUA) to cascade areas as treated extensively in HSP. According to the experience of the material accountancy at our facility, the reduction of the material accountancy capability by changing from U-235 isotope MUF to U element MUF is only about half. However, still the U element MUF approach can meet the current IAEA detection goals for the up to about 1000 tswu/a plant

  10. Friction Properties of Laminated Composite Materials of Alpha-Tricalcium Phosphate–Filled Poly (Vinyl Alcohol) Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Kanae; Iwai, Tomoaki; Shoukaku, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the mechanical characteristics of a polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H) as a candidate material for artificial joint cartilage. In the study, PVA-H was filled with α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) in order to improve its mechanical properties. In addition, laminated composite materials with 3 layers were prepared by laminating α-TCP–filled PVA-H and unfilled PVA-H. The samples were prepared with different numbers of repeated freeze–thaw cycles and several con...

  11. Effect of calcium/silicon ratio on retention of uranium (VI) in portland cement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Li Yuxiang

    2005-01-01

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) materials of varied calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratios were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis at 80 degree C, with calcium oxide and micro-silicon employed. These products were determined to be of gel phase by XRD. Leaching tests with 1% hydrochloric acid indicated that more Uranium (VI) was detained by CSH with lower Ca/Si ratios. Alkali-activated slag cement (with a lower Ca/Si ratio) was found to have a stronger retention capacity than Portland cement (with a higher Ca/Si ratio), at 25 degree C in 102-days leaching tests with simulated solidified forms containing Uranium (VI). The accumulative leaching fraction of Uranium (VI) for Alkali-activated slag cement solidified forms is 17.6% lower than that for Portland cement. The corresponding difference of diffusion coefficients is 40.6%. This could be correlated with the difference of Ca/Si ratios between cements of two kinds. (authors)

  12. Designing dual phase sensing materials from polyaniline filled styrene–isoprene–styrene composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar; Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi; Kasak, Peter; Krupa, Igor; Ali S A Al-Maadeed, Mariam

    2014-01-01

    The demand for developing oil detectors is ever increasing since the cleanup and recovery from oil spill usually take long time. Here we propose oil sensors made of polyaniline (PANI) filled poly(styrene–isoprene–styrene) (SIS) block copolymer composite films with good uniformity and dispersion. The changes in resistivity of the samples in presence of both oil and water media reveal the good sensing ability of SIS–PANI films towards oil in water (dual phase). The morphology and chemical composition of the developed products are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Swelling studies are performed to correlate the sensing response to the structural variations and based on it a mechanism is derived for the dual phase sensing. Contact angle measurements confirm the behavior further. The thermal properties and crystallinity of the composites are also addressed by the thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetric studies. The developed oil sensor material is able to withstand extreme temperature condition as well. - Highlights: • We model a dual phase sensor capable of detecting oil in water. • A mechanism is proposed to correlate sensing with diffusion. • In situ polymerization helps in the uniform distribution of filler. • Polymer composite sensor could be used as stickers on oil pipelines

  13. Cytotoxic effects of cyanoacrylates used as retrograde filling materials: an in vitro analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Cledson Lima de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanoacrylate has been used in medicine and dentistry for many years. It has been used as a postextraction dressing and retrograde filling material in endodontic surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of Histoacryl and other two homologue ethyl cyanoacrylates, Super Bonder and Ultrabond, on cultured fibroblasts, using the Trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The cyanoacrylates were applied to round glass coverslips, which were placed in contact with NIH 3T3 cells. After 0, 6, 12 and 24 h (short-term assay; viability and 1, 3, 5 and 7 days (long-term assay; survival, the cells were examined under phase light microscopy and counted. The data were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis test. In the short-term experiments, only the cultures of the Ultrabond group (GIV presented significant smaller percentages of cell viability than the cultures of the other groups (GI: control; GII: Super Bonder; GIII: Histoacryl. Although the cultures of the Super Bonder group (GII presented smaller percentages of cell viability than cultures of the other groups (GI, GIII, GIV at the long-term assay, this group was the only experimental group presenting a continuous and progressive cell growth. Our results have shown an in vitro biocompatibility of Histoacryl and ethyl cyanoacrylate homologues. These cyanoacrylates could therefore be of importance for endodontic purposes.

  14. Designing dual phase sensing materials from polyaniline filled styrene–isoprene–styrene composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadasivuni, Kishor Kumar, E-mail: kishor_kumars@yahoo.com [Centre for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Ponnamma, Deepalekshmi [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686560, Kerala (India); Kasak, Peter; Krupa, Igor; Ali S A Al-Maadeed, Mariam [Centre for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)

    2014-10-15

    The demand for developing oil detectors is ever increasing since the cleanup and recovery from oil spill usually take long time. Here we propose oil sensors made of polyaniline (PANI) filled poly(styrene–isoprene–styrene) (SIS) block copolymer composite films with good uniformity and dispersion. The changes in resistivity of the samples in presence of both oil and water media reveal the good sensing ability of SIS–PANI films towards oil in water (dual phase). The morphology and chemical composition of the developed products are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Swelling studies are performed to correlate the sensing response to the structural variations and based on it a mechanism is derived for the dual phase sensing. Contact angle measurements confirm the behavior further. The thermal properties and crystallinity of the composites are also addressed by the thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetric studies. The developed oil sensor material is able to withstand extreme temperature condition as well. - Highlights: • We model a dual phase sensor capable of detecting oil in water. • A mechanism is proposed to correlate sensing with diffusion. • In situ polymerization helps in the uniform distribution of filler. • Polymer composite sensor could be used as stickers on oil pipelines.

  15. Source identification of uranium-containing materials at mine legacy sites in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, A C; Martin, P G; Hallam, K R; Payton, O D; Awbery, R; Carvalho, F P; Oliveira, J M; Silva, L; Malta, M; Scott, T B

    2018-03-01

    Whilst prior nuclear forensic studies have focused on identifying signatures to distinguish between different uranium deposit types, this paper focuses on providing a scientific basis for source identification of materials from different uranium mine sites within a single region, which can then be potentially used within nuclear forensics. A number of different tools, including gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry, mineralogy and major and minor elemental analysis, have been utilised to determine the provenance of uranium mineral samples collected at eight mine sites, located within three different uranium provinces, in Portugal. A radiation survey was initially conducted by foot and/or unmanned aerial vehicle at each site to assist sample collection. The results from each mine site were then compared to determine if individual mine sites could be distinguished based on characteristic elemental and isotopic signatures. Gamma and alpha spectrometry were used to differentiate between samples from different sites and also give an indication of past milling and mining activities. Ore samples from the different mine sites were found to be very similar in terms of gangue and uranium mineralogy. However, rarer minerals or specific impurity elements, such as calcium and copper, did permit some separation of the sites examined. In addition, classification rates using linear discriminant analysis were comparable to those in the literature. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Recovery of uranium and lining material from magnesium fluoride slag at UMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.K.; Singh, H.; Shadakshari, B.M.; Meghal, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    At Uranium Metal Plant, uranium metal is produced by reduction of UF 4 with magnesium metal, in a closed reactor lined with refractory MgF 2 lining material. During this reduction, more MgF 2 is produced as the slag. This slag generally contains 2-4% uranium and hence is processed to recover these values and part of the slag, free from uranium is reused for lining the reactor. This paper describes the process parameters finalised for crushing and grinding of the slag and for leaching uranium with nitric acid. The leach liquor contains appreciable amount of fluoride and hence is processed through a separate solvent extraction cycle with tributyl phosphate. The resultant purified uranyl nitrate solution is mixed with the main stream crude solution for final purification. The conditions optimised for the solvent extraction step, the problems faced during the regular operation over the last few years and the experience gained are described. An outline of the scheme to treat larger quantities of the slag on a regular basis is presented. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. The effects of irradiance and exposure time on the surface roughness of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad I.

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the surface roughness of 4 different bulk-fill resin-based composites cured using different irradiance levels. Methods: This in vitro study was performed in February 2017 to August 2017 at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University. Twenty-four specimens were prepared from each of the bulk-fill materials [Tetric N-Ceram (TNC), SonicFill (SF), Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), and Filtek Bulk-Fill (FB)] using a brass metal mold, resulting in a total of 96 specimens, cured using a Bluephase N light curing unit. Half of the total number of specimens (N=48) were cured using high-power irradiance (1200 mW/cm2) for 20 seconds, while the remaining half (N=48) were cured using low power irradiance (650 mW/cm2) for 40 seconds. After 24 hours, baseline surface roughness of each specimen was analyzed using a profilometer, then polished using Sof-lex abrasive disks, and the surface roughness of all groups was assessed. Results: Post-polished SonicFill cured at high irradiance had the highest mean surface roughness (0.23±0.03), whereas pre-polished Smart Dentin Replacement (0.11±0.01) and SonicFill (0.11±0.02) cured at low irradiance had the lowest mean surface roughness. Conclusion: High curing irradiance (1,200 mW/cm2) had no positive influence on the surface roughness of Filtek Bulk Fill and Tetric N-Ceram bulk-fill RBCs compared with lower curing irradiance (650 mW/cm2). However, the difference of curing irradiance significantly affected the surface roughness in SDR and sonic fill RBCs. PMID:29436570

  18. Influence of dental filling material type on the concentration of interleukin 9 in the samples of gingival crevicular fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Several cytokines and lymphokines (IL1β, ENA78, IL6, TNFα, IL8 and S100A8 are expressed during dental pulp inflammation. Analysis of gingival crevicu-lar fluid (GCF offers a non-invasive means of studying gen-eral host response in oral cavity. Although GCF levels of various mediators could reflect the state of inflammation both in dental pulp and gingiva adjacent to a tooth, GCF samples of those without significant gingivitis could be inter-preted as reflection of pulpal process. The aim of this study was to investigate IL9 GCF values in patients with dental car-ies and to assess possible influence of various dental fillings materials on local IL9 production. Methods. The study group included 90 patients, aged 18–70, with inclusion and exclusion criteria in the prospective clinical study. Of the 6 types of material used for the restoration of prepared cavities, 3 were intended for temporary and 3 for definitive restora-tion. According to dental fillings weight, all the participants were divided into 3 groups: those with fillings lighter than 0.50 g, those with 0.50–1.00 g, and those with fillings heavier than 1.00 g. Samples were taken from gingival sulcus using the filter paper technique. Clinical parameters were deter-mined by bleeding index, plaque index (Silness-Lou, 0–3, gingival index (0–3, and gingival sulcus depth. Cytokine con-centrations were assessed using commercially available cy-tomix. Results. According to the weight of dental fillings, there was a clear decreament trend of IL9 values meaning that dental defects greater than 1.00 g of dental filling were associated with lower GCF IL9 concentration. The IL9 val-ues correlated with the degree of gingival index and depth of gingival sulcus, being higher with more advanced gingivitis and more pronounced anatomical changes in the tooth edge. Different filling materials exerted various local IL9 responses. Zink polycarbonate cement and amalgam fillings induced

  19. About Dental Amalgam Fillings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam About Dental Amalgam Fillings Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... should I have my fillings removed? What is dental amalgam? Dental amalgam is a dental filling material ...

  20. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base; Contribution a l'etude des materiaux combustibles nucleaires a base d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englander, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-11-15

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the {gamma} phase. (author) [French] Dans un reacteur de puissance destine a fournir de l'energie thermique industriellement recuperable, la source de chaleur la plus economique reste constituee par de l'uranium metallique naturel. Or, le materiau combustible nucleaire, employe le plus souvent sous forme de barreaux de 20 a 40 mm de diametre, se trouve soumis a un ensemble de contraintes qui provoque des deformations irreversibles, le plus souvent incompatibles avec l'infrastructure du reacteur. Par consequent, le materiau combustible doit presenter a l'origine un certain nombre de qualites qu'il est necessaire de determiner. Aussi a-t-on d'abord etudie les caracteres technologiques propres a chacune des trois phases allotropiques de l'uranium-metal pur et leurs interactions sur la stabilisation du materiau constitue soit par de l'uranium coule, soit par de l'uranium traite en pile en phase {gamma}. (auteur)

  1. Diffusion and Leaching Behavior of Radionuclides in Category 3 Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material – Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Powers, Laura; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-08-31

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed, and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The retardation factors for radionuclides contained in the waste packages can be determined from measurements of diffusion coefficients for these contaminants through concrete and fill material. Some of the mobilization scenarios include (1) potential leaching of waste form before permanent closure cover is installed; (2) after the cover installation, long-term diffusion of radionuclides from concrete waste form into surrounding fill material; (3) diffusion of radionuclides from contaminated soils into adjoining concrete encasement and clean fill material. Additionally, the rate of

  2. Application of uranium impurity data for material characterization in nuclear safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penkin, M.V.; Boulyga, S.F.; Fischer, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Samples of materials involved in the conversion of uranium into nuclear-grade products are collected to support the verification of States' declarations and to look for indications of possible undeclared materials and activities. Samples are analysed by several laboratories to determine concentrations of about sixty impurities; the data consistency is addressed through the unified reporting requirements, the use of common reference materials, and via inter-laboratory comparisons. The impurity analysis results, along with other essential parameters, are interpreted to judge sample conformity to the relevant specifications, to evaluate the facility design information, to assess material provenance and intended use. (author)

  3. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  4. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the Ventron site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, C.; Yu, C.; Jones, L.

    1992-03-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the Ventron site in Beverly, Massachusetts. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The derivations for the single radionuclides and the total uranium guidelines were based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Ventron site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  5. Inorganic-Organic hybrid materials for uranium extraction from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Mourabit, Sabah

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate rocks are industrially processed in large quantities to produce phosphoric acid and fertilisers. These rocks contain significant concentration of uranium (50 to 300 ppm) which could be interesting for nuclear industry. This work deals with the valorisation of uranium as a by-product from fertiliser industry. The aim of this study is to develop a hybrid material, constituted of an inorganic solid support grafted with an extractant (complexing molecule), which can extract selectively uranium from phosphoric acid medium. The first step of our approach was to identify an inorganic support which is stable under these particular conditions (strong acidity and complexing medium). The chemical and mechanical stability of different meso-porous materials, such as silica, glass and carbon was studied. In a second phase, we focused on the identification and the optimisation of complexing molecules, specific of uranium in phosphoric acid. These ligands were then grafted on the most stable solids. Finally, the efficiency of these hybrid systems was evaluated through different tests of extraction, selectivity and de-extraction. (author) [fr

  6. Quantitative assessment of image artifacts from root filling materials on CBCT scans made using several exposure parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Katharina Alves; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; De Oliveira Pinto, Martina Gerlane; De Melo, Daniela Pita [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis, State University of Paraiba, Campina Grande (Brazil); Melo, Saulo Leonardo Sousa [Dept. of Oral Pathology, Radiology and Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City (United States); Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; De Andrade Freitas Oliveira, Luciana Soares [Federal University of Bahia, Salvador (Brazil)

    2017-09-15

    To quantify artifacts from different root filling materials in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images acquired using different exposure parameters. Fifteen single-rooted teeth were scanned using 8 different exposure protocols with 3 different filling materials and once without filling material as a control group. Artifact quantification was performed by a trained observer who made measurements in the central axial slice of all acquired images in a fixed region of interest using ImageJ. Hyperdense artifacts, hypodense artifacts, and the remaining tooth area were identified, and the percentages of hyperdense and hypodense artifacts, remaining tooth area, and tooth area affected by the artifacts were calculated. Artifacts were analyzed qualitatively by 2 observers using the following scores: absence (0), moderate presence (1), and high presence (2) for hypodense halos, hypodense lines, and hyperdense lines. Two-way ANOVA and the post-hoc Tukey test were used for quantitative and qualitative artifact analysis. The Dunnet test was also used for qualitative analysis. The significance level was set at P<.05. There were no significant interactions among the exposure parameters in the quantitative or qualitative analysis. Significant differences were observed among the studied filling materials in all quantitative analyses. In the qualitative analyses, all materials differed from the control group in terms of hypodense and hyperdense lines (P<.05). Fiberglass posts did not differ statistically from the control group in terms of hypodense halos (P>.05). Different exposure parameters did not affect the objective or subjective observations of artifacts in CBCT images; however, the filling materials used in endodontic restorations did affect both types of assessments.

  7. Studies on fission tracks and distributions of uranium and rare earths in granite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1987-01-01

    Many materials contain fossil records of the slow spontaneous fission of uranium they contain as an impurity. Fission fragments, heavy charged particles released in each fission event, produce microscopic trails of radiation damage that may persist over geological times and may be developed to a size observable under an optical microscope by a suitable etching treatment. Such tracks are also produced by fissions induced by thermal neutron irradiation of the uranium. When the material is heated sufficiently, it anneals and the the microscopic trails become shorter and narrower. The track density decreases, because the chemical etchant will not reach some of the shortened tracks. Measurements of track densities before and after annealing can be used, along with laboratory studies of annealing rates, to determine the annealing temperature. Also, the track density of induced fissions is related to the concentration of uranium and the fluence of neutrons to which it was exposed. If the track density due to induced fissions can be distinguished from that due to fossil tracks, estimates of either the concentration or the fluence can be made if the other is known. Two such materials (one a fragment of a granite paving stone, the other a piece of stained glass from a cathedral window) that had been exposed to the atomic bomb at Nagasaki were used in the present work. The fossil record in zircons in the granite was used to estimate the temperature to which it had been exposed in the bombing. Induced fissions were used to estimate the concentration of uranium in the zircons. Nonuniform heating and cooling and nearly uniform exposure to the neutrons make the granite sample unsuitable for determining the neutron fluence from the bomb. Induced fissions in the stained glass were used to estimate the concentration of uranium and the thermal neutron fluence from the A-bomb. Annealing of tracks in glass was also studied

  8. Experimental investigation of different fill materials in arch bridges with particular focus on Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2016-01-01

    Pearl-Chain Bridge technology is a recently developed prefabricated arch solution for road and railway bridges allowing faster, more environmentally friendly, and cheaper bridge construction. This study compared the strength and durability properties of three different types of fill material...

  9. Quantitative assessment of image artifacts from root filling materials on CBCT scans made using several exposure parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Katharina Alves; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; De Oliveira Pinto, Martina Gerlane; De Melo, Daniela Pita; Melo, Saulo Leonardo Sousa; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; De Andrade Freitas Oliveira, Luciana Soares

    2017-01-01

    To quantify artifacts from different root filling materials in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images acquired using different exposure parameters. Fifteen single-rooted teeth were scanned using 8 different exposure protocols with 3 different filling materials and once without filling material as a control group. Artifact quantification was performed by a trained observer who made measurements in the central axial slice of all acquired images in a fixed region of interest using ImageJ. Hyperdense artifacts, hypodense artifacts, and the remaining tooth area were identified, and the percentages of hyperdense and hypodense artifacts, remaining tooth area, and tooth area affected by the artifacts were calculated. Artifacts were analyzed qualitatively by 2 observers using the following scores: absence (0), moderate presence (1), and high presence (2) for hypodense halos, hypodense lines, and hyperdense lines. Two-way ANOVA and the post-hoc Tukey test were used for quantitative and qualitative artifact analysis. The Dunnet test was also used for qualitative analysis. The significance level was set at P .05). Different exposure parameters did not affect the objective or subjective observations of artifacts in CBCT images; however, the filling materials used in endodontic restorations did affect both types of assessments

  10. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovaskainen, R

    1999-11-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International

  11. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovaskainen, R.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, 234 U and 236 U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n( 234 U)/n( 238 U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) and n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from uranium milling and mining

  12. Feasibility of soil-EFB mixtures as a filled barrier material for waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamarudin Samuding; Ismail Abustan; Mohd Tadza Abdul Rahman; Mohamed Hasnain Isa

    2010-01-01

    This paper present the results of laboratory experiment that is involved the characterization and removal efficiency test of soil-EFB (Empty Fruit Bunch) of oil palm mixture. In this study, soil samples were mixed with EFB at 10 % (EFB10), 30 % (EFB30), and 50 % (EFB50). The characterization included the physical and chemical properties of the soil-EFB mixture such as compaction behaviour, cation exchange capacity, permeability and its surface physical morphology. Batch Equilibrium Test was performed in order to determine the adsorption capability of the soil-EFB mixture with the heavy metals solution. Five solutions with different concentrations (2.5 mg/l, 5.0 mg/l, 7.5 mg/l, 10.0 mg/l and 12.5 mg/l) were used in this experiment. Base on the compaction test, the value of optimum water content was influence by the EFB introduced into the soil. This is due to the presence of hydroxyl group, which was probably attributed to absorb water. The permeability of the soil-EFB mixtures ranges from 2.4 x 10 -7 to 6.5 x 10 -7 cm/s meanwhile the Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) result ranges from 11.6 to 31.9 meq/ 100 g. The study has revealed that different percentages of soil-EFB mixture possess different capabilities to remove heavy metals. From the removal efficiency test, it is shown that the removal percentages of heavy metals for soil-EFB mixtures were relatively high as compared to soil alone. Based on the characterization and removal data, the soil-EFB mixture has a good potential to be used as filled barrier material. (author)

  13. International symposium on uranium production and raw materials for the nuclear fuel cycle - Supply and demand, economics, the environment and energy security. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The IAEA periodically organizes nical meetings and international symposia on all areas of the uranium production cycle. This publication contains 160 extended synopses related to the 2005 international symposium on 'Uranium Production and Raw Materials for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle - Supply and Demand, Economics, the Environment and Energy Security'. They cover all areas of natural uranium resources and production cycle including uranium supply and demand; uranium geology and deposit; uranium exploration; uranium mining and milling; waste management; and environment and regulation. Each synopsis was indexed individually.

  14. Filling material for a buried cavity in a collapse area using light-weighted foam and active feldspar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jin Woo; Lee, Ju-hyoung; Kim, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Kyeong

    2017-04-01

    Concrete which is generally used as filling material for a buried cavity has very high strength but significantly high self-load is considered its disadvantage. If it is used as filling material, the second collapse due to additional load, causing irreversible damage. If light-weighted foam and active feldspar are used to solve this problem, the second collapse can be prevented by reducing of self-load of filling material. In this study, the specimen was produced by mixing light-weighted foam, active feldspar and cement, and changes in the density, unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity were analyzed. Using the light-weighted foam could enable the adjustment of density of specimen between 0.5 g/cm3 and 1.7 g/cm3, and if the mixing ratio of the light-weighted foam increases, the specimen has more pores and smaller range of cross-sectional area. It is confirmed that it has direct correlation with the density, and if the specimen has more pores, the density of the specimen is lowered. The density of the specimen influences the unconfined compressive strength and the hydraulic conductivity, and it was also confirmed that the unconfined compressive strength could be adjusted between 0.6 MPa and 8 MPa and the hydraulic conductivity could be adjusted between 10-9cm/sec and 10-3cm/sec. These results indicated that we can adjust unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity of filling materials by changing the mixing amount of lightweight-weighted foam according to the requirements of the field condition. Keywords: filling material, buried cavity, light-weighted foam, feldspar Acknowledgement This research was supported by a Grant from a Strategic Research Project (Horizontal Drilling and Stabilization Technologies for Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) Operation) funded by the Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology.

  15. Elaboration of protocol for characterization of clay as a filling material and coverage for surface repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daisy Mary Marchezini dos

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear energy in its various applications generates wastes that must be properly treated. The Radioactive Waste Management covers operations since generation of the waste until to its storage in repository ensuring the protection of man and of environment of the possible negative impacts. The radioactive waste are segregated, treated, conditioned in suitable packaging and posteriorly are stored or disposal in repository. The “RBMN Project” is a priority project of CNEN to implementation the repository for the deposition of low and intermediate level radioactive waste generated by nuclear energy activities in Brazil, proposing a definitive solution for its storage. Engineered and natural barriers as the filling layer and coverage layer will compose the disposal system of a near surface repository, concept proposed by the “RBMN Project”. The use these barriers views to avoid or restrict the release of radionuclides present in waste for the humans beings and environment. The waterproofing barriers are composed of clays. Certainly, for the national repository, will be used those clays existing in the place where it will be implanted it. So some fundamentals tests will have to be carried for to verify the suitability of these clays as barriers. These tests were determined and realized with a reference clay, a brazilian bentonite constituted of 67.2% montmorillonite. The results were compared with national and international literature of materials with similar mineralogical features. The values found with 95% reliance were 9.73±0,35 μm for granulometric size. For the moisture content were 13,3±0,6% and for capacity of cationic exchange were , 816±9 mmol.kg"-"1. For the hydraulic conductivity, without the use of internal pressure, it was obtained maximum value of 59.0% saturated. In addition, during the observed period, there was no percolation in the test specimen submitted to internal pressure of 200 kPa. This result leads to the conclusion that the

  16. Comparative evaluation of liner materials for inactive uranium-mill-tailings piles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Barnes, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    Under the funding of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed the initial accelerated testing phase of eight candidate liner materials. The tests were designed to comparatively evaluate the long term effectiveness of liner materials as a radionuclide and hazardous chemical leachate barrier. The eight materials tested were selected from a technical review of published literature and industrial specialists. Conditions were then identified that would accelerate the aging processes expected in a uranium tailings environment for 1000 years. High calcium leachates were forced through thin layers of clay liners to accelerate the ion exchange rate of sodium and calcium. Asphalt and synthetic materials were accelerated by exposure to elevate temperatures, high concentrations of oxygen, and increased strengths of aqueous oxidizing agents. By comparing the changes of permeability with time of exposure, the most acceptable materials were then identified. These materials are a catalytically airblown asphalt membrane and natural soil amended with sodium bentonite. Both materials showed an increased resistance to leachate penetration throughout the exposure period with final permeabilities less than 10 -7 cm/s. In addition, the asphalt membrane and sodium bentonite are among the least expensive materials to install at a disposal site. Therefore based on their economic and technical merits, these two materials are being evaluated further in field tests at Grand Junction, Colorado

  17. Proportioning equipment for vibration filling and compacting of grain materials in pipe containers, especially of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkas, V.; Filip, Z.; Beranek, J.

    1981-01-01

    The equipment consists of a base plate to which are attached the fastening collar fo the pipe container and the guide column with the height-adjustable support. The filling pipe is fixed to the support. The proportioning equipment prevents particles of grain material from segregation, thus allowing to achieve homogeneity of the material in the whole volume to be compacted. It also allows determining the height of the column of material in the pipe container without destructive effects on the stacked material. The equipment is designed for the manufacture of shortened fuel elements. (J.B.)

  18. 230Th-234U Model-Ages of Some Uranium Standard Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.W.; Gaffney, A.M.; Kristo, M.J.; Hutcheon, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    The 'age' of a sample of uranium is an important aspect of a nuclear forensic investigation and of the attribution of the material to its source. To the extent that the sample obeys the standard rules of radiochronometry, then the production ages of even very recent material can be determined using the 230 Th- 234 U chronometer. These standard rules may be summarized as (a) the daughter/parent ratio at time=zero must be known, and (b) there has been no daughter/parent fractionation since production. For most samples of uranium, the 'ages' determined using this chronometer are semantically 'model-ages' because (a) some assumption of the initial 230 Th content in the sample is required and (b) closed-system behavior is assumed. The uranium standard reference materials originally prepared and distributed by the former US National Bureau of Standards and now distributed by New Brunswick Laboratory as certified reference materials (NBS SRM = NBL CRM) are good candidates for samples where both rules are met. The U isotopic standards have known purification and production dates, and closed-system behavior in the solid form (U 3 O 8 ) may be assumed with confidence. We present here 230 Th- 234 U model-ages for several of these standards, determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a multicollector ICP-MS, and compare these ages with their known production history

  19. 230Th-234U Model-Ages of Some Uranium Standard Reference Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R W; Gaffney, A M; Kristo, M J; Hutcheon, I D

    2009-05-28

    The 'age' of a sample of uranium is an important aspect of a nuclear forensic investigation and of the attribution of the material to its source. To the extent that the sample obeys the standard rules of radiochronometry, then the production ages of even very recent material can be determined using the {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U chronometer. These standard rules may be summarized as (a) the daughter/parent ratio at time=zero must be known, and (b) there has been no daughter/parent fractionation since production. For most samples of uranium, the 'ages' determined using this chronometer are semantically 'model-ages' because (a) some assumption of the initial {sup 230}Th content in the sample is required and (b) closed-system behavior is assumed. The uranium standard reference materials originally prepared and distributed by the former US National Bureau of Standards and now distributed by New Brunswick Laboratory as certified reference materials (NBS SRM = NBL CRM) are good candidates for samples where both rules are met. The U isotopic standards have known purification and production dates, and closed-system behavior in the solid form (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) may be assumed with confidence. We present here {sup 230}Th-{sup 234}U model-ages for several of these standards, determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry using a multicollector ICP-MS, and compare these ages with their known production history.

  20. Bio leaching of Uranium - bearing material from Abu Thor area, West Central Sinai, Egypt for recovering uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Wahab, G.M.; Amin, M.M.; Aita, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    A uranium-bearing material was recorded within the Intra-Carboniferous Paleokarst Profile of Um-Bogma Formation at Abu Thor area, West Central Sinai, Egypt. The present paper is concerned with the bio leaching of U and Cu using Aspergillus Niger (A. Niger) followed their proper recovery. The working Abu Thor representative sample assays 0.22% U as the element of interest as well as up to 25% CuO beside the other rock constituents SiO 2 (33%), Al 2 O 3 (10.4%) and CaO(8.5%). The effective bio leaching of U and Cu from Abu Thor ore sample using A.Niger was performed at the following optimum conditions: an incubation time of 6 days, sample/ liquid (S/L) ratio of 1/10, ph value of 1 and a temperature of 60 degree C. The prepared bio leach liquor assays 0.19 g/l of U and 15.8 g/l of Cu with leaching efficiencies of 97% and 79%, respectively. Uranium was recovered using 25% TBP in kerosene at O/A ratio of 1/1 and contact time of 5 min with achieved extraction efficiency of 96%. However the stripping of U was conducted by using 8% Na 2 CO 3 at A/O ratio of 1/1 and contact time of 5 min with stripping efficiency reached 99%. On the other hand, Cu was directly precipitated as CuS using the freshly released H 2 S gas with the addition of solid Na 2 S. The optimum precipitation conditions were S/L ratio of 1/100, ph 1.5 and room temperature where the precipitation efficiency of Cu achieved 99%

  1. Method of converting uranium fluoride to intermediate product for uranium oxide manufacture with recycling or reusing valuable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baran, V.; Moltasova, J.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium fluoride is acted upon by water with nitrate containing a cation capable of binding fluoride ions. The uranium is extracted, for instance, with tributyl phosphate with the generated organic phase containing the prevalent proportion of uranium and representing the required intermediate product and the aqueous phase from which is isolated the fluorine component which may be used within the fuel cycle. The nitrate component of the aqueous phase is recycled following treatment. It is also possible to act on uranium fluoride directly with an aqueous solution. Here the cations of nitrate form with the fluorides soluble nondissociated complexes and reduce the concentration of free fluoride ions. The nitrate +s mostly used in an amount corresponding to its solubility in the system prior to the introduction of UF 6 . The uranium from the solution with the reduced concentration of free fluoride ions is extracted into the reaction system under such conditions as to make the prevalent majority of fluorides and an amount of uranium smaller than 5x10 -2 mol/l remain in the aqueous phase and that such an amount of fluorides should remain in the organic phase which is smaller than corresponds to the fluorine/uranium molar ratio in the organic phase. Uranium contained in the organic phase is processed into uranium oxide, with advantage into UO 2 . From the isolated compounds of fluorine and the cation of the nitrate gaseous HF is released which is used either inside or outside of the fuel cycle. (J.P.)

  2. Dating of Uranium Materials by Using Combination of ICP-MS and SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebelkov, Y.; Aleshin, M.; Elantyev, I.; Grachev, A.; Zhizhin, K.; Stebelkov, V.

