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Sample records for uranium aerosols generation

  1. Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols: Generation and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Szrom, Fran; Guilmette, Ray; Holmes, Tom; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L.; Collins, John W.; Sanderson, T. Ellory; Fliszar, Richard W.; Gold, Kenneth; Beckman, John C.; Long, Julie

    2004-10-19

    In a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessing possible health effects from inhaling depleted uranium (DU) aerosols, a series of DU penetrators was fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and continuously monitor the sampler flow rates. Aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. The resulting data provide input useful in human health risk assessments.

  2. An aerosole generator for production of radioactive aerosoles by evaporating uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, W.M.

    1975-01-01

    In the Institut for Biology of the Austrian Research Center at Seibersdorf an experiment is running to study the behaviour of radioactive aerosoles in the organism of miniature swines after inhalation. In the work under discussion the aerosole generator of the equipment used for this inhalation experiments is described by means of which the aerosole-air mixtures are produced. The main part of this generator is a gas burner for evaporating irradiated UO 2 -pellets. (orig.) [de

  3. Measuring aerosols generated inside armoured vehicles perforated by depleted uranium ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhurst, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), the US Department of Defense initiated a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects on soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterised. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and monitor continuously the sampler flow rates. The aerosol samplers selected for these tests included filter cassettes, cascade impactors, a five-stage cyclone and a moving filter. Sampler redundancy was an integral part of the sampling system to offset losses from fragment damage. Wipe surveys and deposition trays collected removable deposited particulate matter. Interior aerosols were analysed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analysed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology and dissolution in vitro. These data, currently under independent peer review, will provide input for future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of inhaled or ingested DU aerosols. This paper briefly discusses the target vehicles, firing trajectories, aerosol samplers and instrumentation control systems, and the types of analyses conducted on the samples. (author)

  4. Measuring Aerosols Generated Inside Armoured Vehicles Perforated by Depleted Uranium Ammunition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2003-01-01

    In response to questions raised after the Gulf War about the health significance of exposure to depleted uranium (DU), the U.S. Department of Defense initiated a study designed to provide an improved scientific basis for assessment of possible health effects of soldiers in vehicles struck by these munitions. As part of this study, a series of DU penetrators were fired at an Abrams tank and a Bradley fighting vehicle, and the aerosols generated by vehicle perforation were collected and characterized. A robust sampling system was designed to collect aerosols in this difficult environment and to monitor continuously the sampler flow rates. Interior aerosols collected were analyzed for uranium concentration and particle size distribution as a function of time. They were also analyzed for uranium oxide phases, particle morphology, and dissolution in vitro. These data will provide input for future prospective and retrospective dose and health risk assessments of inhaled or ingested DU aerosols. This paper briefly discusses the target vehicles, firing trajectories, aerosol samplers and instrumentation control systems, and the types of analyses conducted on the samples

  5. Overview of the Capstone Depleted Uranium Study of Aerosols from Impact with Armored Vehicles: Test Setup and Aerosol Generation, Characterization, and Application in Assessing Dose and Risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Characterization and Risk Assessment Study was conducted to generate data about DU aerosols generated during the perforation of armored combat vehicles with large-caliber DU penetrators, and to apply the data in assessments of human health risks to personnel exposed to these aerosols, primarily through inhalation, during the 1991 Gulf War or in future military operations. The Capstone study consisted of two components: (1) generating, sampling and characterizing DU aerosols by firing at and perforating combat vehicles and (2) applying the source-term quantities and characteristics of the aerosols to the evaluation of doses and risks. This paper reviews the background of the study including the bases for the study, previous reviews of DU particles and health assessments from DU used by the U.S. military, the objectives of the study components, the participants and oversight teams, and the types of exposures it was intended to evaluate. It then discusses exposure scenarios used in the dose and risk assessment and provides an overview of how the field tests and dose and risk assessments were conducted

  6. Determination of the radioactive aerosols transport coefficients generated in open pit uranium mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo Py Junior, D. de.

    1978-01-01

    The classical atmospheric transport model is applied to uranium mining operations. Among the transport parameters there is one concerned with radioactive decay, but it does not include the radioactive decay series which is the specific case for uranium. Therefore, an extension of the transport theory is developed and tested, giving results greater than the ones obtained with the classical model, as expected. (author)

  7. Study of uranium mine aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzic, J.-Y.

    1976-05-01

    With a view to radiation protection of uranium-miners a study was made of the behaviour of radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols in the atmosphere of an experimental mine where temperature, pressure, relative himidity and ventilation are kept constant and in the air of a working area where the nature of the aerosol is dependent on the stage of work. Measurements of radon and daughter products carried out in various points of working areas showed that the gas was quickly diluted, equilibrium between radon and its daughter products (RaA, RaB, RaC) was never reached and the radon-aerosol contact was of short duration (a few minutes). Using a seven-stage Andersen impactor particle size distribution of the mine aerosol (particle diameter >0.3μm) was studied. The characteristic diameters were determined for each stage of the Andersen impactor and statistical analysis verified that aerosol distributions on the lower stages of the impactor were log-normal in most cases. Finally, determination of size distribution of α-radioactivity showed it was retained on fine particles. The percentage of free α-activity was evaluated using a diffusion battery [fr

  8. Characterisation of a uranium fire aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuscher, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium swarf, which can burn spontaneously in air, creates an aerosol which is chemically toxic and radiotoxic. The uptake of uranium oxide in the respiratory system is determined to a large extent by the characteristics of the aerosol. A study has been made of the methods by which aerosols can be characterised. The different measured and defined characteristics of particles are given. The normal and lognormal particle size distributions are discussed. Shape factors interrelating characteristics are explained. Experimental techniques for the characterisation of an aerosol are discussed, as well as the instruments that have been used in this study; namely the Andersen impactor, point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator and the Pollak counter. Uranium swarf was made to burn with a heated filament, and the resulting aerosol was measured. Optical and electron microscopy have been used for the determination of the projected area diameters, and the aerodynamic diameters have been determined with the impactor. The uranium fire aerosol can be represented by a bimodal, or monomodal, lognormal particle size distribution depending on the way in which the swarf burns. The determined activity median aerodynamic diameter of the two peaks were 0,49μm and 6,0μm respectively [af

  9. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; Scribano, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can

  10. Internal dosimetric evaluation due to uranium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Aguilar Juan; Delgado Avila Gustavo

    1991-01-01

    The present work has like object to carry out the internal dosimetric evaluation to the occupationally exposed personnel, due to the inhalation of aerosols of natural uranium and enriched in the pilot plant of nuclear fuel production of the National Institute of Nuclear Research

  11. Stable generator of polydisperse aerosol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuška, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 32, Suppl. 1 (2001), s. S823-S824 ISSN 0021-8502. [European Aerosol Conference 2001. Leipzig, 03.09.2001-07.09.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4031105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : aerosol generator * fine aerosol * polydisperse aerosol Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2001

  12. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols I: uranium concentration in aerosols as a function of time and particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Cheng, Yung Sung; Kenoyer, Judson L; Traub, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    During the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, aerosols containing DU were produced inside unventilated armored vehicles (i.e., Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles) by perforation with large-caliber DU penetrators. These aerosols were collected and characterized, and the data were subsequently used to assess human health risks to personnel exposed to DU aerosols. The DU content of each aerosol sample was first quantified by radioanalytical methods, and selected samples, primarily those from the cyclone separator grit chambers, were analyzed radiochemically. Deposition occurred inside the vehicles as particles settled on interior surfaces. Settling rates of uranium from the aerosols were evaluated using filter cassette samples that collected aerosol as total mass over eight sequential time intervals. A moving filter was used to collect aerosol samples over time, particularly within the first minute after a shot. The results demonstrate that the peak uranium concentration in the aerosol occurred in the first 10 s after perforation, and the concentration decreased in the Abrams tank shots to about 50% within 1 min and to less than 2% after 30 min. The initial and maximum uranium concentrations were lower in the Bradley vehicle than those observed in the Abrams tank, and the concentration levels decreased more slowly. Uranium mass concentrations in the aerosols as a function of particle size were evaluated using samples collected in a cyclone sampler, which collected aerosol continuously for 2 h after perforation. The percentages of uranium mass in the cyclone separator stages ranged from 38 to 72% for the Abrams tank with conventional armor. In most cases, it varied with particle size, typically with less uranium associated with the smaller particle sizes. Neither the Abrams tank with DU armor nor the Bradley vehicle results were specifically correlated with particle size and can best be represented by their average uranium mass concentrations of 65

  13. Devices and methods for generating an aerosol

    KAUST Repository

    Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2016-03-03

    Aerosol generators and methods of generating aerosols are provided. The aerosol can be generated at a stagnation interface between a hot, wet stream and a cold, dry stream. The aerosol has the benefit that the properties of the aerosol can be precisely controlled. The stagnation interface can be generated, for example, by the opposed flow of the hot stream and the cold stream. The aerosol generator and the aerosol generation methods are capable of producing aerosols with precise particle sizes and a narrow size distribution. The properties of the aerosol can be controlled by controlling one or more of the stream temperatures, the saturation level of the hot stream, and the flow times of the streams.

  14. Aerosol generation and delivery in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.; Raghunath, B.

    1998-01-01

    It is well established that radioaerosol lung technique by inhalation is a very versatile technique in the evaluation of health effects and medical diagnostic applications, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, their defence mechanism permeability and many others. Most important part of aerosol technology is to generate reproducibly stable diagnostic radioaerosols of known characteristics. Many compressed air atomisers are commercially available for generating aerosols but they have limited utility in aerosol inhalation, either because of large droplet size, low aerosol output or high airflow rates. There is clearly a need for a versatile and economical aerosol generation/inhalation system that can produce dry labelled aerosol particles with high deep lung delivery efficiency suitable for clinical studies. BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) has developed a dry aerosol generation/delivery system which operates on compressed air and generates dry polydisperse aerosols. This system is described along with an assessment of the aerosol characteristics and efficiency for diagnosis of various respiratory disorders

  15. Aerosols produced by evaporation of a uranium wire; Aerosols produits par evaporation d'un fil d'uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-03-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the aerosols formed when an uranium wire is evaporated in a normal or rarefied atmosphere, either with or without a drying agent. The heating of the wire can be either fast or slow. The first part is a study of aerosol production apparatus and of methods of measuring the aerosol. The second part presents the results obtained with various aerosols: the particles produced by the wire are less than one micron; during rapid heating, the granulometric distribution of the aerosol obeys a log-normal law; during slow heating, the distribution has two modes: one near 0.05 micron, the other close to 0.01 micron. (author) [French] Ce travail est consacre a l'etude des aerosols formes lors de l'evaporation d un fil d'uranium en atmosphere normale ou rarefiee en presence ou non de dessechant. Le chauffage du fil peut etre rapide ou lent. La premiere partie est une etude des appareils de production et des methodes de mesures de l'aerosol. La seconde partie consigne les resultats obtenus sur les differents aerosols: les particules emises par le fil sont inferieures au micron; lors d'un chauffage rapide, la repartition granulometrique de l'aerosol suit une loi log-normale; lors d un chauffage lent, la repartition presente deux modes: l'un voisin de 0.05 micron, l'autre voisin de 0.01 micron. (auteur)

  16. Aerosols produced by evaporation of a uranium wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, C.

    1968-03-01

    This work is devoted to the study of the aerosols formed when an uranium wire is evaporated in a normal or rarefied atmosphere, either with or without a drying agent. The heating of the wire can be either fast or slow. The first part is a study of aerosol production apparatus and of methods of measuring the aerosol. The second part presents the results obtained with various aerosols: the particles produced by the wire are less than one micron; during rapid heating, the granulometric distribution of the aerosol obeys a log-normal law; during slow heating, the distribution has two modes: one near 0.05 micron, the other close to 0.01 micron. (author) [fr

  17. Internal dosimetric evaluation due to uranium aerosols; Evaluacion dosimetrica interna debido a aerosoles de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, Garcia Aguilar; Gustavo, Delgado Avila [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Salazar (Mexico)

    1991-07-01

    The present work has like object to carry out the internal dosimetric evaluation to the occupationally exposed personnel, due to the inhalation of aerosols of natural uranium and enriched in the pilot plant of nuclear fuel production of the National Institute of Nuclear Research.

  18. Electric power generation and uranium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szergenyi, Istvan

    1989-01-01

    Assuming the present trend of nuclear power generation growth, the ratio of nuclear energy in the world power balance will double by the turn of the century. The time of reasonably exploited uranium resources can be predicted as a few decades. Therefore, new nuclear reactor types and more rational uranium management is needed to prolong life of known uranium resources. It was shown how can a better uranium utilization be expected by closed fuel cycles, and what advantages in uranium management can be expected by a better co-operation between small countries and big powers. (R.P.) 16 refs.; 4 figs

  19. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  20. Aerosol generation from Kerosene fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, S.; Lindner, W.

    1981-01-01

    The course of solvent surface fires is dependent on the surface area on fire; depth of pool and solvent composition do not influence the fire rate. But the fire rate increases rapidly with the burning area. The residual oxygen concentration after a fire in a closed container is dependent on the violence of the fire, i.e. on the burning surface. Moreover the ending of the fire is influenced by the TBP-concentration of the solvent. With sufficient supply of solvent the TBP-concentration changes only slightly during the fire, so that a fire at 14% O 2 -concentration is extinguished within the container. With the TBP-concentration changing considerably, i.e. little mass, a fire with a similar burning surface is already extinguished at an O 2 -content of 18%. The aerosol generation depends on the fire rate, and so it is higher in free atmosphere than in closed containers. The soot production in the mixture fire (kerosene /TBP 70/30) is higher by a factor 7 than in the pure kerosene fire. Primary soot-particles have a diameter of approximately 0,05 μm and agglomerate rapidly into aggregates of 0,2-0,4 μm. (orig.) [de

  1. Radon and aerosol release from open-pit uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, V.W.; Nielson, K.K.; Mauch, M.L.

    1982-08-01

    The quantity of 222 Rn (hereafter called radon) released per unit of uranium produced from open pit mining has been determined. A secondary objective was to determine the nature and quantity of airborne particles resulting from mine operations. To accomplish these objectives, a comprehensive study of the release rates of radon and aerosol material to the atmosphere was made over a one-year period from April 1979 to May 1980 at the Morton Ranch Mine which was operated by United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) in partnership with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The mine is now operated for TVA by Silver King Mines. Morton Ranch Mine was one of five open pit uranium mines studied in central Wyoming. Corroborative measurements were made of radon flux and 226 Ra (hereafter called radium) concentrations of various surfaces at three of the other mines in October 1980 and again at these three mines plus a fourth in April of 1981. Three of these mines are located in the Powder River Basin, about 80 kilometers east by northeast of Casper. One is located in the Shirley Basin, about 60 km south of Casper, and the remaining one is located in the Gas Hills, approximately 100 km west of Casper. The one-year intensive study included simultaneous measurement of several parameters: continuous measurement of atmospheric radon concentration near the ground at three locations, monthly 24-hour radon flux measurements from various surfaces, radium analyses of soil samples collected under each of the flux monitoring devices, monthly integrations of aerosols on dichotomous aerosol samplers, analysis of aerosol samplers for total dust loading, aerosol elemental and radiochemical composition, aerosol elemental composition by particle size, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, barometric pressure, and rainfall

  2. Uranium availability for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, S.M.; Hogerton, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    Utilities are encouraged to participate in the effort to explore and develop adequate supplies of uranium in order to assure a high level of effort and have some control over production rates. Regulatory commissions are likewise encouraged to be receptive to utility initiatives by granting assurances of favorable rate treatment to cover investments. Confusion arises over the difference between forward coverage based on proven reserves of commercial-grade uranium and long-range availability based on potential resources. Cancellations and delays in the licensing of nuclear power plants have made it difficult for uranium suppliers to proceed with confidence. Drilling difficulties and the short productive life of most uranium mines will probably keep proven reserve levels lower than long-term plant requirements. Several approaches are outlined for developing uranium reserve estimates. ERDA projections are based on ''favorable ground'' areas where uranium deposits are most probable. It is assumed that, where a market exists, minerals will be extracted and traditional procurement methods will evolve. Since utilities are the only industry committed to a viable fuel cycle, they are justified in joining in the search for supplies

  3. Effectiveness of micronic aerosol generators and their aerosol characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinet, T.; Collignon, M.-A.; Dusser, D.; Barritault, L.; Huchon, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    We assessed the effectiveness of various aerosol-generating systems. Taplin's settling method and Venticis generators has a lower efficiency (37.3 +- 3.8% and 51.8 +- 9.6%, respectively) than the Syntevent (88.8 +- 6.9%, p<0.001), Cadema (89.8 +- 9.9%, p<0.001) and Mefar (85.3 +- 19.4%, p<0.001) generators. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter of the particles produced by the Mefar nebulizer (2.05 +- 0.27 μm) was larger than that of any other generators (p<0.001). The Syntevent (0.54 +- 0.09 μm) generator produced smaller particles than the Mefar, Taplin (0.89 +- 0.10 μm, p<0.01) and Venticis (0.79 +- 0.06 μm, p<0.02) generators. Particles produced by the Cadema system (0.69 +- 0.06 μm) were smaller than those generated by the Taplin system(p<0.05). We conclude: 1) that the Syntevent, Mefar and Cadema aerosol generators are more efficient than the others, and 2) that all the generators tested except the Mefar may be used for studies that depend on the peripheral deposition of small particles within the lungs. (author)

  4. The Generation And Properties Of Solid Monodisperse Aerosols Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A monodisperse aerosol generator (MAGE) was used to generate calibration or monodisperse aerosols containing stearic acid and carnauba wax. Some of the factors affecting the size of aerosol particles generated with the MAGE were determined. The factors include: temperature of operation of the MAGE, type and purity ...

  5. Teratogenicity of depleted uranium aerosols: A review from an epidemiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkar Bindu

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depleted uranium is being used increasingly often as a component of munitions in military conflicts. Military personnel, civilians and the DU munitions producers are being exposed to the DU aerosols that are generated. Methods We reviewed toxicological data on both natural and depleted uranium. We included peer reviewed studies and gray literature on birth malformations due to natural and depleted uranium. Our approach was to assess the "weight of evidence" with respect to teratogenicity of depleted uranium. Results Animal studies firmly support the possibility that DU is a teratogen. While the detailed pathways by which environmental DU can be internalized and reach reproductive cells are not yet fully elucidated, again, the evidence supports plausibility. To date, human epidemiological data include case examples, disease registry records, a case-control study and prospective longitudinal studies. Discussion The two most significant challenges to establishing a causal pathway between (human parental DU exposure and the birth of offspring with defects are: i distinguishing the role of DU from that of exposure to other potential teratogens; ii documentation on the individual level of extent of parental DU exposure. Studies that use biomarkers, none yet reported, can help address the latter challenge. Thoughtful triangulation of the results of multiple studies (epidemiological and other of DU teratogenicity contributes to disentangling the roles of various potentially teratogenic parental exposures. This paper is just such an endeavor. Conclusion In aggregate the human epidemiological evidence is consistent with increased risk of birth defects in offspring of persons exposed to DU.

  6. Radiological Risk Assessment of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Fletcher; Roszell, Laurie E.; Daxon, Eric G.; Guilmette, Ray A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-yr doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. The methodologies of the ICRP International Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) were used for determining the whole body cancer risk. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crew members and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation

  7. Radiological risk assessment of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Fletcher F; Roszell, Laurie E; Daxon, Eric G; Guilmette, Raymond A; Parkhurst, Mary Ann

    2009-03-01

    Assessment of the health risk from exposure to aerosols of depleted uranium (DU) is an important outcome of the Capstone aerosol studies that established exposure ranges to personnel in armored combat vehicles perforated by DU munitions. Although the radiation exposure from DU is low, there is concern that DU deposited in the body may increase cancer rates. Radiation doses to various organs of the body resulting from the inhalation of DU aerosols measured in the Capstone studies were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models. Organs and tissues with the highest calculated committed equivalent 50-y doses were lung and extrathoracic tissues (nose and nasal passages, pharynx, larynx, mouth, and thoracic lymph nodes). Doses to the bone surface and kidney were about 5 to 10% of the doses to the extrathoracic tissues. Organ-specific risks were estimated using ICRP and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodologies. Risks for crewmembers and first responders were determined for selected scenarios based on the time interval of exposure and for vehicle and armor type. The lung was the organ with the highest cancer mortality risk, accounting for about 97% of the risks summed from all organs. The highest mean lifetime risk for lung cancer for the scenario with the longest exposure time interval (2 h) was 0.42%. This risk is low compared with the natural or background risk of 7.35%. These risks can be significantly reduced by using an existing ventilation system (if operable) and by reducing personnel time in the vehicle immediately after perforation.

  8. Generation of aerosols: BARC nebulizer and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soni, P.S.; Raghunath, B.

    1994-01-01

    The concern with atmospheric pollution in recent times has focused attention on aerosols, their distribution pattern after inhalation and the kinetics of their deposition and exclusion from bronchial passages. The technique of radioaerosols for lung imaging is of recent origin. The procedure was proposed as a means of estimating regional ventilation and localizing areas of airway narrowing. The technique is an alternative in the face of non-availability of radioactive gases, especially in developing countries where the cost is the major factor due to economic reasons. Now, it is beyond doubt that radioaerosol lung studies are a potentially valuable tool in the evaluation of respiratory function in health and disease, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Also, the administration of a drug by aerosol inhalation provides a convenient method for the treatment of conditions affecting the respiratory system. This write-up will brief us about radioaerosol, its generation and characterisation

  9. Generation of aerosols: BARC nebulizer and others

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, P S; Raghunath, B

    1994-07-01

    The concern with atmospheric pollution in recent times has focused attention on aerosols, their distribution pattern after inhalation and the kinetics of their deposition and exclusion from bronchial passages. The technique of radioaerosols for lung imaging is of recent origin. The procedure was proposed as a means of estimating regional ventilation and localizing areas of airway narrowing. The technique is an alternative in the face of non-availability of radioactive gases, especially in developing countries where the cost is the major factor due to economic reasons. Now, it is beyond doubt that radioaerosol lung studies are a potentially valuable tool in the evaluation of respiratory function in health and disease, especially to detect chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. Also, the administration of a drug by aerosol inhalation provides a convenient method for the treatment of conditions affecting the respiratory system. This write-up will brief us about radioaerosol, its generation and characterisation.

  10. A study of industrial exposure to uranium aerosols from the laser enrichment procedure - methods and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Claraz, M.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Metivier, H.

    1995-01-01

    Comprehensive studies of the radiotoxicological risk at new uranium enrichment processing facilities using laser isotopic separation, were particularly motivated by the generation of a uranium oxide aerosol identified as UO 2 + U metal . Taking the new ICRP 66 recommendations into account, the following study on this uranium oxide mixture, was aimed at determining the physico-chemical and biokinetic specific parameters required in order to calculate the effective dose. The activity median aerodynamic diameters (AMAD) ranged between 5.2 and 10 μm with, in some cases, up to 20% of submicron size particles, while concentration values at the workplace ranged from 1.8 to 125 Bq m -3 and biological half-time calculations gave a 48 d period with in vitro dissolution test and a 77 d period with in vivo inhalation experiments. Transfer rates and dissolution rates obtained from both in vitro and vivo experiments intend to emphasize a class W behaviour in term of ICRP 30 and M in term of ICRP 66. (authors). 3 figs., 4 tabs., 22 refs

  11. Inhalation toxicology of industrial plutonium and uranium oxide aerosols I. Physical chemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    In the fabrication of mixed plutonium and uranium oxide fuel, large quantities of dry powders are processed, causing dusty conditions in glove box enclosures. Inadvertent loss of glove box integrity or failure of air filter systems can lead to human inhalation exposure. Powdered samples and aerosol samples of these materials obtained during two fuel fabrication process steps have been obtained. A regimen of physical chemical tests of properties of these materials has been employed to identify physical chemical properties which may influence their biological behavior and dosimetry. Materials to be discussed are 750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the ball milling operation and 1750 deg. C heat-treated, mixed uranium and plutonium oxides obtained from the centerless grinding of fuel pellets. Results of x-ray diffraction studies have shown that the powder generated by the centerless grinding of fuel pellets is best described as a solid solution of UO x and PuO x consistent with its temperature history. In vitro dissolution studies of both mixed oxide materials indicate a generally similar dissolution rate for both materials. In one solvent, the material with the higher temperature history dissolves more rapidly. The x-ray diffraction and in vitro dissolution results as well as preliminary results of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analyses will be compared and the implications for the associated biological studies will be discussed. (author)

  12. Generation and characterization of biological aerosols for laser measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Concerns for proliferation of biological weapons including bacteria, fungi, and viruses have prompted research and development on methods for the rapid detection of biological aerosols in the field. Real-time instruments that can distinguish biological aerosols from background dust would be especially useful. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a laser-based, real-time instrument for rapid detection of biological aerosols, and ITRI is working with SNL scientists and engineers to evaluate this technology for a wide range of biological aerosols. This paper describes methods being used to generate the characterize the biological aerosols for these tests. In summary, a biosafe system has been developed for generating and characterizing biological aerosols and using those aerosols to test the SNL laser-based real-time instrument. Such tests are essential in studying methods for rapid detection of airborne biological materials.

  13. Size distributions of aerosols produced from substitute materials by the Laskin cold DOP aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, W.; Macher, J.; First, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    Test aerosols of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DOP) produced by Laskin nozzle aerosol generators are widely used for in-place filter testing and respirator fit testing. Concern for the health effects of this material has led to a search for substitute materials for test aerosols. Aerosols were generated with a Laskin generator and diluted 6000-fold with clean air. Size distributions were measured for DOP, di(2-ethylhexyl)sebecate, polyethylene glycol, mineral oil, and corn oil aerosols with a PMS ASAS-X optical particle counter. Distributions were slightly bimodal with count median diameters from 0.22 to 0.30 μm. Size distributions varied little with aerosol material, operating pressure, or liquid level. Mineral oil and corn oil gave the best agreement with the DOP size distribution

  14. Lung Deposition Calculations for Radioactive Aerosol Particles Originating from Caves and Uranium Mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfoldy, B.; Torok, Sz.; Winkler, R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The present study simulates lung deposition of radioactive aerosol particles originating from the atmosphere of a therapeutic cave (Szemlohegyi cave, Budapest) and several uranium mines. Particle deposition patterns and surface densities have been calculated by the stochastic lung model of Koblinger and Hofmann. In the model, deposition can be caused by the simultaneous effects of Brownian motion, inertial impaction and gravitational settling. The calculations were carried out by considering the aerosol particle size distribution and radon concentration of the atmosphere of the cave and mines. The deposition was computed in the whole lung, in characteristic parts of the respiratory system such as extrathoracic, tracheobronchial, acinar and alveolar regions and in the singe airway generations at different flow rates for adults. The adverse health effects of inhaled radionuclides strongly depend from the local deposition density values in cellular dimensions. Thus we will built in the results to a cellular effects model of Balashazy and Hofmann for the simulation of the pathological effects of inhaled radionuclides for risk assessment. (author)

  15. Analysis of beryllium and depleted uranium: An overview of detection methods in aerosols and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camins, I.; Shinn, J.H.

    1988-06-01

    We conducted a survey of commercially available methods for analysis of beryllium and depleted uranium in aerosols and soils to find a reliable, cost-effective, and sufficiently precise method for researchers involved in environmental testing at the Yuma Proving Ground, Yuma, Arizona. Criteria used for evaluation include cost, method of analysis, specificity, sensitivity, reproducibility, applicability, and commercial availability. We found that atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace meets these criteria for testing samples for beryllium. We found that this method can also be used to test samples for depleted uranium. However, atomic absorption with graphite furnace is not as sensitive a measurement method for depleted uranium as it is for beryllium, so we recommend that quality control of depleted uranium analysis be maintained by testing 10 of every 1000 samples by neutron activation analysis. We also evaluated 45 companies and institutions that provide analyses of beryllium and depleted uranium. 5 refs., 1 tab

  16. Aerosols: generation and role in medicine, industry and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambi, K.S.V.; Sapra, B.K.

    1998-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in aerosol sciences. Areas covered for detailed evaluation with respect to the role of aerosols are industry, medicine, health care and environment, besides basic studies. Knowledge in the areas, specially on generation of aerosols and their role in those fields are briefly summarised and problems for future work are highlighted. Articles relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  17. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols III: morphologic and chemical oxide analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, Kenneth M; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W; Jenson, Evan D; Guilmette, Raymond A

    2009-03-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using x-ray diffraction (XRD), and particle morphologies were examined using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Others appear to have fractures that perhaps resulted from abrasion and comminution, or shear bands that developed from plastic deformation of the DU material. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small bits of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of Health Physics to interpret the

  18. Physicochemical Characterization of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosols III: Morphologic and Chemical Oxide Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Gold, Kenneth; Arey, Bruce W.; Jenson, Evan D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against an armored target causes erosion and fragmentation of the penetrators, the extent of which is dependent on the thickness and material composition of the target. Vigorous oxidation of the DU particles and fragments creates an aerosol of DU oxide particles and DU particle agglomerations combined with target materials. Aerosols from the Capstone DU aerosol study, in which vehicles were perforated by DU penetrators, were evaluated for their oxidation states using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphologies using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS). The oxidation state of a DU aerosol is important as it offers a clue to its solubility in lung fluids. The XRD analysis showed that the aerosols evaluated were a combination primarily of U3O8 (insoluble) and UO3 (relatively more soluble) phases, though intermediate phases resembling U4O9 and other oxides were prominent in some samples. Analysis of particle residues in the micrometer-size range by SEM/EDS provided microstructural information such as phase composition and distribution, fracture morphology, size distribution, and material homogeneity. Observations from SEM analysis show a wide variability in the shapes of the DU particles. Some of the larger particles appear to have been fractured (perhaps as a result of abrasion and comminution); others were spherical, occasionally with dendritic or lobed surface structures. Amorphous conglomerates containing metals other than uranium were also common, especially with the smallest particle sizes. A few samples seemed to contain small chunks of nearly pure uranium metal, which were verified by EDS to have a higher uranium content exceeding that expected for uranium oxides. Results of the XRD and SEM/EDS analyses were used in other studies described in this issue of The Journal of Health Physics to interpret the results of lung solubility studies and in selecting input parameters for

  19. Aerosol Sampling System for Collection of Capstone Depleted Uranium Particles in a High-Energy Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Thomas D.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Hoover, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a kinetic-energy cartridge with a large-caliber depleted uranium (DU) penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post-impact, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the vehicle commander, loader, gunner, and driver. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for depleted uranium concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol

  20. Uranium recovering from slags generated in the metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Center of IPEN/CNEN-SP has recent/y concluded a program for developing the fabrication technology of the nuclear fuel based on the U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion, which is being used in the IEA-R1 research reactor. The uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) fuel production starts with the uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) processing and uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) precipitation. Then, the UF 4 is converted to metallic uranium by magnesiothermic reduction. The UF 4 reduction by magnesium generates MgF 2 slag containing considerable concentrations of uranium, which could reach 20 wt%. The uranium contained in that slag should be recovered and this work presents the results obtained in recovering the uranium from that slag. The uranium recovery is accomplished by acidic leaching of the calcined slag. The calcination transforms the metallic uranium in U 3 O 8 , promoting the pulverization of the pieces of metallic uranium and facilitating the leaching operation. As process variables, have been considered the nitric molar concentration, the acid excess regarding the stoichiometry and the leaching temperature. As result, the uranium recovery reached a 96% yield. (author)

  1. Uranium - raw material reserves for coming generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keutner, H.

    1981-01-01

    Large uranium occurences have been discovered in the South of Mexico. The deposits are situated in the Sierra Mixteca. Reserves of 9.400 tons had been at Mexico's disposal even before these new discoveries. The quantitiy discovered recentyl amounts to 20.000 tons. The uranium reserves available apart from those in centrally controlled economic systems are presently estimated at five million tons. Meanwhile American scientists have found out that all the rivers of the world transport about 16.000 tons of uranium from the continents into the oceans per annum. The energy value of this washed out amount of uranium corresponds to the 25-fold world power demand of today. US scientists have discovered that the oceans can provide uranium for about seven million years of the present world energy demand. While the petroleum reserves decrease worldwide it seems that the exploration of uranium has just been started. (orig.) [de

  2. Seasonal fluctuations of the uranium and thorium contents in aerosols in surface air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, W.

    1985-01-01

    An estimate in the UNSCEAR report the only source considered for the uranium and thorium contents is ground dust. A significant portion of the aerosols, however, comes from chimneys. Aerosol samples taken monthly in Brunswick, Berlin, Skibotn (Northern Norway) were, therefore, scrutinized alpha-spectrometrically for U-238, U-234, Th-230, and Th-232. The activity concentration in surface air of Northern Norway is only about 30 nBq/cm 3 . In Brunswick and Berlin, the concentration was higher by a factor of one to two due to the higher specific activity of the mineral aerosols. Significant differences of the isotope ratios allow conclusions as to the origin of the aerosols. The activity concentrations measured and their seasonal fluctuations must be taken into account in the evaluation of environment monitoring of nuclear fuel factories. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Laboratory evaluation of a vibrating orifice monodisperse aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Everitt, N.M.; Snelling, K.W.

    1985-02-01

    The Berglund-Liu vibrating orifice aerosol generator is capable of producing monodisperse particles in the diameter range 5 to 50 μm. Experiments have been carried out to set up and evaluate such a generator for the preparation of standard liquid (olive oil) and solid (methylene blue) aerosols in the size range 8 to 13 μm. Modifications have been made to the apparatus to improve its performance and increase its particle output. (author)

  4. Initiation of depleted uranium oxide and spent fuel testing for the spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molecke, M.A.; Gregson, M.W.; Sorenson, K.B. [Sandia National Labs. (United States); Billone, M.C.; Tsai, H. [Argonne National Lab. (United States); Koch, W.; Nolte, O. [Fraunhofer Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin (Germany); Pretzsch, G.; Lange, F. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (Germany); Autrusson, B.; Loiseau, O. [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Thompson, N.S.; Hibbs, R.S. [U.S. Dept. of Energy (United States); Young, F.I.; Mo, T. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2004-07-01

    We provide a detailed overview of an ongoing, multinational test program that is developing aerosol data for some spent fuel sabotage scenarios on spent fuel transport and storage casks. Experiments are being performed to quantify the aerosolized materials plus volatilized fission products generated from actual spent fuel and surrogate material test rods, due to impact by a high energy density device, HEDD. The program participants in the U.S. plus Germany, France, and the U.K., part of the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks, WGSTSC have strongly supported and coordinated this research program. Sandia National Laboratories, SNL, has the lead role for conducting this research program; test program support is provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. WGSTSC partners need this research to better understand potential radiological impacts from sabotage of nuclear material shipments and storage casks, and to support subsequent risk assessments, modeling, and preventative measures. We provide a summary of the overall, multi-phase test design and a description of all explosive containment and aerosol collection test components used. We focus on the recently initiated tests on ''surrogate'' spent fuel, unirradiated depleted uranium oxide, and forthcoming actual spent fuel tests. The depleted uranium oxide test rodlets were prepared by the Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, in France. These surrogate test rodlets closely match the diameter of the test rodlets of actual spent fuel from the H.B. Robinson reactor (high burnup PWR fuel) and the Surry reactor (lower, medium burnup PWR fuel), generated from U.S. reactors. The characterization of the spent fuels and fabrication into short, pressurized rodlets has been performed by Argonne National Laboratory, for testing at SNL. The ratio of the aerosol and respirable particles released from HEDD-impacted spent

  5. Submicron-sized aerosol and radon progeny measurements in an uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaud, D.; Chouard, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Submicron-sized aerosol was studied in an uranium mine using an Electrical Aerosol Analyzer and a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer. In addition radon progeny particle size distributions were measured using a prototype instrument developed by us (SDI 2000). With cascade impactor the number weighted mean electrical mobility diameters and the geometric standard deviations ranged respectively from 0.05 to 0.1 μm and 1.8 to 2. The gross alpha activity weighted mean thermodynamic diameters ranged typically from 0.1 to 0.2 μm. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Cuney, M.; Bruneton, P.; Virlogeux, D.; Capus, G.

    2010-01-01

    With the worldwide revival of nuclear energy comes the question of uranium reserves. For more than 20 years, nuclear energy has been neglected and uranium prospecting has been practically abandoned. Therefore, present day production covers only 70% of needs and stocks are decreasing. Production is to double by 2030 which represents a huge industrial challenge. The FBR-type reactors technology, which allows to consume the whole uranium content of the fuel, is developing in several countries and will ensure the long-term development of nuclear fission. However, the implementation of these reactors (the generation 4) will be progressive during the second half of the 21. century. For this reason an active search for uranium ores will be necessary during the whole 21. century to ensure the fueling of light water reactors which are huge uranium consumers. This dossier covers all the aspects of natural uranium production: mineralogy, geochemistry, types of deposits, world distribution of deposits with a particular attention given to French deposits, the exploitation of which is abandoned today. Finally, exploitation, ore processing and the economical aspects are presented. Contents: 1 - the uranium element and its minerals: from uranium discovery to its industrial utilization, the main uranium minerals (minerals with tetravalent uranium, minerals with hexavalent uranium); 2 - uranium in the Earth's crust and its geochemical properties: distribution (in sedimentary rocks, in magmatic rocks, in metamorphic rocks, in soils and vegetation), geochemistry (uranium solubility and valence in magmas, uranium speciation in aqueous solution, solubility of the main uranium minerals in aqueous solution, uranium mobilization and precipitation); 3 - geology of the main types of uranium deposits: economical criteria for a deposit, structural diversity of deposits, classification, world distribution of deposits, distribution of deposits with time, superficial deposits, uranium

  7. Loading capacity of various filters for lithium fire generated aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Barreca, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    The lithium aerosol loading capacity of a prefilter, HEPA filters and a sand and gravel bed filter was determined. The test aerosol was characterized and was generated by burning lithium in an unlimited air atmosphere. Correlation to sodium aerosol loading capacities were made to relate existing data to lithium aerosol loadings under varying conditions. This work is being conducted in support of the fusion reactor safety program. The lithium aerosol was generated by burning lithium pools, up to 45 kgs, in a 340 m 3 low humidity air atmosphere to supply aerosol to recirculating filter test loops. The aerosol was sampled to determine particle size, mass concentrations and chemical species. The dew point and gas concentrations were monitored throughout the tests. Loop inlet aerosol mass concentrations ranged up to 5 gr/m 3 . Chemical compounds analyzed to be present in the aerosol include Li 2 O, LiOH, and Li 2 CO 3 . HEPA filters with and without separators and a prefilter and HEPA filter in series were loaded with 7.8 to 11.1 kg/m 2 of aerosol at a flow rate of 1.31 m/sec and 5 kPa pressure drop. The HEPA filter loading capacity was determined to be greater at a lower flow rate. The loading capacity increased from 0.4 to 2.8 kg by decreasing the flow rate from 1.31 to 0.26 m/sec for a pressure drop of 0.11 kPa due to aerosol buildup. The prefilter tested in series with a HEPA did not increase the total loading capacity significantly for the same total pressure drop. Separators in the HEPA had only minor effect on loading capacity. The sand and gravel bed filter loaded to 0.50 kg/m 2 at an aerosol flow rate of 0.069 m/sec and final pressure drop of 6.2 kPa. These loading capacities and their dependence on test variables are similar to those reported for sodium aerosols except for the lithium aerosol HEPA loading capacity dependence upon flow rate

  8. Characterization of aerosols in uranium handling facilities and its impact on the assessment of internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Ankush; Rao, D.D.; Sawant, Pramilla D.; Khan, Arshad; Srinivasan, P.; Chandrashekara, A.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, compounds of uranium such as Magnesium DiUranate (MDU) U 3 O 8 , UO 2 etc. are handled in different stages of operation. There may be a possibility of intake of these compounds by radiation workers during the course of their work. The internal doses received by the workers depend not only on the quantity but also the physiochemical characteristics of the radioactive contaminant. The depositions in different regions of lung of these inhaled aerosols depend on their particle size; whereas the clearance is dependent upon the chemical nature. In this study, aerosol characterization is carried out in four different Uranium Handling Facilities (UF) for realistic assessment of internal dose to the radiation worker

  9. Upgrading of aerosol generators for use at Cadarache (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspar, G.; Loescher, H.; Ruhmann, H.

    1988-11-01

    The aerosol generators developed for, and used in, the DEMONA project have been further developed for the FUCHIA project run by CEA. As a result of these efforts the generators have been uprated for fifty-hour continuous generation of SnO 2 and CsOH aerosols at a rate of 10 g/min against a system pressure of 5 bar. Significantly higher feed rates may be possible but were not required. The development objective was fully satisfied, the generators are ready for service in the FUCHIA project. (orig.). 1 ref., 2 tabs., 9 figs [de

  10. Preliminary study of depleted uranium aerosol migration in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zhiying; Yu Shui; Zheng Yonghong; Liang Yueqin; Liu Liping; Song Zhanjun; Zhao Fa

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the depth of depleted uranium (DU) migration in six main kinds of Chinese soils and the pollution of the groundwater made by DU migration. Methods: With the circulating column model and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), concentration of uranium and the ratio of 235 U/ 238 U in different depth soils and in the corresponding filter liquids had been determined. Results: In the acid rain of pH 3.0, the migration depth of DU in the washed soil and brown soil were 6-8 cm and 4-6 cm, respectively. And with the increment of the acidity of the acid rain, the migration depth of DU in the soils was increased. The migration depth of DU in the 6 types soils was 0-4 cm. The distributed factor between the liquids and soils was lower than 0.004, and the concentration of uranium in the filter liquids was 0.05-10.33 μg/L. Conclusions: The migration depth of DU in soils can be increased by the acid rain, and the majority of DU was stayed in the upper soils and DU pollution might exist for long time, but the probability of groundwater pollution was low. The migration capability of DU was interrelated with the concentration of organic compound in the soils. (authors)

  11. Microbial aerosol generation during laboratory accidents and subsequent risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A; Parks, S

    2006-04-01

    To quantify microbial aerosols generated by a series of laboratory accidents and to use these data in risk assessment. A series of laboratory accident scenarios have been devised and the microbial aerosol generated by them has been measured using a range of microbial air samplers. The accident scenarios generating the highest aerosol concentrations were, dropping a fungal plate, dropping a large bottle, centrifuge rotor leaks and a blocked syringe filter. Many of these accidents generated low particle size aerosols, which would be inhaled into the lungs of any exposed laboratory staff. Spray factors (SFs) have been calculated using the results of these experiments as an indicator of the potential for accidents to generate microbial aerosols. Model risk assessments have been described using the SF data. Quantitative risk assessment of laboratory accidents can provide data that can aid the design of containment laboratories and the response to laboratory accidents. A methodology has been described and supporting data provided to allow microbiological safety officers to carry out quantitative risk assessment of laboratory accidents.

  12. Training and replacing a 'lost generation' of uranium professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalmers, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    It wasn't long ago, actually only a few years ago, when uranium companies and skilled uranium professionals receive little attention and limited interest from other sections of the mining and resource industries. Actually, there were many uranium professionals, whom in some cases, spent over a decade unwinding their CV's to limit the emphasis on uranium exploration and development from the past. Actually, when the bottom fell out of the uranium industry in the late 70's and early 80's there were literally tens of thousands of professionals internationally that were in a major regroup with their careers to get back into mining proper without the uranium connection and believe me, that wasn't always easy. As in most cases, there was no or limited places for uranium professionals wanting to stay in the industry and consequently, virtually all were forced to leave the sector. Who could have predicted that, after nearly 25 years of limited international investment and significant interest in new uranium exploration and development, that the price for yellowcake today would be in excess of US$100/pound? Concerns over energy security and global warming on top of the all-time high uranium price have really come together to make a true uranium renaissance. A renaissance which looks sounder and more sustainable than ever before. So, how is the industry facing a chronic shortage of experience and the huge task of training a multidisciplinary professional workforce going to cope? Effectively there is a 'lost generation' of professionals and very few people available or knowledgeable enough to train those new to the industry. This is a unique problem in the industry and likely more chronic than the other mining sectors, as typically the economic cycles are seven or eight years, not 25 years as has been seen with uranium

  13. Enhanced Deep Blue Aerosol Retrieval Algorithm: The Second Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, N. C.; Jeong, M.-J.; Bettenhausen, C.; Sayer, A. M.; Hansell, R.; Seftor, C. S.; Huang, J.; Tsay, S.-C.

    2013-01-01

    The aerosol products retrieved using the MODIS collection 5.1 Deep Blue algorithm have provided useful information about aerosol properties over bright-reflecting land surfaces, such as desert, semi-arid, and urban regions. However, many components of the C5.1 retrieval algorithm needed to be improved; for example, the use of a static surface database to estimate surface reflectances. This is particularly important over regions of mixed vegetated and non- vegetated surfaces, which may undergo strong seasonal changes in land cover. In order to address this issue, we develop a hybrid approach, which takes advantage of the combination of pre-calculated surface reflectance database and normalized difference vegetation index in determining the surface reflectance for aerosol retrievals. As a result, the spatial coverage of aerosol data generated by the enhanced Deep Blue algorithm has been extended from the arid and semi-arid regions to the entire land areas.

