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Sample records for uranium dioxide particles

  1. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    Sintered uranium dioxide pellets composed of particles of size > 50 microns suitable for power reactor use are made by incorporating a small amount of sulphur into the uranium dioxide before sintering. The increase in grain size achieved results in an improvement in overall efficiency when such pellets are used in a power reactor. (author)

  2. Contribution to the study of second phases particles dispersion in polycrystalline uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, V.

    1994-06-01

    To reduce fission gas release of irradiated polycrystalline uranium dioxide, the dispersion of intragranular nanometric particles of second phase necessary to pin gas bubbles may complete the advantage of a large-grained fuel microstructure. Moreover, intergranular glass films may improve high temperatures mechanical properties of UO 2 . In this study, mixtures of additives composed of ''corindon'' structure oxides that enhance the fuel grain growth and composed of different oxides with variable solid solubilities in the UO 2 matrix were achieved. Additives with a negligible solubility inhibit grain boundaries motion except those, such as silica, that involve a liquid phase at the sintering temperature. Rare earth oxides that form stable solid solutions with UO 2 cannot lead to precipitation, but have no effect on the fuel grain growth doped with ''corindon'' type oxides. A chromium oxide excess allows the creation of a fuel microstructure described by large grains and intragranular spherical Cr 2 O 3 inclusions observed by scanning electron microscopy. Values for the bulk lattice diffusion coefficient of Cr 3+ cations in UO 2 can be deduced from the experimental growth of those dispersed particles by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. The formation of small precipitated metal particles inside the uranium dioxide matrix induced by the internal reduction of a solid solution has not been performed. However, direct reduction of insoluble chromium oxide particles is easy and produces metallic intragranular precipitates. (author). 119 refs., 112 figs., 33 tabs., 5 annexes

  3. Observations concerning the particle-size of the oxidation products of uranium formed in air or in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baque, P.; Leclercq, D.

    1964-01-01

    This report brings together the particle-size analysis results obtained on products formed by the oxidation or the ignition of uranium in moist air or dry carbon dioxide. The results bring out the importance of the nature of the oxidising atmosphere, the combustion in moist air giving rise to the formation of a larger proportion of fine particles than combustion in carbon dioxide under pressure. (authors) [fr

  4. Uranium dioxide. Sintering test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Description of a sintering method and of the equipment devoted to uranium dioxide powder caracterization and comparison between different samples. Determination of the curve giving specific volume versus pressure and micrographic examination of a pellet at medium pressure [fr

  5. Production of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, J.E.; Shuck, D.L.; Lyon, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    A continuous, four stage fluidized bed process for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to ceramic-grade uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder suitable for use in the manufacture of fuel pellets for nuclear reactors is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of first reacting UF 6 with steam in a first fluidized bed, preferably at about 550 0 C, to form solid intermediate reaction products UO 2 F 2 , U 3 O 8 and an off-gas including hydrogen fluoride (HF). The solid intermediate reaction products are conveyed to a second fluidized bed reactor at which the mol fraction of HF is controlled at low levels in order to prevent the formation of uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ). The first intermediate reaction products are reacted in the second fluidized bed with steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 630 0 C. The second intermediate reaction product including uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is conveyed to a third fluidized bed reactor and reacted with additional steam and hydrogen at a temperature of about 650 0 C producing a reaction product consisting essentially of uranium dioxide having an oxygen-uranium ratio of about 2 and a low residual fluoride content. This product is then conveyed to a fourth fluidized bed wherein a mixture of air and preheated nitrogen is introduced in order to further reduce the fluoride content of the UO 2 and increase the oxygen-uranium ratio to about 2.25

  6. Uranium dioxide electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willit, James L [Batavia, IL; Ackerman, John P [Prescott, AZ; Williamson, Mark A [Naperville, IL

    2009-12-29

    This is a single stage process for treating spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors. The spent nuclear fuel, uranium oxide, UO.sub.2, is added to a solution of UCl.sub.4 dissolved in molten LiCl. A carbon anode and a metallic cathode is positioned in the molten salt bath. A power source is connected to the electrodes and a voltage greater than or equal to 1.3 volts is applied to the bath. At the anode, the carbon is oxidized to form carbon dioxide and uranium chloride. At the cathode, uranium is electroplated. The uranium chloride at the cathode reacts with more uranium oxide to continue the reaction. The process may also be used with other transuranic oxides and rare earth metal oxides.

  7. Uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a sintered, high density, large crystal grain size uranium dioxide pellet is described which involves: (i) reacting a uranyl nitrate of formula UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O with a sulphur source, at a temperature of from about 300 deg. C to provide a sulphur-containing uranium trioxide; (ii) reacting the thus-obtained modified uranium trioxide with ammonium nitrate to form an insoluble sulphur-containing ammonium uranate; (iii) neutralizing the thus-formed slurry with ammonium hydroxide to precipitate out as an insoluble ammonium uranate the remaining dissolved uranium; (iv) recovering the thus-formed precipitates in a dry state; (v) reducing the dry precipitate to UO 2 , and forming it into 'green' pellets; and (vi) sintering the pellets in a hydrogen atmosphere at an elevated temperature

  8. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  9. Production of sized particles of uranium oxides and uranium oxyfluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, I.E.; Randall, C.C.

    1976-01-01

    A process is claimed for converting uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) of a relatively large particle size in a fluidized bed reactor by mixing uranium hexafluoride with a mixture of steam and hydrogen and by preliminary reacting in an ejector gaseous uranium hexafluoride with steam and hydrogen to form a mixture of uranium and oxide and uranium oxyfluoride seed particles of varying sizes, separating the larger particles from the smaller particles in a cyclone separator, recycling the smaller seed particles through the ejector to increase their size, and introducing the larger seed particles from the cyclone separator into a fluidized bed reactor where the seed particles serve as nuclei on which coarser particles of uranium dioxide are formed. 9 claims, 2 drawing figures

  10. Thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, C.G.S.; George, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide of composition UO 2.015 was measured from 300 to 1400 K. The phonon component of the conductivity is found to be quantitatively accounted for by the theoretical expression of Slack derived by modifying the Leibfried-Schlomann equation. (orig.)

  11. Emanation of /sup 232/U daughter products from submicrometer particles of uranium oxide and thorium dioxide by nuclear recoil and inert gas diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, M.A.; Cuddihy, R.G. (Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.)

    1983-01-01

    Emanation of /sup 232/U daughter products by nuclear recoil and inert gas diffusion from spherical, submicrometer particles of uranium oxide and thorium dioxide was studied. Monodisperse samples of particles containing 1% /sup 232/U and having physical diameters between 0.1 and 1 ..mu..m were used for the emanation measurements. Thorium-228 ions recoiling from the particles after alpha-decay of /sup 232/U were collected electrostatically on a recoil cathode. Radon-220 diffusing from the particles was swept by an airstream into a 4 l. chamber where the /sup 220/Rn daughters were collected on a second cathode. Mathematical models of radionuclide emanation from spherical particles were used to calculate the recoil range of /sup 228/Th and the diffusion coefficient of /sup 220/Rn in the particle matrix. A /sup 228/Th recoil range of 0.02 ..mu..m and a /sup 220/Rn diffusion coefficient of 3 x 10/sup -14/ cm/sup 2//sec were obtained in both uranium oxide and thorium dioxide particles.

  12. The analytical and numerical study of the fluorination of uranium dioxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed analytical study of the equations describing the fluorination of UO 2 particles is presented for some limiting cases assuming that the mass flowrate of these particles is so small that they do not affect the state of the gas. The analytical solutions obtained can be used for approximate estimates of the effect of fluorination on particle diameter and temperature but their major application, however, is probably in the verification of self-consistent numerical solutions. Computational results are presented and discussed for a self-consistent problem in which both the effects of gas on particles and particles on gas are accounted for. It has been shown that in the limiting cases for which analytical solutions have been obtained, the coincidence between numerical and analytical results is almost exact. This can be considered as a verification of both the analytical and numerical solutions. (orig.)

  13. Manufacture of uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, M.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide powder is prepared by the AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) method. Supplementing the known process steps, the AUC, after separation from the mother liquor, is washed with an ammonium hydrogen carbonate or an NH 4 OH solution and is subsequently post-treated with a liquid which reduces the surface tension of the residual water in an AUC. Such a liquid is, for instance, alcohol

  14. Internal friction in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin Filho, Pedro Iris

    1979-01-01

    The uranium dioxide inelastic properties were studied measuring internal friction at low frequencies (of the order of 1 Hz). The work was developed in the 160 to 400 deg C temperature range. The effect of stoichiometry variation was studied oxidizing the sample with consequent change of the defect structure originally present in the non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide. The presence of a wide and irregular peak due to oxidation was observed at low temperatures. Activation energy calculations indicated the occurrence of various relaxation processes and assuming the existence of a peak between - 80 and - 70 deg C , the absolute value obtained for the activation energy (0,54 eV) is consistent with the observed values determined at medium and high frequencies for the stress induced reorientation of defects. The microstructure effect on the inelastic properties was studied for stoichiometric uranium dioxide, by varying grain size and porosity. These parameters have influence on the high temperature measurements of internal friction. The internal friction variation for temperatures higher than 340 deg C is thought to be due to grain boundary relaxation phenomena. (author)

  15. Design of a Uranium Dioxide Spheroidization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel P.; Mireles, Omar R.; Frendi, Abdelkader

    2013-01-01

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) fuel cermets. The PSS process improves particle spherocity and surface morphology for coating by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Angular fully dense particles melt in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet at between 32-36 kW, and become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Particles range in size from 100 - 50 microns in diameter. Student s t-test and hypothesis testing of two proportions statistical methods were applied to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders show great than 800% increase in the number of spherical particles over the stock powder with the mean spherocity only mildly improved. It is recommended that powders be processed two-three times in order to reach the desired spherocity, and that process parameters be optimized for a more narrow particles size range. Keywords: spherocity, spheroidization, plasma, uranium-dioxide, cermet, nuclear, propulsion

  16. A METHOD OF PREPARING URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F.A.; Mudge, L.K.

    1963-12-17

    A process of purifying raw, in particular plutonium- and fission- products-containing, uranium dioxide is described. The uranium dioxide is dissolved in a molten chloride mixture containing potassium chloride plus sodium, lithium, magnesium, or lead chloride under anhydrous conditions; an electric current and a chlorinating gas are passed through the mixture whereby pure uranium dioxide is deposited on and at the same time partially redissolved from the cathode. (AEC)

  17. Preparation of UO_2 Fine Particle by Hydrolysis of Uranium(IV) Alkoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Satoh, Isamu; Takahashi, Mitsuyuki; Miura, Shigeyuki

    1997-01-01

    Fine particles of uranium(IV) dioxides were obtained by hydrolysis of uranium(IV) ethoxide which was synthesized by reacting uranium tetrachloride with sodium ethoxide. The monodispersed submicrometer particles were confirmed by SEM observation.

  18. The cohesive energy of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, B.G.

    1958-08-01

    Theoretical values have been calculated of the heats of formation of uranium dioxide and thorium dioxide on the assumption that the atomic binding forces in these solids are predominantly ionic in character. The good agreement found between the theoretical and observed values shows that the ionic model may, with care, be used in calculating the energies of defects in the uranium and thorium dioxide crystal structures. (author)

  19. Exact Solution of Fractional Diffusion Model with Source Term used in Study of Concentration of Fission Product in Uranium Dioxide Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao; Cao Jianzhu; Sun Lifeng

    2011-01-01

    The exact solution of fractional diffusion model with a location-independent source term used in the study of the concentration of fission product in spherical uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) particle is built. The adsorption effect of the fission product on the surface of the UO 2 particle and the delayed decay effect are also considered. The solution is given in terms of Mittag-Leffler function with finite Hankel integral transformation and Laplace transformation. At last, the reduced forms of the solution under some special physical conditions, which is used in nuclear engineering, are obtained and corresponding remarks are given to provide significant exact results to the concentration analysis of nuclear fission products in nuclear reactor. (nuclear physics)

  20. SULPHUR DIOXIDE LEACHING OF URANIUM CONTAINING MATERIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunaes, A.; Rabbits, F.T.; Hester, K.D.; Smith, H.W.

    1958-12-01

    A process is described for extracting uranlum from uranium containing material, such as a low grade pitchblende ore, or mill taillngs, where at least part of the uraniunn is in the +4 oxidation state. After comminuting and magnetically removing any entrained lron particles the general material is made up as an aqueous slurry containing added ferric and manganese salts and treated with sulfur dioxide and aeration to an extent sufficient to form a proportion of oxysulfur acids to give a pH of about 1 to 2 but insufficient to cause excessive removal of the sulfur dioxide gas. After separating from the solids, the leach solution is adjusted to a pH of about 1.25, then treated with metallic iron in the presence of a precipitant such as a soluble phosphate, arsonate, or fluoride.

  1. Fluorination reaction uranium dioxide by fluorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Shinji; Homma, Shunji; Koga, Jiro; Matsumoto, Shiro; Sasahira, Akira; Kawamura, Fumio

    2004-01-01

    Kinetics of the fluorination reaction of uranium dioxide is studied using un-reacted core model with shrinking particles. The model includes the film mass transfer of fluorine gas and its diffusion in the particle. The rate constants of the model are determined by fitting the experimental data for 370-450degC. The model successfully represents the fluorination in this temperature range. The rate control step is identified by examining the rate constants of the model for 300-1,800degC. For temperature range up to 900degC, the fluorination reaction is rate controlling. For over 900degC, both mechanisms of the mass transfer of fluorine and the fluorination reaction control the rate of the fluorination. With further increase of the temperature, however, the fluorination reaction becomes so fast that the mass transfer of fluorine eventually controls the rate of the fluorination. (author)

  2. Yellow cake to ceramic uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawidzki, T.W.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1983-01-01

    This overview article first reviews the processes for converting uranium ore concentrates to ceramic uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Refinery of Eldorado Resources Limited. In addition, some of the problems, solutions, thoughts and research direction with respect to the production and properties of ceramic UO 2 are described

  3. Process for the preparation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.W.; Baugh, D.W. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the preparation of actinide dioxides using actinide nitrate hexahydrates as starting materials is described. The actinide nitrate hexahydrate is reacted with sodium dithionite, and the product is heated in the absence of oxygen to obtain the dioxide. Preferably, the actinide is uranium, plutonium or neptunium. (LL)

  4. Extraction of Uranium Using Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Dioxide for Spent Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayo Sawada; Daisuke Hirabayashi; Youichi Enokida [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    For the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a new method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. Uranium extraction from broken pieces, whose average grain size was 5 mm, of uranium dioxide pellet with nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was demonstrated in the present study. (authors)

  5. Uranium Dioxide Powder Flow ability Improvement Using Sol-Gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanda, D.; Sambodo Daru, G.

    1998-01-01

    The improvement of flow ability characteristics of uranium dioxide powder has been done using sol-gel process. To anticipate a pellet mass production with uniform pellet dimension, the uranium dioxide powder must be have a spherical form. Uranium dioxide spherical powder has been diluted in acid transformed into sol colloidal solution. To obtain uranium dioxide spherical form, the uranium sol-colloidal solution has been dropped in a hot paraffin ( at the temperature of 90 0 C) to form gelatinous colloid and then dried at 800 0 C, and sintered at the temperature of 1700 0 C. The flow ability of spherical uranium dioxide powder has been examined by using Flowmeter Hall (ASTM. B. 213-46T). The measurement result reveals that the spherical uranium dioxide powder has a flow ability twice than that of unprocessed uranium dioxide powder

  6. Dissolution experiments of unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollila, K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the dissolution rate of uranium from unirradiated uranium dioxide pellets in deionized water and natural groundwater. Moreover, the solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater was measured. Two different temperatures, 25 and 60 deg C were used. The low oxygen content of deep groundwater was simulated. The dissolution rate of uranium varied from 10 -7 to 10 -8 g cm -2 d -1 . The rate in reionized water was one order of magnitude lower than in groundwater. No great difference was observed between the natural groundwaters with different composition. Temperature seems to have effect on the dissolution rate. The solubility limit of uranium in natural groundwater in reducing conditions, at 25 deg C, varied from 20 to 600 μg/l and in oxidizing conditions, at 60 deg C, from 4 to 17 mg/l

  7. Improved ionic model of liquid uranium dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gryaznov, [No Value; Iosilevski, [No Value; Yakub, E; Fortov, [No Value; Hyland, GJ; Ronchi, C

    The paper presents a model for liquid uranium dioxide, obtained by improving a simplified ionic model, previously adopted to describe the equation of state of this substance [1]. A "chemical picture" is used for liquid UO2 of stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric composition. Several ionic species

  8. Thermal properties of nonstoichiometry uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazauri, R.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Tenishev, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, was developed a method of oxidation pure uranium dioxide to a predetermined deviation from the stoichiometry. Oxidation was carried out using the thermogravimetric method on NETZSCH STA 409 CD with a solid electrolyte galvanic cell for controlling the oxygen potential of the environment. 4 samples uranium oxide were obtained with a different ratio of oxygen-to-metal: O / U = 2.002, O / U = 2.005, O / U = 2.015, O / U = 2.033. For the obtained samples were determined basic thermal characteristics of the heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity. The error of heat capacity determination is equal to 5%. Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples decreased with increasing deviation from stoichiometry. For the sample with O / M = 2.033, difference of both values with those of stoichiometric uranium dioxide is close to 50%.

  9. Low temperature sintering of hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrel, H.

    1991-12-01

    In the lattice of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content (UO 2+x ), each additional oxygen atoms is introduced by shifting two anions from normal sites to interstitial ones, thereby creating two oxygen vacancies. The point defects then combine to form complex defects comprising several interstitials and vacancies. The group of anions (3x) in the interstitial position participate in equilibria promoting the creation of uranium vacancies thereby considerably increasing uranium self-diffusion. However, uranium grain boundaries diffusion governs densification during the first two stages of sintering of uranium dioxide with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, i.e., up to 93% of the theoretical density. Surface diffusion and evaporation-condensation, which are considerably accentuated by the hyperstoichiometric deviation, play an active role during sintering by promoting crystalline growth during the second and third stages of sintering. U 8 O 8 can be added to adjust the stoichiometry and to form a finely porous structure and thus increase the pore area subjected to surface phenomena. The composition with an O/U ratio equal to 2.25 is found to densify the best, despite a linear growth in sintering activation energy with hyperstoichiometric oxygen content, increasing from 300 kj.mol -1 for UO 2.10 to 440 kJ.mol -1 for UO 2.25 . Seeds can be introduced to obtain original microstructures, for example the presence of large grains in small-grain matrix

  10. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  11. Process for the preparation of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, G.W.; Baugh, D.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An actinide dioxide, e.g., uranium dioxide, plutonium dioxide, neptunium dioxide, etc., is prepared by reacting the actinide nitrate hexahydrate with sodium dithionite as a first step; the reaction product from this first step is a novel composition of matter comprising the actinide sulfite tetrahydrate. The reaction product resulting from this first step is then converted to the actinide dioxide by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) to a temperature of about 500 0 to about 950 0 C for about 15 to about 135 minutes. If the reaction product resulting from the first step is, prior to carrying out the second heating step, exposed to an oxygen-containing atmosphere such as air, the resultant product is a novel composition of matter comprising the actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate which can also be readily converted to the actinide dioxide by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) at a temperature of about 400 0 to about 900 0 C for about 30 to about 150 minutes. Further, the actinide oxysulfite tetrahydrate can be partially dehydrated at reduced pressures (and in the presence of a suitable dehydrating agent such as phosphorus pentoxide). The partially dehydrated product may be readily converted to the dioxide form by heating it in the absence of an oxygen-containing atmosphere (e.g., nitrogen) at a temperature of about 500 0 to about 900 0 C for about 30 to about 150 minutes. 16 claims

  12. Polarographic determination of uranium dioxide stoichiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguie, J.; Uny, G.

    1966-10-01

    The method described allows the determination of small deviations from stoichiometry for uranium dioxide. It was applied to the study of surface oxidation of bulk samples. The sample is dissolved in phosphoric acid under an argon atmosphere; U(VI) is determined by polarography in PO 4 H 3 4.5 N - H 2 SO 4 4 N. U(IV) is determined by potentiometry. The detection limit is UO 2,0002 . The accuracy for a single determination at the 95% confidence level is ±20 per cent for samples with composition included between UO 2,001 and UO 2,01 . (authors) [fr

  13. Process for preparing sintered uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is prepared for use as fuel in nuclear reactors by sintering it to the desired density at a temperature less than 1300 0 C in a chemically controlled gas atmosphere comprised of at least two gases which in equilibrium provide an oxygen partial pressure sufficient to maintain the uranium dioxide composition at an oxygen/uranium ratio of at least 2.005 at the sintering temperature. 7 Claims, No Drawings

  14. Sorption behaviour of uranium and thorium on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, I.M.; El-Absy, M.A.; Abdel-Hamid, M.M.; Aly, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of sorption of uranium and thorium from aqueous nitrate solutions on cryptomelane-type hydrous manganese dioxide (CRYMO) was studied. The exchange of uranium is particle diffusion controlled while that of thorium is chemical reaction at the exchange sites. Sorption of uranium and thorium by CRYMO has been also studied as a function of metal concentrations and temperature. The sorption of both cations is found to be an endothermic process and increases markedly with temperature between 30 and 60 degree C. The sorption results have been analysed by the langmuir adsorption isotherm over the entire range of uranium and thorium concentrations investigated. 35 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Investigation of transformation of uranium hexafluoride into dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, N.P.; Veryatin, U.D.; Yakhonin, I.F.; Logunov, A.F.; Dymkov, Yu.M.

    1982-01-01

    The process of transformation of uranium hexafluoride into dioxide using the method of pyrohydrolysis by steam-hydrogen mixture in a boiling layer using uranium dioxide granules applicable for production of fuel elements is considered. Technological parameters and equipment of the process are described, intermediate stages and process products are considered. Physicochemical and physicomechanical properties of the obtained uranium dioxide granules are given. The results of metallographical investigations into solid products of pyrohydrolysis in phase transformations at certain stages of the process as well as test on vibration packing of the obtained granules in fuel cans are presented

  16. Behaviour of uranium dioxide in liquid nitrogen tetraoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Klavsut', G.N.; Dolgov, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Interaction kinetics of uranium dioxide with liquid nitrogen tetroxide at 25-150 deg C has been studied. It is shown that in the temperature range studied NO[UO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 ] is the final product of the reaction. With the increase of specific surface of uranium dioxide and with the temperature increase the degree of oxide transformation increases. Uranium dioxide-liquid N 2 O 4 interaction proceeds in the diffusion region. Seeming activation energies and rate constants of the mentioned processes are calculated. Effect of nitrogen trioxide additions on transformation kinetics is considered

  17. Dissolution testing of intermediary products in uranium dioxide production by the sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.; Landspersky, H.; Urbanek, V.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed of dissolving polyuranates and uranium dioxides in sulphuric acid and in carbonate solutions for testing intermediate products in the sol-gel process preparation of uranium dioxide. A detailed granulometric analysis of spherical particle dispersion was included as part of the tests. Two different production methods were used for the two types of studied materials. The test results show that the test method is suitable for determining temperature sensitivity of the materials to dissolution reaction. The geometrical distribution of impurities in the spherical particles can be determined from the dissolution kinetics. The method allows the determination of the effect of carbon from impurities on the process of uranium dioxide leaching and is thus applicable for testing materials prepared by the sol-gel method. (Z.M.)

  18. A density functional theory study of uranium-doped thoria and uranium adatoms on the major surfaces of thorium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, Ashley E. [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Santos-Carballal, David [School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom); Leeuw, Nora H. de, E-mail: DeLeeuwN@Cardiff.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    Thorium dioxide is of significant research interest for its use as a nuclear fuel, particularly as part of mixed oxide fuels. We present the results of a density functional theory (DFT) study of uranium-substituted thorium dioxide, where we found that increasing levels of uranium substitution increases the covalent nature of the bonding in the bulk ThO{sub 2} crystal. Three low Miller index surfaces have been simulated and we propose the Wulff morphology for a ThO{sub 2} particle and STM images for the (100), (110), and (111) surfaces studied in this work. We have also calculated the adsorption of a uranium atom and the U adatom is found to absorb strongly on all three surfaces, with particular preference for the less stable (100) and (110) surfaces, thus providing a route to the incorporation of uranium into a growing thoria particle. - Highlights: • Uranium substitution in ThO{sub 2} is found to increase the covalent nature of the ionic bonding. • The (111), (110), and (100) surfaces of ThO{sub 2} are studied and the particle morphology is proposed. • STM images of the (111), (110), and (100) surfaces of ThO{sub 2} are simulated. • Uranium adsorption on the major surfaces of ThO{sub 2} is studied.

  19. An oxyde mixture fuel containing uranium and plutonium dioxides and process to obtain this oxyde mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1976-01-01

    An oxide-mixture fuel containing uranium and plutonium dioxides having the slage of spherical, or nearly spherical, oxide-mixture particles with a diameter within the range of from 0.2 to 2 mn charactarized in that each oxide-mixture particles is provided with an outer layer comprising mainly UO2, the thickness of which is at least 0.05; whereas the inner portion of the oxide-mixture particles comprises mainly PUO 2

  20. Certification of a uranium dioxide reference material for chemical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Y.

    1984-01-01

    This report, issued by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements (CBNM), describes the characterization of a uranium dioxide reference material with accurately determined uranium mass fraction for chemical analyses. The preparation, conditioning, homogeneity tests and the analyses performed on this material are described in Annex 1. The evaluation of the individual impurity results, total of impurities and uranium mass fraction are given in Annex 2. Information on a direct determination of uranium by titration is given in Annex 3. The uranium mass fraction (881.34+-0.13) g.kg -1 calculated in Annex 2 is given on the certificate

  1. Study of non stoichiometric uranium dioxide samples (UO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Sergio C.; Lima, Nelson B. de; Bustillos, Jose O.V.

    1999-01-01

    The gravimetric and voltammetric methods for determination of non-stoichiometric O/U ratio in uranium dioxide used as nuclear fuel are discussed in this work. The oxidation of uranium oxide is very complex due to many phase changes. gravimetric and voltammetric methods do not detect phase changes. The results of this work shown that, to evaluate both methods is requiring to be done Rietveld methods by x-ray diffraction data to identify the uranium oxide phase changes. (author)

  2. The preparation of uranium tetrafluoride from dioxide by aqueous way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, A.R. de; Abrao, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the study for the wet way obtention of uranium tetrafluoride by the reaction of hydrofluoric acid and powder uranium dioxide. With the results obtained at laboratory scale a pilot plant was planned and erected. It is presently in operation for experimental data aquisition. Time of reaction, temperature, excess of reagents and the hydrofluoric acid / uranium dioxide ratio were the main parameters studied to obtain a product with the following characteristics: - density greater than 1 g/cm 3 , - conversion rate greater than 96%, -water content equal to 0,2%, that allows its application to hexafluoride convertion or to magnesiothermic process. (authOr) [pt

  3. Uranium tetrafluoride production via dioxide by wet process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, A.R. de.

    1988-01-01

    The study for the wet way obtention of uranium tetrafluoride by the reaction of hydrofluoric acid and powder uranium dioxide, is presented. From the results obtained at laboratory scale a pilot plant was planned and erected. It is presently in operation for experimental data aquisition. Time of reaction, temperature, excess of reagents and the hydrofluoric acid / uranium dioxide ratio were the main parameters studied to obtain a product with the following characteristics: - density greater than 1 g/cm 3 , conversion rate greater than 96%, and water content equal to 0,2% that allows its application to heaxafluoride convertion or to magnesiothermic process. (author) [pt

  4. Operating conditions of T.B.P. line uranium purification plant, for uranium dioxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardich, R.N.; La Gamma, A.M.; Anasco, R.; Soler, S.M.G. de; Isnardi, E.; Gea, V.; Chiaraviglio, R.; Matyjasczyk, E.; Aramayo, R.

    1992-01-01

    In this contribution are presented the operative conditions and the results obtained step of the Uranium dioxide production plant of Argentina. The refining step involve the Uranium concentrate dissolution, the silica ageing, the filtration and liquid - liquid extraction with n-tributyl phosphate solution in kerosene. The established operative conditions allow to obtain Uranyl nitrate solutions of nuclear purity in industrial scale. (author)

  5. Dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate-hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanekar, A.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2009-01-01

    Direct dissolution of uranium dioxide in supercritical carbon dioxide modified with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) has been attempted. The effects of TBP concentration and pressure on the extraction of uranium have been studied. Addition of hydrogen peroxide in the modifier enhances the dissolution/extraction of uranium. (author)

  6. Method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, T.A.; Holaday, V.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This invention provides an improved method for preparing a sinterable uranium dioxide powder for the preparation of nuclear fuel, using microwave radiation in a microwave induction furnace. The starting compound may be uranyl nitrate hexahydrate, ammonium diuranate or ammonium uranyl carbonate. The starting compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace for a period of time sufficient for compound decomposition. The decomposed compound is heated in a microwave induction furnace in a reducing atmosphere for a period of time sufficient to reduce the decomposed compound to uranium dioxide powder

  7. Standard specification for sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This specification is for finished sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets for use in light-water reactors. It applies to gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets containing uranium of any 235U concentration and any concentration of gadolinium oxide. 1.2 This specification recognizes the presence of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle and consequently defines isotopic limits for gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets made from commercial grade UO2. Such commercial grade UO2 is defined so that, regarding fuel design and manufacture, the product is essentially equivalent to that made from unirradiated uranium. UO2 falling outside these limits cannot necessarily be regarded as equivalent and may thus need special provisions at the fuel fabrication plant or in the fuel design. 1.3 This specification does not include (1) provisions for preventing criticality accidents or (2) requirements for health and safety. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aw...

  8. Evaluation of Hydrothermally Synthesized Uranium Dioxide for Novel Semiconductor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy ...Senanayake, G. Waterhouse, A. Chan, T. Madey, D. Mullins and H. Idriss, "Probing Surface Oxidation of Reduced Uranium Dioxide Thin Film Using

  9. Sintering uranium oxide in the reaction product of hydrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Hollander, W.R.; Nivas, Y.

    1975-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide alone or containing one or more additives such as plutonium dioxide, gadolinium oxide, titanium dioxide, silica, and alumina are heated to 900 to 1599 0 C in the presence of a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, either alone or with an inert carrier gas and held at the desired temperature in this atmosphere to sinter the pellets. The sintered pellets are then cooled in an atmosphere having an oxygen partial pressure of 10 -4 to 10 -18 atm of oxygen such as dry hydrogen, wet hydrogen, dry carbon monoxide, wet carbon monoxide, inert gases such as nitrogen, argon, helium, and neon and mixtures of ayny of the foregoing including a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The ratio of hydrogen to carbon dioxide in the gas mixture fed to the furnace is controlled to give a ratio of oxygen to uranium atoms in the sintered particles within the range of 1.98:1 to about 2.10:1. The water vapor present in the reaction products in the furnace atmosphere acts as a hydrolysis agent to aid removal of fluoride should such impurity be present in the uranium oxide. (U.S.)

  10. Immobilization of chlorine dioxide modified cells for uranium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Shengbin; Ruan, Binbiao; Zheng, Yueping; Zhou, Xiaobin; Xu, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    There has been a trend towards the use of microorganisms to recover metals from industrial wastewater, for which various methods have been reported to be used to improve microorganism adsorption characteristics such as absorption capacity, tolerance and reusability. In present study, chlorine dioxide(ClO 2 ), a high-efficiency, low toxicity and environment-benign disinfectant, was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. FTIR analysis indicated that several cell surface groups are involved in the uranium adsorption and cell surface modification. The modified cells were further immobilized on a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) matrix to improve their reusability. The cell-immobilized adsorbent could be employed either in a high concentration system to move vast UO 2 2+ ions or in a low concentration system to purify UO 2 2+ contaminated water thoroughly, and could be repeatedly used in multiple adsorption-desorption cycles with about 90% adsorption capacity maintained after seven cycles. - Highlights: • Chlorine dioxide was first reported to be used for microorganism surface modification. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells demonstrated a 10.1% higher uranium adsorption capacity than control ones. • The chlorine dioxide modified cells were further immobilized by carboxymethylcellulose to improve their reusability

  11. Contribution to the study of uranium dioxide aqueous corrosion mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallien, J.-P.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion of uranium dioxide by a synthetical ground water has been studied in order to understand the behaviour of nuclear fuels in the hypothesis of a direct storage. An original leaching unit has been carried out in order to control the parameters occurring in the oxidation-dissolution of the uranium dioxide and to condition the leachate (in particular the temperature and the partial pressure of the carbon dioxide). A ground water in equilibrium with the geological enveloping site has been reconstituted from data acquired on the site. The influence of two parameters has been followed: the carbon dioxide carbon pressure and the redox potential. Each experiment has been carried out at 96 C during one month and the time-history of the solutions and of the solids has been studied. In oxidizing conditions, the uranium concentration in solution has been controlled by an U(VI) complex (one oxide, one hydroxide or a carbonate). The possibility of a control by an U(IV) complex (as coffinite, uraninite or uraninite B) has been confirmed in the case of reducing leaching. An original interpretation of the Rutherford backscattering spectra has allowed to describe the decomposition of the samples in a succession of layers of different densities. A very good agreement between the analyses of the solids and those of the solutions has been obtained in the experiments occurring in reducing conditions. Complementary leaching involving solutions containing stable isotopes (deuterium, O 18 ) have revealed the formation of an hydrated layer and the contribution of grain boundaries to the corrosion phenomenon of uranium dioxide. The results of the current hydro-geochemistry study on the uranium Oklo deposit prove the realism of the experiments that have been carried out in the laboratory. (O.M.)

  12. Synthesis and preservation of graphene-supported uranium dioxide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Hanyu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Wang, Haitao [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, 251 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C. [Nuclear Chemistry & Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Na, Chongzheng, E-mail: chongzheng.na@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Civil, Environmental, and Construction Engineering, Texas Tech University, 911 Boston Ave., Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Graphene-supported uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) nanocrystals are potentially important fuel materials. Here, we investigate the possibility of synthesizing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals in polar ethylene glycol compounds by the polyol reduction of uranyl acetylacetone under boiling reflux, thereby enabling the use of an inexpensive graphene precursor graphene oxide into a one-pot process. We show that triethylene glycol is the most suitable solvent with an appropriate reduction potential for producing nanometer-sized UO{sub 2} crystals compared to monoethylene glycol, diethylene glycol, and polyethylene glycol. Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized with triethylene glycol show evidence of heteroepitaxy, which can be beneficial for facilitating heat transfer in nuclear fuel particles. Furthermore, we show that graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by polyol reduction can be readily stored in alcohols, impeding oxidation from the prevalent oxygen in air. Together, these methods provide a facile approach for preparing and storing graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals for further investigation and development under ambient conditions. - Highlights: • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals are synthesized using polyol reduction method. • Triethylene glycol is the best reducing agent for nano-sized UO{sub 2} crystals. • UO{sub 2} nanocrystals grow on graphene through heteroepitaxy. • Graphene-supported UO{sub 2} nanocrystals can be stored in alcohols to prevent oxidation.

  13. Uranium tetracyclopentadienyl interaction with carbon oxide and dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, M.R.; Solov'eva, G.V.; Kozina, I.Z.; Bolotova, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Using the methods of gas-liquid chromatography, IR and UV spectroscopy and element analysis, the reactions of tetracyclogentadienyluranium with carbon oxide and dioxide have been studied. It is shown that complete uranium cyclopentadienyl π-complex-tetracyclopentadienyluranium - in pentane under normal conditions for 100 hr reacts with carbon oxide and dioxide with the formation of polymeric complex ([(etasup(5)-Csub(5)Hsub(5))x(-CO-)U(etasup(5)-Csub(5)Hsub(4))(-CO-)]sub(2)]sub(n), in which two uranium atoms are bonded with two bridge fragments (eta 5 -C 5 H 4 -CO-), and dimeric complex [(eta 5 -C 5 H 5 ) 2 UH 2 xCO 2 ] 2 respectively

  14. Determination of carbon chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijko, N.I.; Timofeev, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of chlorine and fluorine determination and simultaneous determination of carbon and chlorine in electrolytic uranium dioxide are described. The method of chlorine and fluorine determination is based on their separation during oxide pyrohydrolysis with subsequent spectrophotometric analysis of condensate. Lower determination limits constitute 1 μg for chlorine, 0.5 μg for fluorine. Relative standard deviation when the content of impurities analyzed is 10 -3 % constitutes 0.05-0.07

  15. Coarsening-densification transition temperature in sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Narasimha Murty, B.; Chakraborthy, K.P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of coarsening-densification transition temperature (CDTT) has been proposed to explain the experimental observations of the study of sintering undoped uranium dioxide and niobia-doped uranium dioxide powder compacts in argon atmosphere in a laboratory tubular furnace. The general method for deducing CDTT for a given material under the prevailing conditions of sintering and the likely variables that influence the CDTT are described. Though the present work is specific in nature for uranium dioxide sintering in argon atmosphere, the concept of CDTT is fairly general and must be applicable to sintering of any material and has immense potential to offer advantages in designing and/or optimizing the profile of a sintering furnace, in the diagnosis of the fault in the process conditions of sintering, and so on. The problems of viewing the effect of heating rate only in terms of densification are brought out in the light of observing the undesirable phenomena of coring and bloating and causes were identified and remedial measures suggested

  16. Determination of gas residues in uranium dioxide pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riella, H.G.

    1978-01-01

    The measurement of low amounts of residual gases, excluding water, in ceramic grade uranium dioxide pellets, using high temperature vacuum extraction technique, is dealt with. The high temperature extraction gas analysis apparatus was designed and assembled for sequential analysis of up to eight uranium dioxide pellets by run. The system consists of three major units, namely outgassing unit, transfer unit and analytical unit. The whole system is evacuated to a final pressure of less then 10 -5 torr. A weighed pellet is transfered into the outgassing unit for subsequent dropping into a Platinum-Rhodium crucible which is heated inductively up to 1600 0 C during 30 minutes. The released gases are imediately transfered from the outgassing to analytical unit passing through a cold trap at -95 0 C to remove water vapor. The gases are transfered to previously calibrated volumetric bulb where the total pressure and temperature are determined. An estimate of the gas content in the pellets at STP condition is obtained from the measured volume, pressure and temperature of the gas mixture by applying ideal gases equation. Analysis to two lots (fourteen samples) of uranium dioxide pellets by the method described here indicated a mean gas content of 0,060cm 3 /g UO 2 . The lower limit of this technique is 0,03cm 3 /g UO 2 (STP). The time required for the analysis of eight pellets is about 9 hours [pt

  17. Determination of the stoichiometric ratio uranium dioxide samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Sergio Carvalho

    1999-01-01

    The determination of the O/U stoichiometric ratio in uranium dioxide is an important parameter in order to qualify nuclear fuels. The excess oxygen in the crystallographic structure can cause changes in the physico-chemical properties of this compound such as variation of the thermal conductivity alterations, fuel plasticity and others, affecting the efficiency of this material when it is utilized as nuclear fuel in the reactor core. The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods for the determination of uranium oxide samples from two different production processes, using gravimetric, voltammetric and X-ray diffraction techniques. After the evaluation of these techniques, the main aspect of this work is to define a reliable methodology in order to characterize the behavior of uranium oxide. The methodology used in this work consisted of two different steps: utilization of gravimetric and volumetric methods in order to determine the ratio in uranium dioxide samples; utilization of X-ray diffraction technique in order to determine the lattice parameters using patterns and application of the Rietveld method during refining of the structural data. As a result of the experimental part of this work it was found that the X-ray diffraction analysis performs better and detects the presence of more phases than gravimetric and voltammetric techniques, not sensitive enough in this detection. (author)

  18. Contribution to the study of sputtering and damage of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlutig, S.

    2001-03-01

    Swift heavy ion-solid interaction leads in volume to track creation and on the surface to the ejection of particles into the vacuum. To learn more about initial mechanisms of track formation, we are focused on the sputtering of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions. This present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power on the emission of neutral particles and especially on their angular distribution. These measurements are completed by those of the ions emitted from UO 2 targets bombarded with swift heavy ions. The whole experimental results give access to: i) the nature of the sputtered particles; ii) the charge state of the emitted particles; iii) the direction of ejection of the sputtered particles ; iv) the sputtering yields deduced from the angular distributions. These results are compared to the prediction of the sputtering models proposed in the literature and it seems that the supersonic gas flow model is well suited to describe our results. Finally, the sputtering yields are compared with a set of earlier experimental data on uranium dioxide damage obtained by T. Wiss and we observe that only a small fraction of UO 2 monolayers are sputtered. (author)

  19. New method for conversion of uranium hexafluoride to uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Suzuki, M.; Tanaka, H.

    1987-01-01

    Five different methods for conversion of UF 6 to ceramic-grade UO 2 powder have been developed to industrial scale. Two of them, the ammonium diuranate (ADU) and AUC processes, are based on precipitation of uranium compounds from aqueous solutions. The other three follow a dry route in which UF 6 is hydrolyzed and reduced by steam and hydrogen using fluidized bed techniques, rotating kilns, or flame chemistry methods. The ADU process has the advantage of flexible product powder characteristics, while disadvantages include a large quantity of waste, low powder fluidity, and a complicated process. On the other hand, the dry process using fluidized-bed techniques has the advantages of hydrofluoric acid recovery, a free-flowing powder, and process simplicity, but the disadvantages of poorer ceramic properties for the product. The new method developed at Mitsubishi Metal Corp. is a semidry process, which has well-balanced merits over the ADU process and the dry process using fluidized-bed techniques. This process is very attractive from powder characteristics, process simplicity, and waste reduction

  20. Determination of Oxygen - to - Uranium Ratio in Hyperstoichio - Metric Uranium Dioxide. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolk, A.; Lingerak, W.A.

    1970-09-01

    For the determination of the O/U ratio in hyperstoichiometric uranium dioxide we prefer the following chemical procedure. The sample is dissolved in concentrated phosphoric acid without change in valence of the uranium. Then the amount of U (VI) present in the solution is titrated with a Fe (II) - standard solution in phosphoric acid. The titrimetric end-point is detected following the ''dead-stop-end-point'' procedure. When special precautions are made the O/U value can be determined with an accuracy and precision of + 0.0001 0/U units when 500 mg sample aliquots are used. (author)

  1. Surface characterization of uranium metal and uranium dioxide using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Trickle, I.R.; Tucker, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectra of pure uranium metal and stoichiometric uranium dioxide have been obtained using an AEI ES300 spectrometer. Binding energy values for core and valence electrons have been determined using an internally calibrated energy scale and monochromatic Al Kα radiation. Satellite peaks observed accompanying certain principal core ionizations are discussed in relation to the mechanisms by which they arise. Confirmation is obtained that for stoichiometric UOsub(2.00) a single shake-up satellite is observed accompanying the U 4fsub(7/2,5/2) principal core lines, separated by 6.8 eV to higher binding energy. (author)

  2. Kinetics of sintering of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, N.C.; Moorthy, V.K.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of sintering of UO 2 powders derived from ADU route and calcined at different temperatures was studied. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on the calcination temperature, the density chosen and the sintering temperature range. The motive force for sintering is the excess free energy in the particle system. This exists in the powder compact in the form of surface energy and the excess lattice energy due to defects. The defects which can be eliminated at the operating temperature are responsible for the mobility and hence sintering. This concept of the motive force for sintering has been used to explain the difference in the activation energies observed in the present study. This would also explain phenomena such as attainment of limiting density, presence of optimum sintering temperature and the influence of calcination treatments on the sintering behaviour of powders. (author)

  3. Uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets - Determination of nitrogen content - Method using ammonia-sensing electrode. 1. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for determining the nitrogen content in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. It is applicable to the determination of nitrogen, present as nitride, in uranium metal and uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The concentration range within which the method can be used is between 9 μg and 600 μg of nitrogen per gram. Interference can occur from metals which form complex ammines, but these are not normally present in significant amounts

  4. Evaluation of uranium dioxide thermal conductivity using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woongkee; Kaviany, Massoud; Shim, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    It can be extended to larger space, time scale and even real reactor situation with fission product as multi-scale formalism. Uranium dioxide is a fluorite structure with Fm3m space group. Since it is insulator, dominant heat carrier is phonon, rather than electrons. So, using equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we present the appropriate calculation parameters in MD simulation by calculating thermal conductivity and application of it to the thermal conductivity of polycrystal. In this work, we investigate thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and optimize the parameters related to its process. In this process, called Green Kubo formula, there are two parameters i.e correlation length and sampling interval, which effect on ensemble integration in order to obtain thermal conductivity. Through several comparisons, long correlation length and short sampling interval give better results. Using this strategy, thermal conductivity of poly crystal is obtained and comparison with that of pure crystal is made. Thermal conductivity of poly crystal show lower value that that of pure crystal. In further study, we broaden the study to transport coefficient of radiation damaged structures using molecular dynamics. Although molecular dynamics is tools for treating microscopic scale, most macroscopic issues related to nuclear materials such as voids in fuel materials and weakened mechanical properties by radiation are based on microscopic basis. Thus, research on microscopic scale would be expanded in this field and many hidden mechanism in atomic scales will be revealed via both atomic scale simulations and experiments

  5. Surface Characterization and Electrochemical Oxidation of Metal Doped Uranium Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Youn, Young-Sang; Kim, Jong-Goo; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Kim, Jong-Yun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Trivalent element in UO{sub 2} matrix makes the oxygen vacancy from loss of oxygen for charge compensation. Tetravalent element alters lattice parameter of UO{sub 2} due to diameter difference between the tetravalent element and replaced U. These structural changes have significant effect on not only relevant fuel performance but also the kinetics of fuel oxidation. Park and Olander explained the stabilization of Ln (III)-doped UO{sub 2} against oxidation based on oxygen potential calculations. In this work, we have been investigated the effect of Gd{sup 3+} and Th{sup 4+} doping on the UO{sub 2} structure with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize the surface structure of nuclear fuel material. For Gd doped UO{sub 2}, its electrochemical oxidation behaviors are also investigated. The Gd and Th doped uranium dioxide solid solution pellets with various doping level were investigated by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, electrochemical experiments to investigate surface structure and electro chemical oxidation behaviors. The lattice parameter evaluated from XRD spectra indicated the formation of solid solutions. Raman spectra showed the existence of the oxygen vacancy. SEM images showed the grain structure on the surface of Gd doped uranium dioxide depending on doping level and oxygen-to-metal ratio.

  6. Thermodynamic and transport properties of uranium dioxide and related phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The high melting point of uranium dioxide and its stability under irradiation have led to its use as a fuel in a variety of types of nuclear reactors. A wide range of chemical and physical studies has been stimulated by this circumstances and by the complex nature of the uranium dioxide phase itself. The boundaries of this phase widen as the temperature is increased; at 2000 deg. K a single, homogeneous phase exists from U 2.27 to a hypostoichiometric (UO 2-x ) composition, depending on the oxygen potential of the surroundings. Since there is often an incentive to operate a reactor at the maximum practicable heat rating and, therefore, maximum thermal gradient in the fuel, the determination of the physical properties of the UO 2-x phase becomes a matter of great technological importance. In addition a complex sequence of U-O phases may be formed during the preparation of powder feed material or during the sintering process; these affect the microstructure and properties of the final product and have also received much attention. 184 refs, 33 figs, 15 tabs

  7. On the nature of the phase transition in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofryk, K.; Mast, D.; Antonio, D.; Shrestha, K.; Andersson, D.; Stanek, C.; Jaime, M.

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is by far the most studied actinide material as it is a primary fuel used in light water nuclear reactors. Its thermal and magnetic properties remain, however, a puzzle resulting from strong couplings between magnetism and lattice vibrations. UO2 crystalizes in the face-centered-cubic fluorite structure and is a Mott-Hubbard insulator with well-localized uranium 5 f-electrons. In addition, below 30 K, a long range antiferromagnetic ordering of the electric-quadrupole of the uranium moments is observed, forming complex non-collinear 3-k magnetic structure. This transition is accompanied by Jahn-Teller distortion of oxygen atoms. It is believed that the first order nature of the transition results from the competition between the exchange interaction and the Jahn-Teller distortion. Here we present results of our extensive thermodynamic investigations on well-characterized and oriented single crystals of UO2+x (x = 0, 0.033, 0.04, and 0.11). By focusing on the transition region under applied magnetic field we are able to study the interplay between different competing interactions (structural, magnetic, and electrical), its dynamics, and relationship to the oxygen content. We will discuss implications of these results. Work supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division.

  8. Improving the neutronic characteristics of a boiling water reactor by using uranium zirconium hydride fuel instead of uranium dioxide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, Ahmed Abdelghafar [Higher Technological Institute, Ramadan (Egypt)

    2016-06-15

    The present work discusses two different models of boiling water reactor (BWR) bundle to compare the neutronic characteristics of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and uranium zirconium hydride (UZrH{sub 1.6}) fuel. Each bundle consists of four assemblies. The BWR assembly fueled with UO{sub 2} contains 8 × 8 fuel rods while that fueled with UZrH{sub 1.6} contains 9 × 9 fuel rods. The Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport code, based on the Mont Carlo method, is used to design three dimensional models for BWR fuel bundles at typical operating temperatures and pressure conditions. These models are used to determine the multiplication factor, pin-by-pin power distribution, axial power distribution, thermal neutron flux distribution, and axial thermal neutron flux. The moderator and coolant (water) are permitted to boil within the BWR core forming steam bubbles, so it is important to calculate the reactivity effect of voiding at different values. It is found that the hydride fuel bundle design can be simplified by eliminating water rods and replacing the control blade with control rods. UZrH{sub 1.6} fuel improves the performance of the BWR in different ways such as increasing the energy extracted per fuel assembly, reducing the uranium ore, and reducing the plutonium accumulated in the BWR through burnup.

  9. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, T.; CEA Centre d'Etudes de Grenoble, 38

    1996-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author)

  10. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  11. Strain fields and line energies of dislocations in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfitt, David C; Bishop, Clare L; Wenman, Mark R; Grimes, Robin W

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate the stability of typical dislocations in uranium dioxide. We explain in detail the methods used to produce the dislocation configurations and calculate the line energy and Peierls barrier for pure edge and screw dislocations with the shortest Burgers vector 1/2 . The easiest slip system is found to be the {100}(110) system for stoichiometric UO 2 , in agreement with experimental observations. We also examine the different strain fields associated with these line defects and the close agreement between the strain field predicted by atomic scale models and the application of elastic theory. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the processes of slip that may occur for the three different edge dislocation geometries and nudged elastic band calculations are used to establish a value for the Peierls barrier, showing the possible utility of the method in investigating both thermodynamic average behaviour and dynamic processes such as creep and plastic deformation.