    2015-01-01

    The age of nuclear and some other radioactive materials can be determined undoubtedly by using ICP-MS techniques. But it can be correct if only one nuclear or another radioactive material is presented in analyzed sample and no isotope-chronograph presented in background particles in significant quantities. For particle analysis, which can be implemented by using SIMS, these restrictions are not valid. Practically one particle always characterizes only one material and does not contain background isotopes-chronographs. But age determination is based on the result of measuring of the content ratio of Th230 and U234. The difference of ionization coefficients of uranium and thorium and dependence of these coefficients on composition of particle does not allow using this method directly for age determination. Nevertheless SIMS is useful for dating of uranium materials, especially if the sample can contain small amounts of different materials. In this case the analysis of different fragments of materials by SIMS can confirm or not confirm the result, had been obtained by ICP-MS. If all detected and analyzed particles and fragments will have the same ratio of ion currents of Th230 and U234, the result of ICP-MS is true. If particles and fragments will have different ratios the result of ICP-MS cannot be related to any of presented materials. But in the last case the ages of different materials can be still estimated if different fragments have different ages, but the same elemental composition. The ''age'' had been determined by ICP-MS can be correlated with the average ratio of ion currents of Th230 and U234 had been determined by SIMS for all analyzed particles or fragments. This correlation determines the ratio of ionization coefficients of uranium and thorium, which should be the same for particles with the same elemental composition. (author)

  3. Radiological Modeling for Determination of Derived Concentration Levels of an Area with Uranium Residual Material - 13533

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Sanchez, Danyl [CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 40, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    As a result of a pilot project developed at the old Spanish 'Junta de Energia Nuclear' to extract uranium from ores, tailings materials were generated. Most of these residual materials were sent back to different uranium mines, but a small amount of it was mixed with conventional building materials and deposited near the old plant until the surrounding ground was flattened. The affected land is included in an area under institutional control and used as recreational area. At the time of processing, uranium isotopes were separated but other radionuclides of the uranium decay series as Th-230, Ra-226 and daughters remain in the residue. Recently, the analyses of samples taken at different ground's depths confirmed their presence. This paper presents the methodology used to calculate the derived concentration level to ensure that the reference dose level of 0.1 mSv y-1 used as radiological criteria. In this study, a radiological impact assessment was performed modeling the area as recreational scenario. The modelization study was carried out with the code RESRAD considering as exposure pathways, external irradiation, inadvertent ingestion of soil, inhalation of resuspended particles, and inhalation of radon (Rn-222). As result was concluded that, if the concentration of Ra-226 in the first 15 cm of soil is lower than, 0.34 Bq g{sup -1}, the dose would not exceed the reference dose. Applying this value as a derived concentration level and comparing with the results of measurements on the ground, some areas with a concentration of activity slightly higher than latter were found. In these zones the remediation proposal has been to cover with a layer of 15 cm of clean material. This action represents a reduction of 85% of the dose and ensures compliance with the reference dose. (authors)

  4. Uranium pollution in an estuary affected by pyrite acid mine drainage and releases of naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, M.; Manjon, G.; Hurtado, S.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Huelva estuary is affected by former phosphogypsum releases and pyrite acid mine drainage. → Time evolution of uranium concentration is analyzed after halting of NORM releases. → Two new contamination sources are preventing the complete uranium cleaning: (1) The leaching of phosphogypsum stacks located close to Tinto River. (2) Pyrite acid mine drainage. → High uranium concentrations are dissolved in water and precipitate subsequently. - Abstract: After the termination of phosphogypsum discharges to the Huelva estuary (SW Spain), a unique opportunity was presented to study the response of a contaminated environmental compartment after the cessation of its main source of pollution. The evolution over time of uranium concentrations in the estuary is presented to supply new insights into the decontamination of a scenario affected by Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) discharges. The cleaning of uranium isotopes from the area has not taken place as rapidly as expected due to leaching from phosphogypsum stacks. An in-depth study using various techniques of analysis, including 234 U/ 238 U and 230 Th/ 232 Th ratios and the decreasing rates of the uranium concentration, enabled a second source of uranium contamination to be discovered. Increased uranium levels due to acid mine drainage from pyrite mines located in the Iberian Pyrite Belt (SW Spain) prevent complete uranium decontamination and, therefore, result in levels nearly twice those of natural background levels.

  5. Feasibility study on consolidation of Fernald Environmental Management Project depleted uranium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    In 1991, the DOE made a decision to close the FMPC located in Fernald, Ohio, and end its production mission. The site was renamed FEMP to reflect Fernald's mission change from uranium production to environmental restoration. As a result of this change, the inventory of strategic uranium materials maintained at Fernald by DOE DP will need to be relocated to other DOE sites. Although considered a liability to the Fernald Plant due to its current D and D mission, the FEMP DU represents a potentially valuable DOE resource. Recognizing its value, it may be important for the DOE to consolidate the material at one site and place it in a safe long-term storage condition until a future DOE programmatic requirement materializes. In August 1995, the DOE Office of Nuclear Weapons Management requested, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) to assess the feasibility of consolidating the FEMP DU materials at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). This feasibility study examines various phases associated with the consolidation of the FEMP DU at the ORR. If useful short-term applications for the DU fail to materialize, then long-term storage (up to 50 years) would need to be provided. Phases examined in this report include DU material value; potential uses; sampling; packaging and transportation; material control and accountability; environmental, health and safety issues; storage; project management; noneconomic factors; schedule; and cost

  6. Technological studies on uranium refining at nuclear materials authority, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, H.S.

    1997-01-01

    In 1992 nuclear materials authority (NMA) took a decision to establish yellow cake refining. Unit so as to study refining of El-Atshan yellow cake which recently produced by ion-exchange pilot plant, production sector. The research studies followed the conventional refining rout to produce nuclear grade UO 3 . This implies investigations on some common solvents to refine the cake viz. tri alkyl phosphates, tri alkyl phosphine oxides, dialkyl phosphoric acid as well as high-molecular weight long-chain tertiary amines. Moreover, non-conventional refining process has also been presented depending on the selectivity of uranyl ion to be dissolved by carbonate and to be precipitated by hydrogen peroxide. Most of the proposed processes were found feasible to refine El-Atshan yellow cake. however, the non- conventional refining process appears to be the most promising, owing to its superior performance and economy

  7. Effect of the insulation materials filling on the thermal performance of sintered hollow bricks under the air-conditioning intermittent operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoping Hou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Wall insulation performance is an important factor affecting building energy consumption and indoor comfortable level. This study proposes that the insulation materials are filled into the cavities of the sintered hollow brick to replace the single insulation layer. The physical models of typical walls were built by the hollow bricks filled with expanding polystyrene board (EPS in cavities and wall thermal performance is numerically analyzed by the Finite Volume Method under air-conditioning intermittent operation, which conforms to the actual operation rules of air-conditioning. Results show that filling EPS in cavities is beneficial to improve the thermal performance of the bricks, and the larger the EPS filling ratio, the higher the thermal performance improvement. The EPS filling ratio increase has the higher sensitivity on inner surface heat flow under the low EPS filling ratio, and filling EPS in the external cavities is optimum with the decrement rate 5.92% higher than filling EPS in internal cavities for the EPS filling ratio of 20%, while filling EPS in internal and external cavities simultaneously is optimum with decrement rate 2.45%–6.87% higher than that with filling EPS in the internal cavities for the EPS filling ratio of 40%–80%. Keywords: Insulation filling ratio, Insulation filling location, Thermal performance, Sintered hollow bricks

  8. Uranium ores of Kazakhstan as the most technologic source of a fissionable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berikbolov, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    Kazakhstan as is known has unique deposits of uranium. Its resources composed a third part of the world resources. The most important part of resources having a practical value, is related with depression in southern regions of the Republic. By now more than 15 deposits are discovered and partially explored. These deposits from three uranium provinces - Shu-Sarysu, Syr-Darya and Ili. The ores occur in friable water-bearing sandy horizons of Cretaceous and Paleogene age between waterproof agrillaceous sediments at depth from 100 up to 600 m. Ore bodies thickness changes from 5 to 10 m at uranian average-grade 0.03-0.1 %. Width of band shaped ore bodies changes from tens meters to the one kilometers and extent changes from one kilometer up to many tens kilometers. The important feature of deposits is their suitability for development by progressive in situ leaching (ISL) method. It was demonstrated, that uranium ores are comprehensive and, that is important, a lot of commercially important elements, containing in ores, gives in to extraction at development by the ISL method. The preliminary calculation of expenditures for the extraction of useful byproducts from ordinary sulphate solution have demonstrated rather high profitableness for rhenium, scandium, selenium, rare earth even at the very low contents in solution. It was pointed out, that whole technological chain applied now at industrial scale is oriented to mono-metallic uranium ores, therefore present technology of leaching and recovery of industrial solution does not allow ti extract all valuable components containing in ores. The development of new improved technological chain. beginning with a composition of leaching out reagent and up to applying of miscellaneous sorbing materials, can create new mineral-raw base of rare and dissipated elements and to lower considerably the price of uranium mining from sandstone deposits

  9. Vapor corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel materials in storage environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, P.; Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of vapor environments on the corrosion of aluminum spent nuclear fuel (A1 SNF) has been performed. Aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium fuel alloys have been exposed to environments of air/water vapor/ionizing radiation and characterized for applications to degradation mode analysis for interim dry and repository storage systems. Models have been developed to allow predictions of the corrosion response under conditions of unlimited corrodant species. Threshold levels of water vapor under which corrosion does not occur have been identified through tests under conditions of limited corrodant species. Coupons of aluminum 1100, 5052, and 6061, the US equivalent of cladding alloys used to manufacture foreign research reactor fuels, and several aluminum-uranium alloys (aluminum-10, 18, and 33 wt% uranium) were exposed to various controlled vapor environments in air within the following ranges of conditions: Temperature -- 80 to 200 C; Relative Humidity -- 0 to 100% using atmospheric condensate water and using added nitric acid to simulate radiolysis effects; and Gamma Radiation -- none and 1.8 x 10 6 R/hr. The results of this work are part of the body of information needed for understanding the degradation of the A1 SNF waste form in a direct disposal system in the federal repository. It will provide the basis for data input to the ongoing performance assessment and criticality safety analyses. Additional testing of uranium-aluminum fuel materials at uranium contents typical of high enriched and low enriched fuels is being initiated to provide the data needed for the development of empirical models

  10. Sealing ability of a new polydimethylsiloxane-based root canal filling material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özok, A.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the sealing ability of GuttaFlow, RoekoSeal, and AH26 in root canals. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were filled with AH26 (lateral compaction), RoekoSeal, or GuttaFlow (modified single-cone). The sealing ability of the root canal

  11. Sealing ability of a new polydimethylsiloxane-based root canal filling material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozok, Ahmet R.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; Wu, Min-Kai; Wesselink, Paul R.

    We tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in the sealing ability of GuttaFlow, RoekoSeal, and AH26 in root canals. Sixty extracted mandibular premolars were filled with AH26 (lateral compaction), RoekoSeal, or GuttaFlow (modified single-cone). The sealing ability of the root canal

  12. Geochemical study of the insoluble organic material (kerogen) in the Oklo uranium ore and the associated Francevillian schists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, M.; Rouzaud, J.N.; Oberlin, A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the organic material associated with uranium ore and ore transformations undergone by it, in terms of the following problems: (1) In the natural reactor zones, evolution of the organic material in the core and as a function of the distance away from it; (2) Comparison of organic materials from a rich and a poor ore; (3) Intercomparison of organic materials in the dispersed and concentrated state; (4) Comparison of organic materials in the uranium ore zones and in the adjacent non-mineralized Francevillian. The organic material from the reactor core could not be isolated by the normal techniques of treatment with acid. It is found in other cases that the organic material is oxidized in the uranium-bearing sediments and that the nearer to the reaction zone, the greater the oxidation, irrespective of the state of dispersion of the organic material in the rock. The uranium content does not affect this phenomenon, which is attributed to the action of the water raised to a high temperature in the vicinity of the reaction zones. On the basis of the present distribution of organic material and uranium the authors suggest a pattern for the formation of the deposit that would take into account localization of the ore in the sandstones and the part played by organic material in the accumulation process. (author)

  13. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihajlovic, A.

    1965-11-01

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors

  14. Distribution of anthropogenic fill material within the Y-12 plant area, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, G.E. Jr.; Field, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    Widespread groundwater contamination in the vicinity of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has been documented through a variety of monitoring efforts since the late 1970s. Various contaminants, most notably volatile organic compounds (VOCs), have migrated through the subsurface and formed extensive contaminant plumes within the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone, the primary exit pathway for groundwater transport within the Bear Creek Valley. In 1991, an integrated, comprehensive effort (Upper East Fork Poplar Creek [UEFPC] Phase I monitoring network) was initiated in order to (1) identify contaminant source areas within the industrialized portions of the plant and (2) define contamination migration pathways existing between the source areas and the Knox Aquifer/Maynardville Limestone. Data obtained during previous studies have indicated that extensive zones of fill and buried utility trenches may serve as preferred migration pathways. In addition, portions of UEFPC were rerouted, with several of its tributaries being filled during the initial construction of the plant. These filled surface drainage features are also believed to serve as preferred migration pathways. The identification of preferred contaminant migration pathways within the Y-12 Plant area is essential and required to refine the current Bear Creek Valley groundwater conceptual model and to assist in the selection of technically feasible and cost effective remedial strategies. This report presents the results of an initial investigation of the occurrence of manmade (anthropogenic) fill and its effect upon groundwater movement within the plant area. These interpretations are subject to revision and improvement as further investigation of the effects of the fill upon contaminant migration progresses

  15. Analysis of Material Removal and Surface Characteristics in Machining Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes Filled Alumina Composites by WEDM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annebushan Singh Meinam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The reinforcement of ceramic materials with electrically conductive particles increases the overall conductivity of the ceramic material. This allows the ceramic material to be more readily machined using wire electrical discharge machining process. The current work is an approach to identify the machinability of multi walled carbon nanotubes filled alumina composites in wire electrical discharge machining process. Alumina samples of 5 vol. % and 10 vol. % multi walled carbon nanotubes are machined and analysed for material removal rate and the surface characteristics. An increase in material removal rate is observed with increase in filler concentrations. At the same time, better surface roughness is observed. The surface characteristics of composite alumina are further compared with Monel 400 alloy. It has been observed that spalling action is the dominating material removal mechanism for alumina composites, while melting and evaporation is for the Monel 400 alloy.

  16. Fluorimetric determination of uranium in certain refractory minerals, environmental samples and industrial waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premadas, A.; Saravanakumar, G.

    2005-01-01

    A simple sample decomposition and laser fluorimetric determination of uranium at trace level is reported in certain refractory minerals, like ilmenite, rutile, zircon and monazite; environmental samples viz. soil and sediments; industrial waste materials, such as, coal fly ash and red mud. Ilmenite sample is decomposed by heating with ammonium fluoride. Rutile, zircon and monazite minerals are decomposed by fusion using a mixture of potassium bifluoride and sodium fluoride. Environmental and industrial waste materials are brought into solution by treating with a mixture of hydrofluoric and nitric acids. The laser induced fluorimetric determination of uranium is carried out directly in rutile, zircon and in monazite minerals and after separation in other samples. The determination limit was 1 μg x g -1 for ilmenite, soil, sediment, coal fly ash and red mud samples, and it is 5 μg x g -1 for rutile, zircon and monazite. The method is also developed for the optical fluorimetric determination of uranium (determination limit 10 μg x g -1 ) in ilmenite, rutile, zircon and monazite minerals. The methods are simple, accurate, and precise and they require small quantity of sample and can be applied for the routine analysis. (author)

  17. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Paulo Leal; Bernardineli, Norberti; Cavenago, Bruno Cavalini; Torres, Sérgio Aparecido; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Marciano, Marina Angélica

    2016-04-01

    Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc) using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (pCPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM.

  18. Evaluation of adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Wagner Clayton; Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Ortiz, Nilce; Fungaro, Denise Alves, E-mail: wcorrea@ipen.br, E-mail: snguilhen@ipen.br, E-mail: notriz@ipen.br, E-mail: dfungaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Uranium is present in the environment as a result of leaching from natural deposits and activities associated with nuclear fuel, copper mining, uranium mining, milling industry, etc. For the purpose of protecting ecosystem stability and public health, it is crucial to eliminate uranium from aqueous solutions before they are discharged into the environment. Various technologies have been used for removing U(VI) ions from aqueous systems. Among these methods, adsorption has been applied in wastewater because of simple operation procedure and high removal efficiency. Brazil is the largest producer of charcoal in the world, with nearly half of the woody biomass harvested for energy in Brazil being transformed into charcoal. Biochar exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent because of favorable physical/chemical surface characteristics. The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption potential of biochar materials prepared from pyrolysis of Bamboo (CBM), Eucalyptus (CEM) and Macauba (CMA) nuts for the removal of uranium from solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out by a batch technique. Equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed by shaking a known amount of biochar material with 100 mL of U(VI) solution in Erlenmeyer flasks in a shaker at 120 rpm and room temperature (25 deg C) for 24 h. The adsorbent was separated by centrifugation from the solution. The U(VI) concentration remaining in the supernatant solution was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH and bioadsorbent dose on adsorption were investigated. The highest uranium adsorption capacity were obtained at pH 3.0 and 16 g/L biomass dosage for CMA, pH 3.0 and 12 g/L biomass dosage for CBM and pH 2.0 and 10 g/L biomass dosage for CEM. The results demonstrated that the biomass derived char can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of uranium from wastewater. (author)

  19. Evaluation of adsorption of uranium from aqueous solution using biochar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Wagner Clayton; Guilhen, Sabine Neusatz; Ortiz, Nilce; Fungaro, Denise Alves

    2015-01-01

    Uranium is present in the environment as a result of leaching from natural deposits and activities associated with nuclear fuel, copper mining, uranium mining, milling industry, etc. For the purpose of protecting ecosystem stability and public health, it is crucial to eliminate uranium from aqueous solutions before they are discharged into the environment. Various technologies have been used for removing U(VI) ions from aqueous systems. Among these methods, adsorption has been applied in wastewater because of simple operation procedure and high removal efficiency. Brazil is the largest producer of charcoal in the world, with nearly half of the woody biomass harvested for energy in Brazil being transformed into charcoal. Biochar exhibits a great potential as an adsorbent because of favorable physical/chemical surface characteristics. The objective of this work was to evaluate the adsorption potential of biochar materials prepared from pyrolysis of Bamboo (CBM), Eucalyptus (CEM) and Macauba (CMA) nuts for the removal of uranium from solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out by a batch technique. Equilibrium adsorption experiments were performed by shaking a known amount of biochar material with 100 mL of U(VI) solution in Erlenmeyer flasks in a shaker at 120 rpm and room temperature (25 deg C) for 24 h. The adsorbent was separated by centrifugation from the solution. The U(VI) concentration remaining in the supernatant solution was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). The influences of different experimental parameters such as solution pH and bioadsorbent dose on adsorption were investigated. The highest uranium adsorption capacity were obtained at pH 3.0 and 16 g/L biomass dosage for CMA, pH 3.0 and 12 g/L biomass dosage for CBM and pH 2.0 and 10 g/L biomass dosage for CEM. The results demonstrated that the biomass derived char can be used as a low-cost adsorbent for removal of uranium from wastewater. (author)

  20. Determination of uranium and thorium contents inside different materials using track detectors and mean critical angles

    CERN Document Server

    Misdaq, M A; Ktata, A; Merzouki, A; Youbi, N

    1999-01-01

    The critical angles of the CR-39 (theta sub c) and LR-115 type II (theta sub c ') solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) for detecting alpha-particles emitted by the uranium and thorium series have been evaluated by calculating the corresponding ranges of the emitted alpha-particles in different material samples and in the SSNTD studied. The influence of the emitted alpha-particles initial and residual energies on the critical angles of the SSNTD studied has been investigated. The uranium and thorium contents of different geological samples have been evaluated by exploiting data obtained for the critical angles of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors and measuring the corresponding densities of tracks.

  1. Comparison of antibacterial activities of root-end filling materials by an agar diffusion assay and Alamar blue assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui-Hsien Huang

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that both the agar diffusion test and Alamar blue assay gave comparable findings of assessing the antimicrobial activity present in root-end filling materials. No antimicrobial activity was detected for mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium silicate cement, or amalgam after coming into contact with S. mutans, S. sanguinis and E. coli. IRM showed high antimicrobial activity against both S. sanguinis and E. coli.

  2. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola

    2009-12-01

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the 63 μm. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K 2 O) of the Na>Mg>>K. The 2 O) which indicates that also this smectite may be interstratified with a few percent illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite but in this case Fe predominates over Mg in the octahedral sheet. The structural formula suggests that this smectite has the lowest total layer charge of the smectites examined. Kutch BF 04 contains essentially no particles >63 μm. The bentonite has a high content of titanium and iron-rich accessory minerals, such as anatase, magnetite, hematite and goethite. Other accessory minerals of significance are feldspars and quartz, whereas the content of sulphur

  3. Investigation of residual anode material after electrorefining uranium in molten chloride salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, M.A., E-mail: marose@anl.gov [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907 (United States); Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Williamson, M.A.; Willit, J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A buildup of material at uranium anodes during uranium electrorefining in molten chloride salts has been observed. Potentiodynamic testing has been conducted using a three electrode cell, with a uranium working electrode in both LiCl/KCl eutectic and LiCl each containing ∼5 mol% UCl{sub 3}. The anodic current response was observed at 50° intervals between 450 °C and 650 °C in the eutectic salt. These tests revealed a buildup of material at the anode in LiCl/KCl salt, which was sampled at room temperature, and analyzed using ICP-MS, XRD and SEM techniques. Examination of the analytical data, current response curves and published phase diagrams has established that as the uranium anode dissolves, the U{sup 3+} ion concentration in the diffusion layer surrounding the electrode rises precipitously to levels, which may at low temperatures exceed the solubility limit for UCl{sub 3} or in the case of the eutectic salt for K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5}. The reduction in current response observed at low temperature in eutectic salt is eliminated at 650 °C, where K{sub 2}UCl{sub 5} is absent due to its congruent melting and only simple concentration polarization effects are seen. In LiCl similar concentration effects are seen though significantly longer time at applied potential is required to effect a reduction in the current response as compared to the eutectic salt.

  4. Nondestructive assay of special nuclear material for uranium fuel-fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.A. Jr.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    1997-01-01

    A high-quality materials accounting system and effective international inspections in uranium fuel-fabrication facilities depend heavily upon accurate nondestructive assay measurements of the facility's nuclear materials. While item accounting can monitor a large portion of the facility inventory (fuel rods, assemblies, storage items), the contents of all such items and mass values for all bulk materials must be based on quantitative measurements. Weight measurements, combined with destructive analysis of process samples, can provide highly accurate quantitative information on well-characterized and uniform product materials. However, to cover the full range of process materials and to provide timely accountancy data on hard-to-measure items and rapid verification of previous measurements, radiation-based nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques play an important role. NDA for uranium fuel fabrication facilities relies on passive gamma spectroscopy for enrichment and U isotope mass values of medium-to-low-density samples and holdup deposits; it relies on active neutron techniques for U-235 mass values of high-density and heterogeneous samples. This paper will describe the basic radiation-based nondestructive assay techniques used to perform these measurements. The authors will also discuss the NDA measurement applications for international inspections of European fuel-fabrication facilities

  5. 10 CFR 74.33 - Nuclear material control and accounting for uranium enrichment facilities authorized to produce...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and special nuclear material in the accounting records are based on measured values; (3) A measurement... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nuclear material control and accounting for uranium... Section 74.33 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) MATERIAL CONTROL AND ACCOUNTING OF SPECIAL...

  6. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  7. Effect of ultrasonic agitation on push-out bond strength and adaptation of root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Murilo Priori; Vivan, Rodrigo Ricci; Marciano, Marina Angélica; Duque, Jussaro Alves; Fernandes, Samuel Lucas; Rosseto, Mariana Bailo; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro

    2018-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of ultrasonic agitation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium silicate-based cement (CSC), and Sealer 26 (S26) on adaptation at the cement/dentin interface and push-out bond strength. Sixty maxillary canines were divided into 6 groups ( n = 10): MTA, S26, and CSC, with or without ultrasonic activation (US). After obturation, the apical portions of the teeth were sectioned, and retrograde cavities were prepared and filled with cement by hand condensation. In the US groups, the cement was activated for 60 seconds: 30 seconds in the mesio-distal direction and 30 seconds in the buccal-lingual direction, using a mini Irrisonic insert coupled with the ultrasound transducer. After the materials set, 1.5-mm thick sections were obtained from the apexes. The presence of gaps and the bond between cement and dentin were analyzed using low-vacuum scanning electron microscopy. Push-out bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine. Ultrasonic agitation increased the interfacial adaptation of the cements. The S26 US group showed a higher adaptation value than MTA ( p < 0.05). US improved the push-out bond strength for all the cements ( p < 0.05). The US of retrograde filling cements enhanced the bond to the dentin wall of the root-end filling materials tested.

  8. MoS2-Filled PEEK Composite as a Self-Lubricating Material for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, Geraldine; Gradt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    At BAM, several projects were conducted in the past years dealing with the tribological properties of friction couples at cryogenic temperature and in vacuum environment. Promising candidates for vacuum application are MoS2-filled PEEK/PTFE composites, which showed a friction coefficient as low as 0.03 in high vacuum. To complete the tribological profile of these composites, further tests were performed in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) at room temperature. In this paper, friction and stick slip behavior, as well as outgassing characteristics during the test are presented.

  9. Effectiveness of the ProTaper Universal Retreatment™ system for removing a 10-year-old filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, C; Bernart, F; Lima, G; Câmara, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ProTaper Universal Retreatment™ system and the manual technique for removing a 10-year-old filling material. Twenty mesiobuccal canals of mandibular first molars with curvature degrees ranging from 20° to 35° were instrumented by the Double-Flared Instrumentation Technique with the NitiFlex files. The root canals were dried with sterile paper points and filled with gutta-percha and a zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer using a cold lateral condensation technique. Accesses to the cavities were temporarily sealed with Cavit. The teeth were embedded in gauze containing saline solution, which was renewed every 2 weeks, and were stored at 37 °C in 100% humidity for 10 years. Buccolingual and mesiodistal radiographs were taken to evaluate the quality of the root canal filling. The radiographs were mounted in slide frames to allow them to be evaluated by the three examiners, who were specialists in endodontics. Only the specimens in whom there was agreement between the three evaluators were included in the study. The specimens were divided into 2 groups with 10 root canals each, according to gutta-percha removal techniques: Group 1: ProTaper Universal Retreatment™ system; Group 2: Hedström and K-files. Buccolingual and mesiodistal radiographs were taken and evaluated by three examiners who determined the effectiveness of the removal of the filling material. The presence of material was measured according to a score scale. Data were analyzed statistically by Fisher's exact test at 5% significance level. There were no statistical differences between the two methods in the coronal (P=0.211), and middle (P=0.266) thirds, but there were statistical differences between the two methods in the apical third (P=0.038). Not one of the experimental techniques promoted complete removal of the filling materials. The manual technique with K-file and Hedström files achieved better results than the Pro

  10. Characterisation of bentonites from Kutch, India and Milos, Greece - some candidate tunnel back-fill materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Siv; Karnland, Ola (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    During the past decades comprehensive investigations have been made on bentonite clays in order to find optimal components of the multi-barrier system of repositories for radioactive waste. The present study gives a mineralogical characterisation of some selected bentonites, in order to supply some of the necessary background data on the bentonites for evaluating their potential as tunnel back-fill materials. Two bentonites from the island of Milos, Greece (Milos BF 04 and BF 08), and two bentonites from Kutch, India (Kutch BF 04 and BF 08) were analysed for their grain size distribution, cation exchange properties and chemical composition. The mineralogical composition was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis and evaluated quantitatively by use of the Siroquant software. Both the bulk bentonite and the <1mum fraction were analyzed when relevant. Prior to the chemical analyses the <1 mum fractions were converted to homo-ionic clays and purified by dialysis. The chemical data were used for calculating the structural formula of the smectites. Milos BF 04 contains ca. 10% particles >63 mum. The bentonite is distinguished by a high content of dolomite and calcite, which make up almost 25% of the bulk sample. The major accessory minerals are K-feldspars and plagioclase, whereas the content of sulphur-bearing minerals is very low (0.06% total S). Smectite makes up around 60% of the bulk sample, which has a CEC value of 73 meq/100 g. The pool of interlayer cations has a composition Mg>Ca>>Na>>K. The X-ray diffraction characteristics and the high potassium content (1.03% K{sub 2}O) of the <1 mum fraction suggest that the smectite is interstratified with ca. 10% illitic layers. Based on the charge distribution the smectite should be classified as montmorillonite and according to the structural formula, Mg predominates over Fe in the octahedral sheet. However, remnants of Mg-carbonates, if present, may be a source of error in the formula calculation. Milos BF 08 has a

  11. Modified Truncated Multiplicity Analysis to Improve Verification of Uranium Fuel Cycle Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFleur, A.; Miller, K.; Swinhoe, M.; Belian, A.; Croft, S.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate verification of 235U enrichment and mass in UF6 storage cylinders and the UO2F2 holdup contained in the process equipment is needed to improve international safeguards and nuclear material accountancy at uranium enrichment plants. Small UF6 cylinders (1.5'' and 5'' diameter) are used to store the full range of enrichments from depleted to highly-enriched UF6. For independent verification of these materials, it is essential that the 235U mass and enrichment measurements do not rely on facility operator declarations. Furthermore, in order to be deployed by IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities (e.g., during complementary access), it is also imperative that the measurement technique is quick, portable, and sensitive to a broad range of 235U masses. Truncated multiplicity analysis is a technique that reduces the variance in the measured count rates by only considering moments 1, 2, and 3 of the multiplicity distribution. This is especially important for reducing the uncertainty in the measured doubles and triples rates in environments with a high cosmic ray background relative to the uranium signal strength. However, we believe that the existing truncated multiplicity analysis throws away too much useful data by truncating the distribution after the third moment. This paper describes a modified truncated multiplicity analysis method that determines the optimal moment to truncate the multiplicity distribution based on the measured data. Experimental measurements of small UF6 cylinders and UO2F2 working reference materials were performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The data were analyzed using traditional and modified truncated multiplicity analysis to determine the optimal moment to truncate the multiplicity distribution to minimize the uncertainty in the measured count rates. The results from this analysis directly support nuclear safeguards at enrichment plants and provide a more accurate verification method for UF6

  12. First-Principles Integrated Adsorption Modeling for Selective Capture of Uranium from Seawater by Polyamidoxime Sorbent Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladshaw, Austin P; Ivanov, Alexander S; Das, Sadananda; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Tsouris, Costas; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    2018-04-18

    Nuclear power is a relatively carbon-free energy source that has the capacity to be utilized today in an effort to stem the tides of global warming. The growing demand for nuclear energy, however, could put significant strain on our uranium ore resources, and the mining activities utilized to extract that ore can leave behind long-term environmental damage. A potential solution to enhance the supply of uranium fuel is to recover uranium from seawater using amidoximated adsorbent fibers. This technology has been studied for decades but is currently plagued by the material's relatively poor selectivity of uranium over its main competitor vanadium. In this work, we investigate the binding schemes between uranium, vanadium, and the amidoxime functional groups on the adsorbent surface. Using quantum chemical methods, binding strengths are approximated for a set of complexation reactions between uranium and vanadium with amidoxime functionalities. Those approximations are then coupled with a comprehensive aqueous adsorption model developed in this work to simulate the adsorption of uranium and vanadium under laboratory conditions. Experimental adsorption studies with uranium and vanadium over a wide pH range are performed, and the data collected are compared against simulation results to validate the model. It was found that coupling ab initio calculations with process level adsorption modeling provides accurate predictions of the adsorption capacity and selectivity of the sorbent materials. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that this multiscale modeling paradigm could be utilized to aid in the selection of superior ligands or ligand compositions for the selective capture of metal ions. Therefore, this first-principles integrated modeling approach opens the door to the in silico design of next-generation adsorbents with potentially superior efficiency and selectivity for uranium over vanadium in seawater.

  13. Healing process following application of set or fresh mineral trioxide aggregate as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Mehdi; Ghoddusi, Jamileh; Habibi, Ataollah; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2011-01-01

    An unsuccessful attempt to reach the apical area or to place the retrograde material is a major difficulty in periradicular surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the histological evaluation of the healing process following an orthograde versus a retrograde application of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a root-end filling material during apical surgery on cats' teeth in order to find out whether orthograde placement of MTA before surgery can be used instead of retrograde placement during surgery. In this experimental study, 24 canine teeth in 12 mature and healthy cats were filled with either MTA or gutta-percha in an orthograde manner. Two weeks later, the teeth with MTA were surgically exposed and resected to the set-MTA within the canals. The teeth previously filled by gutta-percha were also surgically exposed, and retrograde cavities were prepared at the root ends and filled with fresh-MTA. After 8 weeks, the animals were euthanized by vital perfusion. Six-micron histological slices were prepared from samples, stained by Hematoxylin & Eosin, and histologically studied by means of a light microscope. The collected data was analyzed by the Chi-square and the T-test. One of the samples in the fresh-MTA group was omitted during processing because of inappropriate sectioning. In the set-MTA group, 5 out of 12 showed chronic abscess, while in the fresh-MTA group, 2 out of 11 were discovered to have chronic abscess; however, no significant difference was observed (P>.05). Hard tissue healing (cementum, bone, cementum + bone formation) in the set-MTA and fresh-MTA groups were 7 out of 12 and 9 out of 11, respectively. While healing seemed more likely to occur in the fresh-MTA group, the difference was statistically insignificant (P>.05). The magnitude of bone, cementum, or bone and cementum formation showed slight differences between the two groups; however, the figures failed to show any marked differences (P>.05). Orthograde placement of MTA could be used

  14. Analysis of nuclear reaction products and materials; Preliminary treatment of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soedyartomo.