  14. Physicochemical characterization of Capstone depleted uranium aerosols IV: in vitro solubility analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2009-03-01

    As part of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study, the solubility of selected aerosol samples was measured using an accepted in vitro dissolution test system. This static system was employed along with a SUF (synthetic ultrafiltrate) solvent, which is designed to mimic the physiological chemistry of extracellular fluid. Using sequentially obtained solvent samples, the dissolution behavior over a 46-d test period was evaluated by fitting the measurement data to two- or three-component negative exponential functions. These functions were then compared with Type M and S absorption taken from the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model. The results indicated that there was a substantial variability in solubility of the aerosols, which in part depended on the type of armor being impacted by the DU penetrator and the particle size fraction being tested. Although some trends were suggested, the variability noted leads to uncertainties in predicting the solubility of other DU-based aerosols. Nevertheless, these data provide a useful experimental basis for modeling the intake-dose relationships for inhaled DU aerosols arising from penetrator impact on armored vehicles.

  15. Assessment of the Aerosol Generation and Toxicity of Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T. O'Shaughnessy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current interest in the pulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs has resulted in a need for an aerosol generation system that is capable of consistently producing a CNT aerosol at a desired concentration level. This two-part study was designed to: (1 assess the properties of a commercially-available aerosol generator when producing an aerosol from a purchased powder supply of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs; and (2 assess the pulmonary sub-acute toxicity of DWCNTs in a murine model during a 5-day (4 h/day whole-body exposure. The aerosol generator, consisting of a novel dustfeed mechanism and venturi ejector was determined to be capable of producing a DWCNT consistently over a 4 h exposure period at an average level of 10.8 mg/m3. The count median diameter was 121 nm with a geometric standard deviation of 2.04. The estimated deposited dose was 32 µg/mouse. The total number of cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was significantly (p < 0.01 increased in exposed mice compared to controls. Similarly, macrophages in BAL fluid were significantly elevated in exposed mice, but not neutrophils. All animals exposed to CNT and euthanized immediately after exposure had changes in the lung tissues showing acute inflammation and injury; however these pathological changes resolved two weeks after the exposure.

  16. Behavior of generated aerosols in decommissioning of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomii, H.; Nakamura, K.

    1999-01-01

    Generated aerosols in dismantling of the JPDR were investigated for making an estimation of air contamination. The maximum dose equivalent rate at the surface of each reactor component was 9.4 Sv/h for core shroud, 80 mSv/h for pressure vessel, 2.0 mSv/h for biological shield, respectively. An under-water cutting method with remote handling plasma torch was used for dismantling of the core shroud and the pressure vessel. The biological shield was dismantled by an in-air cutting method and a controlled blasting method. Pipes connected to recirculation system were dismounted by a conventional mechanical and thermal cutting machine in the air. Generated radioactive aerosols were collected in the exhaust air of green house which enclosed the upper part of the reactor room to control the air contamination. An Andersen sampler was used for the measurement of particle distribution in the aerosols. Most of the particle size was below 0.1 μm in the under-water cutting method. The particle size distribution in the in-air cutting method, however, was divided into two parts at 0.1 μm and 0.3 μm. Dispersion rate of aerosol into the atmosphere was decreased exponentially with the depth of water. The dispersion rate and the size distribution of aerosol generated during cutting of the stainless steel pipes and blasting of the biological shield are also reported in the paper. (Suetake, M.)

  17. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation, {sigma}{sub g} of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and {sigma}{sub g} decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 {mu}m and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented.

  18. Aerosol formation from high-velocity uranium drops: Comparison of number and mass distributions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rader, D.J.; Benson, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the aerosol produced by the combustion of high-velocity molten-uranium droplets produced by the simultaneous heating and electromagnetic launch of uranium wires. These tests are intended to simulate the reduction of high-velocity fragments into aerosol in high-explosive detonations or reactor accidents involving nuclear materials. As reported earlier, the resulting aerosol consists mainly of web-like chain agglomerates. A condensation nucleus counter was used to investigate the decay of the total particle concentration due to coagulation and losses. Number size distributions based on mobility equivalent diameter obtained soon after launch with a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer showed lognormal distributions with an initial count median diameter (CMD) of 0.3 μm and a geometric standard deviation, σ g of about 2; the CMD was found to increase and σ g decrease with time due to coagulation. Mass size distributions based on aerodynamic diameter were obtained for the first time with a Microorifice Uniform Deposit Impactor, which showed lognormal distributions with mass median aerodynamic diameters of about 0.5 μm and an aerodynamic geometric standard deviation of about 2. Approximate methods for converting between number and mass distributions and between mobility and aerodynamic equivalent diameters are presented

  19. Reuse of ammonium fluoride generated in the uranium hexafluoride conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Centre of IPEN / CNEN - SP develops and manufactures dispersion fuel with high uranium concentration to meet the demand of the IEA-R1 reactor and future research reactors planned to be constructed in Brazil. The fuel uses uranium silicide (U 3 Si 2 ) dispersed in aluminum. For producing the fuel, the processes for uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) conversion consist in obtaining U 3 Si 2 and / or U 3 O 8 through the preparation of intermediate compounds, among them ammonium uranyl carbonate - AUC, ammonium diuranate - DUA and uranium tetrafluoride - UF 4 . This work describes a procedure for preparing uranium tetrafluoride by a dry route using as raw material the filtrate generated when producing routinely ammonium uranyl carbonate. The filtrate consists primarily of a solution containing high concentrations of ammonium (NH 4 + ), fluoride (F - ), carbonate (CO 3 -- ) and low concentrations of uranium. The procedure is basically the recovery of NH 4 F and uranium, as UF 4 , through the crystallization of ammonium bifluoride (NH 4 HF 2 ) and, in a later step, the addition of UO 2 , occurring fluoridation and decomposition. The UF 4 obtained is further diluted in the UF 4 produced routinely at IPEN / CNEN-SP by a wet route process. (author)

  20. Flame generation of sodium chloride aerosol for filter testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, J.; Kinnear, D.I.

    1975-01-01

    A generator for sodium chloride aerosol is described, which when used in conjunction with a sensitive portable sodium flame detector unit, will permit the in-place testing of large filter installations having air throughputs up to about 80,000 m 3 /h, at penetrations down to at least 0.005 percent. (U.S.)

  1. Characteristic pathological changes of main organs of rates after inhalation of depleted uranium aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Zhu Maoxiang; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Li Yuanmin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathological and morphometric alteration of main organs of rat after inhalation of depleted uranium (DU) aerosole in order to provide information for medical protection against DU weapons. Methods: Routine pathological technique and morphometric measurements were used to observe histopathological and morphological changes in lung, kidney, spleen, liver, brain of rats 1-14 months after inhalation of DU aerosol. Results: After inhalation of DU aerosol, lymphocytic infiltration in the pulmonary parenchyma, serious bronchitis, pulmonary hemorrhage and abscess formation were seen in some of the rats; distinct dilatation of tubules in renal cortex and papillae, casts in some tubules of the cortex, medulla and papillae, and interstitial hemorrhage were found in some other rats; diminution of the area of splenic white pulp, reduction of megakaryocytic mitosis were also observed, the incidence and severity of above changes in the lung and kidney, but not in the liver and brain, showed dependance on the length of time after inhalation or the dose of DU inhaled. Conclusion There are evident injurious effects on rat lung, kidney and spleen by inhalation of DU aerosol. (authors)

  2. Applications of Capstone depleted uranium aerosol risk data to military combat risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxon, Eric G; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Melanson, Mark A; Roszell, Laurie E

    2009-03-01

    Risks to personnel engaged in military operations include not only the threat of enemy firepower but also risks from exposure to other hazards such as radiation. Combatant commanders of the U.S. Army carefully weigh risks of casualties before implementing battlefield actions using an established paradigm that takes these risks into consideration. As a result of the inclusion of depleted uranium (DU) anti-armor ammunition in the conventional (non-nuclear) weapons arsenal, the potential for exposure to DU aerosols and its associated chemical and radiological effects becomes an element of the commanders' risk assessment. The Capstone DU Aerosol Study measured the range of likely DU oxide aerosol concentrations created inside a combat vehicle perforated with a DU munition, and the Capstone Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) estimated the associated doses and calculated risks. This paper focuses on the development of a scientific approach to adapt the risks from DU's non-uniform dose distribution within the body using the current U.S. Department of Defense radiation risk management approach. The approach developed equates the Radiation Exposure Status categories to the estimated radiological risks of DU and makes use of the Capstone-developed Renal Effects Group as a measure of chemical risk from DU intake. Recommendations are provided for modifying Army guidance and policy in order to better encompass the potential risks from DU aerosol inhalation during military operations.

  3. Applications of Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Risk Data to Military Combat Risk Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daxon, Eric G.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Melanson, Mark A.; Roszell, Laurie E.

    2009-01-01

    Risks to personnel engaged in military operations include not only the threat of enemy firepower but also risks from exposure to other hazards such as radiation. Combatant commanders of the U. S. Army carefully weigh risks of casualties before implementing battlefield actions using an established paradigm that take these risks into consideration. As a result of the inclusion of depleted uranium (DU) anti-armor ammunition in the conventional (non-nuclear) weapons arsenal, the potential for exposure to DU aerosols and its associated chemical and radiological effects becomes an element of the commanders risk assessment. The Capstone DU Aerosol Study measured the range of likely DU oxide aerosol concentrations created inside a combat vehicle perforated with a DU munition, and the Capstone Human Health Risk Assessment (HHRA) estimated the associated doses and calculated risks. This paper focuses on the development of a scientific approach to adapt the risks from DU's non uniform dose distribution within the body using the current U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) radiation risk management approach. The approach developed equates the Radiation Exposure Status (RES) categories to the estimated radiological risks of DU and makes use of the Capstone-developed Renal Effects Group (REG) as a measure of chemical risk from DU intake. Recommendations are provided for modifying Army guidance and policy in order to better encompass the potential risks from DU aerosol inhalation during military operations

  4. Uranium vapor generator: pulsed hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleer, M.; Gagne, J.; Leblanc, B.; Demers, Y.; Mongeau, B.

    1979-01-01

    The production of uranium vapors has been studied in the 5 L 0 6 ground state using a pulsed hollow cathode lamp. The evolution of the 238 U ( 5 L 0 6 ) concentration with time has been studied with Xe and Ar as buffer gases. A density of 2.7 x 10 13 atoms cm -3 was obtained with Xe as a buffer gas. In addition, those measurements, obtained from the absorption of a laser beam tuned to the 5758.143 A ( 5 L 0 6 -17,361 7 L 6 ) transition, allowed the determination of the transition probability A=2.1 x 10 5 sec -1 and of the branching ratio BR=0.08 for this transition

  5. Initiation of depleted uranium oxide and spent fuel testing for the spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.; Gregson, M.W.; Sorenson, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    We provide a detailed overview of an on-going, multinational test programme that is developing aerosol data for some spent fuel sabotage scenarios on spent fuel transport and storage casks. Experiments are being performed to quantify the aerosolised materials plus volatilised fission products generated from actual spent fuel and surrogate material test rods, due to impact by a high-energy/density device. The programme participants in the United States plus Germany, France and the United Kingdom, part of the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) have strongly supported and coordinated this research programme. Sandia National Laboratories has the lead role for conducting this research programme; test programme support is provided by both the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. We provide a summary of the overall, multiphase test design and a description of all explosive containment and aerosol collection test components used. We focus on the recently initiated tests on 'surrogate' spent fuel, unirradiated depleted uranium oxide and forthcoming actual spent fuel tests. We briefly summarise similar results from completed surrogate tests that used non-radioactive, sintered cerium oxide ceramic pellets in test rods. (author)

  6. Sodium oxide and uranium oxide aerosol experiments: NSPP Tests 106-108 and Tests 204-207, data record report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.E.; Kress, T.S.; Tobias, M.L.

    1981-03-01

    This data record report describes three sodium oxide aerosol tests and four uranium oxide aerosol tests conducted in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The goal of this project is to establish the validity (or level of conservatism) of the aerosol behavioral code, HAARM-3, and follow-on codes under development at the Battelle Columbus Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Descriptions of the seven tests with tables and graphs summarizing the results are included. 92 figs.

  7. Aerosol retention in the flooded steam generator bundle during SGTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Terttaliisa; Dehbi, Abdel; Guentay, Salih

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → High retention of aerosol particles in a steam generator bundle flooded with water. → Increasing particle inertia, i.e., particle size and velocity, increases retention. → Much higher retention of aerosol particles in the steam generator bundle flooded with water than in a dry bundle. → Much higher retention of aerosol particles in the steam generator bundle than in a bare pool. → Bare pool models have to be adapted to be applicable for flooded bundles. - Abstract: A steam generator tube rupture in a pressurized water reactor may cause accidental release of radioactive particles into the environment. Its specific significance is in its potential to bypass the containment thereby providing a direct pathway of the radioactivity from the primary circuit to the environment. Under certain severe accident scenarios, the steam generator bundle may be flooded with water. In addition, some severe accident management procedures are designed to minimize the release of radioactivity into the environment by flooding the defective steam generator secondary side with water when the steam generator has dried out. To extend our understanding of the particle retention phenomena in the flooded steam generator bundle, tests were conducted in the ARTIST and ARTIST II programs to determine the effect of different parameters on particle retention. The effects of particle type (spherical or agglomerate), particle size, gas mass flow rate, and the break submergence on particle retention were investigated. Results can be summarized as follows: increasing particle inertia was found to increase retention in the flooded bundle. Particle shape, i.e., agglomerate or spherical structure, did not affect retention significantly. Even with a very low submergence, 0.3 m above the tube break, significant aerosol retention took place underlining the importance of the jet-bundle interactions close to the tube break. Droplets were entrained from the water surface with

  8. Generation and characterization of cyclosporine aerosols for administration by inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, M.D.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Snipes, M.B.; Wolff, R.K.; Yeh, H.C.; Griffith, B.P.; Burckart, G.J.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    A method was developed for generating aerosols of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine and a gamma-emitting radiolabel ( 99m Tc) for administration by inhalation. Cyclosporine was dissolved in ethyl alcohol (EtOH) and nebulized with a Love- lace nebulizer operated with 50 psi compressed air. For a cyclosporine concentration of 25 mg/mL, the particle size of the aerosol was 0.7 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD), with 1.8 geometric standard deviation (GSD). The clear solution of EtOH and cyclosporine became a cloudy suspension when a limited amount of saline solution containing a 99m Tc radiolabel was added. This occurred because cyclosporine is hydrophobic. If saline concentrations as high as 6% in EtOH by volume were used, a gummy residue formed in the nebulizer and the particle aerodynamic diameter became unacceptably large (4.7 μm). When the saline concentration was only 3 % (the minimum radiolabel volume needed for gamma camera studies of lung deposition), the suspensions of cyclosporine could be nebulized to give a particle size of 2.2 μm AMAD with 2.1 GSD. The radiolabel was uniformly distributed with the spherical cyclosporine particles. Concentrations and particle size distributions remained constant over 1-h generation periods. These aerosols have been used in inhalation studies with Beagle dogs. (author)

  9. Development of a portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator model

    CERN Document Server

    LiuQun; Gao Xiao Mei; Jia Ming; Guo Chuang Cheng; Wu Tao; Liu Zhao Feng; Qiu Dan Gui

    2002-01-01

    A portable sodium fluorescence aerosol generator has been developed. It is a key equipment for in-situ testing of HEPA filters using sodium fluorescence method. The structure and technical specifications of the model generator are presented, along with its performance testing methods. The performance comparison result of the model with two French-made generators is also presented. The self-made generator has performances as follows: the average mass generating rate is 32.9 mg/h, mass median diameter of the particles 0.22 mu m and geometric standard deviation 1.58. The filtration efficiency up to 99.99% can be achieved flow-rate of ventilation system is less than 150000 m sup 3 /h. The portable model weight 25 kg, which is convenient for in situ testing

  10. National uranium project - an initiative to generate national database on uranium in drinking water of the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Jha, V.N.; Kumar, Ajay; Patra, A.C.; Vinod Kumar, A.

    2018-01-01

    Uranium is a naturally occurring lithophilic heavy element found in earth crust since inception of the earth. It is present naturally in all rock and soil and the concentration depends on geological formation and local geology. Groundwater interact with the host rocks and the wet weathering process facilitate the solubility of uranium in groundwater. The concentration of uranium in groundwater is influenced by geo-chemical parameters such as host rock characteristics and pH, Eh, ORP, ligands, etc. of the interacting water medium. Uranium is a radioactive element of low specific activity (25 Bq/mg) having both chemical and radiological toxicity but its chemical toxicity supersede the radio-toxicity. After a reporting of high uranium content in drinking water of Punjab, BARC has taken a pro-active initiative to generate a national database on uranium in drinking water in all the districts of India under National Uranium Project (NUP)

  11. Contribution of Seawater Surfactants to Generated Primary Marine Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, A. A.; Gerard, V.; Duplessis, P.; Kinsey, J. D.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Bisgrove, J.; Maben, J. R.; Long, M. S.; Chang, R.; Beaupre, S. R.; Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Noziere, B.; Cohen, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Surfactants account for minor fractions of total organic carbon in the ocean but may have major impacts on the surface tension of bursting bubbles at the sea surface that drive the production of primary marine aerosol particles (PMA). Surfactants associated with marine aerosol may also significantly reduce the surface tension of water thereby increasing the potential for cloud droplet activation and growth. During September and October 2016, PMA were produced from bursting bubbles in seawater using a high capacity generator at two biologically productive and two oligotrophic stations in the western North Atlantic, as part of a cruise on the R/V Endeavor. Surfactants were extracted from paired PMA and seawater samples, and their ionic compositions, total concentrations, and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) were quantified and compared for the four hydrographic stations. Higher surfactant concentrations were determined in the aerosol produced from biologically productive seawater compared to oligotrophic seawater, and the surfactants extracted from productive seawater were stronger (had lower CMCs) than those in the oligotrophic seawater. Surfactants associated with PMA and seawater in productive regions also varied over diel cycles, whereas those in the oligotrophic regions did not. This work demonstrates a direct link between surfactants in seawater and those in PMA.

  12. Generation and oxidation of aerosol deposited PdAg nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, S.; Gustafson, J.; Martin, N. M.; Messing, M. E.; Deppert, K.; Liu, Z.; Chang, R.; Fernandes, V. R.; Borg, A.; Grönbeck, H.; Lundgren, E.

    2013-10-01

    PdAg nanoparticles with a diameter of 10 nm have been generated by an aerosol particle method, and supported on a silica substrate. By using a combination of X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy it is shown that the size distribution of the particles is narrow and that the two metals form an alloy with a mixture of 75% Pd and 25% Ag. Under oxidizing conditions, Pd is found to segregate to the surface and a thin PdO like oxide is formed similar to the surface oxide previously reported on extended PdAg and pure Pd surfaces.

  13. Economics of uranium and thorium for the generation of electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, W B

    1958-09-15

    Only a few years ago there was serious talk of the prospect that economically available supplies of uranium and thorium might restrict the development of nuclear power. Now the position is reversed and the state of technical development of nuclear power threatens to restrict the market for the abundant supply of these minerals. Uranium and thorium are essentially fuels well suited to the generation of large blocks of electricity. As such, they must be assessed in relation to competitive fuels -- coal, oil and natural gas and the other large sources, namely water power. The most relevant basis is therefore a study of the demand for electric power and the costs of available sources where this demand exists. (author)

  14. Uranium and the generation of power - the South African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Backstrom, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The author examines uranium requirements, uranium production capacity and uranium reserves in the light of estimated energy forecasts for South Africa and the western world. The impact of breeder reactors, plutonium and uranium enrichment is also considered. He then deals with the South African uranium situation and the exploration that is currently under way, and makes some recommendations. These are followed by a list of characteristics and criteria that have a bearing on uranium mineralisation in various formations in South Africa

  15. Preferential aerosolization of bacteria in bioaerosols generated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, P; Turgeon, N; Gauthier-Levesque, L; Duchaine, C

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about how bacteria are aerosolized in terms of whether some bacteria will be found in the air more readily than others that are present in the source. This report describes in vitro experiments to compare aerosolization rates (also known as preferential aerosolization) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as rod- and coccus-shaped bacteria, using two nebulization conditions. A consortium of five bacterial species was aerosolized in a homemade chamber. Aerosols generated with a commercial nebulizer and a homemade bubble-burst aerosol generator were compared. Data suggest that Pseudomonas aeruginosa was preferentially aerosolized in comparison to Moraxella catarrhalis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus suis, independently of the method of aerosolization. Bacterial integrity of Strep. suis was more preserved compared to other bacteria studied as revealed with PMA-qPCR. We reported the design of an aerosol chamber and bubble-burst generator for the in vitro study of preferential aerosolization. In our setting, preferential aerosolization was influenced by bacterial properties instead of aerosolization mechanism. These findings could have important implications for predicting the composition of bioaerosols in various locations such as wastewater treatment plants, agricultural settings and health care settings. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Recent activities in the Aerosol Generation and Transport Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    General statements may be made on the behavior of single-component and multi-component aerosols in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant vessel. The removal processes for U 3 O 8 , Fe 2 O 3 , and U 3 O 8 + Fe 2 O 3 aerosols are enhanced in a steam-air atmosphere. Steam-air seems to have little effect on removal of concrete aerosol from the vessel atmosphere. A steam-air environment causes a change in aerosol shape from chain-agglomerate to basically spherical for U 3 O 8 , Fe 2 O 3 , and U 3 O 8 + Fe 2 O 3 aerosol; for concrete the change in aerosol shape is from chain-agglomerate to partially spherical. The mass ratio of the individual components of a multi-component aerosol seems to have an observable influence on the resultant behavior of these aerosols in steam. The enhanced rate of removal of the U 3 O 8 , the Fe 2 O 3 , and the mixed U 3 O 8 + Fe 2 O 3 aerosols from the atmosphere of the NSPP vessel by steam-air is probably caused by the change in aerosol shape and the condensation of steam on the aerosol surfaces combining to increase the effect of gravitational settling. The apparent lack of an effect by steam-air on the removal rate of concrete aerosol could result from a differing physical/chemical response of the surfaces of this aerosol to condensing steam

  17. Beschrijving van een verdampings-condensatie aerosol generator voor de produktie van submicron aerosol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijt; A.*; Meulen; A.van der

    1985-01-01

    Dit rapport is een handleiding voor een bedrijfszeker, routinematig gebruik van een zgn. Evaporation-Condensation aerosol Conditioner. Met deze aerosol generatie apparatuur kunnen op stabiele, reproduceerbare manier zeer hoge concentraties (tot 1 miljoen deeltjes per cc) monodispers submicron

  18. Comparison of physical chemical properties of powders and respirable aerosols of industrial mixed uranium and plutonium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize physical and chemical properties which may be important in determining the metabolism of accidentally released, inhaled aerosols of industrial mixed uranium and plutonium oxide fuels and to compare the properties of bulk powders and the respirable fraction they include. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that analysis of mixed-oxide powders from four process steps served to characterize their respirable fractions. IR spectroscopy was useful as a method to detect organic binders that were not observed by X-ray diffraction methods. Both X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy methods can be used in combination to identify the sources of a complex aerosol that might be released from more than one fabrication step. Isotopic distributions in powders and aerosols showed that information important for radiation dose to tissue calculations or Pu lung burden estimates can be obtained by analysis of powders. (U.K.)

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdoun, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    The article includes a historical preface about uranium, discovery of portability of sequential fission of uranium, uranium existence, basic raw materials, secondary raw materials, uranium's physical and chemical properties, uranium extraction, nuclear fuel cycle, logistics and estimation of the amount of uranium reserves, producing countries of concentrated uranium oxides and percentage of the world's total production, civilian and military uses of uranium. The use of depleted uranium in the Gulf War, the Balkans and Iraq has caused political and environmental effects which are complex, raising problems and questions about the effects that nuclear compounds left on human health and environment.

  20. Number concentrations of solid particles from the spinning top aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.P.

    1983-02-01

    A spinning top aerosol generator has been used to generate monodisperse methylene blue particles in the size range from 0.6 to 6 μm. The number concentrations of these aerosols have been determined by means of an optical particle counter and compared with the equivalent measurements obtained by filter collection and microscopy. (author)

  1. Aerosol generation by oxidation and combustion of plutonium and its compounds: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1987-09-01

    Generation of aerosols by oxidation or combustion is one of the greatest risks due to plutonium. A review is made of the most interesting documents available on this topic. Following a brief study of plutonium oxydation conditions, characteristics of aerosols generated by accidents of fires involving metallic Pu and some of its compounds are assessed. Nuclear weapons are not included in this review [fr

  2. World nuclear generating capacity and uranium requirements to 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The outlook for the world nuclear power industry through 2005 is more positive than some may believe. Installed nuclear electric generating capacity is forecast to grow at an average rate of 2.4 percent per year, and reach 448 gigawatts electric (GWe) by 2005. Consequently, annual world uranium requirements also will grow, reaching over 200 million pounds equivalent U 3 O 8 by 2005. This article presents data and summarizes installed nuclear generating capacity and charts its increase as a function of time through the year 2005. This data is also charted by reactor type as well as reactor status: under construction, planned, or estimated future construction. In a similar fashion, the data is also charted by country and continent. Historical and projected data is also given for capacity factor

  3. Aerosols generated by 239PU and 233U droplets burning in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.S.; Raabe, O.G.

    1978-01-01

    The inhalation hazards of radioactive aerosols produced by the explosive disruption and subsequent combustion of metallic plutonium in air are not adequately understood. Results of a study to determine whether uranium can be substituted for plutonium in such a situation in which experiments were performed under identical conditions with laser-ignited, single, freely falling droplets of 239 Pu and 233 U are reported. The total amounts of aerosol produced were studied quantitatively as a function of time during the combustion. Also, particle size distributions of selected aerosols were studied with aerodynamic particle separation techniques. Results showed that the ultimate quantity of aerosols, their final particle size distributions, and depositions as a function of time are not identical mainly because of the different vapor pressures of the metals, and the unlike degrees of violence of the explosions of the droplets

  4. Particle size of radioactive aerosols generated during machine operation in high-energy proton accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Yuichi; Kanda, Yukio; Kondo, Kenjiro; Endo, Akira

    2000-01-01

    In high-energy accelerators, non-radioactive aerosols are abundantly generated due to high radiation doses during machine operation. Under such a condition, radioactive atoms, which are produced through various nuclear reactions in the air of accelerator tunnels, form radioactive aerosols. These aerosols might be inhaled by workers who enter the tunnel just after the beam stop. Their particle size is very important information for estimation of internal exposure doses. In this work, focusing on typical radionuclides such as 7 Be and 24 Na, their particle size distributions are studied. An aluminum chamber was placed in the EP2 beam line of the 12-GeV proton synchrotron at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). Aerosol-free air was introduced to the chamber, and aerosols formed in the chamber were sampled during machine operation. A screen-type diffusion battery was employed in the aerosol-size analysis. Assuming that the aerosols have log-normal size distributions, their size distributions were obtained from the radioactivity concentrations at the entrance and exit of the diffusion battery. Radioactivity of the aerosols was measured with Ge detector system, and concentrations of non-radioactive aerosols were obtained using condensation particle counter (CPC). The aerosol size (radius) for 7 Be and 24 Na was found to be 0.01-0.04 μm, and was always larger than that for non-radioactive aerosols. The concentration of non-radioactive aerosols was found to be 10 6 - 10 7 particles/cm 3 . The size for radioactive aerosols was much smaller than ordinary atmospheric aerosols. Internal doses due to inhalation of the radioactive aerosols were estimated, based on the respiratory tract model of ICRP Pub. 66. (author)

  5. Aerosols generated by spills of viscous solutions and slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballinger, M.Y.; Hodgson, W.H.

    1986-12-01

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases caused by accidents. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop methods for estimating source terms from these accidents. Experiments were run by spilling viscous solutions and slurries to determine the mass and particle-size distribution of the material made airborne. In all cases, 1 L of solution was spilled from a height of 3 m. Aqueous solutions of sucrose (0 to 56%) gave a range of viscosities from 1.3 to 46 cp. The percent of spill mass made airborne from the spills of these solutions ranged from 0.001 to 0.0001. The mass of particles made airborne decreased as solution viscosity increased. Slurry loading ranged from 25 to 51% total solids. The maximum source airborne (0.0046 wt %) occurred with the slurry that had the lightest loading of soluble solids. The viscosity of the carrying solution also had an impact on the source term from spilling slurries. The effect of surface tension on the source term was examined in two experiments. Surface tension was halved in these spills by adding a surfactant. The maximum weight percent airborne from these spills was 0.0045, compared to 0.003 for spills with twice the surface tension. The aerodynamic mass medium diameters for the aerosols produced by spills of the viscous solutions, slurries, and low surface tension liquids ranged from 0.6 to 8.4 μm, and the geometric standard deviation ranged from 3.8 to 28.0

  6. Uranium mine tailings and obligations to future generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, A.

    1980-01-01

    Low-level wastes from uranium mine/mill operations, because of their huge volume, are a serious problem, yet relatively little attention has been paid to them. Management of tailings piles and waste liquids in the short term is fairly effective. However these management techniques involve continuous, active treatment of the wastes, which may not continue after operations shut down, and rely on containment structures with a short effective life. Tailings can probably be rendered safe for future generations if sufficient resources are devoted to the task. The central moral question is whether we are obligated to assume the costs of tailings management, or whether it is permissible to pass them on to future generations. The basic moral principle that each person has the same value as any other implies that the generation that reaps the benefits of nuclear power must assume the costs of managing mine tailings and not discriminate in favour of one group of persons, our own generation. The argument that people who may exist in the future have intrinsically less value than people currently alive is not accepted by the author. The methodology for determining obligations to future generations which has been applied to mine/mill wastes could be applied to other nuclear issues, too. (LL)

  7. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuney, M.; Pagel, M.; Leroy, J.

    1992-01-01

    First, this book presents the physico-chemical properties of Uranium and the consequences which can be deduced from the study of numerous geological process. The authors describe natural distribution of Uranium at different scales and on different supports, and main Uranium minerals. A great place in the book is assigned to description and classification of uranium deposits. The book gives also notions on prospection and exploitation of uranium deposits. Historical aspects of Uranium economical development (Uranium resources, production, supply and demand, operating costs) are given in the last chapter. 7 refs., 17 figs

  8. Particle generation methods applied in large-scale experiments on aerosol behaviour and source term studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiderska-Kowalczyk, M.; Gomez, F.J.; Martin, M.

    1997-01-01

    In aerosol research aerosols of known size, shape, and density are highly desirable because most aerosols properties depend strongly on particle size. However, such constant and reproducible generation of those aerosol particles whose size and concentration can be easily controlled, can be achieved only in laboratory-scale tests. In large scale experiments, different generation methods for various elements and compounds have been applied. This work presents, in a brief from, a review of applications of these methods used in large scale experiments on aerosol behaviour and source term. Description of generation method and generated aerosol transport conditions is followed by properties of obtained aerosol, aerosol instrumentation used, and the scheme of aerosol generation system-wherever it was available. An information concerning aerosol generation particular purposes and reference number(s) is given at the end of a particular case. These methods reviewed are: evaporation-condensation, using a furnace heating and using a plasma torch; atomization of liquid, using compressed air nebulizers, ultrasonic nebulizers and atomization of liquid suspension; and dispersion of powders. Among the projects included in this worked are: ACE, LACE, GE Experiments, EPRI Experiments, LACE-Spain. UKAEA Experiments, BNWL Experiments, ORNL Experiments, MARVIKEN, SPARTA and DEMONA. The aim chemical compounds studied are: Ba, Cs, CsOH, CsI, Ni, Cr, NaI, TeO 2 , UO 2 Al 2 O 3 , Al 2 SiO 5 , B 2 O 3 , Cd, CdO, Fe 2 O 3 , MnO, SiO 2 , AgO, SnO 2 , Te, U 3 O 8 , BaO, CsCl, CsNO 3 , Urania, RuO 2 , TiO 2 , Al(OH) 3 , BaSO 4 , Eu 2 O 3 and Sn. (Author)

  9. Aerosol generation and filter behaviour in sodium fires. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, L; Jordan, S

    1975-11-01

    In the scope of a long-term program (a) aerosol-formation rates during Na fires, (b) the behavior of Na aerosols in a closed system, and (c) the filtration of Na aerosols were investigated. These experiments in the ABRAUS facility should simulate the behaviour of Na aerosols after an accident in the inner and outer containment of the sodium-cooled fast Reactor SNR 300. At the conditions of the inner-containment (0.7% oxygen content in the atmosphere) aerosol-concentrations by Na - 0/sub 2/ reactions of 1 - 10 g/m/sup 3/ are possible. At the conditions of the outer-containment (21% 0/sub 2/-content) aerosol-concentrations at Na fires of 10 - 50 g/m/sup 3/ have been measured. The aerosol-formation rates are proportional to the 0/sub 2/-concentration: the rate at 21% 0/sub 2/-concentration is about 10-times higher than the rate at 0.7% 0/sub 2/. The aerosol formation rate was determined to 20 kgNa/m/sup 2/h at 21% 0/sub 2/. The behaviour of sand-bed-filters was investigated. A sand-bed-filter arrangement was developed which is better than HEPA-standard of fiberglas-filters concerning efficiency (better than 99.99) and load capacity (about 500 g Na/sub 2/0/sub 2//m/sup 2/). Beyond that sand-bed-filters resist high pressure- and temperature-peaks. Liquid Na aerosols are filtered with an efficiency better than 99.9%. A physical model was evaluated to explain pressure increase at the sand-bed-filter during load and penetration of the filter. The calculated values were in good agreement with experimental results.

  10. High efficiency filtration of liquid-metal-generated aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First, M.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper will present data on filter performance for the range of sodium-containing aerorols that can result from large and small releases of hot metallic sodium into confined spaces containing air or special atmospheres and will compare the particle collection effectiveness, space and power requirements, service life, and disposal of the collected materials for the several options. Prompt reduction of in-vessel aerosols with methods that induce rapid coagulation and sedimentation by the application of violent turbulance, sonic energy, or electrostatic attraction; by aerosol scavenging with massive inert dust additions; and by a number of other innovative methods is of special interest because of their potential ability to bring down the aerosol cloud very rapidly and thereby to reduce vessel out-leakage drastically; as well as to relieve the particle load on filters. These methods will be examined as supplements to filtration methods for control of sodium-containing aerosols

  11. Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA v1.0: an idealized forcing generator for climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Toohey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric sulfate aerosols from volcanic eruptions have a significant impact on the Earth's climate. To include the effects of volcanic eruptions in climate model simulations, the Easy Volcanic Aerosol (EVA forcing generator provides stratospheric aerosol optical properties as a function of time, latitude, height, and wavelength for a given input list of volcanic eruption attributes. EVA is based on a parameterized three-box model of stratospheric transport and simple scaling relationships used to derive mid-visible (550 nm aerosol optical depth and aerosol effective radius from stratospheric sulfate mass. Precalculated look-up tables computed from Mie theory are used to produce wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction, single scattering albedo, and scattering asymmetry factor values. The structural form of EVA and the tuning of its parameters are chosen to produce best agreement with the satellite-based reconstruction of stratospheric aerosol properties following the 1991 Pinatubo eruption, and with prior millennial-timescale forcing reconstructions, including the 1815 eruption of Tambora. EVA can be used to produce volcanic forcing for climate models which is based on recent observations and physical understanding but internally self-consistent over any timescale of choice. In addition, EVA is constructed so as to allow for easy modification of different aspects of aerosol properties, in order to be used in model experiments to help advance understanding of what aspects of the volcanic aerosol are important for the climate system.

  12. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article briefly discusses the Australian government policy and the attitude of political party factions towards the mining and exporting of the uranium resources in Australia. Australia has a third of the Western World's low-cost uranium resources

  13. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses the contribution made by various energy sources in the production of electricity. Estimates are made of the future nuclear contribution, the future demand for uranium and future sales of Australian uranium. Nuclear power growth in the United States, Japan and Western Europe is discussed. The present status of the six major Australian uranium deposits (Ranger, Jabiluka, Nabarlek, Koongarra, Yeelerrie and Beverley) is given. Australian legislation relevant to the uranium mining industry is also outlined

  14. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The development, prospecting, research, processing and marketing of South Africa's uranium industry and the national policies surrounding this industry form the headlines of this work. The geology of South Africa's uranium occurences and their positions, the processes used in the extraction of South Africa's uranium and the utilisation of uranium for power production as represented by the Koeberg nuclear power station near Cape Town are included in this publication

  15. Obtention of uranium tetrafluoride from effluents generated in the hexafluoride conversion process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Urano de Carvalho, E.F.; Durazzo, M.; Riella, H.G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The uranium silicide (U3Si2) fuel is produced from uranium hexafluoride (UF6) as the primary raw material. The uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) and metallic uranium are the two subsequent steps. There are two conventional routes for UF4 production: the first one reduces the uranium from the UF6 hydrolysis solution by adding stannous chloride (SnCl2). The second one is based on the hydrofluorination of solid uranium dioxide (UO2) produced from the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This work introduces a third route, a dry way route which utilizes the recovering of uranium from liquid effluents generated in the uranium hexafluoride reconversion process adopted at IPEN/CNEN-SP. Working in the liquid phase, this route comprises the recovery of ammonium fluoride by NH4HF2 precipitation. The crystallized bifluoride is added to the solid UO2 to get UF4, which returns to the metallic uranium production process and, finally, to the U3Si2 powder production. The UF4 produced by this new route was chemically and physically characterized and will be able to be used as raw material for metallic uranium production by magnesiothermic reduction. (author)

  16. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, E.D.J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion is given of uranium as an energy source in The Australian economy. Figures and predictions are presented on the world supply-demand position and also figures are given on the added value that can be achieved by the processing of uranium. Conclusions are drawn about Australia's future policy with regard to uranium (R.L.)

  17. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toens, P.D.

    1981-03-01

    The geological setting of uranium resources in the world can be divided in two basic categories of resources and are defined as reasonably assured resources, estimated additional resources and speculative resources. Tables are given to illustrate these definitions. The increasing world production of uranium despite the cutback in the nuclear industry and the uranium requirements of the future concluded these lecture notes

  18. Late-occurring pulmonary pathologies following inhalation of mixed oxide (uranium + plutonium oxide) aerosol in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, N M; Van der Meeren, A; Fritsch, P; Abram, M-C; Bernaudin, J-F; Poncy, J L

    2010-09-01

    Accidental exposure by inhalation to alpha-emitting particles from mixed oxide (MOX: uranium and plutonium oxide) fuels is a potential long-term health risk to workers in nuclear fuel fabrication plants. For MOX fuels, the risk of lung cancer development may be different from that assigned to individual components (plutonium, uranium) given different physico-chemical characteristics. The objective of this study was to investigate late effects in rat lungs following inhalation of MOX aerosols of similar particle size containing 2.5 or 7.1% plutonium. Conscious rats were exposed to MOX aerosols and kept for their entire lifespan. Different initial lung burdens (ILBs) were obtained using different amounts of MOX. Lung total alpha activity was determined by external counting and at autopsy for total lung dose calculation. Fixed lung tissue was used for anatomopathological, autoradiographical, and immunohistochemical analyses. Inhalation of MOX at ILBs ranging from 1-20 kBq resulted in lung pathologies (90% of rats) including fibrosis (70%) and malignant lung tumors (45%). High ILBs (4-20 kBq) resulted in reduced survival time (N = 102; p inhalation result in similar risk for development of lung tumors as compared with industrial plutonium oxide.

  19. Bio aerosol Generation at wastewater treatment plants: Identification of main bio aerosols sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Monedero, M. A.; Aguilar, M. I.; Fenoll, R.; Roig, A.

    2009-01-01

    Typical operations taking place at wastewater treatment plants, especially those involving aeration and mechanical agitation of raw wastewater, represent one of the main sources of bio aerosols that, if inhaled, could pose a biologic hazard to site workers and local residents. Six different wastewater treatment plants from southeast Spain were monitories in order to identify the main bio aerosol sources and to evaluate the airborne microorganisms levels to which workers may be exposed to. Air samples were taken from selected locations by using a single stage impactor. (Author)

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of a Device for Intra-Pulmonary Aerosol Generation and Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Naqwi, Amir A.; Dolovich, Myrna; Somani, Arif

    2015-01-01

    For infants born with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), liquid bolus delivery of surfactant administered through an endotracheal tube is common practice. While this method is generally effective, complications such as transient hypoxia, hypercapnia, and altered cerebral blood flow may occur. Aerosolized surfactant therapy has been explored as an alternative. Unfortunately, past efforts have led to disappointing results as aerosols were generated outside the lungs with significant pharyngeal deposition and minimal intrapulmonary instillation. A novel aerosol generator (Microjet™) is evaluated herein for intrapulmonary aerosol generation within an endotracheal tube and tested with Curosurf and Infasurf surfactants. Compared with other aerosol delivery devices, this process utilizes low air flow (range 0.01-0.2 L/min) that is ideal for limiting potential barotrauma to the premature newborn lung. The mass mean diameter (MMD) of the particles for both tested surfactants was less than 4 μm, which is ideal for both uniform and distal lung delivery. As an indicator of phospholipid function, surfactant surface tension was measured before and after aerosol formation; with no significant difference. Moreover, this device has an outside diameter of <1mm, which permits insertion into an endotracheal tube (of even 2.0 mm). In the premature infant where intravenous access is either technically challenging or difficult, aerosol drug delivery may provide an alternative route in patient resuscitation, stabilization and care. Other potential applications of this type of device include the delivery of nutrients, antibiotics, and analgesics via the pulmonary route. PMID:26884641

  1. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chazel, V.; Gerasimo, P.; Debouis, V.; Laroche, P.; Paquet, F

    2003-07-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 {mu}m (geometric standard deviation, s{sub g} = 3.7) and 2 {mu}m (s{sub g} = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m{sup -3}, i.e. 8.5 mg m{sup -3} of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, UO{sub 2.25} and probably UO{sub 3.01} and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y{sup -1} for workers and 1 mSv y{sup -1} for members of public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 {mu}g U g{sup -1} was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage. (author)

  2. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chazel, V.; Gerasimo, P.; Debouis, V.; Laroche, P.; Paquet, F.

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 μm (geometric standard deviation, s g = 3.7) and 2 μm (s g = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m -3 , i.e. 8.5 mg m -3 of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U 3 O 8 , UO 2.25 and probably UO 3.01 and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO 3 - , HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y -1 for workers and 1 mSv y -1 for members of public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 μg U g -1 was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage. (author)

  3. Characterisation and dissolution of depleted uranium aerosols produced during impacts of kinetic energy penetrators against a tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazel, V; Gerasimo, P; Dabouis, V; Laroche, P; Paquet, F

    2003-01-01

    Aerosols produced during impacts of depleted uranium (DU) penetrators against the glacis (sloping armour) and the turret of a tank were sampled. The concentration and size distribution were determined. Activity median aerodynamic diameters were 1 microm (geometric standard deviation, sigma(g) = 3.7) and 2 microm (sigma(g) = 2.5), respectively, for glacis and turret. The mean air concentration was 120 Bq m(-3), i.e. 8.5 mg m(-3) of DU. Filters analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X ray diffraction showed two types of particles (fine particles and large molten particles) composed mainly of a mixture of uranium and aluminium. The uranium oxides were mostly U3O8, UO2.25 and probably UO3.01 and a mixed compound of U and Al. The kinetics of dissolution in three media (HCO3-, HCl and Gamble's solution) were determined using in-vitro tests. The slow dissolution rates were respectively slow, and intermediate between slow and moderate, and the rapid dissolution fractions were mostly intermediate between moderate and fast. According to the in-vitro results for Gamble's solution, and based on a hypothetical single acute inhalation of 90 Bq, effective doses integrated up to 1 y after incorporation were 0.54 and 0.56 mSv, respectively, for aerosols from glacis and turret. In comparison, the ICRP limits are 20 mSv y(-1) for workers and 1 mSv y(-1) for members of the public. A kidney concentration of approximately 0.1 microg U g(-1) was predicted and should not, in this case, lead to kidney damage.

  4. Direct radiative effect due to brownness in organic carbon aerosols generated from biomass combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathod, T.D.; Sahu, S.K.; Tiwari, M.; Pandit, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    We report the enhancement in the direct radiative effect due the presence of Brown carbon (BrC) as a part of organic carbon aerosols. The optical properties of organic carbon aerosols generated from pyrolytic combustion of mango tree wood (Magnifera Indica) and dung cake at different temperatures were considered. Mie codes were used to calculate absorption and scattering coefficients coupled with experimentally derived imaginary complex refractive index. The direct radiative effect (DRE) for sampled organic carbon aerosols was estimated using a wavelength dependent radiative transfer equation. The BrC DRE was estimated taking virtually non absorbing organic aerosols as reference. The BrC DRE from wood and dung cake was compared at different combustion temperatures and conditions. The BrC contributed positively to the direct top of the atmosphere radiative effect. Dung cake generated BrC aerosols were found to be strongly light absorbing as compared to BrC from wood combustion. It was noted that radiative effects of BrC from wood depended on its generation temperature and conditions. For BrC aerosols from dung cake such strong dependence was not observed. The average BrC aerosol DRE values were 1.53±0.76 W g"−"1 and 17.84±6.45 W g"−"1 for wood and dung cake respectively. The DRE contribution of BrC aerosols came mainly (67–90%) from visible light absorption though they exhibited strong absorption in shorter wavelengths of the UV–visible spectrum. - Highlights: • Biomass fuels (wood and dung cake) were studied for brown carbon direct radiative effects. • Model calculations predicted positive contribution of Brown carbon aerosols to organic carbon direct radiative effect. • Average direct radiative values for brown carbon from dung cake were higher compare to wood. • The visible light absorption played major role in brown carbon contribution (67–90 %) to total direct radiative effect.