  12. XAS characterisation of xenon bubbles in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: martinp@drncad.cea.fr; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Sabathier, C.; Valot, C. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bat. 130, 13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Nassif, V. [CEA Grenoble, DSM/DRFMC/SP2M/NRS, 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proux, O. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, UMR CNRS/Universite Joseph Fourier, 1381 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, 38400 Saint-Martin-D' Heres (France); Hazemann, J.-L. [Institut Neel, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-06-15

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments were performed on a set of uranium dioxide samples implanted with 10{sup 17} xenon cm{sup -2} at 800 keV (8 at.% at 140 nm). EXAFS measurements performed at 12 K showed that during implantation the gas forms highly pressurised nanometre size inclusions. Bubble pressures were estimated at 2.8 {+-} 0.3 GPa at low temperature. Following the low energy xenon implantation, samples were annealed between 1073 and 1773 K for several hours. Stability of nanometre size highly pressurized xenon aggregates in UO{sub 2} is demonstrated up to 1073 K as for this temperature almost no modification of the xenon environment was observed. Above this temperature, bubbles will trap migrating vacancies and their inner pressure is seen to decrease substantially.

  13. Predictor of regulation of uranium dioxide powder pressing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Eduardo Souza; Araujo, Victor Hugo Leal de; Bernardelli, Sergio Henrique

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important steps of the uranium dioxide pellets fabrication used in the nuclear fuel elements is the green pellets pressing. The target density of the pellets after the sintering process determines the density of the green pellet. To meet the same sintered target density the green density may vary according to the powder characteristics. These variations implies in changing the regulation of the press for different powder's patches. The regulation done empirically imply in productivity loss and necessity of reprocessing the pellets pressed during the press regulation and also depends on the operator experience. At this work, was developed an artificial neural network feed forward back propagation to predict the press regulation, depending on the powder characteristics and the green pellet's target density. The results obtained at INB - Industrias Nucleares do Brasil S. A. during the fabrication of the fifth recharge of Angra II nuclear power plant are presented. (author)

  14. The production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fane, A.G.; Le Page, A.H.

    1975-02-01

    The development of a 0.13 m diameter pulsed fluidised bed reactor for the continuous production of sinterable uranium dioxide from ammonium diuranate is described. Calcination-reduction at 670 to 680 0 C produced powders with surface areas of 4 to 6 m 2 g -1 giving pellet densities in excess of 10.6 g cm -3 . Sinterability was relatively insensitive to changes in operating conditions, provided the availability of hydrogen was adequate, for gas flow rates in the range 0.95 to 1.4 l S -1 , pulse frequencies of 0.5 and 0.75 Hz and mean residence times of the solids from 0.6 to 1.4 hours. Sinterability was shown to be improved either by use of higher input concentrations, or by use of a secondary flow of hydrogen (about 5 per cent of input) fed into the powder collection system and flowing countercurrent to the UO 2 product. The maximum throughput of 17 kg UO 2 h -1 (0.6 hours mean residence time) required only 120 per cent of the stoichiometric requirement at an input concentration of 50 vol.per cent with secondary hydrogen flow. Results are given for studies of the kinetics of reduction of calcined ammonia diuranate in hydrogen and the residence time distribution of solids in a pulsed fluidised bed. Estimates based on these data suggested that the overall conversion of ammonium diuranate to uranium dioxide in the continuously operated pulsed fluidised bed reactor was in excess of 99 per cent. Continuous stabilisation of the UO 2 product was demonstrated at 12 kg h -1 or UO 2 , in a 0.15 m diameter glass stabiliser, using 10 vol.per cent air in nitrogen and a temperature of about 50 0 C. (author)

  15. Irradiation of TZM: Uranium dioxide fuel pin at 1700 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    A fuel pin clad with TZM and containing solid pellets of uranium dioxide was fission heated in a static helium-cooled capsule at a maximum surface temperature of 1700 K for approximately 1000 hr and to a total burnup of 2.0 percent of the uranium-235. The results of the postirradiation examination indicated: (1) A transverse, intergranular failure of the fuel pin occurred when the fuel pin reached 2.0-percent burnup. This corresponds to 1330 kW-hr/cu cm, where the volume is the sum of the fuel, clad, and void volumes in the fuel region. (2) The maximum swelling of the fuel pin was less than 1.5 percent on the fuel-pin diameter. (3) There was no visible interaction between the TZM clad and the UO2. (4) Irradiation at 1700 K produced a course-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.02 centimeter and with some of the grains extending one-half of the thickness of the clad. (5) Below approximately 1500 K, the irradiation of the clad produced a moderately fine-grained structure, with an average grain diameter of 0.004 centimeter.

  16. Uranium dioxide sintering Kinetics and mechanisms under controlled oxygen potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, C.T. de.

    1980-06-01

    The initial, intermediate, and final sintering stages of uranium dioxide were investigated as a function of stoichiometry and temperature by following the kinetics of the sintering reaction. Stoichiometry was controlled by means of the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere, which was measured continuously by solid-state oxygen sensors. Included in the kinetic study were microspheres originated from UO 2 gels and UO 2 pellets produced by isostatic pressing ceramic grade powders. The microspheres sintering behavior was examined using hot-stage microscopy and a specially designed high-temperature, controlled atmosphere furnace. This same furnace was employed as part of an optical dilatometer, which was utilized in the UO 2 pellet sintering investigations. For controlling the deviations from stoichiometry during heat treatment, the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was varied by passing the gas through a Cu-Ti-Cu oxygen trap. The trap temperature determined the oxygen partial pressure of the outflowing mixture. Dry hydrogen was also used in some of the UO sub(2+x) sintering experiments. The determination of diametrial shrinkages and sintering indices was made utilizing high-speed microcinematography and ultra-microbalance techniques. It was observed that the oxygen potential has a substantial influence on the kinetics of the three sintering stages. The control of the sintering atmosphere oxygen partial pressure led to very fast densification of UO sub(2+x). Values in the interval 95.0 to 99.5% of theoretical density were reached in less than one minute. Uranium volume diffusion is the dominant mechanism in the initial and intermediate sintering stages. For the final stage, uranium grain boundary diffusion was found to be the main sintering mechanism. (Author) [pt

  17. Standard test methods for analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the analysis of sintered gadolinium oxide-uranium dioxide pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Section Carbon (Total) by Direct CombustionThermal Conductivity Method C1408 Test Method for Carbon (Total) in Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets By Direct Combustion-Infrared Detection Method Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis Ion-Selective Electrode Method C1502 Test Method for Determination of Total Chlorine and Fluorine in Uranium Dioxide and Gadolinium Oxide Gadolinia Content by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry C1456 Test Method for Determination of Uranium or Gadolinium, or Both, in Gadolinium Oxide-Uranium Oxide Pellets or by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hydrogen by Inert Gas Fusion C1457 Test Method for Determination of Total Hydrogen Content of Uranium Oxide Powders and Pellets by Carrier Gas Extraction Isotopic Uranium Composition by Multiple-Filament Surface-Ioni...

  18. Uranium dioxide and beryllium oxide enhanced thermal conductivity nuclear fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Antonio Santos; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto

    2007-01-01

    The uranium dioxide is the most used substance as nuclear reactor fuel for presenting many advantages such as: high stability even when it is in contact with water in high temperatures, high fusion point, and high capacity to retain fission products. The conventional fuel is made with ceramic sintered pellets of uranium dioxide stacked inside fuel rods, and presents disadvantages because its low thermal conductivity causes large and dangerous temperature gradients. Besides, the thermal conductivity decreases further as the fuel burns, what limits a pellet operational lifetime. This research developed a new kind of fuel pellets fabricated with uranium dioxide kernels and beryllium oxide filling the empty spaces between them. This fuel has a great advantage because of its higher thermal conductivity in relation to the conventional fuel. Pellets of this kind were produced, and had their thermophysical properties measured by the flash laser method, to compare with the thermal conductivity of the conventional uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. (author) (author)

  19. Measurement of fission track of uranium particle by solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, S. C.; Pyo, H. W.; Ji, K. Y.; Kim, W. H.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we discussed results of the measurement of fission tracks for the uranium containing particles by solid state nuclear track detector. Uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were prepared by uranium sorption onto silica powder in weak acidic medium and laser ablation on uranium pellet, respectively. Fission tracks for the uranium containing silica and uranium oxide particles were detected on Lexan plastic detector. It was found that the fission track size and shapes depend on the particle size uranium content in particles. Correlation of uranium particle diameter with fission track radius was also discussed

  20. A kinetic study of the reaction of water vapor and carbon dioxide on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santon, J.P.

    1964-09-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction of water vapour and carbon dioxide with uranium has been performed by thermogravimetric methods at temperatures between 160 and 410 deg G in the first case, 350 and 1050 deg C in the second: Three sorts of uranium specimens were used: uranium powder, thin evaporated films, and small spheres obtained from a plasma furnace. The experimental results led in the case of water vapour, to a linear rate of reaction controlled by diffusion at the lower temperatures, and by a surface reaction at the upper ones. In the case of carbon dioxide, a parabolic law has been found, controlled by diffusional processes. (author) [fr

  1. Green strength of zirconium sponge and uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Murty, B. Narasimha; Sahoo, P.K.; Gopalakrishna, T.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium metal sponge is compacted into rectangular or cylindrical shapes using hydraulic presses. These shapes are stacked and electron beam welded to form a long electrode suitable for vacuum arc melting and casting into solid ingots. The compact electrodes should be sufficiently strong to prevent breakage in handling as well as during vacuum arc melting. Usually, the welds are strong and the electrode strength is limited by the green strength of the compacts, which constitute the electrode. Green strength is also required in uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) powder compacts, to withstand stresses during de-tensioning after compaction as well as during ejection from the die and for subsequent handling by man and machine. The strengths of zirconium sponge and UO 2 powder compacts have been determined by bending and crushing respectively, and Weibul moduli evaluated. The green density of coarse sponge compact was found to be larger than that from finer sponge. The green density of compacts from lightly attrited UO 2 powder was higher than that from unattrited category, accompanied by an improvement in UO 2 green crushing strength. The factors governing green strength have been examined in the light of published literature and experimental evidence. The methodology and results provide a basis for quality control in metal sponge and ceramic powder compaction in the manufacture of nuclear fuel

  2. Micromechanical approach of behavior of uranium dioxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulacroix, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) is the reference fuel for pressurized water nuclear reactors. Our study deals with understanding and modeling of mechanical behavior at the microstructure scale at low temperatures (brittle fracture) and high temperature (viscoplastic strain). We have first studied the geometrical properties of polycrystals at large and of UO 2 polycrystal more specifically. As of now, knowledge of this behavior in the brittle fracture range is limited. Consequently, we developed an experimental method which allows better understanding of brittle fracture phenomenon at grain scale. We show that fracture is fully intra-granular and {100} planes seem to be the most preferential cleavage planes. Experimental results are directly used to deduce constitutive equations of intra-granular brittle fracture at crystal scale. This behavior is then used in 3D polycrystal simulation of brittle fracture. The full field calculation gives access to the initiation of fracture and propagation of the crack through the grains. Finally, we developed a mechanical behavior model of UO 2 in the viscoplastic range. We first present constitutive equations at macroscopic scale which accounts for an ageing process caused by migration of defects towards dislocations. Secondly, we have developed a crystal plasticity model which was fitted to UO 2 . This model includes the rotation of the crystal lattice. We present examples of polycrystalline simulations. (author) [fr

  3. A thermal modelling of displacement cascades in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G., E-mail: guillaume.martin@cea.fr [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Garcia, P.; Sabathier, C. [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Devynck, F.; Krack, M. [Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour, Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Maillard, S. [CEA – DEN/DEC/SESC/LLCC, Bât. 352, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2014-05-01

    The space and time dependent temperature distribution was studied in uranium dioxide during displacement cascades simulated by classical molecular dynamics (MD). The energy for each simulated radiation event ranged between 0.2 keV and 20 keV in cells at initial temperatures of 700 K or 1400 K. Spheres into which atomic velocities were rescaled (thermal spikes) have also been simulated by MD to simulate the thermal excitation induced by displacement cascades. Equipartition of energy was shown to occur in displacement cascades, half of the kinetic energy of the primary knock-on atom being converted after a few tenths of picoseconds into potential energy. The kinetic and potential parts of the system energy are however subjected to little variations during dedicated thermal spike simulations. This is probably due to the velocity rescaling process, which impacts a large number of atoms in this case and would drive the system away from a dynamical equilibrium. This result makes questionable MD simulations of thermal spikes carried out up to now (early 2014). The thermal history of cascades was compared to the heat equation solution of a punctual thermal excitation in UO{sub 2}. The maximum volume brought to a temperature above the melting temperature during the simulated cascade events is well reproduced by this simple model. This volume eventually constitutes a relevant estimate of the volume affected by a displacement cascade in UO{sub 2}. This definition of the cascade volume could also make sense in other materials, like iron.

  4. Studies on the sintering behaviour of uranium dioxide powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets are normally made from their precursor ammonium diuranate, followed by calcination, subsequent reduction to sinterable grade powders and a post operation treatment of pressing and sintering. The low temperature calcined powders, usually exhibiting non-crystalline behaviour (under X-ray diffraction studies) progressively transforms into a crystalline variety on subsequent heat treatment at higher temperature. It is observed however that powders calcined between 800 to 900 0 C exhibit enhanced densification behaviour when sintered at higher temperatures. The isothermal shrinkage versus time plot of the sintered compacts are well described by a hyperbolic relationship which takes care of the observed shrinkage (λ) as caused due to a cumulative effect from the initial sintering of the powder compacts at zero time (α) and that caused due to the structural transformation from a non-crystalline modification with increased thermal treatment (β). The derived equation is a modification of the sintering mechanism of the viscous flow type proposed by Frenkel, involving sintering of an amorphous phase, the viscosity of the latter is presumed to increase with increasing thermal treatment to assume the final modified form as λ=t/(α+βt), where t = time, λ = shrinkage and α and β are the unknown parameters. (orig.)

  5. Study of the changes of uranium dioxide properties resulting from sintering; Izucavanje procesa sinterovanja urandioksida sa gledista promene karakteristicnih osobina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, M M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Uranium dioxide powder used for studying the sintering process having grain size 63 {mu}. Sintering was performed in the temperature interval from 1000 - 1300 deg C in argon atmosphere. The O/U ratio of the used uranium dioxide was 2.07. Densities obtained by sintering under the mentioned conditions were not higher than 91% TG (theoretical density). This showed that the mentioned conditions were optimal, but the uranium dioxide obtained could be used for studying the radiation damage of fuel.

  6. Methods for oxygen/uranium ratio determination in substoichiometric uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.G.; Godin, Yu.G.; S'edin, Yu.D.; Kosykh, V.G.; Nepryakhin, A.M.; Komarenko, F.F.; Kutyreva, G.A.

    1994-01-01

    Investigations are performed into a possibility to use the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, gas chromatography, hydration-dehydration, and e.m.f. of high-temperature solid-electrode galvanic cell for determining O-U atomic ratio in UO 2-x . It is shown that the investigated methods have an analysis error of ± 0.001 O/U units. However, the e.m.f. method, which feature a high accuracy near stoichiometry can be applied only within the limits of UO 2-x homogeneity. A possibility is shown to expend the area of e.m.f. method application during the analysis of substoichiometric uranium dioxide. 9 refs.; 1 tab

  7. Design of a uranium-dioxide powder spheroidization system by plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Daniel

    The plasma spheroidization system (PSS) is the first process in the development of a tungsten-uranium dioxide (W-UO2) ceramic-metallic (cermet) fuel for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion. For the purposes of fissile fuel retention, UO2 spheroids ranging in size from 50 - 100 micrometers (μm) in diameter will be encapsulated in a tungsten shell. The PSS produces spherical particles by melting angular stock particles in an argon-hydrogen plasma jet where they become spherical due to surface tension. Surrogate CeO 2 powder was used in place of UO2 for system and process parameter development. Stock and spheroidized powders were micrographed using optical and scanning electron microscopy and evaluated by statistical methods to characterize and compare the spherocity of pre and post process powders. Particle spherocity was determined by irregularity parameter. Processed powders showed a statistically significant improvement in spherocity, with greater that 60% of the examined particles having an irregularity parameter of equal to or lower than 1.2, compared to stock powder.

  8. The influence of alkali metal impurities on the uranium dioxide hydrofluorination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponelis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect alkali metal impurities (sodium and potassium) in the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) feed material have on the conversion to uraniumtetrafluoride (UF 4 ) was examined. A direct correlation exists between impurity level and sintering with concomitant reduced conversion. The sintering mechanism is attributable to decreased specific surface area. The typical 'die-off' of reaction or conversion can be explained in terms of increased particle growth rather than an arbitray zero porosity function. Hydrofluorination temperatures varied from 250 to 650 degrees C using pellets varying in size from 0.42 mm to 10 mm. Scanning electron microscope photographs show clearly the particle or grain growth in the pellet as well as the increased size with impurity level. A new dimensionless constant, N KP , is defined to facilitate explanation of the reaction as a function of pellet radius. N KP is defined as the ratio of pellet diffusion resistance to particle diffusion resistance of the reacting HF gas. At high values of this number (N KP >40) the conversion is limited to the outer periphery of the pellet while at low values (N KP KP at higher reaction temperatures which means that the particle diffusion resistance increases with increasing impurity level and results in easier sintering of these materials. 53 refs., 206 figs., 94 tabs

  9. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamaury Dubois, S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 et Cs 2 O-ZrO 2 -SO 2 . The compounds CsAISi 2 O 6 and Cs 2 ZrSi 6 O 15 were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ) or (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al 2 O 3 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H 2 . It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO 2 + SiO 2 ), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO 2+x . We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs

  10. Micromechanical simulation of Uranium dioxide polycrystalline aggregate behaviour under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacull, J.

    2011-02-01

    In pressurized water nuclear power reactor (PWR), the fuel rod is made of dioxide of uranium (UO 2 ) pellet stacked in a metallic cladding. A multi scale and multi-physic approaches are needed for the simulation of fuel behavior under irradiation. The main phenomena to take into account are thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod and chemical-physic behavior of the fission products. These last years one of the scientific issue to improve the simulation is to take into account the multi-physic coupling problem at the microscopic scale. The objective of this ph-D study is to contribute to this multi-scale approach. The present work concerns the micro-mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate of UO 2 . Mean field and full field approaches are considered. For the former and the later a self consistent homogenization technique and a periodic Finite Element model base on the 3D Voronoi pattern are respectively used. Fuel visco-plasticity is introduced in the model at the scale of a single grain by taking into account specific dislocation slip systems of UO 2 . A cohesive zone model has also been developed and implemented to simulate grain boundary sliding and intergranular crack opening. The effective homogenous behaviour of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) is fitted with experimental data coming from mechanical tests on a single pellet. Local behavior is also analyzed in order to evaluate the model capacity to assess micro-mechanical state. In particular, intra and inter granular stress gradient are discussed. A first validation of the local behavior assessment is proposed through the simulation of intergranular crack opening measured in a compressive creep test of a single fuel pellet. Concerning the impact of the microstructure on the fuel behavior under irradiation, a RVE simulation with a representative transient loading of a fuel rod during a power ramp test is achieved. The impact of local stress and strain heterogeneities on the multi

  11. Study of uranium dioxide pellets by micro-acoustic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, V.

    1999-01-01

    In order to reduce the volume of spent fuel to reprocess and to improve the productivity and the safety of the nuclear reactor, 'Electricite De France' aim to increase the average fuel discharge burn-up. To elaborate the safety reports, EDF develops codes to simulate the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the nuclear fuel element. These numeric simulations need to evaluate accurately and locally the evolution of the material and of its properties. One of the major concern today is the local characterisation of the intrinsic volume fraction porosity and the mechanical properties of the irradiated fuel. The fuel pellet fragmentation, the steep radial gradient in its physical properties evolution and the chemical evolution of the irradiated material make difficult nay the use of the conventional techniques. This leads EDF to pay interest for the use of two complementary techniques: micro-indentation on the one hand and acoustic methods on the other hand (acoustic microscopy and micro-echography), with an additional constrain to perform on active materials. The objective of this work has been to adapt the acoustic methods for an application on uranium dioxide pellets, used as nuclear fuel in Water Pressurised Reactor. Acquisitions protocols have been set to measure accurately the Rayleigh velocity and the longitudinal velocity of the UO 2 . Using these protocols, we have calibrated these acoustic methods by analysing non irradiated nuclear pellet which properties were well known. This process enable to quantify the effects of different physico-chemical parameters of the UO 2 on the ultrasonic velocities measured. Particularly, the large influence of the porosity has been demonstrated and empirical laws to express the evolution of the acoustic velocities as a function of the volume fraction porosity were established. Moreover, we have established a methodology to characterise the intrinsic elastic constants and the volume fraction porosity on irradiated UO 2 fuel pellets

  12. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  13. Laboratory sol-gel preparation of fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Tympl, M.

    1984-01-01

    The results are summed up of the laboratory investigation of preparing the fine fraction of sintered uranium dioxide particles from uranyl gel using the method of the mixed reactor and the method of the dual-liquid nozzle, processed by leaching, drying, calcination and sintering. None of the two methods provides monodispersion particles under the given conditions but better control of the throughflow of the liquid media may improve results. Leaching of the fine fraction is very quick and the leaching of most components takes no longer than 5 minutes. In view of the fact that leaching of all components does not proceed at the same rate it is recommended that leaching time be doubled, or that leaching take place in two stages. Azeotropic distillation with chlorinated hydrocarbons is a favourable procedure for obtaining quality material; it is, however, necessary to prevent dried particles from comino. into contact with the water phase condensing on the walls of the distillation vessel and running down onto the surface of the distilling mixture. Calcination at a temperature of 500 degC in a thin layer and sintering at temperatures between 1350 and 1550 degC at an adequate rate of inflow of gaseous media and adequate rate of outflow of reaction wastes results in the production of high quality material whose density exceeds 97 to 98% theoretical density. (author)

  14. Models for the adsorption of uranium on titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffrezic-Renault, N.; Poirier-Andrade, H.; Trang, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrated titanium oxide whose acid-base properties are well defined has been used to study the retention mechanism of uranium as UO 2 2+ (in acidic media) and as UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- (in carbonate media). The influence of various parameters on the distribution coefficient of uranium (pH, [CO 3 2- ]) and of the adsorption of uranium on the electrophoretic mobilities of the titanium oxide have been investigated. It is shown that, in both media, coordinative TiO-UO 2 bonds are formed. These strong bonds explain the high affinity of the titanium oxide for uranium. (orig.)

  15. Characterisation of electrodeposited polycrystalline uranium dioxide thin films on nickel foil for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamska, A.M.; Bright, E. Lawrence; Sutcliffe, J.; Liu, W.; Payton, O.D.; Picco, L.; Scott, T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Polycrystalline uranium dioxide thin films were grown on nickel substrates via aqueous electrodeposition of a precursor uranyl salt. The arising semiconducting uranium dioxide thin films exhibited a tower-like morphology, which may be suitable for future application in 3D solar cell applications. The thickness of the homogenous, tower-like films reached 350 nm. Longer deposition times led to the formation of thicker (up to 1.5 μm) and highly porous films. - Highlights: • Electrodeposition of polycrystalline UO_2 thin films • Tower-like morphology for 3D solar cell applications • Novel technique for separation of heavy elements from radioactive waste streams

  16. Production of uranium-molybdenum particles by spark-erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanillas, E.D.; Lopez, M.; Pasqualini, E.E.; Cirilo Lombardo, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    With the spark-erosion method we have produced spheroidal particles of an uranium-molybdenum alloy using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Mostly spherical particles of UO 2 with a distinctive size distribution with peaks centered at 70 and 10 μm were obtained. The particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds

  17. Production of uranium-molybdenum particles by spark-erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanillas, E.D. E-mail: cabanill@cnea.gov.ar; Lopez, M.; Pasqualini, E.E.; Cirilo Lombardo, D.J

    2004-01-01

    With the spark-erosion method we have produced spheroidal particles of an uranium-molybdenum alloy using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Mostly spherical particles of UO{sub 2} with a distinctive size distribution with peaks centered at 70 and 10 {mu}m were obtained. The particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds.

  18. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  19. High temperature behavior of metallic inclusions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, R.L.

    1980-08-01

    The object of this thesis was to construct a temperature gradient furnace to simulate the thermal conditions in the reactor fuel and to study the migration of metallic inclusions in uranium oxide under the influence of temperature gradient. No thermal migration of molybdenum and tungsten inclusions was observed under the experimental conditions. Ruthenium inclusions, however, dissolved and diffused atomically through grain boundaries in slightly reduced uranium oxide. An intermetallic compound (probably URu 3 ) was formed by reaction of Ru and UO/sub 2-x/. The diffusivity and solubility of ruthenium in uranium oxide were measured

  20. Calculation of the energy of stacking faults in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, J.-M.; Soullard, J.

    1976-01-01

    Energy computations of some (100), (110) and (111), planar defects were performed using an ionic bond model for stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. The repulsive contribution to the fault was estimated in two different ways, i.e. using the Born-Mayer classical treatment, or potentials derived from shell model calculations. The stability of the various defect configurations has been studied; on the basis of the numerical values, it may be concluded that dislocation dissociation is unlikely in stoichiometric uranium dioxyde. (Auth.)

  1. Method and device for the dry preparation of ceramic uranium dioxide nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirk, H.; Roepenack, H.; Goeldner, U.

    1977-01-01

    Reprocessing of waste, resulting from the production of ceramic sintered bodies from uranium dioxide for use as nuclear fuel, in a dry process into very finely dispersed pure U 3 O 8 powder may be improved by applying vibrating screening during oxidation. An appropriate device is described. (UWI) [de

  2. Qualitative relations between the kinetics of sintering in hydrogen and the observed microstructures of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, B.; Delmas, R.; Caillat, F.; Lacombe, P.

    1975-01-01

    The microscopic study of uranium dioxide sintered in hydrogen, together with density measurements, shows on the one hand that the large scale appearance of pores trapped at the grain boundaries in the course of sintering has the effect of practically stopping densification, and on the other hand that this particular microstructure is stable over a wide range of time and temperature. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy - Determination of chlorine and fluorine in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  4. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets - Determination of oxygen/uranium atomic ratio by the amperometric method. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This International Standard specifies an analytical method for the determination of the oxygen/uranium atomic ratio in uranium dioxide powder and sintered pellets. The method is applicable to reactor grade samples of hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide powder and pellets. The presence of reducing agents or residual organic additives invalidates the procedure. The test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid, which does not oxidize the uranium(IV) from UO 2 molecules. Thus, the uranium(VI) that is present in the dissolved solution is from UO 3 and/or U 3 O 8 molecules only, and is proportional to the excess oxygen in these molecules. The uranium(VI) content of the solution is determined by titration with a previously standardized solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate hexahydrate in orthophosphoric acid. The end-point of the titration is determined amperometrically using a pair of polarized platinum electrodes. The oxygen/uranium ratio is calculated from the uranium(VI) content. A portion, weighing about 1 g, of the test sample is dissolved in orthophosphoric acid. The dissolution is performed in an atmosphere of nitrogen or carbon dioxide when sintered material is being analysed. When highly sintered material is being analysed, the dissolution is performed at a higher temperature in purified phosphoric acid from which the water has been partly removed. The cooled solution is titrated with an orthophosphoric acid solution of ammonium iron(II) sulfate, which has previously been standardized against potassium dichromate. The end-point of the titration is detected by the sudden increase of current between a pair of polarized platinum electrodes on the addition of an excess of ammonium iron(II) sulfate solution. The paper provides information about scope, principle, reactions, reagents, apparatus, preparation of test sample, procedure (uranium dioxide powder, sintered pellets of uranium dioxide, highly sintered pellets of uranium dioxide and determination

  5. Fracture toughness of WWER Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with various grain size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivov, R.; Novikov, V.; Mikheev, E.; Fedotov, A.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium dioxide fuel pellets with grain sizes 13, 26, and 33 μm for WWER were investigated in the present work in order to determine crack formation and the fracture toughness.The investigation of crack formation in uranium oxide fuel pellets of the WWER-types showed that Young’s modulus and the microhardness of polycrystalline samples increase with increasing grain size, while the fracture toughness decreases. Characteristically, radial Palmqvist cracks form on the surface of uranium dioxide pellets for loads up to 1 kg. Transgranular propagation of cracks over distances several-fold larger than the length of the imprint diagonal is observed in pellets with large grains and small intragrain pores. Intergranular propagation of cracks along grain boundaries with branching occurs in pellets with small grains and low pore concentration on the grain boundaries. Blunting on large pores and at breaks in direction does not permit the cracks to reach a significant length

  6. Characterization of transport properties in uranium dioxide: the case of the oxygen auto-diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Point defects in uranium dioxide which control the transport phenomena are still badly known. The aim of this work is to show how in carrying out several experimental techniques, it is possible to demonstrate both the existence and to determine the nature (charge and localization) of predominant defects responsible of the transport phenomena in a fluorite-type structure oxide. The oxygen diffusion in the uranium dioxide illustrates this. In the first part of this work, the accent is put on the electric properties of uranium dioxide and more particularly on the variation laws of the electric conductivity in terms of temperature, of oxygen potential and of the impurities amounts present in the material. These evolutions are connected to point and charged complex defects models and the pertinence of these models is discussed. Besides, it is shown how the electric conductivity measurements can allow to define oxygen potential domains in which the concentrations in electronic carriers are controlled. This characterization being made, it is shown that the determination of the oxygen intrinsic diffusion coefficient and particularly its dependence to the oxygen potential and to the amount of impurity, allows to determine the main defect responsible to the atomic diffusion as well as its nature and its charge. In the second part, the experimental techniques to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficient are presented: there are the isotopic exchange technique for introducing the tracer in the material, and two techniques to characterize the diffusion profiles (SIMS and NRA). Examples of preliminary results are given for mono and polycrystalline samples. At last, from this methodology on uranium dioxide, studies considered to quantify the thermal and physicochemical effects are presented. Experiments considered with the aim to characterize the radiation diffusion in uranium dioxide are presented too. (O.M.)

  7. Simulation of the interaction between uranium dioxide and zircaloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Garcia, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The code solves the oxygen diffusion equations of the five phases formed during the UO 2 /Zircaloy interaction, using an implicit finite difference method with parabolic interpolation at the interfaces. Uranium and Zirconium mass conservation are considered. The code gives a good simulation of the experimental results for isothermal conditions. (orig.)

  8. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlovic, Lj.

    1962-12-01

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives

  9. X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopic study of the adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, J.G.; Moers, H.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Kirch, G.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption of molecular iodine on uranium metal and on uranium dioxide has been investigated at 25 0 C. Clean surfaces were prepared in an ultrahigh vacuum apparatus and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) and X-ray and electron-induced Auger electron spectroscopies (AES). Adsorption of I 2 was studied for exposures up to 100 langmuirs (1 langmuir = 10 -6 torr s) on uranium metal and to 75 langmuirs on uranium dioxide. Above about 2-langmuir I 2 exposure on uranium, spectroscopic evidence is obtained to indicate the beginning of UI 3 formation. Saturation coverage for I 2 adsorption on uranium dioxide occurs at approximately 10-15 langmuirs. Analysis of the XPS and AES results as well as studies of spectra as a function of temperature lead to the conclusions that a dissociative chemisorption/reaction process occurs on uranium metal while nondissociative adsorption occurs on uranium dioxide. Variations in the iodine Auger kinetic energy and in the Auger parameter are interpreted in light of extra-atomic relaxation processes. 42 references, 10 figures, 1 table

  10. Resuspension of uranium-plutonium oxide particles from burning Plexiglas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering, S.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear fuel materials such as Uranium-Plutonium oxide must be handled remotely in gloveboxes because of their radiotoxicity. These gloveboxes are frequently constructed largely of combustible Plexiglas sheet. To estimate the potential airborne spread of radioactive contamination in the event of a glovebox fire, the resuspension of particles from burning Plexiglas was investigated. (author)

  11. Development of a reduction process of ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1990-07-01

    Laboratory development of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amount of fluoride (approx. 500μg/g) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentration is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical properties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  12. Experience with a uranyl nitrate/uranium dioxide conversion pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcuri, L.; Pietrelli, L.

    1984-01-01

    A plant for the precipitation of sinterable nuclear grade UO 2 powders is described in this report. The plant has been designed, built and set up by SNIA TECHINT. ENEA has been involved in the job as nuclear consultant. Main process steps are: dissolution of UO 2 powder or sintered UO 2 pellets, adjustment of uranyl nitrate solutions, precipitation of uranium peroxide by means of hydrogen peroxide, centrifugation of the precipitate, drying, calcination and reduction to uranium dioxide. The report is divided in two main section: the process description and the ''hot test'' report. Some laboratory data on precipitation of ammonium diuranate by means of NH 4 OH, are also reported

  13. Development of ammonium uranyl carbonate reduction to uranium dioxide using fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.P.; Riella, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory development of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) reduction to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) using fluidized bed furnace technique is described. The reaction is carried out at 500-550 0 C using hydrogen, liberated from cracking of ammonia, as a reducing agent. As the AUC used is obtained from uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) it contains considerable amounts of fluoride ( - 500μgF - /gTCAU) as contaminant. The presence of fluoride leads to high corrosion rates and hence the fluoride concentrations is reduced by pyrohydrolisis of UO 2 . Physical and Chemical proterties of the final product (UO 2 ) obtained were characterized. (author) [pt

  14. Standard test method for the determination of uranium by ignition and the oxygen to uranium (O/U) atomic ratio of nuclear grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.2 This test method does not include provisions for preventing criticality accidents or requirements for health and safety. Observance of this test method does not relieve the user of the obligation to be aware of and conform to all international, national, or federal, state and local regulations pertaining to possessing, shipping, processing, or using source or special nuclear material. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 This test method also is applicable to UO3 and U3O8 powder.

  15. Following the electroreduction of uranium dioxide to uranium in LiCl–KCl eutectic in situ using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.D.; Abdulaziz, R.; Jervis, R.; Bharath, V.J. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Atwood, R.C.; Reinhard, C.; Connor, L.D. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Simons, S.J.R.; Inman, D.; Brett, D.J.L. [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Shearing, P.R., E-mail: p.shearing@ucl.ac.uk [Electrochemical Innovation Lab, Dept. Chemical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • We investigated the electroreduction of UO{sub 2} to U in LiCl/KCL eutectic molten salt. • Combined electrochemical measurement and in situ XRD is utilised. • The electroreduction appears to occur in a single, 4-electron-step, process. • No intermediate compounds were observed. - Abstract: The electrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide to metallic uranium has been investigated in lithium chloride–potassium chloride eutectic molten salt. Laboratory based electrochemical studies have been coupled with in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, for the first time, to deduce the reduction pathway. No intermediate phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction before, during or after electroreduction to form α-uranium. This suggests that the electrochemical reduction occurs via a single, 4-electron-step, process. The rate of formation of α-uranium is seen to decrease during electrolysis and could be a result of a build-up of oxygen anions in the molten salt. Slow transport of O{sup 2−} ions away from the UO{sub 2} working electrode could impede the electrochemical reduction.

  16. Certification of a uranium-238 dioxide reference material for neutron dosimetry (EC nuclear reference material 501)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauwels, J.; Lievens, F.; Ingelbrecht, C.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium-238 oxide of 99.999% isotopic and 99.98% chemical purity was transformed into dioxide spheres of nominal 0.5 and 1.0 mm diameter by gel precipitation and subsequent calcination under carbon dioxide and under argon containing 5% hydrogen at 1 125 K. The spheres were analysed by thermal ionization mass spectrometry, including isotope dilution, by gravimetry and by potentiometric titration. On the basis of these analyses, the uranium mass fraction was certified at 879.4 ± 2.8 g.kg -1 , and the 235 U/U - and 238 U/U abundances at 10.4 ± 0.5 mg.kg -1 and 999.9896 ± 0.0005 g.kg -1 , respectively. The material is intended to be used as a reference material in neutron metrology

  17. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 This test method covers the determination of uranium and the oxygen to uranium atomic ratio in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide powder and pellets. 1.4 This test method covers the determination of chlorine and fluorine in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide. With a 1 to 10-g sample, concentrations of 5 to 200 g/g of chlorine and 1 to 200 μg/g of fluorine are determined without interference. 1.5 This test method covers the determination of moisture in uranium dioxide samples. Detection limits are as low as 10 μg. 1.6 This test method covers the determination of nitride nitrogen in uranium dioxide in the range from 10 to 250 μg. 1.7 This test method covers the spectrographic analysis of nuclear-grade UO2 for the 26 elements in the ranges indicated in Table 2. 1.8 For simultaneous determination of trace ele...

  18. The preparation and the sustained release of titanium dioxide hollow particles encapsulating L-ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Yoko; Kadota, Kazunori; Shimosaka, Atsuko; Yoshida, Mikio; Oshima, Kotaro; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    The preparation of the titanium dioxide hollow particles encapsulating L-ascorbic acid via sol-gel process using inkjet nozzle has been performed, and the sustained release and the effect protecting against degradation of L-ascorbic acid in the particles were investigated. The morphology of titanium dioxide particles was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The sustained release and the effect protecting against degradation of L-ascorbic acid were estimated by dialysis bag method in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) (pH = 7.4) as release media. The prepared titanium dioxide particles exhibited spherical porous structures. The particle size distribution of the titanium dioxide particles was uniform. The hollow titanium dioxide particles encapsulating L-ascorbic acid showed the sustained release. It was also found that the degradation of L-ascorbic acid could be inhibited by encapsulating L-ascorbic acid in the titanium dioxide hollow particles.

  19. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porneuf, A.

    1960-05-01

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [fr

  20. Safety analysis report of uranium dioxide fuel laboratory, Nuclear Research Centre Inchas, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Azim, M.S.; Abdel-Halim, A.

    1987-07-01

    In the Nuclear Research Center Inchas a uranium dioxide fuel laboratory is planned and built by the AEA Cairo (Atomic Energy Authority). The layout of this fuel lab and the programmatical contents are subject to the bilaterial cooperation between Egypt and the Federal Republic of Germany. In this report the safety analysis as basic items for the approval procedure are started in detail. (orig.) [de

  1. Effect of additives on enhanced sintering and grain growth in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.

    1992-06-01

    The use of sintering additives has been the most effective way of promoting grain growth of uranium dioxide. We have established a same mechanism for additives which belongs to corundum structure: chromium, aluminium, vanadium and titanium sesquioxides. Study of thermodynamical stabilities of dopants has lead to define suitable sintering atmospheres in order to enhance grain growth. Low solubility limits have been defined at T=1700 deg C for four additives, from variations of final grain size versus initial dopant concentration Identification of second phase after cooling has been done from electronic diffraction patterns. It appears that these solubilities decrease sharply as positive deviation from stoichiometry of uranium dioxide increases. Dilatometric analysis of sintering of doped uranium dioxide has shown in certain cases some enhancement in densification rates, at the point of onset of abnormal grain growth, which is believed to be the source. Nevertheless, the following growth is accompanied with pores coalescence mechanisms and pores entrapment inside grains. Increased thermal stability, during standard annealing, is expected, limiting thereby redensification of nuclear fuel in reactors. Finally, from investigations of additives vaporizations, Al 2 O 3 and Cr 2 O 3 , oxygen exchanges between additives and matrix are believed to occur, which should lead to enhance pore mobility. (Author)., refs., figs., tabs

  2. The industrial application of a uranium dioxide electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needes, C.R.S.; Nicol, M.J.; Finkelstein, N.P.; Ormrod, G.T.W.

    1975-01-01

    A correlation between the potential of a UO 2 electrode and the rate of recovery of uranium has been proved in laboratory and plant trials. When the recovery rates change because of variation in the concentrations of Fe(III), Fe(II), SO 2- 4 , and H + , a positive correlation is observed. However, an increase in the concentration of phosphate in solution produces an increase in the UO 2 electrode potential but a decrease in the rate of leaching of UO 2 . The correlation between the UO 2 electrode potential and the rate of leaching of UO 2 is then negative. It is concluded that, as a control device, the electrode cannot compete with the platinum electrode for use on certain plants. Nevertheless, the UO 2 electrode will act as a useful warning device if the total concentration of iron in solution decreases to below a level concomitant with the economic recovery of uranium. Furthermore, because of the positive correlation between the UO 2 electrode potential and the phosphate concentration, the electrode will also be of value in the detection of an increase in the phosphate level in solution. When it was incorporated in a suitable industrial probe, the electrode was found to be able to withstand the rigours of the leaching conditions in a large pilot-plant pachuca, and only failed after six weeks operation [af

  3. Preparation, sintering and leaching of optimized uranium thorium dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingant, N.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.; Barre, N.; Hubert, S.; Obbade, S.; Taborda, F.; Abraham, F.

    2009-01-01

    Mixed actinide dioxides are currently studied as potential fuels for several concepts associated to the fourth generation of nuclear reactors. These solids are generally obtained through dry chemistry processes from powder mixtures but could present some heterogeneity in the distribution of the cations in the solid. In this context, wet chemistry methods were set up for the preparation of U 1-x Th x O 2 solid solutions as model compounds for advanced dioxide fuels. Two chemical routes of preparation, involving the precipitation of crystallized precursor, were investigated: on the one hand, a mixture of acidic solutions containing cations and oxalic acid was introduced in an open vessel, leading to a poorly-crystallized precipitate. On the other hand, the starting mixture was placed in an acid digestion bomb then set in an oven in order to reach hydrothermal conditions. By this way, small single-crystals were obtained then characterized by several techniques including XRD and SEM. The great differences in terms of morphology and crystallization state of the samples were correlated to an important variation of the specific surface area of the oxides prepared after heating, then the microstructure of the sintered pellets prepared at high temperature. Preliminary leaching tests were finally undertaken in dynamic conditions (i.e. with high renewal of the leachate) in order to evaluate the influence of the sample morphology on the chemical durability of the final cohesive materials

  4. Determination of microquantities of zirconium and thorium in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber de D'Alessio, Ana; Zucal, Raquel.

    1975-07-01

    A method for the determination of 10 to 50 ppm of zirconium and thorium in uranium IV oxide of nuclear purity is established. Zirconium and thorium are retained in a strong cation-exchange resin Dowex 50 WX8 in 1 M HCl. Zirconium is eluted with 0,5% oxalic acid solution and thorium with 4% ammonium oxalate. The colorimetric determination of zirconium with xilenol orange is done in perchloric acid after destructtion of oxalic acid and thorium is determined with arsenazo III in 5 M HCl. 10 μg of each element were determined with a standard deviation of 2,1% for thorium and 3,4% for zirconium. (author) [es

  5. French experience in the field of internal dosimetry assessment at a nuclear workplace. Methods and results on industrial uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Rannou, A.; Pihet, P.; Dewez, P.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of the new ICRP recommendations and the diversity of industrial exposure materials make it necessary to modify our approach of assessing internal dosimetry. This paper describes a methodology developed to asses different parameters such as activity concentration and particle size distribution at the workplace; physico-chemical characteristics of industrial dust handled; and in vitro and in vivo solubility in order to determine the absorption rate blood. The determination of such specific parameters will lead to dose calculation in terms of committed effective Dose Per Unit of Intake (DPUI). Results obtained for an industrial uranium dioxide, UO 2 , at a French nuclear facility are presented. (author). 21 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Sintering of uranium dioxide obtained by continuous precipitation of AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya, C.D.; Sterba, M.E.; Russo, D.O.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Division in Bariloche Atomic Center evaluates the ceramic behaviour of UO 2 powders obtained from continuously precipitated and reduced AUC (Ammonium Uranyl Tri Carbonate). An analysis is made of powder characteristics (particle morphology and size distribution and specific area) on behaviour of UO 2 during sintering (compaction, sintering, pore and grain microstructure, etc.). 1 ref

  7. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  8. Microporous polystyrene particles for selective carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliva, Maria; Armatas, Gerasimos S; Vamvakaki, Maria

    2012-02-07

    This study presents the synthesis of microporous polystyrene particles and the potential use of these materials in CO(2) capture for biogas purification. Highly cross-linked polystyrene particles are synthesized by the emulsion copolymerization of styrene (St) and divinylbenzene (DVB) in water. The cross-link density of the polymer is varied by altering the St/DVB molar ratio. The size and the morphology of the particles are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Following supercritical point drying with carbon dioxide or lyophilization from benzene, the polystyrene nanoparticles exhibit a significant surface area and permanent microporosity. The dried particles comprising 35 mol % St and 65 mol % DVB possess the largest surface area, ∼205 m(2)/g measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and ∼185 m(2)/g measured by the Dubinin-Radushkevich method, and a total pore volume of 1.10 cm(3)/g. Low pressure measurements suggest that the microporous polystyrene particles exhibit a good separation performance of CO(2) over CH(4), with separation factors in the range of ∼7-13 (268 K, CO(2)/CH(4) = 5/95 gas mixture), which renders them attractive candidates for use in gas separation processes.

  9. Comparative study of the oxidation of various qualities of uranium in carbon dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desrues, R.; Paidassi, J.

    1965-01-01

    Uranium samples of six different qualities were subjected, in the temperature range 400 - 1000 C, to the action of carbon dioxide carefully purified to eliminate oxygen and water vapour; the resulting oxidation was followed micro-graphically and also (but only in the range 400 - 700 C) gravimetrically using an Ugine-Eyraud microbalance. A comparison of the results leads to the following 3 observations. First, the oxidation of the six uraniums studied obeys a linear law, (followed at 700 C by an accelerating law). The rates of reaction differ by a maximum of 100 per cent, the higher purity grades being oxidized more slowly except at 700 C when the reverse is true. Secondly, simultaneously with the growth, of an approximately uniform film of uranium dioxide on the metal, there occurs a localized attack in the form of blisters in the immediate neighbourhood of the monocarbide inclusions in the uranium. The relative importance of this attack is greater for lower oxidation temperatures and for a larger size, number and inequality of distribution of the inclusions, that is to say for higher carbon concentrations in the uranium (which have values from 7 to 1000 ppm in our tests). Thirdly, for oxidation temperatures above 600 C blistering is much less pronounced, but at 700 C the beginning of a general deformation of the sample occurs, which, above 750 C, becomes much greater; this leads to an acceleration of the reaction rate with respect to the linear law. In view of the over-heating, the sample must already be in the γ-phase which is particularly easily deformed; furthermore this expansion phenomenon is more pronounced when the sample is more plastic and therefore purer. (authors) [fr

  10. Penetrate-leach dissolution of zirconium-clad uranium and uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, H.D.

    1975-01-01

    A new decladding-dissolution process was developed for zirconium-clad uranium metal and UO 2 fuels. The proposed penetrate-leach process consists of penetrating the zirconium cladding with Alniflex solution (2M HF--1M HNO 3 --1M Al(NO 3 ) 3 --0.1M K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) and of leaching the exposed core with 10M HNO 3 . Undissolved cladding pieces are discarded as solid waste. Periodic HF and HNO 3 additions, efficient agitation, and in-line zirconium analyses are required for successful control of ZrF 4 and/or AlF 3 precipitation during the cladding-penetration step. Preliminary solvent extraction studies indicated complete recovery of uranium with 30 vol. percent tributyl phosphate (TBP) from both Alniflex solution and blended Alniflex-HNO 3 leach solutions. With 7.5 vol. percent TBP, high extractant/feed flow ratios and low scrub flows are required for satisfactory uranium recovery from Alniflex solution. Modified waste-handling procedures may be required for Alniflex waste, because it cannot be evaporated before neutralization and large quantities of solids are generated on neutralization. The effect of unstable UZr 3 (epsilon phase of uranium-zirconium system) on the safety of penetrate-leach dissolution was investigated

  11. Deuterium migration and trapping in uranium and uranium dioxide during D+ implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium and UO 2 have been implanted with deuterium ions in the energy range 30-85 keV. Subsequently, the near surface regions (100-90000 Angstroem) of these samples were quantitatively profiled for deuterium oxygen using the method of ion beam microanalysis. Mean ranges and widths of the implanted ions were measured and compared with theoretical predictions. Fully oxidized samples were compared with those having only thin oxide films on their surfaces. While the deuterium appeared to migrate during its implantation in uranium, little or no migration appeared either during or after implantation in UO 2 . Further measurements suggest that thin surface oxide films strongly trap the deuterium migrating beneath the surface. It is suggested that the electronic energy loss of the ion beam lowers the effective activation energy for the formation of OD bonds near the target surface. (orig.)

  12. Improvement of Particle Recovery Method for Uranium Isotope Analysis Using SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehee; Park, Jinkyu; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Lim, Sang Ho; Han, Sun-Ho

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new design of vacuum-suction impactor with wider inlet nozzle and outlet nozzle for guiding particles to disperse the particles on the surface of carbon planchet. We prepared simulated samples with lead dioxide and examined particle recovery yield and degree of dispersion using the conventional vacuum impactor and the newly designed ones with different inlet nozzle diameters. We tried to improve the inlet part of vacuum impactor, in order to increase the recovery yield and disperse the collected particle on carbon planchet. As the diameter of inlet nozzle became larger, the collected particles were better dispersed on planchet. In addition, when the inner diameter of the impactor was 3 mm or 5 mm, the recovery yield was higher than that of conventional impactor. Considering the degree of dispersion and recovery yield, we used the impactor with 5 mm exit diameter and recovered the mixed uranium standard materials for SIMS measurement. We were able to reduce the mixing effect and measure the isotopic ratio more accurately and precisely.

  13. Bonding xenon and krypton on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbrowski Ludwik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present density functional theory (DFT calculation results of krypton and xenon atoms interaction on the surface of uranium dioxide single crystal. A pseudo-potential approach in the generalised gradient approximation (GGA was applied using the ABINIT program package. To compute the unit cell parameters, the 25 atom super-cell was chosen. It has been revealed that close to the surface of a potential well is formed for xenon and krypton atom due to its interaction with the atoms of oxygen and uranium. Depth and shape of the well is the subject of ab initio calculations in adiabatic approximation. The calculations were performed both for the case of oxygenic and metallic surfaces. It has been shown that the potential well for the oxygenic surface is deeper than for the metallic surface. The thermal stability of immobilising the atoms of krypton and xenon in the potential wells were evaluated. The results are shown in graphs.

  14. Determination of trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders CRMs by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Husheng; Li Jun

    1997-01-01

    The 237-quaternary ammonium extraction resin chromatography is used to the separation of 6 trace elements in ceramic uranium dioxide pellets powders, which are used as certified reference materials (CRMs). The sample is dissolved in 6.5 mol/L HNO 3 and uranium is separated by chromatographic column. the 6 trace elements Al, Ba, Co, Ta, Ti and V contained in the elutriant are determined by using ICP directly reading spectrometer. For a 300 mg sample, the lowest determinable concentration of impurities in ceramic UO 2 pellets powders CRMs is (0.016-0.250) x 10 -6 . The relative standard deviation is less than 7.5%. The proposed method provides excellent and accurate analytical data for the ceramic UO 2 pellets powders samples (CRMs)

  15. Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic-structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerikar, Pankaj; Watanabe, Taku; Tulenko, James S.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    The stability range of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide is determined as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and non-stoichiometry. The computational approach integrates high accuracy ab initio electronic-structure calculations and thermodynamic analysis supported by experimental data. In particular, the density functional theory calculations are performed at the level of the spin polarized, generalized gradient approximation and includes the Hubbard U term; as a result they predict the correct anti-ferromagnetic insulating ground state of uranium oxide. The thermodynamic calculations enable the effects of system temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on defect formation energy to be determined. The predicted equilibrium properties and defect formation energies for neutral defect complexes match trends in the experimental literature quite well. In contrast, the predicted values for charged complexes are lower than the measured values. The calculations predict that the formation of oxygen interstitials becomes increasingly difficult as higher temperatures and reducing conditions are approached

  16. DISSOLUTION OF METAL OXIDES AND SEPARATION OF URANIUM FROM LANTHANIDES AND ACTINIDES IN SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna L. Quach; Bruce J. Mincher; Chien M. Wai

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of extracting and separating uranium from lanthanides and other actinides by using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) as a solvent modified with tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) for the development of a counter current stripping technique, which would be a more efficient and environmentally benign technology for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing compared to traditional solvent extraction. Several actinides (U, Pu, and Np) and europium were extracted in sc-CO2 modified with TBP over a range of nitric acid concentrations and then the actinides were exposed to reducing and complexing agents to suppress their extractability. According to this study, uranium/europium and uranium/plutonium extraction and separation in sc-CO2 modified with TBP is successful at nitric acid concentrations of less than 6 M and at nitric acid concentrations of less than 3 M with acetohydroxamic acid or oxalic acid, respectively. A scheme for recycling uranium from spent nuclear fuel by using sc-CO2 and counter current stripping columns is presented.