    1976-01-01

    Pre-treatment of samples is necessary to be done in order to achieve the efficient steps and accurate results of uranium analysis. The pre-treatment is particularly affected by the type of sample, the uranium concentration predicated in the sample, and the uranium analytical method which will be applied. A brief discussion about the pre-treatment of uranium analysis in the uranium ore processing and the reprocessing of spent fuel is given. (author)

  15. Entropy generation in Poiseuille flow through a channel partially filled with a porous material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a theoretical analysis of entropy generation due to fully developed flow and heat transfer through a parallel plate channel partially filled with a porous medium under the effect of transverse magnetic field and radiation is presented. Both horizontal plates of the channel are kept at constant and equal temperature. An exact solution of governing equation for both porous and clear fluid regions has been obtained in closed form. The entropy generation number and the Bejan number are also calculated. The effects of various parameters such as magnetic field parameter, radiation parameter, Brinkman number, permeability parameter, ratios of viscosities and thermal conductivities are examined on velocity, temperature, entropy generation rate.

  16. Glucose reactivity with filling materials as a limitation for using the glucose leakage model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Souza, E.M.; Wu, M.K.; Wesselink, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the reactivity of different endodontic materials and sealers with glucose and to asses the reliability of the glucose leakage model in measuring penetration of glucose through these materials. Methodology Ten uniform discs (radius 5 mm, thickness 2 mm) were made of each of the

  17. Computerized simulation of the mechanical behavior of wood-filled shock absorbers of radioactive materials transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, Martin; Wille, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In Germany the mechanical component inspection of transport containers for radioactive materials is performed by BAM (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung) under consideration of national and international standards and guidelines. Experimental and calculative (analytical and numerical) techniques combined with material and/or component testing are the basis of assessment concepts according the state of the art. The authors describe the experiences of BAM concerning assessment and description of the mechanical behavior of shock absorbing components, including modeling strategies, material models, drop tests and experiment-calculation comparison. Energy absorbing components are used to reduce the impact forces at the container in case of a transport accident. In Germany wood filled thin-walled constructions are used. The deformation behavior of the wood is a main part of the calculative simulation procedures in comparison with experimental tests.

  18. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  19. Microbial leakage of MTA, Portland cement, Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Estrada-Bernabé, Pedro-Felício; de Almeida-Decurcio, Daniel; Almeida-Silva, Julio; Rodrigues-Araújo-Estrela, Cyntia; Poli-Figueiredo, José-Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement (PC), Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) as root-end filling materials. An in vitro microbial leakage test (MLT) with a split chamber was used in this study. A mixture of facultative bacteria and one yeast (S. aureus+E. faecalis+P. aeruginosa+B. subtilis+C. albicans) was placed in the upper chamber and it could only reach the lower chamber containing Brain Heart Infusion broth by way of leakage through the root-end filling. Microbial leakage was observed daily for 60 days. Sixty maxillary anterior human teeth were randomly assigned to different groups--MTA and PC (gray and white), Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE, control groups and subgroups to evaluate the influence of EDTA for smear layer removal. These materials were further evaluated by an agar diffusion test (ADT) to verify their antimicrobial efficacy. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test. In the MLT, Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show evidence of microbial leakage over the 60-day experimental period. The other materials showed leakage from the 15th day. The presence of smear layer influenced microbial leakage. Microbial inhibition zones were not observed in all samples tested by ADT. Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show microbial leakage over the experimental period, whereas it was verified within 15 to 45 days in MTA and Portland cement.

  20. Wide band design on the scaled absorbing material filled with flaky CIPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Gao, Wei; Wang, Xiaobing; Liang, Zichang; Liao, Yi

    2018-02-01

    The scaled target measurement is an important method to get the target characteristic. Radar absorbing materials are widely used in the low detectable target, considering the absorbing material frequency dispersion characteristics, it makes designing and manufacturing scaled radar absorbing materials on the scaled target very difficult. This paper proposed a wide band design method on the scaled absorbing material of the thin absorption coating with added carbonyl iron particles. According to the theoretical radar cross section (RCS) of the plate, the reflection loss determined by the permittivity and permeability was chosen as the main design factor. Then, the parameters of the scaled absorbing materials were designed using the effective medium theory, and the scaled absorbing material was constructed. Finally, the full-size coating plate and scaled coating plates (under three different scale factors) were simulated; the RCSs of the coating plates were numerically calculated and measured at 4 GHz and a scale factor of 2. The results showed that the compensated RCS of the scaled coating plate was close to that of the full-size coating plate, that is, the mean deviation was less than 0.5 dB, and the design method for the scaled material was very effective.

  1. Thermal Protection Performance of Carbon Aerogels Filled with Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate as a Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kazemi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are comprised of a class of low density open-cell foams with large void space, nanometer pore size and composed of sparsely semi-colloidal nanometer sized particles forming an open porous structure. Phase change materials are those with high heat of fusion that could absorb and release a large amount of energy at the time of phase transition. These materials are mostly used as thermal energy storage materials but in addition they could serve as an obstacle for passage of heat during phase changes and this has led to their use in thermal protection systems. In this study, the effect of magnesium chloride hexahydrate, as a phase change material (melting point 115°C, on thermal properties of carbon aerogels is investigated. Thermal performance tests are designed and used for comparing the temperature-time behavior of the samples. DSC is applied to obtain the latent heat of melting of the phase change materials and the SEM tests are used to analyze the microstructure and morphology of carbon aerogels. The results show that the low percentage of phase change materials in carbon aerogels does not have any significant positive effect on carbon aerogels thermal properties. However, these properties are improved by increasing the percentage of phase change materials. With high percentage of phase change materials, a sample surface at 300°C would display an opposite surface with a significant drop in temperature increases, while at 115-200°C, with carbon aerogels, having no phase change materials, there is a severe reduction in the rate of temperature increase of the sample.

  2. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the B ampersand T Metals Company site, Columbus, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, Mm.; Yu, C.

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil were derived for the B ampersand T Metals Company site in Columbus, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that following remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose limit of 100 n-mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation. RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three scenarios were considered; each assumed that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site would be used without radiological restrictions. The three scenarios varied with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food and water consumed. The evaluations indicate that the dose constraint of 30 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for uranium (including uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of total uranium (uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238) at the B ampersand T Metals site did not exceed 1, I 00 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker, current use) or 300 pCi/g for Scenario B (resident with municipal water supply, a likely future use). The dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded at the site if the total uranium concentration of the soil did not exceed 880 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident with an on-site water well, a plausible but unlikely future use)

  3. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  4. Guidance for disposal of uranium-mill tailings: long-term stabilization of earthen cover materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhees, L.D.; Sale, M.J.; Webb, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1983-06-01

    The primary hazard associated with uranium-mill tailings is exposure to a radioactive gas, 222 Rn, the concentration of which has been correlated with the occurrence of lung cancer. Previous studies on radon attenuation conclude that the placement of earthen cover materials over the tailings is the most effective technique for reducing radioactive emissions and dispersal of tailings. The success of such a plan, however, depends on long-term protection of these cover materials. 230 Th, which decays to 222 Rn, has a half-life of about 80,000 years. The three major options available for stabilization of uranium-mill tailings are (1) rock cover, (2) soil and revegetation, or (3) a combination of both on different portions of the tailings cover. The optimal choice among these alternatives depends on site-specific characteristics such as climate and local geomorphology and soils, and on design variables such as embankment heights and slopes, modification of upstream drainage, and revegetation practices. Generally, geomorphic evidence suggests that use of soil and vegetation alone will not be adequate to reduce erosion on slopes greater than about 5 0 . For these steeper slopes, riprap will be necessary to maximize the probability of long-term stability. The use of vegetation to control erosion on the flatter portions of the site may be practicable in regions with sufficient rainfall and suitable soil types, but revegetation practices must be carefully evaluated

  5. Algal growth inhibition test in filled, closed bottles for volatile and sorptive materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Nyholm, Niels; Verbruggen, Eric M. J.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well as to the......Exposure concentrations of many hydrophobic substances are difficult to maintain in algal growth inhibition tests performed in open agitated flasks. This is partly because such compounds tend to volatilize from aqueous solution and partly because of sorption to the algal biomass as well......, and the resulting dissolved CO2 concentration supported maximum algal growth rates without pH drift for algal densities up to 4 mg dry weight/L. Two-day toxicity tests with kerosene were performed with this new test design and compared with an open bottle test and with a closed bottle test with headspace. Exposure...... concentrations of the volatile fraction of kerosene decreased by 99% in the open test, by 77% in the closed flask test with headspace, and by 16% in the filled closed bottle test. Algal growth inhibition was observed at much lower additions of kerosene in the new test design because of the improved maintenance...

  6. Systematic review of "filling" procedures for lip augmentation regarding types of material, outcomes and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Miguel Moragas, Joan; Reddy, Rajgopal R; Hernández Alfaro, Federico; Mommaerts, Maurice Y

    2015-07-01

    The ideal lip augmentation technique provides the longest period of efficacy, lowest complication rate, and best aesthetic results. A myriad of techniques have been described for lip augmentation, but the optimal approach has not yet been established. This systematic review with meta-regression will focus on the various filling procedures for lip augmentation (FPLA), with the goal of determining the optimal approach. A systematic search for all English, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Portuguese and Dutch language studies involving FPLA was performed using these databases: Elsevier Science Direct, PubMed, Highwire Press, Springer Standard Collection, SAGE, DOAJ, Sweetswise, Free E-Journals, Ovid Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Willey Online Library Journals, and Cochrane Plus. The reference section of every study selected through this database search was subsequently examined to identify additional relevant studies. The database search yielded 29 studies. Nine more studies were retrieved from the reference sections of these 29 studies. The level of evidence ratings of these 38 studies were as follows: level Ib, four studies; level IIb, four studies; level IIIb, one study; and level IV, 29 studies. Ten studies were prospective. This systematic review sought to highlight all the quality data currently available regarding FPLA. Because of the considerable diversity of procedures, no definitive comparisons or conclusions were possible. Additional prospective studies and clinical trials are required to more conclusively determine the most appropriate approach for this procedure. IV. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Castor oil polyurethane containing silica nanoparticles as filling material of bone defect in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacer, Renato Silva; Poppi, Rodrigo Ré; Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camilo de; Silva, Baldomero Antonio Kato da; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Silva, Iandara Schettert; Delben, José Renato Jurkevicz; Delben, Angela Antonia Sanches Tardivo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the biologic behavior of the castor polymer containing silica nanoparticles as a bone substitute in diafisary defect. Twenty seven male Rattus norvegicus albinus Wistar lineage were submitted to bone defect filled with castor oil polymer. Three experimental groups had been formed with nine animals each: (1) castor oil polymer containing only calcium carbonate; (2) castor oil polymer with calcium carbonate and doped with 5% of silica nanoparticles; (3) castor polymer with calcium carbonate doped with 10% of silica nanoparticles; 3 animals of each group were submitted to euthanasia 15, 30 and 60 days after experimental procedure, and their femurs were removed to histological evaluation. there was bone growth in all the studied groups, with a greater tendency of growth in the group 1. After 30 days all the groups presented similar results. After 60 days a greater amount of fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts in group 3 was observed, with integrated activity of 3 kinds of cells involved in the bone activation-reabsorption-formation. The castor polymer associated to the silica nanoparticles is biocompatible and allows osteoconduction. The presence of osteoprogenitors cells suggests silica osteoinduction capacity.

  8. Hydration characteristics of zirconium oxide replaced Portland cement for use as a root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J; Cutajar, A; Mallia, B

    2011-08-01

    Zirconium oxide can be added to dental materials rendering them sufficiently radiopaque. It can thus be used to replace the bismuth oxide in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Replacement of Portland cement with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at a water/cement ratio of 0.3 resulted in a material with adequate physical properties. This study aimed at investigating the microstructure, pH and leaching in physiological solution of Portland cement replaced zirconium oxide at either water-powder or water-cement ratios of 0.3 for use as a root-end filling material. The hydration characteristics of the materials which exhibited optimal behavior were evaluated. Portland cement replaced by zirconium oxide in varying amounts ranging from 0 to 50% in increments of 10 was prepared and divided into two sets. One set was prepared at a constant water/cement ratio while the other set at a constant water/powder ratio of 0.3. Portland cement and MTA were used as controls. The materials were analyzed under the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the hydration products were determined. X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX) was used to analyze the elemental composition of the hydration products. The pH and the amount of leachate in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) were evaluated. A material that had optimal properties that satisfied set criteria and could replace MTA was selected. The microstructure of the prototype material and Portland cement used as a control was assessed after 30 days using SEM and atomic ratio diagrams of Al/Ca versus Si/Ca and S/Ca versus Al/Ca were plotted. The hydration products of Portland cement replaced with 30% zirconium oxide mixed at water/cement ratio of 0.3 were calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide and minimal amounts of ettringite and monosulphate. The calcium hydroxide leached in HBSS solution resulted in an increase in the pH value. The zirconium oxide acted as inert filler and exhibited no reaction with the hydration by-products of Portland

  9. Evaluation of simulation learning materials use to fill the gap in Japanese dental English education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Naoko; Moross, Janelle; Sunaga, Masayo; Hobo, Koki; Miyoshi, Tomoe; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Morio, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Even though English is most frequently the common language when the patient's native language differs from that of a dentist, the opportunities for Japanese undergraduate dental students to learn dental English are now quite limited. The purposes of our study were to investigate: the effectiveness and feasibility of the computer-assisted simulation materials as one solution strategy for dental English education in Japan, and the needs and demands for dental English from the learners' side. Interactive simulation materials for medical interviews in English and clinical cases which were translated to English, were delivered via Learning Management System (LMS) to nineteen trainee residents of dentistry (residents). Evaluation for the materials, learners' knowledge and interests in the contents, and ease of operation were obtained by post-questionnaire (response rates were 100% and 95%, respectively). Both questionnaire-surveys received positive feedback toward the materials, yet 47% answered that they lacked the level of knowledge about contents of the medical interview in English. Results were sufficient to suggest that the residents would like to have the opportunity to study or practice medical interview in English, or English related to dentistry, and that the simulation materials could be one of the solution strategies for opportunity provision.

  10. In vivo Evaluation of Marginal Microgaps of Sheep Incisors filled with Two Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Figurová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the marginal microgaps of two light-induced polymerization composite materials: Filtek P60 (3M ESPE and Opticor New (Spofa Dental in ovine teeth in vivo. The restorative materials were placed to type A-cavity to buccal surfaces of permanent teeth (Triadan system 301, 302, 303, 401, 402, 403. The variables of composite materials were evaluated in 3 groups of animals, 2 animals in each, at different time intervals (1, 6 and 9 months after beginning of the experiment. In various time intervals, 12 teeth per group were extracted under general injection anaesthesia, 6 teeth from each animal. Altogether 36 teeth were extracted throughout the experiment. During the experiment we observed neither cracks nor marginal discoloration in both Filtek P60 and Opticor New restorations. Retention of all restorations was 100%. Significant (P = 0.029 ANOVA differences were observed in the dentin with Filtek P60 packable restorations which exhibited smaller marginal microgaps (OPTICOR NEW and dentin 11.09 mm, FILTEK P60 and dentin 5.64 μm. The mean size of microgaps between dentin and the packable composite material Filtek P60 was significantly lower (P = 0.029 ANOVA in comparison with the microhybrid Opticor New composite restorations. These materials are suitable as permanent restoration of dental cervical caries in sheep and other herbivores, such as those kept in zoological gardens and companion animals.

  11. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  12. Mechanical and thermal properties of hydroxyapatite filled poly(methyl methacrylate) heat processed denture base material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, S.H.; Arifin, A.; Mohd Ishak, Z.A.; Nizam, A.; Samsudin, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of powder-to-liquid ratio on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the tensile properties of denture base material prepared from poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and hydroxyapatite (HA) previously treated with 3-trimethoxysilylpropyl methacrylate (γ-MPS). Specimens for, mechanical testing were prepared by adding composites powder (PMMA, BPO and RA) to the monomer (MMA and EGDMA) followed by hand mixing as in dental laboratory description usage. The glass transition temperature was studied by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSQ. It was observed that the tensile properties and the Tg were affected by the powder-to-liquid ratio. The mechanical characterization of the materials were performed by using single edge notch-tension (SEN-T) specimens; the fracture toughness was slightly higher in formulation which contained RA filler compared to commercial denture base material. (Author)

  13. Studies of the effects of organic materials on the sorption of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.A.; Bond, K.A.; Ferguson, D.R.; Pilkington, N.J.

    1989-10-01

    The effects of the presence of cellulosic degradation products on the sorption of uranium and plutonium on London clay and Caithness flagstones have been studied using the batch sorption method. Experimental conditions were chosen to simulate both those expected close to a cementitious repository (pH ∼ 11) and at the edge of the zone of migration of the calcium plume (pH ∼ 8). Work was carried out (i) under baseline conditions, in the absence of organic materials (ii) with gluconate, acting as a well-characterised simulant (iii) with authentic degradation products. These experimental studies are complemented by thermodynamic modelling work, the results of which are presented in a companion paper. The results have shown that organic degradation products can have a marked effect on sorption and the present work provides further evidence of the need to take account of the presence of such materials in safety assessment modelling. (author)

  14. Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Exploration, Mining, Production, Supply and Demand, Economics and Environmental Issues (URAM-2009). Proceedings of an International Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-05-01

    This IAEA symposium is a third in a series which began in 2000 to discuss issues related to uranium raw materials. The symposia covered all areas of the uranium production cycle — including uranium geology, exploration, mining; milling and refining of uranium concentrates; and safety, environmental, social, training and regulatory issues — and reported on uranium supply and demand, and market scenarios. The first symposium was held in October 2000 — a time of extremely depressed market prices for uranium and of mines being closed — and primarily addressed environmental and safety issues in the uranium production cycle. By the time the second symposium was held in June 2005, the uranium market had started to improve after nearly two decades of depressed activity because of increased demand due to rising expectations for nuclear power expansion. Since then, there has been a dramatic rise in the uranium spot price, which in turn has promoted a significant increase in uranium exploration activities all over the world. The international symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (URAM-2009) was held at the IAEA, Vienna, 22–26 June 2009, at a time when nuclear energy was emerging as a viable alternative to meet the ever increasing demand of electricity in a sustainable manner, without degrading the environment. However, the global recession and credit crunch could impact the growth of the uranium industry. Since 2000, the identified uranium resource base has grown by more than 75%, exploration efforts have continued to increase in greenfield as well as brownfield sites, annual uranium production has risen, and the issue of social licensing and uranium stewardship has become increasingly important for public acceptance of the uranium industry. Some 210 delegates from 33 States and four international organizations participated in the symposium. In total, 120 technical papers were presented in the oral and poster sessions, and an exhibition on

  15. Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Exploration, Mining, Production, Supply and Demand, Economics and Environmental Issues (URAM-2009). Proceedings of an International Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-05-15

    This IAEA symposium is a third in a series which began in 2000 to discuss issues related to uranium raw materials. The symposia covered all areas of the uranium production cycle — including uranium geology, exploration, mining; milling and refining of uranium concentrates; and safety, environmental, social, training and regulatory issues — and reported on uranium supply and demand, and market scenarios. The first symposium was held in October 2000 — a time of extremely depressed market prices for uranium and of mines being closed — and primarily addressed environmental and safety issues in the uranium production cycle. By the time the second symposium was held in June 2005, the uranium market had started to improve after nearly two decades of depressed activity because of increased demand due to rising expectations for nuclear power expansion. Since then, there has been a dramatic rise in the uranium spot price, which in turn has promoted a significant increase in uranium exploration activities all over the world. The international symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (URAM-2009) was held at the IAEA, Vienna, 22–26 June 2009, at a time when nuclear energy was emerging as a viable alternative to meet the ever increasing demand of electricity in a sustainable manner, without degrading the environment. However, the global recession and credit crunch could impact the growth of the uranium industry. Since 2000, the identified uranium resource base has grown by more than 75%, exploration efforts have continued to increase in greenfield as well as brownfield sites, annual uranium production has risen, and the issue of social licensing and uranium stewardship has become increasingly important for public acceptance of the uranium industry. Some 210 delegates from 33 States and four international organizations participated in the symposium. In total, 120 technical papers were presented in the oral and poster sessions, and an exhibition on

  16. Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Exploration, Mining, Production, Supply and Demand, Economics and Environmental Issues (URAM-2009). Proceedings of an International Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    This IAEA symposium is a third in a series which began in 2000 to discuss issues related to uranium raw materials. The symposia covered all areas of the uranium production cycle — including uranium geology, exploration, mining; milling and refining of uranium concentrates; and safety, environmental, social, training and regulatory issues — and reported on uranium supply and demand, and market scenarios. The first symposium was held in October 2000 — a time of extremely depressed market prices for uranium and of mines being closed — and primarily addressed environmental and safety issues in the uranium production cycle. By the time the second symposium was held in June 2005, the uranium market had started to improve after nearly two decades of depressed activity because of increased demand due to rising expectations for nuclear power expansion. Since then, there has been a dramatic rise in the uranium spot price, which in turn has promoted a significant increase in uranium exploration activities all over the world. The international symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (URAM-2009) was held at the IAEA, Vienna, 22–26 June 2009, at a time when nuclear energy was emerging as a viable alternative to meet the ever increasing demand of electricity in a sustainable manner, without degrading the environment. However, the global recession and credit crunch could impact the growth of the uranium industry. Since 2000, the identified uranium resource base has grown by more than 75%, exploration efforts have continued to increase in greenfield as well as brownfield sites, annual uranium production has risen, and the issue of social licensing and uranium stewardship has become increasingly important for public acceptance of the uranium industry. Some 210 delegates from 33 States and four international organizations participated in the symposium. In total, 120 technical papers were presented in the oral and poster sessions, and an exhibition on

  17. Kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The effects of using different low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density, on the kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Simulations were carried out to calculate prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed-neutron fraction, core excess reactivity and neutron flux spectrum. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were used to carry out these calculations. It was observed that both the silicide fuels had the same prompt neutron generation time 0.02% more than that of the original aluminide fuel, while the oxide fuel had a prompt neutron generation time 0.05% less than that of the original aluminide fuel. The effective delayed-neutron fraction decreased for all the fuels; the decrease was maximum at 0.06% for U 3 Si 2 -Al followed by 0.03% for U 3 Si-Al, and 0.01% for U 3 O 8 -Al fuel. The U 3 O 8 -Al fueled reactor gave the maximum ρ excess at BOL which was 21.67% more than the original fuel followed by U 3 Si-Al which was 2.55% more, while that of U 3 Si 2 -Al was 2.50% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The neutron flux of all the fuels was more thermalized, than in the original fuel, in the active fuel region of the core. The thermalization was maximum for U 3 O 8 -Al followed by U 3 Si-Al and then U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel.

  18. 40 CFR 230.60 - General evaluation of dredged or fill material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (previous tests, the presence of polluting industries and information about their discharge or runoff into... is most likely to be free from chemical, biological, or other pollutants where it is composed... industries, municipalities, or other sources, including types and amounts of waste materials discharged along...

  19. Preparation and certification of a uranium isotope certified reference material JAERI-U5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Shuzo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1982-06-01

    The Committee on Analytical Chemistry of Nuclear Fuels and Reactor Materials, JAERI had planned to prepare a new reference material, JAERI-U5 for uranium isotopic measurement since 1978. The reference material is composed of 6 samples of different enrichment in the range of 0.2 to 4.5 wt. percents of 235 U. The preparation includes dissolution of raw materials, blending of solutions, precipitation of ammonium diuranate, drying and ignition to U 3 O 8 . A mass-spectrometric collaborative analysis was carried out by well-trained two laboratories in this country, JAERI and PNC. The certified values were decided from the result of the collaborative work. As the measurements were based on NBS SRM's, JAERI-U5 should be called tertiary standard. The materials are packed in bottles of low-potassium-content glass for a possible use in non-destructive gamma-rays spectrometry. The reference material has been distributing from JAERI with a price of yen 140,000 per set (6 samples of 2 g of each) since 1979. (author)

  20. Cuspal deflection and microleakage in premolar teeth restored with bulk-fill flowable resin-based composite base materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, A; Hogg, C H; Dowling, A H

    2012-01-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases.......To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases....

  1. Anisotropic local physical properties of human dental enamel in comparison to properties of some common dental filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raue, Lars; Hartmann, Christiane D; Rödiger, Matthias; Bürgers, Ralf; Gersdorff, Nikolaus

    2014-11-01

    A major aspect in evaluating the quality of dental materials is their physical properties. Their properties should be a best fit of the ones of dental hard tissues. Manufacturers give data sheets for each material. The properties listed are characterized by a specific value. This assumes (but does not prove) that there is no direction dependence of the properties. However, dental enamel has direction-dependent properties which additionally vary with location in the tooth. The aim of this paper is to show the local direction dependence of physical properties like the elastic modulus or the thermal expansion in dental hard tissues. With this knowledge the 'perfect filling/dental material' could be characterized. Enamel sections of ∼400-500 μm thickness have been cut with a diamond saw from labial/buccal to palatal/lingual (canine, premolar and molar) and parallel to labial (incisor). Crystallite arrangements have been measured in over 400 data points on all types of teeth with x-ray scattering techniques, known from materials science. X-ray scattering measurements show impressively that dental enamel has a strong direction dependence of its physical properties which also varies with location within the tooth. Dental materials possess only little or no property direction dependence. Therefore, a mismatch was found between enamel and dental materials properties. Since dental materials should possess equal (direction depending) properties, worthwhile properties could be characterized by transferring the directional properties of enamel into a property 'wish list' which future dental materials should fulfil. Hereby the 'perfect dental material' can be characterized.

  2. Experimental evaluation and design of unfilled and concrete-filled FRP composite piles : Task 4B : material & construction specifications : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The overall goal of this project is the experimental evaluation and design of unfilled and concrete-filled FRP composite piles for load-bearing in bridges. This report covers Task 4B, Materials and Construction Specifications. : This technical report...

  3. Comparing ProFile Vortex to ProTaper Next for the efficacy of removal of root filling material: An ex vivo micro-computed tomography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad AlShwaimi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Our findings suggest that PV is as effective as PTN for removal of root canal filling material. Therefore, PV can be considered for use in endodontic retreatment, although more effective files or techniques are still required.

  4. Sealing ability of cermet ionomer cement as a retrograde filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktener, B O; Pehlivan, Y

    1993-03-01

    An in vitro dye leakage study was performed to compare the sealing ability of high copper amalgam with cavity varnish and cermet ionomer cement with and without varnish when used as retrofilling materials. The root canals of 54 maxillary anterior teeth were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and sealer. The apical 3 mm of the roots were resected and apical class I cavity preparations were made. The roots were then randomly divided into three groups and retrofilled with one of the experimental materials. After 72 h of immersion in India ink, the roots were cleared and evaluated for leakage with a stereomicroscope. Statistical analysis indicated that the cermet ionomer cement with varnish group had significantly less leakage than the amalgam group (P cermet ionomer cement without varnish group (P 0.05).

  5. Robust synthesis of epoxy resin-filled microcapsules for application to self-healing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolimowski, Patryk A; Bond, Ian P; Wass, Duncan F

    2016-02-28

    Mechanically and thermally robust microcapsules containing diglycidyl ether bisphenol A-based epoxy resin and a high-boiling-point organic solvent were synthesized in high yield using in situ polymerization of urea and formaldehyde in an oil-in-water emulsion. Microcapsules were characterized in terms of their size and size distribution, shell surface morphology and thermal resistance to the curing cycles of commercially used epoxy polymers. The size distribution of the capsules and characteristics such as shell thickness can be controlled by the specific parameters of microencapsulation, including concentrations of reagents, stirrer speed and sonication. Selected microcapsules, and separated core and shell materials, were analysed using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It is demonstrated that capsules lose minimal 2.5 wt% at temperatures no higher than 120°C. These microcapsules can be applied to self-healing carbon fibre composite structural materials, with preliminary results showing promising performance. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Sound transmission through panels and shells filled with porous material in the presence of external flow

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jie

    2014-01-01

    With increasingly tighter regulations on noise exposure during flight, aircraft designers have been compelled to innovate structures that minimise noise transmission into the cabin space. Porous material is widely used as a passive noise control medium because of their light weight, low cost, and broad band sound abatement effectiveness. The present work, inspired by the need to be able to predict noise transmission characteristics for commonly used constructions, incorporates the effect of f...

  7. Microleakage of conventional, resin-modified, and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement as primary teeth filling material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dita Madyarani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glass ionomer cements are one of many dental materials that widely used in pediatric dentistry due to their advantage of fluoride release and chemical bond to tooth structure. Adherence of the filling material to the cavity walls is one of the most important characteristic that need to be examined its effect on microleakage. Purpose: This study was conducted to examine the microleakage of nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement compared with the conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements. Methods: Standard class V cavities sized 3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm were made on a total of 21 extracted maxillary primary canine teeth and restored with the conventional, resin-modified, dan nano-ionomer glass ionomer cements. All the teeth were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 4 hours. The depth of dye penetration was assessed using digital microscope after sectioning the teeth labio-palatally. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: All type of glass ionomer material showed microleakage. Conventional glass ionomer cement demonstrated the least microleakage with mean score 1.29. the resin-modified glass ionomer cements (mean score 1.57 and nano-ionomer glass ionomer cement (mean score 2.57. Conclusion: The conventional glassionomer, resin modified glassionomer, and nano-ionomer glassionomer showed micro leakage as filling material in primary teeth cavity. The micro leakage among three types was not significant difference. All three material were comparable in performance and can be used for filling material but still needs a coating material to fill the microleakage.Latar belakang: Semen ionomer kaca adalah salah satu dari banyak bahan gigi yang banyak digunakan dalam praktek kedokteran gigi anak karena bahan tersebut merilis fluoride dan berikatan kimia dengan struktur gigi. Perlekatan bahan tumpatan pada dinding kavitas adalah salah satu karakteristik paling penting yang perlu diteliti efeknya terhadap

  8. Chemical properties of gutta-percha endodontic filling material: investigation of five commercial brands; Propriedades quimicas de cones de guta-percha: avaliacao de diferentes marcas comerciais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, Joao Batista A.; Paula, Regina C.M.; Feitosa, Judith P.A. [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica]. E-mail: juniorquim@yahoo.com.br; rpaula@dqoi.ufc.br; judith@dqoi.ufc.br; Gurgel Filho, Eduardo; Teixeira, Fabricio B [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia.Dept. de Odontologia Restauradora]. E-mail: gurgeleduardo@aol.com

    2001-07-01

    Chemical composition e thermal stability of five brands of gutta-percha endodontic filling material were investigated. Samples with higher amount of organic materials possess higher thermal stability. Investigation of gutta-percha polymer extracted from the endodontic filling by IR and NMR shows that the polymer is predominantly trans-polyisoprene. The thermal stability and molar mass were similar for four brands, however the 'Tanari' brand has got lower molar mass value than the other ones. (author)

  9. 235Uranium isotope abundance certified reference material for gamma spectrometry EC nuclear reference material 171 certification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bievre, P.; Eschbach, H.L.; Lesser, R.; Meyer, H.; Audenhove, Van J.

    1986-01-01

    This certification report contains the information necessary for the final certification of EC nuclear reference material 171. It is also intended to inform the user of the reference material concerned on technical/scientific details which are not given in the certificate. The report describes the reference material which consists of sets of U 3 O 8 samples with five different 235 U/U abundances, filled in cylindrical aluminium cans. The can bottom serves as window for emitted gamma radiation. The report describes how the 235 U/U abundances were characterized, how the other properties relevant for gamma measurements were determined and gives all connected results as well as those from the verification measurements. Appendix A represents the draft certificate. 32 refs

  10. International symposium on uranium raw material for the nuclear fuel cycle: Exploration, mining, production, supply and demand, economics and environmental issues (URAM-2009). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Exploration, Mining, Production, Supply and Demand, Economics and Environmental Issues (URAM-2009) addressed all aspects of the uranium fuel cycle, from the availability of raw materials to the long-term sustainability of nuclear power. The revival of the uranium industry in recent years has caused a dramatic increase in uranium exploration and mining activities in several countries. URAM-2009 was intended to bring together scientists, exploration and mining geologists, engineers, operators, regulators and fuel cycle specialists to exchange information and discuss updated research and current issues in uranium geology and deposits, exploration, mining and processing, production economics, and environmental and legal issues. Contributed papers covered uranium markets and economics (including supply and demand); social licensing in the uranium production cycle; uranium exploration (including uranium geology and deposits); uranium mining and processing; environmental and regulatory issues; human resources development. There was a poster session throughout the symposium, as well as an exhibition of topical photographs. A workshop on recent developments in Technical Cooperation Projects relevant to the Uranium Production Cycle area was also organized. On the last day of the symposium, there was an experts' Panel Discussion. The presentations and discussions at URAM-2009 (a) led to a better understanding of the adequacy of uranium sources (both primary and secondary) to meet future demand, (b) provided information on new exploration concepts, knowledge and technologies that will potentially lead to the discovery and development of new uranium resources, (c) described new production technology having the potential to more efficiently and economically exploit new uranium resources; (d) documented the environmental compatibility of uranium production and the overall effectiveness of the final

  11. The effect of dispersed materials on baro-membrane treatment of uranium-containing waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryvoruchko, Antonina P.; Atamanenkoa, Irina D.