  5. Direct aerosol chemical composition measurements to evaluate the physicochemical differences between controlled sea spray aerosol generation schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Collins

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled laboratory studies of the physical and chemical properties of sea spray aerosol (SSA must be under-pinned by a physically and chemically accurate representation of the bubble-mediated production of nascent SSA particles. Bubble bursting is sensitive to the physico-chemical properties of seawater. For a sample of seawater, any important differences in the SSA production mechanism are projected into the composition of the aerosol particles produced. Using direct chemical measurements of SSA at the single-particle level, this study presents an intercomparison of three laboratory-based, bubble-mediated SSA production schemes: gas forced through submerged sintered glass filters ("frits", a pulsed plunging-waterfall apparatus, and breaking waves in a wave channel filled with natural seawater. The size-resolved chemical composition of SSA particles produced by breaking waves is more similar to particles produced by the plunging waterfall than those produced by sintered glass filters. Aerosol generated by disintegrating foam produced by sintered glass filters contained a larger fraction of organic-enriched particles and a different size-resolved elemental composition, especially in the 0.8–2 μm dry diameter range. Interestingly, chemical differences between the methods only emerged when the particles were chemically analyzed at the single-particle level as a function of size; averaging the elemental composition of all particles across all sizes masked the differences between the SSA samples. When dried, SSA generated by the sintered glass filters had the highest fraction of particles with spherical morphology compared to the more cubic structure expected for pure NaCl particles produced when the particle contains relatively little organic carbon. In addition to an intercomparison of three SSA production methods, the role of the episodic or "pulsed" nature of the waterfall method on SSA composition was under-taken. In organic

  6. High-efficiency generation and delivery of aerosols through nasal cannula during noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P Worth; Walenga, Ross L; Son, Yoen-Ju; Hindle, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the delivery of pharmaceutical aerosols through nasal cannula and the feasibility of enhanced condensational growth (ECG) with a nasal interface. The objectives of this study were to develop a device for generating submicrometer aerosols with minimal depositional loss in the formation process and to improve aerosol delivery efficiencies through nasal cannulas. A combination of in vitro experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations that used the strengths of each method was applied. Aerosols were formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer, mixed with ventilation gas, and heated to produce submicrometer sizes. An improved version of the mixer and heater unit was developed based on CFD simulations, and performance was verified with experiments. Aerosol delivery was considered through a commercial large-bore adult cannula, a divided (D) design for use with ECG, and a divided and streamlined (DS) design. The improved mixer design reduced the total deposition fraction (DF) of drug within the mixer by a factor of 3 compared with an initial version, had a total DF of approximately 10%, and produced submicrometer aerosols at flow rates of 10 and 15 L/min. Compared with the commercial and D designs for submicrometer aerosols, the DS cannula reduced depositional losses by a factor of 2-3 and retained only approximately 5% or less of the nebulized dose at all flow rates considered. For conventional-sized aerosols (3.9 and 4.7 μm), the DS device provided delivery efficiencies of approximately 80% and above at flow rates of 2-15 L/min. Submicrometer aerosols can be formed using a conventional mesh nebulizer and delivered through a nasal cannula with total delivery efficiencies of 80-90%. Streamlining the nasal cannula significantly improved the delivery efficiency of both submicrometer and micrometer aerosols; however, use of submicrometer particles with ECG delivery resulted in overall lower depositional losses.

  7. Formation of charged particles in condensation aerosol generators used for inhalation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramu, M.C.R.; Vohra, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    Formation of charged particles in a condensation aerosol generator has been studied using a charge collector and a mobility analyzer. Measurements carried out using the charge collector show that the number of charged particles increases with an increase in the particle diameter. The number of charged particles measured also depends on the thickness of the sodium chloride coating on the platinum wire used in the aerosol generator for the production of condensation nuclei. It was found that the charged particle concentration increases with decreasing coating thickness. Mobility measurements have shown that the particles are singly and doubly charged. It has been estimated that about 10% of the particles produced in the generator are charged. The mechanism of formation of charged particles in the aerosol generator has been briefly discussed. (author)

  8. ARTIST: An International Project Investigating Aerosol Retention in a Ruptured Steam Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.; Dehbi, A.; Suckow, D.; Birchley, J.

    2002-01-01

    Steam generator tube ruptures (SGTR) with a concurrent stuck open safety relief valve are counted among the risk dominant accident sequences because of the potential for radioactive products to bypass the containment. Owing to the absence of relevant empirical data and the complexity of the geometry and controlling processes, the aerosol removal in the steam generator (SG) tubes and in the secondary side is not well understood. Therefore, little or no credit is usually taken for aerosol retention due to natural processes in the various components of a SG. To help reduce the uncertainties associated with fission product release following an SGTR sequence, the Paul Scherrer Institut has initiated an international experimental project to be performed in the ARTIST (AeRosol Trapping In a Steam generaTor) facility in the time period from 2002 to 2007. The ARTIST test section is a scaled model of a real SG, and is comprised of a 264-tube bundle with a maximum height of 3.8 m, as well as one full-size droplet separator and one full-size steam dryer. The ARTIST facility is capable of producing soluble and insoluble aerosols and entrain them at sonic gas flow rates (up to 0.25 kg/s, thus matching comparable values predicted by the codes. In addition, aerosols can be generated at prototypical concentrations (up to 5 g/m 3 ) and sizes (0.2-5 mm AMMD). State of the art instrumentation is used (Low-pressure impactors, photometers, on-line particle sizer, online droplet sizer, etc.). The ARTIST project will simulate the flow and retention of aerosol-borne fission products in the SG, and provide a unique database to support safety assessments and analytical models. The project is foreseen in seven phases: 1) Aerosol retention in the tube under dry secondary side conditions, 2) Aerosol retention in the near field close to break under dry conditions, 3) Aerosol retention in the bundle far field under dry conditions, 4) Aerosol retention in the separator and dryer under dry

  9. Inhalation of Uranium Oxide Aerosols: CNS Deposition, Neurotoxicity, and Role in Gulf War Illness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Johnnye

    2003-01-01

    .... Because several conditions during the war could have produced nasal inflammation, inflammation will be examined as a modifying factor that could result in increased sensitivity to uranium uptake via...

  10. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whillans, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    Events in the Canadian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine and mill expansions and exploration activity are described, as well as changes in governmental policy. Although demand for uranium is weak at the moment, the industry feels optimistic about the future. (LL)

  11. Behavior of the aerosols generated by sodium sheet fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermandjian, J.; Boulaud, D.; Madelaine, G.; Malet, J.C.; Casselman, C.; Duverger de Cuy, G.

    1980-04-01

    In order to validate computing models an experimental programme of sodium sheet fire tests (weight of sodium = 10 kg - combustion area = 0.125 m 2 - initial sodium temperature = 450 0 C) is under way in a 4x4 m 3 steel chamber (diameter = 1.6 m - height = 2.2 m - wall surface/volume = 3.4 m -1 - floor surface/volume = 0.46 m -1 ) with weight concentrations of aerosol above 10 g Na 2 O 2 /m 3 . The following experimental data were obtained: changes in the weight concentration and in the mass distribution of particles in suspension, especially by the use of cascade impactors (Andersen 8 stages) with a dilution system; particle emission rate with time (fire divided into a number of sequences on the basis of the reference test and fire timed by placing a lid on the container); kinetics of the aerosol deposition on the chamber floor (0.24 g Na 2 O 2 /m 2 .s). The application of computing codes (HAARM 3 and PARDISEKO 3B) to these tests showed agreement between experiments and calculations [fr

  12. A versatile generator of nanoparticle aerosols. A novel tool in environmental and occupational exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Alberto; Lobera, M Pilar; Balas, Francisco; Santamaria, Jesus

    2018-06-01

    The increasing presence of nanotechnology on the market entails a growing probability of finding ENMs in the environment. Nanoparticles aerosols are a yet unknown risk for human and environmental exposure that may normally occur at any point during the nanomaterial lifecycle. There is a research gap in standardized methods to assess the exposure to airborne nanoparticles in different environments. The controllable generation of nanoparticle aerosols has long been a challenging objective for researchers and industries dealing with airborne nanoparticles. In this work, a versatile system to generate nanoparticulate aerosols has been designed. The system allows the production of both i) instantaneous nanoparticle clouds and ii) continuous nanoparticle streams with quasi-stable values of particle concentration and size distribution. This novel device uses a compressed-air pressure pulse to disperse the target material into either the testing environment (instantaneous cloud formation) or a secondary chamber, from which a continuous aerosol stream can be drawn, with a tunable nanoparticle concentration. The system is robust, highly versatile and easy to operate, enabling reproducible generation of aerosols from a variety of sources. The system has been verified with four dry nanomaterials: TiO 2 , ZnO, CuO and CNT bundles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R M

    1976-01-01

    Evidence of expanding markets, improved prices and the short supply of uranium became abundantly clear in 1975, providing the much needed impetus for widespread activity in all phases of uranium operations. Exploration activity that had been at low levels in recent years in Canada was evident in most provinces as well as the Northwest Territories. All producers were in the process of expanding their uranium-producing facilities. Canada's Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) by year-end had authorized the export of over 73,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ all since September 1974, when the federal government announced its new uranium export guidelines. World production, which had been in the order of 25,000 tons of U/sub 3/0/sub 8/ annually, was expected to reach about 28,000 tons in 1975, principally from increased output in the United States.

  14. The Amster concept: a configuration generating its own uranium with a mixed thorium and uranium support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergnes, J.; Garzenne, C.; Lecarpentier, D.; Mouney, H.; Delpech, M.

    2001-01-01

    AMSTER is a continuously reloaded, graphite-moderated molten salt critical reactor, using a 238 U or 232 Th fuel support, slightly enriched with 235 U if necessary. Using this concept, one can define a large number of configurations according to the products loaded and recycled. The choice of thorium fuel support leads to two configurations requiring no additional 235 U as fissile material: a configuration with one moderating zone, incinerating Transuranium elements (TRU); a configuration with 2 moderating zones self-consuming TRU and regenerating the fissile uranium ( 233 U). In this configuration, it is even possible to burn 238 U (from depleted uranium) by adding it to the thorium support. These configurations use a minimum amount of fuel (100 kg of 232 Th or 100 kg of a 232 Th- 238 U mix per TWh) and produce very little TRU (a few tens of grams per TWh). (author)

  15. Key findings from the artist project on aerosol retention in a dry steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehbi, Abedeloahab; Suckow, Deltef; Lind, Tettaliisa; Guentat, Salih; Danner, Steffen; Mukin, Roman

    2016-01-01

    A steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) event with a stuck-open safety relief valve constitutes one of the most serious accident sequences in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) because it may create an open path for radioactive aerosol release into the environment. The release may be mitigated by the deposition of fission product particles on a steam generator's (SG's) dry tubes and structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. However, the absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry, and the controlling processes have, until recently, made any quantification of retention difficult to justify. As a result, past risk assessment studies typically took little or no credit for aerosol retention in SGTR sequences. To provide these missing data, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) initiated the Aerosol Trapping In Steam GeneraTor (ARTIST) Project, which aimed to thoroughly investigate various aspects of aerosol removal in the secondary side of a breached steam generator. Between 2003 and 2011, the PSI has led the ARTIST Project, which involved intense collaboration between nearly 20 international partners. This summary paper presents key findings of experimental and analytical work conducted at the PSI within the ARTIST program

  16. Key findings from the artist project on aerosol retention in a dry steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehbi, Abedeloahab; Suckow, Deltef; Lind, Tettaliisa; Guentat, Salih; Danner, Steffen; Mukin, Roman [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    A steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) event with a stuck-open safety relief valve constitutes one of the most serious accident sequences in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) because it may create an open path for radioactive aerosol release into the environment. The release may be mitigated by the deposition of fission product particles on a steam generator's (SG's) dry tubes and structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. However, the absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry, and the controlling processes have, until recently, made any quantification of retention difficult to justify. As a result, past risk assessment studies typically took little or no credit for aerosol retention in SGTR sequences. To provide these missing data, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) initiated the Aerosol Trapping In Steam GeneraTor (ARTIST) Project, which aimed to thoroughly investigate various aspects of aerosol removal in the secondary side of a breached steam generator. Between 2003 and 2011, the PSI has led the ARTIST Project, which involved intense collaboration between nearly 20 international partners. This summary paper presents key findings of experimental and analytical work conducted at the PSI within the ARTIST program.

  17. Key Findings from the Artist Project on Aerosol Retention in a Dry Steam Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelouahab Dehbi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A steam generator tube rupture (SGTR event with a stuck-open safety relief valve constitutes one of the most serious accident sequences in pressurized water reactors (PWRs because it may create an open path for radioactive aerosol release into the environment. The release may be mitigated by the deposition of fission product particles on a steam generator's (SG's dry tubes and structures or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. However, the absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry, and the controlling processes have, until recently, made any quantification of retention difficult to justify. As a result, past risk assessment studies typically took little or no credit for aerosol retention in SGTR sequences. To provide these missing data, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI initiated the Aerosol Trapping In Steam GeneraTor (ARTIST Project, which aimed to thoroughly investigate various aspects of aerosol removal in the secondary side of a breached steam generator. Between 2003 and 2011, the PSI has led the ARTIST Project, which involved intense collaboration between nearly 20 international partners. This summary paper presents key findings of experimental and analytical work conducted at the PSI within the ARTIST program.

  18. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkin, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments in the Australian uranium industry during 1980 are reviewed. Mine production increased markedly to 1841 t U 3 O 8 because of output from the new concentrator at Nabarlek and 1131 t of U 3 O 8 were exported at a nominal value of $37.19/lb. Several new contracts were signed for the sale of yellowcake from Ranger and Nabarlek Mines. Other developments include the decision by the joint venturers in the Olympic Dam Project to sink an exploration shaft and the release of an environmental impact statement for the Honeymoon deposit. Uranium exploration expenditure increased in 1980 and additions were made to Australia's demonstrated economic uranium resources. A world review is included

  19. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabelman, J.W.; Chenoweth, W.L.; Ingerson, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium production industry is well into its third recession during the nuclear era (since 1945). Exploration is drastically curtailed, and many staffs are being reduced. Historical market price production trends are discussed. A total of 3.07 million acres of land was acquired for exploration; drastic decrease. Surface drilling footage was reduced sharply; an estimated 250 drill rigs were used by the uranium industry during 1980. Land acquisition costs increased 8%. The domestic reserve changes are detailed by cause: exploration, re-evaluation, or production. Two significant discoveries of deposits were made in Mohave County, Arizona. Uranium production during 1980 was 21,850 short tons U 3 O 8 ; an increase of 17% from 1979. Domestic and foreign exploration highlights were given. Major producing areas for the US are San Juan basin, Wyoming basins, Texas coastal plain, Paradox basin, northeastern Washington, Henry Mountains, Utah, central Colorado, and the McDermitt caldera in Nevada and Oregon. 3 figures, 8 tables

  20. Inhalation toxicology of industrial plutonium and uranium oxide aerosols II. Deposition, retention and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, J.A.; Eidson, A.F.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Mo, T.

    1978-01-01

    A series of studies has been initiated in which powdered fuel materials obtained at industrial sites have been aerosolized in the dry state for the inhalation exposure of Fischer-344 rats, Beagle dogs and Cynomolgus monkeys to evaluate the potential biological hazard of such accidents. The materials chosen for study were 750 deg. C heat-treated mixed PuO 2 and UO 2 obtained from a ball milling process and 1750 deg. C heat-treated (U,Pu)O 1.97 powder obtained from the centerless grinding of fuel pellets. Care was taken to insure that the regenerated aerosols used in animal inhalation exposures had similar particle size and size distribution characteristics to those measured during glove box sampling at the industrial plant. The deposition, retention, distribution and excretion of these materials are being studied, using serial sacrifice of animals at times from 4 hours to several years after inhalation exposure. Periodic excreta samples are collected on all animals. Biological samples are analyzed to yield data on Pu, Am and U content. Data from animals sacrificed up to one year will be presented. The retention of 239 Pu and 241 Am in the lung and their subsequent clearance and translocation to other tissues such as liver, skeleton and tracheobronchial lymph nodes will be discussed in relation to the influence of species and of the physical chemical properties of the exposure aerosol. (author)

  1. Radiative Effects of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning, Dust Storms, and Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Sundar A.; Vulcan, Donna V.; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, both natural and anthropogenic, are important to the earth's radiative balance. They scatter the incoming solar radiation and modify the shortwave reflective properties of clouds by acting as Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). Although it has been recognized that aerosols exert a net cooling influence on climate (Twomey et al. 1984), this effect has received much less attention than the radiative forcings due to clouds and greenhouse gases. The radiative forcing due to aerosols is comparable in magnitude to current anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing but opposite in sign (Houghton et al. 1990). Atmospheric aerosol particles generated from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are important regional climatic variables. A recent study by Penner et al. (1992) proposed that smoke particles from biomass burning may have a significant impact on the global radiation balance. They estimate that about 114 Tg of smoke is produced per year in the tropics through biomass burning. The direct and indirect effects of smoke aerosol due to biomass burning could add up globally to a cooling effect as large as 2 W/sq m. Ackerman and Chung (1992) used model calculations and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data to show that in comparison to clear days, the heavy dust loading over the Saudi Arabian peninsula can change the Top of the Atmosphere (TOA) clear sky shortwave and longwave radiant exitance by 40-90 W/sq m and 5-20 W/sq m, respectively. Large particle concentrations produced from these types of events often are found with optical thicknesses greater than one. These aerosol particles are transported across considerable distances from the source (Fraser et al. 1984). and they could perturb the radiative balance significantly. In this study, the regional radiative effects of aerosols produced from biomass burning, dust storms and forest fires are examined using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Local Area

  2. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Australian Government will ensure a significant expansion of the uranium industry. Development at Roxby Downs may proceed and Ranger may fulfil two new contracts but the decision specifies that apart from Roxby Downs, no new mines should be approved. The ACTU maintains an anti-uranium policy but reaction to the decision from the trade union movement has been muted. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) has been asked by the Government to conduct an inquiry into a number of issues relating to Australia's role in the nuclear fuel cycle. The inquiry will examine in particular Australia's nuclear safeguards arrangements and the adequacy of existing waste management technology. In two additional decisions the Government has dissociated itself from a study into the feasibility of establishing an enrichment operation and has abolished the Uranium Advisory Council. Although Australian reserves account for 20% of the total in the Western World, Australia accounts for a relatively minor proportion of the world's uranium production

  3. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The French Government has decided to freeze a substantial part of its nuclear power programme. Work has been halted on 18 reactors. This power programme is discussed, as well as the effect it has on the supply of uranium by South Africa

  4. Flavourings significantly affect inhalation toxicity of aerosol generated from electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Noel J; Lawton, Ralph I; Hershberger, Pamela A; Goniewicz, Maciej L

    2016-11-01

    E-cigarettes or electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are designed to deliver nicotine-containing aerosol via inhalation. Little is known about the health effects of flavoured ENDS aerosol when inhaled. Aerosol from ENDS was generated using a smoking machine. Various types of ENDS devices or a tank system prefilled with liquids of different flavours, nicotine carrier, variable nicotine concentrations and with modified battery output voltage were tested. A convenience sample of commercial fluids with flavour names of tobacco, piña colada, menthol, coffee and strawberry were used. Flavouring chemicals were identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. H292 human bronchial epithelial cells were directly exposed to 55 puffs of freshly generated ENDS aerosol, tobacco smoke or air (controls) using an air-liquid interface system and the Health Canada intense smoking protocol. The following in vitro toxicological effects were assessed: (1) cell viability, (2) metabolic activity and (3) release of inflammatory mediators (cytokines). Exposure to ENDS aerosol resulted in decreased metabolic activity and cell viability and increased release of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL10 compared to air controls. Cell viability and metabolic activity were more adversely affected by conventional cigarettes than most tested ENDS products. Product type, battery output voltage and flavours significantly affected toxicity of ENDS aerosol, with a strawberry-flavoured product being the most cytotoxic. Our data suggest that characteristics of ENDS products, including flavours, may induce inhalation toxicity. Therefore, ENDS users should use the products with caution until more comprehensive studies are performed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Interaction of uranium with in situ anoxically generated magnetite on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Miquel; El Aamrani, Souad; Duro, Lara; Gimenez, Javier; Pablo, Joan de; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-01-01

    In the high level nuclear waste repository concept, spent nuclear fuel is designed to be encapsulated in steel canisters. Thus, it is necessary to study the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the behaviour of the radionuclides released from the fuel. In this sense, the main objective of this work is to contribute to the knowledge of the influence of the steel and/or its corrosion products on the uranium(VI) retention. To this aim, magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) has been generated by anaerobic steel corrosion in an autoclave reactor at an overpressure of 8 atm of H 2 (g). After characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), the obtained corroded steel coupons were contacted, at two different H 2 (g) pressures (1 atm and 7.6 atm), with a U(VI) solution. The evolution of the uranium concentration in solution is determined and a study of the composition of the coupons at the end of the experiments is carried out. The main conclusion obtained from this work is that magnetite generated on a steel coupon is able not only to retain uranium via sorption, but also to reduce hexavalent to tetravalent uranium in a higher extent than commercial magnetite, thus, providing an effective retardation path to the migration of uranium (and, potentially, other actinides) out of the repository

  6. Determination of aerosol size distributions at uranium mill tailings remedial action project sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Reif, R.H.; Hoover, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an ongoing program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, to stabilize piles of uranium mill tailings in order to reduce the potential radiological hazards to the public. Protection of workers and the general public against airborne radioactivity during remedial action is a top priority at the UMTRA Project. The primary occupational radionuclides of concern are 230 Th, 226 Ra, 210 Pb, 210 Po, and the short-lived decay products of 222 Rn with 230 Th causing the majority of the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from inhaling uranium mill tailings. Prior to this study, a default particle size of 1.0 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was assumed for airborne radioactive tailings dust. Because of recent changes in DOE requirements, all DOE operations are now required to use the CEDE methodology, instead of the annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE) methodology, to evaluate internal radiation exposures. Under the transition from AEDE to CEDE, with a 1.0 μm AMAD particle size, lower bioassay action levels would be required for the UMTRA Project. This translates into an expanded internal dosimetry program where significantly more bioassay monitoring would be required at the UMTRA Project sites. However, for situations where the particle size distribution is known to differ significantly from 1.0 μm AMAD, the DOE allows for corrections to be made to both the estimated dose to workers and the derived air concentration (DAC) values. For particle sizes larger than 1.0 μm AMAD, the calculated CEDE from inhaling tailings would be relatively lower

  7. Design, demonstration and performance of a versatile electrospray aerosol generator for nanomaterial research and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennerjohn, Nancy; Fung, David C; Hirakawa, Karen S; Hinds, William; Kennedy, Nola J; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantzazu; Prikhodko, Sergey; Zavala-Mendez, Jose D

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are difficult to aerosolize in a controlled manner. We present a method for generating aerosols not only of carbon nanotubes, but also of many reference and proprietary materials including quantum dots, diesel particulate matter, urban dust, and their mixtures, using electrospraying. This method can be used as a teaching tool, or as the starting point for advanced research, or to deliver nanomaterials in animal exposure studies. This electrospray system generates 180 μg of nanotubes per m 3 of carrier gas, and thus aerosolizes an occupationally relevant mass concentration of nanotubes. The efficiency achievable for single-walled carbon nanotubes is 9.4%. This system is simple and quick to construct using ordinary lab techniques and affordable materials. Since it is easy to replace soiled parts with clean ones, experiments on different types of nanomaterial can be performed back to back without contamination from previous experiments. In this paper, the design, fabrication, operation and characterization of our versatile electrospray method are presented. Also, the morphological changes that carbon nanotubes undergo as they make the transition from dry powders to aerosol particles are presented.

  8. The Occupational Exposure Limit for Fluid Aerosol Generated in Metalworking Operations: Limitations and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donguk Park

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to assess current knowledge related to the occupational exposure limit (OEL for fluid aerosols including either mineral or chemical oil that are generated in metalworking operations, and to discuss whether their OEL can be appropriately used to prevent several health risks that may vary among metalworking fluid (MWF types. The OEL (time-weighted average; 5 mg/m3, short-term exposure limit ; 15 mg/m3 has been applied to MWF aerosols without consideration of different fluid aerosol-size fractions. The OEL, is also based on the assumption that there are no significant differences in risk among fluid types, which may be contentious. Particularly, the health risks from exposure to water-soluble fluids may not have been sufficiently considered. Although adoption of The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's recommended exposure limit for MWF aerosol (0.5 mg/m3 would be an effective step towards minimizing and evaluating the upper respiratory irritation that may be caused by neat or diluted MWF, this would fail to address the hazards (e.g., asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by microbial contaminants generated only by the use of water-soluble fluids. The absence of an OEL for the water-soluble fluids used in approximately 80-90 % of all applicants may result in limitations of the protection from health risks caused by exposure to those fluids.

  9. The occupational exposure limit for fluid aerosol generated in metalworking operations: limitations and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donguk

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this review was to assess current knowledge related to the occupational exposure limit (OEL) for fluid aerosols including either mineral or chemical oil that are generated in metalworking operations, and to discuss whether their OEL can be appropriately used to prevent several health risks that may vary among metalworking fluid (MWF) types. The OEL (time-weighted average; 5 mg/m(3), short-term exposure limit ; 15 mg/m(3)) has been applied to MWF aerosols without consideration of different fluid aerosol-size fractions. The OEL, is also based on the assumption that there are no significant differences in risk among fluid types, which may be contentious. Particularly, the health risks from exposure to water-soluble fluids may not have been sufficiently considered. Although adoption of The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's recommended exposure limit for MWF aerosol (0.5 mg/m(3)) would be an effective step towards minimizing and evaluating the upper respiratory irritation that may be caused by neat or diluted MWF, this would fail to address the hazards (e.g., asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by microbial contaminants generated only by the use of water-soluble fluids. The absence of an OEL for the water-soluble fluids used in approximately 80-90 % of all applicants may result in limitations of the protection from health risks caused by exposure to those fluids.

  10. Mitigating secondary aerosol generation potentials from biofuel use in the energy sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Colls, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This paper demonstrates secondary aerosol generation potential of biofuel use in the energy sector from the photochemical interactions of precursor gases on a life cycle basis. The paper is divided into two parts-first, employing life cycle analysis (LCA) to evaluate the extent of the problem for a typical biofuel based electricity production system using five baseline scenarios; second, proposing adequate mitigation options to minimise the secondary aerosol generation potential on a life cycle basis. The baseline scenarios cover representative technologies for 2010 utilising energy crop (miscanthus), short rotation coppiced chips and residual/waste wood in different proportions. The proposed mitigation options include three approaches-biomass gasification prior to combustion, delaying the harvest of biomass, and increasing the geographical distance between the biomass plant and the harvest site (by importing the biofuels). Preliminary results indicate that the baseline scenarios (assuming all the biomass is sourced locally) bear significant secondary aerosol formation potential on a life cycle basis from photochemical neutralisation of acidic emissions (hydrogen chloride and sulphur dioxide) with ammonia. Our results suggest that gasification of miscanthus biomass would provide the best option by minimising the acidic emissions from the combustion plant whereas the other two options of delaying the harvest or importing biofuels from elsewhere would only lead to marginal reduction in the life cycle aerosol loadings of the systems.

  11. Effects of hydrocarbon generation on fluid flow in the Ordos basin and relationship with uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Wei; Xue Chunji; Chi Guoxiang

    2012-01-01

    The Ordos Basin is not only an important uranium mineralization province but also a major producer of oil. gas and coal in China. The genetic relationship between uranium mineralization and hydrocarbons has been recognized by a number of previous studies, but it has not been well understood in terms of hydrodynamics of basin fluid flow. In a previous study we have demonstrated that the preferential localization of uranium mineralization in the upper part of the Jurassic strata may have been related to the interface of an upward flowing, reducing fluid and a downward flowing, oxidizing fluid, and that this interface may have been controlled by the interplay between fluid overpressure, which was related to disequilibrium sediment compaction and drove the upward flow, and topographic relief which drove the down- ward flow. In the present study, we carried out numerical modeling for the contribution of oil and gas generation to the development of fluid overpressure, in addition to sediment compaction and heating. Our results indicate that when hydrocarbon generation was taken into account, fluid overpressure during the Cretaceous was more than doubled in comparison with the simulation when hydrocarbon generation was not considered. Furthermore, fluid overpressure dissipation after ceasing of sedimentation slowed down relative to the no-hydrocarbon generation case. These results suggest that hydrocarbon generation may have played an important role in uranium mineralization, not only in providing reducing agents required for the mineralization, but also in contributing to the driving force to maintain the upward flow against the pushing of topography driven. downward flow, thus helping stabilize the interface between the two fluid system and localization of uranium mineralization. (authors)

  12. Aerosol trapping in steam generator (artist): an investigation of aerosol and iodine behaviour in the secondary side of a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.; Birchley, J.; Suckow, D.; Dehbi, A.

    2000-01-01

    Incidents such as a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) with stuck-open relief valve are important accident sequences for analysis by virtue of the open path for release of radioactivity which ensues. The release may be mitigated by deposition of fission products on the steam generator (SG) tubes and other structures, or by scrubbing in the secondary coolant. The absence of empirical data, the complexity of the geometry and controlling processes, however, make the retention difficult to quantify and its full import is typically not taken into account in risk assessment studies. The ARTIST experimental programme at PSI will simulate the flow and retention of aerosol-borne fission products in the SG secondary, and thus provide a unique database to support safety assessments and analytical models. Scaling of the break flow represents a particular challenge since the aerosol retention processes operate at contrasting length scales. Preliminary calculations have identified a baseline set of conditions, and confirmed the feasibility of the rig design and scaling principles. Flexibility of the rig layout enables simulations to be performed for a range of SG designs, accident situations and accident management philosophies. (authors)

  13. Quantification of the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal on the experimentally determined O/U ratio of a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narasimha Murty, B.; Bharati Misra, U.; Yadav, R.B.; Srivastava, R.K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes quantitatively the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal (that could be formed due to the conducive manufacturing conditions) in a sintered uranium dioxide fuel pellet on the experimentally determined O/U ratio using analytical methods involving dissolution of the pellet material. To quantify the effect of in-situ generated uranium metal in the fuel pellet, a mathematical expression is derived for the actual O/U ratio in terms of the O/U ratio as determined by an experiment involving dissolution of the material and the quantity of uranium metal present in the uranium dioxide pellet. The utility of this derived mathematical expression is demonstrated by tabulating the calculated actual O/U ratios for varying amounts of uranium metal (from 5 to 95% in 5% intervals) and different O/U ratio values (from 2.001 to 2.015 in 0.001 intervals). This paper brings out the necessity of care to be exercised while interpreting the experimentally determined O/U ratio and emphasizes the fact that it is always safer to produce the nuclear fuel with oxygen to uranium ratios well below the specified maximum limit of 2.015. (author)

  14. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  15. Potential aerosol generation mechanisms from damaged shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.

    1976-07-01

    Estimates of the potential airborne release of radioactive materials in transportation accidents are necessary to compare the safety in various shipping methods. To make such estimates, information is required on various aspects of the accident situation (physical and chemical characteristics of the source materials, forces/conditions imposed upon the source material by the accident, etc.). Published data which may be useful in estimating the fractional airborne release of radionuclides are discussed. Special emphasis is given to experimental data generated under conditions similar to those found under accident conditions. Estimates of the fractional airborne release of a liquid and a powder for particular accident scenarios are discussed to illustrate the application of the data

  16. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandini v. Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas-liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D3,2) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D3,2), within a span of 0.07-0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined.

  17. Removal of Aerosol Particles Generated from Vitrification Process for High-Level Liquid Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    加藤 功

    1990-01-01

    The vitrification technology has been developed for the high-level liquid waste (HLLW) from reprocessing nuclear spent fuel in PNC. The removal performance of the aerosol particles generated from the melting process was studied in a nonradioactive full-scale mock-up test facility (MTF). The off-gas treatment system consists of submerged bed scrubber (SBS), venturi scrubber, NOx absorber, high efficiency mist eliminater (HEME). Deoomtamination factors (DFs) were derived from the mass ratio of ...

  18. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  19. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H.

    2014-01-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D 3,2 ) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D 3,2 ), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol characteristics.

  20. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D{sub 3,2}), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol

  1. Hygroscopic properties of smoke-generated organic aerosol particles emitted in the marine atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wonaschütz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Eastern Pacific Emitted Aerosol Cloud Experiment (E-PEACE, a plume of organic aerosol was produced by a smoke generator and emitted into the marine atmosphere from aboard the R/V Point Sur. In this study, the hygroscopic properties and the chemical composition of the plume were studied at plume ages between 0 and 4 h in different meteorological conditions. In sunny conditions, the plume particles had very low hygroscopic growth factors (GFs: between 1.05 and 1.09 for 30 nm and between 1.02 and 1.1 for 150 nm dry size at a relative humidity (RH of 92%, contrasted by an average marine background GF of 1.6. New particles were produced in large quantities (several 10 000 cm−3, which lead to substantially increased cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations at supersaturations between 0.07 and 0.88%. Ratios of oxygen to carbon (O : C and water-soluble organic mass (WSOM increased with plume age: from −3, respectively, while organic mass fractions decreased slightly (~ 0.97 to ~ 0.94. High-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS spectra show that the organic fragment m/z 43 was dominated by C2H3O+ in the small, new particle mode and by C3H7+ in the large particle mode. In the marine background aerosol, GFs for 150 nm particles at 40% RH were found to be enhanced at higher organic mass fractions: an average GF of 1.06 was observed for aerosols with an organic mass fraction of 0.53, and a GF of 1.04 for an organic mass fraction of 0.35.

  2. Electricity generation with natural gas or with uranium?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva M, C.

    2009-10-01

    The program of works and investments of electric sector that actualize each year the Federal Commission of Electricity, include to the projects of electric power generating stations that will begin its commercial operation inside the horizon of the next ten years, in order to satisfy opportunely with appropriate reservation margins the demand of power and energy in the national interconnected system that grows year to year. In spite of its inherent advantages, in the electric sector prospective 2008-2017 are not considered explicitly to the nuclear power plants, except for the small amplification of capacity of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, that already is executing. In this context, the objective of this work is to present and to discuss arguments to favor and against the combined cycle and nuclear technologies, to indicate the risks and disadvantages in that it incurs the electric sector when leaning on so disproportionately on the fossil fuels for the electricity generation, in particular the natural gas, deferring to an indefinite future the installation of nuclear plants whose proven technology is economic, sure, clean and reliable and it contributes decisively to the national energy security. To mitigate the harmful effects of excessive dependence on natural gas to generate electric power, was propose alternatives to the expansion program of electric sector to year 2017, which would have as benefits the decrease of the annual total cost of electric power supply for public service, the significant reduction of natural gas imports and emissions reduction of CO 2 to the atmosphere. (Author)

  3. Rapid generation of protein aerosols and nanoparticles via surface acoustic wave atomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Mar; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie Y

    2008-01-01

    We describe the fabrication of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer and show its ability to generate monodisperse aerosols and particles for drug delivery applications. In particular, we demonstrate the generation of insulin liquid aerosols for pulmonary delivery and solid protein nanoparticles for transdermal and gastrointestinal delivery routes using 20 MHz SAW devices. Insulin droplets around 3 μm were obtained, matching the optimum range for maximizing absorption in the alveolar region. A new approach is provided to explain these atomized droplet diameters by returning to fundamental physical analysis and considering viscous-capillary and inertial-capillary force balance rather than employing modifications to the Kelvin equation under the assumption of parametric forcing that has been extended to these frequencies in past investigations. In addition, we consider possible mechanisms by which the droplet ejections take place with the aid of high-speed flow visualization. Finally, we show that nanoscale protein particles (50-100 nm in diameter) were obtained through an evaporative process of the initial aerosol, the final size of which could be controlled merely by modifying the initial protein concentration. These results illustrate the feasibility of using SAW as a novel method for rapidly producing particles and droplets with a controlled and narrow size distribution.

  4. Design of a recirculating radon progeny aerosol generation and animal exposure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Cuddihy, R.G.; Yeh, H.C.; Barr, E.B.; Boecker, B.B.

    1988-01-01

    Inhalation studies are being conducted at ITRI using laboratory animals exposed to radon-222 progeny attached to vector aerosols that are typical of indoor environments. The purpose of these studies is to identify the cells at risk from inhaled radon progeny and their locations within the respiratory tract. These studies require exposures up to 1000 working level months (WLM) within a few hours. Thus, large amounts of radium-226 are needed to produce the gaseous radon-222. A once-through-exposure-system was considered to be impractical because of statutory discharge limitations and the large amounts of radium that would be required. Therefore, a recirculating exposure system was designed and constructed that removes the aerosol after passing through the exposure chambers and recirculates purified air and radon. The purified radon is mixed with freshly evolving radon from a radon generator and passed Into a reaction-aging chamber where attachment of radon progeny to the vector aerosol occurs. The design includes: (1) 50-200 mg radium-226 in a radon generator, (2) 40 L/min total flow rate, (3) CO 2 removal, (4) reconstitution of oxygen tension and water vapor content to atmospheric levels, and (5) a trap for radon gas. A radon progeny exposure concentration in the range of 4,000 to 50,000 WL is being produced. (author)

  5. Simultaneous radiochemical determination of plutonium, strontium, uranium, and iron nuclides and application to atmospheric deposition and aerosol samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, G.; Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R. (Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz)

    1990-11-01

    A procedure for the sequential radiochemical determination of plutonium, strontium, uranium and iron nuclides is described. The separation is carried out on a single anion exchange column. Pu(IV), U(VI) and Fe(III) are fixed on Bio Rad AG 1-X4 from 9 mol/l HCl, while the sample effluent is used for the determination of radiostrontium. Fe and U are eluted separately with 7 mol/l HNO{sub 3}, and Pu(III) is eluted with 1.2 mol/l HCl containing hydrogen peroxide. Subsequently, Pu and U are electrolysed and counted by alpha spectrometry. Radiostrontium is purified by the nitrate method and counted in a low level beta proportional counter. Fe is purified by extraction and cation exchange and {sup 55}Fe is counted by X-ray spectrometry with a Si(Li) detector. The sample preparation and the application of the procedure to large samples, namely aerosols from 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of air, and monthly deposition samples from 0.6 m{sup 2} sampling area (10-100 l) are described. Chemical yields are for Pu 70 {plus minus} 20, for Sr 80 {plus minus} 15, for U 80-90, and for Fe 75 {plus minus} 10%. As an example, the maximum airborne radionuclide concentrations determined with that procedure in fortnightly collected samples at Neuherberg after the Chernobyl accident were: {sup 239+240}Pu, 2.58; {sup 238}Pu, 1.40; {sup 238}U, 0.65; {sup 234}U, 0.67; {sup 90}Sr, 7600; and {sup 55}Fe, 990 {mu}Bqm{sup -3}. With appropriate changes in sample preparation, the procedure is applicable to other kinds of samples. (orig.).

  6. Simultaneous radiochemical determination of plutonium, strontium, uranium, and iron nuclides and application to atmospheric deposition and aerosol samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, G.; Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure for the sequential radiochemical determination of plutonium, strontium, uranium and iron nuclides is described. The separation is carried out on a single anion exchange column. Pu(IV), U(VI) and Fe(III) are fixed on Bio Rad AG 1-X4 from 9 mol/l HCl, while the sample effluent is used for the determination of radiostrontium. Fe and U are eluted separately with 7 mol/l HNO 3 , and Pu(III) is eluted with 1.2 mol/l HCl containing hydrogen peroxide. Subsequently, Pu and U are electrolysed and counted by alpha spectrometry. Radiostrontium is purified by the nitrate method and counted in a low level beta proportional counter. Fe is purified by extraction and cation exchange and 55 Fe is counted by X-ray spectrometry with a Si(Li) detector. The sample preparation and the application of the procedure to large samples, namely aerosols from 10 5 m 3 of air, and monthly deposition samples from 0.6 m 2 sampling area (10-100 l) are described. Chemical yields are for Pu 70 ± 20, for Sr 80 ± 15, for U 80-90, and for Fe 75 ± 10%. As an example, the maximum airborne radionuclide concentrations determined with that procedure in fortnightly collected samples at Neuherberg after the Chernobyl accident were: 239+240 Pu, 2.58; 238 Pu, 1.40; 238 U, 0.65; 234 U, 0.67; 90 Sr, 7600; and 55 Fe, 990 μBqm -3 . With appropriate changes in sample preparation, the procedure is applicable to other kinds of samples. (orig.)

  7. Uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Voto, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the methodology and technology that are currently being used in varying degrees in uranium exploration activities worldwide. Since uranium is ubiquitous and occurs in trace amounts (0.2 to 5 ppm) in virtually all rocks of the crust of the earth, exploration for uranium is essentially the search of geologic environments in which geologic processes have produced unusual concentrations of uranium. Since the level of concentration of uranium of economic interest is dependent on the present and future price of uranium, it is appropriate here to review briefly the economic realities of uranium-fueled power generation. (author)

  8. Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battey, G.C.; McKay, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Production for 1986 was 4899 t U 3 O 8 (4154 t U), 30% greater than in 1985, mainly because of a 39% increase in production at Ranger. Exports for 1986 were 4166 t U 3 O 8 at an average f.o.b. unit value of $40.57/lb U 3 O 8 . Private exploration expenditure for uranium in Australia during the 1985-86 fiscal year was $50.2 million. Plans were announced to increase the nominal capacity of the processing plant at Ranger from 3000 t/year U 3 O 8 to 4500 t and later to 6000 t/year. Construction and initial mine development at Olympic Dam began in March. Production is planned for mid 1988 at an annual rate of 2000 t U 3 O 8 , 30 000 t Cu, and 90 000 oz (2800 kg) Au. The first long-term sales agreement was concluded in September 1986. At the Manyingee deposit, testing of the alkaline solution mining method was completed, and the treatment plant was dismantled. Spot market prices (in US$/lb U 3 O 8 ) quoted by Nuexco were generally stable. From January-October the exchange value fluctuated from US$17.00-US$17.25; for November and December it was US$16.75. Australia's Reasonably Assured Resources of uranium recoverable at less than US$80/kg U at December 1986 were estimated as 462 000 t U, 3000 t U less than in 1985. This represents 30% of the total low-cost RAR in the WOCA (World Outside the Centrally Planned Economy Areas) countries. Australia also has 257 000 t U in the low-cost Estimated Additional Resources Category I, 29% of the WOCA countries' total resources in this category

  9. Effect of solvent on in vitro dissolution: Summary of results for uranium, americium, and cobalt aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilmette, R.A.; Hoover, M.D.

    1995-12-01

    The revised 10 CFR Part 20 has adopted the ICRP Publication 30 method for calculating the committed effective dose equivalent from intakes of radionuclides. This dosimetry scheme requires knowledge or assumptions about the chemical form of the radionuclide, its particle size, and its known or assumed solubility. The solubility is classified as being either D (relatively soluble), W, or Y (relatively insoluble), depending on whether the material dissolves over periods of days, weeks, or years. Although Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensees may wish to take advantage of material-specific knowledge in order to adjust annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations, relatively few radioactive materials to which workers and the general population may be exposed have been adequately characterized either in terms of physicochemical form or solubility. Experimental measurement of solubility using some type of in vitro dissolution measurement system is therefore needed. However, there is currently no clear consensus regarding the appropriate design of in vitro dissolution systems, particularly when considering the range of different radionuclides to be studied, and the complexity of the biological mechanisms involved in the retention and clearance of inhaled deposited radioactive particles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the several solvents on the dissolution of four test aerosols ({sup 57}Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, {sup 241}AmO{sub 2}, ammonium diuranate [ADU], and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) selected to encompass a variety of chemical and biochemical properties in vivo. The results of this study provide some guidance on the usefulness of in vitro dissolution tests for estimating the solubility of unknown radionuclide particles within the context of a simple model such as the class D, W, and Y formulation of ICRP 30.

  10. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through April 1999

  11. Uranium oxide recycling to give more sustainable power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagger, R.; Garner, D.S.J.; Beaumont, D.M.; Hesketh, K.