  17. Welding uranium with a multikilowatt, continuous-wave, carbon dioxide laser welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, P.W.; Townsend, A.B.

    1977-01-01

    A 15-kilowatt, continuous-wave carbon dioxide laser was contracted to make partial-penetration welds in 6.35-and 12.7-mm-thick wrought depleted uranium plates. Welding power and speed ranged from 2.3 to 12.9 kilowatts and from 21 to 127 millimeters per second, respectively. Results show that depth-to-width ratios of at least unity are feasible. The overall characteristics of the process indicate it can produce welds resembling those made by the electron-beam welding process

  18. Influence of uranium dioxide nonstoichiometric oxygen on the work function of Mo(110) single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekmukhabetov, E.S.; Dzhajmurzin, A.A.; Imanbekov, Zh.Zh.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of the uranium dioxide nonstoichiometric oxygen on the work function of a Mo(110) single crystal has been studied. When the surface diffusion of oxygen on the tested surface takes place, the work function is shown to decrease and, subsequently, to increase until it becomes stable. The dependence of the work function on the temperature of the specimen in the range of 1600-1900 K with a minimum at 1730 K has been found. The minimum is attributed to the dipole layer formation

  19. Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) of uranium and thorium nitrates using carbon dioxide modified with phosphonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchaiah, K.C.; Sujatha, K.; Brahmananda Rao, C.V.S.; Sivaraman, N.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) has emerged as a powerful technique for the extraction of metal ions.The liquid like densities and gas like physical properties of supercritical fluids make them unique to act as special solvents. SFE based procedures were developed and demonstrated in our laboratory for the recovery of actinides from various matrices. In the present study, we have examined for the first time, the use of dialkylalkylphosphonates in supercritical carbon dioxide (Sc-CO 2 ) medium to study the extraction behavior of uranium and thorium nitrates. A series of phosphonates were synthesised by Michaelis-Becker reaction in our laboratory and employed for the SFE

  20. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  1. Synthesis of ordered mesoporous uranium dioxide by a nanocasting route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ran; Wang Lin; Shi, Wei-Qun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Chai, Zhi-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China). School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Collaborative Innovation Center

    2016-11-01

    Ordered mesoporous UO{sub 2} with 3-D structure (for UO{sub 2}-KIT-6) and nanowire bundles (for UO{sub 2}-SBA-15) was synthesized for the first time by a nanocasting route using different ordered mesoporous silica (KIT-6 and SBA-15, respectively) as templates and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate as the metal precursor. The uranyl nitrate was impregnated into the mesopore of the silica template and was converted to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} after the first step. The synthesis of ordered UO{sub 2} mesostructure was achieved by reducing the mesoporous U{sub 3}O{sub 8} with silica composites under 5% H{sub 2}/Ar atmosphere at 700 C, followed by a template removal process. The as-prepared UO{sub 2}-KIT-6 had a particle size of several millimeters, and was constructed with uncoupled subframework mesostructure and crystalline walls, while UO{sub 2}-SBA-15 possessed a rope-like morphology and consisted of nanowire arrays. The surface area and pore volume of ordered UO{sub 2} mesostructure are 47.2 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.23 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} for the UO{sub 2}-KIT-6, and 54.4 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and 0.28 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} for the UO{sub 2}-SBA-15, respectively.

  2. Carbonate effects on hexavalent uranium removal from water by nanocrystalline titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazne, Mahmoud; Meng, Xiaoguang; Korfiatis, George P.; Christodoulatos, Christos

    2006-01-01

    A novel nanocrystalline titanium dioxide was used to treat depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated water under neutral and alkaline conditions. The novel material had a total surface area of 329 m 2 /g, total surface site density of 11.0 sites/nm 2 , total pore volume of 0.415 cm 3 /g and crystallite size of 6.0 nm. It was used in batch tests to remove U(VI) from synthetic solutions and contaminated water. However, the capacity of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water decreased in the presence of inorganic carbonate at pH > 6.0. Adsorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and surface charge measurements were used to investigate the causes of the reduced capacity. The surface charge and the FTIR measurements suggested that the adsorbed U(VI) species was not complexed with carbonate at neutral pH values. The decreased capacity of titanium dioxide to remove U(VI) from water in the presence of carbonate at neutral to alkaline pH values was attributed to the aqueous complexation of U(VI) by inorganic carbonate. The nanocrystalline titanium dioxide had four times the capacity of commercially available titanium dixoide (Degussa P-25) to adsorb U(VI) from water at pH 6 and total inorganic carbonate concentration of 0.01 M. Consequently, the novel material was used to treat DU-contaminated water at a Department of Defense (DOD) site

  3. Experimental studies of neutron irradiated uranium dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanke, R.H.J.

    1990-01-01

    In case of an accident situation, in which the heat of the nuclear fuel can no longer be transferred to coolin water, the temperature of the nuclear fuel ay rise very strongly, so that radioactive fission products may be released, which can ultimately lead to the release of radioactive substances to the environment. In this respect it is important to know more about the release rate of the various fission products and their fuel samples, used in the investigation, were UO-2 spheres of approximately 1 mm. The chemical forms of the particles which are being released from the sphees during evaporation have been determined using a mass spectrometer. At the same time, the activity of the fission products has been measured using a gamma spectrometer. A gamma tomographer has been developed for determining the three-dimensional distribution of the concentration of radioactive fission products in the sphere. With this tomographer the change of this distribution as a function of temperature could be measured. For interpretation of the results two models have been developed: a model of the evaporation of the non-stoichiometric UO-2, and a model of the diffusion of fission products in UO-2. The first model was used to determine the stoichiometry of the sphere while the second has been used to determine the activation energy for the diffusion of the fission products. The main conclusion is that the microstructure of the nuclear fuel has a great effect on both the amount of free oxygen atoms, the release rate and the chemical form of fission products. This microstructure has not been investigated in greater detail so that all other conclusions are of qualitative nature. (author). 111 refs.; 114 figs.; 13 tabs

  4. High-temperature, Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic studies on lanthanum oxide/uranium dioxide solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunder, S.; McEachern, R.; LeBlanc, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Knudsen cell-mass spectroscopic experiments were carried out with lanthanum oxide/uranium oxide solid solutions (1%, 2% and 5% (metal at.% basis)) to assess the volatilization characteristics of rare earths present in irradiated nuclear fuel. The oxidation state of each sample used was conditioned to the 'uranium dioxide stage' by heating in the Knudsen cell under an atmosphere of 10% CO 2 in CO. The mass spectra were analyzed to obtain the vapour pressures of the lanthanum and uranium species. It was found that the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide follows Henry's law, i.e., its value is directly proportional to its concentration in the solid phase. Also, the vapour pressure of lanthanum oxide over the solid solution, after correction for its concentration in the solid phase, is similar to that of uranium dioxide. (authors)

  5. An improved FT-TIMS method of measuring uranium isotope ratios in the uranium-bearing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yan; Wang, Fan; Zhao, Yong-Gang; Li, Li-Li; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Yan; Chang, Zhi-Yuan; Guo, Shi-Lun; Wang, Xiao-Ming; Cui, Jian-Yong; Liu, Yu-Ang

    2015-01-01

    An improved method of Fission Track technique combined with Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (FT-TIMS) was established in order to determine isotope ratio of uranium-bearing particle. Working standard of uranium oxide particles with a defined diameter and isotopic composition were prepared and used to review the method. Results showed an excellent agreement with certified values. The developed method was used to analyze isotope ratio of single uranium-bearing particle in swipe samples successfully. The analysis results of uranium-bearing particles in swipe samples accorded with the operation history of the origin. - Highlights: • The developed method was successfully applied in the analysis of real swipe sample. • Uranium-bearing particles were confined in the middle of track detector. • The fission tracks of collodion film and PC film could be confirmed each other. • The thickness of collodion film should be no more than about 60 μm. • The method could avoid losing uranium-bearing particles in the etching step.

  6. Minimization of the fission product waste by using thorium based fuel instead of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galahom, A. Abdelghafar, E-mail: Agalahom@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    This research discusses the neutronic characteristics of VVER-1200 assembly fueled with five different fuel types based on thorium. These types of fuel based on mixing thorium as a fertile material with different fissile materials. The neutronic characteristics of these fuels are investigated by comparing their neutronic characteristics with the conventional uranium dioxide fuel using the MCNPX code. The objective of this study is to reduce the production of long-lived actinides, get rid of plutonium component and to improve the fuel cycle economy while maintaining acceptable values of the neutronic safety parameters such as moderator temperature coefficient, Doppler coefficient and effective delayed neutrons (β). The thorium based fuel has a more negative Doppler coefficient than uranium dioxide fuel. The moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) has been calculated for the different proposed fuels. Also, the fissile inventory ratio has been calculated at different burnup step. The use of Th-232 as a fertile material instead of U-238 in a nuclear fuel is the most promising fuel in VVER-1200 as it is the ideal solution to avoid the production of more plutonium components and long-lived minor actinides. The reactor grade plutonium accumulated in light water reactor with burnup can be recycled by mixing it with Th-232 to fuel the VVER-1200 assembly. The concentrations of Xe-135 and Sm-151 have been investigated, due to their high thermal neutron absorption cross section.

  7. Anomalous behaviour of thermophysical properties of stoichiometric uranium dioxide by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunev, A.V.; Tarasov, B.A.; Nazarov, A.V.

    2011-01-01

    We present a classical molecular dynamics simulation of uranium dioxide in the temperature range of 300-3000 K. Temperature dependences of thermal conductivity, heat capacity and ionic conductivity are investigated. Our study shows the rise of thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide at very high temperatures (above 2500 K), which is not predicted by the former anharmonic theories. Several pair potentials are used in the simulation, and they depict similar effects. Long range forces are accounted by Ewald sums. Static thermal properties are evaluated in NPT ensemble. It is shown that a high-temperature peak on heat capacity is present and is more legible in large systems. To ensure the best reliability, transport properties are evaluated using the theory of autocorrelation functions in NVE ensemble. In order to properly define thermal conductivity in ionic systems with charge fluxes, an expression which accounts the thermoelectric effect is derived from Onsager reciprocal relations. The rise on temperature dependence of thermal conductivity is accompanied by the peak on heat capacity and an anomalous rise of ionic conductivity. However, it is shown that there is no partial melting of the oxygen sublattice, which suggests that the system does not necessarily exhibit a superionic transition. Instead, kick-out diffusion in oxygen sublattice is proposed to be the origin of such anomalous behavior of thermophysical properties. (author)

  8. Synthesis of uranium and thorium dioxides by Complex Sol-Gel Processes (CSGP). Synthesis of uranium oxides by Complex Sol-Gel Processes (CSGP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptula, A.; Brykala, M.; Lada, W.; Olczak, T.; Wawszczak, D.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Modolo, G.; Daniels, H.

    2010-01-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT), a new method of synthesis of uranium and thorium dioxides by original variant of sol-gel method - Complex Sol-Gel Process (CSGP), has been elaborated. The main modification step is the formation of nitrate-ascorbate sols from components alkalized by aqueous ammonia. Those sols were gelled into: - irregularly agglomerates by evaporation of water; - medium sized microspheres (diameter <150) by IChTJ variant of sol-gel processes by water extraction from drops of emulsion sols in 2-ethylhexanol-1 by this solvent. Uranium dioxide was obtained by a reduction of gels with hydrogen at temperatures >700 deg. C, while thorium dioxide by a simple calcination in the air atmosphere. (authors)

  9. The reaction of sintered aluminium products with uranium dioxide and monocarbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, T.; Knudsen, Per

    1965-01-01

    The compatibility of SAP 930 with uranium dioxide and uranium monocarbide was investigated in the temperature range 450–600° C. The results indicate that a severe reaction occurs between SAP 930 and UO2 within 8000 hours at 600° C, a slight reaction at 600° C for 1000 hours and after 11 900 hours...... at 525° C, and no reaction in 14 300 hours at 450° C. Of the three grades of UC tested (hot pressed, arc cast, cold pressed and sintered) the slightly substoichiometric, hot-pressed UC is judged to be least compatible with SAP 930, reaction occurring after 7300 hours at 450° C. No reaction was observed...... between SAP 930 and the other carbides at this temperature. All SAP−UC combinations are incompatible at 600° C for as little as 100 hours of heat treatment. Tests designed to study the effect of a diffusion barrier on the SAP−UC reaction have shown that anodized SAP 930 and the three uranium carbides...

  10. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-01

    Uranium dioxide UO 2 is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO 2 , we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO 2 and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  11. Exposure assessment of workplace manufacturing titanium dioxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Huadong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhangjian; Zhou, Jingwen; Tang, Shichuan; Kong, Fanling; Li, Xinwei; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Ji; Jia, Guang

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) human exposure is inevitable, but the exposure data on TiO 2 are still limited. This study adopted off-line filter-based sampling combined with real-time activity-based monitoring to measure the concentrations in a workplace manufacturing TiO 2 (primary diameter: 194 ± 108 nm). Mass concentrations (MCs) of aerosol particles in the packaging workshop (total dust: 3.17 mg/m 3 , nano dust: 1.22 mg/m 3 ) were much higher than those in the milling workshop (total dust: 0.79 mg/m 3 , nano dust: 0.31 mg/m 3 ) and executive office (total dust: 0.44 mg/m 3 , nano dust: 0.19 mg/m 3 ). However, the MCs of TiO 2 were at a relatively low level in the packaging workshop (total TiO 2 : 46.4 μg/m 3 , nano TiO 2 : 16.7 μg/m 3 ) and milling workshop (total TiO 2 : 39.4 μg/m 3 , nano TiO 2 : 19.4 μg/m 3 ) by ICP-MS. The number concentration (NC), surface area concentration (SAC) of aerosol particles potentially deposited in alveolar (SAC A ), and tracheobronchial (SAC TB ) regions of lungs in the packaging workshop were (1.04 ± 0.89) × 10 5 particles/cm 3 , 414.49 ± 395.07, and 86.01 ± 83.18 μm 2 /cm 3 , respectively, which were all significantly higher than those of the milling workshop [(0.12 ± 0.40) × 10 5 particles/cm 3 , 75.38 ± 45.23, and 17.60 ± 9.22 μm 2 /cm 3 , respectively] as well as executive office and outdoor background (p < 0.05). Activity-related characteristics were found in both workshops, and the time-variant characteristics showed very similar trends for 3 days in the packaging workshop. Our study provides important data of TiO 2 particles exposure in the workplace.

  12. Polarographic determination of uranium dioxide stoichiometry; La determination polarographique de la stoechiometrie du dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viguie, J.; Uny, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)

    1966-10-01

    The method described allows the determination of small deviations from stoichiometry for uranium dioxide. It was applied to the study of surface oxidation of bulk samples. The sample is dissolved in phosphoric acid under an argon atmosphere; U(VI) is determined by polarography in PO{sub 4}H{sub 3} 4.5 N - H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 4 N. U(IV) is determined by potentiometry. The detection limit is UO{sub 2,0002}. The accuracy for a single determination at the 95% confidence level is {+-}20 per cent for samples with composition included between UO{sub 2,001} and UO{sub 2,01}. (authors) [French] La methode decrite permet de determiner les faibles ecarts a la stoechiometrie du dioxyde d'uranium. Elle a ete appliquee a l'etude de l'oxydation superficielle des echantillons. La mise en solution s'effectue dans l'acide phosphorique concentre sous atmosphere d'argon; U(VI) est dose par polarographie dans le milieu PO{sub 4}H{sub 3} 4,5 N et H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} 4 N; U(IV) est dose par potentiometrie. La limite de detection est UO{sub 2,0002}. La precision obtenue pour une determination au taux de certitude 0,95 est de l'ordre de 20 pour cent pour des echantillons dont la teneur est comprise entre UO{sub 2,001} et UO{sub 2,01}. (auteurs)

  13. Evaluation of a titanium dioxide-based DGT technique for measuring inorganic uranium species in fresh and marine waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchins, Colin M.; Panther, Jared G.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    A new diffusive gradients in a thin film (DGT) technique for measuring dissolved uranium (U) in freshwater is reported. The new method utilises a previously described binding phase, Metsorb (a titanium dioxide based adsorbent). This binding phase was evaluated and compared to the well-established...

  14. The 1/4 technical scale, continuous process of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide from ammonium polyuranates containing fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodarski, R.

    1977-01-01

    Based on the laboratory results, the 1/4 technical apparatus for the continuous reduction and defluorination of ammonium polyuranate containing fluoride was designed and constructed. The possibility of obtaining the ceramic uranium dioxide in a continuous process has been confirmed. The main part of the apparatus used in this process was the horizontal tubular oven with the extruder transporting material. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy - Uranium dioxide pellets - Determination of density and volume fraction of open and closed porosity. 2. ed. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This International Standard describes a method for determining the chlorine and fluorine concentrations in uranium dioxide and in sintered fuel pellets by pyrohydrolysis of samples, followed either by liquid ion-exchange chromatography or by selective electrode measurement of chlorine and fluorine ions. Many ion-exchange chromatography systems and ion-selective electrode measurement systems are available

  16. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  17. Particle length-dependent titanium dioxide nanomaterials toxicity and bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buford Mary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanomaterials have considerable beneficial uses as photocatalysts and solar cells. It has been established for many years that pigment-grade TiO2 (200 nm sphere is relatively inert when internalized into a biological model system (in vivo or in vitro. For this reason, TiO2 nanomaterials are considered an attractive alternative in applications where biological exposures will occur. Unfortunately, metal oxides on the nanoscale (one dimension Results TiO2 nanospheres, short ( 15 μm nanobelts were synthesized, characterized and tested for biological activity using primary murine alveolar macrophages and in vivo in mice. This study demonstrates that alteration of anatase TiO2 nanomaterial into a fibre structure of greater than 15 μm creates a highly toxic particle and initiates an inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages. These fibre-shaped nanomaterials induced inflammasome activation and release of inflammatory cytokines through a cathepsin B-mediated mechanism. Consequently, long TiO2 nanobelts interact with lung macrophages in a manner very similar to asbestos or silica. Conclusions These observations suggest that any modification of a nanomaterial, resulting in a wire, fibre, belt or tube, be tested for pathogenic potential. As this study demonstrates, toxicity and pathogenic potential change dramatically as the shape of the material is altered into one that a phagocytic cell has difficulty processing, resulting in lysosomal disruption.

  18. Size distribution of radon daughter particles in uranium mine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Hinchliffe, L.; Sladowski, R.

    1975-01-01

    The size distribution of radon daughters was measured in several uranium mines using four compact diffusion batteries and a round jet cascade impactor. Simultaneously, measurements were made of uncombined fractions of radon daughters, radon concentration, working level, and particle concentration. The size distributions found for radon daughters were log normal. The activity median diameters ranged from 0.09 μm to 0.3 μm with a mean value of 0.17 μm. Geometric standard deviations were in the range from 1.3 to 4 with a mean value of 2.7. Uncombined fractions expressed in accordance with the ICRP definition ranged from 0.004 to 0.16 with a mean value of 0.04. The radon daughter sizes in these mines are greater than the sizes assumed by various authors in calculating respiratory tract dose. The disparity may reflect the widening use of diesel-powered equipment in large uranium mines. (U.S.)

  19. Fracture toughness and fracture surface energy of sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.; Chandrasekharan, K.N.; Panakkal, J.P.; Ghosh, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the variation of fracture toughness Ksub(ic) and fracture surface energy γsub(s) in sintered uranium dioxide pellets in the density range 9.86 to 10.41 g cm -3 , using Vickers indentation technique. A minimum of four indentations were made on each pellet sample and the average crack length of each indentation and the hardness values were determined. The overall average crack-length datra and the data on volume fraction porosity in the pellets fitted a straight line, from which Ksub(ic) and γsub(s) were calculated. The fracture parameters of nonporous polycrystalline UO 2 , calculated from the experimental data, are presented in tabular form. (U.K.)

  20. The migration of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in irradiated uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.

    1977-05-01

    The mobility of intragranular fission gas bubbles in uranium dioxide irradiated at 1600-1800 0 C has been studied following isothermal annealing at temperatures below 1600 0 C. The intragranular fission gas bubbles, average diameter approximately 2nm, are virtually immobile at temperatures below 1500 0 C. The bubbles have clean surfaces with no solid fission product contamination and are faceted to the highest observed irradiation temperature of 1800 0 C. This bubble faceting is believed to be a major cause of bubble immobility. In fuel operating below 1500 0 C the predominant mechanism allowing the growth of intragranular bubbles and the subsequent gas release must be the diffusion of dissolved gas atoms rather than the movement of entire intragranular bubbles. (author)

  1. Plastic deformation of uranium dioxide: observation of the sub-structures of dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Lefebvre, J.M.; Soullard, J.

    1978-01-01

    Single crystals of uranium dioxide were deformed in compression at imposed strain rates in the temperature range of 700 0 C to 1400 0 C. The crystals were oriented to promote slip over one or two slip systems of the family [100] and also on the [110] system. Thin films of the deformed specimens were examined by transmission electron microscopy. When [100] single glide system operates, the dislocation substructure consist of numerous dipoles, their edge components lying along directions. For the [100] double glide system the grain boundaries and dislocation hexagonal network are observed, the complexity of which increases with the nominal strain. Dislocation arrangments consisting of extensive cellular networks of tangling dislocations and hexagonal netting were detected for [110] system. The auxillary role of [111] planes on the dislocation cross slip from [100] and [110] system was demonstrated. Weak beam images suggest that dissociation of dislocations can occur. (Auth.)

  2. Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.W.; Fink, J.K.; Leibowitz, L.

    1982-01-01

    Vapor pressures and vapor compositions in equilibrium with a hypostoichiometric uranium-plutonium dioxide condensed phase (U/sub 1-y/Pu/sub y/)O/sub 2-x/, as functions of T, x, and y, have been calculated for 0.0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.1, 0.0 less than or equal to y less than or equal to 0.3, and for the temperature range 2500 less than or equal to T less than or equal to 6000 K. The range of compositions and temperatures was limited to the region of interest to reactor safety analysis. Thermodynamic functions for the condensed phase and for each of the gaseous species were combined with an oxygen potential model to obtain partial pressures of O, O 2 , Pu, PuO, PuO 2 , U, UO, UO 2 , and UO 3 as functions of T, x, and y

  3. A new mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model for a uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geun

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model (MEGA) for uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel was developed. It was based upon the diffusional release of fission gases from inside the grain to the grain boundary and the release of fission gases from the grain boundary to the external surface by the interconnection of the fission gas bubbles in the grain boundary. The capability of the MEGA model was validated by a comparison with the fission gas release data base and the sensitivity analyses of the parameters. It was found that the MEGA model correctly predicts the fission gas release in the broad range of fuel burnups up to 98 MWd/kgU. Especially, the enhancement of fission gas release in a high-burnup fuel, and the reduction of fission gas release at a high burnup by increasing the UO 2 grain size were found to be correctly predicted by the MEGA model without using any artificial factor. (author)

  4. The study of Ashby-type sintering diagrams for uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgeoni, P.

    1980-01-01

    Computer modelling of binary and ternary Ashby-type sintering diagrams for stoechiometric and hyperstoechiometric uranium dioxide (in the range O/U = 2, 0-2, 10). Material data and mass transfer equations, selected from the literature, were used. Sintering isochronous curves were calculated and traced as well. Improvement of a modern dilatometric method by reading and processing experimental curves on a computer and by determining for them a criterion of proximity to the theoretical model equation. It was possible: to develop a reliable method of determination for the dominant mechanism, diffusion coefficient and real process activation energy; to draw up the real sintering diagram; to understand the quantitative and qualitative changes occuring during the actual sintering process of UO 2 , concerning massing and modification of pore shape; to recommend the technological parameters of the thermal regime concerning the elimination of lubricant and binder additives in order to obtain high quality sintered tablets. (author)

  5. Determination of trace metals in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvador, V.L.R.; Imakuma, K.

    1988-04-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of low concentrations of Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni in nuclear-grade uranium dioxide by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the use of chemical treatment. The lower limits of detection range from 2 μg g -1 for nickel and manganese to 5 μg g -1 for copper. Samples are prepared in the form of double-layer pellets with boric acid as a binding agent. Standards are prepared in a U 3 O 8 matrix, which is more chemically stable than UO 2 and has similar matrix behaviour. The correlation coefficients for calibration curves are better than 0.999. Erros range from 2.4 % for chromium to 6.8 % for nickel. (author) [pt

  6. Study of process parameters for reducing ammonium uranyl carbonate to uranium dioxide in fluidized bed furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitao Junior, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This work consists of studying the process parameters of AUC (ammonium uranyl carbonate) to U O 2 (uranium dioxide) reduction, with good physical and chemical characteristics, in fluidized bed. Initially, it was performed U O 2 cold fluidization experiments with an acrylic column. Afterward, it was done AUC to U O 2 reduction experiments, in which the process parameters influence in the granulometry, specific surface area, porosity and fluoride amount on the U O 2 powder produced were studied. As a last step, it was done compacting and sintering tests of U O 2 pellets in order to appreciate the U O 2 powder performance, obtained by fluidized bed, in the fuel pellets fabrication. (author)

  7. Fluorine and chlorine determination in mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elinson, S.V.; Zemlyanukhina, N.A.; Pavlova, I.V.; Filatkina, V.P.; Tsvetkova, V.T.

    1981-01-01

    A technique of fluorine and chlorine determination in the mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel and plutonium dioxide, based on their simultaneous separation by means of pyrohydrolysis, is developed. Subsequently, fluorine is determined by photometry with alizarincomplexonate of lanthanum or according to the weakening of zirconium colouring with zylenol orange. Chlorine is determined using the photonephelometric method according to the reaction of chloride-ion interaction with silver nitrate or by spectrophotometric method according to the reaction with mercury rhodanide. The lower limit of fluorine determination is -6x10 -5 %, of chlorine- 1x10 -4 % in the sample of 1g. The relative mean quadratic deviation of the determination result (Ssub(r)), depends on the character of the material analyzed and at the content of nx10 -4 - nx10 -3 mass % is equal to from 0.05 to 0.32 for fluorine and from 0.11 to 0.35 for chlorine [ru

  8. Theoretical study using electronic structure calculations of uranium and cerium dioxides containing defects and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO_2) is the most widely used nuclear fuel in existing nuclear reactors around the world. While in service for energy supply, UO_2 is submitted to the neutron flux and undergoes nuclear fission chain reactions, which create large number of fission products and point defects. The study of the behavior of the fission products and point defects is important to understand the fuel properties under irradiation. We conduct electronic structure calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) to model this radiation damage at the atomic scale. The DFT+U method is used to describe the strong correlation of the 4f electrons of cerium and 5f electrons of uranium in the materials studied (UO_2, CeO_2 and (U, Ce)O_2). (U, Ce)O_2 is studied because it is considered as a low radioactive model material of mixed actinide oxides such as the MOX fuel (U, Pu)O_2 used in light water reactors and fast neutron reactors. Cerium dioxide (CeO_2) is studied to provide reference data of (U, Ce)O_2. We perform a DFT+U study of point defects and gaseous fission products (Xe and Kr) in CeO_2 and compare our results to the existing ones of UO_2. We study the bulk properties as well as the behavior of defects for (U, Ce)O_2, and compare our results to the ones of (U, Pu)O_2. Furthermore, for the study of defects in UO_2, methodological improvements are explored considering the spin-orbit coupling effect and the finite-size effect of the simulation supercell. (author) [fr

  9. Hot deformation of polycrystalline uranium dioxide: from microscopic mechanisms to macroscopic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dherbey, Francine

    2000-01-01

    The improvement of nuclear fuels performances in PWR requires in particular an enhancement of creep ability of uranium dioxide in order to minimise rupture risks of the cladding material during interactions between pellets and cladding. The aim of this study is to investigate the link between the ceramic macroscopic thermo-mechanical behaviour and the changes in the fuel microstructure during deformation. Stoichiometric UO 2 pellets with various grains sizes from 9 pm to 36 μm have been deformed by compression at intermediate temperatures, i.e. near T M /2, and quenched under stress. The damage is characterised by the presence of cavities at low stresses and cracks at high stresses, both along grain boundaries parallel to the compression axis. Inside grains, dislocations organise themselves into cellular substructures in which sub-boundaries are made of dislocation hexagonal networks. In these conditions, uranium dioxide deformation is described by grain boundary sliding, which is the main origin of material damage, partially accommodated by dislocational creep inside grains. A steady-state creep model is proposed on a physical basis. It accounts for the almost similar contributions of two mechanisms which are grain boundaries sliding and intragranular creep, and takes into account the grain boundary roughness. In contrast with phenomenological descriptions used up to now, this picture leads to a unique creep law on the whole range of stresses explored here, from 10 MPa to 80 MPa. The creep rate controlling mechanism seems to be the migration of sub-boundaries. The deformation at constant strain rate is controlled by the same mechanisms as creep. (author) [fr

  10. Contribution to the study of the creep of uranium dioxide. Role of grain growth promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivant-Duguay, Christelle

    1998-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances involves enhancing the plasticity of uranium dioxide UO 2 , in order to reduce the stress applied by the pellet to the cladding during a power ramp. The objective of this work is to identify and to formulate the effects produced by the nature and the concentration of additives of corundum structure, Cr 2 O 3 or Al 2 O 3 , which are grain growth promoters for UO 2 . The review of literature data establishes that oxygen content, grain size or porosity markedly affect the mechanical properties of uranium dioxide. On the other hand, there is relatively little reported work on the influence of doping. Prepared samples have been deformed by uniaxial compression. In the case of standard undoped UO 2 , two distinct preponderant creep mechanisms occur depending on stress level: a grain boundary diffusional creep, as per Coble, for stresses below the transition stress and a dislocation creep above. The doped materials have a large grained microstructure, which allows a dislocation creep only. In the range of temperature and stress investigated here, doping significantly improves the plasticity of standard UO 2 . This common effect of dopants is characterized by a decrease in the flow stress for tests with constant strain rate and by enhanced steady-state creep rates. Cr 2 O 3 doping is the more effective. The apparent benefit of doping results from the gain due to the increased grain size, but it is compensated by the strengthening effect of the additive. The creep law used to describe the behavior of standard UO 2 , has been modified to account for the influence of the dopant, by including either the concentration or the grain size. (author) [fr

  11. Assessment of uranium dioxide fuel performance with the addition of beryllium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Abe, Alfredo; Gomes, Daniel S.; Silva, Antonio T., E-mail: romuniz@usp.br, E-mail: ayabe@ipen.br, E-mail: danieldesouza@gmail.com, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (LabRisco/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Análise, Avaliação e Gerenciamento de Risco; Aguiar, Amanda A., E-mail: amanda.abati.aguiar@gmail.com [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CTMSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident in 2011 pointed the problem related to the hydrogen generation under accident scenarios due to the oxidation of zirconium-based alloys widely used as fuel rod cladding in water-cooled reactors. This problem promoted research programs aiming the development of accident tolerant fuels (ATF) which are fuels that under accident conditions could keep longer its integrity enabling the mitigation of the accident effects. In the framework of the ATF program, different materials have been studied to be applied as cladding to replace zirconium-based alloy; also efforts have been made to improve the uranium dioxide thermal conductivity doping the fuel pellet. This paper evaluates the addition of beryllium oxide (BeO) to the uranium dioxide in order to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fuel pellet. Investigations performed in this area considering the addition of 10% in volume of BeO, resulting in the UO{sub 2}-BeO fuel, have shown good results with the improvement of the fuel thermal conductivity and the consequent reduction of the fuel temperatures under irradiation. In this paper, two models obtained from open literature for the thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2}- BeO fuel were implemented in the FRAPCON 3.5 code and the results obtained using the modified code versions were compared. The simulations were carried out using a case available in the code documentation related to a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rod irradiated under steady state condition. The results show that the fuel centerline temperatures decrease with the addition of BeO, when compared to the conventional UO{sub 2} pellet, independent of the model applied. (author)

  12. Study of the oxidation state of arsenic and uranium in individual particles from uranium mine tailings, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsecz, A.; Osan, J.; Palfalvi, J.; Torok, Sz.; Sajo, I.; Mathe, Z.; Simon, R.; Falkenberg, G.

    2007-01-01

    Uranium ore mining and milling have been terminated in the Mecsek Mountains (southwest Hungary) in 1997. Mine tailings ponds are located between two important water bases, which are resources of the drinking water of the city of Pecs and the neighbouring villages. The average U concentration of the tailings material is 71.73 μg/g, but it is inhomogeneous. Some microscopic particles contain orders of magnitude more U than the rest of the tailings material. Other potentially toxic elements are As and Pb of which chemical state is important to estimate mobility, because in mobile form they can risk the water basis and the public health. Individual U-rich particles were selected with solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) and after localisation the particles were investigated by synchrotron radiation based microanalytical techniques. The distribution of elements over the particles was studied by micro beam X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and the oxidation state of uranium and arsenic was determined by micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy. Some of the measured U-rich particles were chosen for studying the heterogeneity with μ-XRF tomography. Arsenic was present mainly in As(V) and uranium in U(VI) form in the original uranium ore particles, but in the mine tailings samples uranium was present mainly in the less mobile U(IV) form. Correlation was found between the oxidation state of As and U in the same analyzed particles. These results suggest that dissolution of uranium is not expected in short term period. (authors)

  13. Monte Carlo criticality analysis of simple geometries containing tungsten-rhenium alloys engrained with uranium dioxide and uranium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jonathan A.; Charit, Indrajit

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The addition of rhenium to the tungsten matrix within W-UO 2 and W-UN CERMET materials can help reduce the risk of submersion criticality accidents while increasing the strength and ductility of tungsten based nuclear fuel elements. → The addition of rhenium up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UO 2 mixtures can increase the critical mass by 65 kg. → The addition of rhenium up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UN mixtures can increase the critical mass by 22 kg. → The addition of rhenium by up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UO 2 mixtures can reduce the change in reactivity change due to water submersion by $5.07. → The addition of rhenium by up to 30 at.% to simple geometries containing W-UN mixtures can reduce the change in reactivity due to water submersion by $3.24. - Abstract: The critical mass and dimensions of simple geometries containing highly enriched uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and uranium mononitride (UN) encapsulated in tungsten-rhenium alloys are determined using MCNP5 criticality calculations. Spheres as well as cylinders with length to radius ratios of 1.82 are computationally built to consist of 60 vol.% fuel and 40 vol.% metal matrix. Within the geometries, the uranium is enriched to 93 wt.% uranium-235 and the rhenium content within the metal alloy was modeled over the range of 0-30 at.%. The spheres containing UO 2 were determined to have a critical radius of 18.29-19.11 cm and a critical mass ranging from 366 kg to 424 kg. The cylinders containing UO 2 were found to have a critical radius ranging from 17.07 cm to 17.84 cm with a corresponding critical mass of 406-471 kg. Spheres engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 14.82 cm to 15.19 cm and a critical mass between 222 kg and 242 kg. Cylinders which were engrained with UN were determined to have a critical radius ranging from 13.81 cm to 14.15 cm and a corresponding critical mass of 245-267 kg. The critical

  14. Exposure assessment of workplace manufacturing titanium dioxide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Huadong; Zhao, Lin; Chen, Zhangjian [Peking University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (China); Zhou, Jingwen [Jinan Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Tang, Shichuan [Beijing Municipal Institute of Labor Protection, Beijing Key Laboratory of Occupational Safety and Health (China); Kong, Fanling [Shandong Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Li, Xinwei; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Ji, E-mail: zhangji1967@163.com [Jinan Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jia, Guang, E-mail: jiaguangjia@bjmu.edu.cn [Peking University, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health (China)

    2016-10-15

    With the widespread use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) human exposure is inevitable, but the exposure data on TiO{sub 2} are still limited. This study adopted off-line filter-based sampling combined with real-time activity-based monitoring to measure the concentrations in a workplace manufacturing TiO{sub 2} (primary diameter: 194 ± 108 nm). Mass concentrations (MCs) of aerosol particles in the packaging workshop (total dust: 3.17 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 1.22 mg/m{sup 3}) were much higher than those in the milling workshop (total dust: 0.79 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 0.31 mg/m{sup 3}) and executive office (total dust: 0.44 mg/m{sup 3}, nano dust: 0.19 mg/m{sup 3}). However, the MCs of TiO{sub 2} were at a relatively low level in the packaging workshop (total TiO{sub 2}: 46.4 μg/m{sup 3}, nano TiO{sub 2}: 16.7 μg/m{sup 3}) and milling workshop (total TiO{sub 2}: 39.4 μg/m{sup 3}, nano TiO{sub 2}: 19.4 μg/m{sup 3}) by ICP-MS. The number concentration (NC), surface area concentration (SAC) of aerosol particles potentially deposited in alveolar (SAC{sub A}), and tracheobronchial (SAC{sub TB}) regions of lungs in the packaging workshop were (1.04 ± 0.89) × 10{sup 5} particles/cm{sup 3}, 414.49 ± 395.07, and 86.01 ± 83.18 μm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}, respectively, which were all significantly higher than those of the milling workshop [(0.12 ± 0.40) × 10{sup 5} particles/cm{sup 3}, 75.38 ± 45.23, and 17.60 ± 9.22 μm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3}, respectively] as well as executive office and outdoor background (p < 0.05). Activity-related characteristics were found in both workshops, and the time-variant characteristics showed very similar trends for 3 days in the packaging workshop. Our study provides important data of TiO{sub 2} particles exposure in the workplace.

  15. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Ronesch, K.; Zoigner, A.

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-20, were distributed to 32 laboratories in January 1980 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 11 laboratories reported their results (ANNEX 1). 5 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), 2 laboratories used controlled potential coulometry, 2 laboratories used precipitation procedures, 1 laboratory used fluorimetry and 1 laboratory used activation analysis. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 1.7% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -9.1% and +0.92% uranium, but 9 laboratories agree within +-1%U with the reference value. The mean bias of these 9 laboratories is equal to +0.04%U. The standard deviation of the biases of these 9 laboratories is equal to 0.36%.U

  16. Heat processing of gels into sintered uranium dioxide modelled by thermal analysis. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Urbanek, V.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoanalytical methods were used for investigating the processes of air drying and calcination of gels prepared by internal gelation of uranyl nitrate, urea and urotropine solutions at 90 degC. The gels were dried in air at room temperature, at 220 degC in a controlled atmosphere or by azeotropic distillation with CCl 4 . The course of thermal decomposition of the gel depends not only on the drying method used but also on the medium in which the drying process takes place. If the drying is carried out so as to produce a macroporous structure after the elimination of most of the water, ammonia and possibly other gelation by-products and non-reacted gelating agents, the resulting gels can be further processed by calcination, reduction and sintering, thus obtaining compact undamaged spheres of sintered uranium dioxide. Dilatometric analysis generated of uranium trioxide gels showed that the transformation of UO 3 to U 3 O 8 generated another intermediate thermal decomposition product showing a change in dimensions at temperatures of about 520 degC and a change in colour. This phenomenon is analogous to the decomposition of UO 3 prepared by thermal decomposition of α-UO 3 .2H 2 O involving a change in weight producing the UOsub(3-x) compound or a phase transformation with a change in colour; the structural conversion cannot be identified by X-ray structural analysis. (author)

  17. Results of the analysis of the intercomparison samples of the depleted uranium dioxide SR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, H.; Deron, S.; Kuhn, E.; Zoigner, A.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of a homogeneous powder of depleted uranium dioxide, SR-10, were distributed to 27 laboratories in February 1979 for intercomparison of the precisions and accuracies of wet chemical assay. 7 laboratories reported their results. 6 laboratories applied titration procedures, 4 of them applied methods derived from the Davies and Gray procedure (1), and one laboratory used controlled potential coulometry. An analysis of variance yields for each laboratory the estimates of the measurement errors, the dissolution or treatment errors and the random calibration errors. The measurement errors vary between 0.01% and 0.10% relative. The differences to the reference value vary between -0.48% and +0.87% uranium, but 5 laboratories agree within +-0.25% U with the reference value. The biases of 5 laboratories are greater than expected from their random errors. The mean bias of the 7 laboratories is equal to +0.03% U. The standard deviation of the laboratory biases is equal to 0.43% U. (author)

  18. Investigation of high burnup structures in uranium dioxide applying cellular automata: algorithms and codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akishina, E.P.; Kostenko, B.F.; Ivanov, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    A new method of research in spatial structures that result from uranium dioxide burning in nuclear reactors of modern atomic plants is suggested. The method is based on the presentation of images of the mentioned structures in the form of the working field of a cellular automaton (CA). First, it has allowed one to extract some important quantitative characteristics of the structures directly from the micrographs of the uranium fuel surface. Secondly, the CA has been found out to allow one to formulate easily the dynamics of the evolution of the studied structures in terms of such micrograph elements as spots, spots' boundaries, cracks, etc. Relation has been found between the dynamics and some exactly solvable models of the theory of cellular automata, in particular, the Ising model and the vote model. This investigation gives a detailed description of some CA algorithms which allow one to perform the fuel surface image processing and to model its evolution caused by burnup or chemical etching. (author)

  19. Study of Physical modifications induced by chromium doping of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improvement of nuclear fuel performances requires reducing fission gas release. Doping uranium dioxide with chromium is the improvement axis considered in this work. Indeed, chromium fastens crystal growth in UO 2 , and thus enables a significant increase of the grain size. This work aims at the identification of defects produced by chromium addition in UO 2 , and their impact on properties of interest of the material. First, defects existing in doped fuel directly after sintering have been studied. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy allowed the identification of the environment of solubilised chromium in UO 2 . Chromium atoms are roughly substituting for uranium atoms, but generate a complete reorganisation of neighbouring oxygen atoms, and distortion of uranium sublattice. Characterisation of transport properties (electrical conductivity and oxygen self-diffusion) have shown that because of charge balance, chromium plays a leading role on such properties. A model of point defects in UO 2 has been proposed, showing how complex the involved phenomena are. Observations by Transmission Electron Microscopy of ion-irradiated thin foils have shown that chromium makes the coalescence of irradiation defects easier. This behaviour can be explained by a stabilisation of defect clusters due to precipitation of chromium. Finally, study of thermal diffusion of helium in doped UO 2 , performed by Nuclear Reaction Analysis, has confirmed this interaction between chromium atoms and irradiation defects. Indeed, μ-NRA measures have shown no fast gas diffusion close to grain boundaries, in contrast with standard UO 2 behaviour, which is associated with defects recovery in grain boundaries. (author) [fr

  20. Viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide at high temperature; Comportement viscoplastique du dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, F

    2001-02-01

    This work is a part of a project led by EDF the purpose of which is the development of more predictive models to describe the thermomechanical behavior of fuel assembly. First, we recall the baselines of the Power Water Reactors then we deal with the viscoplastic behavior of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This knowledge enables an accurate description of the stress relaxation during Pellet Cladding Interactions. The pellets we have used in the last part are similar to the industrial ones. They exhibit a yield point during strain hardening tests and a sigma creep curve. In order to describe these characteristics, we have adapted different kind of approaches: thermodynamical - the Distribution of Non Linear Relaxations, approaches based on dislocation glide inspired by Alexander and Haasen and introduced in the Pilvin polycrystalline model. We recall the purpose of internal variables in the thermodynamics of system far from equilibrium then in case of a viscoplastic flow controlled by dislocation glide, we establish a link between densities of dislocations and internal variables in the D.N.L.R. approach. As vacancy diffusion in the grain boundary has a contribution to the viscoplastic strain, a similar is presented in appendix. These models are able to reproduce the behavior of UO{sub 2} pellets in strain hardening, stress relaxation and creep tests. Much possible progress has been revealed by the analysis of the tests. Further more, we propose a model for yield point and sigma creep curve. We also have extended these results to the behavior of irradiated pellets and stressed the influence of damage. (author)

  1. Effect of chloride concentration on the solubility of amorphous uranium dioxide at 25deg C under reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, M.; Casas, I.; Pablo, J. de; Torrero, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the solubility of a microcrystalline uranium dioxide on the chloride concentration has been studied at 25deg C under reducing conditions. The concentration of uranium in solution has been found to be some orders of magnitude lower than in perchlorate media. Possible changes of both the morphology and the composition of the solid phase have been investigated by means of Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX) and X-ray Powder Difraction (XPD). The formation of a secondary solid phase as a reason for the decrease of the solubility has been postulated. (orig.)

  2. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  3. In-SEM Raman microspectroscopy coupled with EDX - a case study of uranium reference particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefaniak, Elzbieta A.; Pointurier, Fabien; Marie, Olivier; Truyens, Jan; Aregbe, Yetunde

    2014-01-01

    Information about the molecular composition of airborne uranium-bearing particles may be useful as an additional tool for nuclear safeguards. In order to combine the detection of micrometer-sized particles with the analysis of their molecular forms, we used a hybrid system enabling Raman microanalysis in high vacuum inside a SEM chamber (SEM-SCA system). The first step involved an automatic scan of a sample to detect and save coordinates of uranium particles, along with X-ray microanalysis. In the second phase, the detected particles were relocated in a white light image and subjected to Raman microanalysis. The consecutive measurements by the two beams showed exceptional fragility of uranium particles, leading to their ultimate damage and change of uranium oxidation state. We used uranium reference particles prepared by hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride to test the reliability of the Raman measurements inside the high vacuum. The results achieved by the hybrid system were verified by using a standalone Raman micro spectrometer. When deposited on exceptionally smooth substrates, uranyl fluoride particles smaller than 1000 nm could successfully be analyzed with the SEM-SCA system. (authors)

  4. Standard specification for blended uranium oxides with 235U content of less than 5 % for direct hydrogen reduction to nuclear grade uranium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

  5. Assessment of current atomic scale modelling methods for the investigation of nuclear fuels under irradiation: Example of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolus, M.; Freyss, M.; Krack, M.; Devanathan, R.

    2015-01-01

    We focus here on the assessment of the description of interatomic interactions in uranium dioxide using, on the one hand, electronic structure methods, in particular in the Density Functional Theory (DFT) framework, and on the other hand, empirical potential methods. These two types of methods are complementary, the former enabling results to be obtained from a minimal amount of input data and further insight into the electronic and magnetic properties to be achieved, while the latter are irreplaceable for studies where a large number of atoms need to be considered. We consider basic properties as well as specific ones, which are important for the description of nuclear fuel under irradiation. These are especially energies, which are the main data passed on to higher scale models. For this exercise, we limit ourselves to uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) because of the extensive amount of studies available on this system. (authors)

  6. Investigation of the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric media: a new approach aiming at understanding interface mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delwaulle, Celine

    2011-01-01

    This research thesis deals with the back-end cycle of the nuclear fuel by improving, modernizing and optimizing the processes used for all types of fuels which are to be re-processed. After a presentation of the industrial context and of the state of the art concerning dissolution kinetic data for uranium dioxide and mixed oxide, the author proposes a model which couples dissolution kinetics and hydrodynamics of a solid in presence of auto-catalytic species, in order to better understand phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid-gas interface. The next part reports dissolution experiments on a non-radioactive material (copper) and out of a nuclear environment. Then, the author identifies steps which are required to transpose this experiment within a nuclear environment. The first results obtained on uranium dioxide are discussed. Recommendations for further studies conclude the report

  7. Size distribution of radon daughter particles in uranium mine atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, A.C.; Hinchliffe, L.; Sladowski, R.

    1977-07-01

    An investigation of the particle size distribution and other properties of radon daughters in uranium mines was reported earlier but only summaries of the data were presented. This report consists mainly of tables of detailed measurements that were omitted in the original article. The tabulated data include the size distributions, uncombined fractions and ratios of radon daughters as well as the working levels, radon concentrations, condensation nuclei concentrations, temperature, and relative humidity. The measurements were made in 27 locations in four large underground mines in New Mexico during typical mining operations. The size distributions of the radon daughters were log normal. The activity median diameters ranged from 0.09 μm to 0.3 μm with a mean of 0.17 μm. Geometric standard deviations were from 1.3 to 4 with a mean of 2.7. Uncombined fractions expressed in accordance with the ICRP definition ranged from 0.004 to 0.16 with a mean of 0.04

  8. Determination of thorium and uranium particles in monazite airborne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, K.M. de A.D. da

    1988-01-01

    The work is the determination of the Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter of Airborne particles of Th and U, produced during the milling of monazite in Monozite Sand Plants. The air samples was collected using a Cascade Impactor from Delron DCI-6 with a flux of 12,5 1/min and cut-off diametes of 0,5, 1,0, 4,0, 8,0 and 16,0 μm. Each stage of the cascate impactor was analysed by measuring the X rays induced in collision with 2 MeV protons acellereted by a 4 MV Van de Graaff acceletor located at University Catolic, PUC, RJ. The MMAD found for Th and U was of 1,15 μm with a geometric standard desviation of 2,0. Take in acount that there are more thorium than uranium in the brazilian monazite, and the 232 Th 238 U are thr principal isotopes at the Th and U natural radioative decay series, we considered the mass and the activity distribution as equal. The mean concentration of Th (17,0 Bq/m 3 ) record in the air was 42% above 3/10 of international limit for concentration of oxides of thorium in the air, while the concentration of U remaind below 1/10 of the limit for concentration of U 3 O 8 in the air. (author) [pt

  9. First-principles study on oxidation effects in uranium oxides and high-pressure high-temperature behavior of point defects in uranium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Hua Y.; Song, Hong X.; Jin, K.; Xiang, S. K.; Wu, Q.

    2011-11-01

    Formation Gibbs free energy of point defects and oxygen clusters in uranium dioxide at high-pressure high-temperature conditions are calculated from first principles, using the LSDA+U approach for the electronic structure and the Debye model for the lattice vibrations. The phonon contribution on Frenkel pairs is found to be notable, whereas it is negligible for the Schottky defect. Hydrostatic compression changes the formation energies drastically, making defect concentrations depend more sensitively on pressure. Calculations show that, if no oxygen clusters are considered, uranium vacancy becomes predominant in overstoichiometric UO2 with the aid of the contribution from lattice vibrations, while compression favors oxygen defects and suppresses uranium vacancy greatly. At ambient pressure, however, the experimental observation of predominant oxygen defects in this regime can be reproduced only in a form of cuboctahedral clusters, underlining the importance of defect clustering in UO2+x. Making use of the point defect model, an equation of state for nonstoichiometric oxides is established, which is then applied to describe the shock Hugoniot of UO2+x. Furthermore, the oxidization and compression behavior of uranium monoxide, triuranium octoxide, uranium trioxide, and a series of defective UO2 at 0 K are investigated. The evolution of mechanical properties and electronic structures with an increase of the oxidation degree are analyzed, revealing the transition of the ground state of uranium oxides from metallic to Mott insulator and then to charge-transfer insulator due to the interplay of strongly correlated effects of 5f orbitals and the shift of electrons from uranium to oxygen atoms.