    2007-01-01

    The paper investigated a treatment process of uranium-containing waters in a membrane reactor while using natural mineral kizelgur and synthetic sorbent SKN-1K with subsequent ultra- and nano-filtration separation of the mixture. The retention coefficient of U(VI) by membrane UPM-20 under conditions of quasi-stationary equilibrium reached the levels of 0.87-0.89 and 0.89-0.91, respectively, while using natural mineral kizelgur and synthetic sorbent SKN-1K. In the case of membrane OPMN-P and natural mineral kizelgur the retention coefficient of U(VI) was 0.990-0.991 and 0.993-0.996, respectively, while using natural mineral kizelgur and synthetic sorbent SKN-1K. Data regarding the state of water in membranes formed from natural mineral or synthetic sorbent on the surface of substrate membranes UPM-20 and OPMN-P made it possible to conclude that dispersed materials of different chemical nature affect the process of baro-membrane treatment of uranium-containing waters. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of Solid Geologic Reference Materials for Uranium-Series Measurements via LA-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, K. A.; Goldstein, S. J.; Norman, D. E.; Nunn, A. J.; Murrell, M. T.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium-series geochemistry and geochronology have a wide range of applications in paleoclimatology, volcanology and other disciplines. To further explore these fields, the geoanalytical community has now begun to exploit recent advances in in situ, micron-scale sampling via laser ablation-ICPMS. Unfortunately, improvements in instrumentation have generally outpaced development of the appropriate geologic reference materials required for in situ U-series work. We will report results for uranium and thorium isotopic ratios and elemental concentrations measured in a suite of solid standards from the USGS (e.g., BCR-2G, BHVO-2G, GSD-1G, MACS-1, NKT-2G), as well as those from the MPI-DING series (e.g., ATHO-G, T1-G, StHs6/80-G). Specifically created for microanalysis, two of these standards are synthetic (GSD-1G, MACS-1) and the remainder are naturally-sourced glasses. They cover a range of compositions, ages (± secular equilibrium), elemental concentrations and expected isotopic ratios. The U-series isotopics of some powdered source materials have been characterized (e.g., BCR-2, BHVO-2), although there is no confirmation of the same ratios in the glass. Bulk measurement of these solid standards via TIMS and solution multicollector-ICPMS can then be used to assess the performance of LA-ICPMS techniques which require matrix-matched solid standards for correction of U-series elemental and isotopic ratios. These results from existing, widely-available reference materials will also facilitate quantification and comparison of U-series data among laboratories in the broader geoscience community.

  13. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Uranium-Rich Coals and Associated Coal Combustion Residues from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Nancy; Vengosh, Avner; Dai, Shifeng

    2017-11-21

    Most coals in China have uranium concentrations up to 3 ppm, yet several coal deposits are known to be enriched in uranium. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in these U-rich coals and associated coal combustion residues (CCRs) have not been well characterized. Here we measure NORM (Th, U, 228 Ra, 226 Ra, and 210 Pb) in coals from eight U-rich coal deposits in China and the associated CCRs from one of these deposits. We compared NORM in these U-rich coals and associated CCRs to CCRs collected from the Beijing area and natural loess sediments from northeastern China. We found elevated U concentrations (up to 476 ppm) that correspond to low 232 Th/ 238 U and 228 Ra/ 226 Ra activity ratios (≪1) in the coal samples. 226 Ra and 228 Ra activities correlate with 238 U and 232 Th activities, respectively, and 226 Ra activities correlate well with 210 Pb activities across all coal samples. We used measured NORM activities and ash yields in coals to model the activities of CCRs from all U-rich coals analyzed in this study. The activities of measured and modeled CCRs derived from U-rich coals exceed the standards for radiation in building materials, particularly for CCRs originating from coals with U > 10 ppm. Since beneficial use of high-U Chinese CCRs in building materials is not a suitable option, careful consideration needs to be taken to limit potential air and water contamination upon disposal of U- and Ra-rich CCRs.

  14. Uranium isotopic analysis of depleted uranium in presence of other radioactive materials by using nondestructive gamma-ray measurements in coaxial and planar Ge detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucel, H.; Yeltepe, E.; Dikmen, H.; Turhan, Sh.; Vural, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The isotopic abundance of depleted uranium samples in the presence of other radioactive materials, especially actinide isotopes such as Th 232, Np 237-Pa 233 and Am 241 can be determined from two gamma-ray spectrometric methods. One is the absolute method which employs non-destructive gamma-ray spectrometry for energies below 1001 keV using a coaxial Ge detector calibrated with a set of standards. The other is the multi-group analysis (MGA) method using the low energy region (< 300 keV) with a planar Ge detector intrinsically calibrated with gamma and X-rays of uranium without use of standards. At present absolute method, less intense but cleaner gamma peaks at 163.33 keV (5.08 percent) and 205 keV(5.01 percent) of U 235 are preferred over more intense peaks at 143.76 keV(10.76 percent), possible interference with 143.25 keV(0.44 percent) of Np 237 and 185.705 keV(57.2 percent), possible interference with 186.21 keV(3.51 percent) of Ra 226. In the high energy region the 1001.03 keV(0.837 percent) peak of Pa 234 m is used for the isotopic abundance analysis because the more intense 63.3 keV peak of Th 234 daughter of U 238 parent has a fully multiplet(62.86 keV+63.29 keV) and include the interferences of the 62.70 keV(1.5 percent) peak of Pa 234, the 63.81 keV(0.263 percent) peak of Th 232 and the 63.90 keV(0.011 percent) peak of Np 237. Although the MGA method is quicker and more practical, the more laborious absolute gamma spectrometric method can give more accurate results for the isotopic determination of depleted uranium samples. The relative uranium abundances obtained with the second method (i,e., MGA) are in general inconsistent with the declared values for the uranium samples in the presence of the above mentioned actinides. The reason for these erroneous results is proposed to be the interference of the gamma and X-rays of uranium in the 80-130 keV region used in MGA with those emissions from other radioactive materials present

  15. Establishment of characterizing parameters of clay as a filling material and coverage for repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Daisy M.M. dos; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de, E-mail: dmms@cdtn.br, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The multiple barriers of a repository should be able to provide adequate containment of radionuclides during all the previewed time for the operation and institutional control. One of these barriers is the backfill layer, located between the waste packages and other barriers. Furthermore, after shutting the disposal units with concrete, various materials are used to compose the final coverage of the deposition area. The backfill and the cover layer can be composed of clay or clay mixed with cement, with soil or with rocks. The last layer is a vegetation cover. The selection of the best clay should take into consideration some physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Bentonite is a clay with high absorption capacity, and large volume change in moistening and drying processes, being also effective in the contaminant retention. Additionally, it presents unique properties, such as high swelling potential. Some bentonite characterization works have been developed in the Laboratory of Cementation at CDTN/CNEN (LABCIM/CDTN). The sequence of experiments was: granulometric analysis, moisture, compaction test, hydraulic conductivity and cation exchange capacity. Some initial characterization results are presented and discussed. The paper summarizes these previous studies in order to have the basis for creating a protocol for characterization of a bentonite as a reference material. (author)

  16. Establishment of characterizing parameters of clay as a filling material and coverage for repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daisy M.M. dos; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2015-01-01

    The multiple barriers of a repository should be able to provide adequate containment of radionuclides during all the previewed time for the operation and institutional control. One of these barriers is the backfill layer, located between the waste packages and other barriers. Furthermore, after shutting the disposal units with concrete, various materials are used to compose the final coverage of the deposition area. The backfill and the cover layer can be composed of clay or clay mixed with cement, with soil or with rocks. The last layer is a vegetation cover. The selection of the best clay should take into consideration some physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Bentonite is a clay with high absorption capacity, and large volume change in moistening and drying processes, being also effective in the contaminant retention. Additionally, it presents unique properties, such as high swelling potential. Some bentonite characterization works have been developed in the Laboratory of Cementation at CDTN/CNEN (LABCIM/CDTN). The sequence of experiments was: granulometric analysis, moisture, compaction test, hydraulic conductivity and cation exchange capacity. Some initial characterization results are presented and discussed. The paper summarizes these previous studies in order to have the basis for creating a protocol for characterization of a bentonite as a reference material. (author)

  17. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the Colonie Site, Colonie, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.

    1996-05-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Colonie site located in Colonie, New York. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The site became contaminated with radioactive material as a result of operations conducted by National Lead (NL) Industries from 1958 to 1984; these activities included brass foundry operations, electroplating of metal products, machining of various components using depleted uranium, and limited work with small amounts of enriched uranium and thorium. The Colonie site comprises the former NL Industries property, now designated the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), and 56 vicinity properties contaminated by fallout from airborne emissions; 53 of the vicinity properties were previously remediated between 1984 and 1988. In 1984, DOE accepted ownership of the CISS property from NL Industries. Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines

  18. Cytotoxicity of newly developed pozzolan cement and other root-end filling materials on human periodontal ligament cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minju Song

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity of the pozzolan cement and other root-end filling materials using human periodontal ligament cell. Materials and Methods Endocem (Maruchi, white ProRoot MTA (Dentsply, white Angelus MTA (Angelus, and Super EBA (Bosworth Co. were tested after set completely in an incubator at 37℃ for 7 days, Endocem was tested in two ways: 1 immediately after mixing (fresh specimens and 2 after setting completely like other experimental materials. The methods for assessment included light microscopic examination, cell counting and WST-1 assay on human periodontal ligament cell. Results In the results of microscopic examination and cell counting, Super EBA showed significantly lower viable cell than any other groups (p < 0.05. As the results of WST-1 assay, compared with untreated control group, there was no significant cell viability of the Endocem group. However, the fresh mixed Endocem group had significantly less cell viability. The cells exposed to ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA showed the highest viability, whereas the cells exposed to Super EBA displayed the lowest viability (p < 0.05. Conclusions The cytotoxicity of the pozzolan cement (Endocem was comparable with ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA. Considering the difficult manipulation and long setting time of ProRoot MTA and Angelus MTA, Endocem can be used as the alternative of retrofilling material.

  19. Modification induced by laser irradiation on physical features of plastics materials filled with nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scolaro Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Thermal Laser Welding (TLW process involves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic that will be joined. Polymeric materials of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE, both pure and containing nanostructures at different concentrations (titanium and silver nanoparticles, were prepared as thin foils in order to produce an interface between a substrate transparent to the infrared laser wavelength and an highly absorbent substrate, in order to be welded by the laser irradiation. The used diode laser operates at 970 nm wavelength, in continuum, with a maximum energy of 100 mJ, for times of the order of 1 -60 s, with a spot of 300 μm of diameter. The properties of the polymers and of nanocomposite sheets, before and after the laser welding process, were measured in terms of optical characteristics, wetting ability, surface roughness and surface morphology.

  20. Preliminary laboratory assessments of a lightweight geocomposite material for embankment fill application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Okonta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The cost of retaining structures used for the lateral support of roadside embankments can be significantly reduced through the use of lightly cemented mixtures of expanded polystyrene (EPS beads and backfill soils as lightweight roadside embankment material. Four grades of residually derived sandy soils were mixed with EPS beads and the geocomposites were stabilised with 3% cement content, compacted and cured. The textural properties and shear strength parameters of dry and soaked specimens of the cemented geocomposites were determined by direct shear tests. The shear parameters and slope stability charts were used to simulate the slope of typical road embankments. The settlement potentials at different applied normal stresses were also determined. Inclusion of EPS reduced the dry density of the residual soils from an average value of 1790 kg/m3 to 1335 kg/m3. The maximum friction coefficient, tan ᴓ′, mobilised by the geocomposite specimens decreased with an increase in the soil fines content (>0.425 mm. The difference in tan ᴓ′ between the stabilised geocomposites and the natural soil was also dependent on the fines content. For an embankment height of 20 m, slope angles of 38° and 62° were determined for fine sand geocomposites in fully saturated drainage and drained conditions, respectively. Lower slope angles were determined for geocomposites made from silty, coarse and gravelly sands. A limiting embankment height of 50 m was determined for the four geocomposites. Rainfall-induced settlement of geocomposites was dependent on pre-inundation stiffness; for the range of applied stress up to 200 kPa, the settlement exhibited by the fine and silty sand geocomposites was lower than that for the coarse and gravelly sand geocomposites. Fine and silty sands make poor materials for slope embankments because of their poor hydraulic conductivity; however, fine and silty sand geocomposites have a good conductivity and friction angle to support

  1. The Effect of Hole Transport Material Pore Filling on Photovoltaic Performance in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Melas-Kyriazi, John

    2011-04-05

    A detailed investigation of the effect of hole transport material (HTM) pore filling on the photovoltaic performance of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) and the specific mechanisms involved is reported. It is demonstrated that the efficiency and photovoltaic characteristics of ss-DSCs improve with the pore filling fraction (PFF) of the HTM, 2,2\\',7,7\\'-tetrakis-(N, N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)9,9\\'-spirobifluorene(spiro-OMeTAD). The mechanisms through which the improvement of photovoltaic characteristics takes place were studied with transient absorption spectroscopy and transient photovoltage/photocurrent measurements. It is shown that as the spiro-OMeTAD PFF is increased from 26% to 65%, there is a higher hole injection efficiency from dye cations to spiro-OMeTAD because more dye molecules are covered with spiro-OMeTAD, an order-of-magnitude slower recombination rate because holes can diffuse further away from the dye/HTM interface, and a 50% higher ambipolar diffusion coefficient due to an improved percolation network. Device simulations predict that if 100% PFF could be achieved for thicker devices, the efficiency of ss-DSCs using a conventional rutheniumdye would increase by 25% beyond its current value. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Effect of Hole Transport Material Pore Filling on Photovoltaic Performance in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Melas-Kyriazi, John; Ding, I-Kang; Marchioro, Arianna; Punzi, Angela; Hardin, Brian E.; Burkhard, George F.; Té treault, Nicolas; Grä tzel, Michael; Moser, Jacques-E.; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the effect of hole transport material (HTM) pore filling on the photovoltaic performance of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ss-DSCs) and the specific mechanisms involved is reported. It is demonstrated that the efficiency and photovoltaic characteristics of ss-DSCs improve with the pore filling fraction (PFF) of the HTM, 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis-(N, N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)9,9'-spirobifluorene(spiro-OMeTAD). The mechanisms through which the improvement of photovoltaic characteristics takes place were studied with transient absorption spectroscopy and transient photovoltage/photocurrent measurements. It is shown that as the spiro-OMeTAD PFF is increased from 26% to 65%, there is a higher hole injection efficiency from dye cations to spiro-OMeTAD because more dye molecules are covered with spiro-OMeTAD, an order-of-magnitude slower recombination rate because holes can diffuse further away from the dye/HTM interface, and a 50% higher ambipolar diffusion coefficient due to an improved percolation network. Device simulations predict that if 100% PFF could be achieved for thicker devices, the efficiency of ss-DSCs using a conventional rutheniumdye would increase by 25% beyond its current value. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Experience in usage of T-108 titrimetric laboratory unit for precision analysis of uranium-containing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryzhinskij, M.V.; Bronzov, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Possibilities of the T-108 device of potentiometric titration for precise determination of uranium in various uranium-containing materials are studied, the results being presented. Principle flowsheet of the device and the sequence of analytic procedure of uranium potentiometric titration are considered. U 3 O 8 , UO 2 and UF 4 were used as materials to be analyzed, state standard samples of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 -SSS 2215-81 and U 3 O 8 SSS 2396-83P- as standard samples. It is shown that relative standard deviation during titration using the T-108 device is mainly determined by the error of determination of the final titration point potention and it must not exceed 0.002 for uranium titration considered. The conclusion is made that the variant of potentiometric titration of uranium with the use of the T-108 device is not inferior in its accuracy to gravimetry and surpasses it in productivity and possibility of automation. 4 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. Determination of uranium and thorium in semiconductor memory materials by high fluence neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Northcutt, K.J.; Scott, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and thorium were measured by absolute neutron activation analysis in high-purity materials used to manufacture semiconductor memories. The main thrust of the study concerned aluminum and aluminum alloys used as sources for thin film preparation, evaporated metal films, and samples from the Czochralski silicon crystal process. Average levels of U and Th were found for the source alloys to be approx. 65 and approx. 45 ppB, respectively. Levels of U and Th in silicon samples fell in the range of a few parts per trillion. Evaporated metal films contained about 1 ppB U and Th, but there is some question about these results due to the possibility of contamination

  5. Disposal and reclamation of southwestern coal and uranium wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wewerka, E.M.

    1979-01-01

    The types of solid wastes and effluents produced by the southwestern coal and uranium mining and milling industries are considered, and the current methods for the disposal and reclamation of these materials discussed. The major means of disposing of the solid wastes from both industries is by land fill or in some instances ponding. Sludges or aqueous wastes are normally discharged into settling and evaporative ponds. Basic reclamation measures for nearly all coal and uranium waste disposal sites include solids stabilization, compacting, grading, soil preparation, and revegetation. Impermeable liners and caps are beginning to be applied to disposal sites for some of the more harmful coal and uranium waste materials

  6. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  7. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  8. Cask size and weight reduction through the use of depleted uranium dioxide-concrete material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, S.Yu.; Haire, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Newly developed depleted uranium (DU) composite materials enable fabrication of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport and storage casks that are smaller and lighter in weight than casks made with conventional materials. One such material is DU dioxide (DUO2)-concrete, so-called DUCRETE TM . This paper examines the radiation shielding efficiency of DUCRETE as compared with that of a conventional concrete cask that holds 32 pressurized-water-reactor SNF assemblies. In this analysis, conventional concrete shielding material is replaced with DUCRETE. The thickness of the DUCRETE shielding is adjusted to give the same radiation surface dose, 200 mrem/h (2 mSv/hr), as the conventional concrete cask. It was found that the concrete shielding thickness decreased from 71 to 20 cm and that the cask radial cross-section shielding area was reduced approx 50 %. The weight was reduced approx 21 %, from 154 to approx 127 tons. Should one choose to add an extra outer ring of SNF assemblies, the number of such assemblies would increase from 32 to 52. In this case, the outside cask diameter would still decrease, from 169 to 137 cm. However, the weight would increase somewhat from 156 to 177 tons. Neutron cask surface dose is only approx 10 % of the gamma dose. These reduced sizes and weights will significantly influence the design of next-generation SNF casks

  9. Analytical review of minimum critical mass values for selected uranium and plutonium materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morman, J.A.; Henrikson, D.J.; Garcia, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Current subcritical limits for a number of uranium and plutonium materials (metals and compounds) as given in the ANSI/ANS standards for criticality safety are based on evaluations performed in the late 1970s and early 1980s. This paper presents the results of an analytical study of the minimum critical mass values for a set of materials using current codes and standard cross section sets. This work is meant to produce a consistent set of minimum critical mass values that can form the basis for adding new materials to the single-parameter tables in ANSI/ANS-8.1. Minimum critical mass results are presented for bare and water reflected full-density spheres and for full density moist (1.5 wt-% water) as calculated with KENO-Va, MCNP4A and ONEDANT. Calculations were also performed for both dry and moist materials at one-half density. Some KENO calculations were repeated using several cross section sets to examine potential bias differences. The results of the calculations were compared to the currently accepted subcritical limits. The calculated minimum critical mass values are reasonably consistent for the three codes, and differences most likely reflect differences in the cross section sets. The results are also consistent with values given in ANSI/ANS-8.1. 3 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Study of filling material of dental composites. An analytical approach using radio-activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eke, Canel [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Div. of Physics Education; Er, Kursat [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Endodontics; Segebade, Christian [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Boztosun, Ismail [Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Nuclear Sciences Application and Research Center; Akdeniz Univ., Antalya (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to carry out elemental analyses of dental composites acquired from different producers using photoactivation analysis (PAA). High energy electrons produced by an electron linear accelerator are absorbed by a tungsten disk (Bremsstrahlung converter) thereby producing high energy X-rays (bremsstrahlung). The dental composite materials under study were exposed to the bremsstrahlung radiation whereby radionuclides were produced through photonuclear reactions. Their radioactivities were measured using high resolution semiconductor spectrometers equipped with high purity germanium detectors (HPGe). The spectra were analysed using appropriate computer software. As a result, photonuclear reactions of 12 stable elements were detected in different dental composite species, and the elemental concentrations were calculated. For comparison, the dental composites were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Various sizes and shapes of dental composites were observed using SEM. However, contents of dental composites, e.g. Mg, Ni, Ba and Sr were obtained by PAA whilst C, O, Al, S, Ba and Sr were detected by EDXRF spectrometry. The results for Ba and Sr obtained using the two techniques show considerable difference.

  11. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Keiko; Nomoto, Rie; Tsubota, Yuji; Tsuchikawa, Masuji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2017-11-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS). Polymerization shrinkage was measured according to ISO/FDIS 17304. BBS showed the significantly lowest polymerization shrinkage and significantly higher depth of cure than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). The Knoop hardness, flexural strength and elastic modulus of that were significantly lower than conventional flowable resin composites (p<0.05). BBS had the significantly greatest filler content (p<0.05). SEM images of the surface showed failure of fillers. The lowest polymerization shrinkage was due to the incorporation of a new type of low shrinkage monomer, which has urethane moieties. There were no clear correlations between inorganic filler contents and polymerization shrinkage, flexural strength and elastic modulus. In conclusion, the low polymerization shrinkage of BBS will be useful for cavity treatment in dental clinics.

  12. Department of Energy depleted uranium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinski, F.E.; Butturini, W.G.; Kurtz, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    With its strategic supply of depleted uranium, the Department of Energy is studying reuse of the material in nuclear radiation shields, military hardware, and commercial applications. the study is expected to warrant a more detailed uranium recycle plan which would include consideration of a demonstration program and a program implementation decision. Such a program, if implemented, would become the largest nuclear material recycle program in the history of the Department of Energy. The bulk of the current inventory of depleted uranium is stored in 14-ton cylinders in the form of solid uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ). The radioactive 235 U content has been reduced to a concentration of 0.2% to 0.4%. Present estimates indicate there are about 55,000 UF 6 -filled cylinders in inventory and planned operations will provide another 2,500 cylinders of depleted uranium each year. The United States government, under the auspices of the Department of Energy, considers the depleted uranium a highly-refined strategic resource of significant value. A possible utilization of a large portion of the depleted uranium inventory is as radiation shielding for spent reactor fuels and high-level radioactive waste. To this end, the Department of Energy study to-date has included a preliminary technical review to ascertain DOE chemical forms useful for commercial products. The presentation summarized the information including preliminary cost estimates. The status of commercial uranium processing is discussed. With a shrinking market, the number of chemical conversion and fabrication plants is reduced; however, the commercial capability does exist for chemical conversion of the UF 6 to the metal form and for the fabrication of uranium radiation shields and other uranium products. Department of Energy facilities no longer possess a capability for depleted uranium chemical conversion

  13. Verification of nuclear material balances: General theory and application to a highly enriched uranium fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenhaus, R.; Beedgen, R.; Neu, H.

    1980-08-01

    In the theoretical part it is shown that under the assumption, that in case of diversion the operator falsifies all data by a class specific amount, it is optimal in the sense of the probability of detection to use the difference MUF-D as the test statistics. However, as there are arguments for keeping the two tests separately, and furthermore, as it is not clear that the combined test statistics is optimal for any diversion strategy, the overall guaranteed probability of detection for the bivariate test is determined. A numerical example is given applying the theoretical part. Using the material balance data of a Highly Enriched Uranium fabrication plant the variances of MUF, D (no diversion) and MUF-D are calculated with the help of the standard deviations of operator and inspector measurements. The two inventories of the material balance are stratified. The samples sizes of the strata and the total inspection effort for data verification are determined by game theoretical methods (attribute sampling). On the basis of these results the overall detection probability of the combined system (data verification and material accountancy) is determined both for the MUF-D test and the bivariate (D,MUF) test as a function of the goal quantity. The results of both tests are evaluated for different diversion strategies. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Development and inculcation of new methods in the field of exploring, extraction and reprocessing of uranium raw materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.; Efimova, Z.I.; Skorovarov, D.I.; Ivanov, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    The situation is briefly overviewed in the field of exploration, prospecting, extraction and processing of uranium raw material and industrial introduction of the recently developed methods. The method of underground leaching, including that from deep-seated deposits, is gaining wide acceptance. Of high importance is the industrial introduction of such promising processes as bacterial leaching, continuous column-sorption with a pseudo-luquefied sorbent layer, direct production of UF 6 in an ore-processing factory. Active works are under way now in the field of multi-purpose utilization of uranium ore. New methods are industrially introduced for the extraction of associated uranium from phosphoric acid solutions, copper ore, sea water

  15. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  16. Materials safeguards and accountability in the low enriched uranium conversion-fabrication sector of the fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.; Nilson, R.; Jaech, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Today materials accounting in the low enriched conversion-fabrication sector of the LWR fuel cycle is of increased importance. Low enriched uranium is rapidly becoming a precious metal with current dollar values in the range of one dollar per gram comparing with gold and platinum at 7-8 dollars per gram. In fact, people argue that its dollar value exceeds its safeguards value. Along with this increased financial incentive for better material control, the nuclear industry is faced with the impending implementation of international safeguards and increased public attention over its ability to control nuclear materials. Although no quantity of low enriched uranium (LEU) constitutes a practical nuclear explosive, its control is important to international safeguards because of plutonium production or further enrichment to an explosive grade material. The purpose of the paper is to examine and discuss some factors in the area of materials safeguards and accountability as they apply to the low enriched uranium conversion-fabrication sector. The paper treats four main topics: basis for materials accounting; our assessment of the proposed new IAEA requirements; adequacy of current practices; and timing and direction of future modifications

  17. Derivation of guidelines for uranium residual radioactive material in soil at the New Brunswick Site, Middlesex County, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.; Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-02-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the New Brunswick Site, located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Residual radioactive material guidelines for individual radionuclides of concern and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the New Brunswick Site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, was used in this evaluation; RESRAD implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines. The guidelines derived in this report are intended to apply to the remediation of these remaining residual radioactive materials at the site. The primary radionuclides of concern in these remaining materials are expected to be radium-226 and, to a lesser extent, natural uranium and thorium. The DOE has established generic cleanup guidelines for radium and thorium in soil; however, cleanup guidelines for other radionuclides must be derived on a site-specific basis

  18. Evaluation of the physical properties of an endodontic Portland cement incorporating alternative radiopacifiers used as root-end filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the physical and chemical properties of Portland cement (PC) loaded with alternative radiopacifying materials for use as root-end filling materials in a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like system. Portland cement loaded with barium sulphate, gold and silver/tin alloy was mixed with water, and the physical and chemical properties of the hydrated cements were evaluated. MTA and intermediate restorative material (IRM) were used as controls. The radiopacity was compared to the equivalent thickness of aluminium, and the setting time of the cements was assessed using an indentation technique. The compressive strength and the stress-strain relationship were determined at 28 days. The stress-strain relationship was determined by monitoring the strain generated when the cement was subjected to compressive load. In addition, the pH was determined in water and simulated body fluid for a period of 28 days. The radiopacity of the cements using alternative radiopacifiers was comparable to MTA (P > 0.05). IRM demonstrated a higher radiopacity than all the materials tested (P cements with the exception of IRM exhibited an alkaline pH and had an extended setting time when compared to IRM. MTA had a longer setting time than the PC (P cement (P = 0.159). The addition of a radiopacifier retarded the setting time (P cements had comparable strength to PC (P > 0.05). IRM was the weakest cement tested (P cement loaded with gold radiopacifier had comparable strength to MTA (P = 1). The stress-strain relationship was linear for all the cements with IRM generating more strain on loading. Within the parameters set in this study, bismuth oxide in MTA can be replaced by gold or silver/tin alloy. The physical, mechanical and chemical properties of the cement replaced with alternative radiopacifiers were similar and comparable to ProRoot MTA.

  19. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  20. Coronal leakage of four intracanal medications after exposure to human saliva in the presence of a temporary filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verissimo, Rebeca Dibe; Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; De-Deus, Gustavo; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby; de Souza-Filho, Francisco Jose

    2010-01-01

    To determine the time required for the recontamination of root canals medicated with four different materials. A total of 60 intact, caries-free, human single-rooted teeth with straight roots were selected for this study. After chemo-mechanical preparation they must be changed in the specimens into seven groups: 10 teeth medicated with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH) 2) + Camphorated paramonochlorophanol (CPMC) (G.1); 10 medicated with 2.5% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) (G.2); 10 medicated with 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) in gel (G.3); 10 medicated with 2% CHX in gel + Ca(OH) 2 (G.4); 10 without intracanal medicament and sealed with a coronal temporary filling (G.5). Five teeth were without intracanal medicament and coronally unsealed, used as the positive control group (PC) (G.6) and 5 teeth with intact crowns used as the negative control group (NC) (G.7). Glass vials with rubber stoppers were adjusted for use. The medicaments were prepared and injected into the root canals using sterile plastic syringes. An apparatus was used to evaluate for 30 days leakage. The chamber was filled with 3 ml of human saliva and Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth, incubated at 37 degrees C and checked daily for the appearance of turbidity in the BHI broth. Recontamination was detected after an average time of 2.6 days in group 2, 15.9 days in group 3, 30 days in group 1, 27.6 days in group 4, 2.9 days in group 5, 1 day in the positive control, and there was no contamination in the negative control group. The NaOCl group showed the highest worst average of recontamination; on the other hand, high averages were also shown by Ca(OH) 2 + CPMC and Ca(OH) 2 + 2% CHX in gel.

  1. Contribution of the surface contamination of uranium-materials on the quantitative analysis results by electron probe microbeam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonino, O.; Fournier, C.; Fucili, C.; Dugne, O.; Merlet, C.

    2000-01-01

    The analytical testing of uranium materials is necessary for quality research and development in nuclear industry applications (enrichment, safety studies, fuel, etc). Electron Probe Microbeam Analysis Wavelength Dispersive Spectrometry (EPMA-WDS) is a dependable non-destructive analytical technology. The characteristic X-ray signal is measured to identify and quantify the sample components, and the analyzed volume is about one micron cube. The surface contamination of uranium materials modifies and contributes to the quantitative analysis results of EPMA-WDS. This contribution is not representative of the bulk. A thin oxidized layer appears in the first instants after preparation (burnishing, cleaning) as well as a carbon contamination layer, due to metallographic preparation and carbon cracking under the impact of the electron probe. Several analytical difficulties subsequently arise, including an overlapping line between the carbon Ka ray and the Uranium U NIVOVI ray. Sensitivity and accuracy of the quantification of light elements like carbon and oxygen are also reduced by the presence of uranium. The aim of this study was to improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis on uranium materials by EPMA-WDS by taking account of the contribution of surface contamination. The first part of this paper is devoted to the study of the contaminated surface of the uranium materials U, UFe 2 and U 6 Fe a few hours after preparation. These oxidation conditions are selected so as to reproduce the same contamination surfaces occurring in microprobe analytical conditions. Surface characterization techniques were SIMS and Auger spectroscopy. The contaminated surfaces are shown. They consist of successive layers: a carbon layer, an oxidized iron layer, followed by an iron depletion layer (only in UFe 2 and U 6 Fe), and a ternary oxide layer (U-Fe-O for UFe 2 et U 6 Fe and UO 2+x for uranium). The second part of the paper addresses the estimation of the errors in quantitative

  2. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  3. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  4. Efficacy of ultrasonic activation of NaOCl and orange oil in removing filling material from mesial canals of mandibular molars with and without isthmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Sangoi BARRETO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the volume of remaining filling material after passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and orange oil in mesial canals of mandibular molars, with and without isthmus. Material and Methods Thirty mesial roots of mandibular molars were divided according to the presence or absence of isthmus. Canals were prepared and filled (Micro-CT #1. Filling was removed using rotary instruments, and specimens were sub-divided into three groups according to the irrigation procedures: Conventional – conventional irrigation with NaOCl, PUI/NaOCl – PUI of NaOCl (three activations, 20 seconds each, and PUI/orange oil – PUI of orange oil (Micro-CT#2. Specimens were enlarged using the X2 and X3 ProTaper Next instruments and submitted to the same irrigation protocols (Micro-CT #3. Results No differences were found between the experimental groups in each stage of assessment (P>0.05. The volume of residual filling material was similar to that in Micro-CT #2 and Micro-CT #3, but lower than that observed in Micro-CT #1 (P<0.05. When groups were pooled according to the presence or absence of an isthmus, volume of residual filling material was higher in specimens presenting isthmus (P<0.05. Conclusions PUI of NaOCl or orange oil did not improve filling removal. Isthmus consists in an anatomical obstacle that impairs the removal of filling material.

  5. A new method for determining uranium and thorium contents in mineral mining materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, A.; Membry, A.; Chambaudet, A.; Fromm, M.

    1994-01-01

    The method is based on the quantitative analysis of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). A mathematical model taking into account the variability of the critical angle of registration for the etching of the tracks generated by the incoming alpha projectiles is described. Complementarity of laboratory experiments and theoretical track etching model enables the relationship between critical angle and alpha particles energy to be determined. The formalism of the dosimetric method is based on the calculation of the probability P sub i for an alpha particle emitted in the phosphate to generate an observable etched track in the CR39 SSNTD. The determination of these probabilities cannot be achieved without a good knowledge of the relation expressing the critical angle as a function of particle energy. Supposing a secular equilibrium, we first propose a bulk relation giving the number of parent nuclides of a given family per unit volume of material. By taking the probabilities as P sub i into account, the content of uranium and thorium in the material (phosphates) can be estimated. The results obtained are compared to those cited in the literature. 1 tab., 6 refs. (author)

  6. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Middlesex Sampling Plant Site, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, D.E.