    2001-01-01

    In broad terms there are two routes for irradiated nuclear fuel, the closed cycle involving recycling and the open cycle culminating in direct disposal. The benefits of following the closed cycle are presented. The environmental burdens associated with open and closed cycles are compared using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) for non-active burdens and human irradiation. Consideration is given to the extension of the nuclear fuel cycle to include a proportion of MOX fuel elements within a reactor core, and the impact in terms of total activity, waste volumes and Integrated Toxic Potential (ITP) discussed. The potential of moving to a fast reactor cycle is also raised in support of the recycling of spent nuclear fuel giving sustainable power generation. (author)

  12. Photoacoustic Optical Properties at UV, VIS, and near IR Wavelengths for Laboratory Generated and Winter Time Ambient Urban Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, M.; Arnott, W. P.; Zaveri, R. A.; Song, C.; Moosmuller, H.; Liu, L.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Chen, L.-W.A.; Green, M. C.; Watson, J. G.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the laboratory and ambient photoacoustic (PA) measurement of aerosol light absorption coefficients at ultraviolet wavelength (i.e., 355 nm) and compare with measurements at 405, 532, 870, and 1047 nm. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol light scattering coefficients were achieved by the integrating reciprocal nephelometer within the PA's acoustic resonator. Absorption and scattering measurements were carried out for various laboratory generated aerosols, including salt, incense, and kerosene soot to evaluate the instrument calibration and gain insight on the spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption and scattering. Ambient measurements were obtained in Reno, Nevada, between 18 December 2009 and 18 January 2010. The measurement period included days with and without strong ground level temperature inversions, corresponding to highly polluted (freshly emitted aerosols) and relatively clean (aged aerosols) conditions. Particulate matter (PM) concentrations were measured and analyzed with other tracers of traffic emissions. The temperature inversion episodes caused very high concentration of PM (sub 2.5) and PM( sub 10) (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 micrometers and 10 micrometers, respectively) and gaseous pollutants: carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The diurnal change of absorption and scattering coefficients during the polluted (inversion) days increased approximately by a factor of two for all wavelengths compared to the clean days. The spectral variation in aerosol absorption coefficients indicated a significant amount of absorbing aerosol from traffic emissions and residential wood burning. The analysis of single scattering albedo (SSA), Angstrom exponent of absorption (AEA), and Angstrom exponent of scattering (AES) for clean and polluted days provides evidences that the aerosol aging and coating process is suppressed by strong temperature inversion under cloudy conditions. In

  13. The PSI Artist Project: Aerosol Retention and Accident Management Issues Following a Steam Generator Tube Rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guntay, Salih; Dehbi, Abdel; Suckow, Detlef; Birchley, Jon

    2002-01-01

    Steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) incidents, such as those, which occurred in various operating pressurized, water reactors in the past, are serious operational concerns and remain among the most risk-dominant events. Although considerable efforts have been spent to understand tube degradation processes, develop improved modes of operation, and take preventative and corrective measures, SGTR incidents cannot be completely ruled out. Under certain conditions, high releases of radionuclides to the environment are possible during design basis accidents (DBA) and severe accidents. The severe accident codes' models for aerosol retention in the secondary side of a steam generator (SG) have not been assessed against any experimental data, which means that the uncertainties in the source term following an un-isolated SGTR concurrent with a severe accident are not currently quantified. The accident management (AM) procedures aim at avoiding or minimizing the release of fission products from the SG. The enhanced retention of activity within the SG defines the effectiveness of the accident management actions for the specific hardware characteristics and accident conditions of concern. A sound database on aerosol retention due to natural processes in the SG is not available, nor is an assessment of the effect of management actions on these processes. Hence, the effectiveness of the AM in SGTR events is not presently known. To help reduce uncertainties relating to SGTR issues, an experimental project, ARTIST (Aerosol Trapping In a Steam generator), has been initiated at the Paul Scherrer Institut to address aerosol and droplet retention in the various parts of the SG. The test section is comprised of a scaled-down tube bundle, a full-size separator and a full-size dryer unit. The project will study phenomena at the separate effect and integral levels and address AM issues in seven distinct phases: Aerosol retention in 1) the broken tube under dry secondary side conditions, 2

  14. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  15. Development of uranium reduction system for incineration residue generated at LWR nuclear fuel fabrication plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampei, T.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, N.; Kai, H.; Hirata, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The major portion of combustible solid wastes generated at LWR nuclear fuel fabrication plants in Japan is incinerated and stored in a warehouse. The uranium content in the incineration residue is higher compared with other categories of wastes, although only a small amount of incineration residue is generated. Hence, in the future uranium should be removed from incineration residues before they are reduced to a level appropriate for the final disposal. A system for processing the incineration residue for uranium removal has been developed and tested based on the information obtained through laboratory experiments and engineering scale tests

  16. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  17. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  18. Development of the aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition behavior of radioaerosol emitted by the accident of FDNPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A large amount of radioactivity was discharged by the accident of FDNPP. The long half-life radionuclide, 137Cs was transported through the atmosphere mainly as the aerosol form and deposited to the forests in Fukushima prefecture. After the dry deposition of the 137Cs, the foliar uptake process would occur. To evaluate environmental transfer of radionuclides, the dry deposition and following foliar uptake is very important. There are some pioneering studies for radionuclide foliar uptake with attaching the solution containing stable target element on the leaf, however, cesium oxide aerosols were used for these deposition study [1]. In the FDNPP case, 137Cs was transported in sulfate aerosol form [2], so the oxide aerosol behaviors could not represent the actual deposition behavior in this accident. For evaluation of whole behavior of 137Cs in vegetation system, fundamental data for deposition and uptake process of sulfate aerosol was desired. In this study, we developed aerosol generation system for simulating the dry deposition and the foliar uptake behaviors of aerosol in the different chemical constitutions. In this system, the method of aerosol generation based on the spray drying. Solution contained 137Cs was send to a nozzle by a syringe pump and spraying with a high speed air flow. The sprayed mist was generated in a chamber in the relatively high temperature. The solution in the mist was dried quickly, and micro size solid aerosols consisting 137Cs were generated. The aerosols were suctioned by an ejector and transported inside a tube by the dry air flow, then were directly blown onto the leaves. The experimental condition, such as the size of chamber, chamber temperature, solution flow rate, air flow rate and so on, were optimized. In the deposition experiment, the aerosols on leaves were observed by a SEM/EDX system and the deposition amount was evaluated by measuring the stable Cs remaining on leaf. In the presentation, we will discuss the detail

  19. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stachlewska Iwona S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  20. Near-Range Receiver Unit of Next Generation PollyXT Used with Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar in Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Ritter, Christoph; Neuber, Roland; Heese, Birgit; Engelmann, Ronny; Linne, Holger

    2016-06-01

    The Near-range Aerosol Raman lidar (NARLa) receiver unit, that was designed to enhance the detection range of the NeXT generation PollyXT Aerosol-Depolarization-Raman (ADR) lidar of the University of Warsaw, was employed next the Koldeway Aerosol Raman Lidar (KARL) at the AWI-IPEV German-French station in Arctic during Spring 2015. Here we introduce shortly design of both lidars, the scheme of their installation next to each other, and preliminary results of observations aiming at arctic haze investigation by the lidars and the iCAP a set of particle counter and aethalometer installed under a tethered balloon.

  1. Effects of generation time on spray aerosol transport and deposition in models of the mouth-throat geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael; Das Choudhuri, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    For most newly developed spray aerosol inhalers, the generation time is a potentially important variable that can be fully controlled. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spray aerosol generation time on transport and deposition in a standard induction port (IP) and more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a representative system in which spray momentum was expected to significantly impact deposition. Sectional and total depositions in the IP and MT geometries were assessed at a constant CAG flow rate of 25 mg/sec for aerosol generation times of 1, 2, and 4 sec using both in vitro experiments and a previously developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Both the in vitro and numerical results indicated that extending the generation time of the spray aerosol, delivered at a constant mass flow rate, significantly reduced deposition in the IP and more realistic MT geometry. Specifically, increasing the generation time of the CAG system from 1 to 4 sec reduced the deposition fraction in the IP and MT geometries by approximately 60 and 33%, respectively. Furthermore, the CFD predictions of deposition fraction were found to be in good agreement with the in vitro results for all times considered in both the IP and MT geometries. The numerical results indicated that the reduction in deposition fraction over time was associated with temporal dissipation of what was termed the spray aerosol "burst effect." Based on these results, increasing the spray aerosol generation time, at a constant mass flow rate, may be an effective strategy for reducing deposition in the standard IP and in more realistic MT geometries.

  2. Adaptive response of Chironomus riparius populations exposed to uranium contaminated sediments during consecutive generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, V.

    2010-01-01

    The intensity of selection on populations caused by polluted environment often exceeds which is caused by an unpolluted environment. Therefore, micro evolution can occur in response to this anthropic-directional force over a short period. In this context, this thesis focused on studying phenotypic changes in Chironomus riparius populations exposed during several consecutive generations to uranium-contaminated sediments. In laboratory-controlled conditions experiments were conducted with same origin populations exposed to a range of uranium concentration inducing toxic effects. Over eight-generations of exposure, life-history traits measures revealed micro evolution in exposed populations, including increase of adult reproductive success. Other experiments (acute toxicity test, common garden experiment) performed in parallel enabled to link these micro evolution with a tolerance induction, as a consequence of genetic adaptation. Nonetheless this adaptation also induced cost in terms of fitness and genetic diversity for pre-exposed populations. These results lead to the hypothesis of a selection by uranium that acted sequentially on populations. They also underline the need to better-understand the adaptive mechanisms to better assess the ecological consequences of chronic exposure of populations to a pollutant. (author)

  3. The impact of recirculation, ventilation and filters on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadeyi, M.O.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the impact of recirculation rates (7 and 14 h(-1)), ventilation rates (1 and 2 h(-1)), and filtration on secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) generated by ozone of outdoor origin reacting with limonene of indoor origin. Experiments were conducted within a recirculating air handling......, but this was more than offset by the increased dilution of SOA derived from ozone-initiated chemistry. The presence of a particle filter (new or used) strikingly lowered SOA number and mass concentrations compared with conditions when no filter was present. Even though the particle filter in this study had only 35...

  4. Separation of adhered salt from uranium deposits generated in electro-refiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.W.; Park, K.M.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, J.G.; Ahn, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    It is important to increase a throughput of the salt removal process from uranium deposits which is generated on the solid cathode of electro-refiner in pyroprocess. In this study, it was proposed to increase the throughput of the salt removal process by the separation of the liquid salt prior to the distillation of the LiCl-KCl eutectic salt from the uranium deposits. The feasibility of liquid salt separation was examined by salt separation experiments on a stainless steel sieve. It was found that the amount of salt to be distilled could be reduced by the liquid salt separation prior to the salt distillation. The residual salt remained in the deposits after the liquid salt separation was successfully removed further by the vacuum distillation. It was concluded that the combination of a liquid salt separation and a vacuum distillation is an effective route for the achievement of a high throughput performance in the salt separation process. (author)

  5. On the changing petroleum generation properties of Alum Shale over geological time caused by uranium irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengyu; Schulz, Hans-Martin; Horsfield, Brian; Schovsbo, Niels H.; Noah, Mareike; Panova, Elena; Rothe, Heike; Hahne, Knut

    2018-05-01

    An interdisciplinary study was carried out to unravel organic-inorganic interactions caused by the radiogenic decay of uranium in the immature organic-rich Alum Shale (Middle Cambrian-Lower Ordovician). Based on pyrolysis experiments, uranium content is positively correlated with the gas-oil ratios and the aromaticities of both the free hydrocarbons residing in the rock and the pyrolysis products from its kerogen, indicating that irradiation has had a strong influence on organic matter composition overall and hence on petroleum potential. The Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometry data reveal that macro-molecules in the uranium-rich Alum Shale samples are less alkylated than less irradiated counterparts, providing further evidence for structural alteration by α-particle bombardment. In addition, oxygen containing-compounds are enriched in the uranium-rich samples but are not easily degradable into low-molecular-weight products due to irradiation-induced crosslinking. Irradiation has induced changes in organic matter composition throughout the shale's entire ca. 500 Ma history, irrespective of thermal history. This factor has to be taken into account when reconstructing petroleum generation history. The Alum Shale's kerogen underwent catagenesis in the main petroleum kitchen area 420-340 Ma bp. Our calculations suggest the kerogen was much more aliphatic and oil-prone after deposition than that after extensive exposure to radiation. In addition, the gas sorption capacity of the organic matter in the Alum Shale can be assumed to have been less developed during Palaeozoic times, in contrast to results gained by sorption experiments performed at the present day, for the same reason. The kerogen reconstruction method developed here precludes overestimations of gas generation and gas retention in the Alum Shale by taking irradiation exposure into account and can thus significantly mitigate charge risk when applied in the explorations for both

  6. Physicochemical characteristics of aerosol particles generated during the milling of beryllium silicate ores: implications for risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Chipera, Steve J; Day, Gregory A; Sabey, Phil; Dickerson, Robert M; Sbarra, Deborah C; Duling, Mathew G; Lawrence, Robert B; Stanton, Marcia L; Scripsick, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation of beryllium dusts generated during milling of ores and cutting of beryl-containing gemstones is associated with development of beryllium sensitization and low prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Inhalation of beryllium aerosols generated during primary beryllium production and machining of the metal, alloys, and ceramics are associated with sensitization and high rates of CBD, despite similar airborne beryllium mass concentrations among these industries. Understanding the physicochemical properties of exposure aerosols may help to understand the differential immunopathologic mechanisms of sensitization and CBD and lead to more biologically relevant exposure standards. Properties of aerosols generated during the industrial milling of bertrandite and beryl ores were evaluated. Airborne beryllium mass concentrations among work areas ranged from 0.001 microg/m(3) (beryl ore grinding) to 2.1 microg/m(3) (beryl ore crushing). Respirable mass fractions of airborne beryllium-containing particles were 80% in high-energy input areas (beryl melting, beryl grinding). Particle specific surface area decreased with processing from feedstock ores to drumming final product beryllium hydroxide. Among work areas, beryllium was identified in three crystalline forms: beryl, poorly crystalline beryllium oxide, and beryllium hydroxide. In comparison to aerosols generated by high-CBD risk primary production processes, aerosol particles encountered during milling had similar mass concentrations, generally lower number concentrations and surface area, and contained no identifiable highly crystalline beryllium oxide. One possible explanation for the apparent low prevalence of CBD among workers exposed to beryllium mineral dusts may be that characteristics of the exposure material do not contribute to the development of lung burdens sufficient for progression from sensitization to CBD. In comparison to high-CBD risk exposures where the chemical nature of aerosol

  7. In-duct countermeasures for reducing fire-generated-smoke-aerosol exposure to HEPA filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvares, N.J.; Beason, D.G.; Ford, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to assess the endurance and lifetime of HEPA filters exposed to fire-generated aerosols, and to reduce the aerosol exposure by installing engineering countermeasures in the duct between the fire source and HEPA filters. Large cribs of wood and other potential fuels of interest were ''forcefully burned'' in a partially ventilated enclosure. In a ''forceful burn'' the crib of fuel is continuously exposed to an energetic premixed methane flame during the entire experimental period. This tactic serves two purposes: it optimizes the production of smoke rich in unburned pyrolyzates which provides severe exposure to the filters, and it facilitates the ignition and enhances the combustion of cribs formed with synthetic polymers. The experiments were conducted in an enclosure specifically designed and instrumented for fire tests. The test cell has a volume of 100 m 3 and includes instrumentation to measure the internal temperature distribution, pressure, thermal radiation field, flow fields, gas concentration, particulate size distribution and mass, fuel weight loss, inlet and exit air velocities, and smoke optical density. The countermeasure techniques include the use of passively operated sprinkler systems in the fire test cell, of fine and dense water scrubbing sprays, and of rolling prefiltration systems in the exit duct of the fire test cell. Of the countermeasures surveyed, the rolling prefilter system showed the most promise. This paper concentrates on the effect of control variables; i.e., enclosure air supply, fuel composition and crib porosity on the combustion response; i.e., crib burning rate, enclosure temperature rise, oxygen consumption, and CO, CO 2 and total hydrocarbon production. A discussion of the attempts to rationalize smoke aerosol properties will be included along with results from the effect of countermeasure application on HEPA filter lifetimes

  8. Proceedings of the 1998 Scientific Conference on Obscuration and Aerosol Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coverstone, Amy

    1999-01-01

    ...: Aerosol Particle Generation and Dynamics, Aerosol Characterization Methods-Aerosol Samplers and Collectors, Preparing, Aerosolizing and Characterizing Erwinia Herbicola, and Optical Properties of Aerosols...

  9. Scintiphotography of lungs with dry aerosol--generation and delivery system: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotrappa, P.; Raghunath, B.; Subramanyam, P.S.S.; Raikar, U.R.; Sharma, S.M.

    1977-01-01

    A compressed-air nebulizer with low holdup and high output was used to nebulize [/sup 99m/Tc] pertechnetate presented in normal saline. Generated droplets were dried in line and led to an inhalation chamber from which the dry aerosol was inhaled using a nose or mouth inhalation unit. The mass median diameter of the particles was 0.8 microns, with an associated geometric standard deviation of 2.0. The deep lung delivery efficiency--defined as the ratio of the activity deposited in the lung area to the activity nebulized--was found to be reproducible and consistent (15 to 22%) in all the subjects studied. A 3 to 5 min inhalation of aerosol, nebulized from 20 mCi, was sufficient to provide a lung image of good information density. No noticeable deposit was seen in the trachea or major bronchi. The system is inexpensive, stable in performance, adaptable to other solutions or colloids, and is promising for routine use

  10. Evaporation Kinetics of Laboratory Generated Secondary Organic Aerosols at Elevated Relative Humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2015-01-06

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) dominate atmospheric organic aerosols that affect climate, air quality, and health. Recent studies indicate that, contrary to previously held assumptions, at low relative humidity (RH) these particles are semi-solid and evaporate orders of magnitude slower than expected. Elevated relative humidity has the potential to affect significantly formation, properties, and atmospheric evolution of SOA particles. Here we present a study of the effect of RH on the room-temperature evaporation kinetics of SOA particles formed by ozonolysis of α-pinene and limonene. Experiments were carried out on SOA particles generated, evaporated, and aged at 0%, 50% and 90% RH. We find that in all cases evaporation begins with a relatively fast phase, during which 30% to 70% of the particle mass evaporates in 2 hours, followed by a much slower evaporation rate. Evaporation kinetics at 0% and 50% RH are nearly the same, while at 90% RH a slightly larger fraction evaporates. In all cases, aging the particles prior to inducing evaporation reduces the evaporative losses, with aging at elevated RH leading to more significant effect. In all cases, SOA evaporation is nearly size-independent, providing direct evidence that oligomers play a crucial role in determining the evaporation kinetics.

  11. The generation of diesel exhaust particle aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Cooney

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Cooney1, Anthony J Hickey21Department of Biomedical Engineering; 2School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: The influence of diesel exhaust particles (DEP on the lungs and heart is currently a topic of great interest in inhalation toxicology. Epidemiological data and animal studies have implicated airborne particulate matter and DEP in increased morbidity and mortality due to a number of cardiopulmonary diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, and lung cancer. The pathogeneses of these diseases are being studied using animal models and cell culture techniques. Real-time exposures to freshly combusted diesel fuel are complex and require significant infrastructure including engine operations, dilution air, and monitoring and control of gases. A method of generating DEP aerosols from a bulk source in an aerodynamic size range similar to atmospheric DEP would be a desirable and useful alternative. Metered dose inhaler technology was adopted to generate aerosols from suspensions of DEP in the propellant hydrofluoroalkane 134a. Inertial impaction data indicated that the particle size distributions of the generated aerosols were trimodal, with count median aerodynamic diameters less than 100 nm. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited particles showed tightly aggregated particles, as would be expected from an evaporative process. Chemical analysis indicated that there were no major changes in the mass proportion of 2 specific aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]fluoranthene in the particles resulting from the aerosolization process.Keywords: diesel exhaust particles, aerosol, inhalation toxicology

  12. Current Status of Aerosol Generation and Measurement Facilities for the Verification Test of Containment Filtered Venting System in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the design of aerosol generation and measurement systems are explained and present circumstances are also described. In addition, the aerosol test plan is shown. Containment Filtered Venting System (FCVS) is one of the safety features to reduce the amount of released fission product into the environment by depressurizing the containment. Since Chernobyl accident, the regulatory agency in several countries in Europe such as France, Germany, Sweden, etc. have been demanded the installation of the CFVS. Moreover, the feasibility study on the CFVS was also performed in U.S. After the Fukushima accident, there is a need to improve a containment venting or installation of depressurizing facility in Korea. As a part of a Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) project, KAERI has been conducted the integrated performance verification test of CFVS. As a part of the test, aerosol generation system and measurement systems were designed to simulate the fission products behavior. To perform the integrated verification test of CFVS, aerosol generation and measurement system was designed and manufactured. The component operating condition is determined to consider the severe accident condition. The test will be performed in normal conditions at first, and will be conducted under severe condition, high pressure and high temperature. Undesirable difficulties which disturb the elaborate test are expected, such as thermophoresis on the pipe, vapor condensation on aerosol, etc.

  13. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through June 1999. A decontamination factor for the RMCS exhauster filter housing is calculated based on operation data

  14. Double-layer structure model of the uranium generating bed in the land basins of the northwestern China and its significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhilong

    1988-04-01

    The paper puts forward a double layer structure model of uranium generating bed in the land basins of Northwestern China, i.e. uranium ganerating bed = source layer of uranium+gathering uranium layer. The mechanism of its formation: Feldspar was hydromicatized. Some feldspar, quarts detrital silicate minerals were replaced to redden by the authigenesis of hematite and goethite. In the course of the oxidation, a little uranium is released from the detrital minerals. Because of the oxidation environment, the released uranium wasn't able to be precipitated, only to diffuse to the adjacent grey bed which has low Eh value with uranium-bearing 'stagnant water' fixed in pores during the dewatering process of the diagenesis and form minable uranium deposit. The significance of the model for uranium prospecting are as follows: (1) Uranium source range is much expanded concerning ruanium prospecting in sandstone. (2) For the potential assessment of basin and the selection of potential area, the model is an important prospecting criterion. (3) By using the main criterion uranium-generating bed-arkosic red beds well, the buried ore bodies can be found provided that arkosic red beds were regarded as a significant criterion of uranium-generating bed

  15. Super long-term scenario of world nuclear power generation and uranium supply and demand until 2030 and further 2100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Ryoichi; Kakinoki, Tatsuro

    2007-01-01

    Based on latest nuclear policy and development trend in each country in the world, quantity of nuclear power generation and the uranium supply and demand until 2030 and further 2100 were predicted. As a result, the introduction of nuclear power stations spreads around Asia until 2030. The limitation on the uranium resources clearly does not exist until 2030, but a development period of around 10 years is necessary for exploitation of uranium resources. If timely development investment does not advance, it may invite shortage of uranium supply and promote a remarkable rise of uranium supply price. If the reinforcement of the anti-global warming measure and the diversification of the energy source advance at the super long-term time span called 2100, the world coal power largely decreases and the introduction of the nuclear power enlarges steadily. Introduction of the light water reactor (LWR) extends until 2080 since the fuel uses uranium resources of about 70 year ratio of reserves to production, but quantity of LWR power stations and power generation changes for the decrease due to the limitation of uranium resources after it. On the other hand, sustained expansion of the plutonium utilization by the fuel cycle technology and the introduction of the fast breeder reactor (FBR) advance after 2050. Then the sustained expansion of nuclear power is surely expected to occupy the first share of power generation in 2100. On this account it is necessary to push forward the plutonium use, backend technology and FBR development globally, and Japan is expected to carry a positive role to lead international nuclear energy technology development as a nuclear energy developed nation. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Effects of hydrocarbon generation on fluid flow in the Ordos Basin and its relationship to uranium mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunji Xue

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ordos Basin of North China is not only an important uranium mineralization province, but also a major producer of oil, gas and coal in China. The genetic relationship between uranium mineralization and hydrocarbons has been recognized by a number of previous studies, but it has not been well understood in terms of the hydrodynamics of basin fluid flow. We have demonstrated in a previous study that the preferential localization of Cretaceous uranium mineralization in the upper part of the Ordos Jurassic section may have been related to the interface between an upward flowing, reducing fluid and a downward flowing, oxidizing fluid. This interface may have been controlled by the interplay between fluid overpressure related to disequilibrium sediment compaction and which drove the upward flow, and topographic relief, which drove the downward flow. In this study, we carried out numerical modeling for the contribution of oil and gas generation to the development of fluid overpressure, in addition to sediment compaction and heating. Our results indicate that when hydrocarbon generation is taken into account, fluid overpressure during the Cretaceous was more than doubled in comparison with the simulation when hydrocarbon generation was not considered. Furthermore, fluid overpressure dissipation at the end of sedimentation slowed down relative to the no-hydrocarbon generation case. These results suggest that hydrocarbon generation may have played an important role in uranium mineralization, not only in providing reducing agents required for the mineralization, but also in contributing to the driving force to maintain the upward flow.

  17. Effects of potential once-through improvements on the uranium utilization in the closed LWR cycle assuming self generated recycling of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This paper is concerned with potential improvements to the resource utilization of current generation light water reactors operating on a closed U/Pu fuel cycle. Only those modifications to existing systems layout and fuel cycle practise are discussed that have been considered in Working Group 8 A for the once-through cycle. The objective is to give an impression how much the difference in resource utilization between the once-through and the closed U/Pu cycle were changed if both cycles were reoptimized independantly from each other with respect to uranium consumption. No commercial recycling of U/Pu has been taken place to date in 1300 MWe light water reactors. The feasibility of thermal recycling has been demonstrated however on an industrial scale in reactors of the 300 MWe class. (Obrigheim, Gundremmingen). From this experience and from extensive design calculations it has been concluded that for Pu bearing fuel assemblies of 1300 MWe plants it would be favorable to use the same structural layout and similar fuel management procedures as for uranium assemblies. This would result in plant life-time averaged uranium savings on the order of 35 - 40 % relative to the once-through cycle in case of the Self Generated Recycling Mode

  18. Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables

  19. Characterization of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in uranium mill operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of long-lived radioactive dust clouds generated in several mechanical and physico-chemical operations in a uranium mill have been investigated. The study consisted of the determination of dust size distribution, and of the radionuclides contained in the particles of each dimension class ranging from <0.1 to 26 μm in diameter. Experiments were conducted using several cascade impactors operating at different sample flow rates. Two different types of cascade impactors were used. Radionuclide identification was done using α-spectrometry and γ-spectrometry. Long-lived and short-lived radionuclides were identified in dust samples. The characteristics of the dust clouds depended on the mill operation. The following operations were studied: crushing (vibrating grizzly, jaw crusher, cone crusher); screening; ore transportation; grinding; acid leaching; counter-current decantation; yellowcake precipitation and drying; and yellowcake packaging. In addition, other dust and radioactivity measurements have been carried out

  20. Effects on potential once-through improvements on the uranium utilisation in the closed LWR cycle assuming self-generated recycling of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the mode of operation of a reference 1300 MW(e) PWR operating on self-generating U/Pu recycle and then considers the uranium saving which might be achieved by introducing a number of improvements in design and operation which have been suggested for the once-through cycle. These are: Increased burnup, lattice changes, spectrum shift, enrichment zoning including blankets, full use of early batches of start-up core, improved fuel management and control design, end of cycle coastdown, reconstitution and inversion of BWR fuel, more frequent refueling. The paper concludes that if both the once-through cycle and recycle in the SGR mode were improved to the optimum extent recycle would offer 25-30% uranium savings compared to the once-through cycle

  1. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    -micron filter assemblies. There was no aerosol generation for the case of all air, so the plateout, condensate and smoke were all zero. For the case of all steam, there was very little plateout in the superheated regions (several percent) and the rest of the aerosol was collected in the condensate from the condenser. There was no smoke discharge into the filters. For the experiments with intermediate air-steam fractions, there was some aerosol plateout, considerable aerosol in the condensate and aerosol smoke discharged from the condenser with the escaping air.

  2. Chemical and isotopic composition of secondary organic aerosol generated by alpha-pinene ozonolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meusinger, Carl; Dusek, Ulrike; King, Stephanie M.; Holzinger, Rupert; Rosenorn, Thomas; Sperlich, Peter; Julien, Maxime; Remaud, Gerald S.; Bilde, Merete; Rockmann, Thomas; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a central role in air pollution and climate. However, the description of the sources and mechanisms leading to SOA is elusive despite decades of research. While stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to constrain sources of ambient aerosol, in many cases

  3. Simulation test of aerosol generation from vessels in the pre-treatment system of fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujine, Sachio; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kihara, Takehiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Aerosol concentration and droplet size are measured in off-gas of vessel under various conditions by changing off-gas flow rate, stirring air flow rate, salts concentration and temperature of nitrate solution. Aerosols are also measured under evaporation and air-lift operation. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Inflammatory responses to secondary organic aerosols (SOA generated from biogenic and anthropogenic precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Tuet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary health implications resulting from exposure to secondary organic aerosols (SOA, which comprise a significant fraction of ambient particulate matter (PM, have received increasing interest in recent years. In this study, alveolar macrophages were exposed to SOA generated from the photooxidation of biogenic and anthropogenic precursors (isoprene, α-pinene, β-caryophyllene, pentadecane, m-xylene, and naphthalene under different formation conditions (RO2 + HO2 vs. RO2 + NO dominant, dry vs. humid. Various cellular responses were measured, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS production and secreted levels of cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6. SOA precursor identity and formation condition affected all measured responses in a hydrocarbon-specific manner. With the exception of naphthalene SOA, cellular responses followed a trend where TNF-α levels reached a plateau with increasing IL-6 levels. ROS/RNS levels were consistent with relative levels of TNF-α and IL-6, due to their respective inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Exposure to naphthalene SOA, whose aromatic-ring-containing products may trigger different cellular pathways, induced higher levels of TNF-α and ROS/RNS than suggested by the trend. Distinct cellular response patterns were identified for hydrocarbons whose photooxidation products shared similar chemical functionalities and structures, which suggests that the chemical structure (carbon chain length and functionalities of photooxidation products may be important for determining cellular effects. A positive nonlinear correlation was also detected between ROS/RNS levels and previously measured DTT (dithiothreitol activities for SOA samples. In the context of ambient samples collected during summer and winter in the greater Atlanta area, all laboratory-generated SOA produced similar or higher levels of ROS/RNS and DTT activities. These results

  5. Laboratory studies on leaching of low grade uranium ores and treatment of low level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palabrica, O.T.; Antonino, E.J.; Caluag, L.A.; Villamater, D.

    1980-07-01

    Acid leaching experiments of preconcentrated uranium ore were carried out at a pulp density of 50% solids, using sulfuric acid with sodium chlorate as oxidant. The different leaching parameters considered in this work were temperature, oxidant level and leaching time. In the experimental procedure, the concentration of oxidant and the temperature were varied to determine how they affect the leaching process. Experimental results are illustrated in tabulated form for better interpretation. Uranium analyses were done by fluorimetric and delayed-neutron activation analysis. An anion exchange method using Dowex 1 x 8, 200-400 mesh (Cl - ) was used in treating the low-level liquid waste generated by leaching experiments. The purpose of this treatment was to minimize radioactive contamination in the waste materials and also to recover some of the uranium left in the liquid waste. (author)

  6. Chemical Properties of Brown Carbon Aerosol Generated at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Womack, C.; Franchin, A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Wagner, N.; Manfred, K.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol scattering and absorption are still among the largest uncertainties in quantifying radiative forcing. Biomass burning is a major source of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol in the United States. These aerosol are generally classified into two categories: black carbon (graphitic-like aerosol that absorbs broadly across the ultraviolet and visible spectral regions) and brown carbon (organic aerosol that absorbs strongly in the ultraviolet and near-visible spectral regions). The composition, volatility, and chemical aging of brown carbon are poorly known, but are important to understanding its radiative effects. We deployed three novel instruments to the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in 2016 to measure brown carbon absorption: a photoacoustic spectrometer, broadband cavity enhanced spectrometer, and particle-into-liquid sampler coupled to a liquid waveguide capillary cell. The instruments sampled from a shared inlet with well-characterized dilution and thermal denuding. We sampled smoke from 32 controlled burns of fuels relevant to western U.S. wildfires. We use these measurements to determine the volatility of water-soluble brown carbon, and compare this to the volatility of water-soluble organic aerosol and total organic aerosol. We further examine the wavelength-dependence of the water-soluble brown carbon absorption as a function of denuder temperature. Together this gives new information about the solubility, volatility, and chemical composition of brown carbon.

  7. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  8. A new nebulization device with exchangeable aerosol generation mode as a useful tool to investigate sample introduction processes in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotti, Marco; Lagomarsino, Cristina; Frache, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    A new sample introduction device has been designed in order to differentiate between the effects of the aerosol production and its following desolvation on analytical performances of an inductively coupled plasma optical spectrometer. This research tool allows to easily switch between the pneumatic and ultrasonic aerosol generation mode and to use a joint desolvation chamber. In this way, a real comparison between aerosol production systems may be attained and the influence of aerosol generation process on analytical figures clearly distinguished from that of the desolvation process. In this work, the separate effects of the aerosol generation and desolvation processes on analytical sensitivity and tolerance towards matrix effects have been investigated. Concerning sensitivity, it was found that both the processes play an important role in determining emission intensities, being the increase in sensitivity due to desolvation higher than that due to the improved aerosol generation efficiency. Concerning the matrix effects, a predominant role of the desolvation system was found, while the influence of the aerosol generation mode was much less important. For nitric acid, the decreasing effect was mitigated by the presence of a desolvation system, due to partial removal of the acid. On the contrary, the depressive effect of sulfuric acid was enhanced by the presence of a desolvation system, due to degradation of the solvent removal efficiency and to further decrease in the analyte transport rate caused by clustering phenomena. Concerning the interferences due to sodium and calcium, a depressive effect was observed, which is enhanced by desolvation

  9. The organic fraction of bubble-generated, accumulation mode Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Modini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have detected a dominant accumulation mode (~100 nm in the Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA number distribution. There is evidence to suggest that particles in this mode are composed primarily of organics. To investigate this hypothesis we conducted experiments on NaCl, artificial SSA and natural SSA particles with a Volatility-Hygroscopicity-Tandem-Differential-Mobility-Analyser (VH-TDMA. NaCl particles were atomiser generated and a bubble generator was constructed to produce artificial and natural SSA particles. Natural seawater samples for use in the bubble generator were collected from biologically active, terrestrially-affected coastal water in Moreton Bay, Australia. Differences in the VH-TDMA-measured volatility curves of artificial and natural SSA particles were used to investigate and quantify the organic fraction of natural SSA particles. Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF data, also obtained by the VH-TDMA, were used to confirm the conclusions drawn from the volatility data. Both datasets indicated that the organic fraction of our natural SSA particles evaporated in the VH-TDMA over the temperature range 170–200 °C. The organic volume fraction for 71–77 nm natural SSA particles was 8±6%. Organic volume fraction did not vary significantly with varying water residence time (40 s to 24 h in the bubble generator or SSA particle diameter in the range 38–173 nm. At room temperature we measured shape- and Kelvin-corrected HGF at 90% RH of 2.46±0.02 for NaCl, 2.35±0.02 for artifical SSA and 2.26±0.02 for natural SSA particles. Overall, these results suggest that the natural accumulation mode SSA particles produced in these experiments contained only a minor organic fraction, which had little effect on hygroscopic growth. Our measurement of 8±6% is an order of magnitude below two previous measurements of the organic fraction in SSA particles of comparable sizes. We stress that our results were obtained using coastal seawater and

  10. Use of air sampling data from uranium mills to estimate respiratory tract deposition rates for inhaled yellowcake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidson, A.F.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium aerosols generated during normal yellowcake packaging operations were sampled at four uranium mills. Samplers located in the packaging area were operated before, during and after drums of dried yellowcake were filled and sealed. Mediar aerosol concentrations ranged from 0.04 μg U/l to 0.34 μg U/1 during the routine packaging operations at the four mills. The aerosols were heterogeneous and included a broad range of particle sizes. Both the concentrations and particle size distributions varied with time. Aerosol characteristics could often be related to individual packaging steps. Sampling of yellowcake by hand from a filled open drum to measure the yellowcake moisture content need not pose a unique hazard to the operator. The combined results show that appreciable amounts of airborne uranium would be expected to deposit in the nasopharyngeal compartment of the respiratory tract if inhaled by a worker not wearing respiratory protection

  11. ARI3SG: Aerosol retention in the secondary side of a steam generator. Part II: Model validation and uncertainty analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Claudia; Herranz, Luis E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Validation of a model (ARI3SG) for the aerosol retention in the break stage of a steam generator under SGTR conditions. ► Interpretation of the experimental SGTR and CAAT data by using the ARI3SG model. ► Assessment of the epistemic and stochastic uncertainties effect on the ARI3SG results. - Abstract: A large body of data has been gathered in the last decade through the EU-SGTR, ARTIST and ARTIST 2 projects for aerosol retention in the steam generator during SGTR severe accident sequences. At the same time the attempt to extend the analytical capability has resulted in models that need to be validated. The ARI3SG is one of such developments and it has been built to estimate the aerosol retention in the break stage of a “dry” steam generator. This paper assesses the ARI3SG predictability by comparing its estimates to open data and by analyzing the effect of associated uncertainties. Datamodel comparison has been shown to be satisfactory and highlight the potential use of an ARI3SG-like formulation in system codes.

  12. Uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubini, L.A.; Asem, M.A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The historical development of the uranium market is present in two periods: The initial period 1947-1970 and from 1970 onwards, with the establishment of a commercial market. The world uranium requirements are derived from the corresponding forecast of nuclear generating capacity, with, particular emphasis to the brazilian requirements. The forecast of uranium production until the year 2000 is presented considering existing inventories and the already committed demand. The balance between production and requirements is analysed. Finally the types of contracts currently being used and the development of uranium prices in the world market are considered. (author)

  13. Aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, G.A.; Fish, M.E.

    1978-01-01

    As part of the continuing studies of the effects of very severe reactor accidents, an effort was made to develop, test, and improve simple, effective, and inexpensive methods by which the average citizen, using only materials readily available, could protect his residence, himself, and his family from injury by toxic aerosols. The methods for protection against radioactive aerosols should be equally effective against a clandestine biological attack by terrorists. The results of the tests to date are limited to showing that spores of the harmless bacterium, bacillus globegii (BG), can be used as a simulant for the radioactive aerosols. An aerosol generator of Lauterbach type was developed which will produce an essentially monodisperse aerosol at the rate of 10 9 spores/min. Analytical techniques have been established which give reproducible results. Preliminary field tests have been conducted to check out the components of the system. Preliminary tests of protective devices, such as ordinary vacuum sweepers, have given protection factors of over 1000

  14. Two-generation reproductive toxicity study of implanted depleted uranium (DU) in CD rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfsten, D P; Still, K R; Wilfong, E R; Johnson, E W; McInturf, S M; Eggers, J S; Schaeffer, D J; Bekkedal, M Y-V

    2009-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) munitions and armor plating have been used in several conflicts over the last 17 yr, including the Persian Gulf War and the Iraq War. Because of its effectiveness and availability, DU will continue to be used in military applications into the foreseeable future. There is much controversy over the use of DU in weapons and equipment because of its potential radiological and toxic hazards, and there is concern over the chronic adverse health effects of embedded DU shrapnel in war veterans and bystanders. This study evaluated the effects of long-term implantation of DU on the reproductive success of F0 generation adults and development and survival of subsequent F1 and F2 generations in a two-generation reproductive toxicity study. F0 generation Sprague-Dawley rats, 8 wk of age, were surgically implanted with 0, 4, 8, 12, or 20 DU pellets (1 x 2 mm). Inert implant control animals were implanted with 12 or 20 tantallum (Ta) pellets. The F0 generation was then mated at 120 d post DU implantation. In the F0 generation, when measured on postimplantation d 27 and 117, uranium was present in the urine of DU-implanted animals in a dose-dependent manner. F0 reproductive success was similar across treatment groups and the maternal retrieval test revealed no changes in maternal behavior. DU implantation exerted no effect on the survival, health, or well-being of the F0 generation. Necropsy results of F0 animals were negative with the exception of a marked inflammatory response surrounding the implanted DU pellets. For the F1 generation, measures of F1 development through postnatal day (PND) 20 were unremarkable and no gross abnormalities were observed in F1 offspring. No uranium was detected in whole-body homogenates of PND 4 or PND 20 pups. Necropsy findings of F1 PND 20 pups were negative and no instances of ribcage malformation were observed in F1 PND 20 pups. Body weight and body weight gain of F1 rats through PND 120 were similar across treatment

  15. Molecular size evolution of oligomers in organic aerosols collected in urban atmospheres and generated in a smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberer, Markus; Sax, Mirjam; Samburova, Vera

    2006-10-01

    Only a minor fraction of the total organic aerosol mass can be resolved on a molecular level. High molecular weight compounds in organic aerosols have recently gained much attention because this class of compound potentially explains a major fraction of the unexplained organic aerosol mass. These compounds have been identified with different mass spectrometric methods, and compounds with molecular masses up to 1000 Da are found in secondary organic aerosols (SOA) generated from aromatic and terpene precursors in smog chamber experiments. Here, we apply matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) to SOA particles from two biogenic precursors, alpha-pinene and isoprene. Similar oligomer patterns are found in these two SOA systems, but also in SOA from trimethylbenzene, an anthropogenic SOA precursor. However, different maxima molecular sizes were measured for these three SOA systems. While oligomers in alpha-pinene and isoprene have sizes mostly below 600-700 Da, they grow up to about 1000 Da in trimethylbenzene-SOA. The final molecular size of the oligomers is reached early during the particle aging process, whereas other particle properties related to aging, such as the overall acid concentration or the oligomer concentration, increase continuously over a much longer time scale. This kinetic behavior of the oligomer molecular size growth can be explained by a chain growth kinetic regime. Similar oligomer mass patterns were measured in aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol samples (measured with the same technique). Distinct differences between summer and winter were observed. In summer a few single mass peaks were measured with much higher intensity than in winter, pointing to a possible difference in the formation processes of these compounds in winter and summer.

  16. A Review on the Study of the Generation of (Nanoparticles Aerosols during the Mechanical Solicitation of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on presenting the forefront of the interdisciplinary studies conceived towards the generation of the wear particles aerosol when materials are subjected to mechanical stresses. Various wear mechanisms and instrumentation involved during stress application and aerosolization of wear particles, as well as particles characterization, measurement, and modeling techniques are presented through the investigation of a series of contextual works which are emphasized on the identification of these aspects. The review is motivated from the fact that understanding mechanisms involved in wear-induced particle generation, both at nano- and at microscale, is important for many applications that involve surfaces sliding over each other due to various potential health aspects. An attempt has been made to explain how the information based on this broad spectrum of subjects discovered in this contribution can be used and improved in order to produce a more resilient, rational, and versatile knowledge base which has been found lacking in the present literature during its survey. The area of study is highly multidisciplinary since it involves aerosol, particle, and material sciences.

  17. Uranium geochemistry, mineralogy, geology, exploration and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vivo, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book comprises papers on the following topics: history of radioactivity; uranium in mantle processes; transport and deposition of uranium in hydrothermal systems at temperatures up to 300 0 C: Geological implications; geochemical behaviour of uranium in the supergene environment; uranium exploration techniques; uranium mineralogy; time, crustal evolution and generation of uranium deposits; uranium exploration; geochemistry of uranium in the hydrographic network; uranium deposits of the world, excluding Europe; uranium deposits in Europe; uranium in the economics of energy; role of high heat production granites in uranium province formation; and uranium deposits

  18. Detection of Infectious Influenza Virus in Cough Aerosols Generated in a Simulated Patient Examination Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noti, John D.; Lindsley, William G.; Blachere, Francoise M.; Cao, Gang; Kashon, Michael L.; Thewlis, Robert E.; McMillen, Cynthia M.; King, William P.; Szalajda, Jonathan V.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for aerosol transmission of infectious influenza virus (ie, in healthcare facilities) is controversial. We constructed a simulated patient examination room that contained coughing and breathing manikins to determine whether coughed influenza was infectious and assessed the effectiveness of an N95 respirator and surgical mask in blocking transmission. Methods National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health aerosol samplers collected size-fractionated aerosols for 60 minutes at the mouth of the breathing manikin, beside the mouth, and at 3 other locations in the room. Total recovered virus was quantitated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and infectivity was determined by the viral plaque assay and an enhanced infectivity assay. Results Infectious influenza was recovered in all aerosol fractions (5.0% in >4 µm aerodynamic diameter, 75.5% in 1–4 µm, and 19.5% in <1 µm; n = 5). Tightly sealing a mask to the face blocked entry of 94.5% of total virus and 94.8% of infectious virus (n = 3). A tightly sealed respirator blocked 99.8% of total virus and 99.6% of infectious virus (n = 3). A poorly fitted respirator blocked 64.5% of total virus and 66.5% of infectious virus (n = 3). A mask documented to be loosely fitting by a PortaCount fit tester, to simulate how masks are worn by healthcare workers, blocked entry of 68.5% of total virus and 56.6% of infectious virus (n = 2). Conclusions These results support a role for aerosol transmission and represent the first reported laboratory study of the efficacy of masks and respirators in blocking inhalation of influenza in aerosols. The results indicate that a poorly fitted respirator performs no better than a loosely fitting mask. PMID:22460981

  19. DTPA therapy of lung contaminations: testing a self contained aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducousso, R.; Pasquier, C.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown how much the effectiveness of DTPA therapy of respiratory contamination decreased when the delay of administration of the product increased. Moreover, the effectiveness of local administration of the chelating agent as aerosol has been widely recognized. Owing to both the therapeutic urgency and the local administration, an individual pocket apparatus allowing emergency DTPA inhalation, on the spot of the accident was tried. A turbo-inhalator sold for the administration of an anti-asthmatic powder was tested, using DTPA powder inhaled by a volunteer previously contaminated by a 140 LaCl 3 aerosol [fr

  20. Optical extinction of size-controlled aerosols generated from squid chromatophore pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean R. Dinneen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanophotonic granules populate the interior of cephalopod chromatophores, contributing to their visible color by selectively absorbing and scattering light. Inspired by the performance of these granules, we fabricated nanostructured aerosols by nebulizing a pigment solution extracted from native squid chromatophores. We determined their optical extinction using cavity ring-down spectroscopy and show how extinction cross section is dependent on both particle concentration and size. This work not only advances the fundamental knowledge of the optical properties of chromatophore pigments but also serves as a proof-of-concept method that can be adapted to develop coatings derived from these pigmentary aerosols.