  10. Fabrication of uranium dioxide of different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate; Dobijanje urandioksida razlicitih granulacija iz uranilnitrata preko amonijumdiuranata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojnovic, J; Stamenkovic, I [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za termotehniku reaktora, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Uranium dioxide is most frequently produced by reduction of higher oxides (UO{sub 3}, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) or reduction of uranium salts (uranium diuranate, uranium peroxide, uranyl oxalate). Reduction is most frequently done in hydrogen or carbon monoxide atmosphere under temperatures from 500 - 1700 deg C. One of the most frequently methods for producing uranium oxide is certainly reduction of ammonia diuranate by hydrogen (ADU method). Properties of uranium dioxide obtained by ADU method depend on properties of the initial substance. Investigations shown in this report are concerned with determining the properties of UO{sub 2} powders for determining the connection between their properties and conditions of fabrication and reduction of ADU and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}.

  11. Xenon Defects in Uranium Dioxide From First Principles and Interatomic Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alexander

    In this thesis, we examine the defect energetics and migration energies of xenon atoms in uranium dioxide (UO2) from first principles and interatomic potentials. We also parameterize new, accurate interatomic potentials for xenon and uranium dioxide. To achieve accurate energetics and provide a foundation for subsequent calculations, we address difficulties in finding consistent energetics within Hubbard U corrected density functional theory (DFT+U). We propose a method of slowly ramping the U parameter in order to guide the calculation into low energy orbital occupations. We find that this method is successful for a variety of materials. We then examine the defect energetics of several noble gas atoms in UO2 for several different defect sites. We show that the energy to incorporate large noble gas atoms into interstitial sites is so large that it is energetically favorable for a Schottky defect cluster to be created to relieve the strain. We find that, thermodynamically, xenon will rarely ever be in the interstitial site of UO2. To study larger defects associated with the migration of xenon in UO 2, we turn to interatomic potentials. We benchmark several previously published potentials against DFT+U defect energetics and migration barriers. Using a combination of molecular dynamics and nudged elastic band calculations, we find a new, low energy migration pathway for xenon in UO2. We create a new potential for xenon that yields accurate defect energetics. We fit this new potential with a method we call Iterative Potential Refinement that parameterizes potentials to first principles data via a genetic algorithm. The potential finds accurate energetics for defects with relatively low amounts of strain (xenon in defect clusters). It is important to find accurate energetics for these sorts of low-strain defects because they essentially represent small xenon bubbles. Finally, we parameterize a new UO2 potential that simultaneously yields accurate vibrational properties

  12. Method and device to produce pourable, directly pressable uranium dioxide powder. Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Herstellung von rieselfaehigem, direkt verpressbarem Urandioxid-Pulver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, P.; Isensee, H.J.; Vietzke, H.

    1978-08-17

    The uranium dioxide powder is produced from uranium peroxide which is obtained by continuous precipitation of uranyl nitrate solutions. By varying the precipitation conditions, one can exactly adjust the desired properties of the UO/sub 2/ powder, there is no 'post sintering'. The individual process steps are shown in detail.

  13. Pharmaceutical/food grade titanium dioxide particles are absorbed into the bloodstream of human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pele, Laetitia C; Thoree, Vinay; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Koller, Dagmar; Thompson, Richard P H; Lomer, Miranda C; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-09-02

    Exposure to persistent engineered nano and micro particles via the oral route is well established. Animal studies have demonstrated that, once ingested, a small proportion of such particles translocate from the gastrointestinal tract to other tissues. Exposure to titanium dioxide is widespread via the oral route, but only one study has provided indirect evidence (total titanium analyses) of absorption into the blood stream in humans. We sought to replicate these observations and to provide additional evidence for particulate uptake. Human volunteers with normal intestinal permeability were orally administered 100 mg pharmaceutical/food grade titanium dioxide. Blood samples were collected from 0.5 to 10 h post ingestion and analysed for the presence of reflectant bodies (particles) by dark field microscopy, and for total titanium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Blood film analyses implied early absorption of particles (2 h) with a peak maximum at 6 h following ingestion. The presence of these reflectant particles in blood roughly mirrored the levels of total titanium by ICP-MS, providing good evidence for the latter being a measure of whole particle (titanium dioxide) absorption. This study shows that a fraction of pharmaceutical/food grade titanium dioxide is absorbed systemically by humans following ingestion. It confirms that at least two routes of particle uptake may exist in the human gut- one proximal and one distal. Further work should quantify human exposure and uptake of such persistent particles.

  14. Detection of carbon dioxide in the gases evolved during the hot extraction determination of hydrogen in uranium ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jursik, M.L.; Pope, J.D.

    1977-08-01

    The hot extraction method was used at the National Lead Company of Ohio to determine hydrogen in uranium metal at the 2 ppM level. The volume of gas evolved from the heated sample was assumed to be hydrogen. When a liquid nitrogen trap was placed into the system the hydrogen values were reduced 5 to 10%. The gas retained by the nitrogen trap was identified by mass spectrometry as predominantly carbon dioxide. Low hydrogen values were observed only when the nitrogen trap was used in the analysis of high-carbon (300 to 600 ppM) uranium from NLO production ingots. However, hydrogen values for low-carbon (30 to 50 ppM) uranium were unaffected by the nitrogen trap. The formation of carbon dioxide appears to be associated with the carbon content of the uranium metal. Comparisons of hydrogen values obtained with the hot extraction method and with an inert fusion--thermal conductivity method are also presented. 3 tables, 4 figures

  15. Quantitative analysis of occluded gases in uranium dioxide pellets by the mass spectrometry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega Bustillos, J.O.W.; Rodrigues, C.; Iyer, S.S.

    1981-05-01

    A quantitative analysis of different components of occluded gases except water in uranium dioxide pellets is attempted here. A high temperature vacuum extration system is employed for the liberation and the determination of total volume of the occluded gases. A mass spectrometric technique is employed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these gases. The UO 2 pellets are placed in a graphite crucible and are subjected to varing temperatures (1000 0 C - 1700 0 C). The liberated gases are dehydrated and transferred to a measuring unit consisting essentially of a Toepler pump and a McLeod gauge. In this system the total volume of the gases liberated at N. T. P. is determined with a sensitivity of 0.002 cm 3 /g of UO 2 . An aliquot of the liberated gas is introduced into a quadrupole mass spectrometer (VGA-100 Varian Corp.) for the determination of the different components of the gas. On the basis of the analysis suggestions are made for the possible sources of these gas components. (Author) [pt

  16. Critical experiments simulating accidental water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Glushkov, L.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper focuses on experimental analysis of nuclear criticality safety at accidental water immersion of fuel elements of the Russian TOPAZ-2 space nuclear power system reactor. The structure of water-moderated heterogeneous critical assemblies at the NARCISS facility is described in detail, including sizes, compositions, densities of materials of the main assembly components for various core configurations. Critical parameters of the assemblies measured for varying number of fuel elements, height of fuel material in fuel elements and their arrangement in the water moderator with a uniform or variable spacing are presented. It has been found from the experiments that at accidental water immersion of fuel elements involved, the minimum critical mass equal to approximately 20 kg of uranium dioxide is achieved at 31-37 fuel elements. The paper gives an example of a physical model of the water-moderated heterogeneous critical assembly with a detailed characterization of its main components that can be used for calculations using different neutronic codes, including Monte Carlo ones. (author)

  17. Uranium dioxide thermal characterization by the flash laser method from 23 Celsius to 175 Celsius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faeda, K.C.M.; Lameiras, F.S.; Carneiro, L.S.S.; Camarano, D.M.; Ferreira, R.A.N.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Flash Method has become one of the most common techniques for measuring thermal diffusivity and conductivity in solids and liquids. This method is recognized by INMETRO as standard to be used in Brazil for measuring thermophysical properties of materials, such as metals, carbon composites, ceramics, and also nuclear materials. This article describes the experimental bench of the LMPT-Laboratorio de Medicao de Propriedades Termofisicas de Combustiveis Nucleares e Materiais of the CDTN-Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, (LMPT), as well as the mathematical model developed based on this method. The obtained results for the thermal diffusivity and for the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide (U0 2 ) pellets in the temperature range from 25 deg to 175 deg C, are discussed and compared with the literature data. The estimative of the input quantities uncertainty of the mathematical model was determined according to ISO - BIPM-Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and the Monte Carlo Method was used to estimate of the output quantities uncertainty (thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity). Additionally the results of the x-rays of these pellets are presented. (author)

  18. Cask size and weight reduction through the use of depleted uranium dioxide-concrete material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobach, S.Yu.; Haire, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Newly developed depleted uranium (DU) composite materials enable fabrication of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) transport and storage casks that are smaller and lighter in weight than casks made with conventional materials. One such material is DU dioxide (DUO2)-concrete, so-called DUCRETE TM . This paper examines the radiation shielding efficiency of DUCRETE as compared with that of a conventional concrete cask that holds 32 pressurized-water-reactor SNF assemblies. In this analysis, conventional concrete shielding material is replaced with DUCRETE. The thickness of the DUCRETE shielding is adjusted to give the same radiation surface dose, 200 mrem/h (2 mSv/hr), as the conventional concrete cask. It was found that the concrete shielding thickness decreased from 71 to 20 cm and that the cask radial cross-section shielding area was reduced approx 50 %. The weight was reduced approx 21 %, from 154 to approx 127 tons. Should one choose to add an extra outer ring of SNF assemblies, the number of such assemblies would increase from 32 to 52. In this case, the outside cask diameter would still decrease, from 169 to 137 cm. However, the weight would increase somewhat from 156 to 177 tons. Neutron cask surface dose is only approx 10 % of the gamma dose. These reduced sizes and weights will significantly influence the design of next-generation SNF casks

  19. Properties of raw materials and intermediate products in the production of uranium dioxide sintered tablets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landspersky, H.; Vanecek, I.; Podest, M.

    1977-01-01

    The properties are described of ammonium polyuranate and of powder uranium dioxide. Ammonium polyuranate, an intermediate product, is prepared by filtering the precipitate from uranyl nitrate solution precipitation, this either by an ammonia aqueous solution from a uranyl nitrate aqueous solution or by direct U 6+ precipitation from a TBP kerosene solution by aqueous concentrated ammonia. With relation to further processing, the major properties of the intermediate product include grain size, shape and appearance of crystallites, structure and thermal decomposition. These properties affect the properties of UO 2 , the following intermediate product obtained by reduction of ammonium polyuranate. Powder UO 2 is the final intermediate product; high-compacted UO 2 pellets are manufactured from it by compacting and sintering. The final product properties are affected by the following parameters: specific surface, grain size and shape, U/O ratio and compactibility. The effect of and the techniques of determining these parameters are shown. The necessity is emphasised of studying the properties of powder ammonium polyuranate because changes in its production technology affect the properties of further products. (J.P.)

  20. Study of rare gases behavior in uranium dioxide: diffusion and bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, A.

    2011-01-01

    During in-reactor irradiation of the nuclear fuel, fission gases, mainly xenon and krypton, are generated that are subject to several phenomena: diffusion and precipitation. These phenomena can have adverse consequences on the fuel physical and chemical properties and its in-reactor behavior. The purpose of this work is to better understand the behavior of fission gases by identifying diffusion, bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms. To do this, studies involving separate effects have been established coupling ion irradiations/implantations with fine characterizations on Large Scale Facilities. The influence of several parameters such as gas type, concentration and temperature has been identified separately. Interpretation of the Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS) measurements has enabled us to determine xenon and krypton diffusion coefficients in uranium dioxide. A heterogeneous nucleation mechanism on defects was determined by means of experiments on the JANNuS platform in Orsay that consists of a coupling of an implantor, an accelerator and a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). Finally, TEM and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy characterizations of implanted and annealed samples put in relieve a bubble growth mechanism by atoms and vacancies capture. (author) [fr

  1. Measurement of uranium dioxide thermophysical properties by the laser flash method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Andrade, Roberto Marcio de

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), including a reliable uncertainty assessment, are required by the nuclear reactor design. These important information are used by thermohydraulic codes to define operational aspects and to assure the safety, when analyzing various potential situations of accident. The laser flash method had become the most popular method to measure the thermophysical properties of materials. Despite its several advantages, some experimental obstacles have been found due to the difficulty to obtain experimentally the ideals initial and boundary conditions required by the original method. An experimental apparatus and a methodology for estimating uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat measurements based on the laser flash method are presented. A stochastic thermal diffusion modeling has been developed and validated by standard samples. Inverse heat conduction problems (IHCPs) solved by finite volumes technique were applied to the measurement process with real initial and boundary conditions, and Monte Carlo Method was used for propagating the uncertainties. The main sources of uncertainty were due to: pulse time, laser power, thermal exchanges, absorptivity, emissivity, sample thickness, specific mass and dynamic influence of temperature measurement system. As results, mean values and uncertainties of thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of UO 2 are presented. (author)

  2. Swelling and gas release of grain-boundary pores in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrire, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    The swelling and gas release of overpressured grain boundary pores is sintered unirradiated uranium dioxide were investigated under isothermal conditions. The pores became overpressured when the ambient pressure was reduced, and the excess pressure driving force caused growth and interconnection of the pores, leading to eventual gas release. Swelling was measured continuously by a linear variable differential transformer, and open and closed porosity fractions were determined after the tests by immersion density and quantitative microscopy measurements. The sinter porosity consisted of pores situated on grain faces, grain edges, and grain corners. Isolated pores maintained their equilibrium shape while growing, without any measurable change in dihedral angle. Interconnection occurred predominantly along grain edges, without any evidence of pore sharpening or crack propagation at low driving forces. Extensive open porosity occurred at a threshold density of about 85% TD. There was an almost linear dependence of the initial swelling rate on the driving force, with an activation energy of 200+- 8 kJ/mole, in good agreement with published values of the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion

  3. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Y., E-mail: sasajima@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Shirakata 162-4, Tokai 319-1106 (Japan); Osada, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen-cho 1-1, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R{sub a} was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS{sub e}, i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S{sub e}: electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R{sub a} and gS{sub e} follows the relation R{sub a}{sup 2}=aln(gS{sub e})+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms.

  4. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R a was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS e , i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S e : electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R a and gS e follows the relation R a 2 =aln(gS e )+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms

  5. Results of Uranium Dioxide-Tungsten Irradiation Test and Post-Test Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.; Debogdan, C. E.; Diianni, D. C.

    1973-01-01

    A uranium dioxide (UO2) fueled capsule was fabricated and irradiated in the NASA Plum Brook Reactor Facility. The capsule consisted of two bulk UO2 specimens clad with chemically vapor deposited tungsten (CVD W) 0.762 and 0.1016 cm (0.030-and 0.040-in.) thick, respectively. The second specimen with 0.1016-cm (0.040-in.) thick cladding was irradiated at temperature for 2607 hours, corresponding to an average burnup of 1.516 x 10 to the 20th power fissions/cu cm. Postirradiation examination showed distortion in the bottom end cap, failure of the weld joint, and fracture of the central vent tube. Diametral growth was 1.3 percent. No evidence of gross interaction between CVD tungsten or arc-cast tungsten cladding and the UO2 fuel was observed. Some of the fission gases passed from the fuel cavity to the gas surrounding the fuel specimen via the vent tube and possibly the end-cap weld failure. Whether the UO2 loss rates through the vent tube were within acceptable limits could not be determined in view of the end-cap weld failure.

  6. Formalization of the kinetics for autocatalytic dissolutions. Focus on the dissolution of uranium dioxide in nitric medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlier, F.; Canion, D.; Gravinese, A.; Magnaldo, A.; Lalleman, S.; Borda, G.; Schaer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid is a complex reaction. On the one hand, the dissolution produces nitrous oxides (NOX), which makes it a triphasic reaction. On the other hand, one of the products accelerates the kinetic rate; the reaction is hence called autocatalytic.The kinetics for these kinds of reactions need to be formalized in order to optimize and design innovative dissolution reactors. In this work, the kinetics rates have been measured by optical microscopy using a single particle approach. The advantages of this analytical technique are an easier management of species transport in solution and a precise following of the dissolution rate. The global rate is well described by a mechanism considering two steps: a non-catalyzed reaction, where the catalyst concentration has no influence on the dissolution rate, and a catalyzed reaction. The mass transfer rate of the catalyst was quantified in order to discriminate when the reaction was influenced by catalyst accumulated in the boundary layer or uncatalyzed. This first approximation described well the sigmoid dissolution curve profile. Moreover, experiments showed that solutions filled with catalyst proved to lose reactivity over time. Results pointed out that the higher the liquid-gas exchanges, the faster the kinetic rate decreases with time. Thus, it was demonstrated, for the first time, that there is a link between catalyst and nitrous oxides. The outcome of this study leads to new ways for improving the design of dissolvers. Gas-liquid exchanges are indeed a lever to impact dissolution rates. Temperature and catalyst concentration can be optimized to reduce residence times in dissolvers. (authors)

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  8. The uranium dioxide-uranium system at high temperature; Le systeme uranium-dioxyde d'uranium a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinet, Ph.; Vaugoyeau, H.; Blum, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-07-01

    The liquidus curve has been determined by a saturation method in which the thermal gradient was cancelled upon cooling, and the solidus curve by analyzing the deposits in equilibrium with the liquid at each temperature. The diagram, of a displaced eutectic type, presents a liquid immiscibility domain between 47 and 59 mol per cent of dioxide and a substoichiometry range UO{sub 2x}, the minimum O/U ratio being 1,6 at 3470 {+-} 30 C. The monotectic composition was found by chemical analysis to be 59 mol per cent of dioxide and the reaction temperature 2470 {+-} 30 C. (author) [French] La courbe liquidus a ete determinee par une methode de saturation en annulant le gradient thermique au cours du refroidissement, la courbe solidus par analyse des depots en equilibre avec le liquide a chaque temperature. Le diagramme du type a eutectique deporte comporte un domaine d'immiscibilite liquide entre 47 et 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde, ainsi qu'un domaine d'existence du compose sous stoechiometrique UO{sub 2x}, le rapport O/U minimum etant egal a 1,6 a 2470 {+-} 30 C. La composition du monotectique, obtenue par analyse chimique, est de 59 moles pour cent de dioxyde et la temperature de la reaction a ete trouvee egale a 2470 {+-} 30 C. (auteur)

  9. Etching of uranium dioxide in nitrogen trifluoride RF plasma glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, John Mark

    1999-10-01

    A series of room temperature, low pressure (10.8 to 40 Pa), low power (25 to 210 W) RF plasma glow discharge experiments with UO2 were conducted to demonstrate that plasma treatment is a viable method for decontaminating UO2 from stainless steel substrates. Experiments were conducted using NF3 gas to decontaminate depleted uranium dioxide from stainless-steel substrates. Results demonstrated that UO2 can be completely removed from stainless-steel substrates after several minutes processing at under 200 W. At 180 W and 32.7 Pa gas pressure, over 99% of all UO2 in the samples was removed in just 17 minutes. The initial etch rate in the experiments ranged from 0.2 to 7.4 mum/min. Etching increased with the plasma absorbed power and feed gas pressure in the range of 10.8 to 40 Pa. A different pressure effect on UO2 etching was also noted below 50 W in which etching increased up to a maximum pressure, ˜23 Pa, then decreased with further increases in pressure. A computer simulation, CHEMKIN, was applied to predict the NF3 plasma species in the experiments. The code was validated first by comparing its predictions of the NF3 plasma species with mass spectroscopy etching experiments of silicon. The code predictions were within +/-5% of the measured species concentrations. The F atom radicals were identified as the primary etchant species, diffusing from the bulk plasma to the UO2 surface and reacting to form a volatile UF6, which desorbed into the gas phase to be pumped away. Ions created in the plasma were too low in concentration to have a major effect on etching, but can enhance the etch rate by removing non-volatile reaction products blocking the reaction of F with UO2. The composition of these non-volatile products were determined based on thermodynamic analysis and the electronic structure of uranium. Analysis identified possible non-volatile products as the uranium fluorides, UF2-5, and certain uranium oxyfluorides UO2F, UO2F2, UOF3, and UOF 4 which form over the

  10. The recovery of 99Mo from solutions of irradiated Uranium using a column with nanoparticles of Titanium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androne, G. E.; Petre, M.; Lazar, C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Molyibdenum-99 (T½ = 66.02 h) decays by beta emission to 99 Tcm (T½ = 6.02 h). The latter nuclide is used in many nuclear medicine applications. The 99 Mo is produced from irradiated high (HEU) or low (LEU) enriched uranium. In this work a sensitive and selective method for recovering Mo from uranium solution, using a column with titanium dioxide nanoparticles, is developed. The titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles were synthesized via sol-gel method using titanium tetra-chloride as starting material and urea as a reacting medium. A 40 ml uranium solution containing 450 g/L uranyl nitrate, 1 M HNO 3 , and 4 mg Mo was loaded on a column containing 6 g of TiO 2 sorbent at 75°C. After loading, the column was washed with 1 M HNO 3 and H 2 O. Mo was stripped from the column with 0.1 M NaOH at 25°C. The ICP-MS results indicate that 80-95% of the initial mass of Mo was loaded on the column, and 90-94% of this quantity was recovered in the strip fraction. (authors)

  11. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iltis, X., E-mail: xaviere.iltis@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ben Saada, M. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France)

    2016-06-15

    Four batches of UO{sub 2} pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO{sub 2} pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO{sub 2} viscoplastic deformation mechanisms. - Highlights: • Four different UO{sub 2} pellets batches are microstructurally compared, before and after compression creep tests. • Development of sub-boundaries within the original grains, in crept samples, is quantified by EBSD. • Links are observed between the intra

  12. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A kinetic study of hydro-fluorination of uranium dioxide was performed between 375 and 475 C under partial pressures of HF between 42 and 720 mbar. The reaction was followed by thermogravimetry in isothermal and isobaric conditions. The kinetic data obtained coupled with a characterization of the powder before, during and after reaction by SEM, EDS, BET and XRD showed that the powder grains of UO 2 are transformed according a model of instantaneous germination, anisotropic growth and internal development. The rate limiting step of the growth process is the diffusion of HF in the UF 4 layer. A mechanism of growth of the UF 4 layer has been proposed. In the temperature and pressure range studied, the reaction is of first order with respect to HF and follows an Arrhenius law. A rate equation was determined and used to perform kinetic simulations which have shown a very good correlation with experience. Coupling of this rate equation with heat and mass transport phenomena allowed to perform simulations at the scale of a powder's agglomerate. They have shown that some structures of agglomerates influence the rate of diffusion of the gases in the porous medium and thereby influence the reaction rate. Finally kinetic simulations on powder's beds and pellets were carried out and compared with experimental rates. The experimental and simulated kinetic curves have the same paces, but improvements in the simulations are needed to accurately predict rates: the coupling between the three scales (grain, agglomerate, oven) would be a good example. (author) [fr

  13. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles

    OpenAIRE

    Farzin Heravi; Mohammad Ramezani; Maryam Poosti; Mohsen Hosseini; Arezoo Shajiei; Farzaneh Ahrari

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM). The extrac...

  14. Determination of radium and uranium isotopes in natural waters by sorption on hydrous manganese dioxide followed by alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojanowski, R.; Radecki, Z.; Burns, K.

    2005-01-01

    Water samples, spiked with 133 Ba and 232 U radiotracers, are scavenged for radium and uranium isotopes using hydrous manganese dioxide which is produced in-situ, by reacting manganese (+2) and permanganate ions at pH 8-9. The precipitate is solubilized with ascorbic and acetic acids and the resulting solution filtered through a glass fibre filter GF/F to remove particulate matter. The radium is co-precipitated with barium ions by the addition of a saturated Na 2 SO 4 solution where a small amount of BaSO 4 suspension is introduced to initiate crystallization. The micro precipitate containing the radium is collected on a 0.1 membrane filter and the filtrate saved for follow-up uranium analysis. The 226 Ra on the filter is determined by alpha-spectrometry and its recovery is assessed by measuring the 133 Ba on the same filter using gamma-spectrometry. The filtrate containing uranium is passed through a Dowex AG 1 x 4 ion-exchange resin in the SO 4 2- form which retains uranium while other ions are eluted by dilute (0.25M) sulphuric acid. Uranium is eluted from the column by distilled water, electrodeposited on a silver disc and the uranium isotopes and their recovery are determined by alpha-spectrometry. The method was tested on a variety of natural and spiked water samples with known concentrations of 226 Ra and 238 U and was found to yield accurate results within ±10% RSD of the target values. (author)

  15. Behaviour of ruthenium dioxide particles in borosilicate glasses and melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflieger, Rachel [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)], E-mail: rachel_pflieger@yahoo.fr; Lefebvre, Leila [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Malki, Mohammed [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Polytech Orleans, Universite d' Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Allix, Mathieu [CNRS/CEMHTI-1D Av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45701 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Grandjean, Agnes [DEN/DTCD-SCDV/CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR5257, Centre de Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2009-06-01

    Ruthenium-glass systems are formed during the vitrification of nuclear waste. They are also widely used in micro-electronics because of their unique electrical properties. However, the interaction of this element with the glass matrix remains poorly understood. This work focuses on a RuO{sub 2} particles-nuclear alumino-borosilicate glass system in which the electrical conductivity is known to vary considerably with the RuO{sub 2} content and to become electronic above about 0.5-0.7 vol.% RuO{sub 2} [R. Pflieger, M. Malki, Y. Guari, J. Larionova, A. Grandjean, J. Am. Ceram. Soc., accepted for publication]. Some RuO{sub 2} segregation was observed in SEM/TEM investigations but no continuous chain of RuO{sub 2} particles could be seen. Electron relays between the particles are then necessary for a low-rate percolation, such as the nanoclusters suggested by Adachi et al. [K. Adachi, S. Iida, K. Hayashi, J. Mater. Res. 9 (7) (1994) 1866; K. Adachi, H. Kuno, J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 83 (10) (2000) 2441], which could consist in dissolved ruthenium. Indeed, several observations made here clearly indicate the presence of dissolved ruthenium in the glass matrix, like the modification of the glass density in presence of RuO{sub 2} particles or the diffusion-limited growth of RuO{sub 2} particles in the melt.

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  17. Contribution to the study of sputtering and damage of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions; Contribution a l'etude de la pulverisation et de l'endommagement du dioxyde d'uranium par les ions lourds rapides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlutig, S

    2001-03-01

    Swift heavy ion-solid interaction leads in volume to track creation and on the surface to the ejection of particles into the vacuum. To learn more about initial mechanisms of track formation, we are focused on the sputtering of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions. This present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power on the emission of neutral particles and especially on their angular distribution. These measurements are completed by those of the ions emitted from UO{sub 2} targets bombarded with swift heavy ions. The whole experimental results give access to: i) the nature of the sputtered particles; ii) the charge state of the emitted particles; iii) the direction of ejection of the sputtered particles ; iv) the sputtering yields deduced from the angular distributions. These results are compared to the prediction of the sputtering models proposed in the literature and it seems that the supersonic gas flow model is well suited to describe our results. Finally, the sputtering yields are compared with a set of earlier experimental data on uranium dioxide damage obtained by T. Wiss and we observe that only a small fraction of UO{sub 2} monolayers are sputtered. (author)

  18. Control of manganese dioxide particles resulting from in situ chemical oxidation using permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimi, Michelle; Ko, Saebom

    2009-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation using permanganate is an approach to organic contaminant site remediation. Manganese dioxide particles are products of permanganate reactions. These particles have the potential to deposit in the subsurface and impact the flow-regime in/around permanganate injection, including the well screen, filter pack, and the surrounding subsurface formation. Control of these particles can allow for improved oxidant injection and transport and contact between the oxidant and contaminants of concern. The goals of this research were to determine if MnO(2) can be stabilized/controlled in an aqueous phase, and to determine the dependence of particle stabilization on groundwater characteristics. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to study the ability of four stabilization aids (sodium hexametaphosphate (HMP), Dowfax 8390, xanthan gum, and gum arabic) in maintaining particles suspended in solution under varied reaction conditions and time. Variations included particle and stabilization aid concentrations, ionic content, and pH. HMP demonstrated the most promising results, as compared to xanthan gum, gum arabic, and Dowfax 8390 based on results of spectrophotometric studies of particle behavior, particle filtration, and optical measurements of particle size and zeta potential. HMP inhibited particle settling, provided for greater particle stability, and resulted in particles of a smaller average size over the range of experimental conditions evaluated compared to results for systems that did not include HMP. Additionally, HMP did not react unfavorably with permanganate. These results indicate that the inclusion of HMP in a permanganate oxidation system improves conditions that may facilitate particle transport.

  19. Uranium-Molybdenum particles produced by electro-erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabanillas, Edgardo D.; Lopez, Marisol; Pasqualini, Enrique E.; Lombardo, D. J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We have produced spheroidal U-Mo particles by the electro-erosion method using pure water as dielectric. The particles were characterised by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS-EDAX) and X-ray diffraction. Spheroidal UO 2 particles with a peculiar distribution size were obtained with two distribution centred at 10 and 70 μm. The obtained particles have central inclusions of U and Mo compounds. (author)

  20. Determination of uranium in coated fuel particle compact by potassium fluoride fusion-gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Mitsuo; Iso, Shuichi; Hoshino, Akira; Suzuki, Shuichi.

    1992-03-01

    Potassium fluoride-gravimetric method has been developed for the determination of uranium in TRISO type-coated fuel particle compact. Graphite matrix in the fuel compact is burned off by heating it in a platinum crucible at 850degC. The coated fuel particles thus obtained are decomposed by fusion with potassium fluoride at 900degC. The melt was dissolved with sulfuric acid. Uranium is precipitated as ammonium diuranate, by passing ammonia gas through the solution. The resulting precipitate is heated in a muffle furnace at 850degC, to convert uranium into triuranium octoxide. Uranium in the triuranium octoxide was determined gravimetrically. Ten grams of caoted fuel particles were completely decomposed by fusion with 50 g of potassium fluoride at 900degC for 3 hrs. Analytical result for uranium in the fuel compact by the proposed method was 21.04 ± 0.05 g (n = 3), and was in good agreement with that obtained by non-destructive γ-ray measurement method : 21.01 ± 0.07 g (n = 3). (author)

  1. Report on in-situ studies of flash sintering of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raftery, Alicia Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-24

    Flash sintering is a novel type of field assisted sintering that uses an electric field and current to provide densification of materials on very short time scales. The potential for field assisted sintering techniques to be used in producing nuclear fuel is gaining recognition due to the potential economic benefits and improvements in material properties. The flash sintering behavior has so far been linked to applied and material parameters, but the underlying mechanisms active during flash sintering have yet to be identified. This report summarizes the efforts to investigate flash sintering of uranium dioxide using dilatometer studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory and two separate sets of in-situ studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory’s NSLS-II XPD-1 beamline. The purpose of the dilatometer studies was to understand individual parameter (applied and material) effects on the flash behavior and the purpose of the in-situ studies was to better understand the mechanisms active during flash sintering. As far as applied parameters, it was found that stoichiometry, or oxygen-to-metal ratio, has a significant effect on the flash behavior (time to flash and speed of flash). Composite systems were found to have degraded sintering behavior relative to pure UO2. The critical field studies are complete for UO2.00 and will be analyzed against an existing model for comparison. The in-situ studies showed that the strength of the field and current are directly related to the sample temperature, with temperature-driven phase changes occurring at high values. The existence of an ‘incubation time’ has been questioned, due to a continuous change in lattice parameter values from the moment that the field is applied. Some results from the in-situ experiments, which should provide evidence regarding ion migration, are still being analyzed. Some preliminary conclusions can be made from these results with regard to using field assisted sintering to

  2. Electronic structure of the actinides and their dioxides. Application to the defect formation energy and krypton solubility in uranium dioxide; Etude de la structure electronique des actinides et de leurs dioxydes. Application aux defauts ponctuels et aux gaz de fission dans le dioxyde d`uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, T. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique

    1996-09-28

    Uranium dioxide is the standard nuclear fuel used in French h power plants. During irradiation, fission products such as krypton and xenon are created inside fuel pellets. So, gas release could become, at very high burnup, a limiting factor in the reactor exploitation. To study this subject, we have realised calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) into the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Atomic Sphere Approximation (ASA). First, we have validated our approach by calculating cohesive properties of thorium, protactinium and uranium metals. The good agreement between our results and experimental values implies that 5f electrons are itinerant. Calculated lattice parameter, cohesive energy and bulk modulus for uranium and thorium dioxides are in very good agreement with experiment. We show that binding between uranium and oxygen atoms is not completely ionic but partially covalent. The question of the electrical conductivity still remains an open problem. We have been able to calculate punctual defect formation energies in uranium dioxide. Accordingly to experimental observations, we find that it is easier to create a defect in the oxygen sublattice than in the uranium sublattice. Finally, we have been able to predict a probable site of krypton atoms in nuclear fuel: the Schottky trio. Experiences of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) on uranium dioxide doped by ionic implantation will help us in the comprehension of the studied phenomena and the interpretation of our calculations. (author). 256 refs.

  3. Beryllium Project: developing in CDTN of uranium dioxide fuel pellets with addition of beryllium oxide to increase the thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Alberto Neto; Camarano, Denise das Merces; Miranda, Odair; Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Andrade, Antonio Santos; Queiroz, Carolinne Mol; Gonzaga, Mariana de Carvalho Leal

    2013-01-01

    Although the nuclear fuel currently based on pellets of uranium dioxide be very safe and stable, the biggest problem is that this material is not a good conductor of heat. This results in an elevated temperature gradient between the center and its lateral surface, which leads to a premature degradation of the fuel, which restricts the performance of the reactor, being necessary to change the fuel before its full utilization. An increase of only 5 to 10 percent in its thermal conductivity, would be a significant increase. An increase of 50 percent would be a great improvement. A project entitled 'Beryllium Project' was developed in CDTN - Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, which aimed to develop fuel pellets made from a mixture of uranium dioxide microspheres and beryllium oxide powder to obtain a better heat conductor phase, filling the voids between the microspheres to increase the thermal conductivity of the pellet. Increases in the thermal conductivity in the range of 8.6% to 125%, depending on the level of addition employed in the range of 1% to 14% by weight of beryllium oxide, were obtained. This type of fuel promises to be safer than current fuels, improving the performance of the reactor, in addition to last longer, resulting in great savings. (author)

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  5. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  10. Influence of ZrO2 particles on fluorine-doped lead dioxide electrodeposition process from nitrate bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Yingwu; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Chunmei; Jing, Qiming; Wang, Yang

    2013-01-01

    The influence of ZrO 2 particles on fluorine-doped lead dioxide electrodeposition process on the glass carbon electrode (GCE) from lead nitrate electrolytes was studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA), coupled with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Instantaneous nucleation mechanism is found for fluorine-doped lead dioxide electrodeposition in the presence of ZrO 2 particles according to Scharifker–Hills’ model with three-dimensional growth. The results show that the addition of ZrO 2 particles decrease the active surface area of the GCE, and the growth of the lead dioxide crystallites was obstructed

  11. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  12. Production and characterization of monodisperse uranium particles for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Environmental sampling is a very effective measure to detect undeclared nuclear activities. Generally, samples are taken as swipe samples on cotton. These swipes contain minute quantities of particulates which have an inherent signature of their production and release scenario. These inspection samples are assessed for their morphology, elemental composition and their isotopic vectors. Mass spectrometry plays a crucial role in determining the isotopic ratios of uranium. Method validation and instrument calibration with well-characterized quality control (QC)-materials, reference materials (RMs) and certified reference materials (CRMs) ensures reliable data output. Currently, the availability of suitable well defined microparticles containing uranium and plutonium reference materials is very limited. Primarily, metals, oxides and various uranium and plutonium containing solutions are commercially available. Therefore, the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Services (SGAS) cooperates with the Institute of Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6) at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH in a joint task entitled ''Production of Particle Reference Materials''. The work presented in this thesis has been partially funded by the IAEA, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) through the ''Joint Program on the Technical Development and Further Improvement of IAEA Safeguards between the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the IAEA''. The first step towards monodisperse microparticles was the development of pure uranium oxide particles made from certified reference materials. The focus of the dissertation is (1) the implementation of a working setup to produce monodisperse uranium oxide particles and (2) the characterization of these particles towards the application as QC-material. Monodisperse uranium oxide particles were produced by spray pyrolysis. It was demonstrated that the particle size can be

  13. Transmutation of uranium and thorium in the particle field of the Quinta sub-critical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S. R.; Asquith, N. L.; Voronko, V. A.; Sotnikov, V. V.; Zhadan, Alina; Zhuk, I. V.; Potapenko, A.; Husak, Krystsina; Chilap, V.; Adam, J.; Baldin, A.; Berlev, A.; Furman, W.; Kadykov, M.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kudashkin, I.; Mar'in, I.; Paraipan, M.; Pronskih, V.; Solnyshkin, A.; Tyutyunnikov, S.

    2018-03-01

    The fission rates of natural uranium and thorium were measured in the particle field of Quinta, a 512 kg natural uranium target-blanket sub-critical assembly. The Quinta assembly was irradiated with deuterons of energy 4 GeV from the Nuclotron accelerator of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna, Russia. Fission rates of uranium and thorium were measured using Gamma spectroscopy and fission track techniques. The production rate of 239Np was also measured. The obtained experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo predictions using the MCNPX 2.7 code employing the physics and fission-evaporation models of INCL4-ABLA, CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03. Some of the neutronic characteristics of the Quinta are compared with the "Energy plus Transmutation (EpT)" subcritical assembly, which is composed of a lead target and natU blanket. This comparison clearly demonstrates the importance of target material, neutron moderator and reflector types on the performance of a spallation neutron driven subcritical system. As the dimensions of the Quinta are very close to those of an optimal multi-rod-uranium target, the experimental and Monte Carlo calculation results presented in this paper provide insights on the particle field within a uranium target as well as in Accelerator Driven Systems in general.

  14. Removal of toxic uranium from synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents using uranyl ion imprinted polymer particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preetha, Chandrika Ravindran; Gladis, Joseph Mary; Rao, Talasila Prasada; Venkateswaran, Gopala

    2006-05-01

    Major quantities of uranium find use as nuclear fuel in nuclear power reactors. In view of the extreme toxicity of uranium and consequent stringent limits fixed by WHO and various national governments, it is essential to remove uranium from nuclear power reactor effluents before discharge into environment. Ion imprinted polymer (IIP) materials have traditionally been used for the recovery of uranium from dilute aqueous solutions prior to detection or from seawater. We now describe the use of IIP materials for selective removal of uranium from a typical synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent. The IIP materials were prepared for uranyl ion (imprint ion) by forming binary salicylaldoxime (SALO) or 4-vinylpyridine (VP) or ternary SALO-VP complexes in 2-methoxyethanol (porogen) and copolymerizing in the presence of styrene (monomer), divinylbenzene (cross-linking monomer), and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (initiator). The resulting materials were then ground and sieved to obtain unleached polymer particles. Leached IIP particles were obtained by leaching the imprint ions with 6.0 M HCl. Control polymer particles were also prepared analogously without the imprint ion. The IIP particles obtained with ternary complex alone gave quantitative removal of uranyl ion in the pH range 3.5-5.0 with as low as 0.08 g. The retention capacity of uranyl IIP particles was found to be 98.50 mg/g of polymer. The present study successfully demonstrates the feasibility of removing uranyl ions selectively in the range 5 microg - 300 mg present in 500 mL of synthetic nuclear power reactor effluent containing a host of other inorganic species.

  15. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962); Contribution a l'etude de la microstructure du dioxyde d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porneuf, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-05-15

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [French] La microstructure de frittes d'oxyde d'uranium est etudiee en fonction de divers parametres, en particulier de la temperature et de l'atmosphere de frittage, par examen de la surface externe des frittes, puis de leur microstructure interne (fractographie, ceramographie). Differentes techniques de preparation des surfaces (polissage mecanique ou electrolytique) et de revelation de la structure (attaque chimique ou anodique, bombardement ionique, oxydation preferentielle) ont ete experimentees et comparees. Des figures comparables a celles revelees dans les metaux et liees probablement a des interactions entre dislocations et lacunes ont ete observees. (auteur)

  16. Contribution to the study of the microstructure of uranium dioxide (1962); Contribution a l'etude de la microstructure du dioxyde d'uranium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porneuf, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-05-15

    The microstructure of sintered uranium dioxide is studied in relation with several parameters, specially the sintering temperatures and atmospheres. The external surface and the internal microstructure of the sintered are examined, using fractography and ceramography. Various techniques for preparing surfaces (mechanical and electrolytic polishing) and for revealing the structure (chemical and anodic attack, ionic bombardment oxidation) have been experienced and compared. Patterns similar to those revealed in metals and probably related with interactions between dislocations and vacancies have been observed. (author) [French] La microstructure de frittes d'oxyde d'uranium est etudiee en fonction de divers parametres, en particulier de la temperature et de l'atmosphere de frittage, par examen de la surface externe des frittes, puis de leur microstructure interne (fractographie, ceramographie). Differentes techniques de preparation des surfaces (polissage mecanique ou electrolytique) et de revelation de la structure (attaque chimique ou anodique, bombardement ionique, oxydation preferentielle) ont ete experimentees et comparees. Des figures comparables a celles revelees dans les metaux et liees probablement a des interactions entre dislocations et lacunes ont ete observees. (auteur)

  17. Recovery and recycling of uranium from rejected coated particles for compact high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Rajesh V., E-mail: pairajesh007@gmail.com [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mollick, P.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Kumar, Ashok [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Banerjee, J. [Radiometullurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Radhakrishna, J. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Chakravartty, J.K. [Powder Metallurgy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2016-05-15

    UO{sub 2} microspheres prepared by internal gelation technique were coated with pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide using CVD technique. The particles which were not meeting the specifications were rejected. The rejected/failed UO{sub 2} based coated particles prepared by CVD technique was used for oxidation and recovery and recycling. The oxidation behaviour of sintered UO{sub 2} microspheres coated with different layers of carbon and SiC was studied by thermal techniques to develop a method for recycling and recovery of uranium from the failed/rejected coated particles. It was observed that the complete removal of outer carbon from the spheres is difficult. The crushing of microspheres enabled easier accessibility of oxygen and oxidation of carbon and uranium at 800–1000 °C. With the optimized process of multiple crushing using die & plunger and sieving the broken coated layers, we could recycle around fifty percent of the UO{sub 2} microspheres which could be directly recoated. The rest of the particles were recycled using a wet recycling method. - Highlights: • The oxidation behaviour of coated particles was studied in air, O{sub 2} and moist O{sub 2}. • It was observed that coated layers cannot be completely removed by mere oxidation. • Complete recovery of uranium from the rejected coated particles has been carried out using a combination of dry and wet recovery scheme. • A crushing step prior to oxidation is needed for full recovery of uranium from the coated particles.

  18. An application of 222Rn alpha particle's tracks to uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar H, F.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium exploration method is based on the register of 222 Rn alpha particles; 222 Rn gas is generated in the chain 238 U desintegration. The detection of alpha particles was performed with cellulose nitrate films (NTC), located in a grid at the region in study. The alpha particles produce latent tracks in the NTC films; these tracks may be enlarged by chemical etching and are observed with an ordinary optic microscope, ninety seven NTC films were used, these were distributed in an area of approximately seventeen square kilometers, located in the municipalities of Granados and Huasabas in Sonora Mexico, the detectors remain in the ground for a thirty days mean period. The results obtained show an area with high 222 Rn concentration, this can be related with an underground uranium ore deposit. The more important conclusion is that the results obtained in this work can be used as preliminary results for other prospection methods in this particular area. (author)

  19. Sorption of Uranium Ions from Their Aqueous Solution by Resins Containing Nanomagnetite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud O. Abd El-Magied

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic amine resins composed of nanomagnetite (Fe3O4 core and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA/N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA shell were prepared by suspension polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate with N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide in the presence of nanomagnetite particles and immobilized with different amine ligands. These resins showed good magnetic properties and could be easily retrieved from their suspensions using an external magnetic field. Adsorption behaviors of uranium ions on the prepared resins were studied. Maximum sorption capacities of uranium ions on R-1 and R-2 were found to be 92 and 158 mg/g. Uranium was extracted successfully from three granite samples collected from Gabal Gattar pluton, North Eastern Desert, Egypt. The studied resins showed good durability and regeneration using HNO3.

  20. NARCISS critical stand experiments for studying the nuclear safety in accident water immersion of highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Glushkov, E.S.; Bubelev, V.G.

    2005-01-01

    A brief description of the Topaz-2 SNPS designed under scientific supervision of RRC KI in Russia, and of the NARCISS critical facility, is given. At the NARCISS critical facility, neutronic peculiarities and nuclear safety issues of the Topaz-2 system reactor were studied experimentally. This work is devoted to a detailed description of experiments on investigation of criticality safety in accident water immersion og highly enriched uranium dioxide fuel elements, performed at the NARCISS facility. The experiments were carried out at water-moderated critical assemblies with varying height, number, and spacing of fuel elements. The results obtained in the critical experiments, computational models of the investigated critical configurations, and comparison of the computational and experimental results are given [ru

  1. Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide and zirconium due to high-temperature annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young-Sang; Lee, Jeongmook; Kim, Jandee; Kim, Jong-Yun

    2018-06-01

    Compositional changes at the interface between thorium-doped uranium dioxide (U0.97Th0.03O2) and Zr before and after annealing at 1700 °C for 18 h were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. At room temperature, the U0.97Th0.03O2 pellet consisted of hyperstoichiometric UO2+x with UO2 and ThO2, and the Zr sample contained Zr with ZrO2. After annealing, the former contained stoichiometric UO2 with ThO2 and the latter consisted of ZrO2 along with ZrO2·2H2O.

  2. Exposure assessment and heart rate variability monitoring in workers handling titanium dioxide particles: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichihara, Sahoko [Mie University, Graduate School of Regional Innovation Studies (Japan); Li, Weihua [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Omura, Seiichi [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Fujitani, Yuji [National Institute for Environmental Studies (Japan); Liu, Ying; Wang, Qiangyi [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Hiraku, Yusuke [Mie University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Environmental and Molecular Medicine (Japan); Hisanaga, Naomi [Aichi Gakusen University, Faculty of Human Science and Design (Japan); Wakai, Kenji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine (Japan); Ding, Xuncheng [WHO Collaborating Centre for Research in Human Reproduction, Shanghai Institute of Planned Parenthood Research (China); Kobayashi, Takahiro, E-mail: takakoba@airies.or.jp [Association for International Research Initiatives for Environmental Studies (Japan); Ichihara, Gaku, E-mail: gak@rs.tus.ac.jp [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) particles are used for surface coating and in a variety of products such as inks, fibers, food, and cosmetics. The present study investigated possible respiratory and cardiovascular effects of TiO{sub 2} particles in workers exposed to this particle at high concentration in a factory in China. The diameter of particles collected on filters was measured by scanning electron microscopy. Real-time size-dependent particle number concentration was monitored in the nostrils of four workers using condensation particle counter and optical particle counter. Electrocardiogram was recorded using Holter monitors for the same four workers to record heart rate variability. Sixteen workers underwent assessment of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Mass-based individual exposure levels were also measured with personal cascade impactors. The primary particle diameter ranged from 46 to 562 nm. Analysis of covariance of the pooled data of the four workers showed that number of particles with a diameter <300 nm was associated positively with total number of N–N and negatively with total number of increase or decrease in successive RR intervals greater than 50 ms (RR50+/−) or percentage of RR 50+/− that were parameters of parasympathetic function. The total mass concentration was 9.58–30.8 mg/m{sup 3} during work, but significantly less before work (0.36 mg/m{sup 3}). The clear abnormality in respiratory function was not observed in sixteen workers who had worked for 10 months to 13 years in the factory. The study showed that exposure to particles with a diameter <300 nm might affect HRV in workers handling TiO{sub 2} particles. The results highlight the need to investigate the possible impact of exposure to nano-scaled particles on the autonomic nervous system.

  3. Alpha spectrometric characterization of process-related particle size distributions from active particle sampling at the Los Alamos National Laboratory uranium foundry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plionis, Alexander A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Dominic S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Uranium particles within the respirable size range pose a significant hazard to the health and safety of workers. Significant differences in the deposition and incorporation patterns of aerosols within the respirable range can be identified and integrated into sophisticated health physics models. Data characterizing the uranium particle size distribution resulting from specific foundry-related processes are needed. Using personal air sampling cascade impactors, particles collected from several foundry processes were sorted by activity median aerodynamic diameter onto various Marple substrates. After an initial gravimetric assessment of each impactor stage, the substrates were analyzed by alpha spectrometry to determine the uranium content of each stage. Alpha spectrometry provides rapid nondestructive isotopic data that can distinguish process uranium from natural sources and the degree of uranium contribution to the total accumulated particle load. In addition, the particle size bins utilized by the impactors provide adequate resolution to determine if a process particle size distribution is: lognormal, bimodal, or trimodal. Data on process uranium particle size values and distributions facilitate the development of more sophisticated and accurate models for internal dosimetry, resulting in an improved understanding of foundry worker health and safety.

  4. Particle and carbon dioxide emissions from passenger vehicles operating on unleaded petrol and LPG fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristovski, Z.D.; Jayaratne, E.R.; Morawska, L.; Ayoko, G.A.; Lim, M.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the particle and carbon dioxide emissions from a fleet of six dedicated liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) powered and five unleaded petrol (ULP) powered new Ford Falcon Forte passenger vehicles was carried out on a chassis dynamometer at four different vehicle speeds-0 (idle), 40, 60, 80 and 100 km h -1 . Emission factors and their relative values between the two fuel types together with a statistical significance for any difference were estimated for each parameter. In general, LPG was found to be a 'cleaner' fuel, although in most cases, the differences were not statistically significant owing to the large variations between emissions from different vehicles. The particle number emission factors ranged from 10 11 to 10 13 km -1 and was over 70% less with LPG compared to ULP. Corresponding differences in particle mass emission factor between the two fuels were small and ranged from the order of 10 μg km -1 at 40 to about 1000 μg km -1 at 100 km h -1 . The count median particle diameter (CMD) ranged from 20 to 35 nm and was larger with LPG than with ULP in all modes except the idle mode. Carbon dioxide emission factors ranged from about 300 to 400 g km -1 at 40 km h -1 , falling with increasing speed to about 200 g km -1 at 100 km h -1 . At all speeds, the values were 10% to 18% greater with ULP than with LPG

  5. Uranium dioxide in Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids with DMSO: Dissolution, separation, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Aining; Chu, Taiwei, E-mail: twchu@pku.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in imidazolium-based Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids (ILs) with the help of DMSO. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction show that UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−} is the principal product. The dissolved uranyl species can be easily separated from the ILs via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction. Moreover, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd, compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. The solvents of acetone and acetonitrile could be used to separate the rare-earth elements from uranium in the IL with the help of imidazolium chloride. Considering the complete process from the dissolution of UO{sub 2} and some rare-earth oxides to the separation of uranium and rare-earth elements in the IL, the facile approach is promising for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. - Graphical abstract: UO{sub 2} can be successfully dissolved in Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO to form UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The rare earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd can be separated from uranium in the IL, and meanwhile, the recovery of dissolved uranyl species and Fe-containing IL can also be achieved. - Highlights: • Dissolution of UO{sub 2} can be successfully achieved in imidazolium-based Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO without additional oxidants. • Compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. • The separation of the rare-earth elements from uranium has also been achieved via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction.