    1995-02-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) site in Middlesex, New Jersey. This site has been designated for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. The site became contaminated from operations conducted in support of the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1943 and 1967. Activities conducted at the site included sampling, storage, and shipment of uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores and residues. Uranium guidelines for single radioisotopes and total uranium were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the MSP site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The RESRAD computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation. Four scenarios were considered for the site. These scenarios vary regarding future land use at the site, sources of water used, and sources of food consumed

  7. 78 FR 17450 - Notice of Issuance of Materials License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... License Renewal, Operating License SUA-1341, Uranium One USA, Inc., Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery.... SUA- 1341 to Uranium One USA, Inc. (Uranium One) for its Willow Creek Uranium In Situ Recovery (ISR... Commission License No. SUA-1341 For Uranium One USA, Inc., Irigaray and Christensen Ranch Projects (Willow...

  8. Automation of potentiometric titration for the determination of uranium in nuclear fuel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Pandey, Ashish; Kapoor, Y.S.; Kumar, Manish; Singh, Mamta; Fulzele, Ajeet; Prakash, Amrit; Afzal, Mohd; Panakkal, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Fabrication Facility is fabricating various types of mixed oxide fuels, namely for PHWR, BWR, FBTR and PFBR. Precise determination of uranium in MOX fuel sample is important to get desired burn up in the reactor. The modified Davies and Gray method is routinely used for the potentiometric titration of uranium

  9. Analyses of national uranium resources evaluation reference materials from New Brunswick Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.R.; Caffrey, A.J.; Helmer, R.G.; Willis, C.P.; Rogers, J.W.

    1981-10-01

    Samples of pitchblende ore, monazite sand and uranium oxide have been analyzed for uranium and thorium content by gamma-ray counting and delayed neutron counting. Relative and absolute concentrations were measured. The methods of analysis are described and the final results presented

  10. Evolution of ore-bearing material sources of endogenous uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazansk, V.I.; Laverov, N.P.; Tugarinov, A.I.

    1976-01-01

    Considered are the regularities of changes in types and conditions of uranium deposit formation in connection with the general development of the earth crust tectonic structures. Out of pre-Kembrian uranium deposits considered are Vitwatersrand conglomerates, hydrothermal deposits in pre-Kembrian iron quartzites in the areas of regional fractures in exocontacts of big multiphase granitoid massifs of Proterozoic age and in the fundament folded structures. The hydrothermal-metamorphogen theory is supported of the origin of uranium-bearing sodium metasomatite of Proterozoic, including uranium deposits in the area of the Atabaska lake. Four genetic classes of Palaeozoic deposits are considered. Four periods are singled out in the development of Palaeozoic uranium provinces. Most of the Palaeozoic deposits are shown to be of polygenous origin. Mesozoic deposits are also polygenous, but the combination of ore substance sources in them is more complex

  11. Performance of alpha spectrometry in the analysis of uranium isotopes in environmental and nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F.P.; Oliveira, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of alpha spectrometry in the determination of uranium isotopes at various concentrations levels and with various isotope ratios was tested in a round robin international intercomparison exercise. Results of isotope activity/mass and isotope mass ratios obtained by alpha spectrometry were accurate in a wide range of uranium masses and in isotopic ratios typical of depleted, natural, and low enriched uranium samples. Determinations by alpha spectrometry compared very satisfactorily in accuracy with those by mass spectrometry. For example, determination of U isotopes in natural uranium by alpha spectrometry agreed with mass spectrometry determinations at within ±1%. However, the 236 U isotope, particularly if present in activities much lower than 235 U, might not be determined accurately due to overlap in the alpha particle energies of these two uranium isotopes. (author)

  12. Heat release, time required, and cleaning ability of MTwo R and ProTaper universal retreatment systems in the removal of filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Clovis Monteiro; Fidelis, Natasha Siqueira; Assumpção, Tatiana Santos; Bernardineli, Norberti; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; Bramante, Alexandre Silva; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes

    2010-11-01

    This ex vivo study evaluated the heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy of MTwo (VDW, Munich, Germany) and ProTaper Universal Retreatment systems (Dentsply/Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and hand instrumentation in the removal of filling material. Sixty single-rooted human teeth with a single straight canal were obturated with gutta-percha and zinc oxide and eugenol-based cement and randomly allocated to 3 groups (n = 20). After 30-day storage at 37 °C and 100% humidity, the root fillings were removed using ProTaper UR, MTwo R, or hand files. Heat release, time required, and cleaning efficacy data were analyzed statistically (analysis of variance and the Tukey test, α = 0.05). None of the techniques removed the root fillings completely. Filling material removal with ProTaper UR was faster but caused more heat release. Mtwo R produced less heat release than the other techniques but was the least efficient in removing gutta-percha/sealer. ProTaper UR and MTwo R caused the greatest and lowest temperature increase on root surface, respectively; regardless of the type of instrument, more heat was released in the cervical third. Pro Taper UR needed less time to remove fillings than MTwo R. All techniques left filling debris in the root canals. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy of Different Methods for Removing Root Canal Filling Material in Retreatment - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasam, Swetha; Mariswamy, Annapoorna Ballagere

    2016-06-01

    Although success of endodontic therapy has significantly improved in the last few decades due to the introduction of novel materials and techniques, failures of endodontic therapy requiring re-treatment still comprise a significant percentage of patients requiring root canal treatment. To evaluate and compare the effective removal of gutta percha and sealer, amount of apical debris extrusion and time required for gutta percha removal using various endodontic files. Total 48 extracted mandibular premolars were mounted on acrylic blocks and endodontic procedure was carried out using size 40 K file and obturated using guttapercha and zinc oxide eugenol sealer. After one month storage, samples were decoronated, mounted on screw capped vials and subjected to removal of obturated material by four instruments: H files, safe sided H files, protaper universal retreatment rotary system and ultrasonic retreatment tip, grouped as 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Only 2mm of obturated material from the coronal part was removed using no. 3 Gates Glidden drill, guttapercha was softened with a drop of xylene for 2 mins for each canal and retreatment was performed. The retreatment procedure was said to be complete when no visible debris were observed on the instrument flutes. The samples split into two halves and examined under stereomicroscope, photographed, assessed using AUTOCAD software and percentage of remaining filling material in coronal, middle, apical thirds of the canal was calculated in mm(2). Retreatment time was recorded in seconds and apically extruded debris was assessed by microbalance in grams for each tooth. The data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics, ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test through SPSS for windows (v 16.0). The ultrasonic retreatment tip had less percentage of residual guttapercha/sealer, shorter mean operating time and little apical extrusion with a significant difference (p<0.05) between the other groups. All techniques retained guttapercha

  14. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  15. Properties of n-eicosane-filled microcapsules with different morphology. Phase Change Materials studied by positron spectroscopy and complementary methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zgardzińska, B., E-mail: bozena.zgardzinska@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Filipek, M. [Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Pl. M. Curie-Sklodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Fortuniak, W. [Center of Molecular and Macromolecular Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, Sienkiewicza 112, 90-363 Łódź (Poland); Mroczek, P. [Department of Geoecology and Palaeogeography, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Al. Kraśnicka 2cd, 20-718 Lublin (Poland)

    2016-07-01

    The Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) was used to investigate properties of selected Phase Change Materials (PCMs) as a function of temperature from 123 K to 333 K. Three different PCM microcapsules investigated in this work were built of n-eicosane filling and a siloxane polymer as a shell material. It has been found that the properties of ortho-positronium (o-Ps) annihilating in n-eicosane filler depend on the microcapsule morphology. In the samples where the whole interior is composed of n-eicosane and the polymer forms the outer shell only, the n-eicosane behaves like a neat macroscopic sample. In the microcapsules containing the network of polymer threads inside the globule, n-eicosane shows no rise of o-Ps intensity with time which is typical for all pure alkanes. For this morphology, the melting point of n-eicosane is preceded by the 4 K wide temperature range, where the structure resembling the rotator phase is observed (rotator phase appears in neat even-numbered alkanes with carbon chain over 20 atoms). Supplementary data were obtained by the DSC method. SEM images confirmed the morphological differentiation of microcapsules. Low temperature (close to liquid nitrogen) destroys the structure of microcapsules, particularly their outer shell. - Highlights: • Polymer-alkane microcapsules were synthesized with different morphology. • Morphological diversity of microcapsules is reflected in the parameters of the PALS. • PALS show the effect of spatial limitations on the formation of lamellar structure. • PALS is a new way to determine the percentage of microcapsules components.

  16. Effectiveness of ProTaper Universal retreatment instruments used with rotary or reciprocating adaptive motion in the removal of root canal filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, I D; Arslan, H; Ertas, H; Gök, T; Saygılı, G

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of ProTaper Universal retreatment instruments with continuous rotation and adaptive motion (AM; a modified reciprocating motion that combines rotational and reciprocating motion) in the removal of filling material. Mesiobuccal root canals in 36 mandibular first molars were instrumented up to size F2 with the ProTaper Universal instrument (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) and filled using sealer and ProTaper Universal F2 gutta-percha cones. Gutta-percha was then down-packed and the root canal backfilled using the extruder hand-piece of the Elements Obturation System (SybronEndo, Orange, CA, USA). The teeth were assigned to two groups (n = 18), and removal of the root fillings was performed using one of the following techniques: group 1) ProTaper Universal retreatment files used with rotational motion (RM) and group 2) ProTaper Universal retreatment files used with adaptive motion (AM) (600° clockwise/0° counter-clockwise to 370° clockwise/50° counter-clockwise). The teeth were sectioned, and both halves were analysed at 8 × magnification. The percentage of remaining filling material was recorded. The data were analysed statistically using the Student's t-test at a 95% confidence level (P ProTaper Universal retreatment files with adaptive motion removed more filling materials from root canals than the rotational movement. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Investigation of uranium sorption from carbonate solutions by different ion exchange materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekrasova, N.A.; Kudryavtseva, S.P.; Milyutin, V.V.; Chuveleva, Eh.A.; Firsova, L.A.; Gelis, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    One studied the uranium sorption from the reference carbonate solutions based on the ion-exchange resins varying in the rank. The PFA-300, the A-560, the AB-17x8 highly basic anionites and the ampholytes (S-930, S-922, S-957, ANKB-35) were shown to manifest the best sorption characteristics as to U. One determined the dependences of the static exchange capacity of the PFA-300, the A-560 and the S-922 resins as to the uranium on the carbonate solution pH, as well as the absorbed uranium desorption conditions [ru

  18. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  19. Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, Walter H.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element comprises highly a enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel.

  20. Nickel container of highly-enriched uranium bodies and sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinn, W.H.

    1976-01-01

    A fuel element comprises highly enriched uranium bodies coated with a nonfissionable, corrosion resistant material. A plurality of these bodies are disposed in layers, with sodium filling the interstices therebetween. The entire assembly is enclosed in a fluid-tight container of nickel

  1. HANDBOOK: SUB-SLAB DEPRESSURIZATION FOR LOW PERMEABILITY FILL MATERIAL DESIGN AND INSTALLATION OF A HOME RADON REDUCTION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radon, a radioactive gas, comes from the natural decay of uranium. It moves to the earth's surface through tiny openings and cracks in soil and rocks. In outdoor air, radon is diluted to such low concentrations that it is usually nothing to worry about. However, radon can accumul...

  2. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  3. Numerical Calculation of Light Metal Filling Material PELE%轻金属填充材料 PELE 的数值仿真研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李干; 王志军; 李运禄; 魏波

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyze the influence of the light metal filling material on the Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Efficiency (PELE),AUTODYN explicit nonlinear dynamic analysis software was used to simulate the penetration of PELE filled with different light metal materials against target plate,and the damage effects of different projectile on target plates were obtained.The simulation results shows that the lower hardness of filling material is,the short the length of residual jacket is.Mg-Li alloy is suitable for filling material of PELE.%为了研究铝镁等轻金属作为弹芯对横向效应增强型侵彻体(PELE)的影响,采用显式非线性动力分析软件 AU-TODYN 对内装不同轻金属材料弹丸进行侵彻靶板数值模拟,获得了不同弹体对靶板的毁伤效应。结果表明:填充材料硬度越低,PELE 壳体残留越少,锂镁合金适宜作为 PELE 的填充材料。

  4. 33 CFR 338.2 - Activities involving the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities involving the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S. 338.2 Section 338.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OTHER CORPS ACTIVITIES INVOLVING...

  5. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423, Saudi Arabia and King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia); Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N. [Princess Norah Oncology Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Jeddah 21423 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  6. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.; Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  7. Apical adaptation, sealing ability and push-out bond strength of five root-end filling materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Andrés AMOROSO-SILVA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the fluid filtration, adaptation to the root canal walls, and the push-out bond strength of two resin-based sealers and three calcium silicate-based retrograde filling materials. Fifty maxillary canines were shaped using manual instruments and the apical portion was sectioned. Retrograde cavities of 3-mm depth were prepared. The specimens were divided into five groups (n = 10: Sealer 26 (S26; MBPc (experimental; MTA; Portland cement with 20% zirconium oxide (PC/ZO, and Portland cement with 20% calcium tungstate (PC/CT. The fluid filtration was measured at 7 and 15 days. To evaluate the interfacial adaptation, sections of the teeth, 1 and 2 mm from the apex, were prepared and the percentage of gaps was calculated. The push-out bond strength at 2 mm from the apex was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using the ANOVA/Tukey’s test (p < 0.05. At 7 and 15 days (p = 0.0048, p = 0.006, the PC/CT group showed higher fluid filtration values when compared to other groups. At 1 mm from the apex, no statistical differences in the adaptation were found among the cements (p = 0.44. At 2 mm from the apex, the PC/ZO group presented statistically lower percentage of gaps than S26, MBPc, and MTA (p = 0.0007. The MBPc group showed higher push-out bond strength than other cements evaluated (p = 0.0008. The fluid filtration and interfacial adaptation of the calcium silicate-based cements were similar to those of the resin-based cements. The resinous cement MBPc showed superior push-out bond strength.

  8. Contribution to the study of nuclear fuel materials with a metallic uranium base; Contribution a l'etude des materiaux combustibles nucleaires a base d'uranium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englander, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-11-15

    In a power reactor destined to supply industrially recoverable thermal energy, the most economical source of heat still consists of natural metallic uranium. However, the nuclear fuel material, most often employed in the form of rods of 20 to 40 mm diameter, is subjected to a series of stresses which lead to irreversible distortions usually incompatible with the substructure of the reactor. As a result the fuel material must possess at the outset a certain number of qualities which must be determined. Investigations have therefore been carried out, first on the technological characters peculiar to each of the three allotropic phases of pure uranium metal, and on their interactions on the stabilisation of the material which consists of either cast uranium or uranium pile-treated in the {gamma} phase. (author) [French] Dans un reacteur de puissance destine a fournir de l'energie thermique industriellement recuperable, la source de chaleur la plus economique reste constituee par de l'uranium metallique naturel. Or, le materiau combustible nucleaire, employe le plus souvent sous forme de barreaux de 20 a 40 mm de diametre, se trouve soumis a un ensemble de contraintes qui provoque des deformations irreversibles, le plus souvent incompatibles avec l'infrastructure du reacteur. Par consequent, le materiau combustible doit presenter a l'origine un certain nombre de qualites qu'il est necessaire de determiner. Aussi a-t-on d'abord etudie les caracteres technologiques propres a chacune des trois phases allotropiques de l'uranium-metal pur et leurs interactions sur la stabilisation du materiau constitue soit par de l'uranium coule, soit par de l'uranium traite en pile en phase {gamma}. (auteur)

  9. High-etch-rate bottom-antireflective coating and gap-fill materials using dextrin derivatives in via first dual-Damascene lithography process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Satoshi; Sakaida, Yasushi; Shinjo, Tetsuya; Hashimoto, Keisuke; Nakajima, Yasuyuki

    2008-03-01

    The present paper describes a novel class of bottom antireflective coating (BARC) and gap fill materials using dextrin derivatives. The general trend of interconnect fabrication for such a high performance LSI is to apply cupper (Cu)/ low-dielectric-constant (low-k) interconnect to reduce RC delay. A via-first dual damascene process is one of the most promising processes to fabricate Cu/ low-k interconnect due to its wide miss-alignment margin. The sacrificial materials containing dextrin derivatives under resist for lithography were developed in via-first dual damascene process. The dextrin derivatives in this study was obtained by the esterification of the hydroxyl groups of dextrin resulting in improved solubility in the resist solvents such as propylene glycol monomethylether, propylene glycol monomethylether acetate, and ethyl lactate due to avoid the issue of defects that were caused by incompatability. The etch rate of our developed BARC and gap fill materials using dextrin derivatives was more than two times faster than one of the ArF resists evaluated in a CF4 gas condition using reactive ion etching. The improved etch performance was also verified by comparison with poly(hydroxystyrene), acrylate-type materials and latest low-k materials as a reference. In addition to superior etch performance, these materials showed good resist profiles and via filling performance without voids in via holes.

  10. Evaluation of bacterial leakage of four root- end filling materials: Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA, Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarabian M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Today several materials have been used for root- end filling in endodontic surgery. Optimal properties of Pro Root MTA in in-vitro and in-vivo studies has been proven. On the other hand, based on some studies, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA and Portland cement are similar to Pro Root MTA in physical and biologic properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate bacterial leakage (amount and mean leakage time of four root- end filling materials. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in-vitro study, seventy six extracted single- rooted human teeth were randomly divided into six groups for root-end filling with gray Pro Root MTA, white Pro Root MTA, Root MTA (Iranian Pro Root MTA, Portland Cement (type I and positive and negative control groups. Root canals were instrumented using the step- back technique. Root- end filling materials were placed in 3mm ultra sonic retro preparations. Samples and microleakage model system were sterilized in autoclave. The apical 3-4 mm of the roots were immersed in phenol red with 3% lactose broth culture medium. The coronal access of each specimen was inoculated every 24h with a suspension of Streptococcus sanguis (ATCC 10556. Culture media were observed every 24h for colour change indicating bacterial contamination for 60 days. Statistical analysis was performed using log- rank test with P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: At the end of study 50%, 56.25%, 56.25% and 50% of specimens filled with Gray Pro Root MTA, White Pro Root MTA. Root MTA and Portland Cement (type I had evidence of leakage respectively. The mean leakage time was 37.19±6.29, 36.44±5.81, 37.69±5.97 and 34.81±6.67 days respectively. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant difference among the leakage (amount and mean leakage time of the four tested root- end filling materials (P=0.9958. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, there were no significant differences in leakage among the four

  11. Preparation, characterization, uranium (VI) biosorption models, and conditions optimization by response surface methodology (RSM) for amidoxime-functionalized marine fungus materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xuechun; Gao, Yang; Jiang, Min; He, Dianxiong; Liao, Sen; Hou, Dan; Yan, Xueming; Long, Wei; Wu, Yaxin; Tan, Ni [Univ. of South China, Hengyang (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2017-08-01

    Amidoxime-functionalized marine fungus Fusarium sp. ZZF51 (ZGDA) was synthesized and studied to adsorb uranium (VI) from the aqueous solution. Different instrumental techniques such as FTIR, SEM, and TGA were employed for the characterization of the manufactured materials, and theirs ability of removal uranium (VI) was optimized using RSM. The experimental results showed the maximum adsorption capacity for the synthesized materials was 230.78 mg g{sup -1} at the following optimization conditions: S-L ratio 150 mg L{sup -1}, pH 5.13, uranium (VI) initial concentration 40 mg L{sup -1}, and equilibrium time 122.40 min. More than 85% of the absorbed uranium (VI) could be desorbed by 0.5 or 1.0 mol L{sup -1} HCl, and the modified mycelium could be reused at least five times. The thermodynamic experimental data of adsorption uranium (VI) could fit better with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms models, and the pseudo-second-order model was better to interpret the kinetics process. The modified fungus materials exhibited the better sorption capacity for uranium (VI) in comparison with raw biomass should be attributed to the strong chelation of amidoxime to uranium (VI) ions.

  12. Cuspal deflection and microleakage in premolar teeth restored with bulk-fill flowable resin-based composite base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, A; Hogg, C H; Dowling, A H; Grufferty, B F; Benetti, A R; Fleming, G J P

    2012-06-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases. Twenty-four sound upper premolar teeth with Class II cavities were allocated to three groups (n=8). Restoration of the teeth involved the placement of an RBC (GrandioSO) in eight oblique increments (Group A) or Groups B and C were restored to within 2 mm of the palatal cusp in a single increment with bulk-fill flowable RBC bases (SDR and x-tra base) before the two occlusal cavity increments were placed with GrandioSO. Buccal and palatal cusp deflections were recorded postirradiation using a twin channel deflection measuring gauge. Following restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, immersed in 0.2% basic fuchsin dye for 24h, sectioned and examined for cervical microleakage. The mean total cuspal deflection for the oblique incremental restoration technique was 11.26 (2.56) μm (Group A) and 4.63 (1.19) μm (Group B) and 4.73 (0.99) μm (Group C) for the bulk-fill flowable RBC bases. A significant increase in the mean total cuspal deflection for the incrementally filled GrandioSO compared with the SDR (P=0.007) and x-tra base (P=0.005) restored teeth was evident. No significant difference in the cervical microleakage scores was recorded between groups AC (P>0.05). The bulk-fill flowable RBC bases significantly reduced cuspal deflection compared with a conventional RBC restored in an oblique incremental filling technique with no associated change in cervical microleakage recorded. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imprints left by natural radioactivity in geological materials: uranium fission tracks and thermoluminescence applications in earth sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broquet, P.; Chambaudet, A.; Rebetez, M.; Charlet, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In a rock, all minerals which contain uranium are host to a number of spontaneous fission phenomena forming a single damaged area called a ''latent track'', observations of which may lead to dating, uranium mapping and finding paleo-geo-thermometers (thermal history, used in oil exploration). The radioactive elements during the decay process release energy which is trapped as electrons into the physical or chemical defects of the crystalline lattice; this energy can be later released by heating the mineral (thermic stimulated luminescence); the thermoluminescence is characterized by a glow which spectrum constitutes a typical feature of the mineral, its crystallization conditions and the subsequent evolution of the material. Natural and induced glow curve may be produced. 6 figs., 52 refs

  14. In situ leach uranium mining. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    At the beginning of 1996 there were 437 nuclear power plants in operation with a combined electricity generating capacity of 344 GWe (net gigawatts electric). This represents nearly a 100% increase over the last decade. In 1995 over 2228 TWh (terawatt hours) electricity were generated, equivalent to about 17% of the world's total electricity. To achieve this, about 61 400 tonnes U were required as nuclear fuel. The 15 year decline of the spot uranium price, as indicated by Nuexco Exchange Value (NEV) and other indices, which reached an all time low annual average in 1994 of $18.33/kg U ($7.05/pound U 3 O 8 ), has had a profound impact on uranium related activities. This led to the massive reduction and realignment of all uranium related activities as the worldwide uranium market adjusted from over-production. Because of the economic advantages of properly run in situ leach technology on carefully selected uranium orebodies, relatively more ISL mining facilities have been kept in operation than conventional mining operations. In 1995 world uranium production of about 34 000 t uranium met only about 55% of world requirements. An estimated 16% of production came from ISL mining. In 1996 ISL mining was estimated to have produced over 5600 tU, or over 15% of estimated world production of 36 400 tU. The importance of ISL mining is expected to increase, as the technology has economic and environmental advantages for producing uranium from carefully selected deposits when projects are properly designed and operated by experienced personnel. Several countries host sandstone type uranium deposits, the only type where commercial ISL projects have been developed. ISL uranium mining technology was developed independently in the USA and the former Soviet Union and associated non-WOCA (world outside centrally planned economic areas) countries starting in the 1960s and 1970s. Since the opening of relations between the two areas in the early 1990s there has been a high level of

  15. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  16. Evaluation of iron phosphate (III) as reactive material for removal of uranium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis M, L.

    2004-02-01

    .05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2 g of ferric phosphate, for that 0.1 g of material was used. The isotherms were carried out in function of the p H of the uranyl solutions and of the mass of the ferric phosphate where is observed that to p H 3.5-5 the percentage of removal is the highest reaching bigger values to 90%. Finally the data of the sorption of uranium was adjusted to the pattern of Langmuir. (Author)

  17. Laser ablation microprobe inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry study on diffusion of uranium into cement materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, D.; Chida, T.; Cowper, M.

    2008-01-01

    The diffusion of uranium (U(VI)) in solid cement monoliths of ordinary portland cement (OPC) and low-heat portland cement containing 30 wt.% fly ash (FAC) was measured by an in-diffusion technique. Detailed sharp depth profiles of uranium in the solid cement matrices were successively and quantitatively measured using laser ablation microprobe inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LAMP-ICP-MS), and the apparent (D a ) and effective (D e ) diffusion coefficient of uranium in cement matrix were calculated as: D a =∝ 4 x 10 -16 m 2 s -1 and D e =∝ 3 x 10 -11 m 2 s -1 for OPC, and D a =∝ 2 x 10 -17 m 2 s -1 and D e =∝ 6 x 10 -13 m 2 s -1 for FAC. (orig.)

  18. The development of a material for uranium sorption in NH_3/N environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaotong; He Linfeng; Liu Bing; Tang Yaping

    2014-01-01

    An efficient hybrid silica (TD-silica) bifunctionalized with trimethyl ammonium (TMAP) and phosphonate (DPTS) for Uranium (VI) extraction in NH_3/N media has been developed in this study. The hybrid silica was prepared by a post grafting of N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium at large-pore silica. The resulting TD-modified silica were observed to possess a good stability and high efficiency for uranium (VI) sorption from solution in coexist with NH_3/N. The adsorbed uranium (VI) can be easily desorbed by using 0.05 mol/L HNO_3 and reused for at least 4 times. It is suggested that TD-silica could be a promising solid phase sorbent for highly-efficient removal of U(VI) from solution in coexist with NH_3/N. (author)

  19. Filled skutterudite antimonides: Validation of the electron-crystal phonon-glass approach to new thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandrus, D; Sales, B C; Keppens, V [and others

    1997-07-01

    After a brief review of the transport and thermoelectric properties of filled skutterudite antimonides, the authors present resonant ultrasound, specific heat, and inelastic neutron scattering results that establish the existence of two low-energy vibrational modes in the filled skutterudite LaFe{sub 3}CoSb{sub 12}. It is likely that at least one of these modes represents the localized, incoherent vibrations of the La ion in an oversized atomic cage. These results support the usefulness of weakly bound, rattling ions for the improvement of thermoelectric performance.

  20. Alpha spectroscopic determination of plutonium and uranium in food, biological materials, and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frindik, O.

    1980-07-01

    An alpha-spectrometric method for the plutonium determination which was tested in different samples is described in detail. In particular, this method is capable of determining the very low plutonium levels found in food at present, and allow recoveries of 85-95% of the tracer added. Inorganic samples, such as soil samples for example, can be analyzed by using an abbreviated modification of the method. The measuring preparations show a high degree of spectral purity. Uranium can be separated during the analytical procedure and, after purification, can also be determined alpha-spectrometrically. 90-100% of the uranium are recovered. (orig.) [de

  1. Standard test method for analysis of isotopic composition of uranium in nuclear-grade fuel material by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the isotopic composition of uranium (U) in nuclear-grade fuel material. The following isotopic weight percentages are determined using a quadrupole inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (Q-ICP-MS): 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, and 238U. The analysis can be performed on various material matrices after acid dissolution and sample dilution into water or dilute nitric (HNO3) acid. These materials include: fuel product, uranium oxide, uranium oxide alloys, uranyl nitrate (UNH) crystals, and solutions. The sample preparation discussed in this test method focuses on fuel product material but may be used for uranium oxide or a uranium oxide alloy. Other preparation techniques may be used and some references are given. Purification of the uranium by anion-exchange extraction is not required for this test method, as it is required by other test methods such as radiochemistry and thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS). This test method is also described i...

  2. Coordinated safeguards for materials management in a uranium--plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility: Coprecal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayem, H.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dietz, R.J.; Hakkila, E.A.; Kern, E.A.; Schelonka, E.P.; Shipley, J.P.; Smith, D.B.

    1979-02-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an advanced materials-management system for safeguarding special nuclear materials in a uranium--plutonium nitrate-to-oxide coconversion facility based on the Coprecal process. Design concepts are presented for near real-time (dynamic) accountability by forming dynamic materials balances from information provided by chemical and nondestructive analyses and from process-control instrumentation. Modeling and simulation techniques are used to compare the sensitivities of proposed dynamic materials accounting strategies to both abrupt and protracted diversion. The safeguards implications of coconversion as well as some unique features of the reference process are discussed and design criteria are identified to improve the safeguardability of the Coprecal coconversion process

  3. Method of preparation of uranium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline Loetsch; Thomson, Robert Kenneth James

    2013-07-09

    Method for producing terminal uranium nitride complexes comprising providing a suitable starting material comprising uranium; oxidizing the starting material with a suitable oxidant to produce one or more uranium(IV)-azide complexes; and, sufficiently irradiating the uranium(IV)-azide complexes to produce the terminal uranium nitride complexes.

  4. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  5. Determination of uranium in geologic materials by laser-excited fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-excited fluorescence method is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in rocks and soils. The limit of detection is less than 1 ppm, and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2.6 to 12.5%. The method was evaluated by using known geological reference samples

  6. Determination of trace amounts of uranium in silicate materials by means of neutron activation analysis involving rapid radiochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebihara, M.; Tomura, Kenji; Masutani, M.

    1987-01-01

    Uranium is determined in silicate materials such as standard rocks and a meteorite by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The gamma-ray intensity of 239 U was measured with a planar type pure germanium detector system. The obtained data are mostly consistent with the literature values. Compared with a non-destructive method, the present method was found to improve the sensitivity by at least a factor of ten. Several errors which might be involved in the authors' RNAA procedures were examined and their degrees were evaluated. (author)

  7. Solution of environmental protection problems and complex utilization of raw materials during mining and processing of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvinenko, V.G.; Savva, P.P.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to the complex of measures taken in Priargunsky industrial mine-chemical association and directed to environment protection, complex utilization of raw materials during mining and processing of uranium ores. These measures include: 1) reduction of toxic chemical agent effluents into atmosphere due to introduction of new methods and gas cleaning systems; 2) rational use of water resources owing to application of circulating water supply systems, waste waters treatment and effective control of the state of water consumption by industrial enterprises; 3) utilization of gangue and industrial solid wastes

  8. Contamination of tooth-colored mineral trioxide aggregate used as a root-end filling material: a bacterial leakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montellano, Angela M; Schwartz, Scott A; Beeson, Thomas J

    2006-05-01

    This experiment investigated the ability of tooth-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to maintain an apical seal in the presence of bacteria when contaminated with blood, saline or saliva. Ninety extracted human teeth with single canals were randomly placed into six groups of 15. Canals were prepared to size 50. The apical 3 mm of each root was removed and 3 mm root-end preparations were made with a #329 bur. Root-end preparations in groups 1 through 3 were filled with MTA after contamination with blood, saline, or saliva, respectively. In group 4, uncontaminated root-end preparations were filled with MTA. Groups 5 and 6 served as negative and positive controls. A tube/tooth assembly was utilized to suspend each root end in Trypticase Soy Broth (TSB). The access chambers were filled with Staphylococcus epidermidis. Positive growth over thirty days was demonstrated by turbidity of the TSB. Vitek analysis was used to confirm the presence of S. epidermidis in the positive samples. Data evaluation consisted of a chi(2) analysis (p < 0.05). Although all experimental groups demonstrated leakage, tooth-colored MTA contaminated with saliva (group 3) leaked significantly more than the uncontaminated tooth-colored MTA (group 4) (p = 0.028).

  9. IRMM-1000a and IRMM-1000b. Uranium reference materials certified for the production date based on the 230Th/234U radiochronometer. Part II. Certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venchiarutti, C.; Richter, S.; Jakopic, R.; Aregbe, Y.; Varga, Z.; Nicholl, A.; Krajko, J.; Mayer, K.