  1. Are world uranium resources sufficient to fuel global growth in nuclear generating capacity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.; Vance, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    Increased uranium prices since 2003 have produced more activity in the sector than the previous 20 years. Nuclear reactor construction is proceeding in some countries, ambitious expansion plans have been announced in others and several, particularly in the developing world, are considering introducing nuclear power as a means of meeting rising electricity demand without increasing greenhouse gas emissions. Others have recently decided to either withdraw from the use of nuclear power or not proceed with development plans following the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan in March 2011. Since the mid-1960, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency have jointly prepared a comprehensive update of global uranium resources, production and demand (commonly known as the 'Red Book'. The Red Book is based on government responses to a questionnaire that requests information on uranium exploration and mine development activity, resources and plans for nuclear development to 2035. This presentation provides an overview of the global situation based on the recently published 2011 edition. It features a compilation of global uranium resources, projected mine development and production capability in all the countries currently producing uranium or with plans to do so in the near future. This is compared to updated, post-Fukushima demand projections, reflecting nuclear phase-out plans announced in some countries and ambitious expansion plans of others. The 2011 Red Book shows that currently defined uranium resources are sufficient to meet high case projections of nuclear power development to 2035. (authors)

  2. Dissolution of uranium oxide materials in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Soderholm, S.C.

    1985-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) oxide aerosols prepared in the laboratory and collected in the field were tested to characterize their dissolution in simulated lung fluid and to determine how dissolution is affected by aerosol preparation. DU, a by-product of the uranium fuel cycle, has been selected by the US military for use in several types of munitions. During development, manufacture, testing, and use of these munitions, opportunities exist for inhalation exposure to various (usually oxide) aerosol forms of DU. The hazard potential associated with such exposures is closely related to the chemical form, the size of the DU aerosol material, and its dissolution properties. Five DU sample materials produced by exposing uranium alloy penetrators to certain controlled oxidation atmospheres were studied (oxidation temperatures ranged from 500 to 900 0 C). In addition, two DU sample materials collected in the field were provided by the US Air Force. All sample materials were generated as aerosols and the respirable fraction was separated and collected. Data suggest that under some conditions a rapidly dissolving U 3 O 8 fraction may be formed concurrent with the production of UO 2

  3. Uranium price reporting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report describes the systems for uranium price reporting currently available to the uranium industry. The report restricts itself to prices for U 3 O 8 natural uranium concentrates. Most purchases of natural uranium by utilities, and sales by producers, are conducted in this form. The bulk of uranium in electricity generation is enriched before use, and is converted to uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , prior to enrichment. Some uranium is traded as UF 6 or as enriched uranium, particularly in the 'secondary' market. Prices for UF 6 and enriched uranium are not considered directly in this report. However, where transactions in UF 6 influence the reported price of U 3 O 8 this influence is taken into account. Unless otherwise indicated, the terms uranium and natural uranium used here refer exclusively to U 3 O 8 . (author)

  4. Studies on generation and transport of sodium aerosols in some test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, T.; Shimomura, T.; Hattori, N.

    1986-01-01

    Technical experiences that have been obtained during the course of the experiments to determine the sodium aerosol concentration, to study the deposition of sodium aerosol, and to predict mechanical properties of sodium vapor deposits are presented. In the first study, the sodium aerosol concentrations in an inert cover gas space over a sodium pool and those following a sodium spray injection into an inert atmosphere were determined. The results from the two different experiments were compared with each other and were discussed in comparison with those from the literature. In the second study, deposition of sodium aerosol following a sodium spray injection into an inert atmosphere was examined. The deposition rates on the walls and the floor of a closed concrete cell were measured, and the results obtained were discussed. The third study relates to the sodium vapor deposition within a narrow annulus. In the experiments, a downward argon gas flow that passes the annulus was fed to prevent sodium vapor deposition. Average sodium vapor deposition rates on the walls of the annulus were determined, then the effect of the downward feed gas was discussed. The last study relates to one of the mechanical properties and the deformation rate of solid sodium being compressed. The purpose of the experiments were to obtain data to predict deformation rate of the sodium deposits. (author)

  5. The impact of building recirculation rates on secondary organic aerosols generated by indoor chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuraimi, M.S.; Weschler, Charles J.; Tham, K.W.

    2007-01-01

    Numerous investigators have documented increases in the concentrations of airborne particles as a consequence of ozone/terpene reactions in indoor environments. This study examines the effect of building recirculation rates on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) resulting from r...

  6. Transport of breeder reactor-fire-generated sodium oxide aerosols for building-wake-dominated meteorology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, D.E.; Cooper, A.C.; Miller, C.W.

    1987-02-01

    This report describes the methodology used and results obtained in efforts to estimate the sodium aerosol concentrations at air intake ports of a liquid-metal cooled, fast-breeder nuclear reactor. An earlier version of this methodology has been previously discussed (Fields and Miller, 1985). A range of wind speeds from 2 to 10 m/s is assumed, and an effort is made to include building wake effects which, in many cases, dominate the dispersal of aerosols near buildings. For relatively small release rates, on the order of 1 to 10 kg/s, the plume rise is small and estimates of aerosol concentrations are derived using the methodology of Wilson and Britter (1982), which describes releases from surface vents. For release rates on the order of 100 kg/s much higher release velocities are expected, and plume rise is considered. An effective increase in release height is computed using the Split-H methodology with a parameterization suggested by Ramsdell (1983), and the release source strength is transformed to rooftop level. Evaluation of the acute release aerosol concentration is then based on the methodology for releases from a surface release of this transformed source strength. For a horizontal release, a methodology is developed to chart the plume path as a function of release and site meteorology parameters. Results described herein must be regarded as maximum aerosol concentrations, based on models derived from generic wind tunnel studies. More accurate and site-specific results may be obtained through wind tunnel simulations and through simulating emissions from release points other than those assumed here.

  7. The composition of aerosols generated during a severe reactor accident: Experimental results from the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage Test 1-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, D.A.; Hobbins, R.R.; Hagrman, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental results on fission product and aerosol release during the Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damages (SFD) Test 1-4 are examined to determine the composition of aerosols that would be generated during a severe reactor accident. The SFD 1-4 measured aerosol contained significant quantities of volatile fission products (VFPs) (cesium, iodine, tellurium), control materials (silver and cadmium), and structural materials (tin), indicating that fission product release, vaporization of control material, and release of tin from oxidized Zircaloy were all important aerosol sources. On average the aerosol composition is between one-quarter and one-half VFPs (especially cesium), with the remainder being control material (especially cadmium), and structural material (especially tin). Source term computer codes like CORSOR-M tend to overpredict the release of structural and control rod material relative to fission products by a factor of between 2 and 15 because the models do not account for relocation of molten control, fuel, and structural material during the degradation process, which tends to reduce the aerosol source. The results indicate that the aerosol generation in a severe reactor accident is intimately linked to the core degradation process. They recommend that these results be used to improve the models in source term computer codes

  8. Neural network radiative transfer solvers for the generation of high resolution solar irradiance spectra parameterized by cloud and aerosol parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.; Kosmopoulos, P.G.; Kazadzis, S.; Keramitsoglou, I.; Kiranoudis, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a neural network (NN) model for instantaneous and accurate estimation of solar radiation spectra and budgets geared toward satellite cloud data using a ≈2.4 M record, high-spectral resolution look up table (LUT) generated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran. Two NN solvers, one for clear sky conditions dominated by aerosol and one for cloudy skies, were trained on a normally-distributed and multiparametric subset of the LUT that spans a very broad class of atmospheric and meteorological conditions as inputs with corresponding high resolution solar irradiance target spectra as outputs. The NN solvers were tested by feeding them with a large (10 K record) “off-grid” random subset of the LUT spanning the training data space, and then comparing simulated outputs with target values provided by the LUT. The NN solvers demonstrated a capability to interpolate accurately over the entire multiparametric space. Once trained, the NN solvers allow for high-speed estimation of solar radiation spectra with high spectral resolution (1 nm) and for a quantification of the effect of aerosol and cloud optical parameters on the solar radiation budget without the need for a massive database. The cloudy sky NN solver was applied to high spatial resolution (54 K pixel) cloud data extracted from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation 3 (MSG3) satellite and demonstrated that coherent maps of spectrally-integrated global horizontal irradiance at this resolution can be produced on the order of 1 min. - Highlights: • Neural network radiative transfer solvers for generation of solar irradiance spectra. • Sensitivity analysis of irradiance spectra with respect to aerosol and cloud parameters. • Regional maps of total global horizontal irradiance for cloudy sky conditions. • Regional solar radiation maps produced directly from MSG3/SEVIRI satellite inputs.

  9. Aerossol bacteriano gerado por respiradores mecânicos: estudo comparativo Bacterial aerosol generated by mechanical ventilators: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D'Agostino Dias

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Respiradores mecânicos emitem aerossóis que podem estar colonizados com bactérias. OBJETIVO. Estudar a contaminação ambiental gerada por respiradores, comparando-se dois siste-mas de umidificação. MÉTODOS. Realizaram-se 51 estudos, comparando-se a colonização dos aerossóis emitidos pela válvula expiratória dos aparelhos de ventilação mecânica, sendo em 31 com nebulizadores convencionais e em 20 com condensadores higroscópicos, em quinze minutos de observação. RESULTADOS. Houve emissão de bactérias para o ambiente, pela válvula expiratória, de 32,2% de respiradores equipados com sistema de nebulização convencional e de 5% com condensador (p = 0,0340. CONCLUSÃO. A umidificação da mistura gasosa com o uso de condensadores pode ser um meio eficiente de reduzir a contaminação bacteriana ambiental.Mechanical ventilators generate aerosol which may be bacterially colonized. PURPOSE - To determine the environmental contamination generated by ventilators with two different humidification techniques. METHODS - The study was done comparing the generation of bacterial colonized aerosol by the expiratory valve of mechanical respirators with conventional water nebulization or with hygroscopic condensator as the humidifier source during 15 minutes of observation. RESULTS - The aerosol got positive cultures in 32.2% of the conventional system and in 5% of the condensator system (p = 0.0340. CONCLUSION - We concluded that the humidification by the hygroscopic condensator may be an efficient way to reduce environmental bacterial contamination.

  10. Development and optimisation of process parameters for recovery of uranium from calcia slag and lining material (SLM) by leaching process and subsequent recovery of uranium from the leach liquor generated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Dinesh Kumar; Srivastava, Praveen Kumar; Das, Santanu; Kumar, Raj; Roy, S.B.

    2014-01-01

    Presently uranium value is recovered by nitric acid dissolution of the SLM, to get uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) and subsequent solvent extraction process. UNS generated After SLM dissolution is very lean in uranium content and create difficulty in solvent extraction. Moreover, NO X is also generated during SLM dissolution in nitric acid. An alternate process was developed where nitric acid is not being used and uranium is being recovered by leaching out the SLM using acetic acid. The process was also optimised for recovery and overall economics of the process by using process effluent AALL (Acetic Acid Leach Liquor) as a leaching agent. The uranium value in the leach liquor was precipitated by using sodium hydroxide. The precipitate was dissolved in nitric acid and the Uranyl Nitrate Solution generated was having Uranium concentration of 15-30 g/l. The alternate process developed will have less effluent generation, less NO X generation and will produce more concentrated UNS in comparison to the nitric acid dissolution process

  11. Aerosol indirect effects on lightning in the generation of induced NOx and tropospheric ozone over an Indian urban metropolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Upal; Maitra, Animesh; Talukdar, Shamitaksha; Jana, Soumyajyoti

    Lightning flashes, associated with vigorous convective activity, is one of the most prominent weather phenomena in the tropical atmosphere. High aerosol loading is indirectly associated with the increase in lightning flash rates via the formation of tropospheric ozone during the pre-monsoon and monsoon over the tropics. Tropospheric ozone, an important greenhouse pollutant gas have impact on Earth’s radiation budget and play a key role in changing the atmospheric circulation patterns. Lightning-induced NOx is a primary pollutant found in photochemical smog and an important precursor for the formation of tropospheric ozone. A critical analysis is done to study the indirect effects of high aerosol loading on the formation of tropospheric ozone via lightning flashes and induced NOx formation over an urban metropolitan location Kolkata (22°32'N, 88°20'E), India during the period 2001-2012. The seasonal variation of lightning flash rates (LFR), taken from TRMM-LIS 2.5o x 2.5o gridded dataset, show that the LFR was observed to be intensified in the pre-monsoon (March-May) and high in monsoon (June-September) months over the region. Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 555nm, taken from MISR 0.5o x 0.5o gridded level-3 dataset, plays an indirect effect on the increase in LFR during the pre-monsoon and monsoon months and has positive correlations between them during these periods. This is also justified from the seasonal variation of the increase in LFR due to the increase in AOD over the region during 2001-2012. The calibrated GOME and OMI/AURA satellite data analysis shows that the tropospheric ozone, formed as a result of lightning-induced NOx and due to the increased AOD at 555 nm, also increases during the pre-monsoon and monsoon months. The seasonal variation of lightning-induced tropospheric NOx, taken from SCIAMACHY observations also justified the fact that the pre-monsoon and monsoon LFR solely responsible for the generation of induced NOx over the region. The

  12. LMFBR source term experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrykowski, J.C.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The transport of uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) aerosol through liquid sodium was studied in a series of ten experiments in the Fuel Aerosol Simulant Test (FAST) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The experiments were designed to provide a mechanistic basis for evaluating the radiological source term associated with a postulated, energetic core disruptive accident (CDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). Aerosol was generated by capacitor discharge vaporization of UO 2 pellets which were submerged in a sodium pool under an argon cover gas. Measurements of the pool and cover gas pressures were used to study the transport of aerosol contained by vapor bubbles within the pool. Samples of cover gas were filtered to determine the quantity of aerosol released from the pool. The depth at which the aerosol was generated was found to be the most critical parameter affecting release. The largest release was observed in the baseline experiment where the sample was vaporized above the sodium pool. In the nine ''undersodium'' experiments aerosol was generated beneath the surface of the pool at depths varying from 30 to 1060 mm. The mass of aerosol released from the pool was found to be a very small fraction of the original specimen. It appears that the bulk of aerosol was contained by bubbles which collapsed within the pool. 18 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Chemical and isotopic composition of secondary organic aerosol generated by α-pinene ozonolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meusinger, Carl; Dusek, Ulrike; King, Stephanie M.

    2017-01-01

    -NOx conditions, with OH scavengers and in the absence of seed particles. The excess of ozone and long residence time in the flow chamber ensured that virtually all α-pinene had reacted. Product SOA was collected on two sequential quartz filters. The filters were analysed offline by heating them stepwise from 100...... it is difficult to apply because neither the isotopic composition of aerosol precursors nor the fractionation of aerosol forming processes is well characterised. In this paper, SOA formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene - an important precursor and perhaps the best-known model system used in laboratory studies...... - was investigated using position-dependent and average determinations of 13C in α-pinene and advanced analysis of reaction products using thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The total carbon (TC) isotopic composition δ13C of the initial α-pinene was measured, and the δ13C...

  14. Improving Aerosol and Visibility Forecasting Capabilities Using Current and Future Generations of Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    using ground observations from the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERGNET) and the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET). APPROACH To achieve the...as well as column-integrated x from one High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) site at Huntsville, AL during the NASA Studies of Emissions and...which was built in FY14, has been tested with GOES-13 data. Figure la shows the gridded (l0xl0 Latitude, Longitude) GOES radiance data from cloud

  15. Micro-physics of aircraft-generated aerosols and their potential impact on heterogeneous plume chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B; Luo, B P [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1998-12-31

    Answers are attempted to give to open questions concerning physico-chemical processes in near-field aircraft plumes, with emphasis on their potential impact on subsequent heterogeneous chemistry. Research issues concerning the nucleation of aerosols and their interactions among themselves and with exhaust gases are summarized. Microphysical properties of contrail ice particles, formation of liquid ternary mixtures, and nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in contrails are examined and possible implications for heterogeneous plume chemistry are discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  16. Micro-physics of aircraft-generated aerosols and their potential impact on heterogeneous plume chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaercher, B.; Luo, B.P. [Muenchen Univ., Freising (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Bioklimatologie und Immissionsforschung

    1997-12-31

    Answers are attempted to give to open questions concerning physico-chemical processes in near-field aircraft plumes, with emphasis on their potential impact on subsequent heterogeneous chemistry. Research issues concerning the nucleation of aerosols and their interactions among themselves and with exhaust gases are summarized. Microphysical properties of contrail ice particles, formation of liquid ternary mixtures, and nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in contrails are examined and possible implications for heterogeneous plume chemistry are discussed. (author) 19 refs.

  17. Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium solutions generated in Atalante by R and D activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrave, H.; Beretti, C.; Bros, P.

    2008-01-01

    The Atalante complex operated by the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (Cea) consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. In order to produce mixed oxide powder containing uranium, plutonium and minor actinides and to deal with increasing flows in the facility, a new shielded line will be built and is expected to be operational by 2012. Its main functions will be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure co-conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. (authors)

  18. Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium solutions generated in Atalante by R and D activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagrave, H.; Beretti, C.; Bros, P. [CEA Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The Atalante complex operated by the 'Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique' (Cea) consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. In order to produce mixed oxide powder containing uranium, plutonium and minor actinides and to deal with increasing flows in the facility, a new shielded line will be built and is expected to be operational by 2012. Its main functions will be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure co-conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. (authors)

  19. Validation of an hourly resolved global aerosol model in answer to solar electricity generation information needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schroedter-Homscheidt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy applications need global aerosol optical depth (AOD information to derive historic surface solar irradiance databases from geostationary meteorological satellites reaching back to the 1980's. This paper validates the MATCH/DLR model originating in the climate community against AERONET ground measurements. Hourly or daily mean AOD model output is evaluated individually for all stations in Europe, Africa and the Middle East – an area highly interesting for solar energy applications being partly dominated by high aerosol loads. Overall, a bias of 0.02 and a root-mean-square error (RMSE of 0.23 are found for daily mean AOD values, while the RMSE increases to 0.28 for hourly mean AOD values. Large differences between various regions and stations are found providing a feedback loop for the aerosol modelling community. The difference in using daily means versus hourly resolved modelling with respect to hourly resolved observations is evaluated. Nowadays state-of-the-art in solar resource assessment relies on monthly turbidity or AOD climatologies while at least hourly resolved irradiance time series are needed by the solar sector. Therefore, the contribution of higher temporally modelled AOD is evaluated.

  20. Combining real-time PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing to provide quantitative comparisons of fungal aerosol populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannemiller, Karen C.; Lang-Yona, Naama; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Rudich, Yinon; Peccia, Jordan

    2014-02-01

    We examined fungal communities associated with the PM10 mass of Rehovot, Israel outdoor air samples collected in the spring and fall seasons. Fungal communities were described by 454 pyrosequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the fungal ribosomal RNA encoding gene. To allow for a more quantitative comparison of fungal exposure in humans, the relative abundance values of specific taxa were transformed to absolute concentrations through multiplying these values by the sample's total fungal spore concentration (derived from universal fungal qPCR). Next, the sequencing-based absolute concentrations for Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Epicoccum nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. were compared to taxon-specific qPCR concentrations for A. alternata, C. cladosporioides, E. nigrum, and Penicillium/Aspergillus spp. derived from the same spring and fall aerosol samples. Results of these comparisons showed that the absolute concentration values generated from pyrosequencing were strongly associated with the concentration values derived from taxon-specific qPCR (for all four species, p 0.70). The correlation coefficients were greater for species present in higher concentrations. Our microbial aerosol population analyses demonstrated that fungal diversity (number of fungal operational taxonomic units) was higher in the spring compared to the fall (p = 0.02), and principal coordinate analysis showed distinct seasonal differences in taxa distribution (ANOSIM p = 0.004). Among genera containing allergenic and/or pathogenic species, the absolute concentrations of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Cladosporium were greater in the fall, while Cryptococcus, Penicillium, and Ulocladium concentrations were greater in the spring. The transformation of pyrosequencing fungal population relative abundance data to absolute concentrations can improve next-generation DNA sequencing-based quantitative aerosol exposure assessment.

  1. Properties of aerosol particles generated during 213 nm laser ablation: a study of compact and powdered tungsten carbides as materials with a two-component matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hola, M.; Konecna, V.; Kanicky, V.; Mikuska, P.; Kaiser, J.; Hanzlikova, R.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The laser ablation process of tungsten carbide hardmetals was studied using 213 nm Nd:YAG laser. The samples were presented for ablation as sintered compacts or powders pressed into pellets to compare the generation of particles from samples with similar chemical composition but different physical properties. The influence of laser ablation parameters on the aerosol generation was studied using an optical aerosol spectrometer. In the case of powders, the effect of binder amount was investigated. The structure of generated particles and the properties of ablation-craters were additionally studied by SEM. (author)

  2. The Effects of Electronic Cigarette (ECIG-Generated Aerosol and Conventional Cigarette Smoke on the Mucociliary Transport Velocity (MTV Using the Bullfrog (R. catesbiana Palate Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic L. Palazzolo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: While ECIGs are under scrutiny concerning safety, particularly in reference to the physiological impact that aerosolized ECIG liquid (E-liquid may have on respiratory tissues, others believe that ECIGs are a “Harm Reduction” alternative to conventional cigarettes. Previous studies investigating ciliated respiratory epithelium indicate that smoking shortens cilia length, reduces cilia beat frequency and disrupts respiratory epithelium, which most likely contributes to the inhibition of mucocilliary clearance. Monitoring mucous clearance of respiratory tissues exposed to ECIG-generated aerosol or conventional cigarette smoke, as indexed by mucous transport velocity (MTV, is one way to gauge the impact aerosol and smoke have on the respiratory tract. Therefore, we designed an experiment to test the effect of ECIG-generated aerosol and smoke on MTV using the frog palate paradigm.Methods: Peristaltic pumps transport ECIG-generated aerosol and conventional cigarette smoke into custom-made chambers containing excised bullfrog palates. MTVs were determined before exposure, immediately after exposure and approximately 1 day following exposure. MTVs were also determined (at the same time points for palates exposed to air (control. Surface and cross sectional SEM images of palates from all three groups were obtained to support MTV data.Results: The results indicate that ECIG-generated aerosol has a modest inhibitory effect (p < 0.05 on MTV 1 day post-exposure (0.09 ± 0.01 compared to control MTV (0.16 ± 0.03 mm/s. In contrast, smoke completely inhibits MTV from 0.14 ± 0.03 mm/s immediately before exposure to 0.00 mm/sec immediately after exposure and the MTV is unable to recover 1 day later. SEM images of control palates and palates exposed to ECIG-generated aerosol both show cilia throughout their epithelial surface, while some areas of palates exposed to smoke are completely devoid of cilia. Additionally, the epithelial thickness of

  3. Preliminary steps towards assessing aerosol retention in the break stage of a dry steam generator during severe accident SGTR sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L.E.; Lopez del Pra, C.; Sanchez Velasco, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Severe accidents SGTR sequences are identified as major contributors to risk of PWRs. Their relevance lies in the potential radioactive release from reactor coolant system to the environment. Lack of knowledge on the source term attenuation capability of the steam generator has avoided its consideration in probabilistic safety studies and severe accident management guidelines. This paper describes a research program presently under way on the aerosol retention in the nearby of the tube breach within the secondary side of the steam generation in the absence of water. Its development has been internationally framed within the EU-SGTR and the ARTIST program. Experimental activities are focused on setting up a reliable database in which the influence of gas mass flow rate, breach configuration and particle nature in the aerosol retention are properly considered. Theoretical activities are aimed at developing a predictive tool (ARISG) capable of assessing source term attenuation in the scenario with reasonable accuracy. Given the major importance of jet aerodynamics, 3D CFD analyses are being conducted to assist both test interpretation and model development. (author)

  4. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  5. Salt separation of uranium deposits generated from electrorefining in pyro process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S. W.; Park, K. M.; Jeong, J. H.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, J. G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Electrorefining is a key step in a pyro processing. Electrorefining process is generally composed of two recovery steps- deposit of uranium onto a solid cathode(electrorefining) and then the recovery of the remaining uranium and TRU(TransUranic) elements simultaneously by a liquid cadmium cathode(electrowinning). The uranium ingot is prepared from the deposits after the salt separation. In this study, the sequential operation of the liquid salt separation? distillation of the residual salt was attempted for the achievement of high throughput performance in the salt separation. The effects of deposit size and packing density were also investigated with steel chips, steel chips, and uranium dendrites. The apparent evaporation rate decreased with the increasing packing density or the increasing size of deposits due to the hindrance of the vapor transport by the deposits. It was found that the packing density and the geometry of deposit crucible are important design parameters for the salt separation system. Base on the results of the study, an engineering scale salt distiller was developed and installed in the argon cell. The salt distiller is a batch-type, and the process capacity to about 50 kg U-deposits/day. The design of the salt distiller is based on the remote operation by Master Slave Manipulator (MSM) and a hoist. The salt distiller is composed of two large blocks of the distillation tower and the crucible loading system for the transportation to maintenance room via the Large Transfer Lock (LTL)

  6. Reuse of ammonium fluoride generated in the uranium hexafluoride conversion; Reutilizacao do fluoreto de amonio gerado na reconversao do hexafluoreto de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M., E-mail: jbsneto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Riella, H.G [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Centre of IPEN / CNEN - SP develops and manufactures dispersion fuel with high uranium concentration to meet the demand of the IEA-R1 reactor and future research reactors planned to be constructed in Brazil. The fuel uses uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. For producing the fuel, the processes for uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) conversion consist in obtaining U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and / or U{sub 3}O{sub 8} through the preparation of intermediate compounds, among them ammonium uranyl carbonate - AUC, ammonium diuranate - DUA and uranium tetrafluoride - UF{sub 4}. This work describes a procedure for preparing uranium tetrafluoride by a dry route using as raw material the filtrate generated when producing routinely ammonium uranyl carbonate. The filtrate consists primarily of a solution containing high concentrations of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}), fluoride (F{sup -}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup --}) and low concentrations of uranium. The procedure is basically the recovery of NH{sub 4}F and uranium, as UF{sub 4}, through the crystallization of ammonium bifluoride (NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2}) and, in a later step, the addition of UO{sub 2}, occurring fluoridation and decomposition. The UF{sub 4} obtained is further diluted in the UF{sub 4} produced routinely at IPEN / CNEN-SP by a wet route process. (author)

  7. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postma, A.K.; Dickinson, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Secondary organic aerosol production from pinanediol, a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Penglin; Zhao, Yunliang; Chuang, Wayne K.; Robinson, Allen L.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from pinanediol (PD), a precursor chosen as a semi-volatile surrogate for first-generation oxidation products of monoterpenes. Observations at the CLOUD facility at CERN have shown that oxidation of organic compounds such as PD can be an important contributor to new-particle formation. Here we focus on SOA mass yields and chemical composition from PD photo-oxidation in the CMU smog chamber. To determine the SOA mass yields from this semi-volatile precursor, we had to address partitioning of both the PD and its oxidation products to the chamber walls. After correcting for these losses, we found OA loading dependent SOA mass yields from PD oxidation that ranged between 0.1 and 0.9 for SOA concentrations between 0.02 and 20 µg m-3, these mass yields are 2-3 times larger than typical of much more volatile monoterpenes. The average carbon oxidation state measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer was around -0.7. We modeled the chamber data using a dynamical two-dimensional volatility basis set and found that a significant fraction of the SOA comprises low-volatility organic compounds that could drive new-particle formation and growth, which is consistent with the CLOUD observations.

  9. A perspective on SOA generated in aerosol water from glyoxal and methylglyoxal and its impacts on climate-relevant aerosol properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, glyoxal and methylglyoxal have emerged to be potentially important SOA precursors with significant implications for climate-related aerosol properties. Here we will discuss how the chemistry of these and similar organic compounds in aerosol water can affect the aerosol optical and cloud formation properties. Aqueous-phase SOA production from glyoxal and methylglyoxal is a potential source of strongly light-absorbing organics, or "brown carbon". We characterized the kinetics of brown carbon formation from these precursors in mixtures of ammonium sulfate and water using UV-Vis spectrophotometry. This mechanism has been incorporated into a photochemical box model with coupled gas phase-aqueous aerosol chemistry. Methylglyoxal and related compounds also may impact an aerosol's ability to act as a cloud condensation nucleus. We recently showed via pendant drop tensiometry and aerosol chamber studies that uptake of methylglyoxal from the gas phase driven by aqueous-phase oligomerization chemistry is a potentially significant, previously unidentified source of surface-active organic material in aerosols. Results from pendant drop tensiometry showed significantly depressed surface tension in methylglyoxal-ammonium sulfate solutions. We further found that ammonium sulfate particles exposed to gas-phase methylglyoxal in a 3.5 m3 aerosol reaction chamber activate into cloud droplets at sizes up to 15% lower at a given supersaturation than do pure ammonium sulfate particles. The observed enhancement exceeds that predicted based on Henry's Law and our measurements of surface tension depression in bulk solutions, suggesting that surface adsorption of methylglyoxal plays a role in determining CCN activity. Methylglyoxal and similar gas-phase surfactants may be an important and overlooked source of enhanced CCN activity in the atmosphere. To characterize the SOA products formed in these solutions, an Aerosol Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) was used

  10. A Microcontroller Operated Device for the Generation of Liquid Extracts from Conventional Cigarette Smoke and Electronic Cigarette Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Chastain A; Bokota, Rachael E; Majeste, Andrew E; Murfee, Walter L; Wang, Shusheng

    2018-01-18

    Electronic cigarettes are the most popular tobacco product among middle and high schoolers and are the most popular alternative tobacco product among adults. High quality, reproducible research on the consequences of electronic cigarette use is essential for understanding emerging public health concerns and crafting evidence based regulatory policy. While a growing number of papers discuss electronic cigarettes, there is little consistency in methods across groups and very little consensus on results. Here, we describe a programmable laboratory device that can be used to create extracts of conventional cigarette smoke and electronic cigarette aerosol. This protocol details instructions for the assembly and operation of said device, and demonstrates the use of the generated extract in two sample applications: an in vitro cell viability assay and gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry. This method provides a tool for making direct comparisons between conventional cigarettes and electronic cigarettes, and is an accessible entry point into electronic cigarette research.

  11. Novel method of generation of Ca(HCO32 and CaCO3 aerosols and first determination of hygroscopic and cloud condensation nuclei activation properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trimborn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral aerosols contain CaCO3 as a reactive component. A novel method to produce CaCO3 aerosol was developed by spraying Ca(HCO32 solution, which was generated from a CaCO3 suspension and CO2. By aerosol mass spectrometry the freshly sprayed and dried aerosol was characterized to consist of pure Ca(HCO32 which under annealing in a tube furnace transformed into CaCO3. Transmission Electron Microscopy demonstrated that the particles produced were spherical. The method was able to generate aerosol of sufficient concentration and proper size for the study of physiochemical properties and investigations of heterogeneous reactions of mineral aerosol. The dried Ca(HCO32 particles were somewhat more hygroscopic than CaCO3 particles. However, during humidification a restructuring took place and ∼2/3 of the Ca(HCO32 was transformed to CaCO3. The mixed Ca(HCO32/CaCO3(s particles were insoluble with a growth factor of 1.03 at 95% (hygroscopicity parameter κ=0.011±0.007 relative humidity. This compares to a corresponding growth factor of 1.01 for CaCO3(s (κ=0.0016±0.0004. Mass spectrometric composition analysis, restructuring, and insolubility of the mixed particles suggested that solid Ca(HCO32(s was observed. This would be in contrast to the current belief that Ca(HCO32(s is thermodynamically instable. The CCN activity of Ca(HCO32(s aerosol (κ≈0.15 is remarkably higher than that of CaCO3 aerosol (κ=0.0019±0.0007 and less than that of Ca(NO32. The noticeable but limited solubility of Ca(HCO32 of ≈0.01 mol/l explains limited hygroscopic growth and good CCN activity. Experiments in the Large Jülich Aerosol Chamber indicated that Ca(HCO32(s could exist for several hours under dry atmospheric conditions. However, it was likely buried in a protective layer of CaCO3(s. We conclude that Ca(HCO32 may be formed in the atmosphere in cloud droplets of activated mineral dust by reaction of CaCO3 with CO2 and H2O. The presence of Ca(HCO32 and

  12. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  13. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author)

  14. Special aerosol sources for certification and test of aerosol radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Y.E.; Kuznetsov, Y.V.; Rizin, A.I.; Fertman, D.E. (Union Research Institute of Instrumentation, Moscow (USSR))

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of the development and practical application of new radionuclide source types (Special Aerosol Sources (SAS)), that meet the international standard recommendations, which are used for certification and test of aerosol radiometers (monitors) using model aerosols of plutonium-239, strontium-yttrium-90 or uranium of natural isotope composition and certified against Union of Soviet Socialist Republics USSR national radioactive aerosol standard or by means of a reference radiometer. The original technology for source production allows the particular features of sampling to be taken into account as well as geometry and conditions of radionuclides radiation registration in the sample for the given type of radiometer. (author).

  15. Recycling of reprocessed uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randl, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Since nuclear power was first exploited in the Federal Republic of Germany, the philosophy underlying the strategy of the nuclear fuel cycle has been to make optimum use of the resource potential of recovered uranium and plutonium within a closed fuel cycle. Apart from the weighty argument of reprocessing being an important step in the treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes, permitting their optimum ecological conditioning after the reprocessing step and subsequent storage underground, another argument that, no doubt, carried weight was the possibility of reducing the demand of power plants for natural uranium. In recent years, strategies of recycling have emerged for reprocessed uranium. If that energy potential, too, is to be exploited by thermal recycling, it is appropriate to choose a slightly different method of recycling from the one for plutonium. While the first generation of reprocessed uranium fuel recycled in the reactor cuts down natural uranium requirement by some 15%, the recycling of a second generation of reprocessed, once more enriched uranium fuel helps only to save a further three per cent of natural uranium. Uranium of the second generation already carries uranium-232 isotope, causing production disturbances, and uranium-236 isotope, causing disturbances of the neutron balance in the reactor, in such amounts as to make further fabrication of uranium fuel elements inexpedient, even after mixing with natural uranium feed. (orig./UA) [de

  16. Molecular characterization of brown carbon (BrC) chromophores in secondary organic aerosol generated from photo-oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peng; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E; Kathmann, Shawn M; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is a significant contributor to light absorption and climate forcing. However, little is known about a fundamental relationship between the chemical composition of BrC and its optical properties. In this work, light-absorbing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was generated in the PNNL chamber from toluene photo-oxidation in the presence of NOx (Tol-SOA). Molecular structures of BrC components were examined using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and liquid chromatography (LC) combined with UV/Vis spectroscopy and electrospray ionization (ESI) high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The chemical composition of BrC chromophores and the light absorption properties of toluene SOA (Tol-SOA) depend strongly on the initial NOx concentration. Specifically, Tol-SOA generated under high-NOx conditions (defined here as initial NOx/toluene of 5/1) appears yellow and mass absorption coefficient of the bulk sample (MACbulk@365 nm = 0.78 m(2) g(-1)) is nearly 80 fold higher than that measured for the Tol-SOA sample generated under low-NOx conditions (NOx/toluene atmosphere.

  17. Radioactive aerosols of the object 'Ukryttya' (a review). Part 4.2. Sources and generation of radioactive aerosols during technogenic activities in 1987 - 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogorodnikov, B.I.; Pazukhin, Eh.M.

    2006-01-01

    The sources of radioactive aerosol formation were considered at operation. It is shown that concentrations, radionuclide composition, size distribution, transfer and transformation in environment depended on physical and chemical processes proceeding within reactor breakdown, man-caused activity into premises of the object 'Shelter' and near ChNPP. 34 refs.; 7 figs.; 11 tab

  18. Deposition of aqueous aerosol of technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid generated and delivered by a novel system (AERx) in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, H.K.; Eberl, S.; Bautovich, G.

    1999-01-01

    Deposition of technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid aqueous radioaerosols generated by a novel aerosol delivery system (AER x ) was studied in six healthy subjects using both planar and single-photon emission tomography (SPET) imaging. AER x is a microprocessor-controlled, bolus inhalation device that is actuated at pre-programmed values of inspiratory flow rate and volume. The aims of the study were to determine the effects of posture and inhaled volume upon deposition of the aerosol in the lungs. Each subject inhaled the radioaerosol in two positions (supine vs sitting) and with two inspiratory manoeuvres [vital capacity (VC) vs ''fixed volume'' of 1 l above functional residual capacity]. Simultaneous transmission-emission planar and tomographic images were acquired. The results showed diffuse deposition of the aerosol in the lung. Neither the breathing manoeuvre nor the posture was found to affect the distribution of the aerosol as measured by the ratio of the activity (counts per pixel) in the peripheral:central (penetration index, PI) or in the apex:base regions of the planar lung images (P>0.1). A small, albeit statistically significant, difference in PI (P x system showed high efficiency of delivery, with approximately 50% of the extruded dose in the device depositing in the lung. The uniformity of radioactivity distributed throughout the lung is attributed to the fine particle size (mass median aerodynamic diameter of 2 μm) of the aerosol and the electronic control of aerosol inhalation by the device. In conclusion, the AER x system can be ideal for diffuse aerosol deposition of therapeutic or diagnostic agents and is largely unaffected by inhaled volume and posture. The efficiency of the device device can limit the total radiation exposure of patients and staff administering the radioaerosols, and can make it suitable for delivery of expensive drugs. (orig.)

  19. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milla, E.

    1978-01-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs

  20. Study of radioactive aerosols emissions and establishment of a model in a nuclear medicine environment during the use of a technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombardier, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the control of radioactive aerosols emissions inside the nuclear medicine facilities. These emissions occur during pulmonary scintigraphy examinations using aerosols marked with 99m Tc. Using a test chamber, we have developed a method permitting to quantify these emissions around the aerosol generator. A method dedicated to emissions measurement coming from the patient during the pulmonary ventilation is also described. The results obtained on one patient are exposed in this thesis. We characterized and modelled the ventilation of a complete nuclear medicine department with a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software. This permitted us to study the dissemination of the radioactive aerosol and to compare it with measures of ambient air activity. The numerical model of this department was then employed to test containment solutions and to help defining the best location for air contaminations sensors. An original method combining staff position information and the simulation of the dissemination for the aerosol released has been used to confirm the exposure levels for several professional groups and enhance the workplace studies. (author)

  1. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Bellary, M.P.; Keni, V.S.

    1994-01-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author)

  2. Recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S K; Bellary, M P; Keni, V S [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    An innovative process has been developed for recovery of uranium from crude uranium tetrafluoride cake. The process is based on direct dissolution of uranium tetrafluoride in nitric acid in presence of aluminium hydroxide and use of solvent extraction for removal of fluorides and other bulk impurities to make uranium amenable for refining. It is a simple process requiring minimum process step and has advantage of lesser plant corrosion. This process can be applied for processing of uranium tetrafluoride generated from various sources like uranium by-product during thorium recovery from thorium concentrate, first stage product of uranium recovery from phosphoric acid by OPPA process and off grade uranium tetrafluoride material. The paper describes the details of the process developed and demonstrated on bench and pilot scale and its subsequent modification arising out of bulky solid waste generation. The modified process uses a lower quantity of aluminium hydroxide by allowing a lower dissolution of uranium per cycle and recycles the undissolved material to the next cycle, maintaining the overall recovery at high level. This innovation has reduced the solid waste generated by a factor of four at the cost of a slightly larger dissolution vessel and its increased corrosion rate. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. The uranium equation in 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonny, J.; Fulton, M.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: comparison of world nuclear generating capacity forecasts; world uranium requirements; comparison of uranium production capability forecasts; supply and demand situation in 1990 and 1995; a perspective on the uranium equation (economic factors; development lead times as a factor affecting market stability; the influence of uncertainty; the uranium market in perspective; the uranium market in 1995). (U.K.)

  4. Quantification of Optical and Physical Properties of Combustion-Generated Carbonaceous Aerosols (

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka Eranda; Litton, Charles D

    2015-03-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to quantify and characterize the optical and physical properties of combustion-generated aerosols during both flaming and smoldering combustion of three materials common to underground mines-Pittsburgh Seam coal, Styrene Butadiene Rubber (a common mine conveyor belt material), and Douglas-fir wood-using a combination of analytical and gravimetric measurements. Laser photometers were utilized in the experiments for continuous measurement of aerosol mass concentrations and for comparison to measurements made using gravimetric filter samples. The aerosols of interest lie in the size range of tens to a few hundred nanometers, out of range of the standard photometer calibration. To correct for these uncertainties, the photometer mass concentrations were compared to gravimetric samples to determine if consistent correlations existed. The response of a calibrated and modified combination ionization/photoelectric smoke detector was also used. In addition, the responses of this sensor and a similar, prototype ionization/photoelectric sensor, along with discrete angular scattering, total scattering, and total extinction measurements, were used to define in real time the size, morphology, and radiative transfer properties of these differing aerosols that are generally in the form of fractal aggregates. SEM/TEM images were also obtained in order to compare qualitatively the real-time, continuous experimental measurements with the visual microscopic measurements. These data clearly show that significant differences exist between aerosols from flaming and from smoldering combustion and that these differences produce very different scattering and absorption signatures. The data also indicate that ionization/photoelectric sensors can be utilized to measure continuously and in real time aerosol properties over a broad spectrum of applications related to adverse environmental and health effects.

  5. Assay of uranium in fused salt cake generated at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants by gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, P.C.; Bhanu, A.U.; Sahoo, S.; Iyer, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    A passive gamma-ray spectroscopic method is employed for the assay of uranium in fused salt cake, a scrap produced at the natural uranium metal fuel fabrication plants. The method makes use of NaI(TI) detector coupled with a multichannel analyser. The 1 MeV gamma-ray of 238 U was used for the calibration. The calibration curve was made by counting synthetic mixtures made of U 3 O 8 powder, the heat treatment salt and iron in the form of fine powder. The uranium content in these synthetic mixtures was kept in the range of 1-11 per cent. 23 lots of the fused salt cake taken from three different batches of the salt cake were then analysed by this method. The uranium content of fused salt cake was found to be in the range of 1.70-11.43 per cent. To compare the gamma spectrometric results with a completely independent method, chemical analysis of all the fused salt cakes were also carried out. The NDA results were found to agree within ± 17 per cent with the chemical analysis results. (author)

  6. Uranium material removing and recovering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, Shin-ichi.

    1997-01-01

    A uranium material removing and recovering device for use in removing surplus uranium heavy metal (UO 2 ) generated in a uranium handling facility comprises a uranium material removing device and a uranium material recovering device. The uranium material removing device comprises an adsorbing portion filled with a uranium adsorbent, a control portion for controlling the uranium adsorbent of the uranium adsorbing portion by a controlling agent, a uranium adsorbing device connected thereto and a jetting device for jetting the adsorbing liquid to equipments deposited with uranium. The recovering device comprises a recovering apparatus for recovering uranium materials deposited with the adsorbent liquid removed by the jetting device and a recovering tank for storing the recovered uranium materials. The device of the present invention can remove surplus uranium simply and safely, mitigate body's load upon removing and recovering operations, facilitate the processing for the exchange of the adsorbent and reduces the radioactive wastes. (T.M.)

  7. Isomerization of Second-Generation Isoprene Peroxy Radicals: Epoxide Formation and Implications for Secondary Organic Aerosol Yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Ambro, Emma L.; Møller, Kristian H.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Liu, Jiumeng; Shilling, John E.; Lee, Ben Hwan; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Thornton, Joel A.

    2017-04-11

    We report chamber measurements of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene photochemical oxidation, where radical concentrations were systematically varied and the molecular composition of semi to low volatility gases and SOA were measured online. Using a detailed chemical mechanism, we find that to explain the behavior of low volatility products and SOA mass yields relative to input H2O2 concentrations, the second generation dihydroxy hydroperoxy peroxy radical (C5H11O6•) must undergo an intra-molecular H-shift with a net forward rate constant of order 0.1 s-1 or higher, consistent with quantum chemical calculations which suggest a net forward rate constant of 0.3-0.9 s-1. Furthermore, these calculations suggest the dominant product of this isomerization is a dihydroxy hydroperoxy epoxide (C5H10O5) which is expected to have a saturation vapor pressure ~2 orders of magnitude higher than the dihydroxy dihydroperoxide, ISOP(OOH)2 (C5H12O6), a major product of the peroxy radical reacting with HO2. These results provide strong constraints on the likely volatility distribution of isoprene oxidation products under atmospheric conditions and thus on the importance of non-reactive gas-particle partitioning of isoprene oxidation products as an SOA source.

  8. The effect of actuator nozzle designs on the electrostatic charge generated in pressurised metered dose inhaler aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Young, Paul M; Fletcher, David F; Chan, Hak Kim; Long, Edward; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Traini, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the influence of different actuator nozzle designs on aerosol electrostatic charges and aerosol performances for pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Four actuator nozzle designs (flat, curved flat, cone and curved cone) were manufactured using insulating thermoplastics (PET and PTFE) and conducting metal (aluminium) materials. Aerosol electrostatic profiles of solution pMDI formulations containing propellant HFA 134a with different ethanol concentration and/or model drug beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) were studied using a modified electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) for all actuator designs and materials. The mass of the deposited drug was analysed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both curved nozzle designs for insulating PET and PTFE actuators significantly influenced aerosol electrostatics and aerosol performance compared with conducting aluminium actuator, where reversed charge polarity and higher throat deposition were observed with pMDI formulation containing BDP. Results are likely due to the changes in plume geometry caused by the curved edge nozzle designs and the bipolar charging nature of insulating materials. This study demonstrated that actuator nozzle designs could significantly influence the electrostatic charges profiles and aerosol drug deposition pattern of pMDI aerosols, especially when using insulating thermoplastic materials where bipolar charging is more dominant.