  6. Uranium dioxide in Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids with DMSO: Dissolution, separation, and structural characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Aining; Chu, Taiwei

    2016-01-01

    UO_2 can be successfully dissolved in imidazolium-based Fe(III)-containing ionic liquids (ILs) with the help of DMSO. Spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction show that UO_2Cl_4"2"− is the principal product. The dissolved uranyl species can be easily separated from the ILs via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction. Moreover, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd, compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. The solvents of acetone and acetonitrile could be used to separate the rare-earth elements from uranium in the IL with the help of imidazolium chloride. Considering the complete process from the dissolution of UO_2 and some rare-earth oxides to the separation of uranium and rare-earth elements in the IL, the facile approach is promising for the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. - Graphical abstract: UO_2 can be successfully dissolved in Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO to form UO_2Cl_4"2"−. The rare earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd can be separated from uranium in the IL, and meanwhile, the recovery of dissolved uranyl species and Fe-containing IL can also be achieved. - Highlights: • Dissolution of UO_2 can be successfully achieved in imidazolium-based Fe-containing ILs with the help of DMSO without additional oxidants. • Compared with the total amount of uranium and the rare-earth elements, even if 15.2 wt% of the rare-earth elements of Sm, Eu, and Gd exist in the IL, only uranium-containing crystals would be selectively formed and separated from the system. • The separation of the rare-earth elements from uranium has also been achieved via a combination of crystallization and solvent extraction.

  7. Imaging flow cytometry assays for quantifying pigment grade titanium dioxide particle internalization and interactions with immune cells in whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Rachel E; Vis, Bradley; Pele, Laetitia C; Faria, Nuno; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-10-01

    Pigment grade titanium dioxide is composed of sub-micron sized particles, including a nanofraction, and is widely utilized in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and biomedical industries. Oral exposure to pigment grade titanium dioxide results in at least some material entering the circulation in humans, although subsequent interactions with blood immune cells are unknown. Pigment grade titanium dioxide is employed for its strong light scattering properties, and this work exploited that attribute to determine whether single cell-particle associations could be determined in immune cells of human whole blood at "real life" concentrations. In vitro assays, initially using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, identified titanium dioxide associated with the surface of, and within, immune cells by darkfield reflectance in imaging flow cytometry. This was confirmed at the population level by side scatter measurements using conventional flow cytometry. Next, it was demonstrated that imaging flow cytometry could quantify titanium dioxide particle-bearing cells, within the immune cell populations of fresh whole blood, down to titanium dioxide levels of 10 parts per billion, which is in the range anticipated for human blood following titanium dioxide ingestion. Moreover, surface association and internal localization of titanium dioxide particles could be discriminated in the assays. Overall, results showed that in addition to the anticipated activity of blood monocytes internalizing titanium dioxide particles, neutrophil internalization and cell membrane adhesion also occurred, the latter for both phagocytic and nonphagocytic cell types. What happens in vivo and whether this contributes to activation of one or more of these different cells types in blood merits further attention. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  9. Separation and mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of uranium and thorium from thorium-uranium dioxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, L.W.; Elliot, N.L.; Longhurst, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    A microchemical procedure was developed for the separation and isotopic analysis of U and Th from irradiated (Th,U)O 2 fuel. The separation procedure consisted of two stages; in the first a tributyl phosphate impregnated resin bead was equilibrated with the dissolved fuel in 0.08 M HF/6 M HNO 3 solution. The bead sorbed approximately 1.7 μg of U and 4.8μg of Th and provided good separation of these from the fission products. In the second stage, the U and Th were back-extracted into 0.025 M HF/8 M HNO 3 solution, which contained a small anion-exchange membrane disk. The disk adsorbed approximately 14 ng of U and 45 ng of Th, and subsequently was transferred to the ionizing filament of a thermal-ionization mass spectrometer and covered with a starch deposit. Sensitivities were sufficiently high for sequential analysis of these quantities of Th and U from a single disk. Isotopic data obtained for a combined U and Th standard showed excellent agreement with certified values: overall bias and precision were < 0.03% and 0.2% relative standard deviation, respectively, for both elements. The applicability of the procedure to uranium fuels was also demonstrated. 6 figures, 2 tables

  10. Separation and mass spectrometry of nanogram quantities of uranium and thorium from thorium-uranium dioxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, L.W.; Elliot, N.L.; Longhurst, T.H

    1983-07-01

    A convenient and sensitive microchemical procedure was developed for the separation and isotopic analysis of U and Th from irradiated (Th,U)O{sub 2} fuel. The separation procedure consisted of two stages; in the first a tributyl phosphate impregnated resin bead was equilibrated with the dissolved fuel in 0.08 M HF/6 M HNO{sub 3} solution. The bead sorbed approximately 1.7 {mu}g of U and 4.8 {mu}g of Th and provided good separation of these from the fission products. In the second stage, the U and Th were back-extracted into 0.025 M HF/8 M HNO{sub 3} solution, which contained a small anion-exchange membrane disk. The disk adsorbed approximately 14 ng of U and 45 ng of Th, and subsequently was transferred to the ionizing filament of a thermal-ionization mass spectrometer and covered with a starch deposit. Sensitivities were sufficiently high for sequential analysis of these quantities of Th and U from a single disk. Isotopic data obtained for a combined U and Th standard showed excellent agreement with certified values: overall bias and precision were < -0.03% and 0.2% relative standard deviation, respectively, for both elements. The applicability of the procedure to uranium fuels was also demonstrated. (author)

  11. On the separation of so-called non-volatile uranium fission products of uranium using the conversion of neutron-irradiated uranium dioxide and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elhardt, W.

    1979-01-01

    The investigations are continued in the following work which arose from the concept of separating uranium fission products from uranium. This is achieved in that due to the lattice conversions occurring during the course of solid chemical reactions, fission products can easily pass from the uranium-contained solid to a second solid. The investigations carried out primarily concern the release behaviour of cerium and neodymium in the temperature region of 1200 to 1700 0 C. UO 2 + graphite, both in powder form, are selected as suitable reaction system having the preconditions needed for the lattice conversion for the release effect. The target aimed at from the practical aspect for the improved release of lanthanoids is achieved by an isobar test course - changing temperature from 1200 to 1500 0 C at constant pressure, with a cerium release of 75-80% and a neodynium release of 80-90% (maximum at 1400 0 C). The concepts on the mechanism of the fission product release are related to transport processes in crystal lattices, as well as chemical solid reactions and evaporation processes on the surface of UC 2 grains. (orig./RB) [de

  12. Effect of Particle-size Distribution on Chemical Washing Experiment of Uranium Contaminated Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wan Suk; Kim, Gye Nam; Shon, Dong Bin; Park, Hye Min; Kim, Ki Hong; Lee, Kun Woo; Lee, Ki Won; Moon, Jei Kwon

    2011-01-01

    Taken down of nuclear institution was radioactive contaminated concrete over 70% of whole waste. Advanced countries have realized the importance of waste processing. Nuclear institutions keep a lot of radioactive contaminated concrete in internal waste storage. Therefore radioactive contaminated concrete disport to whole waste and reduce for self-processing standard concentration may be disposed of inexpensive more than radioactive waste storage. This study uses mechanical and thermal technology for a uranium contaminated concrete process in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's radioactive waste storage. Mechanical and thermal technologies are divided based on particle size. Each particles-sized concrete analyzed for uranium contamination using an MCA instrument. A chemical washing experiment was carried out

  13. Method of decontamination for uranium oxide particles floating in liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terakado, Tsutomu; Ebara, Tsuneo; Sato, Kuniaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly treat liquid waste containing uranium oxide particles floating in it and to enable substantially complete decontamination. Method: An iron salt such as ferrous sulfate or the like is added to liquid waste with floating uranium oxide particles, an alkaline solution such as caustic soda or the like is then added to the liquid waste while feeding compressed air at 0.1 to 0.02 l/sec. per ton of liquid waste, and the pH of the liquid waste is made to from 6.5 to 7.5. Thereafter, the feed of compressed air is stopped, the liquid waste is allowed to stand, and is then filtered. (Aizawa, K.)

  14. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO2 nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO2 particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO2 particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO2 particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO2 particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO2 particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles. PMID:27092499

  15. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeko Tada-Oikawa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO2 nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO2 particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2 cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm and rutile (50 nm TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL of anatase (100 nm, rutile (50 nm, and P25 TiO2 particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO2 particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles increased interleukin (IL-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm TiO2 particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO2 nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO2 particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles.

  16. Titanium Dioxide Particle Type and Concentration Influence the Inflammatory Response in Caco-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada-Oikawa, Saeko; Ichihara, Gaku; Fukatsu, Hitomi; Shimanuki, Yuka; Tanaka, Natsuki; Watanabe, Eri; Suzuki, Yuka; Murakami, Masahiko; Izuoka, Kiyora; Chang, Jie; Wu, Wenting; Yamada, Yoshiji; Ichihara, Sahoko

    2016-04-16

    Titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics, sunscreens, biomedicine, and food products. When used as a food additive, TiO₂ nanoparticles are used in significant amounts as white food-coloring agents. However, the effects of TiO₂ nanoparticles on the gastrointestinal tract remain unclear. The present study was designed to determine the effects of five TiO₂ particles of different crystal structures and sizes in human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and THP-1 monocyte-derived macrophages. Twenty-four-hour exposure to anatase (primary particle size: 50 and 100 nm) and rutile (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner in THP-1 macrophages, but in not Caco-2 cells. However, 72-h exposure of Caco-2 cells to anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles reduced cellular viability in a dose-dependent manner. The highest dose (50 µg/mL) of anatase (100 nm), rutile (50 nm), and P25 TiO₂ particles also reduced cellular viability in Caco-2 cells. The production of reactive oxygen species tended to increase in both types of cells, irrespective of the type of TiO₂ particle. Exposure of THP-1 macrophages to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles increased interleukin (IL)-1β expression level, and exposure of Caco-2 cells to 50 µg/mL of anatase (50 nm) TiO₂ particles also increased IL-8 expression. The results indicated that anatase TiO₂ nanoparticles induced inflammatory responses compared with other TiO₂ particles. Further studies are required to determine the in vivo relevance of these findings to avoid the hazards of ingested particles.

  17. Solid state speciation and potential bioavailability of depleted uranium particles from Kosovo and Kuwait

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, O.C. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway)], E-mail: ole-christian.lind@umb.no; Salbu, B.; Skipperud, L. [Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway); Janssens, K.; Jaroszewicz, J.; De Nolf, W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    A combination of synchrotron radiation based X-ray microscopic techniques ({mu}-XRF, {mu}-XANES, {mu}-XRD) applied on single depleted uranium (DU) particles and semi-bulk leaching experiments has been employed to link the potential bioavailability of DU particles to site-specific particle characteristics. The oxidation states and crystallographic forms of U in DU particles have been determined for individual particles isolated from selected samples collected at different sites in Kosovo and Kuwait that were contaminated by DU ammunition during the 1999 Balkan conflict and the 1991 Gulf war. Furthermore, small soil or sand samples heavily contaminated with DU particles were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal fluid (0.16 M HCl) extractions. Characteristics of DU particles in Kosovo soils collected in 2000 and in Kuwait soils collected in 2002 varied significantly depending on the release scenario and to some extent on weathering conditions. Oxidized U (+6) was determined in large, fragile and bright yellow DU particles released during fire at a DU ammunition storage facility and crystalline phases such as schoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.25H{sub 2}O), dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.0.75H{sub 2}O) and metaschoepite (UO{sub 3}.2.0H{sub 2}O) were identified. As expected, these DU particles were rapidly dissolved in 0.16 M HCl (84 {+-} 3% extracted after 2 h) indicating a high degree of potential mobility and bioavailability. In contrast, the 2 h extraction of samples contaminated with DU particles originating either from corrosion of unspent DU penetrators or from impacted DU ammunition appeared to be much slower (20-30%) as uranium was less oxidized (+4 to +6). Crystalline phases such as UO{sub 2}, UC and metallic U or U-Ti alloy were determined in impacted DU particles from Kosovo and Kuwait, while the UO{sub 2,34} phase, only determined in particles from Kosovo, could reflect a more corrosive environment. Although the results are based on a limited number of DU particles

  18. Preparation of uranium dioxide by thermal decomposition and direct reduction of ammonium uranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez R, R.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium uranate has been studied by infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It has been show that ammonia remains in the solid until substantially 350 Centigrade degrees, when gaseous nitrogen is released. It is concluded that compounds derived from the calcination of ammonium uranate at atmospheric pressure, produced amorphous U O 3 at about 350-400 Centigrade degrees and transform to U 3 O 8 via α - U O 3 and/or α - U O 3 . The object of this study was to obtain reliable fundamental information regarding the character of the pure carbon monoxide-ammonium uranate-uranium trioxide-uranium octaoxide reaction, in the range of temperatures that has been used in commercial reduction processes. Through the use of high-purity samples and by the proper control of incidental variable, this object was realized. (Author)

  19. AES study of growth process of al thin films on uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wei; Liu Kezhao; Yang Jiangrong; Xiao Hong

    2009-01-01

    Metallic uranium was exposed to 40 languirs of oxygen at room temperature in order to form UO 2 on the surface of metallic U. And thin layers of aluminum on UO 2 were prepared by sputter deposition under ultra high vacuum conditions. Process of Al thin film growth and its interaction with UO 2 were investigated by auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). It was shown that the Al thin film growth underwent via the Volmer-Weber (VW) mode. At room temperature, Al and UO 2 interact with each other, electrons transfer occurres from Al atoms to uranium ions, and a few of Al 2 O 3 exist in the region of UO 2 /Al interface due to O 2 adsorption to the surface. Inter-diffusion between UO 2 and Al is observable. Aluminum diffuses into interface region of UO 2 and U. It results in the formation of a coexistence regime containing uranium oxide, metallic U and Al. (authors)

  20. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  1. Combined effects of alpha particles and depleted uranium on Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Candy Y.P.; Pereira, Sandrine; Cheng, Shuk Han; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-01-01

    The combined effects of low-dose or high-dose alpha particles and depleted uranium (DU) in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were studied. Three schemes were examined—(i) [I L U L ]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure, (ii) [I H U H ]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure and (iii) [I H U L ]: 4.4 mGy alpha-particle dose + 10 µg/l DU exposure—in which Zebrafish embryos were irradiated with alpha particles at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) and/or exposed to uranium at 5–6 hpf. The results were also compared with our previous work, which studied the effects of [I L U H ]: 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose + 100 µg/l DU exposure. When the Zebrafish embryos developed to 24 hpf, the apoptotic signals in the entire embryos, used as the biological endpoint for this study, were quantified. Our results showed that [I L U L ] and [I H U L ] led to antagonistic effects, whereas [I H U H ] led to an additive effect. The effect found for the previously studied case of [I L U H ] was difficult to define because it was synergistic with reference to the 100 µg/l DU exposure, but it was antagonistic with reference to the 0.44 mGy alpha-particle dose. All the findings regarding the four different schemes showed that the combined effects critically depended on the dose response to each individual stressor. We also qualitatively explained these findings in terms of promotion of early death of cells predisposed to spontaneous transformation by alpha particles, interacting with the delay in cell death resulting from various concentrations of DU exposure

  2. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Heravi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2 nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium (DMEM. The extracts were obtained and exposed to culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF and mouse L929 fibroblasts. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Both adhesives were moderately toxic for HGF cells on the first day of the experiment, but the TiO2-containing adhesive produced significantly lower toxicity than the pure adhesive (P0.05. There was a significant reduction in cell toxicity with increasing pre-incubation time (P<0.001. L929 cells showed similar toxicity trends, but lower sensitivity to detect cytotoxicity of dental composites. Conclusion. The orthodontic adhesive containing TiO2 nano-particles indicated comparable or even lower toxicity than its nano-particle-free counterpart, indicating that incorporation of 1 wt% TiO2 nano-particles to the composite structure does not result in additional health hazards compared to that occurring with the pure adhesive.

  3. In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assessment of an Orthodontic Composite Containing Titanium-dioxide Nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heravi, Farzin; Ramezani, Mohammad; Poosti, Maryam; Hosseini, Mohsen; Shajiei, Arezoo; Ahrari, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Incorporation of nano-particles to orthodontic bonding systems has been considered to prevent enamel demineralization around appliances. This study investigated cytotoxicity of Transbond XT adhesive containing 1 wt% titanium dioxide (TiO2) nano-particles. Materials and methods. Ten composite disks were prepared from each of the conventional and TiO2-containg composites and aged for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM). The extracts were obtained and exposed to culture media of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and mouse L929 fibroblasts. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results. Both adhesives were moderately toxic for HGF cells on the first day of the experiment, but the TiO2-containing adhesive produced significantly lower toxicity than the pure adhesive (P0.05). There was a significant reduction in cell toxicity with increasing pre-incubation time (Porthodontic adhesive containing TiO2 nano-particles indicated comparable or even lower toxicity than its nano-particle-free counterpart, indicating that incorporation of 1 wt% TiO2 nano-particles to the composite structure does not result in additional health hazards compared to that occurring with the pure adhesive.

  4. Adsorption of acids and bases from aqueous solutions onto silicon dioxide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Huseyin; Erkan, Belgin

    2009-12-30

    The adsorption of acids and bases onto the surface of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) particles was systematically studied as a function of several variables, including activation conditions, contact time, specific surface area, particle size, concentration and temperature. The physical properties of SiO(2) particles were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by FT-IR spectroscopy, and morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM of samples showed good dispersion and uniform SiO(2) particles with an average diameter of about 1-1.5 microm. The adsorption results revealed that SiO(2) surfaces possessed effective interactions with acids and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity was achieved with NaOH, where the best fit isotherm model was the Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption properties of raw SiO(2) particles were further improved by ultrasonication. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of NaOH adsorbate at 25 degrees C on sonicated SiO(2) (182.6 mg/g) was found to be greater than that of the unsonicated SiO(2) (154.3mg/g). The spontaneity of the adsorption process was established by decreases in DeltaG(ads)(0), which varied from -10.5 to -13.6 kJ mol(-1), in the temperature range 283-338K.

  5. Dissolution of uranium and plutonium particles: simulations using the Mercer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1983-10-01

    There is a need to be able to predict the amount of plutonium that will be in solution at a given time from dissolution of particles in order to better predict the environmental behavior and possible adverse effects of plutonium spills. The equation developed by Mercer (1967) to simulate the dissolution of particles in lungs was parameterized and used to simulate the dissolution of a population of plutonium or uranium particles in the soil. Parameter values for the size distribution of particles in soil, and the density of the particles were found; however, values for the shape factors, and the dissolution rate were virtually non-existent. The calculated mass dissolved was most sensitive to the median diameter of the population of particles and least sensitive to the geometric standard deviation. A given percent change in the shape parameter and the dissolution rate resulted in approximately an equal percent change in the mass dissolved. Provided that the population of particles follows a log-normal distribution, the particles are homogeneous in composition and the dissolution can be represented by first-order kinetics, this equation can probably be applied with slight modification to estimate the mass dissolved at a given time. 66 references, 7 figures, 4 tables

  6. Study of the behaviour of cesium fission product in uranium dioxide by the ab initio method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Florence

    2008-01-01

    The knowledge of the behaviour of fission products in the nuclear fuel is very important for safety considerations and for understanding the evolution of the fuel properties under irradiation. In this work, we focussed mainly on the behaviour of caesium in UO 2 through ab initio studies of its solubility at point defects in the matrix, its diffusion and its contribution to the formation of solid phases in the fuel. The role of electronic correlation effects of the f electrons of uranium on these properties and on the description of the defect free crystal, is assessed. The formation energies of the main point defects are calculated and their concentration as a function of fuel stoichiometry and temperature is estimated. The migration barriers and migration paths for the self-diffusion of oxygen and uranium vacancies and oxygen interstitials in UO 2 are discussed. The solubility of Cs is found to be very low in UO 2 in agreement with experimental findings. The most favourable trapping sites are determined as a function of oxygen concentration in the fuel. Our results show that in the hyper-stoichiometric regime, the diffusion of Cs from its most favourable trapping site is limited by the uranium vacancy diffusion mechanism. We also considered the formation of the main solid phases of caesium resulting from its oxidation (Cs 2 O, Cs 2 O 2 , CsO 2 ) and from its interaction with the fuel (Cs 2 UO 4 ), with molybdenum (Cs 2 MoO 4 ) and with the zirconium of the clad (Cs 2 ZrO 3 ), since the formation of such phases, their solubility and their interdependence will affect the release of caesium. (author)

  7. Influence of clay particles on the transport and retention of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Tong, Meiping; Wang, Xueting; Kim, Hyunjung

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of two representative suspended clay particles, bentonite and kaolinite, on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in saturated quartz sand in both NaCl (1 and 10 mM ionic strength) and CaCl2 solutions (0.1 and 1 mM ionic strength) at pH 7. The breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite or kaolinite were higher than those without the presence of clay particles in NaCl solutions, indicating that both types of clay particles increased nTiO2 transport in NaCl solutions. Moreover, the enhancement of nTiO2 transport was more significant when bentonite was present in nTiO2 suspensions relative to kaolinite. Similar to NaCl solutions, in CaCl2 solutions, the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with bentonite were also higher than those without clay particles, while the breakthrough curves of nTiO2 with kaolinite were lower than those without clay particles. Clearly, in CaCl2 solutions, the presence of bentonite in suspensions increased nTiO2 transport, whereas, kaolinite decreased nTiO2 transport in quartz sand. The attachment of nTiO2 onto clay particles (both bentonite and kaolinite) were observed under all experimental conditions. The increased transport of nTiO2 in most experimental conditions (except for kaolinite in CaCl2 solutions) was attributed mainly to the clay-facilitated nTiO2 transport. The straining of larger nTiO2-kaolinite clusters yet contributed to the decreased transport (enhanced retention) of nTiO2 in divalent CaCl2 solutions when kaolinite particles were copresent in suspensions.

  8. Production and characterization of monodisperse uranium particles for nuclear safeguards applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knott, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Environmental sampling is a very effective measure to detect undeclared nuclear activities. Generally, samples are taken as swipe samples on cotton. These swipes contain minute quantities of particulates which have an inherent signature of their production and release scenario. These inspection samples are assessed for their morphology, elemental composition and their isotopic vectors. Mass spectrometry plays a crucial role in determining the isotopic ratios of uranium. Method validation and instrument calibration with well-characterized quality control (QC)-materials, reference materials (RMs) and certified reference materials (CRMs) ensures reliable data output. Currently, the availability of suitable well defined microparticles containing uranium and plutonium reference materials is very limited. Primarily, metals, oxides and various uranium and plutonium containing solutions are commercially available. Therefore, the IAEA's Safeguards Analytical Services (SGAS) cooperates with the Institute of Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety (IEK-6) at the Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH in a joint task entitled ''Production of Particle Reference Materials''. The work presented in this thesis has been partially funded by the IAEA, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH and the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) through the ''Joint Program on the Technical Development and Further Improvement of IAEA Safeguards between the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the IAEA''. The first step towards monodisperse microparticles was the development of pure uranium oxide particles made from certified reference materials. The focus of the dissertation is (1) the implementation of a working setup to produce monodisperse uranium oxide particles and (2) the characterization of these particles towards the application as QC-material. Monodisperse uranium oxide particles were produced by spray pyrolysis. It was

  9. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  11. Dissociation of carbon dioxide and creation of carbon particles and films at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Takahiro [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Maekawa, Toru [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Hasumura, Takashi [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Rantonen, Nyrki [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Ishii, Koji [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Nakajima, Yoshikata [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Hanajiri, Tatsuro [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Yoshida, Yoshikazu [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Whitby, Raymond [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Mikhalovsky, Sergey [School of Pharmacy and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Brighton, Cockroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    As fluids approach their gas-liquid critical points, the physical properties such as the specific heat and compressibility diverge due to the formation of large molecular clusters. Incident light cannot penetrate near-critical fluids because of the large clusters, a phenomenon known as critical opalescence. In this paper, we irradiate near-critical carbon dioxide (ncCO{sub 2}), the critical temperature and pressure of which are 31.0{sup 0}C and 7.38 MPa, with a laser beam of 213, 266, 355 and 532 nm wavelength and show that CO{sub 2} is dissociated and particles are produced when the system is set so close to the critical point that critical opalescence occurs in the case of 213 and 266 nm wavelength, whereas no particles are produced when the temperature is made to deviate from the critical value. We also apply a dc electric field to ncCO{sub 2} during irradiation with a laser beam of 213 and 266 nm wavelength and find that particles are formed on both anode and cathode. As the intensity of the electric field increases, films are formed on the electrodes. Electron diffraction patterns and energy-dispersive x-ray, Auger electron, x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic analyses show that the particles and films are composed of amorphous carbon.

  12. Dissociation of carbon dioxide and creation of carbon particles and films at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru; Hasumura, Takashi; Rantonen, Nyrki; Ishii, Koji; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Whitby, Raymond; Mikhalovsky, Sergey

    2007-09-01

    As fluids approach their gas-liquid critical points, the physical properties such as the specific heat and compressibility diverge due to the formation of large molecular clusters. Incident light cannot penetrate near-critical fluids because of the large clusters, a phenomenon known as critical opalescence. In this paper, we irradiate near-critical carbon dioxide (ncCO2), the critical temperature and pressure of which are 31.0°C and 7.38 MPa, with a laser beam of 213, 266, 355 and 532 nm wavelength and show that CO2 is dissociated and particles are produced when the system is set so close to the critical point that critical opalescence occurs in the case of 213 and 266 nm wavelength, whereas no particles are produced when the temperature is made to deviate from the critical value. We also apply a dc electric field to ncCO2 during irradiation with a laser beam of 213 and 266 nm wavelength and find that particles are formed on both anode and cathode. As the intensity of the electric field increases, films are formed on the electrodes. Electron diffraction patterns and energy-dispersive x-ray, Auger electron, x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic analyses show that the particles and films are composed of amorphous carbon.

  13. Dissociation of carbon dioxide and creation of carbon particles and films at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Takahiro; Maekawa, Toru; Hasumura, Takashi; Rantonen, Nyrki; Ishii, Koji; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Yoshida, Yoshikazu; Whitby, Raymond; Mikhalovsky, Sergey

    2007-01-01

    As fluids approach their gas-liquid critical points, the physical properties such as the specific heat and compressibility diverge due to the formation of large molecular clusters. Incident light cannot penetrate near-critical fluids because of the large clusters, a phenomenon known as critical opalescence. In this paper, we irradiate near-critical carbon dioxide (ncCO 2 ), the critical temperature and pressure of which are 31.0 0 C and 7.38 MPa, with a laser beam of 213, 266, 355 and 532 nm wavelength and show that CO 2 is dissociated and particles are produced when the system is set so close to the critical point that critical opalescence occurs in the case of 213 and 266 nm wavelength, whereas no particles are produced when the temperature is made to deviate from the critical value. We also apply a dc electric field to ncCO 2 during irradiation with a laser beam of 213 and 266 nm wavelength and find that particles are formed on both anode and cathode. As the intensity of the electric field increases, films are formed on the electrodes. Electron diffraction patterns and energy-dispersive x-ray, Auger electron, x-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic analyses show that the particles and films are composed of amorphous carbon

  14. A kinetic study of the reaction of water vapor and carbon dioxide on uranium; Cinetique de la reaction de la vapeur d'eau et du dioxyde de carbone sur l'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santon, J P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-09-15

    The kinetic study of the reaction of water vapour and carbon dioxide with uranium has been performed by thermogravimetric methods at temperatures between 160 and 410 deg G in the first case, 350 and 1050 deg C in the second: Three sorts of uranium specimens were used: uranium powder, thin evaporated films, and small spheres obtained from a plasma furnace. The experimental results led in the case of water vapour, to a linear rate of reaction controlled by diffusion at the lower temperatures, and by a surface reaction at the upper ones. In the case of carbon dioxide, a parabolic law has been found, controlled by diffusional processes. (author) [French] L'etude cinetique de la reaction de la vapeur d'eau et du dioxyde de carbone sur l'uranium a ete entreprise au moyen de methodes thermogravimetriques, dans te premier cas entre 160 et 410 deg C et dans le second entre 350 et 1050 deg C. Le materiau utilise se presentait sous trois formes: poudres, couches minces evaporees et billes obtenues par fusion en chalumeau a plasma. Les resultats experimentaux ont permis de mettre en evidence, dans le cas de la vapeur d'eau, une cinetique lineaire controlee par la diffusion a basse temperature et d'interface a haute temperature. Dans le cas du dioxyde de carbone par contre, on trouve une cinetique parabolique controlee par la diffusion. (auteur)

  15. Creep of uranium dioxide: bending test and mechanical behaviour; Etude du fluage du dioxyde d'uranium: caracterisation par essais de flexion et modelisation mecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, Ch

    2003-09-01

    These PhD work in the frame of Pellet-Cladding Interactions studies, in the fuel assemblies of nuclear plants. Electricite de France (EDF) must well demonstrate and insure the integrity of the cladding. For that purpose, the viscoplastic behaviour of the nuclear fuel has to be known and, if possible, controlled. This PhD work aimed to characterize the creep of uranium dioxide, in conditions of transient power regime. First, a literature survey on mechanical behaviour of UO{sub 2} revealed that the ceramic was essentially studied with compressive tests, and that its creep behaviour is characterized by two domains, depending on the stress level. To estimate the loadings in a fuel pellet, EDF and CEA developed specific global codes. A simulation during a power ramp allowed the order of magnitude of the loadings in the pellet to be determined (temperature, thermal gradients, strains, strain rate...). The stress calculation using a finite element simulation requires the identification of behaviour laws, able to describe the behaviour under small strains, low strain rates, and under tensile stresses. Starting from this observation, three point bending method has been chosen to test the uranium dioxide. As, for representativeness reasons, testing specimens cut in actual fuel pads was required in our study; a ten millimeters span has been used. For this study, a specific three-point testing device has been developed, that can tests specimens up to 2 000 C in a controlled atmosphere (Ar + 5% H{sub 2}). A special care has been taken for the measurement of the deflexion of the sample, which is measured using a laser beam, that allow an accuracy of {+-}2{mu}m to be reached at high temperature. Specimens with 0,5 to 1 mm thickness have been tested using this jig. A Norton's law describe, with respective stress exponent and activation energy values of 1.73 and 540 kJ.mole-1, provided a good description of the stationary creep rate. Then, the mechanical behaviour of the fuel

  16. Extraction of Uranium from Aqueous Solutions Using Ionic Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Conjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Joanna S.; Sheaff, Chrystal N.; Yoon, Byunghoon; Addleman, Raymond S.; Wai, Chien M.

    2009-01-01

    Uranyl ions (UO2)2+ in aqueous nitric acid solutions can be extracted into supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) via an imidazolium-based ionic liquid using tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent. The transfer of uranium from the ionic liquid to the supercritical fluid phase was monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy using a high-pressure fiberoptic cell. The form of the uranyl complex extracted into the supercritical CO2 phase was found to be UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2. The extraction results were confirmed by UV/Vis spectroscopy and by neutron activation analysis. This technique could potentially be used to extract other actinides for applications in the field of nuclear waste management.

  17. Determination of Krypton Diffusion Coefficients in Uranium Dioxide Using Atomic Scale Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vathonne, Emerson; Andersson, David A; Freyss, Michel; Perriot, Romain; Cooper, Michael W D; Stanek, Christopher R; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2017-01-03

    We present a study of the diffusion of krypton in UO 2 using atomic scale calculations combined with diffusion models adapted to the system studied. The migration barriers of the elementary mechanisms for interstitial or vacancy assisted migration are calculated in the DFT+U framework using the nudged elastic band method. The attempt frequencies are obtained from the phonon modes of the defect at the initial and saddle points using empirical potential methods. The diffusion coefficients of Kr in UO 2 are then calculated by combining this data with diffusion models accounting for the concentration of vacancies and the interaction of vacancies with Kr atoms. We determined the preferred mechanism for Kr migration and the corresponding diffusion coefficient as a function of the oxygen chemical potential μ O or nonstoichiometry. For very hypostoichiometric (or U-rich) conditions, the most favorable mechanism is interstitial migration. For hypostoichiometric UO 2 , migration is assisted by the bound Schottky defect and the charged uranium vacancy, V U 4- . Around stoichiometry, migration assisted by the charged uranium-oxygen divacancy (V UO 2- ) and V U 4- is the favored mechanism. Finally, for hyperstoichiometric or O-rich conditions, the migration assisted by two V U 4- dominates. Kr migration is enhanced at higher μ O , and in this regime, the activation energy will be between 4.09 and 0.73 eV depending on nonstoichiometry. The experimental values available are in the latter interval. Since it is very probable that these values were obtained for at least slightly hyperstoichiometric samples, our activation energies are consistent with the experimental data, even if further experiments with precisely controlled stoichiometry are needed to confirm these results. The mechanisms and trends with nonstoichiometry established for Kr are similar to those found in previous studies of Xe.

  18. Study on principle and method of measuring system for external dimensions, geometric density and appearance quality of uranium dioxide pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Wei; Deng Hua; Wang Tao

    2010-01-01

    To adapt to the need of nuclear power development, and keep in step with the increasingly growing nuclear fuel element production, a special measuring system for integrated measuring, calculation, data processing method of External Dimensions, Tolerance of figure and place, Geometric Density and Appearance Quality of Uranium Dioxide Pellet is studied and discussed. This system is with important guiding significance for the improvement of technologic and frocking level.. The measuring system is primarily applied to sampling test during production and is the same with several types of products.The successful application of this measuring method ensures the accuracy and reliability of measured data, reduces the artificial error and makes the measuring be move convenient and fast, thus achieves high precision and high efficiency of measuring process. The measuring method is approach the advanced world level of measuring method at the same industry. So, based on the product inspection requirement, using special measuring instrument and computer data processing system is an important approach we use for nonce and future. (authors)

  19. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  20. Fracture of Zircaloy cladding by interactions with uranium dioxide pellets in LWR fuel rods. Technical report 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.; Ranjan, G.V.; Cipolla, R.C.

    1976-11-01

    Power reactor fuel rod failures can be caused by uranium dioxide fuel pellet-Zircaloy cladding interactions. The report summarizes the current position attained in a detailed theoretical study of Zircaloy cladding fracture caused by the growth of stress corrosion cracks which form near fuel pellet cracks as a consequence of a power increase after a sufficiently high burn-up. It is shown that stress corrosion crack growth in irradiated Zircaloy must be able to proceed at very low stress intensifications if uniform friction effects are operative at the fuel-cladding interface, when the interfacial friction coefficient is less than unity, when a symmetric distribution of fuel cracks exists, and when symmetric interfacial slippage occurs (i.e., ''uniform'' conditions). Otherwise, the observed fuel rod failures must be due to departures from ''uniform'' conditions, and a very high interfacial friction coefficient and particularly fuel-cladding bonding, are means of providing sufficient stess intensification at a cladding crack tip to explain the occurrence of cladding fractures. The results of the investigation focus attention on the necessity for reliable experimental data on the stress corrosion crack growth behavior of irradiated Zircaloy, and for further investigations on the correlation between local fuel-cladding bonding and stress corrosion cracking

  1. The pressure bonding ability of uranium dioxide powders in relation to the evolution of their surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danroc, J.

    1982-09-01

    The long term storage of sinterable uranium dioxide powders generally improves their pressure bonding ability and the strength of the resulting green pellets. Evidence of the gradual evolution of the surface texture and composition of these powders during storage at room temperature and pressure has been provided by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric and microcalorimetric methods. These techniques demonstrated the existence of a thin adherent surface layer of UO 3 2H 2 0. Such a natural evolutionary process can be reproduced and substantially amplified by subjecting the powder to thermal treatments at temperatures up to 90 0 C in a moist air environment. It was shown that powder treated in this manner could be more readily compacted into strong green pellets than could raw material. The tensile strength, commonly regarded as a quality test for such pellets and measured by the brazilian method, was found to be at least twice that of normal pellets. The high density and geometric integrity of these sintered products ensures the extrapolation of these preparation techniques to the mass production of nuclear reactor fuel pellets [fr

  2. Influence of instrument conditions on the evaporation behavior of uranium dioxide with UV laser-assisted atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) provides the ability to detect subnanometer chemical variations spatially with high accuracy. Due to its ability to spatially characterize chemistry in non-conducting materials, such as oxides, provides the opportunity to characterize stoichiometry, which strongly is tied to material performance. However, accuracy has been correlated with instrument run parameters. A systematic study of the effect of laser energy, temperature, and detection rate is performed on the evaporation behavior of a model oxide, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). Modifying the detection rate and temperature did not affect its evaporation behavior as laser energy. It was discovered that three laser evaporation regimes are present in UO 2 . Very low laser energy produces a behavior similar to DC-field evaporation, moderate laser energy produces the desired laser assisted field evaporation and high laser energy produces thermal effects in the evaporation behavior. Laser energy had the greatest impact on evaporation and the optimal instrument condition for UO 2 was determined to be 50K, 10 pJ laser energy, 0.3% detection rate, and a 100 kHz repetition rate. These conditions provide the best combination of mass resolution, accurate stoichiometry, and evaporation behavior.

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  4. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  5. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  6. Analysis of normalized-characteristic curves and determination of the granulometric state of dissolved uranium dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.; Neumann, L.

    1977-01-01

    Methods are presented for the analysis of normalized-characteristic curves, which make it possible to determine the granulometric composition of a dissolved polydispersion - the cumulative mass distribution of particles - as a function of the relative particle size. If the size of the largest particle in the dissolved polydispersion is known, these methods allow the determination of the dependence of cumulative mass ratios of particles on their absolute sizes. In the inverse method of the geometrical model for determining the granulometric composition of a dissolved polydispersion, the polydispersion is represented by a finite number of monodispersions. An accurate analysis of normalized-characteristic equations leads to the Akselrud dissolution model. As against the other two methods, the latter allows the determination of the granulometric composition for an arbitrary number of particle sizes. The method of the granulometric atlas is a method for estimating the granulometric composition of a dissolved polydispersion and is based on comparison of a normalized-characteristic curve for an unknown granulometric composition with an atlas of normalized-characteristic curves for selected granulometric spectra of polydispersions. (author)

  7. Uranium trace and alpha activity characterization of coal and fly ash using particle track etch technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Uranium is extensively found in carbonaceous components of sedimentary rocks and is considered to be accumulated in coals during the coalification process through the geological times. Burning of coal is mainly responsible for a manifold increase in the concentration of radioactive nuclides in atmosphere precipitates. Fly ash being an incombustible residue and formed from 90% of the inorganic material in coal, escapes into the atmosphere and constitutes a potential hazard. Also its use as one of the pozzolanic materials in the products of concrete, bricks etc and filling of ground cavities is even more hazardous because of the wall radioactivity, besides emission and diffusion of radon. This paper reports a simple method called Particle Track Etch (PTE) technique, for trace determination of uranium content in coal and fly ash samples by making use of low cost and versatile plastic detectors known as Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs). Total alpha activity has also been estimated using these SSNTDs. The values of uranium concentration in coal samples are found to range from 1.1 to 3.6 ppm (uniform component) and 33 to 46 ppm (non-uniform part) whereas in fly ash, it varies from 8 to 11 ppm (uniform) and 55 to 71 ppm in non-uniform range. It is also observed that the alpha activity is a function of uranium concentration for most of the natural samples of coal studied except for mixtures of fly ash samples where relationship is found to be on higher side. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Rapid removal of uranium from aqueous solutions using magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2 composite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fang-Li; Qin, Zhi; Bai, Jing; Rong, Wei-Dong; Fan, Fu-You; Tian, Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Liang

    2012-04-01

    Rapid removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles as the novel adsorbent. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial pH, amount of adsorbent, shaking time and initial U(VI) concentrations on uranium sorption efficiency as well as the desorbing of U(VI). The sorption of uranium on Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was pH-dependent, and the optimal pH was 6.0. In kinetics studies, the sorption equilibrium can be reached within 180 min, and the experimental data were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order model, and the equilibrium sorption capacities calculated by the model were almost the same as those determined by experiments. The Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with the uranium sorption equilibrium data for the concentration range of 20-200 mg/L. The maximum uranium sorption capacity onto magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles was estimated to be about 52 mg/g at 25 °C. The highest values of uranium desorption (98%) was achieved using 0.01 M HCl as the desorbing agent. Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles showed a good selectivity for uranium from aqueous solution with other interfering cation ions. Present study suggested that magnetic Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2) composite particles can be used as a potential adsorbent for sorption uranium and also provided a simple, fast separation method for removal of heavy metal ion from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute and subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats with nanoscale and pigment grade titanium dioxide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Brown, S C; Donner, E M

    2015-10-01

    Data generated using standardized testing protocols for toxicity studies generally provide reproducible and reliable results for establishing safe levels and formulating risk assessments. The findings of three OECD guideline-type oral toxicity studies of different duration in rats are summarized in this publication; each study evaluated different titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles of varying sizes and surface coatings. Moreover, each study finding demonstrated an absence of any TiO2 -related hazards. To briefly summarize the findings: 1) In a subchronic 90-day study (OECD TG 408), groups of young adult male and female rats were dosed with rutile-type, surface-coated pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 145 nm - 21% nanoparticles by particle number criteria) by oral gavage for 90 days. The no-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both male and female rats in this study was 1000 mg/kg bw/day, the highest dose tested. The NOAEL was determined based on a lack of TiO2 particle-related adverse effects on any in-life, clinical pathology, or anatomic/microscopic pathology parameters; 2) In a 28-day repeated-dose oral toxicity study (OECD TG 407), groups of young adult male rats were administered daily doses of two rutile-type, uncoated, pigment-grade TiO2 test particles (d50 = 173 nm by number) by daily oral gavage at a dose of 24,000 mg/kg bw/day. There were no adverse effects measured during or following the end of the exposure period; and the NOAEL was determined to be 24,000 mg/kg bw/day; 3) In an acute oral toxicity study (OECD TG 425), female rats were administered a single oral exposure of surface-treated rutile/anatase nanoscale TiO2 particles (d50 = 73 nm by number) with doses up to 5000 mg/kg and evaluated over a 14-day post-exposure period. Under the conditions of this study, the oral LD50 for the test substance was >5000 mg/kg bw. In summary, the results from these three toxicity studies - each with different TiO2 particulate-types, demonstrated an absence of

  10. Investigating the structural changes of uranium dioxide dependent on additives, Phase I - Uranium-oxide system from structural-phase aspect; Ispitivanje strukturnih promena kod urandioksida u zavisnosti od aditiva, I faza - Sistem Uran-kiseonik sa strukturno-faznog aspekta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojlovic, Lj [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Laboratorija za reaktorske materijale, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    Having in mind the complex structure of the system uranium-oxygen, and that experimental studies of this system lead to controversial conclusions, an extensive review and analysis of the papers published on this subject were needed. This review wold be very useful for interpreting the expected structural changes of the uranium dioxide dependent on the additives.

  11. Application of Radio-Frequency Plasma Glow Discharge to Removal of Uranium Dioxide from Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Saber, Hamed H.

    2000-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that radio-frequency (rf) plasma glow discharge using NF 3 gas is an effective technique for the removal of uranium oxide from metal surfaces. The results of these experiments are analyzed to explain the measured dependence of the UO 2 removal or etch rate on the NF 3 gas pressure and the absorbed power in the plasma. The NF 3 gas pressure in the experiments was varied from 10.8 to 40 Pa, and the deposited power in the plasma was varied from 25 to 210 W. The UO 2 etch rate was strongly dependent on the absorbed power and, to a lesser extent, on the NF 3 pressure and decreased exponentially with immersion time. At 210 W and 17 Pa, all detectable UO 2 in the samples (∼10.6 mg each) was removed at the endpoint, whereas the initial etch rate was ∼3.11 μm/min. When the absorbed power was ≤50 W, however, the etch rate was initially ∼0.5 μg/min and almost zero at the endpoint, with UO 2 only partially etched. This self-limiting etching of UO 2 at low power is attributed to the formation of nonvolatile intermediates UF 2 , UF 3 , UF 4 , UF 5 , UO 2 F, and UO 2 F 2 on the surface. Analysis indicated that the accumulation of UF 6 and, to a lesser extent, O 2 near the surface partially contributed to the exponential decrease in the UO 2 etch rate with immersion time. Unlike fluorination with F 2 gas, etching of UO 2 using rf glow discharge is possible below 663 K. The average etch rates of the amorphous UO 2 in the NF 3 experiments are comparable to the peak values reported in other studies for crystalline UO 2 using CF 4 /O 2 glow discharge performed at ∼150 to 250 K higher sample temperatures

  12. Improvement of cesium retention in uranium dioxide by additional phases; Amelioration de la retention du cesium dans le dioxyde d`uranium au moyen de phases exogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamaury Dubois, S

    1995-09-19

    The objective of this study is to improve the cesium retention in nuclear fuel. A bibliographic survey indicates that cesium is rapidly released from uranium dioxide in an accident condition. At temperatures higher than 1500 deg C or in oxidising conditions, our experiments show the difficulty of maintaining cesium inside simulated fuel. Two ternary systems are potentially interesting for the retention of cesium and to reduce the kinetics of release from the fuel: Cs{sub 2}O-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} et Cs{sub 2}O-ZrO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}. The compounds CsAISi{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}ZrSi{sub 6}O{sub 15} were studied from 1200 deg C to 2000 deg C by thermogravimetric analysis. The volumetric diffusion coefficients of cesium in these structures, in solid state as well as in liquid one, were measured. A fuel was sintered with (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}) or (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}) and the intergranular phase was characterized. In the presence of (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is realized at 1610 deg C in H{sub 2}. It is a liquid phase sintering. On the other end, with (ZrO{sub 2} + SiO{sub 2}), the sintering is a low temperature one in oxidising atmosphere. Finally, cesium containing simulated fuels were produced with these additives. According to the effective diffusion coefficients that were measured, the additives improved the retention of cesium. We have predicted the improvement that could be hoped for in a nuclear reactor, depending on the dispersion of the intergranular additives, the temperature and the degree of oxidation of the UO{sub 2+x}. We wait for a factor of 2 for x=0 and more than 8 for x=0.05, up to 2000 deg C. (author). 148 refs., 122 figs., 34 tabs.

  13. Effects of oral administration of titanium dioxide fine-sized particles on plasma glucose in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ning; Hu, Hailong; Guo, Qian; Jin, Sanli; Wang, Changlin; Oh, Yuri; Feng, Yujie; Wu, Qiong

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is an authorized additive used as a food colorant, is composed of nano-sized particles (NP) and fine-sized particles (FP). Previous study reported that oral administration of TiO2 NPs triggers an increase in plasma glucose of mice. However, no previous studies have focused on toxic effects of TiO2 FPs on plasma glucose homeostasis following oral administration. In the current study, mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs greater than 100 nm in size (64 mg/kg body weight per day), and effects on plasma glucose levels examined. Our results showed that titanium levels was not changed in mouse blood, livers and pancreases after mice were orally administered TiO2 FPs. Biochemical analyzes showed that plasma glucose and ROS levels were not affected by TiO2 FPs. Histopathological results showed that TiO2 FPs did not induce pathology changes in organs, especially plasma glucose homeostasis regulation organs, such as pancreas and liver. Western blotting showed that oral administration of TiO2 FPs did not induce insulin resistance (IR) in mouse liver. These results showed that, TiO2 FPs cannot be absorbed via oral administration and affect plasma glucose levels in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Production and analysis of ultradispersed uranium oxide powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajogin, A. P.; Komyak, A. I.; Umreiko, D. S.; Umreiko, S. D.

    2010-05-01

    Spectroscopic studies are made of the laser plasma formed near the surface of a porous body containing nanoquantities of uranium compounds which is irradiated by two successive laser pulses. The feasibility of using laser chemical methods for obtaining nanoclusters of uranium oxide particles in the volume of a porous body and the simultaneous possibility of determining the uranium content with good sensitivity are demonstrated. The thermochemical and spectral characteristics of the analogs of their compounds with chlorine are determined and studied. The possibility of producing uranium dioxides under ordinary conditions and their analysis in the reaction products is demonstrated.

  15. PRODUCTION OF METAL CHEMICAL WELDING ADDITIVE WITH NANODISPERSED PARTICLES OF TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLDYREV Alexander Mikhaylovich

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When welding bridge structures automatic welding under a gumboil layer with metal chemical additive (MCA is widely applied in the modern bridge building. MCA consists of a chopped welding wire (granulated material, which is powdered by modifying chemical additive of titanium dioxide (TiO₂ in the cylindrical mixer «drunk cask». Chemical composition of all welding materials including welding wire, gumboil, electrodes, are strictly normalized and controlled. However, the existing technology of producing MCA doesn’t allow precise controlling of its structure under working conditions and that causes an impact on the stability of welded connections properties. Therefore the aim of this work is to develop a technology to produce stable MCA structure. The paper compares the existing and proposed manufacturing techniques of the metal chemical additive (MCA which is applied in automatic welding of butt connections for bridge structures. It is shown that production of MCA in a high-energy planetary mill provides more stable structure of the additive introduced into a welded joint. The granulometric analysis of the powder TiO₂ showed that when processing MCA in a planetary mill TiO₂ particles are crashed to nanodimensional order. This process is accompanied by crushing of granulated material too. The proposed method for production of MCA in a planetary mill provides stronger cohesion of dioxide with the granulate surface and, as a consequence, more stable MCA chemical structure. Application of MCA which has been mechanical intensified in a planetary mill, increases stability of mechanical properties, if compare with applied technology, in single-order by breaking point and almost twice by impact viscosity.

  16. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  17. Elastic and plastic properties of uranium dioxide from 5 to 330 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gust, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    Published Hugoniot data for UO 2 is in error, because the measuring techniques used did not resolve the strong multiple-wave shock-structures present. Hence calculations related to liquid metal, fast-breeder-reactor, excursion analyses based on extrapolations of that data are in serious error. The inclined prism, flash gap, and two-stage gas-gun techniques are used to determine shock-compression parameters for UO 2 to 300 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit for UO 2 was found to be 5.7 GPa. At higher pressure, a plot of shock vs particle velocity displays a discontinuity between 1.0 < U/sub p/ < 1.8 km/s, which appears to be a manifestation of a solid-solid phase transition. For 1.8 < U/sub p/ < 4.0 km/s, the plot is given by U/sub s/ = 5.8 + 1.28

  18. Low density, variation in sintered density and high nitrogen in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishna, Palanki; Murty, B.N.; Anuradha, M.; Nageshwara Rao, P.; Jayaraj, R.N.; Ganguly, C.