    2016-01-01

    The IRMM-1000a and IRMM-1000b uranium reference materials, of 20 and 50 mg uranium, respectively, were produced by the European Commission Joint Research Centre's Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (EC-JRC-IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (EC-JRC-ITU). They are novel uranium reference materials certified for the production date based on the 230 Th/ 234 U radiochronometer, i.e. the date of the last chemical separation of these two radionuclides. The certified reference value and its uncertainty, homogeneity and stability of the material were established in accordance with the ISO Guide 34:2009 and the 'Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement'. (author)

  10. 装填材料对PELE侵彻混凝土效能影响研究%Influence of filling material on penetration of PELE into concrete target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范少博; 陈智刚; 郭光全; 侯秀成; 陈冬梅

    2012-01-01

    为研究惰性装填物对PELE侵彻混凝土靶板效能影响,利用有限元软件LS-DYNA对不同惰性装填物的PELE侵彻混凝土靶板进行数值模拟.结果表明:与PELE侵彻混凝土靶板相比钢靶的形成破片质量较大、速度较慢;不同装填物对靶板的破坏效能不同;尼龙装填物比橡胶对靶板破坏的面积大,破片数量多.通过实验验证了模拟结果的正确性和可靠性.%Researches on the influence of inert fillings on penetration of PELE into concrete targets were carried out Penetration of PELE with different inert fillings into concrete targets was simulated by LS-DYNA. The results show that the fragments formed by penetration into concrete targets are larger and the velocity is lower than those into steel targets, and the different fillings have different damage efficiency. The damage area and the amount of fragments are larger for nylon filling material than for rubber. Correctness and reliability of the simulation results are verified by experiments.

  11. Evaluation of new geological reference materials for uranium-series measurements: Chinese Geological Standard Glasses (CGSG) and macusanite obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, J S; Murrell, M T; Goldstein, S J; Nunn, A J; Amato, R S; Hinrichs, K A

    2013-10-15

    Recent advances in high-resolution, rapid, in situ microanalytical techniques present numerous opportunities for the analytical community, provided accurately characterized reference materials are available. Here, we present multicollector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) and multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) uranium and thorium concentration and isotopic data obtained by isotope dilution for a suite of newly available Chinese Geological Standard Glasses (CGSG) designed for microanalysis. These glasses exhibit a range of compositions including basalt, syenite, andesite, and a soil. Uranium concentrations for these glasses range from ∼2 to 14 μg g(-1), Th/U weight ratios range from ∼4 to 6, (234)U/(238)U activity ratios range from 0.93 to 1.02, and (230)Th/(238)U activity ratios range from 0.98 to 1.12. Uranium and thorium concentration and isotopic data are also presented for a rhyolitic obsidian from Macusani, SE Peru (macusanite). This glass can also be used as a rhyolitic reference material, has a very low Th/U weight ratio (around 0.077), and is approximately in (238)U-(234)U-(230)Th secular equilibrium. The U-Th concentration data agree with but are significantly more precise than those previously measured. U-Th concentration and isotopic data agree within estimated errors for the two measurement techniques, providing validation of the two methods. The large (238)U-(234)U-(230)Th disequilibria for some of the glasses, along with the wide range in their chemical compositions and Th/U ratios should provide useful reference points for the U-series analytical community.

  12. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package invert and backfill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Haire, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A new technology has been proposed in which depleted uranium, in the form of oxides or silicates, is placed around the outside of the spent nuclear fuel waste packages in the geological repository. This concept may (1) reduce the potential for repository nuclear criticality events and (2) reduce long-term release of radionuclides from the repository. As a new concept, there are significant uncertainties

  13. Matpro--version 10: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reymann, G.A.

    1978-02-01

    The materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO--Version 10) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures

  14. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A.

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures

  15. MATPRO-Version 11: a handbook of materials properties for use in the analysis of light water reactor fuel rod behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Reymann, G.A. (comps.)

    1979-02-01

    This handbook describes the materials properties correlations and computer subcodes (MATPRO-Version 11) developed for use with various LWR fuel rod behavior analytical programs at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Formulations of fuel rod material properties, which are generally semiempirical in nature, are presented for uranium dioxide and mixed uranium--plutonium dioxide fuel, zircaloy cladding, and fill gas mixtures.

  16. Uranium hexafluoride - chemistry and technology of a raw material of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, W.; Jacob, E.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride exhibits an unusual combination of properties: UF 6 is both a large-scale industrial product, and also one of the most reactive compounds known. Its industrial application arises from the need to use enriched uranium with up to 4% 235 U as fuel in light water reactors. Enrichment is performed in isotope separation plants with UF 6 as the working gas. Its volatility and thermal stability make UF 6 suitable for this application. UF 6 handling is difficult because of its high reactivity and its radioactivity, and special experience and equipment are required which are not commonly available in laboratories or industrial facilities. The chemical reactions of UF 6 are characterized by its marked fluorination efficiency which is similar to that of F 2 . Of special importance in connection with the handling of UF 6 is its extreme sensitivity to hydrolysis. Because they all use UF 6 , the isotope separation processes currently in use (gas diffusion, gas centrifuge, separation nozzle process) have a number of common features. For instance, they are all beset by the problem of formation of solid UF 6 decomposition products, e.g. by radiolysis of UF 6 molecules induced by its own radiation. Reconversion of UF 6 into UO 2 is achieved by three well-known methods (ADU, AUC, IDP-process). To produce uranium metal, UF 6 is first reduced to UF 4 , which is subsequently reduced by Ca 6 or Mg metal. 158 refs

  17. Safety concerning the alteration in fuel material usage (new installation of the uranium enrichment pilot plant) at Ningyo Pass Mine of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A report of the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety was presented to the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, which is concerned with the safety in the alteration of fuel material usage (new installation of the uranium enrichment pilot plant) at the Ningyo Pass Mine. Its safety was confirmed. The alteration, i.e. installation of the uranium enrichment pilot plant, is as follows. Intended for the overall test of centrifugal uranium enrichment technology, the pilot plant includes a two-storied main building of about 9,000 m 2 floor space, containing centrifuges, UF 6 equipment, etc., a uranium storage of about 1,000 m 2 floor space, and a waste water treatment facility, two-storied with about 300 m 2 floor space. The contents of the examination are safety of the facilities, criticality control, radiation control, waste treatment, and effects of accidents on the surrounding environment. (Mori, K

  18. Reactivity feedback coefficients of a low enriched uranium fuelled material test research reactor at end-of-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The isotopic concentration in the fuel changes as soon as it starts its operation. → The neutronic properties of a reactor also change with fuel burnup. → The reactivity feedbacks at end-of-life of a material test reactor fuelled with low enriched uranium fuel are calculated. → Codes used include WIMS-D4 and CITATION. - Abstract: The reactivity feedback coefficients at end-of-life of a material test reactor fuelled with low enriched uranium fuel were calculated. The reactor used for the study was the IAEA's 10 MW benchmark reactor. Simulations were carried out to calculate the different reactivity feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, reactivity coefficient for change of water temperature and reactivity coefficient for change of water density. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitude of all the reactivity feedback coefficients increased at end of life of the reactor by almost 2-5%.

  19. Preparation of new nano magnetic material Fe3O4@g-C3N4 and good adsorption performance on uranium ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Wei; Liu, Huijun; Yan, Xueming; Fu, Li

    2018-03-01

    A new nano magnetic material Fe3O4@g-C3N4 was prepared by deposition reduction method, which performed good adsorption performance to uranium ion. Characterization results showed that the g-C3N4 particles were wrapped around the nano magnetic Fe3O4 particles, and the textural properties of this material was improved, so the adsorption performance to uranium ion was good. Adsorption experiments of this material demonstrated that the optimum pH value was 10, the optimum mass of adsorbent was 6.5 mg and the optimum adsorption time was 150 min in the initial concentration of 140 mg/L uranium ion solution system, and the maximum adsorption capacity was up to 352.1 mg/g and the maximum adsorption rate was more than 90%.

  20. Solid state processing of massive uranium mononitride, using uranium and uranium higher nitride powders as starting materials (1962); Preparation a l'etat solide de mononitrure d'uranium massif a partir de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-12-15

    The mechanism and the optimum conditions for preparing uranium mononitride have been studied. The results have been used for hot pressing (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C, under vacuum) a mixture of powders of uranium and uranium higher nitrides. The products obtained have been identified by X-ray measurements and may be - at will and depending upon the stoichiometry - either UN, or a cermet a U{sub {alpha}}-UN. As revealed by the curved shape of grain boundaries, the sinters obtained here do not easily evolve towards physico-chemical equilibrium when submitted to heat treatment. This behaviour is quite different from the one observed with uranium monocarbide prepared by a similar method. This fact may be ascribed to the insolubility in the matrix UN of particles of UO{sub 2} being present as impurities. The density, hardness and thermal conductivity of these products are higher than those measured on uranium nitride or cermets U-UN obtained by other methods. (author) [French] Apres une etude prealable du mecanisme et des conditions optimales de nitruration de l'uranium, on a montre qu'il est possible de preparer par frittage sous charge (250 kg/cm{sup 2}, 1000 deg. C sous vide) d'un melange de poudres d'uranium et de nitrures superieurs d'uranium, un produit qui a ete identifie par diffraction de rayons X. On peut ainsi obtenir a volonte, soit le monocarbure UN, soit un cermet U{sub {alpha}}-UN dans le cas de compositions sous-stoechiometriques. Au contraire du monocarbure d'uranium prepare dans des conditions analogues, les produits obtenus ici, soumis a un traitement thermique, n'evoluent pas facilement vers un etat d'equilibre physico-chimique caracterise par l'existence de joints de grains rectilignes. On attribue ce phenomene a l'insolubilite de l'impurete UO{sub 2} dans UN. La densite, la durete, la conductibilite thermique de ces produits se revelent superieures a celles des nitrures d'uranium ou des cermets U-UN obtenus par les autres methodes. (auteur)

  1. Measuring the fill height of sealed cans with a compound pendulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinard, P.M.

    1995-06-01

    A compound pendulum has been designed, fabricated, tested, and used to determine the fill height of material in sealed cans. The specific cans that stimulated this work are partially filled with uranium and plutonium oxide. Fill height affects nondestructive assays using fission neutrons, but corrections for various fill heights can be made once the height is known. Heights vary with use as the powder compacts or loosens, so it is necessary to determine the height at the time of the neutron measurement. The pendulum is small and readily portable so it can be taken to the location of the neutron measurement. Tests with open cans filled with sand to various known heights had accuracies generally within 3%. Factors that can affect the accuracy are examined and discussed. Experience in using the pendulum on sealed cans is related

  2. Study of radon emanation from uranium mill tailings. Relations between radon emanating power and physicochemical properties of the material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, D.

    1999-01-01

    The uranium extraction from ores leads to large amounts of mill tailings still containing radionuclides, such as thorium-230 and radium-226, which generate radon-222. Without protective action, radon exposition may be high enough to cause concern for health of populations living in the vicinity of an uranium mill tailings disposal. This exposition pathway has therefore to be taken into account in the radiological impact studies. The emanating power, i.e. the part of radon atoms which escape from the solid particles, is directly involved in the radon source term evaluation. It may be determined for a given material by laboratory measurements. Emanating powers from 0.08 to 0.33 have been obtained for mill tailings from Jouac (Limousin, France), at various moisture contents. In order to reduce the relations of dependence between some of the emanation parameters, more simple phases, kaolinite and polymeric resins, have been studied. Those experiments have led us to the selection of the mechanisms and the parameters to consider for the development of an emanation modelling. The whole of the results obtained point out the radon sorption, in various proportions depending on the materials. The moisture content influence on the emanation from materials containing fine particles have been confirmed: the emanation increases with this parameter until a continuous water film surrounding the particles have been formed, and then become constant. This 'water effect' occurs in a moisture content range, which depends on the material porosity. Elsewhere, the presence of amorphous phases may led to a high radon emanation. (author)

  3. Interim report of working group on development and examination of new material, high performance centrifuge technology, Advisory Committee on Nuclear Uranium Enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The industrialization of uranium enrichment in Japan has been advanced by the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. by centrifugal separation technology. In April, 1988, the partial operation of the uranium enrichment prototype plant by centrifugal separation process (200 t SWU/year) was begun in Ningyo Pass, Okayama Prefecture, and its full operation is expected in January, 1989. Based on this achievement, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industry Co., Ltd. advances the construction of a commercial uranium enrichment plant in Rokkasho Village, Aomori Prefecture, aiming at the start of operation around 1991. On the other hand, the environment surrounding the uranium enrichment business in Japan is extremely severe at present, and due to the excessive supply capacity of world uranium enrichment service and the recent rapid appreciation of yen, the further improvement of the economical efficiency of Japanese uranium enrichment business is demanded. The working group held four meetings since May, 1988, and evaluated the present status of the research and development of new material, high performance centrifuges, and investigated and discussed the method of advancing the research and development hereafter. The results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. A rapid method for the determination of uranium in ores and carbonaceous materials by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolmay, R.T.; Jacobs, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of uranium by a non-fusion method in a wide range of uranium-bearing materials, e.g. ores, coals, and resins, is described. Matrix effects are corrected for by dilution and fine grinding of the sample with coarse river sand and application of a technique for background correction. The linear calibration range is up to 1000 p.p.m. of U 3 O 8 . It was found that the suitable dilution of resins with river sand and fine grinding makes it possible for up to 6 per cent U 3 O 8 to be determined. Ten samples can be analysed in two-and-a-half hours. The precision and accuracy is 5 and 2 per cent at U 3 O 8 concentrations of 500 and 2000 p.p.m. respectively. The laboratory method, a listing of the computer programme required for the calibration and calculation of the U 3 O 8 concentrations, and instructions for the calculation of the error in the determination are given in the appendices [af

  5. The influence of irradiation potential on the degree of conversion and mechanical properties of two bulk-fill flowable RBC base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finan, Leah; Palin, William M; Moskwa, Natalia; McGinley, Emma Louise; Fleming, Garry J P

    2013-08-01

    To assess the depth of cure claims of two bulk-fill flowable RBC bases (SDR and x-tra base) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, biaxial flexure strength (BFS), and Vickers hardness number (VHN) for specimen depths of 8mm (in 1mm increments). The degree of conversion (DC) was measured by monitoring the peak height (6164cm(-1)) of specimens (11.0±0.1mm diameter, 1.0±0.1mm thickness) during light irradiation for 20s using a quartz tungsten halogen light curing unit at 650±26mW/cm(2). DC was measured up to 120s post irradiation and repeated (n=3) for irradiation depths up to 8mm (in 1mm increments). Further series (n=20) of eight discs were prepared, stacked, light irradiated and numbered from one to eight (distance from the LCU). The specimens were stored at 37±1°C for 24h and BFS tested with the fracture fragments used to determine the VHN for each specimen. X-tra base can be irradiated to 8mm without a change in DC, something the SDR material cannot claim. However, the DC results confirm both bulk-fill flowable RBC bases have a depth of cure in excess of 4mm. One-way ANOVAs of BFS and VHN data showed significant differences between irradiation depths for x-tra base and SDR with increasing irradiation depth (4mm) resulting in significant reductions in mean BFS and VHN. The claims that the bulk-fill flowable RBC bases have a depth of cure in excess of 4mm can be confirmed but the differing chemistry of the resin formulations and filler characteristics contribute to significant differences in DC, BFS and VHN data between the two materials tested. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of the pore filling fraction of carbazole-based hole-transporting materials in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Ben Manaa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbazole-based molecular glasses have emerged as a promising alternative to the widely used hole-transporting materials (HTM spiro-OMeTAD in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs. The pore filling fraction (PFF of the mesoporous TiO2 layer by the HTM appears as a key parameter determining the final efficiency of a DSSC. In this work, the pore-filling properties of a family of carbazole-based HTMs are investigated for the first time and the photovoltaic behavior of DSSC devices (fabricated using the D102 dye is discussed in light of the present findings. It is found that N-aryl substituted 3,6-bis(diphenylaminyl-carbazole derivatives exhibit relatively low PFF of ca. 60%. Methoxy groups on the diphenylamine moieties have little influence on the PFF, indicating that the strong enhancement in power conversion efficiency (PCE is not related to an improved filling of the pores by the HTM. N-alkylated HTMs lead to higher PFF, increasing with the alkyl chain length, up to 78%.

  7. Effectiveness of ProTaper, D-RaCe, and Mtwo retreatment files with and without supplementary instruments in the removal of root canal filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques da Silva, B; Baratto-Filho, F; Leonardi, D P; Henrique Borges, A; Volpato, L; Branco Barletta, F

    2012-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of different retreatment rotary files in removing gutta-percha and endodontic sealer from canals. Ninety straight single-rooted premolars were prepared up to a size 30 and filled with gutta-percha and sealer and then randomly assigned to six retreatment groups (n = 15). Groups I, III, and V were retreated using rotary systems ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTUR), D-RaCe, and Mtwo Retreatment, respectively. Groups II, IV, and VI were retreated using the additional instruments F4, size 40, .04 taper RaCe, and size 40, .04 taper Mtwo, respectively. The roots were split vertically, and images of the halves were obtained using a high-resolution scanner and evaluated with AutoCAD software to calculate the percentage of residual material. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Student-Newman-Keuls tests using a 5% significance cutoff (P 0.05) between groups when additional instruments were used. The percentage of residual material was lowest in the PTUR group and was statistically significant only when compared to the D-RaCe system (P = 0.0038). All root canals had residual filling material after retreatment even when additional instruments were used. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  8. Periapical tissue response after use of intermediate restorative material, gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement, and mineral trioxide aggregate as retrograde root-end filling materials: a histologic study in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälivaara, Dan-Åke; Abrahamsson, Peter; Isaksson, Sten; Salata, Luiz Antonio; Sennerby, Lars; Dahlin, Christer

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the periapical tissue response of 4 different retrograde root-filling materials, ie, intermediate restorative material, thermoplasticized gutta-percha, reinforced zinc oxide cement (Super-EBA), and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), in conjunction with an ultrasonic root-end preparation technique in an animal model. Vital roots of the third and fourth right mandibular premolars in 6 healthy mongrel dogs were apicectomized and sealed with 1 of the materials using a standardized surgical procedure. After 120 days, the animals were sacrificed and the specimens were analyzed radiologically, histologically, and scanning electron microscopically. The Fisher exact test was performed on the 2 outcome values. Twenty-three sections were analyzed histologically. Evaluation showed better re-establishment of the periapical tissues and generally lower inflammatory infiltration in the sections from teeth treated with the intermediate restorative material and the MTA. New root cement on the resected dentin surfaces was seen on all sections regardless of the used material. New hard tissue formation, directly on the surface of the material, was seen only in the MTA sections. There was no statistical difference in outcome among the tested materials. The results from this dog model favor the intermediate restorative material and MTA as retrograde fillings when evaluating the bone defect regeneration. MTA has the most favorable periapical tissue response when comparing the biocompatibility of the materials tested. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  10. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. Wear studies on ZrO2-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO 2 composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO 2 composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5 wt.% ZrO 2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Graphical abstract: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a type of biomaterial which might be used in surface modification. In this study, the wettabilities, composition, hardness, friction and wear characteristics of PEEK/ZrO 2 coatings were investigated, compared with bare Ti6Al4V sample. After comprehensive evaluation, 5 wt.% ZrO 2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Highlights: • PEEK coating were filled by ZrO 2 nanoparticles with different weight percentage. • The lubrication regime of all the tested samples are boundary lubrication. • Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear were the dominant wear

  12. Wear studies on ZrO{sub 2}-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jian [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Yuhong, E-mail: liuyuhong@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Tyagi, Rajnesh [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (BHU) Varanasi, Varanasi 221005 (India); Liu, Weiqiang, E-mail: weiqliu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Biomechanics and Biotechnology Lab, Research Institute of Tsinghua University in Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518057 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5 wt.% ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Graphical abstract: Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is a type of biomaterial which might be used in surface modification. In this study, the wettabilities, composition, hardness, friction and wear characteristics of PEEK/ZrO{sub 2} coatings were investigated, compared with bare Ti6Al4V sample. After comprehensive evaluation, 5 wt.% ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc. - Highlights: • PEEK coating were filled by ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles with different weight percentage. • The lubrication regime of all the tested samples are boundary lubrication. • Adhesive wear and mild abrasive

  13. Long-Term Strength of a Thick-Walled Pipe Filled with an Aggressive Medium, with Account for Damageability of the Pipe Material and Residual Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriev, S. A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes the study of scattered fracture of a thick-walled pipe filled with an aggressive medium, which creates uniform pressure on the inner surface of the pipe. It is assumed that the aggressive medium affects only the value of instantaneous strength. Damageability is described by an integral operator of the hereditary type. The problem is solved with allowance for residual strength of the pipe material behind the fracture front. Numerical calculation is carried out, and relationships between the fracture front coordinate and time for various concentrations of the aggressive medium and residual strength behind the fracture front are constructed.

  14. Application of the 226Ra-230Th-234U and 227Ac-231Pa-235U radiochronometers to uranium certified reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolison, J.M.; Treinen, K.C.; McHugh, K.C.; Gaffney, A.M.; Williams, R.W.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium certified reference materials (CRM) issued by New Brunswick Laboratory were subjected to dating using four independent uranium-series radiochronometers. In all cases, there was acceptable agreement between the model ages calculated using the 231 Pa- 235 U, 230 Th- 234 U, 227 Ac- 235 U or 226 Ra- 234 U radiochronometers and either the certified 230 Th- 234 U model date (CRM 125-A and CRM U630), or the known purification date (CRM U050 and CRM U100). The agreement between the four independent radiochronometers establishes these uranium certified reference materials as ideal informal standards for validating dating techniques utilized in nuclear forensic investigations in the absence of standards with certified model ages for multiple radiochronometers. (author)

  15. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  16. COGEMA's UMF [Uranium Management Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamorlette, G.; Bertrand, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The French government-owned corporation, COGEMA, is responsible for the nuclear fuel cycle. This paper describes the activities at COGEMA's Pierrelatte facility, especially its Uranium Management Facility. UF6 handling and storage is described for natural, enriched, depleted, and reprocessed uranium. UF6 quality control specifications, sampling, and analysis (halocarbon and volatile fluorides, isotopic analysis, uranium assay, and impurities) are described. In addition, the paper discusses the filling and cleaning of containers and security at UMF

  17. Control and accountancy of nuclear materials in a uranium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, N.H.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear material control and accountancy system has been developed by Goodyear Atomic Corporation to meet safeguards and security requirements. It comprises three major elements: physical security, nuclear material control, and nuclear material accounting. This safeguards system is called Dynamic Material Control and Accountancy System (DYMCAS). The system approaches real-time computer control on a transaction-by-transaction basis

  18. Evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings sites for liner requirements: Characterization and interaction of tailings, soil, and liner materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Martin, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of laboratory experiments using soils from Clive, Utah and tailings samples from three inactive uranium processing sites. The results are to be used to predict contaminant behavior for comparison with the regulatory criteria to decide whether a liner is needed. The interactions of leachates with soils and liner material were studied using both batch and column methods. It is determined that batch leaching tests are suitable for screening a large number of tailings samples for relative contaminant concentrations between samples but not for determining contaminant concentrations and release rates in tailings leachate. The results of column leaching tests on samples of tailings from inactive sites indicate that contaminant concentrations are highest in initial leachate from the columns and that concentrations decrease by an order of magnitude or more after one pore volume

  19. Quantitative spectrographic analysis of Li, Na and Ca in uranium base materials, using the carrier distillation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Brito, J. de.

    1978-01-01

    A spectrographic method for the quantitative determination of Ca, Li and Na in uranium base materials is described. The carrier destillation technique is used and a study is made for the selection of best carrier compounds. In U 3 O 8 matrix, the best results are obtained with 4% In 2 O 3 for the determination of Na and a 15% mixed carrier (3 NaCl + 1 Y 2 O 3 ) for the determination of Ca and Li. The minium determination limit for Ca and Li is 1 ppm while for Na it is 15 ppm. The precision of the method is calculated and the relative standard deviation is found to be 11, 16 and 6,5% for Ca, Li and Na respectively [pt

  20. Uranium resource technology, Seminar 3, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This conference proceedings contains 20 papers and 1 panel discussion on uranium mining and ore treatment, taking into account the environmental issues surrounding uranium supply. Topics discussed include: the US uranium resource base, the technology and economics of uranium recovery from phosphate resources, trends in preleash materials handling of sandstone uranium ores, groundwater restoration after in-situ uranium leaching, mitigation of the environmental impacts of open pit and underground uranium mining, remedial actions at inactive uranium mill tailings sites, environmental laws governing in-situ solution mining of uranium, and the economics of in-situ solution mining. 16 papers are indexed separately

  1. Possibilities of structure stabilisation in saliniferous formations using salt grit as a filling material; Moeglichkeiten der Gefuegestabilisierung von Salzgrusversatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Sebastian; Gruner, Matthias; Mischo, Helmut [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bergbau und Spezialtiefbau

    2014-09-15

    The final disposal of high-active wastes in deep geological formations is an issue of great national and international import. On account of its good thermal conductivity and creep capability much research is currently focussed on sand as a host rock material. After the emplacement of wastes in abandoned mining cavities these must be sealed up to prevent fluids from coming into contact with the wastes. This must be done using materials that are either native or similar to the materials of the host formation. A particularly suitable material in the case of saliniferous formations is salt grit. Up to this point investigations have primarily been focused on preparing a suitable salt grit material and the rheological properties of the binding agent. This article presents and interprets the results of preliminary experiments on the miscibility of salt grit and binding agent suspensions. The MgO and CaSO{sub 4}-based binding agent systems analysed proved to be suitable. Among the MgO binding agents a composition of 3:1:8 was found to be more suitable than one of 5:1:8 on account of its lower initial viscosity. This reduces the amount of mixing required for wetting the material across all grain sizes, improving the chances of success. In the case of the two semihydrates of CaSO{sub 4} both the α and the β semihydrate proved suitable. This is due to a low fluid content which still also allows for a sufficiently low viscosity of the binding agent suspensions.

  2. Nuclear weapon relevant materials and preventive arms control. Uranium-free fuels for plutonium elimination and spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebert, Wolfgang; Englert, Matthias; Pistner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Today, the most significant barrier against the access to nuclear weapons is to take hold on sufficient amounts of nuclear weapon-relevant nuclear materials. It is mainly a matter of fissionable materials (like highly enriched uranium and plutonium) but also of fusionable tritium. These can be used as reactor fuel in civil nuclear programmes but also in nuclear weapon programmes. To stop or to hinder nuclear proliferation, in consequence, there is not only a need to analyse open or covered political objectives and intentions. In the long term, it might be more decisive to analyse the intrinsic civil-military ambivalence of nuclear materials and technologies, which are suitable for sensitive material production. A farsighted strategy to avoid proliferation dangers should take much more account to technical capabilities as it is done in the political debate on nuclear non-proliferation so far. If a technical option is at a state's disposal, it is extremely difficult and lengthy to revert that again. The dangers, which one has to react to, are stemming from already existing stocks of nuclear weapon-relevant materials - in the military as well as in the civil realm - and from existing or future technologies, which are suitable for the production of such materials (cf. info 1 and 2). Therefore, the overall approach of this research project is to strive for a drastic reduction of the access to nuclear weapon-relevant material and its production capabilities. Thus, on one hand the nuclear proliferation by state actors could be answered more effectively, on the other hand by that approach a decisive barrier against the access on nuclear weapons by sub-national groups and terrorists could also be erected. For this purpose, safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and other measures of physical accountancy will remain indispensable elements of arms control. However, one has to consider that the goal of nuclear non-proliferation could not be achieved and

  3. Feasibility studies to establish at the Kazakhstan Ulba metallurgical plant the manufacturing capability to produce low-enriched uranium certified reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nesuhoff, J [NBL; Cratto, P [NBL; Pfennigwerth, G [Y12 NATIONAL SEC. COMPLEX; Mikhailenko, A [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Maliutina, I [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Nations, J [GREGG PROTECTION SERVICES

    2009-01-01

    One of the salient features of the transition plan that the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is presently implementing in the Former Soviet Union countries is the availability of uranium certified reference materials for calibration of nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement equipment. To address this challenge, DOE/NNSA and U.S. national laboratories have focused their cooperative efforts on establishing a reliable source for manufacturing, certifying, and supplying of such standards. The Ulba Metallurgical Plant (UMP), Kazakhstan, which processes large quantities of low-enriched uranium to produce ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear-powered reactors, is well situated to become a key supplier of low-enriched uranium certified reference materials for the country and Central Asia region. We have recently completed Phase I of a feasibility study to establish at UMP capabilities of manufacturing these standards. In this paper we will discuss details of a proposed methodology for uranium down-blending, material selection and characterization, and a proposed methodology of measurement by destructive (DA) and non-destructive (NDA) analysis to form a database for material certification by the competent State authorities in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In addition, we will discuss the prospect for manufacturing of such standards at UMP.

  4. The outcome of apical microsurgery using MTA as the root-end filling material: 2- to 6-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, M K; Tekin, U; Kaval, M E; Solmaz, M C

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the influence of various predictors on the healing outcome 2-6 years after apical microsurgery (AMS) using MTA as the root-end filling material. A total of 90 anterior teeth with asymptomatic persistent periradicular periodontitis of strictly endodontic origin that failed after either nonsurgical or surgical treatment were included. Surgery was completed under local anaesthesia using a standardized clinical protocol. Clinical and radiographic measures as well as the follow-up period were used to determine the healing outcome. For statistical analysis of the predictors, the outcome was dichotomized into healed cases and nonhealed cases. Odds ratios were calculated, and Pearson chi-square or Fisher's exact tests were used to analyse the data. Clinical and radiographic assessment of AMS revealed that 80% were healed, 14.4% were nonhealed, whilst 5.6% were judged to be uncertain. None of the various predictors investigated had a significant influence on the outcome of AMS. The results of this clinical study demonstrated that 80% of cases that received apical microsurgery healed when using MTA as the root-end filling material. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties of opal matrices with intersphere nanocavities filled with crystalline multiferroic, piezoelectric, and segnetoelectric materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samoilovich, M.I.; Rinkevich, A.B.; Bovtun, Viktor; Belyanin, A.F.; Kempa, Martin; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Tsvetkov, M.Yu.; Klescheva, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 11 (2013), s. 2132-2147 ISSN 1070-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : composites * opal matrices * optical, magnetic, and dielectric properties Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2013

  6. A multi-scale methodology to model damage, deformation and ignition of highly-filled energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivier, G. [Paris Univ., Paris (France). LMT Cachan; CEA Le Ripault, Monts (France); Trumel, H. [CEA Le Ripault, Monts (France); Hild, F. [Paris Univ., Paris (France). LMT Cachan

    2009-07-01

    The kinetic energy that occurs when energetic materials are impacted can be converted to heat through dissipative deformation processes while the macroscopic temperature remains unaffected. In this study, a thermodynamics-based approach was used to model the elasto-plastic behaviour that occurs during the deformation process of microstructures. Macroscopic material was modelled as a statistical distribution of unit cells containing a crack grain embedded in an elastic mortar-like matrix. A mesoscopic unit cell model was also developed under confined shear. The study demonstrated that stored energy is a non-negligible part of the total energy of the system, and that stored energy can be released during the unloading process. It was concluded that the mesoscopic analysis of the cracked cell demonstrates that continuum thermodynamics can be used to predict hot spots induced by friction. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  7. On-site transportation and handling of uranium-233 special nuclear material: Preliminary hazards and accident analysis. Final

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solack, T.; West, D.; Ullman, D.; Coppock, G.; Cox, C.

    1995-01-01

    U-233 Special Nuclear Material (SNM) currently stored at the T-Building Storage Areas A and B must be transported to the SW/R Tritium Complex for repackaging. This SNM is in the form of oxide powder contained in glass jars which in turn are contained in heat sealed double polyethylene bags. These doubled-bagged glass jars have been primarily stored in structural steel casks and birdcages for approximately 20 years. The three casks, eight birdcages, and one pail/pressure vessel will be loaded onto a transport truck and moved over an eight day period. The Preliminary Hazards and Accident Analysis for the on-site transportation and handling of Uranium-233 Special Nuclear Material, documented herein, was performed in accordance with the format and content guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, dated July 1994, specifically Chapter Three, Hazard and Accident Analysis. The Preliminary Hazards Analysis involved detailed walkdowns of all areas of the U-233 SNM movement route, including the T-Building Storage Area A and B, T-Building truck tunnel, and the roadway route. Extensive discussions were held with operations personnel from the Nuclear Material Control Group, Nuclear Materials Accountability Group, EG and G Mound Security and the Material Handling Systems Transportation Group. Existing documentation related to the on-site transportation of hazardous materials, T-Building and SW/R Tritium Complex SARs, and emergency preparedness/response documentation were also reviewed and analyzed to identify and develop the complete spectrum of energy source hazards

  8. TECHNICAL REPORT ON TECHNOLOGICALLY ENHANCED NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS FROM URANIUM MINING, VOLUME II: INVESTIGATION OF POTENTIAL HEALTH, GEOGRAPHIC, AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES OF ABANDONED URANIUM MINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volume II investigates the potential radiogenic risks from abandoned uranium mines and evaluates which may pose the greatest hazards to members of the public and to the environment. The intent of this report is to identify who may be most likely to be exposed to wastes at small a...