  9. Direct deposition of gas phase generated aerosol gold nanoparticles into biological fluids--corona formation and particle size shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian R Svensson

    Full Text Available An ongoing discussion whether traditional toxicological methods are sufficient to evaluate the risks associated with nanoparticle inhalation has led to the emergence of Air-Liquid interface toxicology. As a step in this process, this study explores the evolution of particle characteristics as they move from the airborne state into physiological solution. Airborne gold nanoparticles (AuNP are generated using an evaporation-condensation technique. Spherical and agglomerate AuNPs are deposited into physiological solutions of increasing biological complexity. The AuNP size is characterized in air as mobility diameter and in liquid as hydrodynamic diameter. AuNP:Protein aggregation in physiological solutions is determined using dynamic light scattering, particle tracking analysis, and UV absorption spectroscopy. AuNPs deposited into homocysteine buffer form large gold-aggregates. Spherical AuNPs deposited in solutions of albumin were trapped at the Air-Liquid interface but was readily suspended in the solutions with a size close to that of the airborne particles, indicating that AuNP:Protein complex formation is promoted. Deposition into serum and lung fluid resulted in larger complexes, reflecting the formation of a more complex protein corona. UV absorption spectroscopy indicated no further aggregation of the AuNPs after deposition in solution. The corona of the deposited AuNPs shows differences compared to AuNPs generated in suspension. Deposition of AuNPs from the aerosol phase into biological fluids offers a method to study the protein corona formed, upon inhalation and deposition in the lungs in a more realistic way compared to particle liquid suspensions. This is important since the protein corona together with key particle properties (e.g. size, shape and surface reactivity to a large extent may determine the nanoparticle effects and possible translocation to other organs.

  10. Direct Deposition of Gas Phase Generated Aerosol Gold Nanoparticles into Biological Fluids - Corona Formation and Particle Size Shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Christian R.; Messing, Maria E.; Lundqvist, Martin; Schollin, Alexander; Deppert, Knut; Pagels, Joakim H.; Rissler, Jenny; Cedervall, Tommy

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing discussion whether traditional toxicological methods are sufficient to evaluate the risks associated with nanoparticle inhalation has led to the emergence of Air-Liquid interface toxicology. As a step in this process, this study explores the evolution of particle characteristics as they move from the airborne state into physiological solution. Airborne gold nanoparticles (AuNP) are generated using an evaporation-condensation technique. Spherical and agglomerate AuNPs are deposited into physiological solutions of increasing biological complexity. The AuNP size is characterized in air as mobility diameter and in liquid as hydrodynamic diameter. AuNP:Protein aggregation in physiological solutions is determined using dynamic light scattering, particle tracking analysis, and UV absorption spectroscopy. AuNPs deposited into homocysteine buffer form large gold-aggregates. Spherical AuNPs deposited in solutions of albumin were trapped at the Air-Liquid interface but was readily suspended in the solutions with a size close to that of the airborne particles, indicating that AuNP:Protein complex formation is promoted. Deposition into serum and lung fluid resulted in larger complexes, reflecting the formation of a more complex protein corona. UV absorption spectroscopy indicated no further aggregation of the AuNPs after deposition in solution. The corona of the deposited AuNPs shows differences compared to AuNPs generated in suspension. Deposition of AuNPs from the aerosol phase into biological fluids offers a method to study the protein corona formed, upon inhalation and deposition in the lungs in a more realistic way compared to particle liquid suspensions. This is important since the protein corona together with key particle properties (e.g. size, shape and surface reactivity) to a large extent may determine the nanoparticle effects and possible translocation to other organs. PMID:24086363

  11. Characterizing uranium oxide reference particles for isotopic abundances and uranium mass by single particle isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraiem, M.; Richter, S.; Erdmann, N.; Kühn, H.; Hedberg, M.; Aregbe, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A method to quantify the U mass in single micron particles by ID-TIMS was developed. ► Well-characterized monodisperse U-oxide particles produced by an aerosol generator were used. ► A linear correlation between the mass of U and the volume of particle(s) was found. ► The method developed is suitable for determining the amount of U in a particulate reference material. - Abstract: Uranium and plutonium particulate test materials are becoming increasingly important as the reliability of measurement results has to be demonstrated to regulatory bodies responsible for maintaining effective nuclear safeguards. In order to address this issue, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) in collaboration with the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has initiated a study to investigate the feasibility of preparing and characterizing a uranium particle reference material for nuclear safeguards, which is finally certified for isotopic abundances and for the uranium mass per particle. Such control particles are specifically required to evaluate responses of instruments based on mass spectrometric detection (e.g. SIMS, TIMS, LA-ICPMS) and to help ensuring the reliability and comparability of measurement results worldwide. In this paper, a methodology is described which allows quantifying the uranium mass in single micron particles by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). This methodology is characterized by substantial improvements recently achieved at IRMM in terms of sensitivity and measurement accuracy in the field of uranium particle analysis by TIMS. The use of monodisperse uranium oxide particles prepared using an aerosol generation technique developed at ITU, which is capable of producing particles of well-characterized size and isotopic composition was exploited. The evidence of a straightforward correlation between the particle volume and the mass of uranium was demonstrated in this study

  12. Physical characteristics and solubility of long-lived airborne particulates in uranium producing and manufacturing facilities Phase IV - Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.; Stuart, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    The rates of dissolution in simulated lung fluid of uranium, thorium-230, radium-226 and lead-210 from six aerosol samples associated with mining operations at Cluff Lake, Saskatchewan were determined. Parallel studies were carried out for uranium aerosol samples collected directly on open-face filters at the Port Hope refinery and from four aerosol samples generated in the laboratory from yellowcake dusts obtained from the Blind River mill in Ontario. Bulk dusts were collected from surfaces in workplace locations. These dusts were resuspended in the laboratory and collected on glass fibre substrates using cascade impactor sampling methods. Two particle size fractions, less than 7 microns and 7-10 microns were collected. In all, 18 samples were subjected to parallel extractions by simulated lung fluid under continuous flow, at 37 deg C at pH 7.4, over a period of 66 days. For each extraction, 10 lung fluid fractions were collected at predetermined intervals and analyzed for uranium to estimate uranium dissolution rates as a function of time. For the Cluff Lake ore dust samples, analyses and dissolution rates estimates for thorium-230, radium-226 and lead-210 were also performed. The samples taken from Cluff Lake were found to be relatively insoluble. Uranium dissolution rates of about 20% were measured over 66 days. No measurable Th-228 dissolution was found during the experiments. Ra-226 and Pb-210 were most soluble as a fine particulate (less than 7 μm), with complete dissolution for some samples. Aerosol samples from Blind River and Port Hope were more readily soluble (complete dissolution over 66 days). The Blind River aerosols dissolved more slowly than the Port Hope aerosols. In both cases, the majority of the dissolution occurred within the first week. There was no effect of particle size on dissolution rate. (author). 12 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig

  13. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  14. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate's beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ∼60 C, 80 C, and 95 C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal

  15. Characterisation of the borgwaldt LM4E system for in vitro exposures to undiluted aerosols from next generation tobacco and nicotine products (NGPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Jason; Jaunky, Tomasz; Thorne, David; Gaça, Marianna D

    2018-03-01

    Traditional in vitro exposure to combustible tobacco products utilise exposure systems that include the use of smoking machines to generate, dilute and deliver smoke to in vitro cell cultures. With reported lower emissions from next generation tobacco and nicotine products (NGPs), including e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products (THPs), diluting the aerosol is potentially not required. Herein we present a simplified exposure scenario to undiluted NGP aerosols, using a new puffing system called the LM4E. Nicotine delivery from an e-cigarette was used as a dosimetry marker, and was measured at source across 4 LM4E ports and in the exposure chamber. Cell viability studies, using Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, were performed using H292 human lung epithelial cells, testing undiluted aerosols from an e-cigarette and a THP. E-cigarette mean nicotine generated at source was measured at 0.084 ± 0.005 mg/puff with no significant differences in delivery across the 4 different ports, p = 0.268 (n = 10/port). Mean nicotine delivery from the e-cigarette to the in vitro exposure chamber (measured up to 100 puffs) was 0.046 ± 0.006 mg/puff, p = 0.061. Aerosol penetration within the LM4E was 55% from source to chamber. H292 cells were exposed to undiluted e-cigarette aerosol for 2 h (240 puffs) or undiluted THP aerosol for 1 h (120 puffs). There were positive correlations between puff number and nicotine in the exposed culture media, R 2  = 0.764 for the e-cigarette and R 2  = 0.970 for the THP. NRU determined cell viability for e-cigarettes after 2 h' exposure resulted in 21.5 ± 17.0% cell survival, however for the THP, full cytotoxicity was reached after 1-h exposure. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of depleted uranium on the reproductive success and F1 generation survival of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourrachot, Stéphanie [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Brion, François [Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité d’évaluation des risques écotoxicologiques, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Pereira, Sandrine; Floriani, Magali; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Palluel, Olivier [Institut National de l’Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Unité d’évaluation des risques écotoxicologiques, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Adam-Guillermin, Christelle, E-mail: christelle.adam-guillermin@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The effect of depleted uranium on zebrafish reproduction was studied. • An inhibition of egg production and an increase of F1 embryo mortality were observed. • Decreased circulating concentration of vitellogenin was observed in females. • Increased DNA damages were observed in parent gonads and in embryos. • U environmental concentration impairs reproduction and genetic integrity of fish. - Abstract: Despite the well-characterized occurrence of uranium (U) in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the chronic exposure of fish to low levels of U and its potential effect on reproduction. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of environmental concentrations of depleted U on the reproductive output of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and on survival and development of the F1 embryo-larvae following parental exposure to U. For that purpose, sexually mature male and female zebrafish were exposed to 20 and 250 μg/L of U for 14 days and allowed to reproduce in clean water during a further 14-day period. At all sampling times, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were analyzed to investigate the effects of U exposure on these reproductive endpoints. In addition, accumulation of U in the gonads and its genotoxic effect on male and female gonad cells were quantified. The results showed that U strongly affected the capability of fish to reproduce and to generate viable individuals as evidenced by the inhibition of egg production and the increased rate of mortality of the F1 embryos. Interestingly, U exposure resulted in decreased circulating concentrations of vitellogenin in females. Increased concentrations of U were observed in gonads and eggs, which were most likely responsible for the genotoxic effects seen in fish gonads and in embryos exposed maternally to U. Altogether, these findings highlight the negative effect of environmentally relevant concentrations of U which alter the reproductive

  17. Effects of depleted uranium on the reproductive success and F1 generation survival of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourrachot, Stéphanie; Brion, François; Pereira, Sandrine; Floriani, Magali; Camilleri, Virginie; Cavalié, Isabelle; Palluel, Olivier; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of depleted uranium on zebrafish reproduction was studied. • An inhibition of egg production and an increase of F1 embryo mortality were observed. • Decreased circulating concentration of vitellogenin was observed in females. • Increased DNA damages were observed in parent gonads and in embryos. • U environmental concentration impairs reproduction and genetic integrity of fish. - Abstract: Despite the well-characterized occurrence of uranium (U) in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the chronic exposure of fish to low levels of U and its potential effect on reproduction. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of environmental concentrations of depleted U on the reproductive output of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and on survival and development of the F1 embryo-larvae following parental exposure to U. For that purpose, sexually mature male and female zebrafish were exposed to 20 and 250 μg/L of U for 14 days and allowed to reproduce in clean water during a further 14-day period. At all sampling times, whole-body vitellogenin concentrations and gonad histology were analyzed to investigate the effects of U exposure on these reproductive endpoints. In addition, accumulation of U in the gonads and its genotoxic effect on male and female gonad cells were quantified. The results showed that U strongly affected the capability of fish to reproduce and to generate viable individuals as evidenced by the inhibition of egg production and the increased rate of mortality of the F1 embryos. Interestingly, U exposure resulted in decreased circulating concentrations of vitellogenin in females. Increased concentrations of U were observed in gonads and eggs, which were most likely responsible for the genotoxic effects seen in fish gonads and in embryos exposed maternally to U. Altogether, these findings highlight the negative effect of environmentally relevant concentrations of U which alter the reproductive

  18. Acid rock drainage in the uranium mining and milling site of Pocos de Caldas, Brazil -- duration assessment, pollutant generation modelling and remediation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, H.M.; Franklin, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    This geochemical modeling work was carried out to simulate the acid drainage generation from one of the waste-rock piles at the Pocos de Caldas uranium mining site. The mathematical code STEADQYL was used. The estimated results were in good agreement for sulphate and uranium concentrations and the duration of the acid water generation was estimated to be about 500 years. The effect of covering the dump with a material that minimized oxygen diffusion was assessed. Projections indicated that covering the dump with a 1.0 m thickness of a material (like clay), which had an oxygen diffusion coefficient of 10 9 m 2 ·s 1 , would reduce the pollutant concentrations to acceptable values. The estimated cost, when using this strategy, would be about US $10 million. (author)

  19. Summary case for mining and export of Australia's uranium deposits for peaceful uses in generation of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    Arguments in support of the mining and export of Australian uranium are presented. They concern economic development and export income; environmental advantages over fossil fuels; the existence of appropriate safety standards and procedures and of effective waste management procedures; and the potential, as a uranium exporter, to influence international discussions relating to safeguards. Chapters cover world statistics on nuclear power, sources of uranium, fuel cycle stages and related safety issues, environmental aspects of the fuel cycle, safeguards, high level waste management, the connection between nuclear power and nuclear weapons, and economic benefits to Australia

  20. Aerosol filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Goossens, W.R.A.; De Smet, M.; Trine, J.; Hertschap, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes the work on the development of fibre metallic prefilters to be placed upstream of HEPA filters for the exhaust gases of nuclear process plants. Investigations at ambient and high temperature were carried out. Measurements of the filtration performance of Bekipor porous webs and sintered mats were performed in the AFLT (aerosol filtration at low temperature) unit with a throughput of 15 m 3 /h. A parametric study on the influence of particle size, fibre diameter, number of layers and superficial velocity led to the optimum choice of the working parameters. Three selected filter types were then tested with polydisperse aerosols using a candle-type filter configuration or a flat-type filter configuration. The small-diameter candle type is not well suited for a spraying nozzles regeneration system so that only the flat-type filter was retained for high-temperature tests. A high-temperature test unit (AFHT) with a throughput of 8 to 10 m 3 /h at 400 0 C was used to test the three filter types with an aerosol generated by high-temperature calcination of a simulated nitric acid waste solution traced with 134 Cs. The regeneration of the filter by spray washing and the effect of the regeneration on the filter performance was studied for the three filter types. The porous mats have a higher dust loading capacity than the sintered web which means that their regeneration frequency can be kept lower

  1. Uranium, radium and thorium in soils with high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, MCNP-generated efficiencies, and VRF non-linear full-spectrum nuclide shape fitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metzger Robert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for analysis of uranium and radium in soils by gamma spectroscopy has been developed using VRF (“Visual RobFit” which, unlike traditional peak-search techniques, fits full-spectrum nuclide shapes with non-linear least-squares minimization of the chi-squared statistic. Gamma efficiency curves were developed for a 500 mL Marinelli beaker geometry as a function of soil density using MCNP. Collected spectra were then analyzed using the MCNP-generated efficiency curves and VRF to deconvolute the 90 keV peak complex of uranium and obtain 238U and 235U activities. 226Ra activity was determined either from the radon daughters if the equilibrium status is known, or directly from the deconvoluted 186 keV line. 228Ra values were determined from the 228Ac daughter activity. The method was validated by analysis of radium, thorium and uranium soil standards and by inter-comparison with other methods for radium in soils. The method allows for a rapid determination of whether a sample has been impacted by a man-made activity by comparison of the uranium and radium concentrations to those that would be expected from a natural equilibrium state.

  2. Uranium, radium and thorium in soils with high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, MCNP-generated efficiencies, and VRF non-linear full-spectrum nuclide shape fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Robert; Riper, Kenneth Van; Lasche, George

    2017-09-01

    A new method for analysis of uranium and radium in soils by gamma spectroscopy has been developed using VRF ("Visual RobFit") which, unlike traditional peak-search techniques, fits full-spectrum nuclide shapes with non-linear least-squares minimization of the chi-squared statistic. Gamma efficiency curves were developed for a 500 mL Marinelli beaker geometry as a function of soil density using MCNP. Collected spectra were then analyzed using the MCNP-generated efficiency curves and VRF to deconvolute the 90 keV peak complex of uranium and obtain 238U and 235U activities. 226Ra activity was determined either from the radon daughters if the equilibrium status is known, or directly from the deconvoluted 186 keV line. 228Ra values were determined from the 228Ac daughter activity. The method was validated by analysis of radium, thorium and uranium soil standards and by inter-comparison with other methods for radium in soils. The method allows for a rapid determination of whether a sample has been impacted by a man-made activity by comparison of the uranium and radium concentrations to those that would be expected from a natural equilibrium state.

  3. Characterization of titanite generations from Gameleira-I deposit (U-anomaly 35) Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP), Bahia state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Camila M. dos; Rios, Francisco Javier; Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Palmieri, Helena E.

    2017-01-01

    The Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP) is located in northwest of Bahia state and is the major uranium deposit of Brazil. Titanite is a common accessory mineral in rocks of LRUP and usually is part of uranium ore assemblage. Thirty three polished thin sections of F10 drill-hole located in Gameleira I deposit (anomaly 35) were petrographically studied and used for mineral chemistry study. Petrographically, titanite can be differentiated according to texture between granular and prismatic. Granular titanite is generally associated with magmatic assemblage (alkali feldspar hypersolvus granite) and it is present in some albitites (barren magnetite albitite). Prismatic titanite is restricted to albitite (garnet and mineralized magnetite albitite) and is associated with metamorphic assemblage. Microprobe analyses shows a trend from granites to mineralized albitites and do not cluster titanite by its texture, but by its host rocks. On the other hand, trace elements can distinguish titanite generation according to texture. Granular titanite is characterized by some highest high field strength elements (HFSE) values, like Hf, Pb, Th, U and HREE+Y, and the lowest V content. Vanadium has positive correlation with Zr/Hf ratio and inverse with U. Vanadium versus U relationship is inverse to the previously found by literature in LRUP what indicates that titanite was submitted to complexes processes of uranium loss after its crystallization. In addition, hafnium loss can be related to precipitation of hydrothermal zircon as it is strongly partitioned to this mineral. (author)

  4. Characterization of titanite generations from Gameleira-I deposit (U-anomaly 35) Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP), Bahia state, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila M. dos; Rios, Francisco Javier; Amorim, Lucas E.D.; Palmieri, Helena E., E-mail: cms@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The Lagoa Real Uranium Province (LRUP) is located in northwest of Bahia state and is the major uranium deposit of Brazil. Titanite is a common accessory mineral in rocks of LRUP and usually is part of uranium ore assemblage. Thirty three polished thin sections of F10 drill-hole located in Gameleira I deposit (anomaly 35) were petrographically studied and used for mineral chemistry study. Petrographically, titanite can be differentiated according to texture between granular and prismatic. Granular titanite is generally associated with magmatic assemblage (alkali feldspar hypersolvus granite) and it is present in some albitites (barren magnetite albitite). Prismatic titanite is restricted to albitite (garnet and mineralized magnetite albitite) and is associated with metamorphic assemblage. Microprobe analyses shows a trend from granites to mineralized albitites and do not cluster titanite by its texture, but by its host rocks. On the other hand, trace elements can distinguish titanite generation according to texture. Granular titanite is characterized by some highest high field strength elements (HFSE) values, like Hf, Pb, Th, U and HREE+Y, and the lowest V content. Vanadium has positive correlation with Zr/Hf ratio and inverse with U. Vanadium versus U relationship is inverse to the previously found by literature in LRUP what indicates that titanite was submitted to complexes processes of uranium loss after its crystallization. In addition, hafnium loss can be related to precipitation of hydrothermal zircon as it is strongly partitioned to this mineral. (author)

  5. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  6. Individual and big technology: a comparative attitudinal research to electricity generation from coal and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midden, C.J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic issue addressed in this research can be formulated as follows: how can peoples reactions to high risk energy technologies be described, analysed and compared. In this study the technologies for electricity generation of nuclear power and coal were chosen for comparison. The thesis gives a general introduction and considers: 1. policy issues involved in the introduction and implementation of large scale technologies. 2. the current electricity supply situation with particular emphasis on the contribution of nuclear power and coal. 3. recent research which has contributed to the formulation of energy policy decisions. The attitudinal framework adopted in this study is discussed in relation to other approaches for the analysis of risk perception, classification of risks and personal and collective decisions about risk taking. (Auth.)

  7. Aldehyde levels in e-cigarette aerosol: Findings from a replication study and from use of a new-generation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Kistler, Kurt A; Pennington, Alexander; Spyrou, Alketa; Kouretas, Dimitris; Gillman, Gene

    2018-01-01

    A recent study identified high aldehyde emissions from e-cigarettes (ECs), that when converted to reasonable daily human EC liquid consumption, 5 g/day, gave formaldehyde exposure equivalent to 604-3257 tobacco cigarettes. We replicated this study and also tested a new-generation atomizer under verified realistic (no dry puff) conditions. CE4v2 atomizers were tested at 3.8 V and 4.8 V, and a Nautilus Mini atomizer was tested at 9.0 W and 13.5 W. All measurements were performed in a laboratory ISO-accredited for EC aerosol collection and aldehyde measurements. CE4v2 generated dry puffs at both voltage settings. Formaldehyde levels were >10-fold lower, acetaldehyde 6-9-fold lower and acrolein 16-26-fold lower than reported in the previous study. Nautilus Mini did not generate dry puffs, and minimal aldehydes were emitted despite >100% higher aerosol production per puff compared to CE4v2 (formaldehyde: 16.7 and 16.5 μg/g; acetaldehyde: 9.6 and 10.3 μg/g; acrolein: 8.6 and 11.7 μg/g at 9.0 W and 13.5 W, respectively). EC liquid consumption of 5 g/day reduces aldehyde exposure by 94.4-99.8% compared to smoking 20 tobacco cigarettes. Checking for dry puffs is essential for EC emission testing. Under realistic conditions, new-generation ECs emit minimal aldehydes/g liquid at both low and high power. Validated methods should be used when analyzing EC aerosol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Classification of Uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlkamp, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A listing of the recognized types of uranium mineralization shows nineteen determinable types out of which only six can be classified as of economic significance at present: Oligomiitic quartz pebble conglomerates, sandstone types, calcretes, intra-intrusive types, hydrothermal veins, veinlike types. The different types can be genetically related to prevalent geological environments, i.e. 1. the primary uranium occurrences formed by endogenic processes, 2. the secondary derived from the primary by subsequent exogenic processes, 3. the tertiary occurrences are assumed to be formed by endogenic metamorphic processes, although little is known about the behaviour of the uranium during the metamorphosis and therefore the metallogenesis of this tertiary uranium generation is still vague. A metallotectonic-geochronologic correlation of the uranium deposits shows a distinct affinity of the uranium to certain geological epochs: The Upper Archean, Lower Proterozoic, the Hercynian and, in a less established stage, the Upper Proterozoic. (orig.) 891 HP/orig. 892 MKO [de

  9. Induction of Metallothionein Expression After Exposure to Conventional Cigarette Smoke but Not Electronic Cigarette (ECIG-Generated Aerosol in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Cobb

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: With the invention of electronic cigarettes (ECIG, many questions have been raised regarding their safety as an alternative to smoking conventional cigarettes. Conventional cigarette smoke contains a variety of toxicants including heavy metals. However, ECIG-generated aerosol contains only trace amounts of metals, adding to the argument for it being a safer alternative. In response to heavy metal exposure, metallothioneins are induced in cells to help store the metal, detoxify the body, and are also known responders to oxidative stress. In an attempt to add to the evaluation of the safety of ECIGs, metallothionein expression was quantified using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as an assessment of stress induced cellular damage caused by exposure.Methods: Adult nematodes were exposed to either ECIG aerosol or conventional cigarette smoke at doses of 15, 30, and 45 puffs, the equivalent of one, two, and three cigarettes, respectively. Movement, survival, and stress-induced sleep were assessed for up to 24 h after exposure. Relative expression levels for mtl-1 and mtl-2, C. elegans metallothionein genes, were analyzed after 1, 5, and 24 h post exposure using quantitative RT-PCR.Results: Nematodes exposed to conventional cigarette smoke underwent stress-induced sleep in a dose dependent manner with animals recovering to values within the range of air control after 5 h post exposure. Those exposed to ECIG aerosol did not undergo stress-induced sleep and were indistinguishable from controls. The expression of mtl-1 increased in a dose and time dependent manner in C. elegans exposed to conventional cigarette smoke, with a maximum expression observed at 5 h post exposure of 45 puffs. No induction of mtl-2 was observed in any animals. Additionally, ECIG aerosol did not induce expression of mtl-1 and mtl-2 at levels different than those of untreated.Conclusion: ECIG aerosol failed to induce a stress response in C. elegans. In contrast

  10. Improvements in modelling (by ESCADRE mod1.0) radiative heat losses through gas and aerosols generated by molten corium-concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passalacqua, R.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosols generated during the molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) influence the reactor cavity thermal hydraulics: the cloud of aerosols, located inside the reactor cavity, restrains the upward-directed heat exchange consequently the cool-down of the high-temperature molten corium for a considerable period of time. IPSN is developing a computer code system for source predictions in severe accident scenarios. This code system is named ESCADRE. WECHSL/CALTHER is internal module dealing with MCCI (it is also a stand-alone code): it models the heat transfers involving the superior volume of the cavity. When modelling the upward-directed power distribution by WECHSL/CALTHER, a faster concrete basemat penetration takes place due to the low heat losses of the closed MCCI cavity enclosure. The model, here presented, is going to be validated with data from the AEROSTAT experiment. This experiment, planned at CEA Cadarache, will evaluate the influence of aerosols on the global power distribution in the reactor cavity. Radiative heat losses are important especially for cavity configurations such as those of new plant designs (equipped with a core-catcher) where the upward power losses are promoted by the corium spreading in a flat cavity

  11. Exposure implications for uranium aerosols formed at a new laser enrichment facility: application of the ICRP Respiratory Tract and Systemic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansorbolo, E.; Hodgson, A.; Stradling, G.N.; Hodgson, S.; Metivier, H.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Jarvis, N.S.; Birchall, A

    1998-07-01

    A pilot enrichment facility developed in France employs laser technology. The development of this process has resulted in three different types of aerosols identified as variable mixtures of U{sub metal}+ UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. A procedure is described for assessing intakes and doses after inhalation of these dusts using site and material specific data in conjunction with the most recent ICRP biokinetic models. It is concluded that exposure control could be based on either radiotoxicity or chemical toxicity and that chest monitoring and urine assay could be useful, provided that measurements are made soon after a known acute intake. (author)

  12. Uranium market 1986-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The report on the uranium market describes the technical and economic factors influencing the nuclear fuel industry in mid-1986. The contents of the report includes a discussion of: the nuclear generating capacity, the demand for uranium (requirements and procurements), supplies of uranium, and the interaction between supply and demand. The report does not study in depth the effects of the Chernobyl accident on the uranium market.

  13. Uranium resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power-generating capacity will continue to expand, albeit at a slower pace than during the past fifteen years. This expansion must be matched by an adequately increasing supply of uranium. This report compares uranium supply and demand data in free market countries with the nuclear industry's natural uranium requirements up to the year 2000. It also reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production in 46 countries

  14. Depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffer, E.; Nifenecker, H.

    2001-02-01

    This document deals with the physical, chemical and radiological properties of the depleted uranium. What is the depleted uranium? Why do the military use depleted uranium and what are the risk for the health? (A.L.B.)

  15. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  16. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  17. Influence of physical properties and chemical composition of sample on formation of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond laser ablation at 213 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa, E-mail: mhola@sci.muni.c [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Konecna, Veronika [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Veveri 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kaiser, Jozef [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technicka 2896/2, 616 69 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2010-01-15

    The influence of sample properties and composition on the size and concentration of aerosol particles generated by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser ablation at 213 nm was investigated for three sets of different materials, each containing five specimens with a similar matrix (Co-cemented carbides with a variable content of W and Co, steel samples with minor differences in elemental content and silica glasses with various colors). The concentration of ablated particles (particle number concentration, PNC) was measured in two size ranges (10-250 nm and 0.25-17 mum) using an optical aerosol spectrometer. The shapes and volumes of the ablation craters were obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by an optical profilometer, respectively. Additionally, the structure of the laser-generated particles was studied after their collection on a filter using SEM. The results of particle concentration measurements showed a significant dominance of particles smaller than 250 nm in comparison with larger particles, irrespective of the kind of material. Even if the number of particles larger than 0.25 mum is negligible (up to 0.1%), the volume of large particles that left the ablation cell can reach 50% of the whole particle volume depending on the material. Study of the ablation craters and the laser-generated particles showed a various number of particles produced by different ablation mechanisms (particle splashing or condensation), but the similar character of released particles for all materials was observed by SEM after particle collection on the membrane filter. The created aerosol always consisted of two main structures - spherical particles with diameters from tenths to units of micrometers originally ejected from the molten surface layer and mum-sized 'fibres' composed of primary agglomerates with diameters in the range between tens and hundreds of nanometers. The shape and structure of ablation craters were in good agreement with particle concentration

  18. Uranium industry annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U 3 O 8 (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U 3 O 8 (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world's largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market

  19. Uranium industry annual 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    Uranium production in the United States has declined dramatically from a peak of 43.7 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (16.8 thousand metric tons uranium (U)) in 1980 to 3.1 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1.2 thousand metric tons U) in 1993. This decline is attributed to the world uranium market experiencing oversupply and intense competition. Large inventories of uranium accumulated when optimistic forecasts for growth in nuclear power generation were not realized. The other factor which is affecting U.S. uranium production is that some other countries, notably Australia and Canada, possess higher quality uranium reserves that can be mined at lower costs than those of the United States. Realizing its competitive advantage, Canada was the world`s largest producer in 1993 with an output of 23.9 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (9.2 thousand metric tons U). The U.S. uranium industry, responding to over a decade of declining market prices, has downsized and adopted less costly and more efficient production methods. The main result has been a suspension of production from conventional mines and mills. Since mid-1992, only nonconventional production facilities, chiefly in situ leach (ISL) mining and byproduct recovery, have operated in the United States. In contrast, nonconventional sources provided only 13 percent of the uranium produced in 1980. ISL mining has developed into the most cost efficient and environmentally acceptable method for producing uranium in the United States. The process, also known as solution mining, differs from conventional mining in that solutions are used to recover uranium from the ground without excavating the ore and generating associated solid waste. This article describes the current ISL Yang technology and its regulatory approval process, and provides an analysis of the factors favoring ISL mining over conventional methods in a declining uranium market.

  20. Trans-generational study of DNA alterations and their consequences on life history traits and energy budget of Daphnia magna exposed to depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaire, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how toxicants affect species at various levels of biological organization is a major research goal in both ecotoxicology and radioecology. As part of IRSN program ENVIRHOM, which aims to assess environmental risks related to the presence of radionuclides in the environment, this PhD work explored how depleted uranium alters DNA and affects life history traits (survival, growth and reproduction) of an aquatic invertebrate, Daphnia magna. To answer to this problematic, an experimental approach and a modeling approach are conducted. An experimental study is performed to evaluate DNA accumulation and transmission during an uranium exposure (0; 2; 9.9; 22.2 and 50 μg.L -1 ) over two successive generations (F0 and F1). Different exposures scenarios (continuous, post-hatching and embryo exposure) are achieved to test the specific sensitivity of several life stages to uranium. Genotoxic effects are estimated using random amplified DNA technique combined with PCR (PCR-RAPD). In continuous and post-hatching exposure scenarios, results highlighted an accumulation and a transmission of DNA damage across generations with an increase in effect severity. DNA alterations are reported at hatching of the F1 generation at a concentration as low as 2 μg.L -1 . Effects on growth and reproduction are stronger when the embryo stage is exposed and remain visible at 9.9 μg.L -1 despite a return in a clean medium at hatching. Results suggest that DNA damage could be used as early indicators of future effects on life history traits. A mechanistic analysis of experimental results is conducted using a DEBtox model (dynamic energy budget applied to toxicology) to better understand the causes of the increase in effect severity across generations. A model with two stress factors (one correlated to external concentration and another correlated to a damage level) is developed. Results of fits suggest the involvement of one second mode of action to explain immediate effects of

  1. Organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN

  2. Uranium conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina

    2006-03-01

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF 6 and UF 4 are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material

  3. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  4. Production of a pulseable fission-like neutron flux using a monoenergetic 14 MeV neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltick, D.; McConchie, S.; Sword, E.

    2008-04-01

    The design and performance of a pulseable neutron source utilizing a D-T neutron generator and a depleted uranium reflector are presented. Approximately half the generator's 14 MeV neutron flux is used to produce a fission-like neutron spectrum similar to 252Cf. For every 14 MeV neutron entering the reflector, more than one fission-like neutron is reflected back across the surface of the reflector. Because delayed neutron production is more than two orders of magnitude below the prompt neutron production, the source takes full advantage of the generator's pulsed mode capability. Applications include all elemental characterization systems using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy. The source simultaneously emits 14 MeV neutrons optimal to excite fast neutron-induced gamma-ray signals, such as from carbon and oxygen, and fission-like neutrons optimal to induce neutron capture gamma-ray signals, such as from hydrogen, nitrogen, and chlorine. Experiments were performed, which compare well to Monte Carlo simulations, showing that the uranium reflector enhances capture signals by up to a factor of 15 compared to the absence of a reflector.

  5. Characteristics of attached radon-222 daughters under both laboratory and underground uranium-mine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.O.; Cooper, J.A.; Langford, J.C.; Petersen, M.R.

    1981-09-01

    The organic, inorganic, and radiological characteristics of airborne aerosols have been measured as a function of particle size in controlled atmosphere test chambers and operating uranium mines. Concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in two mines ranged from 26 to 57 ng/m 3 of air. The carbon chain length of adsorbed n-alkanes was correlated with particle size. Normal mining activities produced an ore dust aerosol with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) greater than 2 μm. The elements Na, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Fe, and U exhibited elemental ratios similar to bulk ore and had comparable MMAD's. The S, Zn, and Pb were higher in aerosols than bulk ore and were associated with smaller MMAD particulates. Radon daughter particle size distributions were influenced by the kinds of particulates generated in mining activity

  6. Raw material uranium; Rohstoff Uran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-03-15

    Uranium is an important raw material in human life. Mostly using nuclear fission uranium is used in nuclear medicine, industry and research. The most important application is the generation of electricity in nuclear power plants. Due to the global availability the worldwide uranium supply is guaranties for a long time. The contribution covers the issues medicine, neutron research, energy generation, occurrence, mining, processing, recycling and disposal.

  7. Uranium enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by (1) the anatexis of continental crust (2) processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichement in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (Authors)

  8. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Nicola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Massoli, Paola; Paglione, Marco; Croasdale, David R.; Parmar, Yatish; Tagliavini, Emilio; Gilardoni, Stefania; Decesari, Stefano

    2017-09-01

    The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization - proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS). Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1 × 1012 molec OH cm-3 × s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC), providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  9. Characterizing source fingerprints and ageing processes in laboratory-generated secondary organic aerosols using proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR analysis and HPLC HULIS determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zanca

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of secondary organic aerosol (SOA in laboratory settings has greatly increased our knowledge of the diverse chemical processes and environmental conditions responsible for the formation of particulate matter starting from biogenic and anthropogenic volatile compounds. However, characteristics of the different experimental setups and the way they impact the composition and the timescale of formation of SOA are still subject to debate. In this study, SOA samples were generated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM oxidation flow reactor using α-pinene, naphthalene and isoprene as precursors. The PAM reactor facilitated exploration of SOA composition over atmospherically relevant photochemical ageing timescales that are unattainable in environmental chambers. The SOA samples were analyzed using two state-of-the-art analytical techniques for SOA characterization – proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR spectroscopy and HPLC determination of humic-like substances (HULIS. Results were compared with previous Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS measurements. The combined 1H-NMR, HPLC, and AMS datasets show that the composition of the studied SOA systems tend to converge to highly oxidized organic compounds upon prolonged OH exposures. Further, our 1H-NMR findings show that only α-pinene SOA acquires spectroscopic features comparable to those of ambient OA when exposed to at least 1  ×  1012 molec OH cm−3  ×  s OH exposure, or multiple days of equivalent atmospheric OH oxidation. Over multiple days of equivalent OH exposure, the formation of HULIS is observed in both α-pinene SOA and in naphthalene SOA (maximum yields: 16 and 30 %, respectively, of total analyzed water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC, providing evidence of the formation of humic-like polycarboxylic acids in unseeded SOA.

  10. Secondary organic aerosol formation by limonene ozonolysis: Parameterizing multi-generational chemistry in ozone- and residence time-limited indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Michael S.

    2016-11-01

    Terpene ozonolysis reactions can be a strong source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. SOA formation can be parameterized and predicted using the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), also known as the SOA yield, which quantifies the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized terpene. Limonene is a monoterpene that is at sufficient concentrations such that it reacts meaningfully with ozone indoors. It has two unsaturated bonds, and the magnitude of the limonene ozonolysis AMF varies by a factor of ∼4 depending on whether one or both of its unsaturated bonds are ozonated, which depends on whether ozone is in excess compared to limonene as well as the available time for reactions indoors. Hence, this study developed a framework to predict the limonene AMF as a function of the ozone [O3] and limonene [lim] concentrations and the air exchange rate (AER, h-1), which is the inverse of the residence time. Empirical AMF data were used to calculate a mixing coefficient, β, that would yield a 'resultant AMF' as the combination of the AMFs due to ozonolysis of one or both of limonene's unsaturated bonds, within the volatility basis set (VBS) organic aerosol framework. Then, β was regressed against predictors of log10([O3]/[lim]) and AER (R2 = 0.74). The β increased as the log10([O3]/[lim]) increased and as AER decreased, having the physical meaning of driving the resultant AMF to the upper AMF condition when both unsaturated bonds of limonene are ozonated. Modeling demonstrates that using the correct resultant AMF to simulate SOA formation owing to limonene ozonolysis is crucial for accurate indoor prediction.

  11. Review of the toxicologic and radiologic risks to military personnel from exposure to depleted uranium during and after combat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Academies Press (U.S.); National Research Council (U.S.). Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; National Research Council (U.S.) Committee on Toxicologic and Radiologic Effects from Exposure to Depleted Uranium During and After Combat

    2008-01-01

    .... Depleted uranium is a toxic heavy metal and is weakly radioactive. Concerns have been raised about the adverse health effects from exposure to depleted uranium that is aerosolized during combat...

  12. Determination of uranium and thorium contents using a 14 MeV neutron generator and a radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casagrande, J.A.

    1981-04-01

    A simple method was developed which can determine uranium and thorium in uranium ores, by 14MeV neutron activation and delayed neutron counting. The process can be used in field laboratories to select samples for processing. The method does not require a previous treatment of the samples and the analysis time is below 5 minutes. The detection limit of the method is about 2 ppm, when the yield of the 14MeV source has a value of 2 X 10 11 neutrons/second, and an optimized delayed neutron counter is used. A radiometric method is used determine separately the thorium content of the sample, and this result is combined with the activation one in order to obtain uranium content. The radiometric method in the counting of the 2,6 MeV gamma rays from 208 Tl using a NaI(Tl) detector. Delayed neutron counting is performed with BF 3 detectors inside a paraffin box. The problem of radioactive equilibrium does not affect thorium determination since the biggest activities of thorium daughters are much smaller than the times involved in the displacements of mineral which can give origin to the radioactive desequilibrium. (Author) [pt

  13. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  14. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process

  15. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE ' PO Mayak' , 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating

  16. Overview of the uranium prospecting in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, P; Vaz Chaves, N.; Pirelli, H.

    1985-01-01

    The report is about Uranium prospection in Uruguay by DINAMIGE experts. They were explained the radioactive properties elements in Uranium and its importance as a fuel oil for electric energy generation

  17. Solubility of airborne uranium samples from uranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, T.; Oved, S.; Sarah, R.; Gonen, R.; Paz-Tal, O.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Tshuva, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: During the production and machining processes of uranium metal, aerosols might be released to the air. Inhalation of these aerosols is the main route of internal exposure of workers. To assess the radiation dose from the intake of these uranium compounds it is necessary to know their absorption type, based on their dissolution rate in extracellular aqueous environment of lung fluid. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has assigned UF4 and U03 to absorption type M (blood absorption which contains a 10 % fraction with an absorption rate of 10 minutes and 90 % fraction with an absorption rate of 140 fays) and UO2 and U3O8 to absorption type S (blood absorption rate with a half-time of 7000 days) in the ICRP-66 model.The solubility classification of uranium compounds defined by the ICRP can serve as a general guidance. At specific workplaces, differences can be encountered, because of differences in compounds production process and the presence of additional compounds, with different solubility characteristics. According to ICRP recommendations, material-specific rates of absorption should be preferred to default parameters whenever specific experimental data exists. Solubility profiles of uranium aerosols were determined by performing in vitro chemical solubility tests on air samples taken from uranium production and machining facilities. The dissolution rate was determined over 100 days in a simultant solution of the extracellular airway lining fluid. The filter sample was immersed in a test vial holding 60 ml of simultant fluid, which was maintained at a 37 o C inside a thermostatic bath and at a physiological pH of 7.2-7.6. The test vials with the solution were shaken to simulate the conditions inside the extracellular aqueous environment of the lung as much as possible. The tests indicated that the uranium aerosols samples taken from the metal production and machining facilities at the Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN

  18. S.210: A Bill to establish the United States Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the United States, to provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry and to provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated pursuant to Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, January 15, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    The bill would amend the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 to establish the US Enrichment Corporation to operate the Federal uranium enrichment program on a profitable and efficient basis in order to maximize the long term economic value to the US, would provide a Federal contribution for the reclamation of mill tailings generated as a result of Federal defense contracts at active uranium and thorium processing sites, and would provide assistance to the domestic uranium industry

  19. Aerosol particles generated by diesel-powered school buses at urban schools as a source of children’s exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstetler, Heather A.; Yermakov, Mikhail; Reponen, Tiina; Ryan, Patrick H.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Various heath effects in children have been associated with exposure to traffic-related particulate matter (PM), including emissions from school buses. In this study, the indoor and outdoor aerosol at four urban elementary schools serviced by diesel-powered school buses was characterized with respect to the particle number concentrations and size distributions as well as the PM2.5 mass concentrations and elemental compositions. It was determined that the presence of school buses significantly affected the outdoor particle size distribution, specifically in the ultrafine fraction. The time-weighted average of the total number concentration measured outside the schools was significantly associated with the bus and the car counts. The concentration increase was consistently observed during the morning drop-off hours and in most of the days during the afternoon pick-up period (although at a lower degree). Outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations measured at schools ranged from 3.8 to 27.6 µg m−3. The school with the highest number of operating buses exhibited the highest average PM2.5 mass concentration. The outdoor mass concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were also highest at the school with the greatest number of buses. Most (47/55) correlations between traffic-related elements identified in the outdoor PM2.5 were significant with elements identified in the indoor PM2.5. Significant associations were observed between indoor and outdoor aerosols for EC, EC/OC, and the total particle number concentration. Day-to-day and school-to-school variations in Indoor/Outdoor (I/O) ratios were related to the observed differences in opening windows and doors, which enhanced the particle penetration, as well as indoor activities at schools. Overall, the results on I/O ratio obtained in this study reflect the sizes of particles emitted by diesel-powered school bus engines (primarily, an ultrafine fraction capable of penetrating indoors). PMID:25904818

  20. Aerosol particles generated by diesel-powered school buses at urban schools as a source of children's exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstetler, Heather A; Yermakov, Mikhail; Reponen, Tiina; Ryan, Patrick H; Grinshpun, Sergey A

    2011-03-01

    Various heath effects in children have been associated with exposure to traffic-related particulate matter (PM), including emissions from school buses. In this study, the indoor and outdoor aerosol at four urban elementary schools serviced by diesel-powered school buses was characterized with respect to the particle number concentrations and size distributions as well as the PM2.5 mass concentrations and elemental compositions. It was determined that the presence of school buses significantly affected the outdoor particle size distribution, specifically in the ultrafine fraction. The time-weighted average of the total number concentration measured outside the schools was significantly associated with the bus and the car counts. The concentration increase was consistently observed during the morning drop-off hours and in most of the days during the afternoon pick-up period (although at a lower degree). Outdoor PM2.5 mass concentrations measured at schools ranged from 3.8 to 27.6 µg m -3 . The school with the highest number of operating buses exhibited the highest average PM2.5 mass concentration. The outdoor mass concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) were also highest at the school with the greatest number of buses. Most (47/55) correlations between traffic-related elements identified in the outdoor PM2.5 were significant with elements identified in the indoor PM2.5. Significant associations were observed between indoor and outdoor aerosols for EC, EC/OC, and the total particle number concentration. Day-to-day and school-to-school variations in Indoor/Outdoor (I/O) ratios were related to the observed differences in opening windows and doors, which enhanced the particle penetration, as well as indoor activities at schools. Overall, the results on I/O ratio obtained in this study reflect the sizes of particles emitted by diesel-powered school bus engines (primarily, an ultrafine fraction capable of penetrating indoors).