    2000-01-01

    Low sintered density and density variation in sintered UO 2 were found to have been caused by non uniformity in the granule feed characteristics to the compacting press. The nitrogen impurity content of sintered UO 2 was found to be sintering furnace related and associated with low sintered density pellets. The problems of low density, variation in sintered density and high nitrogen could be solved by the replacement of the prevailing four punch precompaction by a single punch process; by the introduction of a vibro-sieve for the separation of fine particles from the press feed granules; by innovation in the powder feed shoe design for simultaneous and uniform dispensing of powder in all the die holes; by increasing the final compaction pressure and by modifying the gas flows and preheat temperature in the sintering furnace. (author)

  19. Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Thomas D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Hoover, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post-impact, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the vehicle commander, loader, gunner, and driver. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for depleted uranium concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol

  20. Particle Size Effects in Bio leaching of Uranium From Saghand Ore by Acidithiobacillus Ferroxidans (A.f.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashidi, A.; Roosta Azad, R.; Safdari, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of mineral particle size on the bio leaching of uranium from Saghand mine (anomaly 1 and 2) by acidophilic mesophile Acidithiobacillus ferroxidans was investigated in a shake flask. The findings are indicating that this strain is suitable for the uranium recovery from the mentioned ore. In the range of our studies the uranium recovery is faster in the case of d 80 =108 micron from anomaly 1, while, a comminution level of d 80 =160 micron was obtained as an appropriate size for the anomaly 2. The results showed that the particle size distribution of the mineral in this range did not considerably influence the microbial activity. Also, based on the results of bacterial oxidation, the negative effects and toxicity due to the presence of solid and solute components do not put a limit on the microbial activity, and at the tested parameters range, the grown microbial population is performing the desired process excellently.

  1. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  2. Improvement of the homogeneity of atomized particles dispersed in high uranium density research reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Park, Jong-Man; Lee, Yoon-Sang; Lee, Don-Bae; Sohn, Woong-Hee; Hong, Soon-Hyung

    1998-01-01

    A study on improving the homogeneous dispersion of atomized spherical particles in fuel meats has been performed in connection with the development of high uranium density fuel. In comparing various mixing methods, the better homogeneity of the mixture could be obtained as in order of Spex mill, V-shape tumbler mixer, and off-axis rotating drum mixer. The Spex mill mixer required some laborious work because of its small capacity per batch. Trough optimizing the rotating speed parameter for the V-shape tumbler mixer, almost the same homogeneity as with the Spex mill could be obtained. The homogeneity of the extruded fuel meats appeared to improve through extrusion. All extruded fuel meats with U 3 Si powder of 50-volume % had fairly smooth surfaces. The homogeneity of fuel meats by V-shaped tumbler mixer revealed to be fairly good on micrographs. (author)

  3. Lung Deposition Calculations for Radioactive Aerosol Particles Originating from Caves and Uranium Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfoldy, B.; Torok, Sz.; Winkler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The present study simulates lung deposition of radioactive aerosol particles originating from the atmosphere of a therapeutic cave (Szemlohegyi cave, Budapest) and several uranium mines. Particle deposition patterns and surface densities have been calculated by the stochastic lung model of Koblinger and Hofmann. In the model, deposition can be caused by the simultaneous effects of Brownian motion, inertial impaction and gravitational settling. The calculations were carried out by considering the aerosol particle size distribution and radon concentration of the atmosphere of the cave and mines. The deposition was computed in the whole lung, in characteristic parts of the respiratory system such as extrathoracic, tracheobronchial, acinar and alveolar regions and in the singe airway generations at different flow rates for adults. The adverse health effects of inhaled radionuclides strongly depend from the local deposition density values in cellular dimensions. Thus we will built in the results to a cellular effects model of Balashazy and Hofmann for the simulation of the pathological effects of inhaled radionuclides for risk assessment. (author)

  4. Comparative study of the oxidation of various qualities of uranium in carbon dioxide at high temperatures; Etude comparative de l'oxydation de diverses qualites d'uranium dans l'anhydride carbonique aux temperatures elevees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrues, R; Paidassi, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Uranium samples of six different qualities were subjected, in the temperature range 400 - 1000 C, to the action of carbon dioxide carefully purified to eliminate oxygen and water vapour; the resulting oxidation was followed micro-graphically and also (but only in the range 400 - 700 C) gravimetrically using an Ugine-Eyraud microbalance. A comparison of the results leads to the following 3 observations. First, the oxidation of the six uraniums studied obeys a linear law, (followed at 700 C by an accelerating law). The rates of reaction differ by a maximum of 100 per cent, the higher purity grades being oxidized more slowly except at 700 C when the reverse is true. Secondly, simultaneously with the growth, of an approximately uniform film of uranium dioxide on the metal, there occurs a localized attack in the form of blisters in the immediate neighbourhood of the monocarbide inclusions in the uranium. The relative importance of this attack is greater for lower oxidation temperatures and for a larger size, number and inequality of distribution of the inclusions, that is to say for higher carbon concentrations in the uranium (which have values from 7 to 1000 ppm in our tests). Thirdly, for oxidation temperatures above 600 C blistering is much less pronounced, but at 700 C the beginning of a general deformation of the sample occurs, which, above 750 C, becomes much greater; this leads to an acceleration of the reaction rate with respect to the linear law. In view of the over-heating, the sample must already be in the {gamma}-phase which is particularly easily deformed; furthermore this expansion phenomenon is more pronounced when the sample is more plastic and therefore purer. (authors) [French] Des echantillons de six qualites d'uranium ont ete soumis, dans l'intervalle 400-1000 C, a l'action de l'anhydride carbonique tres soigneusement purifie en oxygene et en vapeur d'eau, et leur oxydation a ete suivie par voie micrographique et egalement (mais seulement entre 400

  5. Radiation enhanced thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide; Diffusion thermique et sous irradiation du chlore dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipon, Yves [Ecole doctorale de physique et d' astrophysique, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon-I, Lyon (France)

    2006-12-15

    This work concerns the study of the thermal and radiation enhanced diffusion of {sup 36}Cl in uranium dioxide. It is a contribution to PRECCI programme (research programme on the long-term behaviour of the spent nuclear fuel). {sup 36}Cl is a long lived volatile activation product (T = 300 000 years) able to contribute significantly to the instant release fraction in geological disposal conditions. We simulated the presence of {sup 36}Cl by implanting a quantity of {sup 37}Cl comparable to the impurity content of chlorine in UO{sub 2}. In order to evaluate the diffusion properties of chlorine in the fuel and in particular to assess the influence of the irradiation defects, we performed two kinds of experiments: - the influence of the temperature was studied by carrying out thermal annealings in the temperature range 900 - 1300 deg. C; we showed that implanted chlorine was mobile from temperatures as low as 1000 deg. C and determined a thermal diffusion coefficient D{sub 1000} {sub deg.} {sub C} around 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and deduced an activation energy of 4.3 eV. This value is one of lowest compared to that of volatile fission products such as iodine or the xenon. These parameters reflect the very mobile behaviour of chlorine; - the irradiation effects induced by fission products were studied by irradiating the samples with {sup 127}I (energy of 63.5 MeV). We showed that the implanted chlorine diffusion in the temperature range 30 - 250 deg. C is not purely athermal. In these conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub 250} {sub deg.} {sub C} for the implanted chlorine is around 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} and the activation energy is calculated to be 0.1 eV. Moreover, at 250 deg. C, we observed an important transport of the pristine chlorine from the bulk towards the surface. This chlorine comes from a zone where the defects are mainly produced by the nuclear energy loss process at the end of iodine range. We showed the importance of the

  6. Contribution to the study of defects created by α particles in uranium at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raharinaivo, A.L.

    1969-01-01

    A device is described for the irradiation, in liquid helium, of metallic strips with α particles produced by radioactive sources. It has thereby been possible to measure changes in resistivity of variously treated uranium samples (cold- worked, annealed, previously exposed to neutrons, etc. ) as a function of the irradiation flux. The annealings carried out after irradiation compare favorably to those effected after a quenching from 100 to 4 K (JOUSSET experiments). The results are discussed; it is concluded that a defect, very probably of the interstitial type, is mobile in uranium at temperatures below 5 K. (author) [fr

  7. Measurements and properties of ice particles and carbon dioxide bubbles in aqueous mixture utilizing optical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Amadou O.

    Optical techniques are used to determine the size, shape and many other properties of particles ranging from the micro to a nano-level. These techniques have endless applications. This research is based on a project assigned by a "Vendor" that wants anonymity. The Leica optical microscope and the Dark Field Polarizing Metallurgical Microscope is used to determine the size and count of ice crystals (Vendors products) in multiple time frames. Since the ice temperature influences, its symmetry and the shape is subject to changes at room temperature (300 K) and the atmospheric pressure that is exerted on the ice crystals varies. The ice crystals are in a mixture of water, electrolytes and carbon dioxide with the optical spectroscopy (Qpod2) and Spectra suite, the optical density of the ice crystals is established from the absorbance and transmission measurements. The optical density in this case is also referred to as absorption; it is plotted with respect to a frequency (GHz), wavelength (nm) or Raman shift (1/cm) which shows the light colliding with the ice particles and CO2. Depending on the peaks positions, it is possible to profile the ice crystal sizes using a mean distribution plots. The region of absorbency wavelength expected for the ice is in the visible range; the water molecules in the (UV) Ultra-violet range and the CO2 in the (IR) infrared region. It is also possible to obtain the reflection and transmission output as a percentage change with the wavelengths ranging from 200 to 1100 nm. The refractive index of the ice can be correlated to the density based on the optical acoustic theorem, or Mie Scattering Theory. The viscosity of the ice crystals and the solutions from which the ice crystals are made of as well are recorded with the SV-10 viscometer. The baseline viscosity is used as reference and set lower than that of the ice crystals. The Zeta potential of the particles present in the mixture are approximated by first finding the viscosity of the

  8. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  9. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  10. Study and simulation of the behaviour under irradiation of helium in uranium dioxide; Etude et modelisation du comportement sous irradiation de l'helium dans le dioxyde d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, G

    2007-06-15

    Large quantities of helium are produced from {alpha}-decay of actinides in nuclear fuels during its in-pile operating and its storage. It is important to understand the behaviour of helium in these matrix in order to well simulate the evolution and the resistance of the fuel element. During this thesis, we have used nuclear reaction analyses (NRA) to follow the evolution of the helium implanted in polycrystalline and monocrystalline uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). An experimental rig was developed to follow the on-line helium release in UO{sub 2} and the evolution of {sup 3}He profiles as a function of annealing temperature. An automated procedure taking into account the evolution of the depth resolution was developed. Analyses performed with a nuclear microprobe allowed to characterise the spatial distribution of helium at the grain scale and to study the influence of the sample microstructure on the helium migration. This work put into evidence the particular role of grain boundaries and irradiation defects in the helium release process. The analyse of experimental results with a diffusion model corroborates these interpretations. It allowed to determine quantitatively physical properties that characterise the helium behaviour in uranium dioxide (diffusion coefficient, activation energy..). (author)

  11. Extraction of uranium from simulated ore by the supercritical carbon dioxide fluid extraction method with nitric acid-TBP complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dung, Le Thi Kim; Imai, Tomoki; Tomioka, Osamu; Nakashima, Mikio; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Meguro, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method using CO 2 as a medium with an extractant of HNO 3 -tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) complex was applied to extract uranium from several uranyl phosphate compounds and simulated uranium ores. An extraction method consisting of a static extraction process and a dynamic one was established, and the effects of the experimental conditions, such as pressure, temperature, and extraction time, on the extraction of uranium were ascertained. It was found that uranium could be efficiently extracted from both the uranyl phosphates and simulated ores by the SFE method using CO 2 . It was thus demonstrated that the SFE method using CO 2 is useful as a pretreatment method for the analysis of uranium in ores. (author)

  12. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  13. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  14. Efficient isotope ratio analysis of uranium particles in swipe samples by total-reflection x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Kazuo; Fukuyama, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takashi; Esaka, Konomi T.; Magara, Masaaki; Sakurai, Satoshi; Usuda, Shigekazu

    2004-01-01

    A new particle recovery method and a sensitive screening method were developed for subsequent isotope ratio analysis of uranium particles in safeguards swipe samples. The particles in the swipe sample were recovered onto a carrier by means of vacuum suction-impact collection method. When grease coating was applied to the carrier, the recovery efficiency was improved to 48±9%, which is superior to that of conventionally-used ultrasoneration method. Prior to isotope ratio analysis with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) was applied to screen the sample for the presence of uranium particles. By the use of Si carriers in TXRF analysis, the detection limit of 22 pg was achieved for uranium. By combining these methods with SIMS, the isotope ratios of 235 U/ 238 U for individual uranium particles were efficiently determined. (author)

  15. Standard specification for uranium oxides with a 235U content of less than 5 % for dissolution prior to conversion to nuclear-grade uranium dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This specification covers uranium oxides, including processed byproducts or scrap material (powder, pellets, or pieces), that are intended for dissolution into uranyl nitrate solution meeting the requirements of Specification C788 prior to conversion into nuclear grade UO2 powder with a 235U content of less than 5 %. This specification defines the impurity and uranium isotope limits for such urania powders that are to be dissolved prior to processing to nuclear grade UO2 as defined in Specification C753. 1.2 This specification provides the nuclear industry with a general standard for such uranium oxide powders. It recognizes the diversity of conversion processes and the processes to which such powders are subsequently to be subjected (for instance, by solvent extraction). It is therefore anticipated that it may be necessary to include supplementary specification limits by agreement between the buyer and seller. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for prevent...

  16. Uranium dioxide Caramel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    The work performed in France on Caramel fuels for research reactors reflects the reality of a program based on non proliferation criteria, as they have already appeared several years ago. This work actually includes the following different aspects: identification of the non proliferation criterion defining this action; determination of the economical and technical goals to be reached; realization of research and development studies finalized in a full scale demonstration; transposition to an industrial and commercial level

  17. Measurements of children's exposures to particles and nitrogen dioxide in Santiago, Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Suh, Helen H.; Koutrakis, Petros; Oyola, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    An exposure study of children (aged 10-12 years) living in Santiago, Chile, was conducted. Personal, indoor and outdoor fine and inhalable particulate matter ( 2.5 and 10 , respectively), and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) were measured during pilot (N=8) and main (N=20) studies, which were conducted during the winters of 1998 and 1999, respectively. For the main study, personal indoor and outdoor 24-h samples were collected for five consecutive days. Similar mean personal, indoor and outdoor PM 2.5 concentrations (69.5, 68.5 and 68.1 μg m -3 , respectively) were found. However, for coarse particles (calculated as the difference between measured PM 10 and PM 2.5 , PM 2.5-10 ) indoor and outdoor levels (35.4 and 47.4 μg m -3 ) were lower than their corresponding personal exposures (76.3 μg m -3 ). Indoor and outdoor NO 2 concentrations were comparable (35.8 and 36.9 ppb) and higher than personal exposures (25.9 ppb). Very low ambient indoor and personal O 3 levels were found, which were mostly below the method's limit of detection (LOD). Outdoor particles contributed significantly to indoor concentrations, with effective penetration efficiencies of 0.61 and 0.30 for PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 , respectively. Personal exposures were strongly associated with indoor and outdoor concentrations for PM 2.5 , but weakly associated for PM 2.5-10 . For NO 2 , weak associations were obtained for indoor-outdoor and personal-outdoor relationships. This is probably a result of the presence of gas cooking stoves in all the homes. Median I/O, P/I and P/O ratios for PM 2.5 were close to unity, and for NO 2 they ranged between 0.64 and 0.95. These ratios were probably due to high ambient PM 2.5 and NO 2 levels in Santiago, which diminished the relative contribution of indoor sources and subjects' activities to indoor and personal PM 2.5 and NO 2 levels

  18. Measurements of children's exposures to particles and nitrogen dioxide in Santiago, Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas-Bracho, Leonora; Suh, Helen H.; Koutrakis, Petros [Harvard University, School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Avenue, 02115 Boston, MA (United States); Oyola, Pedro [Comision Nacional del Medio Ambiente CONAMA, Santiago (Chile)

    2002-03-27

    An exposure study of children (aged 10-12 years) living in Santiago, Chile, was conducted. Personal, indoor and outdoor fine and inhalable particulate matter (<2.5 {mu}m in diameter, PM{sub 2.5} and <10 {mu}m in diameter, PM{sub 10}, respectively), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) were measured during pilot (N=8) and main (N=20) studies, which were conducted during the winters of 1998 and 1999, respectively. For the main study, personal indoor and outdoor 24-h samples were collected for five consecutive days. Similar mean personal, indoor and outdoor PM{sub 2.5} concentrations (69.5, 68.5 and 68.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively) were found. However, for coarse particles (calculated as the difference between measured PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}, PM{sub 2.5-10}) indoor and outdoor levels (35.4 and 47.4 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were lower than their corresponding personal exposures (76.3 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Indoor and outdoor NO{sub 2} concentrations were comparable (35.8 and 36.9 ppb) and higher than personal exposures (25.9 ppb). Very low ambient indoor and personal O{sub 3} levels were found, which were mostly below the method's limit of detection (LOD). Outdoor particles contributed significantly to indoor concentrations, with effective penetration efficiencies of 0.61 and 0.30 for PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5-10}, respectively. Personal exposures were strongly associated with indoor and outdoor concentrations for PM{sub 2.5}, but weakly associated for PM{sub 2.5-10}. For NO{sub 2}, weak associations were obtained for indoor-outdoor and personal-outdoor relationships. This is probably a result of the presence of gas cooking stoves in all the homes. Median I/O, P/I and P/O ratios for PM{sub 2.5} were close to unity, and for NO{sub 2} they ranged between 0.64 and 0.95. These ratios were probably due to high ambient PM{sub 2.5} and NO{sub 2} levels in Santiago, which diminished the relative contribution of indoor sources and subjects' activities to indoor and personal PM

  19. Ultrafine titanium dioxide particles in the absence of photoactivation can induce oxidative damage to human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurr, J.-R.; Wang, Alexander S.S.; Chen, C.-H.; Jan, K.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafine titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles have been shown to exhibit strong cytotoxicity when exposed to UVA radiation, but are regarded as a biocompatible material in the absence of photoactivation. In contrast to this concept, the present results indicate that anatase-sized (10 and 20 nm) TiO 2 particles in the absence of photoactivation induced oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and micronuclei formation, and increased hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide production in BEAS-2B cells, a human bronchial epithelial cell line. However, the treatment with anatase-sized (200 and >200 nm) particles did not induce oxidative stress in the absence of light irradiation; it seems that the smaller the particle, the easier it is for the particle to induce oxidative damage. The photocatalytic activity of the anatase form of TiO 2 was reported to be higher than that of the rutile form. In contrast to this notion, the present results indicate that rutile-sized 200 nm particles induced hydrogen peroxide and oxidative DNA damage in the absence of light but the anatase-sized 200 nm particles did not. In total darkness, a slightly higher level of oxidative DNA damage was also detected with treatment using an anatase-rutile mixture than with treatment using either the anatase or rutile forms alone. These results suggest that intratracheal instillation of ultrafine TiO 2 particles may cause an inflammatory response

  20. Feasibility study of the single particle analysis of uranium by laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Yeong Keong; Han, Sun Ho; Pyo, Hyung Yeol; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyu Seok

    2004-01-01

    The control of activities in nuclear facilities worldwide is one of the most important tasks of nuclear safeguard. To meet the needs for nuclear safeguard, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) strengthened the control of nuclear activities to detect these activities earlier. Thus, it is very important to develop analytical techniques to determine the isotopic composition of hot particles from swipe samples. The precise measurement of the 234 U/ 238 U, 235 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U ratios is important because it provides information about the initial enrichment of reactor uranium, core history, and post accident story. Because conventional α-spectrometry is not sufficiently sensitive for the determination of long-lived radionuclides in environmental samples, several analytical techniques, such as SNMS (Sputtered Neutral Mass Spectrometry), RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry), AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) etc., have been proposed for uranium isotope measurements. In case of microparticles, analytical techniques such as SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been applied for the isotopic characterization. The aim of this work was the development of a sensitive analytical technique for determination of isotopic ratio of uranium in swipe samples. In this work, feasibility of LIMS (Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry) for the determination of such particles has been evaluated using a reference material of natural uranium

  1. Measurement of the time development of particle showers in a uranium scintillator calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell, A.; Hervas, L.; Parsons, J.A.; Sciulli, F.; Sippach, W.; Wai, L.

    1992-11-01

    We report on the time evolution of particle showers, as measured in modules of the uranium-scintillator barrel calorimeter of the ZEUS detector. The time development of hadronic showers differs significantly from that of electromagnetic showers, with about 40% of the response to hadronic showers arising from energy depositions which occur late in the shower development. The degree of compensation and the hadronic energy resolution were measured as a function of integration time, giving a value of e/π=1.02±0.01 for a gate width of 100 ns. The possibilities for electron-hadron separation based on the time structure of the shower were studied, with pion rejection factors in excess of 100 being achieved for electron efficiencies greater than 60%. The custom electronics used to perform these measurements samples the calorimeter signal at close to 60 MHz, stores all samples for a period of over 4 μs using analog switched capacitor pipelines, and digitizes the samples for triggered events with 12-bit ADC's. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of Uranium-di-Oxide nano-particles by pulsed laser ablation in ethanol and their characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Aniruddha; Prasad, Manisha; Shail, Shailini

    2015-01-01

    The importance of actinide based nano-structures is well known in the area of biology, nuclear medicine, and nuclear industry. Pulsed laser ablation in liquid is recognised as an attractive technique for production of nano-structures of different metals and metal oxides with high purity. In this paper, we report synthesis of uranium-di-oxide nano particles by pulsed laser ablation in ethanol. The second harmonic emission of an electro- optically Q-switched nano-second Nd-YAG laser was used as the coherent source here. The structural and optical properties of the fabricated Uranium-di-oxide nano- particles were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, EDX and UV- Vis-NIR spectrophotometry. The mean size of the particles was found to be dependent on the laser ablation parameters. XRD and TEM analysis confirmed the phase of the synthesised material as pure crystalline Uranium-di- oxide with Face Centred Cubic structure. UV- Vis- NIR absorption spectra of the colloidal solution show high absorption in the UV regime. (author)

  3. A Facile Method for Separating and Enriching Nano and Submicron Particles from Titanium Dioxide Found in Food and Pharmaceutical Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Capco, David G.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the presence of nano-scale titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an additive in human foodstuffs, but a practical protocol to isolate and separate nano-fractions from soluble foodstuffs as a source of material remains elusive. As such, we developed a method for separating the nano and submicron fractions found in commercial-grade TiO2 (E171) and E171 extracted from soluble foodstuffs and pharmaceutical products (e.g., chewing gum, pain reliever, and allergy medicine). Primary particle analysis of commercial-grade E171 indicated that 54% of particles were nano-sized (i.e., < 100 nm). Isolation and primary particle analysis of five consumer goods intended to be ingested revealed differences in the percent of nano-sized particles from 32%‒58%. Separation and enrichment of nano- and submicron-sized particles from commercial-grade E171 and E171 isolated from foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals was accomplished using rate-zonal centrifugation. Commercial-grade E171 was separated into nano- and submicron-enriched fractions consisting of a nano:submicron fraction of approximately 0.45:1 and 3.2:1, respectively. E171 extracted from gum had nano:submicron fractions of 1.4:1 and 0.19:1 for nano- and submicron-enriched, respectively. We show a difference in particle adhesion to the cell surface, which was found to be dependent on particle size and epithelial orientation. Finally, we provide evidence that E171 particles are not immediately cytotoxic to the Caco-2 human intestinal epithelium model. These data suggest that this separation method is appropriate for studies interested in isolating the nano-sized particle fraction taken directly from consumer products, in order to study separately the effects of nano and submicron particles. PMID:27798677

  4. Results of solid state nuclear track detector technique application in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks, for uranium prospecting in Caetite (BA-Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, M.A.P.V. de; Khouri, M.T.F.C.

    1988-11-01

    The solid state nuclear track detector technique has been used in radon detection, by alpha particles tracks for uranium prospecting on the ground in Caetite city (Bahia-Brazil). The sensitive film to alpha particles used were CA 8015 exposed during 15 days and the results of three anomalies of this region are showed in a form of maps, made with the density of tracks obtained, and were compared with scintillation counter measurements. The technique showed to be simple and an effective auxiliary for the prospection of uranium ore bodies. The initial uranium exploration costs can be reduced by using this technique. (author) [pt

  5. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO/sub 2//Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented.

  6. Ex-reactor determination of thermal gap and contact conductance between uranium dioxide: zircaloy-4 interfaces. Stage I: low gas pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, J.E.; Begej, S.

    1979-04-01

    A study of thermal gap and contact conductance between depleted uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) and Zircaloy-4 (Zr4) has been made utilizing two measurement apparatuses developed as part of this program. The Modified Pulse Design (MPD) apparatus is a transient technique employing a heat pulse (laser) and a signal detector to monitor the thermal energy transmitted through a UO 2 /Zr4 sample pair which are either physically separated or in contact. The Modified Longitudinal Design (MLD) apparatus is a steady-state technique based on a modified cylindrical column design with a self-guarding sample geometry. Description of the MPD and MLD apparatus, data acquisition, reduction and error analysis is presented along with information on specimen preparation, thermal property and surface characterization. A technique using an optical height gauge to determine the average mean-plane of separation between the simple pairs is also presented

  7. Method to determine the thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and the surface conductance at the cladding-core interface from internal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsykanov, V A; Samsonov, B F; Spiridonov, Yu G; Fomin, N A

    1975-01-01

    A method is given for determining the temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide and the contact conductance of the gas gap between the core and cladding of a fuel element. These quantities should be determined on various samples with different diameters. A method is described for determining the heat-production rate of a fuel element to within 1.5 to 2.5 percent. The method is based on using a calibrated electric heater and a sensor to measure the specific energy evolution from reactor gamma-radiation. The total errors in determining the thermal conductivity and the contact conductance do not exceed 4.5 and 8 percent, respectively.

  8. Theoretical studies on the stopping power of deuterium-tritium mixed with uranium plasmas for α particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhigang; Fu, Zhen-Guo; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The stopping power of a compressed and highly ionized deuterium-tritium (DT) and uranium (U) plasma for α particles at very high temperatures (T = 5 keV) is examined theoretically with the dimensional continuation method. We show that with increasing density of U, both the magnitude and width of the resonance peak in the stopping power (as a function of the α particle energy), increases because of the ions, while the penetration distance of the α particles decreases. A simple relation of decreasing penetration distance as a function of plasma density is observed, which may be useful for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Moreover, by comparing the results with the case of a DT plasma mixed with beryllium, we find that the effect of a higher Z plasma is stronger, with regard to energy loss as well as the penetration distance of α particles, than that of a lower Z plasma

  9. Impact of natural organic matter on particle behavior and phototoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to their inherent phototoxicity and inevitable environmental release, titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are increasingly studied in the field of aquatic toxicology. One of the particular interests is the interactions between nano-TiO2 and natural organic matter (NOM)...

  10. Toxicity of Depleted Uranium Dust Particles: Results of a New Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is mostly composed of U-238, a naturally radioactive isotope. Concerning chemical toxicity, uranium, being a heavy metal, is known to have toxic effects on specific organs in the body, the kidneys in particular. Its effects are similar to those of other heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Scientific evidence resulting both from in vitro and in vivo analyses shows that current models of the mechanisms of toxicity of uranium dust are not fully satisfactory. They should be refined in order to obtain more effective responses and predictions regarding health effects. In particular, radiotoxicity potential of Depleted Uranium dust originated by military use of this material for ammunition must be re-evaluated taking into account the bystander effect, the dose enhancing effect and other minor phenomena. Uranium dust has both chemical and radiological toxicity: the synergistic aspect of the two effects has to be accounted for, in order to arrive to a complete description of the phenomenon. The combination of the two different toxicities (chemical and radiological) of depleted uranium is attempted here for the first time, approaching the long-term effects of Depleted Uranium, and in particular the carcinogenetic effects. A case study (Balkan war, 1999) is discussed. (Author)

  11. Effects of uranium compounds on skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, B.M. de

    1982-12-01

    The following uranium compounds were topically applied to the dorsal skin of 35 day-old Wistar rats (60 g, male): uranium dioxide, uranyl nitrate, uranyl acetate, ammonium uranyl tricarbonate and ammonium diuranate. Percutaneous absorption was mediated with the aid of a vehicle and known quantities of various particle-sized batches of uranium compounds were directly implanted in the subcutaneous tissue. Animals were sacrificed 3, 6, 24 and 48 hours after implantation. Subcutaneous tissue and muscle underneath the implantation site were anlaysed by light and electron microscopy. A Cameca 322 X-ray microanalyzer was used to analyze uranium traces in calcified tissue (bones and teeth) and kidneys. A steady loss in body weight was observed in animals given high concentration of uranyl nitrate and ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. All animals died five days after the onset of the experiment due to renal failure. Slightly soluble compounds, ammonium diuranate and uranyl acetate, caused only a slight decrease in body weight. Uranium dioxide, the most insoluble compound used, induced only a transitory slight body weight decrease. Histopathological study revealed damages to the tissues of topicated skin, hair follicles and adnexal glands. High concentration of uranium was indicated in bone, teeth and kidneys by X-ray scanning

  12. Exposure to nano-size titanium dioxide causes oxidative damages in human mesothelial cells: The crystal form rather than size of particle contributes to cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Kenji; Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Morii, Akane; Noguchi, Takumi; Ogasawara, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuyuki

    2017-10-14

    Exposure to nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes has been shown to cause pleural mesothelioma similar to that caused by asbestos, and has become an environmental health issue. Not only is the percutaneous absorption of nano-size titanium dioxide particles frequently considered problematic, but the possibility of absorption into the body through the pulmonary route is also a concern. Nevertheless, there are few reports of nano-size titanium dioxide particles on respiratory organ exposure and dynamics or on the mechanism of toxicity. In this study, we focused on the morphology as well as the size of titanium dioxide particles. In comparing the effects between nano-size anatase and rutile titanium dioxide on human-derived pleural mesothelial cells, the anatase form was shown to be actively absorbed into cells, producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to DNA. In contrast, we showed for the first time that the rutile form is not easily absorbed by cells and, therefore, does not cause oxidative DNA damage and is significantly less damaging to cells. These results suggest that with respect to the toxicity of titanium dioxide particles on human-derived mesothelial cells, the crystal form rather than the particle size has a greater effect on cellular absorption. Also, it was indicated that the difference in absorption is the primary cause of the difference in the toxicity against mesothelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of food-grade titanium dioxide: the presence of nanosized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Doudrick, Kyle; Bi, Xiangyu; Hristovski, Kiril; Herckes, Pierre; Westerhoff, Paul; Kaegi, Ralf

    2014-06-03

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is widely used in food products, which will eventually enter wastewater treatment plants and terrestrial or aquatic environments, yet little is known about the fraction of this TiO2 that is nanoscale, or the physical and chemical properties of TiO2 that influence its human and environmental fate or toxicity. Instead of analyzing TiO2 properties in complex food or environmental samples, we procured samples of food-grade TiO2 obtained from global food suppliers and then, using spectroscopic and other analytical techniques, quantified several parameters (elemental composition, crystal structure, size, and surface composition) that are reported to influence environmental fate and toxicity. Another sample of nano-TiO2 that is generally sold for catalytic applications (P25) and widely used in toxicity studies, was analyzed for comparison. Food-grade and P25 TiO2 are engineered products, frequently synthesized from purified titanium precursors, and not milled from bulk scale minerals. Nanosized materials were present in all of the food-grade TiO2 samples, and transmission electron microscopy showed that samples 1-5 contained 35, 23, 21, 17, and 19% of nanosized primary particles (average hydrodynamic diameter of >100 nm. Food-grade samples contained phosphorus (P), with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 1.8 mg of P/g of TiO2. The phosphorus content of P25 was below inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection limits. Presumably because of a P-based coating detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the ζ potential of the food-grade TiO2 suspension in deionized water ranged from -10 to -45 mV around pH 7, and the iso-electric point for food-grade TiO2 (grade materials, and although the presence of amorphous TiO2 could not be ruled out, it is unlikely on the basis of Raman analysis. The food-grade TiO2 was solar photoactive. Cationic dyes adsorbed more readily to food-grade TiO2 than P25, indicating very different potentials for

  14. The compatibility of stainless steels with particles and powders of uranium carbide and low-sulphur UCS fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, S.

    1978-05-01

    Slightly hyperstoichiometric (U,Pu)C is a potential nuclear fuel for fast breeder reactors. The excess carbon above the stoichiometric amount results in a higher carbon activity in the fuel, and carbon is transferred to the stainless steel cladding, resulting in embrittlement of the cladding. It is with this problem of carbon transfer from the fuel to the cladding that this thesis is concerned. For practical reasons, UC and not (U,Pu)C was used as the fuel. The theory of decarburisation of carbide fuel and the carburisation of stainless steel, the facilities constructed for the project at the Atomic Energy Board, and the experimental techniques used, including preparation of the fuels, are discussed. The effect of a number of variables of uranium carbide fuel on its compatibility behaviour with stainless steels was investigated, as well as the effect om microstructure and type of stainless steel (304, 304 L and 316) on the rate of carburisation. These studies can be briefly summarised under the following headings: powder-particle size; surface oxidation of uranium carbide; preparation temperature of uranium carbide; low sulfur UCS fuels; uranium sulfide and the microstructure and type of steel. The author concludes that: the effect of surface oxidation and particle size must be taken into account when evaluating out-of-pile tests; the possible effects of surface oxidation must be taken into account when considering vibro-compacted carbide fuels; there is no advantage in replacing a fraction of the carbon atoms by sulphur atoms in slightly hyperstoichiometric carbide fuels, and the type and thermo-mechanical treatment of the stainless steel used as cladding material in a fuel pin is not important as far as the rate of carburisation by the fuel is concerned

  15. A Facile Method for Separating and Enriching Nano and Submicron Particles from Titanium Dioxide Found in Food and Pharmaceutical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, James J; Doudrick, Kyle; Yang, Yu; Capco, David G; Westerhoff, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate the presence of nano-scale titanium dioxide (TiO2) as an additive in human foodstuffs, but a practical protocol to isolate and separate nano-fractions from soluble foodstuffs as a source of material remains elusive. As such, we developed a method for separating the nano and submicron fractions found in commercial-grade TiO2 (E171) and E171 extracted from soluble foodstuffs and pharmaceutical products (e.g., chewing gum, pain reliever, and allergy medicine). Primary particle analysis of commercial-grade E171 indicated that 54% of particles were nano-sized (i.e., E171 and E171 isolated from foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals was accomplished using rate-zonal centrifugation. Commercial-grade E171 was separated into nano- and submicron-enriched fractions consisting of a nano:submicron fraction of approximately 0.45:1 and 3.2:1, respectively. E171 extracted from gum had nano:submicron fractions of 1.4:1 and 0.19:1 for nano- and submicron-enriched, respectively. We show a difference in particle adhesion to the cell surface, which was found to be dependent on particle size and epithelial orientation. Finally, we provide evidence that E171 particles are not immediately cytotoxic to the Caco-2 human intestinal epithelium model. These data suggest that this separation method is appropriate for studies interested in isolating the nano-sized particle fraction taken directly from consumer products, in order to study separately the effects of nano and submicron particles.

  16. Risk assessment strategies for nanoscale and fine-sized titanium dioxide particles: Recognizing hazard and exposure issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, David B; Donner, E Maria

    2015-11-01

    The basic tenets for assessing health risks posed by nanoparticles (NP) requires documentation of hazards and the corresponding exposures that may occur. Accordingly, this review describes the range and types of potential human exposures that may result from interactions with titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles or NP - either in the occupational/workplace environment, or in consumer products, including food materials and cosmetics. Each of those applications has a predominant route of exposure. Very little is known about the human impact potential from environmental exposures to NP - thus this particular issue will not be discussed further. In the workplace or occupational setting inhalation exposure predominates. Experimental toxicity studies demonstrate low hazards in particle-exposed rats. Only at chronic overload exposures do rats develop forms of lung pathology. These findings are not supported by multiple epidemiology studies in heavily-exposed TiO2 workers which demonstrate a lack of correlation between chronic particle exposures and adverse health outcomes including lung cancer and noncancerous chronic respiratory effects. Cosmetics and sunscreens represent the major application of dermal exposures to TiO2 particles. Experimental dermal studies indicate a lack of penetration of particles beyond the epidermis with no consequent health risks. Oral exposures to ingested TiO2 particles in food occur via passage through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), with studies indicating negligible uptake of particles into the bloodstream of humans or rats with subsequent excretion through the feces. In addition, standardized guideline-mandated subchronic oral toxicity studies in rats demonstrate very low toxicity effects with NOAELs of >1000 mg/kg bw/day. Additional issues which are summarized in detail in this review are: 1) Methodologies for implementing the Nano Risk Framework - a process for ensuring the responsible development of products containing nanoscale

  17. Evaluation of refractory-metal-clad uranium nitride and uranium dioxide fuel pins after irradiation for times up to 10 450 hours at 990 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, K. J.; Gluyas, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of some materials variables on the irradiation performance of fuel pins for a lithium-cooled space power reactor design concept were examined. The variables studied were UN fuel density, fuel composition, and cladding alloy. All pins were irradiated at about 990 C in a thermal neutron environment to the design fuel burnup. An 85-percent dense UN fuel gave the best overall results in meeting the operational goals. The T-111 cladding on all specimens was embrittled, possibly by hydrogen in the case of the UN fuel and by uranium and oxygen in the case of the UO2 fuel. Tests with Cb-1Zr cladding indicate potential use of this cladding material. The UO2 fueled specimens met the operational goals of less than 1 percent cladding strain, but other factors make UO2 less attractive than low-density UN for the contemplated space power reactor use.

  18. Nitration of benzo[a]pyrene adsorbed on coal fly ash particles by nitrogen dioxide: role of thermal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristovich, Robert L; Dutta, Prabir K

    2005-09-15

    Nitration of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by nitrogen dioxide (NO2) adsorbed on the surface of thermally activated coal fly ash and model aluminosilicate particles led to the formation of nitrobenzo[a]pyrenes as verified by extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was utilized to follow the nitration reaction on the surface of zeolite Y. Nitrobenzo[a]pyrene formation was observed along with the formation of nitrous acid and nitrate species. The formation of the BaP radical cation was also observed on thermally activated aluminosilicate particles by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. On the basis of GC/MS, DRIFTS, and ESR spectroscopy results, a mechanism of nitration involving intermediate BaP radical cations generated on thermally activated aluminosilicate particles is proposed. These observations have led to the hypothesis that nitration of adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons on coal fly ash by reaction with nitrogen oxides can occur in the smokestack, but with the aging of the fly ash particles, the extent of the nitration reaction will be diminished.

  19. The removal of uranium onto carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, Richard A., E-mail: richardandrewcrane@gmail.com; Scott, Thomas [University of Bristol, School of Physics, Interface Analysis Centre (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    In the current work carbon-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (CS nZVI), synthesised by the vacuum heat treatment of ferric citrate trihydrate absorbed onto carbon black, have been tested for the removal of uranium (U) from natural and synthetic waters. Two types of CS nZVI were tested, one vacuum annealed at 600 °C for 4 h and the other vacuum annealed at 700 °C for 4 h, with their U removal behaviour compared to nZVI synthesised via the reduction of ferrous iron using sodium borohydride. The batch systems were analysed over a 28-day reaction period during which the liquid and nanoparticulate solids were periodically analysed to determine chemical evolution of the solutions and particulates. Results demonstrate a well-defined difference between the two types of CS nZVI, with greater U removal exhibited by the nanomaterial synthesised at 700 °C. The mechanism has been attributed to the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C exhibiting (i) a greater proportion of surface oxide Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} (0.34 compared to 0.28); (ii) a greater conversion of ferric citrate trihydrate [2Fe(C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 7})·H{sub 2}O] to Fe{sup 0}; and (iii) a larger surface area (108.67 compared to 88.61 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}). Lower maximum U uptake was recorded for both types of CS nZVI in comparison with the borohydride-reduced nZVI. A lower decrease in solution Eh and DO was also recorded, indicating that less chemical reduction of U was achieved by the CS nZVI. Despite this, lower U desorption in the latter stages of the experiment (>7 days) was recorded for the CS nZVI synthesised at 700 °C, indicating that carbon black in the CS nZVI is likely to have contributed towards U sorption and retention. Overall, it can be stated that the borohydride-reduced nZVI were significantly more effective than CS nZVI for U removal over relatively short timescales (e.g. <48 h), however, they were more susceptible to U desorption over extended time periods.

  20. Control of Manganese Dioxide Particles Resulting From In Situ Chemical Oxidation Using Permanganate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Study Description Impacts of MnO2 Reference Field evaluation: A 5-spot recirculation network was employed to deliver 3000 mg/L NaMnO4 to treat up...that affect particle interactions. It may (1) act as a coagulant, facilitating MnO2 aggregation and deposition, (2) convert to other iron hydroxide ...chemical characteristics of the porous media, including pHpzc, zeta potential, particle size (average and distribution), and mineralogy , dictate the extent

  1. Demonstration and determination of submicroscopic particles of uranium in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sihelska, K.; Lorincik, J.; Sus, F.; Vesela, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this work laboratories of the Centrum vyzkumu Rez, Ltd are presented. Fission track analysis (FTA) is used for analysis of uranium in environmental samples. Treatment of samples for FTA is described and some results ar presented. The method of SIMS is used, too.

  2. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  3. Plutonium uptake by plants from soil containing plutonium-238 dioxide particles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, K.W.; McFarlane, J.C.

    1977-05-01

    Three plant species--alfalfa, lettuce, and radishes were grown in soils contaminated with plutonium-238 dioxide (238)PuO2 at concentrations of 23, 69, 92, and 342 nanocuries per gram (nCi/g). The length of exposure varied from 60 days for the lettuce and radishes to 358 days for the alfalfa. The magnitude of plutonium incorporation as indicated by the discrimination ratios for these species, after being exposed to the relatively insoluble PuO2, was similar to previously reported data using different chemical forms of plutonium. Evidence indicates that the predominant factor in plutonium uptake by plants may involve the chelation of plutonium contained in the soils by the action of compounds such as citric acid and/or other similar chelating agents released from the plant roots

  4. Physical and chemical analysis of interaction between oxide fuel and pyrocarbon coating of coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutikov, R.A.; Kromov, Yu.F.; Chernikov, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    In terms of the model proposed the equilibrium pressure of gases (CO, Kr, Xe) in pyrocarbon-coated uranium dioxide fuel particles has been calculated, as function of the initial composition of the fuel (O/U), the design features of the coated particles, the fuel temperature, and the burnup. The possibility of reducing gas pressure in the particles by alloying the kernels with uranium carbide, and increasing the kernel capacity for retention of solid fission products by alloying the uranium oxide with aluminum-silicates, has been investigated. (author)

  5. Experiment and modeling: Ignition of aluminum particles with a carbon dioxide laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Salil

    Aluminum is a promising ingredient for high energy density compositions used in propulsion systems, explosives, and pyrotechnics. Aluminum powder fuel additives enable one to achieve higher combustion enthalpies and reaction temperatures. Therefore, to develop aluminum based novel and customized high density energetic materials, understanding of ignition and combustion kinetics of aluminum powders is required. In most practical systems, metal ignition and combustion occur in environments with rapidly changing temperatures and gas compositions. The kinetics of exothermic reactions in related energetic materials is commonly characterized by thermal analysis, where the heating rates are very low, on the order of 1--50 K/min. The extrapolation of the identified kinetics to the high heating rates is difficult and requires direct experimental verification. This difficulty led to development of new experimental approaches to directly characterize ignition kinetics for the heating rates in the range of 103--104 K/s. However, the practically interesting heating rates of 106 K/s range have not been achieved. This work is directed at development of an experimental technique and respective heat transfer model for studying ignition of aluminum and other micron-sized metallic particles at heating rates varied around 106 K/s. The experimental setup uses a focused CO2 laser as a heating source and a plate capacitor aerosolizer to feed the aluminum particles into the laser beam. The setup allows using different environment for particle aerosolization. The velocities of particles in the jet are in the range of 0.1 --0 3 m/s. For each selected jet velocity, the laser power is increased until the particles are observed to ignite. The ignition is detected optically using a digital camera and a photomultiplier. The ignition thresholds for spherical aluminum powder were measured at three different particle jet velocities, in air environment. A single particle heat transfer model was

  6. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs; Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically; Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards; Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste; and Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements

  7. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R; Martinez, Andrew S; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L; Wingen, Lisa M; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-11-03

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine-California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs.

  8. The impact of particle size, relative humidity, and sulfur dioxide on iron solubility in simulated atmospheric marine aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartledge, Benton T; Marcotte, Aurelie R; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D; Majestic, Brian J

    2015-06-16

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in about half of the world's oceans, and its most significant source is atmospheric deposition. To understand the pathways of iron solubilization during atmospheric transport, we exposed size segregated simulated marine aerosols to 5 ppm sulfur dioxide at arid (23 ± 1% relative humidity, RH) and marine (98 ± 1% RH) conditions. Relative iron solubility increased as the particle size decreased for goethite and hematite, while for magnetite, the relative solubility was similar for all of the fine size fractions (2.5-0.25 μm) investigated but higher than the coarse size fraction (10-2.5 μm). Goethite and hematite showed increased solubility at arid RH, but no difference (p > 0.05) was observed between the two humidity levels for magnetite. There was no correlation between iron solubility and exposure to SO2 in any mineral for any size fraction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) measurements showed no change in iron speciation [Fe(II) and Fe(III)] in any minerals following SO2 exposure. SEM-EDS measurements of SO2-exposed goethite revealed small amounts of sulfur uptake on the samples; however, the incorporated sulfur did not affect iron solubility. Our results show that although sulfur is incorporated into particles via gas-phase processes, changes in iron solubility also depend on other species in the aerosol.

  9. Preparation of uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirths, G.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium dioxide is converted to uranium tetrafluoride under stoichiometric excess of hydrogen fluoride. The water formed in the process and the unreacted hydrogen fluoride are cooled and the condensate fractionally distilled into water and approx. 40% hydrofluoric acid. The hydrofluoric acid and water-free hydrogen fluoride are fed back into the process. (WI) [de

  10. Uranium extraction from underground deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, C.R.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium is extracted from underground deposits by passing an aqueous oxidizing solution of carbon dioxide over the ore in the presence of calcium ions. Complex uranium carbonate or bicarbonate ions are formed which enter the solution. The solution is forced to the surface and the uranium removed from it

  11. Nano-scaled particles of titanium dioxide convert benign mouse fibrosarcoma cells into aggressive tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO(2), either uncoated (TiO(2)-1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO(2)-2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO(2)-1, but not TiO(2)-2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO(2)-1 and TiO(2)-2 treatments. However, TiO(2)-2, but not TiO(2)-1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO(2)-1 and TiO(2)-2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO(2)-2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO(2)-2, but not TiO(2)-1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO(2) toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO(2)-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO(2) has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells.

  12. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  13. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  14. Investigation of chemical changes in uranium oxyfluoride particles using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kips, R.S.; Kristo, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how environmental conditions may affect sample composition is critical to the interpretation of laboratory analyses from environmental sampling. We prepared a set of UO 2 F 2 particle samples from the hydrolysis of UF 6 and stored these samples in environmental chambers at different temperature, humidity and lighting conditions. The NanoSIMS ion microprobe was used to measure the UF + /U + secondary ion ratio of individual particles. Monitoring variations in this ratio may provide insights on changes in particle composition over time and in response to environmental exposure. This report presents the baseline measurements carried out on freshly-prepared particle samples to determine the initial amount of fluorine. (author)

  15. Performance of laser ablation. Quadrupole-based ICP-MS coupling for the analysis of single micrometric uranium particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabien Pointurier; Amelie Hubert; Anne-Claire Pottin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe the application of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) coupling to particle analysis, i.e., the determination of the isotopic composition of micrometric uranium particles. The performances of this analysis technique are compared with those of the two reference particle analysis techniques: secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and fission track-thermo-ionization mass spectrometry (FT-TIMS), based on the measurement of the isotopic ratios of 235 U/ 238 U in particles present in an inter-comparison particulate sample. The agreement of the results obtained using LA-ICP-MS with target values and with the results obtained using FT-TIMS and SIMS was good. Accuracy was equivalent to that of the other two techniques (±3 % deviation). However, relative experimental uncertainties present with LA-ICP-MS (7 %) were higher than those present with FT-TIMS (4.5 %) and SIMS (3 %). Furthermore, measurement yield of LA-ICP-MS coupling was close to that obtained with the same quadrupole ICP-MS for the measurement of a liquid sample (∼10 -4 ), but lower than that obtained with FT-TIMS and SIMS, respectively, by a factor of 10 and 20, although the particles analyzed using LA-ICP-MS were most likely smaller (diameter ∼0.6 μm, containing 4-7 fg of 235 U). Nevertheless, thanks to the brevity of the signals obtained, the detection capacity for low isotopic concentrations by LA-ICP-MS coupling is equivalent to that of FT-TIMS, although it remains well below that of SIMS (x 15). However, with more sensitive double focusing ICP-MS, performances equivalent to those achieved using SIMS could be obtained. (author)

  16. Field and modeling study of windblown particles from a uranium mill tailings pile. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwendiman, L.C.; Sehmel, G.A.; Horst, T.W.; Thomas, C.W.; Perkins, R.W.

    1979-04-01

    A field study is reported, showing that for a carbonate-leach-process mill tailings pile in the Grants, New Mexico region much of the residual radioactive constituents in the tailings is found associated with particles 7 μm in diameter and smaller. As the tailings material dries, particle attachment and aggregation occurs with the result that radioactive constituents become associated more with larger particles. Soil samples taken at surface and subsurface on radial lines extending from the tailings pile for 5 miles showed the distribution of radium-226 and other radionuclides in the soil. The radeium-226 deposited on the soil was distributed in such a manner that about 1.6 Ci of randon-222 per day enters the atmosphere from this secondary source. The suspension and transport of particles were studied using an array of sampling towers and wind speed and velocity instrumentation that signaled designated samplers at upwind and downwind locations to operate when wind direction and speed criteria were satisfied. Flux of particles in various size ranges was determined as a function of wind speed. The radionuclide content of airborne particles as a function of particle size was measured for some samplers. A significant fraction of airborne radioactive material is associated with respirable particles. 56 figures, 13 tables

  17. Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-09-01

    The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

  18. Establishment of THERPRO Database and Estimation of the Effect of Fuel Burn-up on the Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Seon

    2005-02-01

    Materials property data are an essential part of major disciplines in many engineering fields. To nuclear engineering, fundamental understanding of thermo-physical chemical mechanical properties of nuclear materials is very important. THERPRO data base that is re-designed and re-constructed through this study is a web-based on-line nuclear materials properties data base. For the future upgrade of the data base contemporary information technologies have been incorporated during the construction. Basically THERPRO data base has a hierarchical structure consisting of several levels: home page, element, compound, property, author, report, and bibliography level. All of data sets in each level are interconnected using network structure and thus every data can be easily retrieved including the bibliographical information by an appropriate query action. As a part of THERPRO DB utilization, the effect of fuel burn-up on the thermal conductivity of irradiated uranium dioxide is analyzed with the data contained in the data base as well as recent data published in the relevant journals. Their data are comparatively studied and the effect is estimated using FRAPCON-3 code with two in-pile data sets, BR-3 111i5 and Oconee rod 15309. The results show that the fuel center line temperature can differ 200 .deg. C∼400 .deg. C from thermal conductivity models depending on burn-up, which can significantly influence high burn-up fuel performance. In conclusion, it is demonstrated through this study that THERPRO data base can be a great utility for nuclear engineers and researchers, if appropriately utilized

  19. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulyga, S F; Becker, J S

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10(-4) and 10(-3) counts per atom were achieved for 238U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH+/U+ was 1.2 x 10(-4) and 1.4 x 10(-4), respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 microg L(-1) NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% (238U/235U) and 1.4% (236U/238U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% (235U/238U) and 1.9% (236U/P38U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236U/238U ratio ranged from 10(-5) to 10(-3). Results obtained with ICP-MS, alpha- and gamma-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples.