  9. Investigation of the isotopic composition of lead and of trace elements concentrations in natural uranium materials as a signature in nuclear forensics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svedkauskaite-LeGore, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania); Mayer, K.; Millet, S.; Nicholl, A.; Rasmussen, G. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Baltrunas, D. [Institute of Physics, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2007-07-01

    Lead is contained as trace element in uranium ores and propagates throughout the production process to intermediate products like yellow cake or uranium oxide. The lead isotopes in such material originate from two sources: natural lead and radiogenic lead. The variability of the isotopic composition of lead in ores and yellow cakes was studied and the applicability of this parameter for nuclear forensic investigations was investigated. Furthermore, the chemical impurities contained in these materials were measured in order to identify characteristic differences between materials from different mines. For the samples investigated, it could be shown, that the lead isotopic composition varies largely from mine to mine and it may be used as one of the parameters to distinguish between materials of different origins. Some of the chemical impurities show a similar pattern and support the conclusions drawn from the lead isotope data. (orig.)

  10. Quantifying multiple trace elements in uranium ore concentrates. An interlaboratory comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, S.; Boulyga, S.F.; Penkin, M.V.; Jovanovic, S.; Lindvall, R.; Rasmussen, G.; Riciputi, L.

    2014-01-01

    An intercomparison was organized, with six laboratories tasked to quantify sixty-nine impurities in two uranium materials. The main technique employed for analysis was inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in combination with matrix-matched external calibration. The results presented highlight the current state-of-the-practice; lessons learned include previously unaccounted polyatomic interferences, issues related to sample dissolution, blank correction and calibration, and the challenge of estimating measurement uncertainties. The exercise yielded consensus values for the two analysed materials, suitable for use as laboratory standards to partially fill a gap in the availability of uranium reference materials characterized for impurities. (author)

  11. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  12. Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard, use or release of contaminated materials, buildings, areas or dumps from uranium mining. Recommendations of the Commission on Radiological Protection with explanations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Neumann, M.

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents the full texts of the SSK Recommendations addressing the aspects and problems involved, and which can be separately retrieved from the database: 1) Radiological protection principles concerning the release of scrap from the shut-down of uranium mining plants; 2) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for industrial use of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 3) Radiological protection principles concerning the use for forest and agricultural purposes and as public gardens (parks) and residential areas of areas contaminated from uranium mining; 4) Radiological protection principles concerning the safeguard and use of mine dumps; 5) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for further commercial or industrial use of buildings used for commercial or industrial purposes and the disposal of building debris from uranium mining and milling; 6) Radiological protection principles concerning the release for general use of reusable equipment and installations from uranium mining. The following appendices round up the material: 1) Radiation exposure from mining in Saxony and Thuringia and its evaluation (Summary of the results of consultations during the 1990 closed meeting); 2) Radiological protection principles for the limitation of the radiation exposure of the public to radon and its daughters; 3) Epidemiological studies on the health state of the inhabitants of the mining region and the miners in Saxony and Thuringia. (orig.) [de

  13. Properties of raw materials and intermediate products in the production of uranium dioxide sintered tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Vanecek, I.; Podest, M.

    1977-01-01

    The properties are described of ammonium polyuranate and of powder uranium dioxide. Ammonium polyuranate, an intermediate product, is prepared by filtering the precipitate from uranyl nitrate solution precipitation, this either by an ammonia aqueous solution from a uranyl nitrate aqueous solution or by direct U 6+ precipitation from a TBP kerosene solution by aqueous concentrated ammonia. With relation to further processing, the major properties of the intermediate product include grain size, shape and appearance of crystallites, structure and thermal decomposition. These properties affect the properties of UO 2 , the following intermediate product obtained by reduction of ammonium polyuranate. Powder UO 2 is the final intermediate product; high-compacted UO 2 pellets are manufactured from it by compacting and sintering. The final product properties are affected by the following parameters: specific surface, grain size and shape, U/O ratio and compactibility. The effect of and the techniques of determining these parameters are shown. The necessity is emphasised of studying the properties of powder ammonium polyuranate because changes in its production technology affect the properties of further products. (J.P.)

  14. Automated sample-processing and titration system for determining uranium in nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrar, J.E.; Boyle, W.G.; Breshears, J.D.; Pomernacki, C.L.; Brand, H.R.; Kray, A.M.; Sherry, R.J.; Pastrone, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The system is designed for accurate, precise, and selective determination of from 10 to 180 mg of uranium in 2 to 12 cm 3 of solution. Samples, standards, and their solutions are handled on a weight basis. These weights, together with their appropriate identification numbers, are stored in computer memory and are used automatically in the assay calculations after each titration. The measurement technique (controlled-current coulometry) is based on the Davies-Gray and New Brunswick Laboratory method, in which U(VI) is reduced to U(IV) in strong H 3 PO 4 , followed by titration of the U(IV) with electrogenerated V(V). Solution pretreatment and titration are automatic. The analyzer is able to process 44 samples per loading of the sample changer, at a rate of 4 to 9 samples per hour. The system includes a comprehensive fault-monitoring system that detects analytical errors, guards against abnormal conditions which might cause errors, and prevents unsafe operation. A detailed description of the system, information on the reliability of the component subsystems, and a summary of its evaluation by the New Brunswick Laboratory are presented

  15. Certified reference materials for the determination of uranium, thorium, and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoliquido, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) is the Department of Energy's Nuclear Materials Measurements and Standards Laboratory. As part of its mission, NBL provides certified reference materials (CRMs) for the analysis of various types of materials encountered in the nuclear fuel cycle. The reference material program at NBL gained greater prominence in 1981, when an interagency agreement between NBL and NBS established NBL as the distributor of one category of SRMs, the special nuclear materials SRMs. When NBS reorganized and became NIST in 1987, NBL bought out the remaining inventory of these particular SRMs which it was already distributing and renamed them as CRMs. The difference between the radioactivity SRMs which NIST still provides and the nuclear material CRMs which NBL provides will be explained. NBL CRMs are distributed worldwide and are used in nuclear safeguards applications and in geological and environmental research. The current NBL CRM inventory will be described

  16. Assessment of Radioactive Materials and Heavy Metals in the Surface Soil around the Bayanwula Prospective Uranium Mining Area in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Haribala; Hu, Bitao; Wang, Chengguo; Bao, Shanhu; Sai, Gerilemandahu; Xu, Xiao; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Yuhong

    2017-03-14

    The present work is the first systematic and large scale study on radioactive materials and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area in China. In this work, both natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and heavy metals in 48 surface soil samples were analyzed using High Purity Germanium (HPGe) γ spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The obtained mean activity concentrations of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th, 40 K, and 137 Cs were 25.81 ± 9.58, 24.85 ± 2.77, 29.40 ± 3.14, 923.0 ± 47.2, and 5.64 ± 4.56 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose rate were 76.7 ± 3.1 nGy/h and 83.1 ± 3.8 μ Sv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, and internal hazard index were also calculated, and their mean values were within the acceptable limits. The estimated lifetime cancer risk was 3.2 × 10 -4 /Sv. The heavy metal contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb from the surface soil samples were measured and their health risks were then assessed. The concentrations of all heavy metals were much lower than the average backgrounds in China except for lead which was about three times higher than that of China's mean. The non-cancer and cancer risks from the heavy metals were estimated, which are all within the acceptable ranges. In addition, the correlations between the radionuclides and the heavy metals in surface soil samples were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. Strong positive correlations between radionuclides and the heavy metals at the 0.01 significance level were found. In conclusion, the contents of radionuclides and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area are at a normal level.

  17. Bioaccessibility and Risk of Exposure to Metals and SVOCs in Artificial Turf Field Fill Materials and Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavilonis, Brian T; Weisel, Clifford P; Buckley, Brian; Lioy, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    To reduce maintenance costs, municipalities and schools are starting to replace natural grass fields with a new generation synthetic turf. Unlike Astro-Turf, which was first introduced in the 1960s, synthetic field turf provides more cushioning to athletes. Part of this cushioning comes from materials like crumb rubber infill, which is manufactured from recycled tires and may contain a variety of chemicals. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential exposures from playing on artificial turf fields and associated risks to trace metals, semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by examining typical artificial turf fibers (n = 8), different types of infill (n = 8), and samples from actual fields (n = 7). Three artificial biofluids were prepared, which included: lung, sweat, and digestive fluids. Artificial biofluids were hypothesized to yield a more representative estimation of dose than the levels obtained from total extraction methods. PAHs were routinely below the limit of detection across all three biofluids, precluding completion of a meaningful risk assessment. No SVOCs were identified at quantifiable levels in any extracts based on a match of their mass spectrum to compounds that are regulated in soil. The metals were measurable but at concentrations for which human health risk was estimated to be low. The study demonstrated that for the products and fields we tested, exposure to infill and artificial turf was generally considered de minimus, with the possible exception of lead for some fields and materials. © 2013 Society for Risk Analysis.

  18. Bio-accessibility and Risk of Exposure to Metals and SVOCs in Artificial Turf Field Fill Materials and Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavilonis, Brian T.; Weisel, Clifford P.; Buckley, Brian; Lioy, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    To reduce maintenance costs, municipalities and schools are starting to replace natural grass fields with a new generation synthetic turf. Unlike Astro-Turf, which was first introduced in the 1960’s, synthetic field turf provides more cushioning to athletes. Part of this cushioning comes from materials like crumb rubber infill, which is manufactured from recycled tires and may contain a variety of chemicals. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential exposures from playing on artificial turf fields and associated risks to trace metals, semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by examining typical artificial turf fibers (n=8), different types of infill (n=8), and samples from actual fields (n=7). Three artificial biofluids were prepared which included: lung, sweat, and digestive fluids. Artificial biofluids were hypothesized to yield a more representative estimation of dose than the levels obtained from total extraction methods. PAHs were routinely below the limit of detection across all three biofluids precluding completion of a meaningful risk assessment. No SVOCs were identified at quantifiable levels in any extracts based on a match of their mass spectrum to compounds that are regulated in soil. The metals were measurable but at concentrations for which human health risk was estimated to be low. The study demonstrated that for the products and fields we tested, exposure to infill and artificial turf was generally considered de minimus, with the possible exception of lead for some fields and materials. PMID:23758133

  19. Criticality experiments: analysis, evaluation, and programs. 8. Prompt Neutron Decay Constants in Uranium Diluted with Matrix Material Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, Rene; Loaiza, David; Brunson, Glenn

    2001-01-01

    Rossi-Alpha measurements were performed on uranium diluted with matrix material systems to determine the prompt neutron decay constants. These constants represent an eigenvalue characteristic of these particular critical assemblies, which can be experimentally measured by the Rossi-Alpha or pulse neutron source techniques and calculated by a deterministic or Monte Carlo method. In the measurements presented in this paper, highly enriched foils diluted in various X/ 235 U ratios with polyethylene and SiO 2 , and polyethylene and aluminum were assembled to a high multiplication, and the prompt neutron decay constants were obtained by the Rossi-Alpha technique. The uranium diluted with matrix material experiments were fueled with highly enriched uranium foils. The average dimensions of the bare foils were 22.86 cm squared and 0.00762 cm thick. The foils were laminated with plastic sheets to reduce the amount of airborne contamination. Each foil weighed ∼70 g. The diluent material consisted of SiO 2 , or 6061 aluminum plates, which were embedded into polyethylene plates. The SiO 2 and aluminum plates were 22.86 cm square and 0.64 cm thick. The polyethylene plates were 39.12 cm square and 1.91 cm thick. Each polyethylene plate had a central recess whose dimensions were 22.86 cm by 22.86 cm by 0.64 cm deep and was used to accommodate the SiO 2 , or aluminum plates as well as the uranium foils. There were eight 39.12-cm-squared by 2.54-cm-thick high density polyethylene plates that form the top and bottom reflectors (four at the top and four at the bottom). Also, one of the polyethylene plates located in the center of the assembly had holes drilled in a radial direction to accommodate neutron detectors. Four 3 He detectors were placed in this plate. The 3 He detectors were 1.27 cm in diameter and ∼15 cm long. Rossi-Alpha measurements were performed at several subcritical separations for both experiments. The data were collected with a type I time analyzer (PATRM

  20. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  1. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy's (DOE's) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites

  2. Additive Manufacturing of Metallic and Ceramic Components by the Material Extrusion of Highly-Filled Polymers: A Review and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM, molten or viscous materials are pushed through an orifice and are selectively deposited as strands to form stacked layers and subsequently a three-dimensional object. The commonly used materials for MEAM are thermoplastic polymers and particulate composites; however, recently innovative formulations of highly-filled polymers (HP) with metals or ceramics have also been made available. MEAM with HP is an indirect process, which uses sacrificial polymeric binders to shape metallic and ceramic components. After removing the binder, the powder particles are fused together in a conventional sintering step. In this review the different types of MEAM techniques and relevant industrial approaches for the fabrication of metallic and ceramic components are described. The composition of certain HP binder systems and powders are presented; the methods of compounding and filament making HP are explained; the stages of shaping, debinding, and sintering are discussed; and finally a comparison of the parts produced via MEAM-HP with those produced via other manufacturing techniques is presented. PMID:29783705

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Metallic and Ceramic Components by the Material Extrusion of Highly-Filled Polymers: A Review and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Joamin; Cano, Santiago; Schuschnigg, Stephan; Kukla, Christian; Sapkota, Janak; Holzer, Clemens

    2018-05-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is the fabrication of real three-dimensional objects from metals, ceramics, or plastics by adding material, usually as layers. There are several variants of AM; among them material extrusion (ME) is one of the most versatile and widely used. In MEAM, molten or viscous materials are pushed through an orifice and are selectively deposited as strands to form stacked layers and subsequently a three-dimensional object. The commonly used materials for MEAM are thermoplastic polymers and particulate composites; however, recently innovative formulations of highly-filled polymers (HP) with metals or ceramics have also been made available. MEAM with HP is an indirect process, which uses sacrificial polymeric binders to shape metallic and ceramic components. After removing the binder, the powder particles are fused together in a conventional sintering step. In this review the different types of MEAM techniques and relevant industrial approaches for the fabrication of metallic and ceramic components are described. The composition of certain HP binder systems and powders are presented; the methods of compounding and filament making HP are explained; the stages of shaping, debinding, and sintering are discussed; and finally a comparison of the parts produced via MEAM-HP with those produced via other manufacturing techniques is presented.

  4. Assessment of exposure to chemical agents in in fill material for artificial turf soccer pitches: development and implementation of a survey protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, P.; Proietto, A.R.; Gordiani, A.; Ferrante, R.; Tranfo, G.; Paci, E.; Pigini, D.

    2008-01-01

    Health concerns over the composition of the in fill material used to construct artificial turf pitches (e.g., for soccer and rugby), raised the need to develop a specific procedure to assess the risks of human exposure to pollutants that may be released by these materials. The aim of this paper was to develop and implement a survey protocol to assess exposure of artificial turf pitches users (e.g., coaches and maintenance personnel) through environmental and biological monitoring of toxic and carcinogenic substances contained in some types of in fill materials for artificial turf pitches. The exposure was assessed by personal and environmental sampling of hazardous substances - particularly of benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals (lead, cadmium, chromium, tin and zinc) - for comparison with the occupational exposure limit values as per the Italian regulations and the lists of the American Conference of Industrial Governmental Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition, biological monitoring was performed for the quantitative and qualitative determination of the exposure bio markers of the substances of interest in potentially exposed individuals and in control group. Environmental sampling was performed on an outdoor, artificial turf soccer pitch in a sports facility in Rome characterized by recycled in fill material (rubber granules from recycled tyres, without any further processing); suction pumps were used as environmental samplers to collect the samples (located in areas of the soccer pitch deemed representative of exposure conditions) and personal samplers (in this latter case exclusively for monitoring PAHs) worn by the coaches during training sessions. For the various substances the following sampling systems were used: vials for BTX (benzene, toluene, and xylene), filters for metals and combined systems (filter plus vial) for the PAHs. The extracts were then analyzed by various instrumental techniques such as gas

  5. Long-term management and use of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, A.

    2001-01-01

    The products resulting from the process of enrichment of natural uranium, or reprocessed uranium, are enriched uranium products as the light fraction and depleted uranium (uranium tails) as the heavy fraction. If the source material is natural uranium, the mass ratios of uranium products and uranium tails can be derived relatively easily from the required enrichment level of the uranium product (product assay (% of U-235)) and the selected depletion level of the uranium tails (tails assay (% of U-235)). The paper discusses among other aspects the dependence of the tails mass on the required enrichment level of the relevant uranium product, for various tails assays. (orig./CB) [de

  6. DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Pope, R.B.; Ashline, R.C.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments

  7. Some aspects of in-pile swelling of fissile materials, 1. part: non-alloyed α uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikailoff, H.

    1964-01-01

    An examination has been carried out of non-alloyed uranium samples, having various structural states, cold-worked and recrystallized, as-cast and β-treated, and irradiated at temperatures of between 450 and 600 C and with burn-ups from 1300 to 5500 MW days/metric ton. These samples swelled because of precipitation of the fission gases the porosity thus produced has a morphology depending mainly on the type of deformation to which the metal has been subjected and which is due to in-pile growth. The most homogeneous distribution of pores, and thus that leading to the minimum swelling, is only observed in the material having a marked [010] texture in which the growth and perhaps the thermal cycling introduce little or no strain. For other materials the deformation /swelling association causes a more rapid destruction of the samples either by cracking when the deformation is due to twinning, or by pronounced swelling localized in the bands when deformation is due to slipping. Finally the fission-gas precipitation considerably facilitates, above 500 C, the germination and growth of the intergranular cracks which can then develop at low stresses. (author) [fr

  8. Cytotoxicity and Initial Biocompatibility of Endodontic Biomaterials (MTA and Biodentine™) Used as Root-End Filling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-García, Diana María; Aguirre-López, Eva; Méndez-González, Verónica; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and cellular adhesion of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Biodentine (BD) on periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDL). Methods. PDL cells were obtained from nonerupted third molars and cultured; MTS cellular profusion test was carried out in two groups: MTA and BD, with respective controls at different time periods. Also, the LIVE/DEAD assay was performed at 24 h. For evaluation of cellular adhesion, immunocytochemistry was conducted to discern the expression of Integrin β1 and Vinculin at 12 h and 24 h. Statistical analysis was performed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results. MTA and BD exhibited living cells up to 7 days. More expressions of Integrin β1 and Vinculin were demonstrated in the control group, followed by BD and MTA, which also showed cellular loss and morphological changes. There was a significant difference in the experimental groups cultured for 5 and 7 days compared with the control, but there was no significant statistical difference between both cements. Conclusions. Neither material was cytotoxic during the time evaluated. There was an increase of cell adhesion through the expression of focal contacts observed in the case of BD, followed by MTA, but not significantly.

  9. Modeling the mobility of uranium from NORM-rich bedrock using multivariate statistical techniques - The mobility of uranium from U-containing bedrock materials as a function of pH: Implications for tunnel construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmers, Tari; Fjermestad, Halldis; Salbu, Brit; Skipperud, Lindis [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, 1432 Aas (Norway); Meland, Sondre; Hagelia, Per [Norwegian Public Roads Administration, P.O. Box 8142, 0033 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    According to amendments made to the Norwegian Pollution Control Act in 2011, naturally occurring radioactive material is now to be considered as an environmental contaminant, in addition to organic pollutants and trace metals. Environmental contamination is strongly correlated with the mobility and bioavailability of metals and radionuclides in natural systems. In order to determine the risk of environmental contamination from e.g. uranium (U) in alum shale areas, it is of particular importance to determine the mobility of U and trace metals found in the rock materials and their binding mechanisms. By determining the speciation and mobility of uranium and trace metals, better predictions can be made on the transport of contaminants in the environment from intervention like road and tunnel construction. The substrate media analyzed in this work was collected from a future tunnel construction site that is being built in the Gran municipality on National road Rv4 in Norway. The bedrock in the Gran municipality is rich in U-bearing minerals. Therefore, there is high potential for environmental contamination from the rock material removed for tunnel construction purposes. The present work focuses upon the effects of pH and the contact time (substrate media: solution) on the mobility of uranium. In order to identify the effects of pH and contact time on mobility, sample cores collected from an area rich in alum shale were subjected to an extended leaching experiment. In this experiment, the substrate materials were treated with five different pH solutions and were analyzed for different contact times. In addition, the results were compared to data from a sequential extraction experiment. In the leaching experiment, the mobilization of uranium in all of the substrate material was affected by the pH of solution. All of the samples were capable of quickly buffering pH solutions with a pH as low as 4 to neutral-alkaline conditions, attributed to the carbonate minerals

  10. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil at the Former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company Site, Fairfield, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faillace, E.R.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1995-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium in soil were derived for the former Associate Aircraft Tool and Manufacturing Company site in Fairfield, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Single-nuclide and total-uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that, after remedial action, the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual living or working in the immediate vicinity of the site should not exceed (1) 30 mrem/yr for the current-use and likely future-use scenarios or (2) 100 mrem/yr for less likely future-use scenarios. The DOE residual radioactive material (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  11. An interview study of persons who attribute health problems to dental filling materials--part two in a triangulation study on 65 and 75 years old Swedes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhlnacke, Katri; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Dental materials are perceived as a health problem by some people, although scientists do not agree about possible causes of such problems. The aim of this paper was to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of experiences from living with health problems attributed to dental materials. Addressed topics were the type of problem, both as to general and oral health, perceived causes of the problems,their experienced effect on life, and reception by health professionals. Persons, who in a previous large questionnaire study had answered that they had experienced troubles from dental materials and also agreed to answer follow-up questions, were contacted with a request to take part in an interview study. Eleven individual interviews were held.The interviews were transcribed verbatim and the material was analysed according to the Qualitative Content Analysis method. Meaning units were extracted and condensed into a number of codes, which were combined into subcategories, categories, and themes. Four themes were identified: 1) Long-term oral, mental, and somatic difficulties of varying character, caused by dental amalgam. 2) Problems treated mainly by replacement of dental material in fillings. 3) Powerful effects on life, mostly negative. 4) The reception by health professionals was generally good, but with elements of encounters where they felt treated with nonchalance and lack of respect. In conclusion, people who attributed their health difficulties to dental materials had a complex range of problems and the perception was that amalgam/mercury was the cause of the troubles. The reception from health professionals was perceived as generally good, although with occasional negative experiences.

  12. Preparation, characterization and certification of uranium isotope reference materials; Preparacao, Caracterizacao e certificacao de materiais de referencia isotopicos de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira Junior, Olivio Pereira de

    2006-07-01

    This work describes the preparation, characterization and certification of a set of uranium isotope reference materials ranging from 0.5 to 20.0 % of {sup 235}U in mass. The most important concepts of metrology in chemical measurements were applied so that the certified quantities in these materials could be directly traceable to the International System of Units (SI). As a consequence of this approach, these materials can be used in the instruments calibration, estimation of measurement uncertainty, method validation, assessment of performance of analysts, quality control routines and interlaboratory comparison programmes. The most advanced methods and techniques in mass spectrometry, that is, gas source mass spectrometry (GSMS), thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) were investigated to identify which are the dominant components in the uncertainty and to quantify its contribution to the final value of the measurement uncertainty of the isotopic ratio. The results obtained were then compared to verify which are the methods and techniques associated to the lowest measurement uncertainty values. The isotope amount ratio n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) was certified in the materials produced to expanded uncertainties ranging from 0.02 to 0.10 % and the ratios n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 238}U), to uncertainties ranging from 0.03 to 2.20 %. These values fully comply to the requirements of the isotopic characterization of nuclear fuel as well as the analysis of environmental samples for nuclear safeguards. (author)

  13. Combined effects of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off on rogue wave propagation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Tchokonte, M. B. Tchoula; Kofane, T. C.

    2018-04-01

    The generalized nonparaxial nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials is reduced to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. Based on the modified Darboux transformation method, the nonparaxial chiral optical rogue waves are constructed from the scalar model with modulated coefficients. We show that the parameters of nonparaxiality, third-order dispersion, and differential gain or loss term are the main keys to control the amplitude, linear, and nonlinear effects in the model. Moreover, the influence of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off effect are also evidenced under the defocusing and focusing regimes of the vector nonparaxial NLS equations with constant and modulated coefficients. Through an algorithm scheme of wider applicability on nonparaxial beam propagation methods, the most influential effect and the simultaneous controllability of combined effects are underlined, showing their properties and their potential applications in optical fibers and in a variety of complex dynamical systems.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of the uranium favorability in the Kaiparowits Plateau Region, Garfield and Kane Counties, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubyk, W.S.; Young, P.

    1978-05-01

    The basal sandstone of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) and the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic) in the Kaiparowits Plateau, southcentral Utah, were evaluated in terms of uranium potential. Both surface and subsurface data were utilized. Favorability of the basal Chinle sandstone was based on (1) presence of intermediate-size sandstone-filled channels cut into the Moenkopi; (2) presence of carbonaceous material; (3) an adequate source of uranium; and (4) gamma-ray anomalies from test-hole logs. Favorability of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation was based on (1) sandstone-mudstone ratios that approach equality, and (2) presence of thick sandstone lenses, carbonaceous material, and halos of light-tan to brown limonite staining. Although the basal Chinle sandstone and the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison contain sizable uranium deposits throughout much of the Colorado Plateau, both units lack characteristics that are favorable for significant uranium deposits in the Kaiparowits Plateau

  15. Incidence of apical crack formation and propagation during removal of root canal filling materials with different engine driven nickel-titanium instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Özyürek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine the incidence of crack formation and propagation in apical root dentin after retreatment procedures performed using ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR, Mtwo-R, ProTaper Next (PTN, and Twisted File Adaptive (TFA systems. Materials and Methods The study consisted of 120 extracted mandibular premolars. One millimeter from the apex of each tooth was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and the apical surface was polished. Twenty teeth served as the negative control group. One hundred teeth were prepared, obturated, and then divided into 5 retreatment groups. The retreatment procedures were performed using the following files: PTR, Mtwo-R, PTN, TFA, and hand files. After filling material removal, apical enlargement was done using apical size 0.50 mm ProTaper Universal (PTU, Mtwo, PTN, TFA, and hand files. Digital images of the apical root surfaces were recorded before preparation, after preparation, after obturation, after filling removal, and after apical enlargement using a stereomicroscope. The images were then inspected for the presence of new apical cracks and crack propagation. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests using SPSS 21.0 software. Results New cracks and crack propagation occurred in all the experimental groups during the retreatment process. Nickel-titanium rotary file systems caused significantly more apical crack formation and propagation than the hand files. The PTU system caused significantly more apical cracks than the other groups after the apical enlargement stage. Conclusions This study showed that retreatment procedures and apical enlargement after the use of retreatment files can cause crack formation and propagation in apical dentin.

  16. Uranium industry in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikipelov, B.V.; Chernov, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    A brief historical account of the Soviet production of natural and enriched uranium is given. The geological and geographical location of major uranium deposits are mentioned. The processing of natural ores including in-situ leaching (ISL) is also briefly described. Gas centrifuges play a large part in uranium enrichment. The role of Techsnabexport for the export of nuclear materials is explained

  17. Selection and specification criteria for fills for cut-and-fill mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, E. G.

    1980-05-15

    Because of significant differences in placement and loading conditions, the ideal fill material for a cut-and-fill operation has different characteristics to those for a fill for a filled open stoping operation. The differing requirements of the two mining operations must be understood and accounted for in establishing fill selection and specification criteria. Within the paper, aspects of the particular requirements of cut-and-fill mining are analyzed and related to the specific fill tests and properties required. Emphasis is placed upon the role of fill in ground support, though this cannot be isolated from overall fill performance. Where appropriate, test data are introduced and areas requiring continuing research highlighted.

  18. Politics of Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is the most political of all the elements, the material for the production of both the large amounts of electricity and the most destructive weapons in the world. The problems that its dual potential creates are only now beginning to become evident. Author Norman Moss looks at this situation and sheds light on many of the questions that emerge. The nuclear issue always comes back to how much uranium there is, what can be done with it, and which countries have it. Starting with a concise history of uranium and explaining its technology in terms the nonspecialist can understand, The Politics of Uranium considers the political issues that technical arguments obscure. It tells the little-known story of the international uranium cartel, explains the entanglements of governments with the uranium trade, and describes the consequences of wrong decisions and blunders-especially the problems of nuclear waste. It also examines the intellectual and emotional roots of the anti-nuclear movement

  19. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  20. US uranium market developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusiewski, S.V.; Patterson, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Domestic uranium delivery commitments have risen significantly since January 1979, with the bulk of deliveries scheduled after 1990. Much of the long-term procurement will be obtained from captive production. However, buyers have adjusted their delivery schedules in the near term, deferring some procurement to later years, including a portion of planned captive production. Under current commitments, US imports of foreign uranium in the 1981 to 1985 period will be greater than our exports of domestic uranium. The anticipated supply of domestic uranium through 1985 is clearly more than adequate to fill the probable US demand in the meantime, uranium producers are continuing their efforts to increase future domestic supply by their considerable investments in new or expanded mine and mill facilities. Since January 1980, average contract prices including market-price settlements, for 1980 uranium deliveries have increased slightly, but average market-price settlements made this year have decreased by several dollars. While the general trend of US uranium prices has been upward since we began reporting price data in 1973, some reductions in average prices for future deliveries appeared in 1980. The softening of prices for new procurement can be expected to be increasingly apparent in future surveys

  1. Shirley Basin Uranium Mill. Environmental report to accompany source material license application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-12-01

    This document summarizes all of the environmental monitoring conducted by Utah. This Environmental Report consequently supplements and updates the information presented in the Source Material License application of August 18, 1970 and the Final Environmental Statement (FES) of December 1974. Water and air quality, liquid waste management, soil/vegetation monitoring, and reclamation are covered

  2. Improving gross count gamma-ray logging in uranium mining with the NGRS probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carasco C.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AREVA Mines and the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache are collaborating to improve the sensitivity and precision of uranium concentration measurement by means of gamma ray logging. The determination of uranium concentration in boreholes is performed with the Natural Gamma Ray Sonde (NGRS based on a NaI(Tl scintillation detector. The total gamma count rate is converted into uranium concentration using a calibration coefficient measured in concrete blocks with known uranium concentration in the AREVA Mines calibration facility located in Bessines, France. Until now, to take into account gamma attenuation in a variety of boreholes diameters, tubing materials, diameters and thicknesses, filling fluid densities and compositions, a semi-empirical formula was used to correct the calibration coefficient measured in Bessines facility. In this work, we propose to use Monte Carlo simulations to improve gamma attenuation corrections. To this purpose, the NGRS probe and the calibration measurements in the standard concrete blocks have been modeled with MCNP computer code. The calibration coefficient determined by simulation, 5.3 s-1.ppmU-1 ± 10%, is in good agreement with the one measured in Bessines, 5.2 s-1.ppmU-1. Based on the validated MCNP model, several parametric studies have been performed. For instance, the rock density and chemical composition proved to have a limited impact on the calibration coefficient. However, gamma self-absorption in uranium leads to a nonlinear relationship between count rate and uranium concentration beyond approximately 1% of uranium weight fraction, the underestimation of the uranium content reaching more than a factor 2.5 for a 50 % uranium weight fraction. Next steps will concern parametric studies with different tubing materials, diameters and thicknesses, as well as different borehole filling fluids representative of real measurement conditions.

  3. Improving gross count gamma-ray logging in uranium mining with the NGRS probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasco, C.; Pérot, B.; Ma, J.-L.; Toubon, H.; Dubille-Auchère, A.

    2018-01-01

    AREVA Mines and the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache are collaborating to improve the sensitivity and precision of uranium concentration measurement by means of gamma ray logging. The determination of uranium concentration in boreholes is performed with the Natural Gamma Ray Sonde (NGRS) based on a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The total gamma count rate is converted into uranium concentration using a calibration coefficient measured in concrete blocks with known uranium concentration in the AREVA Mines calibration facility located in Bessines, France. Until now, to take into account gamma attenuation in a variety of boreholes diameters, tubing materials, diameters and thicknesses, filling fluid densities and compositions, a semi-empirical formula was used to correct the calibration coefficient measured in Bessines facility. In this work, we propose to use Monte Carlo simulations to improve gamma attenuation corrections. To this purpose, the NGRS probe and the calibration measurements in the standard concrete blocks have been modeled with MCNP computer code. The calibration coefficient determined by simulation, 5.3 s-1.ppmU-1 ± 10%, is in good agreement with the one measured in Bessines, 5.2 s-1.ppmU-1. Based on the validated MCNP model, several parametric studies have been performed. For instance, the rock density and chemical composition proved to have a limited impact on the calibration coefficient. However, gamma self-absorption in uranium leads to a nonlinear relationship between count rate and uranium concentration beyond approximately 1% of uranium weight fraction, the underestimation of the uranium content reaching more than a factor 2.5 for a 50 % uranium weight fraction. Next steps will concern parametric studies with different tubing materials, diameters and thicknesses, as well as different borehole filling fluids representative of real measurement conditions.