  1. Feasibility study of the dissolution rates of uranium ore dust, uranium concentrates and uranium compounds in simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A flow-through apparatus has been devised to study the dissolution in simulated lung fluid of aerosol materials associated with the Canadian uranium industry. The apparatus has been experimentally applied over 16 day extraction periods to approximately 2g samples of < 38um and 53-75um particle-size fractions of both Elliot Lake and Mid-Western uranium ores. The extraction of uranium-238 was in the range 24-60% for these samples. The corresponding range for radium-226 was 8-26%. Thorium-230, lead-210, polonium-210, and thorium-232 were not significantly extracted. It was incidentally found that the elemental composition of the ores studied varies significantly with particle size, the radionuclide-containing minerals and several extractable stable elements being concentrated in the smaller size fraction. Samples of the refined compounds uranium dioxide and uranium trioxide were submitted to similar 16 day extraction experiments. Approximately 0.5% of the uranium was extracted from a 0.258g sample of unsintered (fluid bed) uranium dioxide of particle size < 38um. The corresponding figure for a 0.292g sample of uranium trioxide was 97%. Two aerosol samples on filters were also studied. Of the 88ug uranium initially measured on stage 2 of a cascade impactor sample collected from the yellow cake packing area of an Elliot Lake mill, essentially 100% was extracted over a 16 day period. The corresponding figure for an open face filter sample collected in a fuel fabrication plant and initially measured at 288ug uranium was approximately 3%. Recommendations are made with regard to further work of a research nature which would be useful in this area. Recommendations are also made on sampling methods, analytical methods and extraction conditions for various aerosols of interest which are to be studied in a work of broader scope designed to yield meaningful data in connection with lung dosimetry calculations

  2. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  3. Implementation of the ICRP 66 respiratory tract model: example of occupational exposure to uranium oxides formed in a new laser enrichment process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansoborlo, E.; Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Hodgson, A.; Stradling, G.N.; Birchall, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new uranium enrichment facility using laser isotopic separation generates aerosols consisting of U metal + UO 2 : with traces of UPON. Results of lung absorption to blood showed that the U metal + UO 2 transportability was appreciably greater than for other industrial forms of UO 2 . Taking into account the new ICRP human respiratory tract model, the data were used as a basis for assessing the dose coefficient, for the dust sampled at the workplace. (author)

  4. Air sampling to assess potential generation of aerosolized viable bacteria during flow cytometric analysis of unfixed bacterial suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Christine F; Inglis, Timothy JJ

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated aerosolized viable bacteria in a university research laboratory during operation of an acoustic-assisted flow cytometer for antimicrobial susceptibility testing by sampling room air before, during and after flow cytometer use. The aim was to assess the risk associated with use of an acoustic-assisted flow cytometer analyzing unfixed bacterial suspensions. Air sampling in a nearby clinical laboratory was conducted during the same period to provide context for the existing background of microorganisms that would be detected in the air. The three species of bacteria undergoing analysis by flow cytometer in the research laboratory were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Burkholderia thailandensis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. None of these was detected from multiple 1000 L air samples acquired in the research laboratory environment. The main cultured bacteria in both locations were skin commensal and environmental bacteria, presumed to have been disturbed or dispersed in laboratory air by personnel movements during routine laboratory activities. The concentrations of bacteria detected in research laboratory air samples were reduced after interventional cleaning measures were introduced and were lower than those in the diagnostic clinical microbiology laboratory. We conclude that our flow cytometric analyses of unfixed suspensions of K. pneumoniae, B. thailandensis and S. pneumoniae do not pose a risk to cytometer operators or other personnel in the laboratory but caution against extrapolation of our results to other bacteria and/or different flow cytometric experimental procedures. PMID:29608197

  5. Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol generated from limonene oxidation by ozone studied with chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodegradation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA prepared by ozone-initiated oxidation of D-limonene is studied with an action spectroscopy approach, which relies on detection of volatile photoproducts with chemical ionization mass-spectrometry as a function of the UV irradiation wavelength. Efficient photodegradation is observed for a broad range of ozone (0.1–300 ppm and D-limonene (0.02–3 ppm concentrations used in the preparation of SOA. The observed photoproducts are dominated by oxygenated C1-C3 compounds such as methanol, formic acid, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, and acetone. The irradiation wavelength dependence of the combined yield of the photoproducts closely tracks the absorption spectrum of the SOA material suggesting that photodegradation is not limited to the UV wavelengths. Kinetic simulations suggest that RO2+HO2/RO2 reactions represent the dominant route to photochemically active carbonyl and peroxide species in the limonene SOA prepared in these experiments. Similar photodegradation processes are likely to occur in realistic SOA produced by OH- or O3-initiated oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds in clean air.

  6. Study on generation and granulometry of a standard aerosol of CINa for use in determinations of filtration efficiency of absolute filters; Estudio sobre la generacion y granulometria de un aerosol patron de CINa para la determinacion de eficacias filtrantes de filtros absolutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milla, E

    1978-07-01

    This work has as objective the study of the conditions of generation and granulometry of an aerosol generated by atomizing with compressed a i r a solution of CINa in water in order to obtain particles, CINa cubes. The droplets of the spray formed are dried in a stream of air, acting as a carrier, inside the pipe of a bank of test filters. The granulometric analysis has been carried out by sampling in the gaseous phase. A dispersion photometer was used that yields the size spectrum of particles. The variables concerned in generation, whose influence on aerosol granulometry were analyzed are: characteristic diameter of atomizer unit, pressure of compressed air of generation, concentration of saline solution, temperature of air carrier, length of bank pipe, sampling position across a section, length of sampling duct and ratio between speeds in pipe and duct. (Author) 50 refs.

  7. Studies on entrained DNPPA separation by charcoal adsorption from aqueous solutions generated during uranium recovery from strong phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.K.; Vijayalakshmi, R.; Singh, H.

    2010-01-01

    During the separation of metal ions by solvent extraction technique in hydrometallurgical operations, organic solvents either get entrained or dissolved in various types of aqueous streams, which need to be separated out to prevent environmental pollution and solvent loss. Generally entrained solvents are separated on plant scale by parallel plate separators or by froth floatation cells, while the dissolved solvents are recovered either by organic diluent wash or by charcoal adsorption. A novel process has been developed to recover uranium from merchant grade phosphoric acid (MGA) employing synergistic mixture of DNPPA (di-nonyl phenyl phosphoric acid ) and TOPO (tri-n-octyl phosphine oxide) dissolved in petrofin. After recovery of uranium, MGA has to be returned to the host company for the production of fertilizer. This MGA has to be free from any contamination due to DNPPA and TOPO. Separation of DNPPA and TOPO from MGA by diluent wash method has been reported. There is no information available in literature for the separation of DNPPA and TOPO from such aqueous streams by carbon adsorption. The present investigation describes the methodology based on charcoal adsorption study (batch and continuous column operation) to separate DNPPA from MGA. Three different types of charcoal namely coconut shell based, coal based and pelletized charcoal were evaluated for DNPPA separation from MGA containing 100 mg/L DNPPA. It was found that the % DNPPA adsorptions in single contact (0.5g C/50 ml) were 57, 34 and 10 in coconut shell, coal based and pelletised charcoal respectively. Based on the results, the coconut shell based charcoal was selected for further study. Adsorption of DNPPA by coconut shell based charcoal was investigated by carrying out the experiments with 50 ml MGA containing 770 mg/L DNPPA by adding 1 to 7 g charcoal respectively in separate beakers

  8. NOAA's National Air Quality Predictions and Development of Aerosol and Atmospheric Composition Prediction Components for the Next Generation Global Prediction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajner, I.; Hou, Y. T.; McQueen, J.; Lee, P.; Stein, A. F.; Tong, D.; Pan, L.; Huang, J.; Huang, H. C.; Upadhayay, S.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA provides operational air quality predictions using the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC): ozone and wildfire smoke for the United States and airborne dust for the contiguous 48 states at http://airquality.weather.gov. NOAA's predictions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) became publicly available in February 2016. Ozone and PM2.5 predictions are produced using a system that operationally links the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model with meteorological inputs from the North American mesoscale forecast Model (NAM). Smoke and dust predictions are provided using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. Current NAQFC focus is on updating CMAQ to version 5.0.2, improving PM2.5 predictions, and updating emissions estimates, especially for NOx using recently observed trends. Wildfire smoke emissions from a newer version of the USFS BlueSky system are being included in a new configuration of the NAQFC NAM-CMAQ system, which is re-run for the previous 24 hours when the wildfires were observed from satellites, to better represent wildfire emissions prior to initiating predictions for the next 48 hours. In addition, NOAA is developing the Next Generation Global Prediction System (NGGPS) to represent the earth system for extended weather prediction. NGGPS will include a representation of atmospheric dynamics, physics, aerosols and atmospheric composition as well as coupling with ocean, wave, ice and land components. NGGPS is being developed with a broad community involvement, including community developed components and academic research to develop and test potential improvements for potentially inclusion in NGGPS. Several investigators at NOAA's research laboratories and in academia are working to improve the aerosol and gaseous chemistry representation for NGGPS, to develop and evaluate the representation of atmospheric composition, and to establish and improve the coupling with radiation and microphysics

  9. Stratospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Ivanov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements can provide both spatial and temporal data of sufficient resolution to be of use in climate models. Relatively recent results from a wide range of instrument techniques for measuring stratospheric aerosol parameters are described. Such techniques include impactor sampling, lidar system sensing, filter sampling, photoelectric particle counting, satellite extinction-sensing using the sun as a source, and optical depth probing, at sites mainly removed from tropospheric aerosol sources. Some of these techniques have also had correlative and intercomparison studies. The main methods for determining the vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosols are outlined: lidar extinction measurements from satellites; impactor measurements from balloons and aircraft; and photoelectric particle counter measurements from balloons, aircraft, and rockets. The conversion of the lidar backscatter to stratospheric aerosol mass loading is referred to. Absolute measurements of total solar extinction from satellite orbits can be used to extract the aerosol extinction, and several examples of vertical profiles of extinction obtained with the SAGE satellite are given. Stratospheric mass loading can be inferred from extinction using approximate linear relationships but under restrictive conditions. Impactor sampling is essentially the only method in which the physical nature of the stratospheric aerosol is observed visually. Vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol number concentration using impactor data are presented. Typical profiles using a dual-size-range photoelectric dustsonde particle counter are given for volcanically disturbed and inactive periods. Some measurements of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols are also presented. Volatility measurements are described, indicating that stratospheric aerosols are composed primarily of about 75% sulfuric acid and 25% water

  10. Health and environmental problems of using depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matousek, J.

    2006-01-01

    In the 1970's, a core of depleted uranium (DU) began to be introduced into the break through anti-tank munitions to enhance their effectiveness. The health and environmental threats of DU stem from the pyrophoric character of the core, burnt when penetrating armour to an aerosol of uranium oxides deposited in tissues after inhalation or ingestion. Their delayed effects are due to internal alpha irradiation by daughter products and toxicity of uranium. (authors)

  11. Czechoslovak uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluskal, O.

    1992-01-01

    Data and knowledge related to the prospecting, mining, processing and export of uranium ores in Czechoslovakia are presented. In the years between 1945 and January 1, 1991, 98,461.1 t of uranium were extracted. In the period 1965-1990 the uranium industry was subsidized from the state budget to a total of 38.5 billion CSK. The subsidies were put into extraction, investments and geologic prospecting; the latter was at first, ie. till 1960 financed by the former USSR, later on the two parties shared costs on a 1:1 basis. Since 1981 the prospecting has been entirely financed from the Czechoslovak state budget. On Czechoslovak territory uranium has been extracted from deposits which may be classified as vein-type deposits, deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones and deposits connected with weathering processes. The future of mining, however, is almost exclusively being connected with deposits in uranium-bearing sandstones. A brief description and characteristic is given of all uranium deposits on Czechoslovak territory, and the organization of uranium mining in Czechoslovakia is described as is the approach used in the world to evaluate uranium deposits; uranium prices and actual resources are also given. (Z.S.) 3 figs

  12. Uranium and environment in Kazakstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fyodorov, G.; Bayadilov, E.; Zhelnov, V.; Akhmetov, M.; Abakumov, A.

    1997-01-01

    Kazakstan's data on uranium as a state report has been included for the first time in the Red Book. Therefore the report contains two large themes presented in Suggested Topics for Papers: Country report, based on the 1995 NEA/IAEA Red Book Questionnaire and environmental impact regulations. Kazakstan is considered as one of the world leaders on uranium supply. In Kazakstan there are many well known types of deposits but the main one is the sandstone-rollfront type. That type is represented by the group of deposits of the Syr-Darya uranium ore province. Deposits of that type include that main part of uranium ore of the Republic of Kazakstan and supply almost all of its uranium mining. At the large three enterprises the uranium is extracted by underground leaching. The mining method of uranium extraction is stopped. Because of the poor development of nuclear energy, Kazakstan's need for uranium is not very high. Presence of a large amount of cheap and technological uranium ores allow the Republic to export uranium. There are plans to increase uranium mining and perhaps to establish new mining facilities including joint-ventures. More than 50 uranium deposits are known in Kazakstan. During prospecting and exploitation of these deposits a large amount of rad wastes in the form of ore dumps and tailings were generated. They have a substantial influence on the environment. Moreover, near the sandstone-rollfront type uranium deposits the large amount of underground water has been contaminated by radionuclides. Special investigation of this phenomenon is necessary. In Kazakstan there are the rad waste disposal conception and contaminated earth recultivation regulations. At present ''The Rad Wastes Management Law'' is submitted for approval. (author). 2 figs

  13. Uranium 2003 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2004-01-01

    Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a detailed statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020.

  14. Methodology and a preliminary data base for examining the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    An analytical model was developed to assess and examine the health effects associated with the production of electricity from uranium and coal fuels. The model is based on a systematic methodology that is both simple and easy to check, and provides details about the various components of health risk. A preliminary set of data that is needed to calculate the health risks was gathered, normalized to the model facilities, and presented in a concise manner. Additional data will become available as a result of other evaluations of both fuel cycles, and they should be included in the data base. An iterative approach involving only a few steps is recommended for validating the model. After each validation step, the model is improved in the areas where new information or increased interest justifies such upgrading. Sensitivity analysis is proposed as the best method of using the model to its full potential. Detailed quantification of the risks associated with the two fuel cycles is not presented in this report. The evaluation of risks from producing electricity by these two methods can be completed only after several steps that address difficult social and technical questions. Preliminary quantitative assessment showed that several factors not considered in detail in previous studies are potentially important. 255 refs., 21 figs., 179 tabs.

  15. Uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poty, B.; Roux, J.

    1998-01-01

    The processing of uranium ores for uranium extraction and concentration is not much different than the processing of other metallic ores. However, thanks to its radioactive property, the prospecting of uranium ores can be performed using geophysical methods. Surface and sub-surface detection methods are a combination of radioactive measurement methods (radium, radon etc..) and classical mining and petroleum prospecting methods. Worldwide uranium prospecting has been more or less active during the last 50 years, but the rise of raw material and energy prices between 1970 and 1980 has incited several countries to develop their nuclear industry in order to diversify their resources and improve their energy independence. The result is a considerable increase of nuclear fuels demand between 1980 and 1990. This paper describes successively: the uranium prospecting methods (direct, indirect and methodology), the uranium deposits (economical definition, uranium ores, and deposits), the exploitation of uranium ores (use of radioactivity, radioprotection, effluents), the worldwide uranium resources (definition of the different categories and present day state of worldwide resources). (J.S.)

  16. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report looks at the following issues: How much Soviet uranium ore and enriched uranium are imported into the United States and what is the extent to which utilities flag swap to disguise these purchases? What are the U.S.S.R.'s enriched uranium trading practices? To what extent are utilities required to return used fuel to the Soviet Union as part of the enriched uranium sales agreement? Why have U.S. utilities ended their contracts to buy enrichment services from DOE?

  17. Review of uranium market price

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maragatham Kumar; Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Koh You Beng

    2007-01-01

    Uranium is used as an abundant source of concentrated energy and is the principal fuel for the generation of electricity by nuclear reactors. In nuclear reactors, the uranium fuel is assembled in such a way that a controlled fission chain reaction can be achieved. Since uranium is the main source of nuclear energy, demand prospects for uranium has increased dramatically with the renewed global interest in nuclear power generation in recent years. Although the global uranium market is relatively small worldwide, compared to other mineral and energy sources, it is a very important market as nuclear power generation accounts for about 18% of global electricity supply. After reaching historic lows in 1990s, uranium prices have risen substantially in recent years. The outlook for nuclear power has changed since 2000, with concerns over global warming, proven excellent safety record, competitive costs, progress on nuclear waste disposal issues and also continuing new nuclear plant construction around the world. These and various other influencing factors have resulted in the uranium market evolving from one that was driven by excess secondary supplies to that by primary production. This paper reviews the global market prices for the years 1987 until 2006 and the factors, which influence the changes in global uranium market prices. (Author)

  18. Nano-objects emitted during maintenance of common particle generators: direct chemical characterization with aerosol mass spectrometry and implications for risk assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Patrik T., E-mail: patrik.nilsson@design.lth.se; Isaxon, Christina [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Eriksson, Axel C. [Lund University, Nuclear Physics (Sweden); Messing, Maria E. [Lund University, Solid State Physics (Sweden); Ludvigsson, Linus; Rissler, Jenny [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Hedmer, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan [Lund University, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine (Sweden); Gudmundsson, Anders [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden); Deppert, Knut [Lund University, Solid State Physics (Sweden); Bohgard, Mats; Pagels, Joakim H. [Lund University, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Nanotechnology gives us materials with enhanced or completely new properties. At the same time, inhalation of manufactured nano-objects has been related to an array of adverse biological effects. We characterized particle emissions, which occurred during maintenance of common metal nanoparticle generators and contrasted the properties of the emitted particles with those originally produced by the generators. A new approach using online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), for time- and size-resolved measurements of the particle chemical composition, was applied in combination with more conventional techniques for particle sampling and analysis, including electron microscopy. Emissions during maintenance work, in terms of mass and surface area concentration in the size range of 0.02–10 μm, were dominated by large agglomerates (1–5 μm). With AMS, we show that the particle composition depends on both generator type and maintenance task being performed and that the instrument can be used for highly time-resolved selective studies of metal nanoparticle emissions. The emitted agglomerates have a relatively high probability to be deposited in the lower respiratory tract, since the mean particle diameter coincided with a peak in the lung deposition curve. Each of these agglomerates consisted of a very high number (10{sup 3}–10{sup 5}/agglomerate) of nanometer-sized primary particles originating from the particle synthesis process. This made them possess large surface areas, one of the key properties in nanotoxicology. Similar agglomerates may be emitted in a wide range of processes when nanoparticles are manufactured or handled. The fate of such agglomerates, once deposited in the respiratory tract, is unknown and should therefore be considered in future particle toxicological studies. Our results highlight the importance of including micrometer-sized particles in exposure and emission assessments.

  19. Nano-objects emitted during maintenance of common particle generators: direct chemical characterization with aerosol mass spectrometry and implications for risk assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Patrik T.; Isaxon, Christina; Eriksson, Axel C.; Messing, Maria E.; Ludvigsson, Linus; Rissler, Jenny; Hedmer, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Gudmundsson, Anders; Deppert, Knut; Bohgard, Mats; Pagels, Joakim H.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology gives us materials with enhanced or completely new properties. At the same time, inhalation of manufactured nano-objects has been related to an array of adverse biological effects. We characterized particle emissions, which occurred during maintenance of common metal nanoparticle generators and contrasted the properties of the emitted particles with those originally produced by the generators. A new approach using online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), for time- and size-resolved measurements of the particle chemical composition, was applied in combination with more conventional techniques for particle sampling and analysis, including electron microscopy. Emissions during maintenance work, in terms of mass and surface area concentration in the size range of 0.02–10 μm, were dominated by large agglomerates (1–5 μm). With AMS, we show that the particle composition depends on both generator type and maintenance task being performed and that the instrument can be used for highly time-resolved selective studies of metal nanoparticle emissions. The emitted agglomerates have a relatively high probability to be deposited in the lower respiratory tract, since the mean particle diameter coincided with a peak in the lung deposition curve. Each of these agglomerates consisted of a very high number (10 3 –10 5 /agglomerate) of nanometer-sized primary particles originating from the particle synthesis process. This made them possess large surface areas, one of the key properties in nanotoxicology. Similar agglomerates may be emitted in a wide range of processes when nanoparticles are manufactured or handled. The fate of such agglomerates, once deposited in the respiratory tract, is unknown and should therefore be considered in future particle toxicological studies. Our results highlight the importance of including micrometer-sized particles in exposure and emission assessments

  20. Direct measurement of aerosol shape factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeller, W.

    1983-12-01

    The dynamic shape factor whereas the coagulation shape factor is an average over the total examined size range. The experiments have shown that the results of experiments with a certain aerosol system cannot be transferred to other aerosol systems without further consideration. The outer shape of particles of a certain size depends on the specific properties of the material as well as on the experimental conditions during the aerosol generation. For both aerosol systems examined the mean dynamic shape factor, averaged over the total examined size range, agrees roughly with the coagulation shape factor. (Description of aerosol centrifuge and of differential mobility analyzer). (orig./HP) [de

  1. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model - Part 1: Assessing the influence of constrained multi-generational ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathar, S. H.; Cappa, C. D.; Wexler, A. S.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kleeman, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Multi-generational oxidation of volatile organic compound (VOC) oxidation products can significantly alter the mass, chemical composition and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) compared to calculations that consider only the first few generations of oxidation reactions. However, the most commonly used state-of-the-science schemes in 3-D regional or global models that account for multi-generational oxidation (1) consider only functionalization reactions but do not consider fragmentation reactions, (2) have not been constrained to experimental data and (3) are added on top of existing parameterizations. The incomplete description of multi-generational oxidation in these models has the potential to bias source apportionment and control calculations for SOA. In this work, we used the statistical oxidation model (SOM) of Cappa and Wilson (2012), constrained by experimental laboratory chamber data, to evaluate the regional implications of multi-generational oxidation considering both functionalization and fragmentation reactions. SOM was implemented into the regional University of California at Davis / California Institute of Technology (UCD/CIT) air quality model and applied to air quality episodes in California and the eastern USA. The mass, composition and properties of SOA predicted using SOM were compared to SOA predictions generated by a traditional two-product model to fully investigate the impact of explicit and self-consistent accounting of multi-generational oxidation.Results show that SOA mass concentrations predicted by the UCD/CIT-SOM model are very similar to those predicted by a two-product model when both models use parameters that are derived from the same chamber data. Since the two-product model does not explicitly resolve multi-generational oxidation reactions, this finding suggests that the chamber data used to parameterize the models captures the majority of the SOA mass formation from multi-generational oxidation under the conditions

  2. Properties and Fluxes of Primary Marine Aerosol Generated Via Detrainment of Turbulence-Modulated Bubble Plumes from Fresh North Atlantic Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, W. C.; Long, M. S.; Duplessis, P.; Kieber, D. J.; Maben, J. R.; Frossard, A. A.; Kinsey, J. D.; Beaupre, S. R.; Lu, X.; Chang, R.; Zhu, Y.; Bisgrove, J.

    2017-12-01

    During a September-October 2016 cruise of the R/V Endeavor in the western North Atlantic Ocean, primary marine aerosol (PMA) was produced in a high capacity generator during day and night via detrainment of bubbles from biologically productive and oligotrophic seawater. The turbulent mixing of clean air and seawater in a Venturi nozzle produced bubble plumes with tunable size distributions. Physicochemical characteristics of size-resolved PMA and seawater were measured. PMA number production efficiencies per unit air detrained (PEnum) increased with increasing detainment rate. For given conditions, PEnum values summed over size distributions were roughly ten times greater than those for frits whereas normalized size distributions were similar. Results show that bubble size distributions significantly modulated number production fluxes but not relative shapes of corresponding size distributions. In contrast, mass production efficiencies (PEmass) decreased with increasing air detrainment and were similar to those for frits, consistent with the hypothesis that bubble rafts on the seawater surface modulate emissions of larger jet droplets that dominate PMA mass production. Production efficiencies of organic matter were about three times greater than those for frits whereas organic enrichment factors integrated over size distributions were similar.

  3. Estimation of Uncertainty in Aerosol Concentration Measured by Aerosol Sampling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chan; Song, Yong Jae; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Kim, Gyu Tae; Lee, Doo Yong [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    FNC Technology Co., Ltd has been developed test facilities for the aerosol generation, mixing, sampling and measurement under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The aerosol generation system is connected to the aerosol mixing system which injects SiO{sub 2}/ethanol mixture. In the sampling system, glass fiber membrane filter has been used to measure average mass concentration. Based on the experimental results using main carrier gas of steam and air mixture, the uncertainty estimation of the sampled aerosol concentration was performed by applying Gaussian error propagation law. FNC Technology Co., Ltd. has been developed the experimental facilities for the aerosol measurement under high pressure and high temperature. The purpose of the tests is to develop commercial test module for aerosol generation, mixing and sampling system applicable to environmental industry and safety related system in nuclear power plant. For the uncertainty calculation of aerosol concentration, the value of the sampled aerosol concentration is not measured directly, but must be calculated from other quantities. The uncertainty of the sampled aerosol concentration is a function of flow rates of air and steam, sampled mass, sampling time, condensed steam mass and its absolute errors. These variables propagate to the combination of variables in the function. Using operating parameters and its single errors from the aerosol test cases performed at FNC, the uncertainty of aerosol concentration evaluated by Gaussian error propagation law is less than 1%. The results of uncertainty estimation in the aerosol sampling system will be utilized for the system performance data.

  4. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, G.

    1975-01-01

    The winning of uranium ore is the first stage of the fuel cycle. The whole complex of questions to be considered when evaluating the profitability of an ore mine is shortly outlined, and the possible mining techniques are described. Some data on uranium mining in the western world are also given. (RB) [de

  5. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  6. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    GAO was asked to address several questions concerning a number of proposed uranium enrichment bills introduced during the 100th Congress. The bill would have restructured the Department of Energy's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation to allow it to compete more effectively in the domestic and international markets. Some of GAO's findings discussed are: uranium market experts believe and existing market models show that the proposed DOE purchase of a $750 million of uranium from domestic producers may not significantly increase production because of large producer-held inventories; excess uranium enrichment production capacity exists throughout the world; therefore, foreign producers are expected to compete heavily in the United States throughout the 1990s as utilities' contracts with DOE expire; and according to a 1988 agreement between DOE's Offices of Nuclear Energy and Defense Programs, enrichment decommissioning costs, estimated to total $3.6 billion for planning purposes, will be shared by the commercial enrichment program and the government

  7. Uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is a press release issued by the OECD on 9th March 1976. It is stated that the steep increases in demand for uranium foreseen in and beyond the 1980's, with doubling times of the order of six to seven years, will inevitably create formidable problems for the industry. Further substantial efforts will be needed in prospecting for new uranium reserves. Information is given in tabular or graphical form on the following: reasonably assured resources, country by country; uranium production capacities, country by country; world nuclear power growth; world annual uranium requirements; world annual separative requirements; world annual light water reactor fuel reprocessing requirements; distribution of reactor types (LWR, SGHWR, AGR, HWR, HJR, GG, FBR); and world fuel cycle capital requirements. The information is based on the latest report on Uranium Resources Production and Demand, jointly issued by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  8. Uranium 2007 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2008-01-01

    Based on official information received from 40 countries, Uranium 2007 provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1st January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. It finds that with rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of underinvestment.

  9. Uranium metal production by molten salt electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takasawa, Yutaka

    1999-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a promising uranium enrichment technology in the next generation. Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides into uranium metal is proposed for the preparation of uranium metal as a feed material for AVLIS plant. Considering economical performance, continuos process concept and minimizing the amount of radioactive waste, an electrolytic process for producing uranium metal directly from uranium oxides will offer potential advantages over the existing commercial process. Studies of uranium metal by electrolysis in fluoride salts (BaF 2 -LiF-UF 4 (74-11-15 w/o) at 1150-1200degC, using both a laboratory scale apparatus and an engineering scale one, and continuous casting of uranium metal were carried out in order to decide the optimum operating conditions and the design of the industrial electrolytic cells. (author)

  10. The effect of the number of condensed phases modeled on aerosol behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixler, N.E.; Schaperow, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within a nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS. A recently completed independent peer review of VICTORIA, while confirming the overall adequacy of the code, recommended a number of modeling improvements. One of these recommendations, to model three rather than a single condensed phase, is the focus of the work reported here. The recommendation has been implemented as an option so that either a single or three condensed phases can be treated. Both options have been employed in the study of fission product behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence. Differences in deposition patterns and mechanisms predicted using these two options are discussed

  11. The uranium International trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez U, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the understanding of how the present dynamic of uranium International trade is developed, the variables which fall into, the factors that are affecting and conditioning it, in order to clarify which are going to be the outlook in the future of this important resource in front of the present ecological situation and the energetic panorama of XXI Century. For this purpose, as starting point, the uranium is considered as a strategic material which importance take root in its energetic potential as alternate energy source, and for this reason in Chapter I, the general problem of raw materials, its classification and present situation in the global market is presented. In Chapter II, by means of a historical review, is explain what uranium is, how it was discovered, and how since the end of the past Century and during the last three decades of present, uranium pass of practically unknown element, to the position of a strategic raw material, which by degrees, generate an International market, owing to its utilization as a basic resource in the generation of energy. Chapter III, introduce us in the roll played by uranium, since its warlike applications until its utilization in nuclear reactors for the generation of electricity. Also is explain the reason for this change in the perception at global level. Finally, in Chapter IV we enter upon specifically in the present conditions of the International market of this mineral throughout the trends of supply and demand, the main producers, users, price dynamics, and the correlation among these economical variables and other factors of political, social and ecological nature. All of these with the purpose to found out, if there exist, a meaning of the puzzle that seems to be the uranium International trade

  12. Uranium supply and demand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, M J

    1976-01-01

    Papers were presented on the pattern of uranium production in South Africa; Australian uranium--will it ever become available; North American uranium resources, policies, prospects, and pricing; economic and political environment of the uranium mining industry; alternative sources of uranium supply; whither North American demand for uranium; and uranium demand and security of supply--a consumer's point of view. (LK)

  13. A study of the attachment of thoron decay products to aerosols using an aerosol centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, V.

    1979-01-01

    The physical attachment of radioactive decay products (particulate, not gas) to polydisperse fluorescein aerosal particles in two size ranges 0.1 μM-0.33 μM radius and 0.25 μM-1.35 μM radius has been studied under dynamic conditions with a view to find the fraction of thoron decay products attached to the aerosals and the particle size distribution of the host aerosols in the atmosphere of uranium mines. The experimental set-up and procedure are described. An aerosol cloud of fluorescein was introduced into a reaction chamber containing a steady source of thoron and decay products were allowed to interact and attach to the aerosols in the chamber. To simulate conditions normally encountered in uranium mining and milling operations, the concentration of aerosol particles was kept high as compared to the number of decay products. The Lovelace Aerosol Particle Separator, which is an advanced, continuous centrifugal aerosol separator, was used to sample and separate the tagged aerosols into various size groups. The radioactivity associated with each group was determined. The results show the same dependence of attachment of decay products on the size of aerosol particles as predicted by the diffusion theory proposed by Lassen and Rau (1960), even though the experimental conditions of the present study do not conform to those required to satisfy the above mentioned diffusion theory. The method employed in this work to study attachment is reproducible and simple and can be adopted in uranium and thorium mines and associated processing industries. (M.G.B.)

  14. Observational evidence for the aerosol impact on ice cloud properties regulated by cloud/aerosol types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, B.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Jiang, J. H.; Li, Q.; Liu, X.; Huang, L.; Wang, Y.; Su, H.

    2017-12-01

    The interactions between aerosols and ice clouds (consisting only of ice) represent one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing from pre-industrial time to the present. The observational evidence for the aerosol impact on ice cloud properties has been quite limited and showed conflicting results, partly because previous observational studies did not consider the distinct features of different ice cloud and aerosol types. Using 9-year satellite observations, we find that, for ice clouds generated from deep convection, cloud thickness, cloud optical thickness (COT), and ice cloud fraction increase and decrease with small-to-moderate and high aerosol loadings, respectively. For in-situ formed ice clouds, however, the preceding cloud properties increase monotonically and more sharply with aerosol loadings. The case is more complicated for ice crystal effective radius (Rei). For both convection-generated and in-situ ice clouds, the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings are modulated by water vapor amount in conjunction with several other meteorological parameters, but the sensitivities of Rei to aerosols under the same water vapor amount differ remarkably between the two ice cloud types. As a result, overall Rei slightly increases with aerosol loading for convection-generated ice clouds, but decreases for in-situ ice clouds. When aerosols are decomposed into different types, an increase in the loading of smoke aerosols generally leads to a decrease in COT of convection-generated ice clouds, while the reverse is true for dust and anthropogenic pollution. In contrast, an increase in the loading of any aerosol type can significantly enhance COT of in-situ ice clouds. The modulation of the aerosol impacts by cloud/aerosol types is demonstrated and reproduced by simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Adequate and accurate representations of the impact of different cloud/aerosol types in climate models are crucial for reducing the

  15. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, 37, Mira Ave., RU-607190 Sarov (Nizhnii Gorod), 010450 (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  16. Anticorrosion protection of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharov, Ivan D.; Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    Uranium in atmospheric conditions is non-stable. Sloughing products are being generated on its surface during storage or use. These corrosion products make many difficulties because of necessity to provide personnel safety. Besides, uranium corrosion may cause damage in parts. The first works devoted to uranium corrosion were performed in the framework of the USA Manhattan Project in the early forties of last century. Various methods of uranium protection were investigated, among them the galvanic one was the most studied. Later on the galvanic technology was patented. The works on this problem remains urgent up to the present time. In Russia, many methods of uranium corrosion protection, mainly against atmospheric corrosion, were tried on. In particular, such methods as diffusion zinc and paint coating were investigated. In the first case, a complex intermetallic U-Zn compound was formed but its protection was not reliable enough, this protection system was inconvenient and uncertain and that is why an additional paint coating was necessary. In the case of paint coatings another problem appeared. It was necessary to find such a coating where gas-permeability would prevail over water-permeability. Otherwise significant uranium corrosion occurs. This circumstance together with low mechanical resistance of paint coatings does not allow to use paint coating for long-term protection of uranium. Currently, there are following methods of uranium protection: ion-plasma, galvanic and thermo-vacuum annealing. These are described in this paper. In the end the issue of corrosion protection in reactor core zones is addressed. Here the greatest difficulties are caused when enriched uranium heated up to 500 deg. C needs anticorrosion protection. In this case various metal coatings are not reliable because of brittle inter-metallide formation. The reliable protection may be provided only up to the temperature plus 400 - 500 deg. C with the help of galvanic copper coating since

  17. Prospects and problems of uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Ryukichi

    1974-01-01

    The problem of uranium enrichment now concerns principally peaceful nuclear power generation. With the current oil crisis, energy resources assume unprecedented importance. However, the requirements for enriched uranium vary with the vicissitude of the world situation in nuclear power generation; the enterprise of uranium enrichment is related to economic aspect. The following matters are described: dimension of enrichment problem, political factors, changes in requirements, projects in each country, and strategy of enrichment in Japan. (Mori, K.)

  18. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects; Uranium, uranium appauvri, effets biologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  19. Uranium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreyra, Mariana D.; Suarez Mendez, Sebastian

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are presented the methods and procedures optimized by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) for the determination of: natural uranium mass, activity of enriched uranium in samples of: urine, mucus, filters, filter heads, rinsing waters and Pu in urine, adopted and in some cases adapted, by the Environmental Monitoring and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory. The analyzed material corresponded to biological and environmental samples belonging to the staff professionally exposed that work in plants of the nuclear fuel cycle. For a better comprehension of the activities of this laboratory, it is included a brief description of the uranium radiochemical toxicity and the limits internationally fixed to preserve the workers health

  20. Uranium-enriched granites in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.R.; Aakerblom, G.

    1980-01-01

    Granites with uranium contents higher than normal occur in a variety of geological settings in the Swedish Precambrian, and represent a variety of granite types and ages. They may have been generated by the anatexis of continental crust or processes occurring at a much greater depth. They commonly show enrichment in F, Sn, W and/or Mo. Only in one case is an important uranium mineralization thought to be directly related to a uranium-enriched granite, while the majority of epigenetic uranium mineralizations with economic potential are related to hydrothermal processes in areas where the bedrock is regionally uranium-enhanced. (author)

  1. URANIUM 1991 resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The uranium supply aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle have undergone considerable change during the last few years. Nuclear power generating capacity can continue to expand only if there is confidence in the final supply of uranium. This report presents governmental compilations of uranium resource and production data, as established in 1991. It also presents short-term projections of the nuclear industry future natural uranium requirements and reviews the status of uranium exploration, resources and production throughout the world. 10 refs., 14 figs., 15 tabs., 6 appendices

  2. Chemical and technological investigations to establish the production of 99Mo/sup(99m)Tc-Generators from uranium fission in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munze, R.; El-Bayoumy, S.; Mosaad, K.; Hallaba, E.

    1980-01-01

    Different possibilities to meet the current estimated demand of sup(99m)Tc for medical uses in the Arab Republic of Egypt have been investigated using irradiation and separation experiments and theoretical calculations. The investigation includes the evaluation of the real present irradiation capability of the Egyptian Research Reactor as well as pilot runs suitable technological schemes for target design and chemical processing of irradiated uranium targets. The suitability of the produced 99 Mo for the preparation of 99 Mo/sup(99m)Tc-generators has been confirmed. Separation yield (80%) as well as the radiochemical and radionuclidic purity of the sup(99m)Tc (TcO 4 98%, sup(99m)Tc 99,9%) corresponds to comparable results for similar processes cited in recent literature. The necessary requirements, related to the irradiation capability of the reactor and the demands of the radiochemical facilities, have been derived. The present work is the fruit of three months cooperation between the Agency expert and the Egyptian Counterpart

  3. Relating hygroscopicity and optical properties to chemical composition and structure of secondary organic aerosol particles generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denjean, C.; Formenti, P.; Picquet-Varrault, B.; Pangui, E.; Zapf, P.; Katrib, Y.; Giorio, C.; Tapparo, A.; Monod, A.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Decorse, P.; Mangeney, C.; Doussin, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) were generated from the ozonolysis of α-pinene in the CESAM (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber) simulation chamber. The SOA formation and aging were studied by following their optical, hygroscopic and chemical properties. The optical properties were investigated by determining the particle complex refractive index (CRI). The hygroscopicity was quantified by measuring the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the particle size (size growth factor, GF) and on the scattering coefficient (scattering growth factor, f(RH)). The oxygen to carbon atomic ratios (O : C) of the particle surface and bulk were used as a sensitive parameter to correlate the changes in hygroscopic and optical properties of the SOA composition during their formation and aging in CESAM. The real CRI at 525 nm wavelength decreased from 1.43-1.60 (±0.02) to 1.32-1.38 (±0.02) during the SOA formation. The decrease in the real CRI correlated to the O : C decrease from 0.68 (±0.20) to 0.55 (±0.16). In contrast, the GF remained roughly constant over the reaction time, with values of 1.02-1.07 (±0.02) at 90% (±4.2%) RH. Simultaneous measurements of O : C of the particle surface revealed that the SOA was not composed of a homogeneous mixture, but contained less oxidised species at the surface which may limit water absorption. In addition, an apparent change in both mobility diameter and scattering coefficient with increasing RH from 0 to 30% was observed for SOA after 14 h of reaction. We postulate that this change could be due to a change in the viscosity of the SOA from a predominantly glassy state to a predominantly liquid state.

  4. Paradigmatic Shifts in Exploration Process: The Role of Industry-Academia Collaborative Research and Development in Discovering the Next Generation of Uranium Ore Deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlatt, J., E-mail: jmarlatt5@cogeco.ca [Raven Minerals Corp.,Toronto (Canada); Kyser, K. [Queen’s Facility for Isotope Research, Queen’s University, Kingston (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Uranium exploration increased over the past decade in a sympathetic response to a rapid increase in the price of uranium, inspired by fuel supply-demand and stock market dynamics. Exploration activity likely peaked during this cycle in 2008 with in excess of 900 companies engaged in the global exploration of a portfolio of over 3000 projects. Global uranium exploration expenditures for the period 2004–2008 are estimated at US$3.2 billion — from US$130 million in 2004 to an estimated peak of US$1.2 billion in 2008. A major focus of the exploration effort has been on brown-fields exploration in historical uranium districts. Less effort has been devoted to exploration at green-field frontiers. A significant reduction in global exploration expenditures in 2009 and beyond is anticipated concurrent with the global recession. There is not much evidence to indicate that brand-new, large, and higher grade, uranium deposits have been discovered during this uranium exploration cycle. It is likely that future uranium explorers will need to be more efficient and effective in their efforts and to adopt new and innovative business strategies for their survival and success. This paper addresses some of the fundamental reasons why major economic discoveries of uranium ore bodies have been elusive over the past two decades, through a cyclical model know as the ‘learning curve’, using the prolific Athabasca Basin, Saskatchewan, as an exemplar. This model relates exploration expenditure, quantities of discovered uranium, and the sequence of uranium deposit discoveries, to reveal that discovery cycles are epochal in nature and that they are also intimately related to the development and deployment of new exploration technologies. The history of uranium exploration is parsed into the early ‘prospector’ exploration phase (1960–1980) and the current ‘model driven’ phase (1981–present). The future of successful uranium exploration is envisaged as

  5. Rossing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    In this article the geology of the deposits of the Rossing uranium mine in Namibia is discussed. The planning of the open-pit mining, the blasting, drilling, handling and the equipment used for these processes are described

  6. Overseas uranium exploration by PNC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Reiji; Iida, Yoshimasa; Shigeta, Naotaka; Takahashi, Osamu; Yamagishi, Akiko; Miyada, Hatsuho; Kobayashi, Takao

    1998-01-01

    Japan entirely depends on overseas countries for uranium resources for its nuclear electric power generation due to the lack of domestic resources. In order to secure a steady supply of natural uranium, Japanese government has implemented a long-term procurement policy through purchase contracts by private sectors, subsidizing private sectors' exploration and initial stage exploration outside the reach of private sectors' activity by PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation). The subsequent long slump in the price of uranium, however, led most of Japanese private sectors to discontinue their exploration activity. Upon this situation, PNC has pursued a little more advanced stage exploration in addition to basic research and initial stage exploration and has improved its exploration techniques to enable the discovery of deep-seated uranium ore deposits. As the result, PNC has acquired significant uranium exploration tenements and interests similar to those owned by major uranium companies such as Cameco and Cogema. PNC has also contributed to discovery of new uranium deposits. In this report, the history of PNC's activities and its role in the long-term uranium procurement policy are reviewed and it is also described about the outcome thorough its activities and future exploration trend and the tasks. (author)

  7. Uranium purchasers reassert their influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braatz, U.

    1976-01-01

    The growing uranium requirement in the Western world in the long run can be met only by a participation of the electricity generating industry and the governments of the participating countries in the development costs of new deposits, according to statements by leading representatives of the uranium producers and consumers at a symposium organized by the Uranium Institute in the summer of 1976. On the other hand, the uranium market is likely to get under more and more pressure because of the delays in nuclear power programs worldwide. It is probable that the price of uranium will soon have reached its peak for a long time to come. Uranium producers also will have to bear in mind that a price policy which makes the use of uranium unattractive compared with other sources of energy could well result in a situation in which the largest uranium consumers would build more conventional thermal power stations to bridge the time to commercial introduction of fast breeder reactors. (orig.) [de

  8. Uranium, depleted uranium, biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Physicists, chemists and biologists at the CEA are developing scientific programs on the properties and uses of ionizing radiation. Since the CEA was created in 1945, a great deal of research has been carried out on the properties of natural, enriched and depleted uranium in cooperation with university laboratories and CNRS. There is a great deal of available data about uranium; thousands of analyses have been published in international reviews over more than 40 years. This presentation on uranium is a very brief summary of all these studies. (author)

  9. Uranium loans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    When NUEXCO was organized in 1968, its founders conceived of a business based on uranium loans. The concept was relatively straightforward; those who found themselves with excess supplies of uranium would deposit those excesses in NUEXCO's open-quotes bank,close quotes and those who found themselves temporarily short of uranium could borrow from the bank. The borrower would pay interest based on the quantity of uranium borrowed and the duration of the loan, and the bank would collect the interest, deduct its service fee for arranging the loan, and pay the balance to those whose deposits were borrowed. In fact, the original plan was to call the firm Nuclear Bank Corporation, until it was discovered that using the word open-quotes Bankclose quotes in the name would subject the firm to various US banking regulations. Thus, Nuclear Bank Corporation became Nuclear Exchange Corporation, which was later shortened to NUEXCO. Neither the nuclear fuel market nor NUEXCO's business developed quite as its founders had anticipated. From almost the very beginning, the brokerage of uranium purchases and sales became a more significant activity for NUEXCO than arranging uranium loans. Nevertheless, loan transactions have played an important role in the international nuclear fuel market, requiring the development of special knowledge and commercial techniques

  10. Health and environmental impact of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furitsu, Katsumi

    2010-01-01

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is 'nuclear waste' produced from the enrichment process and is mostly made up of 238 U and is depleted in the fissionable isotope 235 U compared to natural uranium (NU). Depleted uranium has about 60% of the radioactivity of natural uranium. Depleted uranium and natural uranium are identical in terms of the chemical toxicity. Uranium's high density gives depleted uranium shells increased range and penetrative power. This density, combined with uranium's pyrophoric nature, results in a high-energy kinetic weapon that can punch and burn through armour plating. Striking a hard target, depleted uranium munitions create extremely high temperatures. The uranium immediately burns and vaporizes into an aerosol, which is easily diffused in the environment. People can inhale the micro-particles of uranium oxide in an aerosol and absorb them mainly from lung. Depleted uranium has both aspects of radiological toxicity and chemical toxicity. The possible synergistic effect of both kinds of toxicities is also pointed out. Animal and cellular studies have been reported the carcinogenic, neurotoxic, immuno-toxic and some other effects of depleted uranium including the damage on reproductive system and foetus. In addition, the health effects of micro/ nano-particles, similar in size of depleted uranium aerosols produced by uranium weapons, have been reported. Aerosolized DU dust can easily spread over the battlefield spreading over civilian areas, sometimes even crossing international borders. Therefore, not only the military personnel but also the civilians can be exposed. The contamination continues after the cessation of hostilities. Taking these aspects into account, DU weapon is illegal under international humanitarian laws and is considered as one of the inhumane weapons of 'indiscriminate destruction'. The international society is now discussing the prohibition of DU weapons based on 'precautionary principle'. The 1991 Gulf War is reportedly the first

  11. Uranium Task Force final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    Site-specific data on the management of uranium of 17 facilities have been assembled and analyzed to develop a comprehensive report on uranium processes, treatment, storage, and disposal on a Department of Energy-wide basis. By integrating a variety of waste generation sources, treatment processes, storage facilities, and disposal options, this waste management system study aims to effectively characterize and evaluate the performance and effectiveness of the total Department of Energy system for the management of uranium, as well as the individual sites. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Organ burdens and excretion rates of inhaled uranium - computations using ICRP model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abani, M.C.; Murthy, K.B.S.; Sunta, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium being a highly toxic material, proper estimation of the body burden is very important. During manufacture of uranium fuel, it is likely to enter the body by inhalation. By the body burden and excretion measurements, one should be able to assess whether the intake is within the safe limits or not. This is possible if one performs theoretical calculations and estimates the amount of uranium which builds up in the body as a function of time. Similarly theoretical estimates in case of excretion have to be made. For this purpose, a computer programme has been developed to find out organ burdens and excretion rates resulting from exposure to a radioactive nuclide. ICRP-30 lung model has been used and cases of single instantaneous inhalation of 1 ALI as well as inhalation at a steady rate of ALI/365 per day have been considered. Using this programme, results for uranium aerosols of classes D, W and Y and sizes 0.2, 1 and 5 microns are generated by ND computers in tabular as well as graphical forms. These will be useful in conjunction with body burden measurements by direct counting or excretion analysis. (author). 7 tabs., 56 figs

  13. Uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskorin, B.N.; Golynko, Z.Sh.

    1981-01-01

    The process of uranium extraction from gold-uranium ores in the South Africa is considered. Flowsheets of reprocessing gold-uranium conglomerates, pile processing and uranium extraction from the ores are presented. Continuous counter flow ion-exchange process of uranium extraction using strong-active or weak-active resins is noted to be the most perspective and economical one. The ion-exchange uranium separation with the succeeding extraction is also the perspective one.