  20. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and 236U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulyga, S.F.; Becker, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The 236 U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10 -4 and 10 -3 counts per atom were achieved for 238 U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH + /U + was 1.2 x 10 -4 and 1.4 x 10 -4 , respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 μg L -1 NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ( 238 U/ 235 U) and 1.4% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ( 235 U/ 238 U) and 1.9% ( 236 U/ 238 U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the 236 U/ 238 U ratio ranged from 10 -5 to 10 -3 . Results obtained with ICP-MS, α- and γ-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  1. Titanium dioxide particle – induced goblet cell hyperplasia : association with mast cells and IL-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Soo-Ho

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhalation of particles aggravates respiratory symptoms including mucus hypersecretion in patients with chronic airway disease and induces goblet cell hyperplasia (GCH in experimental animal models. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Methods To understand this, the numbers of goblet cells, Muc5ac (+ expressing epithelial cells and IL-13 expressing mast cells were measured in the trachea of sham or TiO2 particles – treated rats using periodic acid-Schiff, toluidine blue and immunohistochemical staining. RT-PCR for Muc-1, 2 and 5ac gene transcripts was done using RNA extracted from the trachea. Differential cell count and IL-13 levels were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. In pretreatment groups, cyclophosphamide (CPA or dexamethasone (DEX was given before instillation of TiO2. TiO2 treatment markedly increased Muc5ac mRNA expression, and Muc5ac (+ or PAS (+ epithelial cells 48 h following treatment. Results The concentration of IL-13 in BAL fluids was higher in TiO2 treated – rats when compared to those in sham rats (p 2 treated – rats (p 0.05. In contrast, pretreatment with dexamethasone (DEX diminished the percentage of PAS (+ cells and the levels of IL-13 (p 2 treatment increased the IL-13 (+ mast cells (p 0.05. In addition there were significant correlations of IL-13 (+ rate of mast cells in the trachea with IL-13 concentration in BAL fluid (p 2 treated rats (p Conclusion In conclusion, TiO2 instillation induces GCH and Muc5ac expression, and this process may be associated with increased production of IL-13 by mast cells.

  2. Experimental study and model development for 'uranium dioxide-epoxy resin' heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chairat, Aziza

    2015-01-01

    kinetic model to the partial differential equations (mass, energy and momentum balance) to obtain a representative model of the oven in terms of temperature and chemical species composition. The Modeling of the oven is carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The results showed a good agreement with experimental measurements. After pyrolysis, char still contains significant amount of hydrogen. To minimize this quantity, the oxidation of the char is a necessary step. Two treatment types are proposed: An oxidation under a controlled oxygen atmosphere and carbon dioxide gasification. These methods are efficient to eliminate the residual of hydrogen content while keeping the fuel integrity. (author) [fr

  3. Literature review of thermal and radiation performance parameters for high-temperature, uranium dioxide fueled cermet materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haertling, C.; Hanrahan, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    High-temperature fissile-fueled cermet literature was reviewed. Data are presented primarily for the W-UO 2 as this was the system most frequently studied; other reviewed systems include cermets with Mo, Re, or alloys as a matrix. Failure mechanisms for the cermets are typically degradation of mechanical integrity and loss of fuel. Mechanical failure can occur through stresses produced from dissimilar expansion coefficients, voids created from diffusion of dissimilar materials or formation of metal hydride and subsequent volume expansion. Fuel loss failure can occur by high temperature surface vaporization or by vaporization after loss of mechanical integrity. Techniques found to aid in retaining fuel include the use of coatings around UO 2 fuel particles, use of oxide stabilizers in the UO 2 , minimizing grain sizes in the metal matrix, minimizing impurities, controlling the cermet sintering atmosphere, and cladding around the cermet

  4. Specific activity of uranium and thorium in marketable rock phosphate as a function of particle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, R; McKlveen, J W [Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA); Jenkins, R [Phillip Morris Research Center, Richmond, VA (USA); McDowell, W J [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1980-07-01

    Marketable rock phosphate fertilizer from Florida was classified into seven particle size fractions ranging from 149 ..mu..m to less than 0.5 ..mu..m using a Bahco Microparticle Classifier and air elutriation. The resulting size fractions were assayed for U and /sup 230/Th by solvent extraction and liquid scintillation ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy. Results indicated that the specific activity of U and /sup 230/Th increased with decreasing particle size. Maximum activities of 110 pCi/g U and 50 pCi/g /sup 230/Th were found in particles less than 1.0 ..mu..m in aerodynamic diameter. Qualitative emission spectrographic analysis of the fractions revealed that the concentrations of Al, Cu, Mg, Na, Ti and Zn also increased with decreasing particle size.

  5. In-situ removal and characterisation of uranium-containing particles from sediments surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P. G.; Griffiths, I.; Jones, C. P.; Stitt, C. A.; Davies-Milner, M.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Yamashiki, Y.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, T. B.

    2016-03-01

    Traditional methods to locate and subsequently study radioactive fallout particles have focused heavily on autoradiography coupled with in-situ analytical techniques. Presented here is the application of a Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope with both backscattered electron and energy dispersive spectroscopy detectors, along with a micromanipulator setup and electron-hardening adhesive to isolate and remove individual particles before synchrotron radiation analysis. This system allows for a greater range of new and existing analytical techniques, at increased detail and speed, to be applied to the material. Using this method, it was possible to erform detailed energy dispersive spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation characterisation of material likely ejected from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant found within a sediment sample collected from the edge of the 30 km exclusion zone. Particulate material sub-micron in maximum dimension examined during this work via energy dispersive spectroscopy was observed to contain uranium at levels between 19.68 and 28.35 weight percent, with the application of synchrotron radiation spectroscopy confirming its presence as a major constituent. With great effort and cost being devoted to the remediation of significant areas of eastern Japan affected by the incident, it is crucial to gain the greatest possible understanding of the nature of this contamination in order to inform the most appropriate clean-up response.

  6. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios (i.e. 10 −5 ). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for 234 U/ 238 U and 235 U/ 238 U ratios. Experimental results obtained for 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios deviated by less than −2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U c (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for 234 U/ 238 U, 235 U/ 238 U and 236 U/ 238 U, respectively. - Highlights: ► LA-MC-ICP-MS was fully validated for the direct analysis of individual particles. ► Traceability was established by using an IRMM glass particle reference material. ► Measured U isotope ratios were in agreement with the certified range. ► A comprehensive total combined uncertainty evaluation was performed. ► The analysis of 236 U/ 238 U isotope ratios was improved by using a deceleration filter.

  7. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles

    OpenAIRE

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F.; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a ‘Nu Plasma HR’ multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10–20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abu...

  8. Uranium and plutonium containing particles in a sea sediment sample from Thule, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moring, M.; Ikäheimonen, T.K.; Pöllänen, R.

    2001-01-01

    Particles composed of radioactive materials and probably originating from US nuclear weapons were identified in sea sediment samples collected from Thule, Greenland in 1997. The weapons were destroyed close to the Thule Air Base in 1968 in an aeroplane crash, which dispersed radioactive materials...

  9. Direct uranium isotope ratio analysis of single micrometer-sized glass particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Stefanie; Boulyga, Sergei F; Prohaska, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    We present the application of nanosecond laser ablation (LA) coupled to a 'Nu Plasma HR' multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS) for the direct analysis of U isotope ratios in single, 10-20 μm-sized, U-doped glass particles. Method development included studies with respect to (1) external correction of the measured U isotope ratios in glass particles, (2) the applied laser ablation carrier gas (i.e. Ar versus He) and (3) the accurate determination of lower abundant (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios (i.e. 10(-5)). In addition, a data processing procedure was developed for evaluation of transient signals, which is of potential use for routine application of the developed method. We demonstrate that the developed method is reliable and well suited for determining U isotope ratios of individual particles. Analyses of twenty-eight S1 glass particles, measured under optimized conditions, yielded average biases of less than 0.6% from the certified values for (234)U/(238)U and (235)U/(238)U ratios. Experimental results obtained for (236)U/(238)U isotope ratios deviated by less than -2.5% from the certified values. Expanded relative total combined standard uncertainties U(c) (k = 2) of 2.6%, 1.4% and 5.8% were calculated for (234)U/(238)U, (235)U/(238)U and (236)U/(238)U, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Micromechanical simulation of Uranium dioxide polycrystalline aggregate behaviour under irradiation; Modele numerique micro-mecanique d'agregat polycristallin pour le comportement des combustibles oxydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacull, J.

    2011-02-15

    In pressurized water nuclear power reactor (PWR), the fuel rod is made of dioxide of uranium (UO{sub 2}) pellet stacked in a metallic cladding. A multi scale and multi-physic approaches are needed for the simulation of fuel behavior under irradiation. The main phenomena to take into account are thermomechanical behavior of the fuel rod and chemical-physic behavior of the fission products. These last years one of the scientific issue to improve the simulation is to take into account the multi-physic coupling problem at the microscopic scale. The objective of this ph-D study is to contribute to this multi-scale approach. The present work concerns the micro-mechanical behavior of a polycrystalline aggregate of UO{sub 2}. Mean field and full field approaches are considered. For the former and the later a self consistent homogenization technique and a periodic Finite Element model base on the 3D Voronoi pattern are respectively used. Fuel visco-plasticity is introduced in the model at the scale of a single grain by taking into account specific dislocation slip systems of UO{sub 2}. A cohesive zone model has also been developed and implemented to simulate grain boundary sliding and intergranular crack opening. The effective homogenous behaviour of a Representative Volume Element (RVE) is fitted with experimental data coming from mechanical tests on a single pellet. Local behavior is also analyzed in order to evaluate the model capacity to assess micro-mechanical state. In particular, intra and inter granular stress gradient are discussed. A first validation of the local behavior assessment is proposed through the simulation of intergranular crack opening measured in a compressive creep test of a single fuel pellet. Concerning the impact of the microstructure on the fuel behavior under irradiation, a RVE simulation with a representative transient loading of a fuel rod during a power ramp test is achieved. The impact of local stress and strain heterogeneities on the multi

  11. About the elaboration of pure uranium dicarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besson, J.; Blum, P.; Guinet, Ph.; Spitz, J.

    1963-01-01

    In order to develop methods for the elaboration of as pure as possible uranium dicarbide, the authors report the study of different elaboration processes based on the reaction between uranium and carbon, or between uranium and hydrocarbon, or between uranium oxide and carbon. They finally choose a method which comprises an arc-induced fusion of a mixture of uranium dioxide and carbon. The fusion process is described. The influence of thermal treatments is discussed as well as the graphite electrode carburization

  12. Studies on supercritical hydrothermal syntheses of uranium and lanthanide oxide particles and their reaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, DongKi; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop preparation method of raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels by supercritical hydrothermal (SH) treatments, we have investigated behavior of aqueous solutions dissolving U(VI), Ln(III) (Ln: lanthanide = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), Cs(I), and Sr(II) nitrate or chloride compounds under SH conditions (temperature = 400-500 °C, pressure = 30-40 MPa). As a result, it was found that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) compounds produce LnO2, that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Sm) compounds are hardly converted to their oxides, and that LnCl3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), CsNO3, and Sr(NO3)2 do not form their oxide compounds. Furthermore, HNO2 species were detected in the liquid phase obtained after treating HNO3 aqueous solutions containing Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) under SH conditions, and also NO2 and NO compounds were found to be produced by decomposition of HNO3. From these results, it was proposed that the Ln oxide (LnO2) particles are directly formed with oxidation of Ln(III) to Ln(IV) by HNO3 and HNO2 species in the SH systems. Moreover, the uranyl ions were found to form U3O8 and UO3 depending on the concentration of HNO3. From these results, it is expected that the raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels are efficiently prepared by the SH method.

  13. Thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental data on thermodynamic and transport properties of solid and liquid UO 2 have been reviewed and analyzed to obtain consistent equations for the thermophysical properties. Thermodynamic properties that have been assessed include enthalpy, heat capacity, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion, density, surface tension and vapor pressure. Transport properties that have been assessed are thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, viscosity, emissivity and optical constants. The assessments include a review of the experiments and data, review of previous recommendations, analysis of data to obtain new recommendations, determination of uncertainties in the recommended values, and comparisons of new recommendations with data and previous recommendations

  14. Determination of uranium isotopic composition and {sup 236}U content of soil samples and hot particles using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulyga, S.F. [Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Inst., Minsk (Belarus); Becker, J.S. [Central Department for Analytical Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP) the environment was contaminated with spent nuclear fuel. The {sup 236}U isotope was used in this study to monitor the spent uranium from nuclear fallout in soil samples collected in the vicinity of the Chernobyl NPP. Nuclear track radiography was applied for the identification and extraction of hot radioactive particles from soil samples. A rapid and sensitive analytical procedure was developed for uranium isotopic ratio measurement in environmental samples based on double-focusing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (DF-ICP-MS) with a MicroMist nebulizer and a direct injection high-efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN). The performance of the DF-ICP-MS with a quartz DIHEN and plasma shielded torch was studied. Overall detection efficiencies of 4 x 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -3} counts per atom were achieved for {sup 238}U in DF-ICP-QMS with the MicroMist nebulizer and DIHEN, respectively. The rate of formation of uranium hydride ions UH{sup +}/U{sup +} was 1.2 x 10{sup -4} and 1.4 x 10{sup -4}, respectively. The precision of short-term measurements of uranium isotopic ratios (n = 5) in 1 {mu}g L{sup -1} NBS U-020 standard solution was 0.11% ({sup 238}U/{sup 235}U) and 1.4% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a MicroMist nebulizer and 0.25% ({sup 235}U/{sup 238}U) and 1.9% ({sup 236}U/{sup 238}U) using a DIHEN. The isotopic composition of all investigated Chernobyl soil samples differed from those of natural uranium; i.e. in these samples the {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U ratio ranged from 10{sup -5} to 10{sup -3}. Results obtained with ICP-MS, {alpha}- and {gamma}-spectrometry showed differences in the migration properties of spent uranium, plutonium, and americium. The isotopic ratio of uranium was also measured in hot particles extracted from soil samples. (orig.)

  15. Process for producing uranium oxide rich compositions from uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHollander, W.R.; Fenimore, C.P.

    1978-01-01

    Conversion of gaseous uranium hexafluoride to a uranium dioxide rich composition in the presence of an active flame in a reactor defining a reaction zone is achieved by separately introducing a first gaseous reactant comprising a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and a reducing carrier gas, and a second gaseous reactant comprising an oxygen-containing gas. The reactants are separated by a shielding gas as they are introduced to the reaction zone. The shielding gas temporarily separates the gaseous reactants and temporarily prevents substantial mixing and reacting of the gaseous reactants. The flame occurring in the reaction zone is maintained away from contact with the inlet introducing the mixture to the reaction zone. After suitable treatment, the uranium dioxide rich composition is capable of being fabricated into bodies of desired configuration for loading into nuclear fuel rods. Alternatively, an oxygen-containing gas as a third gaseous reactant is introduced when the uranium hexafluoride conversion to the uranium dioxide rich composition is substantially complete. This results in oxidizing the uranium dioxide rich composition to a higher oxide of uranium with conversion of any residual reducing gas to its oxidized form

  16. Study on treatment of radioactive liquid waste from uranium ore processing by the use of nano Fe_3O_4 KT particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Anh; Nguyen Ba Tien; Doan Thi Thu Hien; Luu Cao Nguyen; Nguyen Van Chinh

    2015-01-01

    Nano Fe_3O_4 KT was produced from the Military Institute of Science and Technology were used to adsorbed heavy metal elements in liquid waste. In this report, the nano Fe_3O_4 KT particles sized 80-100 nm and specific surface area was 50-70 m"2/g was applied to study the adsorption of radioactive elements in the liquid waste of uranium ores processing. The effective parameters on adsorption process included temperature, stirring rate, stirring time, the pH value of the solution, the initial concentration of uranium in solution. The results showed the maximum adsorption capacity of the nano Fe_3O_4 KT was 53.5 mg/g with conditions such as room temperature, stirring speed 120 rounds/minute, the pH value of solution was 8, stirring time about 2 hours (Uranium/materials). From the results obtained, nano Fe_3O_4 KT tested to treatment liquid waste of uranium ore processing after preliminary precipitation removed almost heavy metals and a part of radioactive elements. The results were analyzed on the ICP-MS and α, β total counting, instrument. The solution concentration after treatment was suitable for Vietnam discharge standards into environment (QCVN 40:2011 on Industrial wastewater). (author)

  17. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  18. Electrical impedance studies of uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampton, R.N.

    1986-11-01

    The thesis presents data on the electrical properties of uranium oxide at temperatures from 1700K to 4.2K, and pressures between 25 K bar and 70 K bar. The impedance data were analysed using the technique of complex plane representation to establish the conductivity and dielectric constant of uranium dioxide. The thermophysical data were compared with previously reported experimental and theoretical work on uranium dioxide and other fluorite structured oxides. (U.K.)

  19. Rapid non-destructive quantitative estimation of urania/ thoria in mixed thorium uranium di-oxide pellets by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shriwastwa, B.B.; Kumar, Anil; Raghunath, B.; Nair, M.R.; Abani, M.C.; Ramachandran, R.; Majumdar, S.; Ghosh, J.K.

    2001-01-01

    A non-destructive technique using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry has been standardised for quantitative estimation of uranium/thorium in mixed (ThO 2 -UO 2 ) fuel pellets of varying composition. Four gamma energies were selected; two each from the uranium and thorium series and the time of counting has been optimised. This technique can be used for rapid estimation of U/Th percentage in a large number of mixed fuel pellets from a production campaign

  20. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husain, Mainul; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Guo, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO2 via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162......μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO2 in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific q...

  1. METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, R.H.

    1957-10-29

    S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

  2. Studies on O/M ratio determination in uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampath, S.; Chawla, K.L.

    1975-01-01

    Thermogravimetric studies were carried out in unsintered and sintered samples of uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide under different atmospheric conditions (air, argon and moist argon/hydrogen). Moisture loss was found to occur below 200 0 C for uranium dioxide samples, upto 700 0 C for sintered plutonium dioxide and negligible for sintered samples. The O/M ratios for non-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (sintered and unsintered), plutonium dioxide and mixed uranium and plutonium oxides (sintered) could be obtained with a precision of +- 0.002. Two reference states UOsub(2.000) and UOsub(2.656) were obtained for uranium dioxide and the reference state MOsub(2.000) was used for other cases. For unsintered plutonium dioxide samples, accurate O/M ratios could not be obtained of overlap of moisture loss with oxygen loss/gain. (author)

  3. The Dissolution of Uranium Oxides in HB-Line Phase 1 Dissolvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A series of characterization and dissolution studies has been performed to define flowsheet conditions for the dissolution of uranium oxide materials in dissolvers. The samples selected for analysis were uranium oxide materials. The selection of these uranium oxide materials for characterization and dissolution studies was based on high enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results from the characterization study identified ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and iron/chromium/nickel (Fe/Cr/Ni) particles as impurities along with the tri-uranium oxide (U3O8) and uranium trioxide (UO3). The weight percent uranium in this material was found to vary depending on the impurity content. The trace impurity plutonium appears to be associated with the Fe/Cr/Ni particles. A small amount of absorbed moisture and waters of hydration is present. Most of the uranium oxides easily dissolved in low-molar nitric acid solutions without fluoride within one to two hours at solution temperature s between 60-80 degrees C. A small amount of residue remained following this dissolution step. To assure complete dissolution of uranium from these oxide materials, an additional dissolution step at 90 degrees C to boiling for at least one to two hours has been suggested. Only trace amounts of iron associated with Fe2O3 and Fe/Cr/Ni particles will dissolve during the dissolution steps. Neither hydrogen nor heat will be generated during the dissolution of these uranium oxide materials in nitric acid solutions. Some brown nitrogen dioxide (NO2) fumes will be generated during the dissolution of U3O8

  4. Process for in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espenscheid, W.F.; Yan, F.Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present invention relates to the recovery of uranium from subterranean ore deposits, and more particularly to an in-situ leaching operation employing an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and carbon dioxide as the lixiviant. Uranium is solubilized in the lixiviant as it traverses the subterranean uranium deposit. The lixiviant is subsequently recovered and treated to remove the uranium

  5. Interaction of Al2O3xSiO2 alloyed uranium oxide with pyrocarbon coating of fuel particles under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.S.; Khromov, Yu.F.; Svistunov, D.E.; Chujko, E.E.

    1989-01-01

    Method of comparative data analysis for P O2 and P CO was used to consider interaction in fuel particle between pyrocarbon coating and fuel sample, alloyed with alumosilicate addition. Equations of interaction reactions for the case of hermetic and depressurized fuel particle are presented. Calculations of required xAl 2 O 3 XySiO 2 content, depending on oxide fuel burnup, were conducted. It was suggested to use silicon carbide for limitation of the upper level of CO pressure in fuel particle. Estimation of thermal stability of alumosilicates under conditions of uranium oxide burnup equals 1100 and 1500 deg C for Al/Si ratio in addition 1/1 and 4/1 respectively

  6. Applications of fluorescence techniques to the study of uranium in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments: hydrolysis and photo-reduction reactions on titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliet, Veronique

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of Time-Resolved Fluorescence to characterise the spectroscopy of hydroxo-complexes of hexavalent Uranium, and to study photochemical reactions involving these species at mineral/water interfaces. The instrumentation used comprised of either an excimer laser coupled to an optical multichannel analyser OMA or a Nd-YAG laser coupled to a stroboscopic photomultiplier. The hydrolysis of Uranium at a constant temperature of 25 deg. C, has been studied in the pH ranges 0-5 and 9-12. Deconvolution of spectra and fluorescence decay curves for Uranium yielded individual fluorescence spectra and decay times for uranyl UO 2 2+ and its hydroxo-complexes UO 2 OH + , (UO 2 )2(OH) 2 2+ , (UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 + et UO 2 (OH) 3 - . The comparison of fluorescence efficiencies for the various species showed that the complex (UO 2 )2(OH) 2 2+ is up to 85 times more fluorescent than uranyl, depending on the emission wavelength. Further, investigations of fluorescence decays as a function of temperature in the pH range 0-6, yielded activation energies for the various Uranium hydroxo species. The knowledge gained in homogeneous media served in the study of the photochemical behaviour of Uranium in suspensions of the semi-conductor mineral, TiO 2 . After UV-light absorption, charge carriers formed at the mineral surface were found to reduce hexavalent Uranium to the tetravalent oxidation state. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy has been used to monitor the kinetics of the oxidation state change. A reaction mechanism is proposed on the basis of results obtained by studying the kinetics of the process at different values of pH The role of humic substances on the heterogeneous redox reaction has also been examined. (author) [fr

  7. Terminal uranium(V/VI) nitride activation of carbon dioxide and carbon disulfide. Factors governing diverse and well-defined cleavage and redox reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaves, Peter A.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Liddle, Stephen T.; Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L.; Lewis, William

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE 2 (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren TIPS )(N)][K(B15C5) 2 ] (1, Tren TIPS =N(CH 2 CH 2 NSiiPr 3 ) 3 ; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5) 2 ] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren TIPS )(N)] (2) reacts with CO 2 to give isolable [U(Tren TIPS )(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren TIPS )(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N 2 and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(κ 2 -CS 3 )][K(B15C5) 2 ] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5) 2 ][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS 2 to give [U(Tren TIPS )(NCS)] (8) and ''S'', with the latter trapped as Ph 3 PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE 2 follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS 2 as a reactivity surrogate for CO 2 . (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Rapid non-destructive quantitative estimation of urania/ thoria in mixed thorium uranium di-oxide pellets by high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriwastwa, B.B.; Kumar, Anil; Raghunath, B.; Nair, M.R.; Abani, M.C.; Ramachandran, R.; Majumdar, S.; Ghosh, J.K

    2001-06-01

    A non-destructive technique using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry has been standardised for quantitative estimation of uranium/thorium in mixed (ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}) fuel pellets of varying composition. Four gamma energies were selected; two each from the uranium and thorium series and the time of counting has been optimised. This technique can be used for rapid estimation of U/Th percentage in a large number of mixed fuel pellets from a production campaign.

  9. Acute effects of total suspended particles and sulfur dioxides on preterm delivery: a community-based cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X.P.; Ding, H.; Wang, X.B. [Harvard University, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1995-11-01

    The acute effects of air pollution on preterm delivery were examined in a prospective cohort in Beijing, China. From early pregnancy until delivery in 1988, we followed all registered pregnant women who lived in four residential areas of Beijing. Information for both mothers and infants was collected. Daily air pollution and meteorological data were obtained independently. The sample for analysis included 25 370 resident women who gave first live births in 1988. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to estimate the effects of air pollution on gestational age and preterm delivery (i.e. {lt} 37 wk), with adjustment for outdoor temperature and humidity, day of the week, season, maternal age, gender of child, and residential area. Very high concentrations of ambient sulfur dioxide (mean = 102 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), (maximum = 630 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and total suspended particulates (mean = 375 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), (maximum =1 003 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) were observed in these areas. There was a significant dose-dependent association between gestational age and sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulate concentrations. The estimated reduced duration of gestation was 0.075 wk (12.6 h) and 0.042 wk (7.1 h) for each 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} increase in sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates 7-d lagged moving average, respectively. We concluded that high levels of total suspended particulates and sulfur dioxide, or of a more complex pollution mixture associated with these pollutants, appear to contribute to excess risk of preterm delivery in this population. Further work needs to be carried out, with more detailed information on personal exposure and effect modifiers.

  10. Sem-EDXRF and ICP-MS investigation of the morphological and chemical composition of depleted uranium particles from Kuwait areas affected by the 1991 Gulf War

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danesi, P.R.; Burns, K.; Campbell, M.; Ciurapinski, A.; Donohue, D.; Admon, U.; Burkart, W.

    2004-01-01

    Selected soil samples collected in Kuwait locations where residues of DU ammunition existed as a legacy of the 1991 Gulf War, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence detector (SEM- EDXRF) with the objective to identify the presence of DU particles and characterize their shape and size. The isotopic and total bulk concentrations of uranium in the samples were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. The samples studied by SEM-EDXRF were prepared by gently tapping an aluminum stab covered with a doubled-sided adhesive carbon disk, thereby ensuring that the physical integrity of the samples was maintained. The results have indicted that soil collected just below (∼ 5 cm) corroded DU penetrators contained several DU oxide particles (isotopic ratio 235 U/ 238 U = 0.0021) ranging in size from 1 to 10 microns (approximate geometrical diameter) having an irregular shape. The particles are most likely corrosion products from the DU penetrators. Some particles are imbedded in a larger matrix containing aluminum oxide (corrosion product of the penetrator jacket) and silica (sand). Swipes collected inside holes in tanks hit by DU ammunition, using ultra-pure cotton cloths, have indicated the presence of many small DU particles in the range 1 to 10 microns. In this case the particles were found to contain also small quantities of Fe, probably the results on alloying process occurring when the DU penetrators impact with the tank armor. (author)

  11. Removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous systems by nanoscale zero-valent iron particles suspended in carboxy-methyl cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Ioana-Carmen, E-mail: ioana.popescu@icpmrr.ro [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources – ICPMRR Bucharest B-dul Carol I No. 70, Sector 2, 202917 Bucharest (Romania); Filip, Petru [C. D. Nenitescu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202B, Sector 6, 71141 Bucharest (Romania); Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [Al.I. Cuza University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Humelnicu, Ionel [Al.I. Cuza University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Scott, Thomas Bligh; Crane, Richard Andrew [Interface Analysis Centre, University of Bristol, 121 St. Michael’s Hill, Bristol BS2 8BS (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15

    Carboxy-methyl-cellulose (CMC), a common “delivery vehicle” for the subsurface deployment of iron nanoparticles (INP) has been tested in the current work for the removal of aqueous uranium from synthetic water samples. A comparison of the removal of aqueous uranium from solutions using carboxy-methyl-cellulose with and without iron nanoparticles (CMC–INP and CMC, respectively) was tested over a 48 h reaction period. Analysis of liquid samples using spectrophotometry determined a maximum sorption capacity of uranium, Q{sub max}, of 185.18 mg/g and 322.58 mg/g for CMC and CMC–INP respectively, providing strong evidence of an independent aqueous uranium removal ability exhibited by CMC. The results point out that CMC provides an additional capacity for aqueous uranium removal. Further tests are required to determine whether similar behaviour will be observed for other aqueous contaminant species and if the presence of CMC within a INP slurry inhibits or aids the reactivity, reductive capacity and affinity of INP for aqueous contaminant removal.

  12. Preparation of Uranium Dioxide by Electrochemical Reduction in Ammonium Carbonate Solutions and Subsequent Precipitation; Preparation de bioxyde d'uranium par reduction electrochimique dans des solutions de carbonate d'ammonium et precipitation; Prigotovlenie dvuokisi urana metodom ehlektrokhimicheskogo vosstanovleniya v rastvore karbonata ammoniya s posleduyushchim osazhdeniem; Preparacion de dioxido de uranio por reduccion electroquimica en soluciones de carbonato amonico u precipitacion subsiguiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pravdic, V.; Branica, M.; Pucar, Z. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1963-11-15

    Experiments in a small scale electrolysis cell on cathodic reduction of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) show the possibility of an efficient way to obtain uranium (IV) in carbonate solutions. From this solution uranium (IV) hydrous oxide precipitates by merely raising the temperature. To obtain larger quantities of material needed for technological testing, a scale-up of the process was attempted. An electrolysis cell of hard PVC (polyvinylchloride) was constructed with a mercury pool cathode of approximately 2.5 dm{sup 2} and platinum anodes. The catholyte was separated from the anolyte by cationexchange membranes. The catholyte was circulated between two 50-1 reservoirs and streamed toward the vigorously stirred mercury cathode. The working potential of mercury was controlled against an Ag/AgCl/KC1 (sat.) reference electrode, the potential being held constant at -1.5 V. The current efficiency is approximately 90%; the power consumed for the reduction process is about 0.8 kWh/kg of uranium dioxide. After the electrolysis was completed the precipitation was initiated only by heating the deeply green clear solution up to 70 deg. C in a separate all-glass vessel of 60-1 volume. From 50, 1 of the catholyte solution 1 kg of a centrifuged product (containing about 20% of water) was obtained. The coulometric analysis of the oxygen-uranium ratio always gave results in the range of 2.04 to 2.09. By the procedure described uranium (IV) hydrous oxide is selectively precipitated, and the oxygen-uranium ratio in the precipitate was found to be independent of the degree of completion of the reduction. The product was identified as the alpha phase of uranium dioxide by the X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments in sintering and characterization of uranium dioxide thus obtained for the ceramic nuclear fuel requirements are under way. (author) [French] Des experiences faites dans une petite cellule d'electrolyse sur la reduction cathodique d'uranium (VI) en uranium (IV) montrent qu

  13. Terminal uranium(V/VI) nitride activation of carbon dioxide and carbon disulfide. Factors governing diverse and well-defined cleavage and redox reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaves, Peter A.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kefalidis, Christos E.; Maron, Laurent [LPCNO, CNRS and INSA, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France); Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J.L. [School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Lewis, William [School of Chemistry, The University of Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-24

    The reactivity of terminal uranium(V/VI) nitrides with CE{sub 2} (E=O, S) is presented. Well-defined C=E cleavage followed by zero-, one-, and two-electron redox events is observed. The uranium(V) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (1, Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiiPr{sub 3}){sub 3}; B15C5=benzo-15-crown-5) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (3), whereas the uranium(VI) nitride [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(N)] (2) reacts with CO{sub 2} to give isolable [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)(NCO)] (4); complex 4 rapidly decomposes to known [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(O)] (5) with concomitant formation of N{sub 2} and CO proposed, with the latter trapped as a vanadocene adduct. In contrast, 1 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(κ{sup 2}-CS{sub 3})][K(B15C5){sub 2}] (6), 2, and [K(B15C5){sub 2}][NCS] (7), whereas 2 reacts with CS{sub 2} to give [U(Tren{sup TIPS})(NCS)] (8) and ''S'', with the latter trapped as Ph{sub 3}PS. Calculated reaction profiles reveal outer-sphere reactivity for uranium(V) but inner-sphere mechanisms for uranium(VI); despite the wide divergence of products the initial activation of CE{sub 2} follows mechanistically related pathways, providing insight into the factors of uranium oxidation state, chalcogen, and NCE groups that govern the subsequent divergent redox reactions that include common one-electron reactions and a less-common two-electron redox event. Caution, we suggest, is warranted when utilising CS{sub 2} as a reactivity surrogate for CO{sub 2}. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Some practical and theoretical considerations of personal alpha-particle dosimetry. Joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada (JP-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1989-01-01

    The status of personal α-particle dosimetry in the uranium industry is presented. A brief description of personal dosimeters and prototypes is followed by some theoretical considerations regarding their practical use under steady-state and time-dependent field conditions. It is suggested that, at present, more effort should be placed on the evaluation of dosimeters than in the development of new ones. Also, more information should be gathered from countries which use personal α-particle dosimeters routinely. Furthermore, emphasis is recommended on comparison of personal dosimetry data with experimental data by area monitoring, using continuous monitoring systems, as well as with data by grab-sampling techniques. (author). 44 refs., 1 tab

  15. Some practical and theoretical considerations of personal alpha-particle dosimetry. Joint panel on occupational and environmental research for uranium production in Canada (JP-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigu, J [Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Elliot Lake, ON (Canada). Elliot Lake Lab.; Duport, P [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1990-12-31

    The status of personal {alpha}-particle dosimetry in the uranium industry is presented. A brief description of personal dosimeters and prototypes is followed by some theoretical considerations regarding their practical use under steady-state and time-dependent field conditions. It is suggested that, at present, more effort should be placed on the evaluation of dosimeters than in the development of new ones. Also, more information should be gathered from countries which use personal {alpha}-particle dosimeters routinely. Furthermore, emphasis is recommended on comparison of personal dosimetry data with experimental data by area monitoring, using continuous monitoring systems, as well as with data by grab-sampling techniques. (author). 44 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Preparation of uranium dioxide by thermal decomposition and direct reduction of ammonium uranate; Preparacion del dioxido de uranio por descomposicion termica y reduccion directa del uranato de amonio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez R, R

    1996-12-31

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium uranate has been studied by infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It has been show that ammonia remains in the solid until substantially 350 Centigrade degrees, when gaseous nitrogen is released. It is concluded that compounds derived from the calcination of ammonium uranate at atmospheric pressure, produced amorphous U O{sub 3} at about 350-400 Centigrade degrees and transform to U{sub 3} O{sub 8} via {alpha} - U O{sub 3} and/or {alpha} - U O{sub 3}. The object of this study was to obtain reliable fundamental information regarding the character of the pure carbon monoxide-ammonium uranate-uranium trioxide-uranium octaoxide reaction, in the range of temperatures that has been used in commercial reduction processes. Through the use of high-purity samples and by the proper control of incidental variable, this object was realized. (Author).

  17. Study of the effect of Titanium dioxide nano particle size on efficiency of the dye-sensitized Solar cell using natural Pomegranate juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Behjat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC using natural Pomegranate juice as dye-sensitizeris fabricated and characterized. DSSCS consist of a working electrode, a redox electrolyte containing iodide and tri-iodide ions and a counter electrode. A nanocrystalline TiO2 semiconductor with a wide band-gap coated with a monolayer dye-sensitizer is used as working electrode. The effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanoparticle size on efficiency of the DSSC based Pomegranate juice as a sensitizer is studied. For monolayer structure, we used two sizes of TiO2 nanoparticle (25 nm and 100 nm and a mixture of these two sizes. The highest efficiency of 0.61% was obtained with mixture of 25 and 100 nm TiO2 nano-particles in working electrode. For double-layer structure, we used 100 and 400 nm size TiO2 particles as light-scattering. The best efficiency was obtained using 400 nm TiO2 as light-scattering particles.

  18. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, Mainul; Saber, Anne T.; Guo, Charles; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jensen, Keld A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Williams, Andrew; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Hakan; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO 2 ). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO 2 via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO 2 in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO 2 in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p 2 in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO 2 were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose group

  19. The Effect of Gold Nano Particles Compared to Dioxide Titanium Nano Particles on Vital Factors of Isolated Candida albicans in Patients with Oral Candidiasis in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Rahimzadeh Torabi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Oral Candidiasis is fungal infection that affects the oral cavity. Oral infections caused by yeast of the genus Candida and particularly Candida albicans (oral candidiasis have been recognized throughout recorded history. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the antifungal effects of gold nanoparticles and dioxide titanium nanoparticles on patients with Oral Candidiasis patients. This review is to give the reader a contemporary overview of oral candidiasis, the organisms involved, and the management strategies that are currently employed or could be utilized in the future. Methods This experimental study has been done in Isfahan city totally with 56 numbers of patients suffering from Candidiasis in groups of different ages from hospitals and laboratories The resulted from swap in Sabouraud Dexteros agar and finally with complementary experiments 56 isolated Candida albicans (oral Candidiasis detected and grew in culture milieu then gold nanoparticles (10 nanometers and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (10 - 15 nanometers in different consistencies add to this milieu and the least density of halting and the least density of killing fungi for different suspension thinness containing Candida albicans. The data were analyzed by spss 15 version software. Results The results showed that gold nanoparticles have a good anticandidial effects and can be used to treat infections of Candida, it is recommended that further research considered the effects of different infections candidiasis in In vitro condition. Conclusions Using gold nanoparticles with 10 nanometer diameters have high antifungal effect on oral candidiasis and its function has been proved. In current study halting effect of gold nanoparticles on micro-organisms experimented in different densities was observed.

  20. The influence of the addition of depleted uranium on particle pushing in melt-processed, bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diko, P; Zmorayova, K; Babu, N Hari; Krabbes, G; Cardwell, D A

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure of single-grain, melt-processed (MP) YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 /Y 2 BaCuO 5 (Y-123/Y-211) samples (YBCO) containing varying amounts of depleted uranium (DU) and Pt has been studied. Only partial refinement of the Y-211 particle size was observed in Pt-free samples, which generally contained both small and large Y-211 particles. Small Y-211 particles in these samples are pushed extensively in the c-growth sector (c-GS) and all Y-211 particles (small and large) coarsen with the distance from the seed and with increasing DU concentration. Samples fabricated with Pt contained only very fine Y-211 particles, which were generally pushed strongly in the c-GS. In this case the size of the Y-211 particles did not vary significantly with distance from the seed. U- and U/Pt-containing sub-micron sized particles present in the melt-processed YBCO microstructure were not pushed during solidification, although their arrangement within the structure of the sample was influenced clearly by the growth process. The so-called cyclic growth was observed in the c-GS at the highest DU concentration (0.8 wt%). In these samples, this growth pattern is associated with the formation of a liquid phase rich in U and Y at the growth front. The cyclic growth mechanism was modified by the addition of Pt. Crystals of Y 2 Ba 4 UCuO x with Ba 3 YUO x phase inclusions were observed to be present in the U/Y-rich melt

  1. Dye sensitized solar cell based on environmental friendly eosin Y dye and Al doped titanium dioxide nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Swati S.; Bodkhe, Gajanan A.; Shirsat, Sumedh M.; Hussaini, S. S.; Shejwal, N. N.; Shirsat, Mahendra D.

    2018-03-01

    Present communication deals with the development of cost effective dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with eco-friendly materials. Eco-friendly Eosin Y dye was used to sensitize photo anode which was fabricated using undoped and Aluminium doped titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Undoped and Aluminium doped TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized by simple and cost effective sol-gel method. Aluminium doped and undoped TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible, FT-IR spectroscopy, x-ray Diffraction, and Scanning Electron Micrograph with EDX. The photo-voltaic activity of the cell was studied under light irradiation of 100 milliwatt cm-2. Aluminium doped TiO2 nanoparticle photo electrode exhibits more than 60% increase in cell efficiency as compared to the undoped TiO2 nanoparticle photo electrode.

  2. Leaching behavior of U, Mn, Sr, and Pb from different particle-size fractions of uranium mill tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Tongjiang; Sun, Hongjuan

    2017-06-01

    Pollution by the release of heavy metals from tailings constitutes a potential threat to the environment. To characterize the processes governing the release of Mn, Sr, Pb, and U from the uranium mill tailings, a dynamic leaching test was applied for different size of uranium mill tailings samples. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were performed to determine the content of Mn, Sr, Pb, and U in the leachates. The release of mobile Mn, Sr, Pb, and U fraction was slow, being faster in the initial stage and then attained a near steady-state condition. The experimental results demonstrate that the release of Mn, Sr, Pb, and U from uranium mill tailings with different size fractions is controlled by a variety of mechanisms. Surface wash-off is the release mechanism for Mn. The main release mechanism of Sr and Pb is the dissolution in the initial leaching stage. For U, a mixed process of wash-off and diffusion is the controlling mechanism.

  3. Sem-EDXRF and ICP-MS investigation of the morphological and chemical composition of depleted uranium particles from Kuwait areas affected by the 1991 Gulf War

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danesi, P.R.; Burns, K.; Campbell, M.; Ciurapinski, A.; Donohue, D.; Admon, U.; Burkart, W. [International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    Selected soil samples collected in Kuwait locations where residues of DU ammunition existed as a legacy of the 1991 Gulf War, have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence detector (SEM- EDXRF) with the objective to identify the presence of DU particles and characterize their shape and size. The isotopic and total bulk concentrations of uranium in the samples were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and alpha spectrometry. The samples studied by SEM-EDXRF were prepared by gently tapping an aluminum stab covered with a doubled-sided adhesive carbon disk, thereby ensuring that the physical integrity of the samples was maintained. The results have indicted that soil collected just below ({approx} 5 cm) corroded DU penetrators contained several DU oxide particles (isotopic ratio {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U = 0.0021) ranging in size from 1 to 10 microns (approximate geometrical diameter) having an irregular shape. The particles are most likely corrosion products from the DU penetrators. Some particles are imbedded in a larger matrix containing aluminum oxide (corrosion product of the penetrator jacket) and silica (sand). Swipes collected inside holes in tanks hit by DU ammunition, using ultra-pure cotton cloths, have indicated the presence of many small DU particles in the range 1 to 10 microns. In this case the particles were found to contain also small quantities of Fe, probably the results on alloying process occurring when the DU penetrators impact with the tank armor. (author)

  4. Erosion of common structural materials and the degradation of suspended particles in flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, D.A.; Hawes, R.I.; Rose, P.W.

    1968-06-01

    Experiments have been performed to examine the erosion of common materials of construction by a flowing suspension of graphite powder in carbon dioxide gas and the degradation of the graphite powder in the suspension. The suspension was circulated through a stainless steel loop at a pressure of 200 p.s.i.g. and bulk fluid temperature of 100-150 deg. C. No change in the weight of pins of mild steel, stainless steel and zircaloy, which were placed across the flow stream in a region where the velocity approached 100 ft./sec, could be detected after 350 hours of circulation. Examination of micro-photographs of the cross sections of the specimens showed no change in the structure of the metals. Considerable erosion of graphite pins producing a 6% decrease in the weight was observed under similar conditions. Detailed spectrographic analysis of the suspended powder taken at various times during the experiment showed no noticeable increase in the impurity content which could be attributed to erosion of the test specimens. A considerable increase in the tungsten, tin and cobalt concentration was observed and this is attributed to wear of the pump seal surfaces. The mean particle size of the suspended graphite powder was observed to decrease rapidly from 5 microns to 3 microns after only a few hours of circulation in the loop. After this initial period there was little further change in the particle size, the mean diameter being 2.85 microns after 167 hours of circulation. (author)

  5. Spectroscopy and DFT studies of uranyl carbonate, rutherfordine, UO2CO3: a model for uranium transport, carbon dioxide sequestration, and seawater species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalashnyk, N.; Perry, D. L.; Massuyeau, F.; Faulques, E.

    2017-12-01

    Several optical microprobe experiments of the anhydrous uranium carbonate—rutherfordine—are presented in this work and compared to periodic density functional theory results. Rutherfordine is the simplest uranyl carbonate and constitutes an ideal model system for the study of the rich uranium carbonate family relevant for environmental sustainability. Micro-Raman, micro-reflectance, and micro-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy studies have been carried out in situ on native, micrometer-sized crystals. The sensitivity of these techniques is sufficient to analyze minute amounts of samples in natural environments without using x-ray analysis. In addition, very intense micro-PL and micro-reflectance spectra that were not reported before add new results on the ground and excited states of this mineral. The optical gap value determined experimentally is found at about 2.6-2.8 eV. Optimized geometry, band structure, and phonon spectra have been calculated. The main vibrational lines are identified and predicted by this theoretical study. This work is pertinent for optical spectroscopy, for identification of uranyl species in various environmental settings, and for nuclear forensic analysis.

  6. Sorption of Uranium(VI) and Thorium(IV) ions from aqueous solutions by nano particle of ion exchanger SnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilchi, A.; Rasouli Garmarodi, S.; Shariati Dehaghan, T.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the extensive use of nuclear energy and its replacement for fossil fuels in recent decades, the radioactive waste production has increased enormously. The vast majority of the radioactive wastes products, are in the liquid form and consequently their treatment is of great importance. In this paper, tin oxide with nano-structure has been synthesized as an absorbent by the homogenous sedimentation method in the presence of urea, so as to adsorb uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) ions. The results obtained from the XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy and nitrogen adsorption/ desorption analyses on the tin oxide sample showed the cassiterite structure with an average particle size of 30 nanometer and a specific surface area of 27.5 m 2 /g. The distribution coefficients of uranium and thorium were studied by means of batch method. The effects of different variables such as pH and time of contact between the exchanger and solution were investigated and the optimum conditions for sorption of these ions were determined.

  7. Thickness- and Particle-Size-Dependent Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon Dioxide on Thin-Layer Porous Silver Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wang, Zhiyong; Mehio, Nada; Jin, Xianbo; Dai, Sheng

    2016-03-08

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 can not only convert it back into fuels, but is also an efficient manner to store forms of renewable energy. Catalysis with silver is a possible technology for CO2 reduction. We report that in the case of monolithic porous silver, the film thickness and primary particle size of the silver particles, which can be controlled by electrochemical growth/reduction of AgCl film on silver substrate, have a strong influence on the electrocatalytic activity towards CO2 reduction. A 6 μm thick silver film with particle sizes of 30-50 nm delivers a CO formation current of 10.5 mA cm(-2) and a mass activity of 4.38 A gAg (-1) at an overpotential of 0.39 V, comparable to levels achieved with state-of-the-art gold catalysts. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Mixed Matrix Membrane of Poly (4-methyl-1-pentyne Filled with MIL 53 Particles and Its Application in Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abedini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The performance of poly (4-metyl-1-pentyne as mixed matrix membrane (MMM mixed with MIL 53 particles was studied to separate mixtures of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. MIL 53 particles was added to the polymer matrix with 10, 20 and 30 weight percentages. The adsorption of CO2 and N2 gases by MIL 53 was evaluated and the adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir equation. Structure and thermal/mechanical properties of prepared membranes were characterized by means of FTIR, SEM, TGA and elongation test. Moreover, the gas permeation properties of membranes were studied by measuring the permeation of pure CO2 and N2. Furthermore, for accurate understanding of the gas permeation properties of the membranes, diffusion and solution coefficient of gases in neat membrane and MMMs were calculated using modified time-lag method. The results from TGA analysis showed that the degradation temperature of MMMs was enhanced and increased to 348ºC for membrane containing 30 wt% of MIL 53. The SEM images also illustrated a relatively uniform dispersion of particles with proper polymer/filler interfaces in the polymer matrix. The gas permeation results revealed that the permeability of both gases (especially CO2 increased with increasing MIL 53 loading, in which the permeability of CO2 increased from 98.74 Barrer in neat membrane to 217.65 Barrer in MMM containing 30 wt% filler. Moreover, calculation of CO2/N2 selectivity depicted that the selectivity enhanced from 16.66 to 22.70. Finally, the performance of MMMs was compared with Robeson’s upper bound in CO2/N2 separation and results showed that the MMM having 30 wt% of MIL 53 took over the Robeson bound.

  9. Emission of light charged particles from fragments produced on fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belovitzky, G.E.; Shteingrad, O.M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of light charged particles (LCP) with Z = 1, 2 from fragments produced in fission of uranium nuclei by 153 MeV protons and 1700 MeV negative pions was studied. It was found that LCP accompanying the fission by pions are emitted from non-accelerated fragments immediately after the fission, whereas in the case of 153 MeV protons, the LCP are emitted from the accelerated heavy fragments. The number of LCP emitted in the course of pion-induced fission is 0.7 per fission event, which exceeds by a factor of 30 the corresponding number for 153 MeV protons [ru

  10. Do gamma rays and alpha particles cause different types of lung cancer? A comparison between atomic bomb survivors and uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Excess lung cancer risk has been associated with exposure to alpha particle radiation from inhaled radon daughter products among uranium miners in Czechoslovakia, Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, and with exposure to gamma rays and neutrons from the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Differences in distribution by histological type, as well as certain epidemiological differences, suggest the possibility of differences in the causation of radiation-induced lung cancer. An epidemiological analysis is summarised of results from a blind pathology panel review of tissue slides from lung cancer cases diagnosed in 108 Japanese A bomb survivors and 92 American uranium miners selected on the basis of radiation exposure, smoking history, sex, age, and source and quality of pathology material. Consensus diagnoses were obtained with respect to principal sub-type, including squamous cell cancer, small cell cancer, adenocarcinoma, and less frequent sub-types. The results were analysed in terms of population, radiation dose, and smoking history. As expected, the proportion of squamous cell cancer was positively related to smoking history in both populations. The relative frequencies of small cell cancer and adenocarcinoma were very different in the two populations, but this difference was adequately accounted for by differences in radiation dose (more specifically, dose-based relative risk estimates based on published risk coefficients). Data for the two populations conformed to a common pattern, in which radiation-induced cancers appeared more likely to be of the small-cell sub-type, and less likely to be adenocarcinomas. No additional explanation in terms of radiation quality (alpha particles or gamma rays), uniform or local irradiation, inhaled as against external radiation source, or other population differences, appeared to be required. (author)

  11. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-09-28

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared.

  12. Accountability methods for plutonium and uranium: the NRC manuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutmacher, R.G.; Stephens, F.B.