  4. Joint ANSI-INMM 8.1: Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of uranium hexafluoride cylinder material accountability bulk measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontius, P.E.; Doher, L.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reports the progress to date in a demonstration of the procedures in ANSI N15.18-1975, ''Mass Calibration Techniques for Nuclear Material Control,'' sponsored and funded by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The philosophy of mass measurement as a production process, as promulgated in ANSI N15.18-1975, is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the use of artifact Reference Mass Standards (RMS) as references for uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) calibration and bulk measurement processes. The history of the creation of the artifact concept and its adoption by ANSI N15.18-1975 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission is narrated. The program now under way is specifically described; including descriptions of the RMS, their calibration, and the assignment of uncertainties to them by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). Instrument tests, in-house standards (IHS), and assignment of values relative to the RMS-NBS values at nuclear facilities which measure UF 6 cylinders are described. Comparisons and the data base are detailed to provide realistic measurement process parameters associated with accountable transfer of UF 6 . The as yet uncompleted part of the demonstration is described, that is, to further close the measurement loop by verification both between and within facilities

  5. Incidence of apical crack formation and propagation during removal of root canal filling materials with different engine driven nickel-titanium instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyürek, Taha; Tek, Vildan; Yılmaz, Koray; Uslu, Gülşah

    2017-11-01

    To determine the incidence of crack formation and propagation in apical root dentin after retreatment procedures performed using ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR), Mtwo-R, ProTaper Next (PTN), and Twisted File Adaptive (TFA) systems. The study consisted of 120 extracted mandibular premolars. One millimeter from the apex of each tooth was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and the apical surface was polished. Twenty teeth served as the negative control group. One hundred teeth were prepared, obturated, and then divided into 5 retreatment groups. The retreatment procedures were performed using the following files: PTR, Mtwo-R, PTN, TFA, and hand files. After filling material removal, apical enlargement was done using apical size 0.50 mm ProTaper Universal (PTU), Mtwo, PTN, TFA, and hand files. Digital images of the apical root surfaces were recorded before preparation, after preparation, after obturation, after filling removal, and after apical enlargement using a stereomicroscope. The images were then inspected for the presence of new apical cracks and crack propagation. Data were analyzed with χ 2 tests using SPSS 21.0 software. New cracks and crack propagation occurred in all the experimental groups during the retreatment process. Nickel-titanium rotary file systems caused significantly more apical crack formation and propagation than the hand files. The PTU system caused significantly more apical cracks than the other groups after the apical enlargement stage. This study showed that retreatment procedures and apical enlargement after the use of retreatment files can cause crack formation and propagation in apical dentin.

  6. Variation of the material laplacian of G1 with the radius of the uranium bar; Variation du laplacien matiere de G1 avec le rayon du barreau d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanguy, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1957-07-01

    In this report are described and interpreted some experiments, carried out in the pile G1 during a period of shut-down, which have made it possible to measure the variation of the material Laplacian of the lattice with the radius of the uranium bar. The variation of the reactivity of the pile is measured when an increasing number of fuel elements are progressively replaced in the central region by fuel elements of greater diameter; it is shown that, starting from measurements based on less than ten per cent of the total number of elements, the variation of reactivity corresponding to the replacement of all the elements can be determined; it is then easy to deduce the variations of the Laplacian. Results: the variations of the Laplacian with the uranium rod diameter are 0 (d. 26 mm), +0.065 {+-} 0.004 m{sup -2} (d. 28 mm) and +0.080 {+-} 0.008 m{sup -2} (d. 32 mm). (author) [French] Dans ce rapport sont decrites et interpretees des experiences realisees sur la pile G1 'froide', experiences qui ont permis de mesurer la variation du Laplacien matiere du reseau avec le rayon du barreau d'uranium. On mesure la variation de reactivite de la pile lorsqu'on remplace progressivement dans la region centrale un nombre croissant de cartouches par des cartouches de plus gros diametre; on montre qu'a partir de mesures portant sur moins de dix pour cent du nombre total de cartouches, on peut determiner la variation de reactivite qui correspondrait au remplacement de toutes les cartouches; il est facile d'en deduire les variations du Laplacien. Resultats: les variations du Laplacien en fonction du diametre du barreau d'uranium sont: 0 (d. 26 mm), +0.065 {+-} 0.004 m{sup -2} (d. 28 mm) and +0.080 {+-} 0.008 m{sup -2} (d. 32 mm). (auteur)

  7. Assessment of Radioactive Materials and Heavy Metals in the Surface Soil around the Bayanwula Prospective Uranium Mining Area in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haribala Bai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work is the first systematic and large scale study on radioactive materials and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area in China. In this work, both natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and heavy metals in 48 surface soil samples were analyzed using High Purity Germanium (HPGe γ spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. The obtained mean activity concentrations of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, 40K, and 137Cs were 25.81 ± 9.58, 24.85 ± 2.77, 29.40 ± 3.14, 923.0 ± 47.2, and 5.64 ± 4.56 Bq/kg, respectively. The estimated average absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose rate were 76.7 ± 3.1 nGy/h and 83.1 ± 3.8 μSv, respectively. The radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, and internal hazard index were also calculated, and their mean values were within the acceptable limits. The estimated lifetime cancer risk was 3.2 × 10−4/Sv. The heavy metal contents of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb from the surface soil samples were measured and their health risks were then assessed. The concentrations of all heavy metals were much lower than the average backgrounds in China except for lead which was about three times higher than that of China’s mean. The non-cancer and cancer risks from the heavy metals were estimated, which are all within the acceptable ranges. In addition, the correlations between the radionuclides and the heavy metals in surface soil samples were determined by the Pearson linear coefficient. Strong positive correlations between radionuclides and the heavy metals at the 0.01 significance level were found. In conclusion, the contents of radionuclides and heavy metals in surface soil around the Bayanwula prospective uranium mining area are at a normal level.

  8. Effect of Flapless Immediate Implantation and Filling the Buccal Gap with Xenograft Material on the Buccal Bone Level: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Paknejad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Following tooth extraction, soft and hard tissue alterations occur; Different factors can affect this process. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of gap filling on buccal alveolar crestal bone level after immediate implant placement after 4- to 6-month observation period.Materials and Methods: This   randomized clinical trial was performed on 20 patients (mean age of 38.8 years requiring tooth extraction in a total of 27 areas in the anterior maxilla. The treatment strategy was as follows: atraumatic flapless tooth extraction, implant placement, insertion of a graft (test group or no material (control group between the implant and the socket wall, connection healing abutment placement and suturing the area. Clinical and cone beam computed tomographic examinations were performed before implant placement (baseline, 24 hours after surgery and 4-6 months (T2 after implant placement, to assess the buccal plate height (BH and implant complications.Results: After 4 months of healing, a reduction in different bone measurements was noticed in the two groups. No statistically significant differences were assessed in bone height measurements between the test and control groups at different time points. The study demonstrated that immediate implantation resulted in 1.30 and 1.66 mm reduction in buccal bone plate in the test and control groups, respectively.Conclusions: The study demonstrated that immediate implantation in the extraction socket together with xenograft failed to prevent bone resorption.

  9. Reactor physics and reactor strategy investigations into the fissionable material economy of the thorium and uranium cycle in fast breeder reactors and high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schikorr, W.M.

    In this work the properties governing the fissionable material economy of the uranium and thorium cycles are investigated for the advanced reactor types currently under development - the fast breeder reactor (FBR) and the high temperature reactor (HTR) - from the point of view of the optimum utilization of the available nuclear fuel reserves and the continuance of supply of these reserves. For this purpose, the two reactor types are first of all considered individually and are subsequently discussed as a complementary overall system

  10. Fabrication of uranium-americium mixed oxide fuels: thermodynamical modeling and materials properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, D.

    2011-01-01

    Fuel irradiation in pressurized water reactors lead to the formation of fission products and minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) which can be transmuted in fast neutrons reactors. In this context, the aim of this work was to study the fabrication conditions of the U 1-y Am y O 2+x fuels which exhibit particular thermodynamical properties requiring an accurate monitoring of the oxygen potential during the sintering step. For this reason, a thermodynamical model was developed to assess the optimum sintering conditions for these materials. From these calculations, U 1-y Am y O 2+x (y=0.10; 0.15; 0.20; 0.30) were sintered in two range of atmosphere. In hyper-stoichiometric conditions at low temperature, porous and multiphasic compounds are obtained whereas in reducing conditions at high temperature materials are dense and monophasic. XAFS analyses were performed in order to obtain additional experimental data for the thermodynamical modeling refinement. These characterizations also showed the reduction of Am(+IV) to Am(+III) and the partial oxidation of U(+IV) to U(+V) due to a charge compensation mechanism occurring during the sintering. Finally, taking into account the high - activity of Am, self-irradiation effects were studied for two types of microstructures and two Am contents (10 and 15%). For each composition, a lattice parameter increase was observed without structural change coupled with a macroscopic swelling of the pellet diameter up to 1.2% for the dense compounds and 0.6% for the tailored porosity materials. (author) [fr

  11. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  12. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  13. Enhancement of open-circuit voltage and the fill factor in CdTe nanocrystal solar cells by using interface materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jiaoyan; Yang, Yuehua; Gao, Yuping; Qin, Donghuan; Wu, Hongbin; Huang, Wenbo; Hou, Lintao

    2014-01-01

    Interface states influence the operation of nanocrystal (NC) solar cell carrier transport, recombination and energetic mechanisms. In a typical CdTe NC solar cell with a normal structure of a ITO/p-CdTe NCs/n-acceptor (or without)/Al configuration, the contact between the ITO and CdTe is a non-ohm contact due to a different work function (for an ITO, the value is ∼4.7 eV, while for CdTe NCs, the value is ∼5.3 eV), which results in an energetic barrier at the ITO/CdTe interface and decreases the performance of the NC solar cells. This work investigates how interface materials (including Au, MoO x and C 60 ) affect the performance of NC solar cells. It is found that devices with interface materials have shown higher V oc than those without interface materials. For the case in which we used Au as an interface, we obtained a high open-circuit voltage of 0.65 V, coupled with a high fill factor (62%); this resulted in a higher energy conversion efficiency (ECE) of 5.3%, which showed a 30% increase in the ECE compared with those without the interlayer. The capacitance measurements indicate that the increased V oc in the case in which Au was used as the interface is likely due to good ohm contact between the Au’s and the CdTe NCs’ thin film, which decreases the energetic barrier at the ITO/CdTe interface. (paper)

  14. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  15. Development of metal uranium fuel and testing of construction materials (I-VI); Part I; Razvoj metalnog goriva i ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala (I-VI deo); I deo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihajlovic, A [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-11-15

    This project includes the following tasks: Study of crystallisation of metal melt and beta-alpha transforms in uranium and uranium alloys; Study of the thermal treatment influence on phase transformations and texture in uranium alloys; Radiation damage of metal uranium; Project related to irradiation of metal uranium in the reactor; Development of fuel element for nuclear reactors.

  16. Efficacy of CM-Wire, M-Wire, and Nickel-Titanium Instruments for Removing Filling Material from Curved Root Canals: A Micro-Computed Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Clarissa Teles; Duarte, Marco Antonio Hungaro; de Almeida, Marcela Milanezi; de Andrade, Flaviana Bombarda; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the removal of filling material after using CM-wire, M-wire, and nickel-titanium instruments in both reciprocating and rotary motions in curved canals. Thirty maxillary lateral incisors were divided into 9 groups according to retreatment procedures: Reciproc R25 followed by Mtwo 40/.04 and ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files; ProDesign R 25/.06 followed by ProDesign Logic 40/.05 and ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files; and Gates-Glidden drills, Hedström files, and K-files up to apical size 30 followed by K-file 40 and K-file 50 up to the working length. Micro-computed tomography scans were performed before and after each reinstrumentation procedure to evaluate root canal filling removal. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal-Wallis, Friedman, and Wilcoxon tests (P < .05). No significant differences in filling material removal were found in the 3 groups of teeth. The use of Mtwo and ProDesign Logic 40/.05 rotary files did not enhance filling material removal after the use of reciprocating files. The use of ProDesign Logic 50/.01 files significantly reduced the amount of filling material at the apical levels compared with the use of reciprocating files. Association of reciprocating and rotary files was capable of removing a large amount of filling material in the retreatment of curved canals, irrespective of the type of alloy of the instruments. The use of a ProDesign Logic 50/.01 file for apical preparation significantly reduced the amount of remnant material in the apical portion when compared with reciprocating instruments. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Lake Austin uranium deposit, Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, A.G.; Deutscher, R.L.; Butt, C.R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The Lake Austin uranium deposit is a calcrete type deposit in the Yilgarn Block, near Cue, in a catchment area of granitoids and greenstones. The uranium is in valley fill and the sediments of the Lake Austin playa. The mineralization occurs over 1 to 6 meter thickness close to the water table in calcrete overlying clays and/or weathered bedrock. The principal uranium mineral is carnotite. Waters in nearby channels have an uranium content of over 30 ppb. The chloride content of the water increases downstream in the nearby drainages, as does the uranium and vanadium content. (author)

  18. Sandstone uranium deposits of Meghalaya: natural analogues for radionuclide migration and backfill material in geological repository for high level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Narayan, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    Sandstone uranium deposits serve as potential natural analogue to demonstrate safety offered by geological media against possible release of nuclear waste from their confinement and migration towards biosphere. In this study, available database on geochemical aspects of Domisiat uranium deposit of Meghalaya has been evaluated to highlight the behavior of radionuclides of concern over long term in a geological repository. Constituents like actinides (U and Th), fission products and RE elements are adequately retained in clays and organic matters associated with these sandstone deposits. The study also highlights the possibility of utilization of lean ore discarded during mining and milling as backfill material in far field areas and optimizing near field buffers/backfills in a geological repository located in granitic rocks in depth range of 400-500m. (author)

  19. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  20. Recovery of uranium by a reverse osmosis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, J.G.; Stana, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for concentrating and recovering uranium material from an aqueous solution, comprises passing a feed solution containing uranium through at least one reverse osmosis membrane system to concentrate the uranium, and then flushing the concentrated uranium solution with water in a reverse osmosis membrane system to further concentrate the uranium

  1. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.; Cachim, P.B.; Da Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanics of filled carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, A.O.

    2014-04-01

    The benefits of filling carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with assorted molecular and crystalline substances have been investigated for the past two decades. Amongst the study of new structural phases, defects, chemical reactions and varied types of host-guest interactions, there is one fundamental characterisation aspect of these systems that continues to be overlooked: the mechanical behaviour of filled CNTs. In contrast to their empty counterparts, the mechanics of filled CNTs is a subject where reports appear far and apart, this despite being key to the application of these materials in technological devices. In the following paragraphs, we review the work that has been carried out up to the present on the mechanics of filled CNTs. The studies discussed range from experimental resonant frequency essays performed within electron microscopes to modelling, via molecular dynamics, of three-point bending of nanotubes filled with gases. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of neutron activation analysis techniques for the determination of uranium concentrations in geological and environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberger, S.; Kapsimalis, R.

    2013-01-01

    We have described the determination of uranium in environmental, geological, and agricultural specimens by three different non-destructive nuclear methods. The effectiveness, as defined as the lower limits of detection in this work, of quantifying trace levels of bulk uranium in geological samples was evaluated for several common NAA techniques. These techniques include short-lived and medium-lived neutron activation analysis using thermal and epithermal neutrons; these results were compared with an assessment of Compton suppressed gamma-ray counting. A careful evaluation of three major (n,γ) reactions with chlorine, manganese and sodium that could impede determining low levels of uranium due to high Compton continuums was done. The evaluation of Compton suppressed passive gamma counting revealed that uranium concentrations below 50 mg kg −1 were not adequate to achieve good counting statistics using the 234m Pa the second daughter product of 238 U. -- Highlights: ► Determination of uranium concentrations in geological, environmental, and agricultural specimens. ► Use of several NAA and passive counting methods. ► Identified several key interferences. ► Use of Compton suppression to minimize effects of interferences

  4. Uranium. Resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The events characterising the world uranium market in the last several years illustrate the persistent uncertainly faced by uranium producers and consumers worldwide. With world nuclear capacity expanding and uranium production satisfying only about 60 per cent of demand, uranium stockpiles continue to be depleted at a high rate. The uncertainty related to the remaining levels of world uranium stockpiles and to the amount of surplus defence material that will be entering the market makes it difficult to determine when a closer balance between uranium supply and demand will be reached. Information in this report provides insights into changes expected in uranium supply and demand until well into the next century. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the foremost reference on uranium. This world report is based on official information from 59 countries and includes compilations of statistics on resources, exploration, production and demand as of 1 January 1997. It provides substantial new information from all of the major uranium producing centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe, North America and the New Independent States, including the first-ever official reports on uranium production in Estonia, Mongolia, the Russian Federation and Uzbekistan. It also contains an international expert analysis of industry statistics and worldwide projections of nuclear energy growth, uranium requirements and uranium supply

  5. Lacustrine-humate model for primary uranium ore deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two generations of uranium ore, primary and redistributed, occur in fluvial sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin; the two stages of ore formation can be related to the hydrologic history of the basin. Primary ore formed soon after Morrison deposition, in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous, and a model, the lacustrine-humate model, is offered that views primary mineralization as a diagenetic event related to early pore fluid evolution. The basic premise is that the humate, a pore-filling organic material closely associated with primary ore, originated as humic acids dissolved in pore waters of greenish-gray lacustrine mudstones deposited in the mud-flat facies of the Brushy Basin Member and similar K shale beds in the Westwater Canyon Member. During compaction associated with early burial, formation water expelled from lacustrine mudstone units carried these humic acids into adjacent sandstone beds where the organics precipitated, forming the humate deposits that concentrated uranium. During the Tertiary, much later in the hydrologic history of the basin, when Jurassic sediments were largely compacted, oxygenated ground water flowed basinward from uplifted basin margins. This invasion of Morrison sandstone beds by oxidizing ground waters redistributed uranium from primary ores along redox boundaries, forming ore deposits that resemble roll-front-type uranium ores. 11 figures

  6. Remote sensing in uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offield, T.W.

    1976-01-01

    New types of multispectral data and computer enhancement of images provide a basis for quantitative analysis of ground reflectance, colour discrimination and removal of illumination-geometry effects, not possible with standard aerial photographs. These methods can be designed to take advantage of spectral characteristics of minerals such as hematite and limonite in attempting to discriminate areas of alteration around mineral deposits. The spectral bands of Landsat are not optimum for this discrimination, but several studies show that enhancement of Landsat images permits effective mapping of altered ground in some areas. Red and yellow ground may be confused, a problem where only one of these colours marks alteration related to mineralization. Altered ground in uranium areas has been successfully defined at Cameron, Arizona and Crooks Gap and the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. The Wyoming studies, described in some detail, resulted in unambiguous discrimination of red alteration at Crooks Gap but only partial distinction of red altered ground from yellow-weathering areas in the Powder River Basin. In South Texas, heavy vegetation severely limits the detection of reflectance differences in geological materials or of structural features. Thermal-infrared images of the Texas area aid in detection and mapping of channel-fill deposits, potential loci of uranium mineralization in the Miocene Catahoula Tuff. (author)

  7. Uranium deposits in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilpolt, R.H.; Simov, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Africa is not only known for its spectacular diamond, gold, copper, chromium, platinum and phosphorus deposits but also for its uranium deposits. At least two uranium provinces can be distinguished - the southern, with the equatorial sub-province; and the south Saharan province. Uranium deposits are distributed either in cratons or in mobile belts, the first of sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate type, while those located in mobile belts are predominantly of vein and similar (disseminated) type. Uranium deposits occur within Precambrian rocks or in younger platform sediments, but close to the exposed Precambrian basement. The Proterozoic host rocks consist of sediments, metamorphics or granitoids. In contrast to Phanerozoic continental uranium-bearing sediments, those in the Precambrian are in marginal marine facies but they do contain organic material. The geology of Africa is briefly reviewed with the emphasis on those features which might control the distribution of uranium. The evolution of the African Platform is considered as a progressive reduction of its craton area which has been affected by three major Precambrian tectonic events. A short survey on the geology of known uranium deposits is made. However, some deposits and occurrences for which little published material is available are treated in more detail. (author)

  8. Uranium deposits of Australia to 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spannari, S.

    1979-01-01

    This bibliography provides a retrospective account of Australian uranium deposits, particularly the unpublished materials in the Australian Capital Territory. Some abstracts are included. Occurrences, mineralogy, ore genesis, structural controls and the eonomic geology of uranium deposits are covered but the mining of uranium, exploration reports, surveys, environmental aspects and controversial materials are not

  9. Fluoride release and recharge behavior of a nano-filled resin-modified glass ionomer compared with that of other fluoride releasing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumita B; Oxman, Joe D; Falsafi, Afshin; Ton, Tiffany T

    2011-12-01

    To compare the long-term fluoride release kinetics of a novel nano-filled two-paste resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI), Ketac Nano (KN) with that of two powder-liquid resin-modified glass-ionomers, Fuji II LC (FLC) and Vitremer (VT) and one conventional glass-ionomer, Fuji IX (FIX). Fluoride release was measured in vitro using ion-selective electrodes. Kinetic analysis was done using regression analysis and compared with existing models for GIs and compomers. In a separate experiment the samples of KN and two conventional glass-ionomers, FIX and Ketac Molar (KM) were subjected to a treatment with external fluoride source (Oral-B Neutra-Foam) after 3 months of fluoride release and the recharge behavior studied for an additional 7-day period. The cumulative amount of fluoride released from KN, VT and FLC and the release profiles were statistically similar but greater than that for FIX at P coating of KN with its primer and of DY with its adhesive did not significantly alter the fluoride release behavior of the respective materials. The overall rate for KN was significantly higher than for the compomer DY. DY showed a linear rate of release vs. t and no burst effect as expected for compomers. The nanoionomer KN showed fluoride recharge behavior similar to the conventional glass ionomers FIX and KM. Thus, it was concluded that the new RMGI KN exhibits fluoride ion release behavior similar to typical conventional and RMGIs and that the primer does not impede the release of fluoride.

  10. Study of 5f electron based filled skutterudite compound EuFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12}, a thermoelectric (TE) material: FP-LAPW method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, A., E-mail: amitshan2009@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mizoram University, Aizawl 796004 (India); Rai, D.P., E-mail: dibyaprakashrai@gmail.com [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, 3 Heqing Road, Beijing 100084 (China); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modlisation Mathmatique (LPQ3M), Dpartement de Technologie, Universit de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria); Maibam, J. [Department of Physics, Assam University, Silchar 788011 (India); Sandeep, E-mail: sndp.chettri@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mizoram University, Aizawl 796004 (India); Thapa, R.K., E-mail: r.k.thapa@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Mizoram University, Aizawl 796004 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The compound EuFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} shows a semi-metallic behavior with pseudo gap. • The inherent dense band near E{sub F} facilitate the charge carriers. • The magnetic moment within LSDA and mBJ are underestimated. • The inclusion of onsite Coulomb repulsion (U) in LSDA has improved the result. • The results obtained from LSDA + U are consistent with the experimental data. - Abstract: We have studied the elastic, electronic and magnetic properties along with the thermoelectric properties of an undoped filled skutterudite EuFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The LSDA, LSDA + U and a new exchange-correlation functional called modified Becke Johnson (mBJ) potential based on density functional theory (DFT) were used for studying material properties. The Eu-f and Fe-d are strongly correlated elements thus the inclusion of Coulomb repulsion (U) expected to give an exact ground state properties. The exchange-splitting of Eu-4f states were analyzed to explain the ferromagnetic behavior of EuFe{sub 4}Sb{sub 12} (half-metallic behavior). The numerical values of isotropic elastic parameters and related properties are estimated in the framework of the Voigt–Reuss–Hill approximation. The calculation of thermal transport properties at various temperature shows the high value of Seebeck coefficient and figure of merit (ZT) = 0.25 at room temperature in consistent to the experimental results.

  11. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  12. Uranium thiolate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leverd, Pascal C.

    1994-01-01

    This research thesis proposes a new approach to the chemistry of uranium thiolate complexes as these compounds are very promising for various uses (in bio-inorganic chemistry, in some industrial processes like oil desulphurization). It more particularly addresses the U-S bond or more generally bonds between polarizable materials and hard metals. The author thus reports the study of uranium organometallic thiolates (tricyclo-penta-dienic and mono-cyclo-octa-tetraenylic complexes), and of uranium homoleptic thiolates (tetra-thiolate complexes, hexa-thiolate complexes, reactivity of homoleptic thiolate complexes) [fr

  13. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  14. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mfarhan_73@yahoo.co.uk; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-09-15

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease.

  15. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2008-01-01

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease

  16. Uranium retrieval support, storage, and marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.; Marshall, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy is implementing a stewardship approach to management of uranium assets. This life-cycle approach to managing uranium addresses current needs in the context of a long-term strategy. In June 1998, the United States Department of Energy established the Uranium Management Group. The mission of the UMG is to safely collect and store commercially viable uranium from various DOE facilities at a central location. The Oak Ridge Operations Office, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was given the task to establish a facility for the storage of these uranium materials. Materials collected are non-waste uranium and packaged to allow transport and long-term storage. Coordination of uranium management under the Uranium Management Group offers significant opportunities for sayings through improved planning and efficiency and creates an environmentally sound approach for the storage and reuse of excess uranium. (author)

  17. Uranium retrieval support, storage, and marketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.; Marshall, E.M. [U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy is implementing a stewardship approach to management of uranium assets. This life-cycle approach to managing uranium addresses current needs in the context of a long-term strategy. In June 1998, the United States Department of Energy established the Uranium Management Group. The mission of the UMG is to safely collect and store commercially viable uranium from various DOE facilities at a central location. The Oak Ridge Operations Office, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was given the task to establish a facility for the storage of these uranium materials. Materials collected are non-waste uranium and packaged to allow transport and long-term storage. Coordination of uranium management under the Uranium Management Group offers significant opportunities for sayings through improved planning and efficiency and creates an environmentally sound approach for the storage and reuse of excess uranium. (author)

  18. A comparison between thorium-uranium and low enrichment uranium cycles in the high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerles, J M

    1973-03-15

    In a previous report, it was shown that the Uranium cycle could be used as well with multi-hole block (GGA type) as with tubular elements. Now, in a F.S.V. geometry, a comparison is made between Thorium cycle and Uranium cycle. This comparison will be concerned with the physical properties of the materials, the needs of natural Uranium, the fissile material inventory and, at last, an attempt of economical considerations. In this report the cycle will be characterizd by the fertile material. So, we write ''Thorium cycle'' for Highly Enriched Uranium - Thorium cycle and ''Uranium cycle'' for low Enrichment Uranium cycle.

  19. A safeguards case study of the Nuclear Materials and equipment corporation uranium processing plant Apollo, Pennsylvania. Appendix B with proprietary information removed. Staff technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, W.; Hockert, J.; Quinn, E.

    1980-04-01

    The report characterizes the Atomic Energy Commission safeguards requirements and the safeguards systems and procedures in place at the Nuclear Materials and Equipment (NUMEC) uranium processing plant in Apollo, Pennsylvania during the spring of 1964. Based upon this characterization, a list of safeguards weaknesses which would be considered deficiencies under 1979 requirements is developed. Appendixes A and B to the report provide a detailed characterization of AEC safeguards requirements as well as a side by side comparison of NUMEC's safeguards program in 1964 with the safeguards program currently required of a comparable licensed facility

  20. Efficiency of the scattered primary radiation as an internal standard in the determination of uranium and thorium in geological materials by X-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Guerra, J.P.; Bayon, A.

    1980-01-01

    The efficiency of the scattered primary coherent and incoherent X-radiation of various wavelengths has been studied as a matrix correction in the determination of uranium and thorium in geological materials by X-ray spectrometry. The excitation has been performed with molybdenum and tungsten targets. Results illustrate that the incoherently-scattered Mok βsub(1,3) and Mok βsub(1,2) radiation are, respectively, the optimum reference lines. The particle size influence and the critical thickness of the sample are also considered.(auth.)

  1. Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L.; Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M.

    1991-11-01

    A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC ampersand A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC ampersand A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion

  2. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, S.R.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Three overall factors are necessary for formation of uranium deposits in sandstone: a source of uranium, host rocks capable of transmitting uranium-bearing solutions, and a precipitant. Possible sources of uranium in sandstone-type deposits include groundwaters emanating from granitic highlands, arkosic sediments, tuffaceous material within or overlying the host rocks, connate fluids, and overlying black shales. The first three sources are considered the most likely. Host rocks are generally immature sandstones deposited in alluvial-fan, intermontane-basin or marginal-marine environments, but uranium deposits do occur in well-winnowed barrier-bar or eolian sands. Host rocks for uranium deposits generally show coefficients of permeability on the order of 1 to 100 gal/day/ft 2 . Precipitants are normally agents capable of reducing uranium from the uranyl to the uranous state. The association of uranium with organic matter is unequivocal; H 2 S, a powerful reductant, may have been present at the time of formation of some deposits but may go unnoticed today. Vanadium can serve to preserve the tabular characteristics of some deposits in the near-surface environment, but is considered an unlikely primary precipitant for uranium. Uranium deposits in sandstone are divided into two overall types: peneconcordant deposits, which occur in locally reducing environments in otherwise oxidized sandstones; and roll-type deposits, which occur at the margin of an area where an oxidized groundwater has permeated an otherwise reduced sandstone. Uranium deposits are further broken down into four subclasses; these are described

  3. Use of depleted uranium silicate glass to minimize release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel waste packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    A Depleted Uranium Silicate Container Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill the void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (a) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (b) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments

  4. Recovering uranium from phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Wet-process phosphoric acid contains a significant amount of uranium. This uranium totals more than 1,500 tons/yr in current U.S. acid output--and projections put the uranium level at 8,000 tons/yr in the year 2000. Since the phosphoric acid is a major raw material for fertilizers, uranium finds its way into those products and is effectively lost as a resource, while adding to the amount of radioactive material that can contaminate the food chain. So, resource-conservation and environmental considerations both make recovery of the uranium from phosphoric acid desirable. This paper describes the newly developed process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid by using solvent-extraction technique. After many extractants had been tested, the researchers eventually selected the combination of di (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEPA) and trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as the most suitable. The flowscheme of the process is included

  5. Evaluation of debris extruded apically during the removal of root canal filling material using ProTaper, D-RaCe, and R-Endo rotary nickel-titanium retreatment instruments and hand files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topçuoğlu, Hüseyin Sinan; Aktı, Ahmet; Tuncay, Öznur; Dinçer, Asiye Nur; Düzgün, Salih; Topçuoğlu, Gamze

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of debris extruded apically during the removal of root canal filling material using ProTaper (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland), D-RaCe (FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland), and R-Endo (Micro-Mega, Besançon, France) nickel-titanium (NiTi) rotary retreatment instruments and hand files. Sixty extracted single-rooted mandibular premolar teeth were prepared with K-files and filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus sealer (Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany). The teeth were then randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 15 for each group) for retreatment. The removal of canal filling material was performed as follows: hand files, ProTaper, D-RaCe, and R-Endo retreatment instruments. Debris extruded apically during the removal of canal filling material was collected into preweighed Eppendorf tubes. The tubes were then stored in an incubator at 70°C for 5 days. The weight of the dry extruded debris was established by subtracting the preretreatment and postretreatment weight of the Eppendorf tubes for each group. The data obtained were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests. All retreatment techniques caused the apical extrusion of debris. Hand files produced significantly more debris when compared with ProTaper, D-RaCe, and R-Endo rotary systems (P ProTaper, D-RaCe, and R-Endo retreatment systems (P > .05). The findings showed that during the removal of root canal filling material, rotary NiTi retreatment instruments used in this study caused less apical extrusion of debris compared with hand files. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Uranium exploration in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; Hawkins, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    As a result of exploration which recommenced in 1966 Australia's uranium reserves increased from 6,200 tonnes in 1967 to 227,000 tonnes uranium by June 1976. Most discoveries in the early 1950's were made by prospectors. The increase in reserves during the past decade is the result of exploration by companies utilising improved technology in areas selected as geologically favourable. These reserves were established at relatively low cost. In the Alligator Rivers Uranium Province the ''vein'' type deposits at Jabiluka, Ranger, Koongarra and Nabarlek contain 17% of the world's reserves. Most of these discoveries resulted from the investigation of airborne radiometric anomalies but cover over the prospective host rocks will necessitate the future use of costlier and more indirect exploration techniques. There was exploration for sandstone type uranium deposits in most of Australia's sedimentary basins. The greatest success was achieved in the Lake Frome Basin in South Australia. Other deposits were found in the Ngalia and Amadeus Basins in Central Australia and in the Westmoreland area, N.W. Queensland. A major uranium deposit was found in an unusual environment at Yeelirrie, Western Australia where carnotite occurs in a caliche and clay host which fills a shallow, ancient drainage channel. Although caliche occurrences are relatively widespread on the Precambrian shield no other economic deposit has been found. Recent discoveries in the Georgetown area of Queensland indicate the presence of another uranium province but it is too early to assess its potential. The ore occurs in clastic sediments at the base of a volcanic sequence overlying a Precambrian basement. Several companies which have established large uranium reserves have a number of additional attractive prospects. Exploration activity in Australia in 1975 was at a lower level than in previous years, but the potential for discovering further deposits is considered to be high

  7. Discrimination of source reactor type by multivariate statistical analysis of uranium and plutonium isotopic concentrations in unknown irradiated nuclear fuel material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Martin; Kristo, Michael J

    2008-11-01

    The problem of identifying the provenance of unknown nuclear <