    1977-01-01

    Four manuals containing methods for the accountability of plutonium nitrate solutions, plutonium dioxide, uranium dioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide have been prepared by us and issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A similar manual on methods for the accountability of uranium and plutonium in reprocessing plant dissolver solutions is now in preparation. In the present paper, we discuss the contents of the previously issued manuals and give a preview of the manual now being prepared

  13. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  14. Are Polyatomic Interferences, Cross Contamination, Mixing-Effect, etc., Obstacles for the Use of Laser Ablation-ICP-MS Coupling as an Operational Technique for Uranium Isotope Ratio Particle Analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donard, A.; Pointurier, F.; Pecheyran, C.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of ''environmental samples'', which consists in dust collected with cotton clothes wiped by inspectors on surfaces inside declared nuclear facilities, is a key tool for safeguards. Although two methods (fission tracks-TIMS and SIMS) are already used routinely to determine the isotopic composition of uranium particles, the laser ablationinductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) coupling has been proven to be an interesting option thanks to its rapidity, high sensitivity and high signal/noise ratio. At CEA and UPPA, feasibility of particle analysis using a nanosecond LA device and a quadrupole ICP-MS has been demonstrated. However, despite the obvious potential of LA-ICP-MS for particle analysis, the effect of many phenomena which may bias isotope ratio measurements or lead to false detections must be investigated. Actually, environmental samples contain many types of non-uranium particles (organic debris, iron oxides, etc.) that can form molecular interferences and induce the risk of isotopic measurement bias, especially for minor isotopes (234U, 236U). The influence of these polyatomic interferences on the measurements will be discussed. Moreover, different uranium isotopic compositions can be found in the same sample. Therefore, risks of memory effect and of particle-toparticle cross-contamination by the deposition of ablation debris around the crater have also been investigated. This study has been conducted by using a femtosecond laser ablation device coupled to a high sensitivity sector field ICP-MS. Particles were fixed onto the discs with collodion and were located thanks to their fission tracks so that micrometric particles can be analyzed separately. All uranium isotope ratios were measured. Results are compared with the ones obtained with the fission tracks-TIMS technique on other deposition discs from the same sample. Performance of the method in terms of accuracy, precision, and detection limits are estimated

  15. METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, R.D.

    1962-09-01

    A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

  16. Enhanced photo-response of porous silicon photo-detectors by embeddingTitanium-dioxide nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hiba M.; Makki, Sameer A.; Abd, Ahmed N.

    2018-05-01

    Porous silicon (n-PS) films can be prepared by photoelectochemical etching (PECE) Silicon chips n - types with 15 (mA / cm2), in 15 minutes etching time on the fabrication nano-sized pore arrangement. By using X-ray diffraction measurement and atomic power microscopy characteristics (AFM), PS was investigated. It was also evaluated the crystallites size from (XRD) for the PS nanoscale. The atomic force microscopy confirmed the nano-metric size chemical fictionalization through the electrochemical etching that was shown on the PS surface chemical composition. The atomic power microscopy checks showed the roughness of the silicon surface. It is also notified (TiO2) preparation nano-particles that were prepared by pulse laser eradication in ethanol (PLAL) technique through irradiation with a Nd:YAG laser pulses TiO2 target that is sunk in methanol using 400 mJ of laser energy. It has been studied the structural, optical and morphological of TiO2NPs. It has been detected that through XRD measurement, (TiO2) NPs have been Tetragonal crystal structure. While with AFM measurements, it has been realized that the synthesized TiO2 particles are spherical with an average particle size in the (82 nm) range. It has been determined that the energy band gap of TiO2 NPs from optical properties and set to be in (5eV) range.The transmittance and reflectance spectra have determined the TiO2 NPs optical constants. It was reported the effectiveness of TiO2 NPs expansion on the PS Photodetector properties which exposes the benefits in (Al/PS/Si/Al). The built-in tension values depend on the etching time current density and laser flounce. Al/TiO2/PS/Si/Al photo-detector heterojunction have two response peaks that are situated at 350 nm and (700 -800nm) with max sensitivity ≈ 0.7 A/W. The maximum given detectivity is 9.38at ≈ 780 nm wavelength.

  17. Determination of the levels of particles PM10 and nitrogen dioxide at the city of Heredia, Costa Rica: 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Murillo, Jorge; Rodriguez-Roman, Susana; Solis-Torres, Ligia Dina

    2009-01-01

    The levels of particulate matter PM 10 were determined at two sites of Heredia City (Rectory of the Universidad Nacional and Plazoleta del Fortin) of March to August 2006, obtaining as annual average 48 ± 8 and 31 ± 8 μg/m 3 , respectively. Also, the levels of sulfates, nitrates and chlorides were measured for both sites. The annual averages have resulted not to be significantly different for both sites, with a level of significance of 5%. In one of the ten sites of measurement of the concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the city, has presented higher values to the recommendation of the World Health Organization, monitoring for one month. The principal component analysis that were applied to the data of this gas, has showed that the variations in the levels are due to large-scale phenomena (meteorological). However, the concentration of sulfate present in the particulate matter has reached higher values to those recorded in cities like Rio de Janeiro and Mexico D.F., product probably of the high sulfur content present in the fuels that are used by the vehicle fleet at Costa Rica. The principal component analysis indicates that has existed a a strong correlation between the concentrations of sulfate and nitrate present in the particles PM 10 , pointing the contribution of anthropogenic sources. In the case of chloride, has highlighted the strong existing relationship with the meteorological parameters that were registered during the sampling period. (author) [es

  18. Evaluation of the levels of particles PM10 and nitrogen dioxide at the city of San Jose, Costa Rica: 2005-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Murillo, Jorge; Rodriguez Roman, Susana

    2009-01-01

    The levels of particulate matter PM 10 were determined at two sites of San Jose City (Catedral Metropolitana and Junta de Educacion), during a year (September 2005-September 2006), obtaining as annual average 36 ± 8 μg/m 3 and 25 ± 7 μg/m 3 , respectively. Also, the levels of sulfates, nitrates and chlorides were measured for both sites. The annual averages have resulted not to be significantly different for both sites, with a level of significance of 5%. Three of the fourteen sites of measurement of the concentration of nitrogen dioxide in the city, have presented higher values to the recommendation of the World Health Organization, monitoring for one month. The principal component analysis that were applied to the data of this gas, has showed that the variations in the levels are due to large-scale phenomena (meteorological). However, the concentration of sulfate present in the particulate matter has reached higher values to those recorded in cities like Rio de Janeiro and Mexico D.F., product probably of the high sulfur content present in the fuels that are used by the vehicle fleet at Costa Rica. The principal component analysis indicates that has existed a strong correlation between the concentrations of sulfate and nitrate present in the particles PM 10 , pointing the contribution of anthropogenic sources. In the case of chloride, has highlighted the strong existing relationship with the meteorological parameters that were registered during the sampling period. (author) [es

  19. Ventilation conditions and atmospheric characteristics of a laboratory uranium mine. Application to the distribution of radioactive particles in the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duport, Philippe.

    1978-09-01

    The CEA laboratory uranium mine and the characteristics of its ventilation are described. A method of measuring air flows based on the determination of a tracer gas was developed. Variations of radon concentrations and of its daughter products concentrations and radioactive equilibrium were observed as a function of the various ventilation rates. Particle size distribution of radioactive aerosols was studied in the laboratory mine when unoperated. Several methods of evaluation of the free fraction were compared, and the application of the laws of aerosol physics to the production of radioactive aerosols in a mine was investigated. A study of radioactive ions showed that the usual equations of atmospheric electricity could be applied to charged radioactive aerosols in a mine. Finally an experimental method was developed in order to directly examine the deposit of an aerosol labelled by radon daughter products in the respiratory tract of animals. The experimental results obtained with aerosols in the particle size range 5.10 -8 - 5.10 -6 were compared to the theoretical data derived from models published in the literature [fr

  20. Study of the oxidation risks during the sintering of uranium dioxide, and characterization of the excess oxygen; Etude du risque d'oxydation lors du frittage du bioxyde d'uranium et caracterisation de l'oxygene excedentaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conte, M; Brandela, M

    1966-05-01

    During sintering in reducing atmospheres, UO{sub 2} pellets can be oxidized by gaseous impurities. The effects of temperature cycles, the partial pressure of O{sub 2} and the flow rate of the gas over the pellets were investigated. In these atmospheres, the O{sub 2} partial pressure during sintering is low at high temperatures, as a consequence of the dissociation rate of the combined water, but below 1000 deg C, it can be high enough to result in a noticeable oxidation of the surface of the pellets during cooling. The crystalline phases which can occur have been identified and two methods of detection have been proposed: a micrographic examination after chemical etching and radiocrystallography. (authors) [French] Lors du frittage industriel du bioxyde d'uranium en atmosphere reductrice (hydrogene ou ammoniac dissocie) la presence d'impuretes oxydantes dans l'atmosphere peut provoquer l'oxydation des pastilles d'UO{sub 2}; les auteurs ont etudie les phenomenes en faisant varier le cycle de temperature, la pression partielle d'oxygene introduit dans l'hydrogene, la vitesse de passage du gaz sur les pastilles. Dans les atmospheres considerees la pression partielle d'oxygene au-dessus de l'UO{sub 2} en cours de frittage est faible a temperature elevee car elle resulte de la dissociation de l'eau formee, mais a t < 1000 degrees C elle, peut etre assez importante pour provoquer une oxydation notable de la surface des pastilles lors du refroidissement. Les phases cristallines susceptibles d'etre formees ont ete reperees et deux methodes de detection proposees: la micrographie apres attaque chimique specifique et la radiocristallographie. (auteurs)

  1. Pro-inflammatory adjuvant properties of pigment-grade titanium dioxide particles are augmented by a genotype that potentiates interleukin 1β processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedle, Sebastian; Pele, Laetitia C; Otter, Don E; Hewitt, Rachel E; Singh, Harjinder; Roy, Nicole C; Powell, Jonathan J

    2017-12-08

    Pigment-grade titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles are an additive to some foods (E171 on ingredients lists), toothpastes, and pharma-/nutraceuticals and are absorbed, to some extent, in the human intestinal tract. TiO 2 can act as a modest adjuvant in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) when triggered by common intestinal bacterial fragments, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or peptidoglycan. Given the variance in human genotypes, which includes variance in genes related to IL-1β secretion, we investigated whether TiO 2 particles might, in fact, be more potent pro-inflammatory adjuvants in cells that are genetically susceptible to IL-1β-related inflammation. We studied bone marrow-derived macrophages from mice with a mutation in the nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing 2 gene (Nod2 m/m ), which exhibit heightened secretion of IL-1β in response to the peptidoglycan fragment muramyl dipeptide (MDP). To ensure relevance to human exposure, TiO 2 was food-grade anatase (119 ± 45 nm mean diameter ± standard deviation). We used a short 'pulse and chase' format: pulsing with LPS and chasing with TiO 2 +/- MDP or peptidoglycan. IL-1β secretion was not stimulated in LPS-pulsed bone marrow-derived macrophages, or by chasing with MDP, and only very modestly so by chasing with peptidoglycan. In all cases, however, IL-1β secretion was augmented by chasing with TiO 2 in a dose-dependent fashion (5-100 μg/mL). When co-administered with MDP or peptidoglycan, IL-1β secretion was further enhanced for the Nod2 m/m genotype. Tumour necrosis factor α was triggered by LPS priming, and more so for the Nod2 m/m genotype. This was enhanced by chasing with TiO 2 , MDP, or peptidoglycan, but there was no additive effect between the bacterial fragments and TiO 2 . Here, the doses of TiO 2 that augmented bacterial fragment-induced IL-1β secretion were relatively high. In vivo, however, selected intestinal cells appear

  2. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husain, Mainul, E-mail: mainul.husain@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Guo, Charles, E-mail: charles.guo@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Jacobsen, Nicklas R., E-mail: nrj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Jensen, Keld A., E-mail: kaj@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.williams@hc-sc.gc.ca [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Vogel, Ulla, E-mail: ubv@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark); Wallin, Hakan, E-mail: hwa@nrcwe.dk [The Danish NanoSafety Centre, National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen DK-2100 (Denmark); Institute of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen DK-1014 (Denmark); Halappanavar, Sabina, E-mail: sabina.halappanavar@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  3. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  4. Oxidation and crystal field effects in uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobin, J. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Booth, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shuh, D. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); van der Laan, G. [Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sokaras, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Weng, T. -C. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States); Yu, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bagus, P. S. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Tyliszczak, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Nordlund, D. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-07-06

    An extensive investigation of oxidation in uranium has been pursued. This includes the utilization of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, hard x-ray absorption near-edge structure, resonant (hard) x-ray emission spectroscopy, cluster calculations, and a branching ratio analysis founded on atomic theory. The samples utilized were uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium trioxide (UO3), and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4). As a result, a discussion of the role of non-spherical perturbations, i.e., crystal or ligand field effects, will be presented.

  5. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core

  6. Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

  7. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. Methods ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3?M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with di...

  8. In situ leaching process for recording uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, W.M.; Timmins, T.H.; Sherry, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method of recovering uranium values from a subterranean deposit comprising: injecting an alkaline carbonate lixiviant into said deposit; flowing said alkaline carbonate lixiviant through said deposit to dissolve said uranium values into said lixiviant; producing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values from said deposit; flowing said lixiviant and said dissolved uranium values through an adsorption material to adsorp said uranium values from said lixiviant; eluting said adsorption material with an eluant of ammonium carbonate to desorb said uranium values from said adsorption material into said eluate in a concentration greater than in said lixiviant; heating said eluate and said desorbed uranium values to vaporize off ammonia and carbon dioxide therefrom, thereby causing uranium values to crystallize from the eluate; and recovering said solid uranium values

  9. Electrochemical preparation of new uranium oxide phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, V.V.; Lyalyushkin, N.V.; Bove, A.L.; Komarov, V.K.; Kapshukov, I.I.

    1992-01-01

    Behaviour of uranium ions in oxidation states 3+ and 4+ in molten chlorides of alkali metals in the temperature range of 700-900 degC in the atmosphere of an inert gas was studied by the method of cyclic voltametry. It is shown that as a result of introduction of crystal uranium dioxide into the salt melt formation of uranium oxide ions of the composition UO + and UO 2+ occurs, the ions participating in electrode reactions and bringing about formation of the following uranium oxides on the cathode: UO and, presumably, U 3 O 4 . Oxides UO and U 3 O 4 are thermodynamically unstable at low temperatures and decompose into uranium oxide of the composition UO 2-x , where x varies from 0 to 0.05, and metal uranium

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH-DENSITY U/AL DISPERSION PLATES FOR MO-99 PRODUCTION USING ATOMIZED URANIUM POWDER

    OpenAIRE

    RYU, HO JIN; KIM, CHANG KYU; SIM, MOONSOO; PARK, JONG MAN; LEE, JONG HYUN

    2013-01-01

    Uranium metal particle dispersion plates have been proposed as targets for Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) production to improve the radioisotope production efficiency of conventional low enriched uranium targets. In this study, uranium powder was produced by centrifugal atomization, and miniature target plates containing uranium particles in an aluminum matrix with uranium densities up to 9 g-U/cm3 were fabricated. Additional heat treatment was applied to convert the uranium particles into UAlx compou...

  11. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all Micropore volumes, assessed using t-plots to analyze N2 desorption data, were also the same for all dry-sieved micropore volumes and mass-transfer rate properties. Pore volumes for dry-sieved size fractions exceeded values for the corresponding wet-sieved fractions. We hypothesize that repeated field wetting and drying cycles lead to the formation of aggregates and/or coatings containing (micro)pore networks which provided an additional mass-transfer resistance over that associated with individual particles. The 2–8 mm fraction exhibited a larger average and standard deviation in the distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of microporous basaltic rock fragments.

  12. Contribution to the study of defects created by {alpha} particles in uranium at 4.2 K; Contribution a l'etude des defauts crees par irradiation a l'aide de particules {alpha} dans l'uranium a 4.2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raharinaivo, A.L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A device is described for the irradiation, in liquid helium, of metallic strips with {alpha} particles produced by radioactive sources. It has thereby been possible to measure changes in resistivity of variously treated uranium samples (cold- worked, annealed, previously exposed to neutrons, etc. ) as a function of the irradiation flux. The annealings carried out after irradiation compare favorably to those effected after a quenching from 100 to 4 K (JOUSSET experiments). The results are discussed; it is concluded that a defect, very probably of the interstitial type, is mobile in uranium at temperatures below 5 K. (author) [French] On decrit un dispositif permettant d'irradier, dans l'helium liquide, des lames metalliques par des particules {alpha} issues de sources radioactives. On a ainsi mesure les variations de resistivite, en fonction du flux d'irradiation, d'uranium diversement traite (ecroui, recuit, prealablement irradie par des neutrons...). Les recuits apres irradiation se comparent bien aux recuits apres trempe de 100 a 4 K (experiences de JOUSSET). L'ensemble des resultats est discute et il conduit a la conclusion qu'un defaut, tres vraisemblablement interstitiel, est mobile dans l'uranium a des temperatures inferieures a 5 K. (auteur)

  13. Contribution to the study of defects created by {alpha} particles in uranium at 4.2 K; Contribution a l'etude des defauts crees par irradiation a l'aide de particules {alpha} dans l'uranium a 4.2 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raharinaivo, A L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A device is described for the irradiation, in liquid helium, of metallic strips with {alpha} particles produced by radioactive sources. It has thereby been possible to measure changes in resistivity of variously treated uranium samples (cold- worked, annealed, previously exposed to neutrons, etc. ) as a function of the irradiation flux. The annealings carried out after irradiation compare favorably to those effected after a quenching from 100 to 4 K (JOUSSET experiments). The results are discussed; it is concluded that a defect, very probably of the interstitial type, is mobile in uranium at temperatures below 5 K. (author) [French] On decrit un dispositif permettant d'irradier, dans l'helium liquide, des lames metalliques par des particules {alpha} issues de sources radioactives. On a ainsi mesure les variations de resistivite, en fonction du flux d'irradiation, d'uranium diversement traite (ecroui, recuit, prealablement irradie par des neutrons...). Les recuits apres irradiation se comparent bien aux recuits apres trempe de 100 a 4 K (experiences de JOUSSET). L'ensemble des resultats est discute et il conduit a la conclusion qu'un defaut, tres vraisemblablement interstitiel, est mobile dans l'uranium a des temperatures inferieures a 5 K. (auteur)

  14. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  15. The behaviour of uranium metal in hydrogen atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C.; Stevens, J.C.H.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction between commercial H 2 and uranium metal leads to the formation of UO 2 due to traces of water vapour or oxygen. When extremely pure H 2 is used uranium hydride may be formed but, even with 99.9999% H 2 , uranium dioxide forms preferentially. The present work identifies the presence of UH 3 in the X-ray photoelectron spectrum of a uranium sample which has been exposed to ca. 10 10 L† H 2 at ca. 200 0 C. This spectrum indicates that the hydride possesses a high degree of covalency, since the oxidation state of uranium in UH 3 appears to be ca. 1.4. (author)

  16. Fission products stability in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brillant, G.; Gupta, F.; Pasturel, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fission product stability in nuclear fuels is investigated using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, incorporation and solution energies of He, Kr, Xe, I, Te, Ru, Sr and Ce in pre-existing trap sites of UO 2 (vacancies, interstitials, U-O divacancy, and Schottky trio defects) are calculated using the projector-augmented-wave method as implemented in the Vienna ab initio simulation package. Correlation effects are taken into account within the DFT+U approach. The stability of many binary and ternary compounds in comparison to soluted atoms is also explored. Finally the involvement of FP in the formation of metallic and oxide precipitates in oxide fuels is discussed in the light of experimental results.

  17. Methods for the accountability of uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, F.B.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Ernst, K.; Harrar, J.E.; Turel, S.P.

    1975-06-01

    Procedures for the determination of the total U and the amount of 235 U isotope in UO 2 powder and pellets are given. Methods for U determination include coulometry, titration, and gravimetry. Surface-ionization mass spectroscopy is described for 235 U measurement. Spectrometric procedures are described for determining the impurity content in the UO 2 . (U.S.)

  18. Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, D.F.

    1987-08-01

    The ceramic samples (UO 2 ) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D 2 ) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO 2 . Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600 0 C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D 2 ), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H 2 in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO 2 was determined to be: 3.0 x 10 7 exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm and for polycrystalline UO 2 : 5.5 x 10 4 exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/√atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO 2 depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO 2 lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO 2 specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200 0 C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800 0 C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO 2 could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO 2 specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Gavarini, S.; Martin, P.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.

    2006-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, isotopes such as 35 Cl present as impurities in the nuclear fuel are activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of nuclear fuel, the activation products such as 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute to the ''instant release fraction'' as they are likely to migrate in defects and grain boundaries. In order to differentiate diffusion mechanisms due to ''athermal'' processes during irradiation from thermally activated diffusion, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This work concerns the measurement of the thermal diffusion coefficient of chlorine in UO 2 . 37 Cl was implanted at a 10 13 at/cm 2 fluence in depleted UO 2 samples which were then annealed in the 900-1200 C temperature range and finally analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to obtain 37 Cl depth profiles. The migration process appears to be rather complex, involving mechanisms such as atomic, grain boundary, directed diffusion along preferential patterns as well as trapping into sinks before successive effusion. However, using a diffusion model based on general equation of transport, apparent diffusion coefficients could be calculated for 1000 and 1100 C and a mean activation energy of 4.3 eV is proposed. This value is one of the lowest values compared to those found in literature for other radionuclides pointing out a great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures. In order to unequivocally determine the diffusion behaviour of both implanted and pristine chlorine before and after thermal annealing, the structural environment of chlorine in UO 2 was examined using micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (micro-XAS). (orig.)

  20. Examining the efficiency of muffle furnance-induced alkaline hydrolysis in determining the titanium content of environmental samples containing engineered titanium dioxide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A novel muffle furnace (MF)-based potassium hydroxide (KOH) fusion digestion technique was developed and its comparative digestion and dissolution efficacy for different titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs)/environmental matrices was evaluated. Digestion of different enviro...

  1. Solubility measurement of uranium in uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Elless, M.; Hoffman, F.

    1993-08-01

    A short-term equilibration study involving two uranium-contaminated soils at the Fernald site was conducted as part of the In Situ Remediation Integrated Program. The goal of this study is to predict the behavior of uranium during on-site remediation of these soils. Geochemical modeling was performed on the aqueous species dissolved from these soils following the equilibration study to predict the on-site uranium leaching and transport processes. The soluble levels of total uranium, calcium, magnesium, and carbonate increased continually for the first four weeks. After the first four weeks, these components either reached a steady-state equilibrium or continued linearity throughout the study. Aluminum, potassium, and iron, reached a steady-state concentration within three days. Silica levels approximated the predicted solubility of quartz throughout the study. A much higher level of dissolved uranium was observed in the soil contaminated from spillage of uranium-laden solvents and process effluents than in the soil contaminated from settling of airborne uranium particles ejected from the nearby incinerator. The high levels observed for soluble calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate are probably the result of magnesium and/or calcium carbonate minerals dissolving in these soils. Geochemical modeling confirms that the uranyl-carbonate complexes are the most stable and dominant in these solutions. The use of carbonate minerals on these soils for erosion control and road construction activities contributes to the leaching of uranium from contaminated soil particles. Dissolved carbonates promote uranium solubility, forming highly mobile anionic species. Mobile uranium species are contaminating the groundwater underlying these soils. The development of a site-specific remediation technology is urgently needed for the FEMP site

  2. The association between the incidence of postmenopausal breast cancer and concentrations at street-level of nitrogen dioxide and ultrafine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Weichenthal, Scott; Lavigne, Eric; Valois, Marie-France; Hatzopoulou, Marianne; Van Ryswyk, Keith; Shekarrizfard, Maryam; Villeneuve, Paul J; Crouse, Daniel; Parent, Marie-Élise

    2017-10-01

    There is scant information as to whether traffic-related air pollution is associated with the incidence of breast cancer. Nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and ultrafine particles (UFPs, variations in traffic-related air pollution and may also be associated with incidence. We conducted a population-based, case-control study of street-level concentrations of NO 2 and UFPs and incident postmenopausal breast cancer in Montreal, Canada. Incident cases were identified between 2008 and 2011 from all but one hospital that treated breast cancer in the Montreal area. Population controls were identified from provincial electoral lists of Montreal residents and frequency-matched to cases using 5-year age groups. Concentrations of NO 2 and UFPs were estimated using two separate land-use regression models. Exposures were assigned to residential locations at the time of recruitment, and we identified residential histories of women who had lived in these residences for 10 years or more. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for individual-level and ecological covariates. We assessed the functional form of NO 2 and UFP exposures using natural cubic splines. We found that the functional form of the response functions between incident postmenopausal breast cancer and concentrations of NO 2 and UFPs were consistent with linearity. For NO 2 , we found increasing risks of breast cancer for all subjects combined and stronger associations when analyses were restricted to those women who had lived at their current address for 10 years or more. Specifically, the OR, adjusted for personal covariates, per increase in the interquartile range (IQR=3.75 ppb) of NO 2 was 1.08 (95%CI: 0.92-1.27). For women living in their homes for 10 years or more, the adjusted OR was 1.17 (95%CI: 0.93-1.46; IQR=3.84 ppb); for those not living at that home 10 years before the study, it was 0.93 (95%CI: 0.64, 1.36; IQR=3.65 ppb). For UFPs, the ORs were

  3. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  4. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  5. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  6. Treatment of uranium turning with the controllable oxidizing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Bingyi; Zhang Yonggang; Zhen Huikuan

    1989-02-01

    The concept, procedure and safety measures of the controllable oxidizing for uranium turning is described. The feasibility study on technological process has been made. The process provided several advantages such as: simplicity of operation, no pollution environment, safety, high efficiency and low energy consumption. The process can yield nuclear pure uranium dioxide under making no use of a great number of chemical reagent. It may supply raw material for fluoration and provide a simply method of treatment for safe store of uranium turning

  7. Gravimetric determination of uranium in SALE samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    As a participant in the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory Evaluation (SALE) program, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at General Atomic routinely assays uranium dioxide and uranyl nitrate SALE samples for uranium content. Gravimetric methods are relatively easy and inexpensive to apply when the samples for uranium content. Gravimetric methods are relatively easy and inexpensive to apply when the samples are free from substantial amounts of metallic impurities. Clearly the gravimetric procedure alone is not specific for uranium and must be enhanced by the use of impurity corrections. Emission spectrography is used routinely as the technique of choice for making such corrections. In cases where it is essential to assay specifically for uranium, the modified Davies-Gray titration using a weighed titrant method is applied. In this paper some essential features of these gravimetric and titrimetric procedures are discussed

  8. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  9. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  10. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  11. Locating underground uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Underground uranium deposits are located by placing wires of dosimeters each about 5 to 18 mg/cm 2 thick underground in a grid pattern. Each dosimeter contains a phosphor which is capable of storing the energy of alpha particles. In each pair one dosimeter is shielded from alpha particles with more than 18 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material but not gamma and beta rays and the other dosimeter is shielded with less than 1 mg/cm 2 thick opaque material to exclude dust. After a period underground the dosimeters are heated which releases the stored energy as light. The amount of light produced from the heavily shielded dosimeter is subtracted from the amount of light produced from the thinly shielded dosimeter to give an indication of the location and quantity of uranium underground

  12. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  13. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  14. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  15. Airborne uranium, its concentration and toxicity in uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Mauro, J.; Ryniker, J.; Fellman, R.

    1979-02-01

    The release of uranium hexafluoride and its hydrolysis products into the work environment of a plant for enriching uranium by means of gas centrifuges is discussed. The maximum permissible mass and curie concentration of airborne uranium (U) is identified as a function of the enrichment level (i.e., U-235/total U), and chemical and physical form. A discussion of the chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium as a function of enrichment and chemical form is included. The toxicity of products of UF 6 hydrolysis in the atmosphere, namely, UO 2 F 2 and HF, the particle size of toxic particulate material produced from this hydrolysis, and the toxic effects of HF and other potential fluoride compounds are also discussed. Results of an investigation of known effects of humidity and temperature on particle size of UO 2 F 2 produced by the reaction of UF 6 with water vapor in the air are reported. The relationship of the solubility of uranium compounds to their toxic effects was studied. Identification and discussion of the standards potentially applicable to airborne uranium compounds in the working environment are presented. The effectiveness of High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) filters subjected to the corrosive environment imposed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride is discussed

  16. Synthesis of Uranium nitride powders using metal uranium powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Dong Joo; Oh, Jang Soo; Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Keon Sik

    2012-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) is a potential fuel material for advanced nuclear reactors because of their high fuel density, high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, and considerable breeding capability in LWRs. Uranium nitride powders can be fabricated by a carbothermic reduction of the oxide powders, or the nitriding of metal uranium. The carbothermic reduction has an advantage in the production of fine powders. However it has many drawbacks such as an inevitable engagement of impurities, process burden, and difficulties in reusing of expensive N 15 gas. Manufacturing concerns issued in the carbothermic reduction process can be solved by changing the starting materials from oxide powder to metals. However, in nitriding process of metal, it is difficult to obtain fine nitride powders because metal uranium is usually fabricated in the form of bulk ingots. In this study, a simple reaction method was tested to fabricate uranium nitride powders directly from uranium metal powders. We fabricated uranium metal spherical powder and flake using a centrifugal atomization method. The nitride powders were obtained by thermal treating those metal particles under nitrogen containing gas. We investigated the phase and morphology evolutions of powders during the nitriding process. A phase analysis of nitride powders was also a part of the present work

  17. Performance Analysis Review of Thorium TRISO Coated Particles during Manufacture, Irradiation and Accident Condition Heating Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Thorium, in combination with high enriched uranium, was used in all early high temperature reactors (HTRs). Initially, the fuel was contained in a kernel of coated particles. However, particle quality was low in the 1960s and early 1970s. Modern, high quality, tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles with thorium oxide and uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) had been manufactured since 1978 and were successfully demonstrated in irradiation and accident tests. In 1980, HTR fuels changed to low enriched uranium UO 2 TRISO fuels. The wide ranging development and demonstration programme was successful, and it established a worldwide standard that is still valid today. During the process, results of the thorium work with high quality TRISO fuel particles had not been fully evaluated or documented. This publication collects and presents the information and demonstrates the performance of thorium TRISO fuels.This publication is an outcome of the technical contract awarded under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Near Term and Promising Long Term Options for Deployment of Thorium Based Nuclear Energy, initiated in 2012. It is based on the compilation and analysis of available results on thorium TRISO coated particle performance in manufacturing and during irradiation and accident condition heating tests

  18. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  19. Novel precipitation technique for uranium recovery from carbonate leach solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujoy Biswas; Rupawate, V.H.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.; Chakravartty, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    The recovery of uranium from carbonate ore leach solution was studied using novel precipitation method. The uranium from leach liquor was recovered as magnesium diuranate with NaOH in presence of trace amount of Mg 2+ . Effects of various parameters such as addition of H 2 SO 4 , MgO, MgSO 4 as well as NaOH were investigated for maximum uranium recovery. Overall uranium recovery of the process was 97 % with improved particle size (∼57 µm). Based on the experimental findings, a process flow-sheet was developed for uranium recovery from carbonate ore leach solution with a uranium concentration of <1 g/L. (author)

  20. A study on chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eun, H.C.; Kim, T.J.; Jang, J.H.; Kim, G.Y.; Lee, S.J.; Hur, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the chlorination of uranium metal using ammonium chloride (NH 4 Cl) was conducted to derive an easy and simple uranium chloride production method without impurities. In thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, it was predicted that only uranium chlorides can be produced by the reactions between uranium metal and NH 4 Cl. Experimental conditions for the chlorination of uranium metal were determined using a chlorination test of cerium metal using NH 4 Cl. It was confirmed that UCl 3 and UCl 4 in the form of particles as uranium chlorination products can be obtained from the chlorination method using NH 4 Cl. (author)

  1. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  2. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  3. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Frajndlich, E.U. de.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F 6 ) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F 6 to uranium dioxide (U O 2 ) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  4. Influence of acidified acidity to uranium bioleaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiang; Liu Yajie; Zheng Zhihong; Yuan Baohua; Shen Chuan; Shi Weijun

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the acidified acidity and the acid consumption and uranium leaching rate in the process of uranium bioleaching is investigated. Results indicate that higher uranium leaching rate is obtained when the relatively high acidity was applied at beginning. For different minerals, although the original acidity should be different, lower original acidity was not better for shortening leaching period and improving uranium leaching rate. It confirms 30-40 g/L sulfuric acid as the original acidity was more suitable and more than 30 g/ L should be applied if the mineral particle sizes were larger. (authors)

  5. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I 2 ) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF 4 , spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area

  6. Uranium-bearing wastes and their radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Imamura, Mitsutaka; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are no data available with regard to radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes; such data are needed for the assessment of radiation exposure from radon that will be generated in the distant future as one uranium progeny at shallow land disposal sites for uranium-bearing wastes. There are many kinds of uranium-bearing wastes. However, it is not necessary to measure the radon emanation coefficients for all of them for two reasons. First, the radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium are determined by the uranium chemical form, the manner of uranium deposition on the waste matrix, and the size of the particles which constitute the waste matrix. Therefore, only a few representative measurements are sufficient for such uranium-bearing wastes. Second, it is possible to make theoretical calculations of radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. In the present study, simulated uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium were prepared, their radon emanation coefficients were measured and radon emanation coefficients were calculated theoretically for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. The obtained radon emanation coefficients are distributed at higher values than those for ubiquitous soils and rocks in the natural environment. Therefore, it is not correct to just compare uranium concentrations among uranium-bearing wastes, ubiquitous soils and rocks in terms of radiation exposure. The radon emanation coefficients obtained in the present study have to be employed together with the uranium concentration in uranium-bearing wastes in order to achieve proper assessment of radiation exposure. (author)

  7. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  8. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  9. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  10. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  11. The influence of adding modified zirconium oxide-titanium dioxide nano-particles on mechanical properties of orthodontic adhesive: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felemban, Nayef H; Ebrahim, Mohamed I

    2017-01-13

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to examine the effect of incorporating different concentrations of Zirconium oxide-Titanium dioxide (ZrO2-TiO2) nanoparticles, which can have antibacterial properties, on the mechanical properties of an orthodontic adhesive. ZrO2-TiO2 (Zirconium oxide, HWNANO, Hongwu International Group Ltd, China) -Titanium dioxide, Nanoshell, USA) nanopowder were incorporated into orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT, 3 M Unitek, Monrovia, USA) with different concentrations (0.5% weight nonofiller and 1% weight nanofiller). The size of nanoparticle was 70-80 nm for ZrO2 and less than 50 nm for TiO2. For measuring the shear bond strength of the three groups of orthodontic adhesives [Transbond (control), Transbond mixed with 0.5% weight ZrO2-TiO2, and Transbond mixed with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2], 30 freshly extracted human first premolars were used and bonded with stainless steel metal brackets (Dentaurum®, Discovery®, Deutschland), using the 3 orthodontic adhesives and 3 M Unitek; Transbond TM Plus Self-Etching Primer (10 samples in each group). The recorded values of compressive strength and tensile strength (measured separately on 10 samples of orthodontic adhesives (add the 3 D size of sample, light cured for 40 s on both sides) of each orthodontic adhesives), as well as the shear bond strength in Mega Pascal unit (MPa) were collected and exposed to one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc tests. orthodontic adhesive with 1% weight ZrO2-TiO2 showed the highest mean compressive (73.42 ± 1.55 MPa, p: 0.003, F: 12.74), tensile strength (8.65 ± 0.74 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 68.20), and shear bond strength (20.05 ± 0.2 MPa, p: 0.001, F: 0.17). Adding ZrO2-TiO2 nanoparticle to orthodontic adhesive increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and shear bond strength in vitro, but in vivo studies and randomized clinical trials are needed to validate the present findings.

  12. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, G [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I; Tore, C; Tanker, E [Turkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey)

    1997-08-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs.

  13. Boron nitride coated uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, G.; Uslu, I.; Tore, C.; Tanker, E.

    1997-01-01

    Pure Urania and Urania-gadolinia (5 and 10%) fuels were produced by sol-gel technique. The sintered fuel pellets were then coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The analyses under scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a variety of BN structures, mainly platelike and rodlike structures were observed. Burnup calculations by using WIMSD4 showed that BN coated and gadolinia containing fuels have larger burnups than other fuels. The calculations were repeated at different pitch distances. The change of the radius of the fuel pellet or the moderator/fuel ratio showed that BN coated fuel gives the highest burnups at the present design values of a PWR. Key words: burnable absorber, boron nitride, gadolinia, CVT, nuclear fuel. (author). 32 refs, 14 figs

  14. Amperometric biosensor for total monoamines using a glassy carbon paste electrode modified with human monoamine oxidase B and manganese dioxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aigner, Maximilian; Telsnig, Dietlind; Teubl, Christian; Ortner, Astrid; Kalcher, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Wallner, Silvia; Edmondson, Dale

    2015-01-01

    We have prepared a biosensor for the determination of the total monoamine content in complex matrices by immobilizing a human monoamine oxidase B (hMAO B) on a glassy carbon paste electrode and adding manganese dioxide microparticles as the mediator. The enzyme hMAO B (expressed in Pichia pastoris and immobilized by using a dialysis membrane) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of monoamines, and this results in the formation of the corresponding aldehyde, ammonia and hydrogen peroxide. The latter was detected at pH 7.5 at a working voltage of 400 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) by differential pulse voltammetry and amperometrically by applying flow injection analysis. Analytical parameters were established by using phenylethylamine (PEA) as a standard substrate. Peak height and concentration of PEA are linearly related in the 0.5 to 150 μg mL −1 concentration range, and the limits of detection and of quantification are 0.15 and 0.5 μg mL −1 of PEA, respectively. Substrate specificity was investigated with different monoamines including PEA, serotonin, benzylamine, dopamine, tyramine, and norepinephrine. The applicability of the biosensor was successfully tested in a commercial fish sauce that served as a complex matrix. The total monoamine content was calculated as PEA-equivalents. (author)

  15. Flotation of uranium from uranium ores in Canada. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthuswami, S.V.; Vigayan, S.; Woods, D.R.; Banerjee, S.

    1983-01-01

    About 150 flotation tests were done on Elliot Lake ore with 15 reagents as collectors in order to screen and choose an attractive collector for uranium flotation. Several variables were studied including pH, conditioning time and mode of collector addition. The tests were done in a Denver or Agitair subaeration cell. The particle size of the ore was kept at 85% below -325 mesh. Three reagents (Kelex 00, TOPO, and cupferron) were identified as having the most promise. The best results were obtained with cupferron, where 93-95% of the uranium was recovered in 25-30% of the mass of original ore. Radium in the tails varied between 5 and 30 pCi/g depending on the mass of uranium floated. Radium was recovered in proportion to uranium in the tests done at neutral pH. The preconcentration results obtained by flotation alone were comparable to those obtained using pyrite flotation and wet high-intensity magnetic separation of uranium. The consumption of cupferron was 4 kg/Mg ore for each flotation stage. This was 10-15 times larger than the collector usage in conventional oxide flotation. This scheme did not require other reagents as depressants, activators or modifiers. Reproducibility was good and similar recoveries were obtained with fresh or old ores, and with distilled or mine water. The selectivity of cupferron for uranium in the ore studied was outstanding

  16. A spectroscopic study of uranium species formed in chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkovich, Vladimir A.; Bhatt, Anand I.; May, Iain; Griffiths, Trevor R.; Thied, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    The chlorination of uranium metal or uranium oxides in chloride melts offers an acceptable process for the head-end of pyrochemical reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The reactions of uranium metal and ceramic uranium dioxide with chlorine and with hydrogen chloride were studied in the alkali metal chloride melts, NaCl-KCl at 973K, NaCl-CsCl between 873 and 923K and LiCl-KCl at 873K. The uranium species formed therein were characterized from their electronic absorption spectra measured in situ. The kinetic parameters of the reactions depend on melt composition, temperature and chlorinating agent used. The reaction of uranium dioxide with oxygen in the presence of alkali metal chlorides results in the formation of alkali metal uranates. A spectroscopic study, between 723 and 973K, on their formation and their solutions was undertaken in LiCl, LiCl-KCl eutectic and NaCl-CsCl eutectic melts. The dissolution of uranium dioxide in LiCl-KCl eutectic at 923K containing added aluminium trichloride in the presence of oxygen has also been investigated. In this case, the reaction leads to the formation of uranyl chloride species. (author)

  17. Vasomotor function in rat arteries after ex vivo and intragastric exposure to food-grade titanium dioxide and vegetable carbon particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ditte Marie; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2018-01-01

    -grade particle exposure on vasomotor function and systemic oxidative stress in an ex vivo study and intragastrically exposed rats.Methods: In an ex vivo study, aorta rings from naive Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed for 30 min to food-grade TiO2 (E171), benchmark TiO2 (Aeroxide P25), food-grade vegetable carbon...... (E153) or benchmark carbon black (Printex 90). Subsequently, the vasomotor function was assessed in wire myographs. In an in vivo study, lean Zucker rats were exposed intragastrically once a week for 10 weeks to vehicle, E171 or E153. Doses were comparable to human daily intake. Vasomotor function...... no differences between groups.Conclusion: Gastrointestinal tract exposure to E171 and E153 was associated with modest albeit statistically significant alterations in the vasocontraction and vasorelaxation responses. Direct particle exposure to aorta rings elicited a similar type of response. The vasomotor...

  18. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  19. Gas phase deposition of oxide and metal-oxide coatings on fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patokin, A.P.; Khrebtov, V.L.; Shirokov, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Production processes and properties of oxide (Al 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 ) and metal-oxide (Mo-Al 2 O 3 , Mo-ZrO 2 , W-Al 2 O 3 , W-ZrO 2 ) coatings on molybdenum substrates and uranium dioxide fuel particles were investigated. It is shown that the main factors that have an effect on the deposition rate, density, microstructure and other properties of coatings are the deposition temperature, the ratio of H 2 and CO 2 flow rates, the total reactor pressure and the ratio of partial pressures of corresponding metal chlorides during formation of metal-oxide coatings

  20. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  1. Stability and aggregation of nanoscale titanium dioxide particle (nTiO2): Effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhong; Cheng, Tao

    2018-02-01

    Fate and transport of engineered nanoscale titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) have received much attention during the past decade. The aggregation and stability of nTiO 2 in water with complicated components, however, have not been fully examined. The objective of this paper is to determine the individual and synergistic effect of cation valence, humic acid, and clay colloids on nTiO 2 stability and aggregation, and elucidate the related mechanisms. We conducted systematic laboratory experiments to determine nTiO 2 stability and aggregation in NaCl and MgCl 2 solutions, both in the absence and presence of humic acid and illite colloids. Results showed that Mg 2+ , in comparison to Na + , could make the zeta potential of nTiO 2 more positive, and shift the point of zero charge of nTiO 2 (pH pzc,TiO2 ) towards higher pH. We also found that nTiO 2 are destabilized by illite colloids at pH < pH pzc,TiO2 through formation of illite-nTiO 2 hetero-aggregates, but are not interfered by illite colloids at higher pH. HA was found to make nTiO 2 stable via electrostatic and steric effects, both in the absence and presence of illite colloids. Calculated interaction energy based on DLVO theory revealed that instability of the nTiO 2 suspensions is mainly caused by primary minima, and that secondary minima normally do not destabilize the suspension, even though they are found to promote aggregation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Process development study on production of uranium metal from monazite sourced crude uranium tetra-fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S; Satpati, S.K.; Hareendran, K.N.; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of an economic process for recovery, process flow sheet development, purification and further conversion to nuclear grade uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been a technological challenge and the present paper, discusses the same.The developed flow-sheet is a combination of hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes. Crude UF 4 is converted to uranium di-oxide (UO 2 ) by chemical conversion route and UO 2 produced is made fluoride-free by repeated repulping, followed by solid liquid separation. Uranium di-oxide is then purified by two stages of dissolution and suitable solvent extraction methods to get uranium nitrate pure solution (UNPS). UNPS is then precipitated with air diluted ammonia in a leak tight stirred vessel under controlled operational conditions to obtain ammonium di-uranate (ADU). The ADU is then calcined and reduced to produce metal grade UO 2 followed by hydro-fluorination using anhydrous hydrofluoric acid to obtain metal grade UF 4 with ammonium oxalate insoluble (AOI) content of 4 is essential for critical upstream conversion process. Nuclear grade uranium metal ingot is finally produced by metallothermic reduction process at 650℃ in a closed vessel, called bomb reactor. In the process, metal-slag separation plays an important role for attaining metal purity as well as process yield. Technological as well economic feasibility of indigenously developed process for large scale production of uranium metal from the crude UF 4 has been established in Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), India

  3. U-bearing particles in miners' and millers' lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.; Wrenn, M.E.; Singh, N.P.; Miller, S.C.; Jones, K.W.; Cholewa, M.; Hanson, A.L.; Saccomanno, G.

    1984-01-01

    The size distribution of uranium-bearing particles in air particulates in occupational areas of active uranium mines and mills is largely uninvestigated. Investigation of the size of residual uranium-bearing particles in uranium miners' and millers' lungs is warranted because significant inhalation of uranium can occur in certain occupational areas. Average uranium concentrations of about 0.3 ppM U in uranium miners' and millers' lungs have been reported. Local uranium concentrations in uranium-bearing particles inhaled and regionally deposited in the lungs of uranium miners and millers are orders of magnitude larger than the average uranium concentrations reported. The feasibility of using microPIXE (particle induced x-ray emission) techniques to search for such uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues has been demonstrated. Proton microbeams 20 μm in diameter, scanning in 5 μm steps, were used to irradiate sections of lung tissues 10 to 40 μm thick. The paper will briefly describe the method, and present and discuss the results obtained in an extensive search for uranium-bearing particles embedded in lung tissues, collected at autopsy, of former uranium miners and millers. 13 references, 1 table

  4. Dry uranium tetrafluoride process preparation using the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, Joao Batista da

    2008-01-01

    It is a well known fact that the use of uranium tetrafluoride allows flexibility in the production of uranium suicide and uranium oxide fuel. To its obtention there are two conventional routes, the one which reduces uranium from the UF 6 hydrolysis solution with stannous chloride, and the hydro fluorination of a solid uranium dioxide. In this work we are introducing a third and a dry way route, mainly utilized to the recovery of uranium from the liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process, at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recuperation of ammonium fluoride by NH 4 HF 2 precipitation. Working with the solid residues, the crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO 2 , which comes from the U mini plates recovery, also to its conversion in a solid state reaction, to obtain UF 4 . That returns to the process of metallic uranium production unity to the U 3 Si 2 obtention. This fuel is considered in IPEN CNEN/SP as the high density fuel phase for IEA-R1m reactor, which will replace the former low density U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel. (author)

  5. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  6. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  7. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  8. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  9. The effect of particle size of comminuted bituminous coal on low-temperature sorption of nitrogen and room-temperature sorption of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygankiewicz, J.; Dudzinska, A.; Zyla, M.

    2006-11-15

    Sorption isotherms of N2 and CO{sub 2} were determined at 77.5 and 293 K, respectively, on 65-85% C bituminous coals (type 32) in relation to particle size (0.063-0.075, 0.075-0.125, 0.1250.25, and 0.25-0.355 mm), volatiles, and origin. N2 sorbed only on the external surface, at best on the 0.063-0.075 mm grade (1.18-3.53 m{sup 2}/g in specific surface). CO{sub 2} penetrated very easily into the micro and submicro porous structure (so that it could displace other gases, e.g. CH4 and thus enabled the micropore volume and the specific surface of the coals to be determined. The porous structure was as accessible to CO{sub 2} as it was to H{sub 2}O and MeOH.

  10. Pulmonary response to surface‐coated nanotitanium dioxide particles includes induction of acute phase response genes, inflammatory cascades, and changes in microRNAs: A toxicogenomic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Jackson, Petra; Williams, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    with acute phase, inflammation and immune response 5 days post exposure with concomitant changes in several miRNAs. The role of these miRNAs in pulmonary response to inhaled particles is unknown and warrants further research. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2011. © 2011 Wiley‐Liss, Inc....... in increased levels of mRNA for acute phase markers serum amyloid A‐1 (Saa1) and serum amyloid A‐3 (Saa3), several C‐X‐C and C‐C motif chemokines, and cytokine tumor necrosis factor genes. Protein analysis of Saa1 and 3 showed selective upregulation of Saa3 in lung tissues. Sixteen miRNAs were induced by more...... than 1.2‐fold (adjusted P‐value changes in the expression of genes associated...

  11. Activation of Chalcogens and Chalcogenides at Reactive Uranium Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Franke, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of uranium has experienced a tremendous recent increase of interest within the last three decades, likely due to the fact that complexes of trivalent uranium can effectively engage activation and functionalization of small molecules, such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), dinitrogen (N2), or dioxygen (O2). Many small molecules are of great biochemical and industrial relevance, but their thermodynamical stability requires high pressures and temperatures...

  12. Monosodium titanate particle characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, G.T.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    A characterization study was performed on monosodium titanate (MST) particles to determine the effect of high shear forces expected from the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process pumps on the particle size distribution. The particles were characterized using particle size analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). No significant changes in particle size distributions were observed between as-received MST and after 2--4 hours of shearing. Both as-received and sheared MST particles contained a large percentage of porosity with pore sizes on the order of 500 to 2,000 Angstroms. Because of the large percentage of porosity, the overall surface area of the MST is dominated by the internal surfaces. The uranium and plutonium species present in the waste solution will have access to both interior and exterior surfaces. Therefore, uranium and plutonium loading should not be a strong function of MST particle size

  13. Uranium - what role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  14. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  15. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  16. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  17. Depleted uranium oxides as spent-nuclear-fuel waste-package fill materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    Depleted uranium dioxide fill inside the waste package creates the potential for significant improvements in package performance based on uranium geochemistry, reduces the potential for criticality in a repository, and consumes DU inventory. As a new concept, significant uncertainties exist: fill properties, impacts on package design, post- closure performance

  18. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  19. Derived enriched uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDIES OF URANIUM METAL CORROSION MECHANISM AND KINETICS IN WATER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudanova, Natalya; Maslennikov, Alexander; Peretroukhine, Vladimir F.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2006-01-01

    During long-term underwater storage of low burn-up uranium metal fuel, a corrosion product sludge forms containing uranium metal grains, uranium dioxide, uranates and, in some cases, uranium peroxide. Literature data on the corrosion of non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys do not allow unequivocal prediction of the paragenesis of irradiated uranium in water. The goal of the present work conducted under the program 'CORROSION OF IRRADIATED URANIUM ALLOYS FUEL IN WATER' is to study the corrosion of uranium and uranium alloys and the paragenesis of the corrosion products during long-term underwater storage of uranium alloy fuel irradiated at the Hanford Site. The elucidation of the physico-chemical nature of the corrosion of irradiated uranium alloys in comparison with non-irradiated uranium metal and its alloys is one of the most important aspects of this work. Electrochemical methods are being used to study uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics. The present part of work aims to examine and revise, where appropriate, the understanding of uranium metal corrosion mechanism and kinetics in water