  14. Uranium 2005 Resources, Production and Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris. Nuclear Energy Agency

    2006-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. This 21st edition presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1st January 2005 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2025 are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major c...

  15. Uranium 2014 resources, production and demand

    CERN Document Server

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. Paris

    2014-01-01

    Published every other year, Uranium Resources, Production, and Demand, or the "Red Book" as it is commonly known, is jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is the recognised world reference on uranium and is based on official information received from 43 countries. It presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Long-term projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements are provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. This edition focuses on recent price and production increases that could signal major changes in the industry.

  16. Uranium production in thorium/denatured uranium fueled PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Uranium-232 buildup in a thorium/denatured uranium fueled pressurized water reactor, PWR(Th), was studied using a modified version of the spectrum-dependent zero dimensional depletion code, LEOPARD. The generic Combustion Engineering System 80 reactor design was selected as the reactor model for the calculations. Reactors fueled with either enriched natural uranium and self-generated recycled uranium or uranium from a thorium breeder and self-generated recycled uranium were considered. For enriched natural uranium, concentrations of 232 U varied from about 135 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) in the zeroth generation to about 260 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. For the case in which thorium breeder fuel (with its relatively high 232 U concentration) was used as reactor makeup fuel, concentrations of 232 U varied from 441 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at discharge from the first generation to about 512 ppM ( 232 U/U weight basis) at the end of the fifth generation. Concentrations in freshly fabricated fuel for this later case were 20 to 35% higher than the discharge concentration. These concentrations are low when compared to those of other thorium fueled reactor types (HTGR and MSBR) because of the relatively high 238 U concentration added to the fuel as a denaturant. Excellent agreement was found between calculated and existing experimental values. Nevertheless, caution is urged in the use of these values because experimental results are very limited, and the relevant nuclear data, especially for 231 Pa and 232 U, are not of high quality

  17. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The economic and environmental sustainability of uranium mining has been analysed by Monash University researcher Dr Gavin Mudd in a paper that challenges the perception that uranium mining is an 'infinite quality source' that provides solutions to the world's demand for energy. Dr Mudd says information on the uranium industry touted by politicians and mining companies is not necessarily inaccurate, but it does not tell the whole story, being often just an average snapshot of the costs of uranium mining today without reflecting the escalating costs associated with the process in years to come. 'From a sustainability perspective, it is critical to evaluate accurately the true lifecycle costs of all forms of electricity production, especially with respect to greenhouse emissions, ' he says. 'For nuclear power, a significant proportion of greenhouse emissions are derived from the fuel supply, including uranium mining, milling, enrichment and fuel manufacture.' Dr Mudd found that financial and environmental costs escalate dramatically as the uranium ore is used. The deeper the mining process required to extract the ore, the higher the cost for mining companies, the greater the impact on the environment and the more resources needed to obtain the product. I t is clear that there is a strong sensitivity of energy and water consumption and greenhouse emissions to ore grade, and that ore grades are likely to continue to decline gradually in the medium to long term. These issues are critical to the current debate over nuclear power and greenhouse emissions, especially with respect to ascribing sustainability to such activities as uranium mining and milling. For example, mining at Roxby Downs is responsible for the emission of over one million tonnes of greenhouse gases per year and this could increase to four million tonnes if the mine is expanded.'

  18. Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleise, A.; Danesi, P.R.; Burkart, W.

    2003-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation

  19. Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleise, A.; Danesi, P.R.; Burkart, W. E-mail: w.burkart@iaea.org

    2003-07-01

    Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation.

  20. Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleise, A; Danesi, P R; Burkart, W

    2003-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU), a waste product of uranium enrichment, has several civilian and military applications. It was used as armor-piercing ammunition in international military conflicts and was claimed to contribute to health problems, known as the Gulf War Syndrome and recently as the Balkan Syndrome. This led to renewed efforts to assess the environmental consequences and the health impact of the use of DU. The radiological and chemical properties of DU can be compared to those of natural uranium, which is ubiquitously present in soil at a typical concentration of 3 mg/kg. Natural uranium has the same chemotoxicity, but its radiotoxicity is 60% higher. Due to the low specific radioactivity and the dominance of alpha-radiation no acute risk is attributed to external exposure to DU. The major risk is DU dust, generated when DU ammunition hits hard targets. Depending on aerosol speciation, inhalation may lead to a protracted exposure of the lung and other organs. After deposition on the ground, resuspension can take place if the DU containing particle size is sufficiently small. However, transfer to drinking water or locally produced food has little potential to lead to significant exposures to DU. Since poor solubility of uranium compounds and lack of information on speciation precludes the use of radioecological models for exposure assessment, biomonitoring has to be used for assessing exposed persons. Urine, feces, hair and nails record recent exposures to DU. With the exception of crews of military vehicles having been hit by DU penetrators, no body burdens above the range of values for natural uranium have been found. Therefore, observable health effects are not expected and residual cancer risk estimates have to be based on theoretical considerations. They appear to be very minor for all post-conflict situations, i.e. a fraction of those expected from natural radiation.

  1. Behavior of aerosols in a steam-air environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Longest, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of aerosols assumed to be characteristic of those generated during light water reactor (LWR) accident sequences and released into containment is being studied in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) which is located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The program plan for the NSPP aerosol project provides for the study of the behavior, within containment, of simulated LWR accident aerosols emanating from fuel, reactor core structural materials, and from concrete-molten core materials interactions. The aerodynamic behavior of each of these aerosols was studied individually to establish its characteristics; current experiments involve mixtures of these aerosols to establish their interaction and collective behavior within containment. Tests have been conducted with U 3 O 8 aerosols, Fe 2 O 3 aerosols, and concrete aerosols in an environment of either dry air [relative humidity (RH) less than 20%] or steam-air [relative humidity (RH) approximately 100%] with aerosol mass concentration being the primary experimental variable

  2. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, H.K.; Melvin, J.G.

    1988-06-01

    Canada is the world's largest producer and exporter of uranium, most of which is enriched elsewhere for use as fuel in LWRs. The feasibility of a Canadian uranium-enrichment enterprise is therefore a perennial question. Recent developments in uranium-enrichment technology, and their likely impacts on separative work supply and demand, suggest an opportunity window for Canadian entry into this international market. The Canadian opportunity results from three particular impacts of the new technologies: 1) the bulk of the world's uranium-enrichment capacity is in gaseous diffusion plants which, because of their large requirements for electricity (more than 2000 kW·h per SWU), are vulnerable to competition from the new processes; 2) the decline in enrichment costs increases the economic incentive for the use of slightly-enriched uranium (SEU) fuel in CANDU reactors, thus creating a potential Canadian market; and 3) the new processes allow economic operation on a much smaller scale, which drastically reduces the investment required for market entry and is comparable with the potential Canadian SEU requirement. The opportunity is not open-ended. By the end of the century the enrichment supply industry will have adapted to the new processes and long-term customer/supplier relationships will have been established. In order to seize the opportunity, Canada must become a credible supplier during this century

  3. Field measurements of mixed exposure of operators to radioactive aerosol, gas and quartz in confinement of mining equipment cabs during open-pit mining of high-grade uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Atiemo, M.A.; Markham, J.W.

    1982-07-01

    A series of field measurements of miners mixed exposure to radon and daughters, uranium ore dust and respirable quartz, was conducted in an open-pit mine in Northern Saskatchewan during 1980-81. Control of radon gas levels in the mining equipment cabs is required. Dust may be reduced by minimizing the resuspension of dust from contaminated surfaces within the cabs

  4. Nuclear aerosol behavior during reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1990-01-01

    Some early reactor accidents are recalled together with their associated environmental consequences. One such consequence is the generation of radioactive aerosol. We described the various physical processes that such an aerosol cloud undergoes within the secondary containment building. These physical processes are then brought together quantitatively in a balance equation for the aerosol size spectrum as a function of position and time. Methods for solving this equation are discussed and illustrated by the method of moments based upon log-normal and modified gamma distributions. Current problems are outlined and directions for future work into aerosol behavior are suggested. (author)

  5. Uranium distribution in Brazilian granitic rocks. Identification of uranium provinces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassinari, C.G.G.

    1993-01-01

    The research characterized and described uranium enriched granitoids in Brazil. They occur in a variety of tectonic environments and are represented by a variety granite types of distinct ages. It may be deduced that in general they have been generated by partial melting process of continental crust. However, some of them, those with tonality composition, indicate a contribution from mantle derived materials, thus suggesting primary uranium enrichment from the upper mantle. Through this study, the identification and characterization of uranium enriched granite or uranium provinces in Brazil can be made. This may also help identify areas with potential for uranium mineralization although it has been note that uranium mineralization in Brazil are not related to the uranium enrichment process. In general the U-anomalous granitoids are composed of granites with alkaline composition and granite ''sensu strictu'' which comprise mainly of syenites, quartz-syenites and biotite-hornblende granites, with ages between 1,800 - 1,300 M.a. The U-anomalous belongings to this period present high Sr initial ratios values, above 0.706, and high Rb contents. Most of the U-enriched granitoids occur within ancient cratonic areas, or within Early to Mid-Proterozoic mobile belts, but after their cratonization. Generally, these granitoids are related to the border zones of the mobile belts or deep crustal discontinuity. Refs, 12 figs, 3 tabs

  6. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  7. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  8. Safety of uranium enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekawa, Shigeru; Morikami, Yoshio; Morita, Minoru; Takahashi, Tsukasa; Tokuyasu, Takashi.

    1991-01-01

    With respect to safety evaluation of the gas centrifuge enrichment facility, several characteristic problems are described as follows. Criticality safety in the cascade equipments can be obtained to maintain the enrichment of UF 6 below 5 %. External radiation dose equivalent rate of the 30B cylinder is low enough, the shield is not necessary. Penetration ratio of the two-stage HEPA filters for UF 6 aerosol is estimated at 10 -9 . From the experimental investigation, vacuum tightness is not damaged by destruction of gas centrifuge rotor. Carbon steel can be used for uranium enrichment equipments under the condition below 100degC. (author)

  9. Models for estimating the radiation hazards of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.

    1982-01-01

    Hazards to the health of workers in uranium mines derive from the decay products of radon and from uranium and its descendants. Radon daughters in mine atmospheres are either attached to aerosols or exist as free atoms and their physical state determines in which part of the lung the daughters deposit. The factors which influence the proportions of radon daughters attached to aerosols, their deposition in the lung and the dose received by the cells in lung tissue are discussed. The estimation of dose to tissue from inhalation or ingestion of uranium and daughters is based on a different set of models which have been applied in recent ICRP reports. The models used to describe the deposition of particulates, their movement in the gut and their uptake by organs, which form the basis for future limits on the concentration of uranium and daughters in air or on their intake with food, are outlined

  10. Models for estimating the radiation hazards of uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, K.N.

    1990-01-01

    Hazards to the health of workers in uranium mines derive from the decay products of radon and from uranium and its descendants. Radon daughters in mine atmospheres are either attached to aerosols or exist as free atoms and their physical state determines in which part of the lung the daughters deposit. The factors which influence the proportions of radon daughters attached to aerosols, their deposition in the lung and the dose received by the cells in lung tissue are discussed. The estimation of dose to tissue from inhalation of ingestion or uranium and daughters is based on a different set of models which have been applied in recent ICRP reports. The models used to describe the deposition of particulates, their movement in the gut and their uptake by organs, which form the basis for future limits on the concentration of uranium and daughters in air or on their intake with food, are outlined. 34 refs., 12 tabs., 9 figs

  11. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  12. Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Tanaka, Toru; Nitta, Shinnosuke; Itosu, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Shun; Oki, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Various characteristics such as size distribution, chemical component and radioactivity have been analyzed for radioactive aerosols released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Measured results for radioactive aerosols suggest that the potential transport medium for radioactive cesium was non-sea-salt sulfate. This result indicates that cesium isotopes would preferentially attach with sulfate compounds. In the present work the attachment behavior of fission products to aqueous solution aerosols of sodium salts has been studied using a generation system of solution aerosols and spontaneous fission source of {sup 248}Cm. Attachment ratios of fission products to the solution aerosols were compared among the aerosols generated by different solutions of sodium salt. A significant difference according as a solute of solution aerosols was found in the attachment behavior. The present results suggest the existence of chemical effects in the attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols.

  13. Bioassay for uranium mill tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschaeche, A.N.

    1986-01-01

    Uranium mill tailings are composed of fine sand that contains, among other things, some uranium (U/sup 238/ primarily), and all of the uranium daughters starting with /sup 230/Th that are left behind after the usable uranium is removed in the milling process. Millions of pounds of tailings are and continue to be generated at uranium mills around the United States. Discrete uranium mill tailings piles exist near the mills. In addition, the tailings materials were used in communities situated near mill sites for such purposes as building materials, foundations for buildings, pipe runs, sand boxes, gardens, etc. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) is a U.S. Department of Energy Program designed with the intention of removing or stabilizing the mill tailings piles and the tailings used to communities so that individuals are not exposed above the EPA limits established for such tailings materials. This paper discusses the bioassay programs that are established for workers who remove tailings from the communities in which they are placed

  14. Uranium update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is about the current uranium mining situation, especially that in Saskatchewan. Canada has a unique advantage with the Saskatchewan uranium deposits. Making the most of this opportunity is important to Canada. The following is reviewed: project development and the time and capital it takes to bring a new project into production; the supply and demand situation to show where the future production fits into the world market; and our foreign competition and how we have to be careful not to lose our opportunity. (author)

  15. Uranium and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    Producing and using uranium as a fuel for the generation of electricity involves many activities and industries. Some 100,000 Canadian jobs are dependent upon the nuclear power industry. Of these, 38,000 people are employed directly by more than 100 corporations. This publication describes the components, relationships and some special aspects of 'the nuclear fuel cycle,' which includes exploration, mining, milling, refining, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, reactors, and waste management

  16. Machining of uranium and uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium and uranium alloys can be readily machined by conventional methods in the standard machine shop when proper safety and operating techniques are used. Material properties that affect machining processes and recommended machining parameters are discussed. Safety procedures and precautions necessary in machining uranium and uranium alloys are also covered. 30 figures

  17. AEC determines uranium enrichment policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Uranium Enrichment of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) has submitted a report to AEC chairman concerning the promotion of the introduction of advanced material, high performance centrifuges to replace conventional metallic drum centrifuges, and the development of next generation advanced centrifuges. The report also called for the postponement until around 1997 of the decision whether the development should be continued or not on atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) and molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS) processes, as well as the virtual freezing of the construction of a chemical process demonstration plant. The report was approved by the AEC chairman in August. The uranium enrichment service market in the world will continue to be characterized by oversupply. The domestic situation of uranium enrichment supply-demand trend, progress of the expansion of Rokkasho enrichment plant, the trend in the development of gas centrifuge process and the basic philosophy of commercializing domestic uranium enrichment are reported. (K.I.)

  18. Uranium and nuclear energy: 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The papers (25 in all) cover energy policy issues (5 papers), uranium mining safety (4 papers), uranium production (3 papers), public attitudes and waste management (4 papers), advancing enrichment technology especially laser-based techniques (4 papers) and the uranium market (5 papers). The address by Lord Marshall, chairman of the Central Electricity Generating Board, which explains why an accident like the one at Chernobyl could not happen in a British reactor is also reprinted. All are indexed separately. The first appendix lists the nuclear power plants in the world, country by country, and gives details of type, supplier and commercial operation. The second appendix lists the uranium production facilities in the world country by country giving their status, ownership and some brief comments. (U.K.)

  19. United States uranium enrichment policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    ERDA's uranium enrichment program policies governing the manner in which ERDA's enrichment complex is being operated and expanded to meet customer requirements for separative work, research and development activities directed at providing technology alternatives for future enrichment capacity, and establishing the framework for additional domestic uranium enrichment capacity to meet the domestic and foreign nuclear industry's growing demand for enrichment services are considered. The ERDA enrichment complex consists of three gaseous diffusion plants located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Today, these plants provide uranium enrichment services for commercial nuclear power generation. These enrichment services are provided under contracts between the Government and the utility customers. ERDA's program involves a major pilot plant cascade, and pursues an advanced isotope separation technique for the late 1980's. That the United States must develop additional domestic uranium enrichment capacity is discussed

  20. Radioactive Aerosol Size Distribution Measured in Nuclear Workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, T.; Oved, S.; German, U.

    2002-01-01

    Inhalation is the main route for internal exposure of workers to radioactive aerosols in the nuclear industry.Aerosol's size distribution and in particular its activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD)is important for determining the fractional deposition of inhaled particles in the respiratory tract and the resulting doses. Respiratory tract models have been published by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP).The former model has recommended a default AMAD of 1 micron for the calculation of dose coefficients for workers in the nuclear industry [1].The recent model recommends a 5 microns default diameter for occupational exposure which is considered to be more representative of workplace aerosols [2]. Several researches on radioactive aerosol's size distribution in nuclear workplaces has supported this recommendation [3,4].This paper presents the results of radioactive aerosols size distribution measurements taken at several workplaces of the uranium production process

  1. Aerosol scrubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Submerged Gravel Scrubber is an air cleaning system developed by the Department of Energy's Liquid Metal Reactor Program. The Scrubber System has been patented by the Department of Energy. This technology is being transferred to industry by the DOE. Its basic principles can be adapted for individual applications and the commercialized version can be used to perform a variety of tasks. The gas to be cleaned is percolated through a continuously washed gravel bed. The passage of the gas through the gravel breaks the stream into many small bubbles rising in a turbulent body of water. These conditions allow very highly efficient removal of aerosols from the gas

  2. Uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheeseman, E.W.

    1980-01-01

    The international uranium market appears to be currently over-supplied with a resultant softening in prices. Buyers on the international market are unhappy about some of the restrictions placed on sales by the government, and Canadian sales may suffer as a result. About 64 percent of Canada's shipments come from five operating Ontario mines, with the balance from Saskatchewan. Several other properties will be producing within the next few years. In spite of the adverse effects of the Three Mile Island incident and the default by the T.V.A. of their contract, some 3 600 tonnes of new uranium sales were completed during the year. The price for uranium had stabilized at US $42 - $44 by mid 1979, but by early 1980 had softened somewhat. The year 1979 saw the completion of major environmental hearings in Ontario and Newfoundland and the start of the B.C. inquiry. Two more hearings are scheduled for Saskatchewan in 1980. The Elliot Lake uranium mining expansion hearings are reviewed, as are other recent hearings. In the production of uranium for nuclear fuel cycle, environmental matters are of major concern to the industry, the public and to governments. Research is being conducted to determine the most effective method for removing radium from tailings area effluents. Very stringent criteria are being drawn up by the regulatory agencies that must be met by the industry in order to obtain an operating licence from the AECB. These criteria cover seepages from the tailings basin and through the tailings retention dam, seismic stability, and both short and long term management of the tailings waste management area. (auth)

  3. Toxicity evaluation of e-juice and its soluble aerosols generated by electronic cigarettes using recombinant bioluminescent bacteria responsive to specific cellular damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Shiv; Mitchell, Robert J; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2017-04-15

    Electronic-cigarettes (e-cigarette) are widely used as an alternative to traditional cigarettes but their safety is not well established. Herein, we demonstrate and validate an analytical method to discriminate the deleterious effects of e-cigarette refills (e-juice) and soluble e-juice aerosol (SEA) by employing stress-specific bioluminescent recombinant bacterial cells (RBCs) as whole-cell biosensors. These RBCs carry luxCDABE-operon tightly controlled by promoters that specifically induced to DNA damage (recA), superoxide radicals (sodA), heavy metals (copA) and membrane damage (oprF). The responses of the RBCs following exposure to various concentrations of e-juice/SEA was recorded in real-time that showed dose-dependent stress specific-responses against both the e-juice and vaporized e-juice aerosols produced by the e-cigarette. We also established that high doses of e-juice (4-folds diluted) lead to cell death by repressing the cellular machinery responsible for repairing DNA-damage, superoxide toxicity, ion homeostasis and membrane damage. SEA also caused the cellular damages but the cells showed enhanced bioluminescence expression without significant growth inhibition, indicating that the cells activated their global defense system to repair these damages. DNA fragmentation assay also revealed the disintegration of total cellular DNA at sub-toxic doses of e-juice. Despite their state of matter, the e-juice and its aerosols induce cytotoxicity and alter normal cellular functions, respectively that raises concerns on use of e-cigarettes as alternative to traditional cigarette. The ability of RBCs in detecting both harmful effects and toxicity mechanisms provided a fundamental understanding of biological response to e-juice and aerosols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uranium industry annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  5. Uranium industry annual 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-04-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1996 (UIA 1996) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1996 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1987 through 1996 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2006, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. A feature article, The Role of Thorium in Nuclear Energy, is included. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  6. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  7. Calibration of aerosol radiometers. Special aerosol sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Problems of calibration of artificial aerosol radiometry and information-measurement systems of radiometer radiation control, in particular, are considered. Special aerosol source is suggested, which permits to perform certification and testing of aerosol channels of the systems in situ without the dismantling

  8. A Comparison of the Pharmacokinetics and Pulmonary Lymphatic Exposure of a Generation 4 PEGylated Dendrimer Following Intravenous and Aerosol Administration to Rats and Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gemma M; Bischof, Robert J; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; McLeod, Victoria M; Chan, Linda J; Jones, Seth A; Owen, David J; Porter, Christopher J H; Kaminskas, Lisa M

    2016-02-01

    Cancer metastasis to pulmonary lymph nodes dictates the need to deliver chemotherapeutic and diagnostic agents to the lung and associated lymph nodes. Drug conjugation to dendrimer-based delivery systems has the potential to reduce toxicity, enhance lung retention and promote lymphatic distribution in rats. The current study therefore evaluated the pharmacokinetics and lung lymphatic exposure of a PEGylated dendrimer following inhaled administration. Plasma pharmacokinetics and disposition of a 22 kDa PEGylated dendrimer were compared after aerosol administration to rats and sheep. Lung-derived lymph could not be sampled in rats and so lymphatic transport of the dendrimer from the lung was assessed in sheep. Higher plasma concentrations were achieved when dendrimer was administered to the lungs of rats as a liquid instillation when compared to an aerosol. Plasma pharmacokinetics were similar between sheep and rats, although some differences in disposition patterns were evident. Unexpectedly, less than 0.5% of the aerosol dose was recovered in pulmonary lymph. The data suggest that rats provide a relevant model for assessing the pharmacokinetics of inhaled macromolecules prior to evaluation in larger animals, but that the pulmonary lymphatics are unlikely to play a major role in the absorption of nanocarriers from the lungs.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1990, September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and uranium marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry including utilities with nuclear-powered electric generating plants. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1990), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis within the US Department of Energy. 19 figs., 47 tabs

  10. Uranium mining: Environmental and health impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Producing uranium in a safe and environmentally responsible manner is important not only to the producers and consumers of the product, but also to society at large. Given expectations of growth in nuclear generating capacity in the coming decades - particularly in the developing world - enhancing awareness of leading practice in uranium mining is important. This was the objective of a recent NEA report entitled Managing Environmental and Health Impacts of Uranium Mining, providing a non-technical overview of the significant evolution of uranium mining practices from the time that it was first mined for military purposes until today. (author)

  11. Depleted uranium processing and fluorine extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laflin, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nuclear era, there has never been a commercial solution for the large quantities of depleted uranium hexafluoride generated from uranium enrichment. In the United States alone, there is already in excess of 1.6 billion pounds (730 million kilograms) of DUF_6 currently stored. INIS is constructing a commercial uranium processing and fluorine extraction facility. The INIS facility will convert depleted uranium hexafluoride and use it as feed material for the patented Fluorine Extraction Process to produce high purity fluoride gases and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The project will provide an environmentally friendly and commercially viable solution for DUF_6 tails management. (author)

  12. Uranium - the element: its occurrence and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, I. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Uranium metal and its compounds have been of great interest to physicists and chemists due to its use for both civil and military applications, e.g. production of electricity, use in the medical field and for making nuclear weapons. This review paper describes the occurrence, chemistry and metallurgy of the element 'uranium', its conversion to stable compounds such as yellow cake, uranium tetrafluoride and uranium hexafluoride and the enrichment technologies and uses for both civil and military purposes. The paper is meant for ready reference for students and teachers in connection with the recent spate of interest shown in nuclear power generation in Pakistan and abroad. (author)

  13. Impact of aerosols on ice crystal size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Gu, Yu; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Li, Qinbin; Fu, Rong; Huang, Lei; Liu, Xiaohong; Shi, Xiangjun; Su, Hui; He, Cenlin

    2018-01-01

    The interactions between aerosols and ice clouds represent one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing from pre-industrial time to the present. In particular, the impact of aerosols on ice crystal effective radius (Rei), which is a key parameter determining ice clouds' net radiative effect, is highly uncertain due to limited and conflicting observational evidence. Here we investigate the effects of aerosols on Rei under different meteorological conditions using 9-year satellite observations. We find that the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings are modulated by water vapor amount in conjunction with several other meteorological parameters. While there is a significant negative correlation between Rei and aerosol loading in moist conditions, consistent with the "Twomey effect" for liquid clouds, a strong positive correlation between the two occurs in dry conditions. Simulations based on a cloud parcel model suggest that water vapor modulates the relative importance of different ice nucleation modes, leading to the opposite aerosol impacts between moist and dry conditions. When ice clouds are decomposed into those generated from deep convection and formed in situ, the water vapor modulation remains in effect for both ice cloud types, although the sensitivities of Rei to aerosols differ noticeably between them due to distinct formation mechanisms. The water vapor modulation can largely explain the difference in the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings in various seasons. A proper representation of the water vapor modulation is essential for an accurate estimate of aerosol-cloud radiative forcing produced by ice clouds.

  14. Direct impact aerosol sampling by electrostatic precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Jason D.; Harter, Andrew G.; Stinson, Brad J.; Sullivan, Nicholas M.

    2016-02-02

    The present disclosure provides apparatuses for collecting aerosol samples by ionizing an air sample at different degrees. An air flow is generated through a cavity in which at least one corona wire is disposed and electrically charged to form a corona therearound. At least one grounded sample collection plate is provided downstream of the at least one corona wire so that aerosol ions generated within the corona are deposited on the at least one grounded sample collection plate. A plurality of aerosol samples ionized to different degrees can be generated. The at least one corona wire may be perpendicular to the direction of the flow, or may be parallel to the direction of the flow. The apparatus can include a serial connection of a plurality of stages such that each stage is capable of generating at least one aerosol sample, and the air flow passes through the plurality of stages serially.

  15. Uranium 2009: Resources, Production and Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    With several countries currently building nuclear power plants and planning the construction of more to meet long-term increases in electricity demand, uranium resources, production and demand remain topics of notable interest. In response to the projected growth in demand for uranium and declining inventories, the uranium industry - the first critical link in the fuel supply chain for nuclear reactors - is boosting production and developing plans for further increases in the near future. Strong market conditions will, however, be necessary to trigger the investments required to meet projected demand. The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on information compiled in 40 countries, including those that are major producers and consumers of uranium. This 23. edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2009, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres around the world, as well as from countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2035 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  16. The latest figures on uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, R.

    2010-01-01

    According to the latest figures on uranium, soon to be published by the NEA, uranium resources, production and demand are all on the rise. Exploration efforts have increased recently in line with the expected expansion of nuclear energy in the coming years. Total identified resources have grown and are now sufficient to cover 100 years of supply at 2008 rates of consumption. Costs of production have, however, also increased. This article is based on the latest edition of the 'Red Book', Uranium 2009: Resources, Production and Demand, which presents the results of the most recent biennial review of world uranium market fundamentals and a statistical profile of the world uranium industry as of 1 January 2009. It contains official data provided by OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) member countries on uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2035 are also provided as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. Despite recent declines stemming from the global financial crisis, world demand for electricity is expected to continue to grow significantly over the next several decades to meet the needs of an increasing population and economic growth. The recognition by an increasing number of governments that nuclear power can produce competitively priced, base-load electricity that is essentially free of greenhouse gas emissions, coupled with the role that nuclear can play in enhancing security of energy supply, increases the prospects for growth in nuclear generating capacity, although the magnitude of that growth remains to be determined. Regardless of the role that nuclear energy ultimately plays in meeting rising electricity demand, the uranium resource base is more than adequate to meet projected requirements. Meeting even high-case requirements to 2035 would consume less

  17. Purification method for calcium fluoride containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogami, Takeshi

    1998-01-01

    Calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) containing uranium is heated in an electrolytic bath having a cathode and an anode to form a molten salt, and the molten salt is electrolytically reduced to form metal uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. The calcium fluoride molten salt separated by the deposition of generated metal uranium on the surface of the cathode is solidified by cooling. The solidified calcium fluoride is recovered. When metal uranium is deposited on the surface of the cathode by the electrolytic reduction of the molten salt, impurities such as plutonium and neptunium are also deposited on the surface of the anodes entrained by the metal uranium. Impurities having high vapor pressures such as americium and strontium are evaporated and removed from the molten salts. Then, nuclides such as uranium can thus be separated and recovered, and residual CaF 2 can be recovered in a state easily storable and reutilizable. (T.M.)

  18. Uranium 2003: resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. This edition, the 20., presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supplies and demand as of 1 January 2003 based on official information received from 43 countries. Uranium 2003: Resources, Production and Demand paints a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and for the first time, a report for Turkmenistan. Also included are international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020. The long lead times required to bring resources into production underscore the importance of making timely decisions to pursue production capability well in advance of any supply shortfall. (author)

  19. Study of filterable materials and protection instruments by the use of radioactive aerosols; Etude de materiaux filtrants et d'appareils de protection a l'aide des aerosols radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billard,; Chevalier,; Pradel, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Many filtration problems can be studied by means of radioactive aerosols. For the investigations described in this paper we have chosen the solid disintegration products of radon, the radioactive gas formed from radium, because of the facilities of generation and measurement it offers. Radon and its daughters are in fact always present in the atmosphere in sufficient concentration for certain tests. In order to improve the sensitivity of the measurements, radon from uranium ore can be used. The technique of measuring by counting {alpha} particles is rapid and easy to employ. We have thus been able to define a test for filterable substances, and to check filtering installation and individual protection instruments. (author) [French] Les aerosols radioactifs permettent d'etudier de nombreux problemes de filtration. Pour les etudes decrites dans ce document, nous avons choisi les produits solides de desintegration du radon, gaz radioactif forme a partir du radium en raison des facilites de generation et de mesure. Le radon et ses descendants sont, en effet, toujours presents dans l'atmosphere en concentration suffisante pour certains essais. Pour ameliorer la sensibilite des mesures, il suffit d'utiliser le radon provenant de minerai d'uranium. La technique de mesure par comptage des particules {alpha} est rapide et facile a mettre en oeuvre. Nous avons pu ainsi definir un test pour les substances filtrantes et controler les installations de filtration et des appareils de protection individuelle. (auteur)

  20. Aerosols and the lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The lectures of the colloquium are discussed in summary form. There were 5 lectures on aerosol deposition, 5 on aerosol elimination, 7 on toxicology, and 7 on the uses of aerosols in medical therapy. In some cases aerosols with radioactive labels were used. Several lectures reviewed the kinetics and toxicology of airborne environmental pollutants. (MG) [de

  1. Supercritical fluid extraction of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2017-01-01

    Uranium being strategic material, its separation and purification is of utmost importance in nuclear industry, for which solvent extraction is being employed. During solvent extraction significant quantity of radioactive liquid waste gets generated which is of environmental concern. In recent decades supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has emerged as promising alternative to solvent extraction owing to its inherent advantage of reduction in liquid waste generation and simplification of process. In this paper a brief overview of research work carried out so far on SFE of uranium by BARC has been given

  2. The sensitivity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA component partitioning to the predictions of component properties – Part 3: Investigation of condensed compounds generated by a near-explicit model of VOC oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. McFiggans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of the absorptive partitioning of secondary organic aerosol components were carried out using a number of methods to estimate vapour pressure and non-ideality. The sensitivity of predicted condensed component masses, volatility, O:C ratio, molar mass and functionality distribution to the choice of estimation methods was investigated in mixtures of around 2700 compounds generated by a near explicit mechanism of atmospheric VOC degradation. The sensitivities in terms of all metrics were comparable to those previously reported (using 10 000 semi-randomly generated compounds. In addition, the change in predicted aerosol properties and composition with changing VOC emission scenario was investigated showing key dependencies on relative anthropogenic and biogenic contributions. Finally, the contribution of non-ideality to the changing distribution of condensed components was explored in terms of the shift in effective volatility by virtue of component activity coefficients, clearly demonstrating both enhancement and reduction of component masses associated with negative and positive deviations from ideality.

  3. A clean environment approach to uranium mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grancea, Luminita

    2015-01-01

    A global and multi-faceted response to climate change is essential if meaningful and cost-effective progress is to be made in reducing the effects of climate change around the world. There is no doubt that the uranium mining sector has an important role to play in such a goal. Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of baseload low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Given expectations of growth in nuclear generating capacity and the associated uranium demand, enhancing awareness of leading practices in uranium mining is indispensable. Actors in the uranium mining sector operate in a complex world, throughout different geographies, and involving global supply chains. They manage climate-sensitive water, land and energy resources and balance the interests of various stakeholders. Managed well, uranium mining delivers sustainable value for economic growth, employment and infrastructure, with specific attention given to the preservation of the environment. In the early phases of the industry, however, downside risks existed, which created legacy environmental and health issues that still can be recalled today. This article addresses key aspects of modern uranium mining operations that have been introduced as regulations and practices have evolved in response to societal attitudes about health, safety and environmental protection. Such aspects of mine management were seldom, if ever, respected in the early stages of uranium mining. With the implementation of modern mine lifecycle parameters and regulatory requirements, uranium mining has become a leader in safety and environmental management. Today, uranium mining is conducted under significantly different circumstances and is now the most regulated and one of the safest forms of mining in the world. Experiences from modern uranium mines show that successful companies develop innovative strategies to manage all the

  4. Uranium - what role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grey, T.; Gaul, J.; Crooks, P.; Robotham, R.

    1980-01-01

    Opposing viewpoints on the future role of uranium are presented. Topics covered include the Australian Government's uranium policy, the status of nuclear power around the world, Australia's role as a uranium exporter and problems facing the nuclear industry

  5. Brazilian uranium exploration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, J.P.M.

    1981-01-01

    General information on Brazilian Uranium Exploration Program, are presented. The mineralization processes of uranium depoits are described and the economic power of Brazil uranium reserves is evaluated. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This paper analyzes under four different scenarios the adequacy of a $500 million annual deposit into a fund to pay for the cost of cleaning up the Department of Energy's (DOE) three aging uranium enrichment plants. These plants are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. In summary the following was found: A fixed annual $500 million deposit made into a cleanup fund would not be adequate to cover total expected cleanup costs, nor would it be adequate to cover expected decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) costs. A $500 million annual deposit indexed to an inflation rate would likely be adequate to pay for all expected cleanup costs, including D and D costs, remedial action, and depleted uranium costs

  7. Uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spriggs, M.

    1980-01-01

    The balance between uranium supply and demand is examined. Should new resources become necessary, some unconventional sources which could be considered include low-grade extensions to conventional deposits, certain types of intrusive rock, tuffs, and lake and sea-bed sediments. In addition there are large but very low grade deposits in carbonaceous shales, granites, and seawater. The possibility of recovery is discussed. Programmes of research into the feasibility of extraction of uranium from seawater, as a by-product from phosphoric acid production, and from copper leach solutions, are briefly discussed. Other possible sources are coal, old mine dumps and tailings, the latter being successfully exploited commercially in South Africa. The greatest constraints on increased development of U from lower grade sources are economics and environmental impact. It is concluded that apart from U as a by-product from phosphate, other sources are unlikely to contribute much to world requirements in the foreseeable future. (U.K.)

  8. Filter-based Aerosol Measurement Experiments using Spherical Aerosol Particles under High Temperature and High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chan; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Doo Young [FNC TECH., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Optical Particle Counter (OPC) is used to provide real-time measurement of aerosol concentration and size distribution. Glass fiber membrane filter also be used to measure average mass concentration. Three tests (MTA-1, 2 and 3) have been conducted to study thermal-hydraulic effect, a filtering tendency at given SiO{sub 2} particles. Based on the experimental results, the experiment will be carried out further with a main carrier gas of steam and different aerosol size. The test results will provide representative behavior of the aerosols under various conditions. The aim of the tests, MTA 1, 2 and 3, are to be able to 1) establish the test manuals for aerosol generation, mixing, sampling and measurement system, which defines aerosol preparation, calibration, operating and evaluation method under high pressure and high temperature 2) develop commercial aerosol test modules applicable to the thermal power plant, environmental industry, automobile exhaust gas, chemical plant, HVAC system including nuclear power plant. Based on the test results, sampled aerosol particles in the filter indicate that important parameters affecting aerosol behavior aerosols are 1) system temperature to keep above a evaporation temperature of ethanol and 2) aerosol losses due to the settling by ethanol liquid droplet.

  9. Moving to world's best uranium address

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Most exploration dollars spent in South Australia are focused on exploiting uranium. This is for good reason as South Australia is the world's best address for uranium. Pressure to cut CO 2 emissions and the ballistic growth of the Chinese and Indian economies has heightened expectations that the worldwide use of uranium for power generation will mushroom beyond its current 17% market share. The recent Australia-China deal only seems to confirm this; hence uranium's growing popularity among miners and explorers. Such is the attractiveness of uranium-related floats, when Toro Energy sought $18m in March it was swamped with more than three times share application volume. In the north west, Southern Gold and Hindmarsh Resources are expectantly drilling for commercial uranium deposits all around the acreage that hosts the Challenger gold mine in the Gawler Craton. The first exploration drilling for uranium in quaternary-age river channels will take place in South Australia's far north in May. Red Metal says while older and deeper tertiary river channels in the area that host the Beverley uranium mine were explored for uranium, the younger near-surface channel has not had a single hole drilled for uranium. This is despite the area being one of the 'hottest radiogenic terrains in South Australia'. The company will target calcrete-style uranium mineralisation similar to the Yerrlirrie deposit in Western Australia (52,000t U308). Tasman Resources will start drilling to test seven uranium targets within 30km of Olympic Dam, the world's largest known uranium deposit, later this year. Tasman also holds tenements adjoining the Warrior uranium deposit near Tarcoola that contains known radiometric anomalies within the 40km-long Wynbring paleochannels. They are the fourth largest uranium explorer in South Australia. Alliance Resources and its JV partner Quasar Resources are exploring the Beverley 4 Mile uranium prospect at Arkaroola. Quasar is an affiliate of Heathgate Resources

  10. Aftermath of Uranium Ore Processing on Floodplains: Lasting Effects of Uranium on Soil and Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H.; Boye, K.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    A former uranium ore processing site located between the Wind River and the Little Wind River near the city of Riverton, Wyoming, has generated a uranium plume in the groundwater within the floodplain. Uranium is toxic and poses a threat to human health. Thus, controlling and containing the spread of uranium will benefit the human population. The primary source of uranium was removed from the processing site, but a uranium plume still exists in the groundwater. Uranium in its reduced form is relatively insoluble in water and therefore is retained in organic rich, anoxic layers in the subsurface. However, with the aid of microbes uranium becomes soluble in water which could expose people and the environment to this toxin, if it enters the groundwater and ultimately the river. In order to better understand the mechanisms controlling uranium behavior in the floodplains, we examined sediments from three sediment cores (soil surface to aquifer). We determined the soil elemental concentrations and measured microbial activity through the use of several instruments (e.g. Elemental Analyzer, X-ray Fluorescence, MicroResp System). Through the data collected, we aim to obtain a better understanding of how the interaction of geochemical factors and microbial metabolism affect uranium mobility. This knowledge will inform models used to predict uranium behavior in response to land use or climate change in floodplain environments.

  11. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that in 1990 the Department of Energy began a two-year project to illustrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new uranium enrichment technology-the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. GAO believes that completing the AVLIS demonstration project will provide valuable information about the technical viability and cost of building an AVLIS plant and will keep future plant construction options open. However, Congress should be aware that DOE still needs to adequately demonstrate AVLIS with full-scale equipment and develop convincing cost projects. Program activities, such as the plant-licensing process, that must be completed before a plant is built, could take many years. Further, an updated and expanded uranium enrichment analysis will be needed before any decision is made about building an AVLIS plant. GAO, which has long supported legislation that would restructure DOE's uranium enrichment program as a government corporation, encourages DOE's goal of transferring AVLIS to the corporation. This could reduce the government's financial risk and help ensure that the decision to build an AVLIS plant is based on commercial concerns. DOE, however, has no alternative plans should the government corporation not be formed. Further, by curtailing a planned public access program, which would have given private firms an opportunity to learn about the technology during the demonstration project, DOE may limit its ability to transfer AVLIS to the private sector

  12. Overview of Canada's uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowell, A.F.

    1982-06-01

    This paper places Canada's uranium industry in its international context. Most uranium, except that produced in the United States, is traded internationally. A brief history of the industry worldwide is given to show how the principal producing areas have fared to date. The industry is young, highly cyclical, and still far from achieving stability. Uranium is a single end-use commodity, entirely dependent on the generation of electricity in nuclear stations, and is without price elasticity: lowering the price does not increase demand. The typical nuclear fuel processing chain has not encouraged or led to much vertical integration. Uranium is subject to more governmental control than any other commodity. The principal market is located in the industrial countries of western Europe, the United States, Canada, and the far east. The uranium supply-demand situation is reviewed, including the current and near-term oversupply and the longer term outlook to 1995. The major negative impact of reactor cancellations and deferments in the United States is discussed. Because of the difficulty in getting reactors on line, it has become easier to forecast the demand for uranium over the next 10 years. It is more difficult to predict how that demand will be met from the more than ample competing sources. Canada's potential for supplying a significant portion of this demand is considered in relation to producers and potential new producers in other countries

  13. Derived enriched uranium market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, E.

    1996-01-01

    The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market

  14. The Impact of Aerosol Particle Mixing State on the Hygroscopicity of Sea Spray Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Steven R; Collins, Douglas B; Lee, Christopher; Morris, Holly S; Novak, Gordon A; Prather, Kimberly A; Quinn, Patricia K; Sultana, Camille M; Tivanski, Alexei V; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Cappa, Christopher D; Bertram, Timothy H

    2015-06-24

    Aerosol particles influence global climate by determining cloud droplet number concentrations, brightness, and lifetime. Primary aerosol particles, such as those produced from breaking waves in the ocean, display large particle-particle variability in chemical composition, morphology, and physical phase state, all of which affect the ability of individual particles to accommodate water and grow into cloud droplets. Despite such diversity in molecular composition, there is a paucity of methods available to assess how particle-particle variability in chemistry translates to corresponding differences in aerosol hygroscopicity. Here, an approach has been developed that allows for characterization of the distribution of aerosol hygroscopicity within a chemically complex population of atmospheric particles. This methodology, when applied to the interpretation of nascent sea spray aerosol, provides a quantitative framework for connecting results obtained using molecular mimics generated in the laboratory with chemically complex ambient aerosol. We show that nascent sea spray aerosol, generated in situ in the Atlantic Ocean, displays a broad distribution of particle hygroscopicities, indicative of a correspondingly broad distribution of particle chemical compositions. Molecular mimics of sea spray aerosol organic material were used in the laboratory to assess the volume fractions and molecular functionality required to suppress sea spray aerosol hygroscopicity to the extent indicated by field observations. We show that proper accounting for the distribution and diversity in particle hygroscopicity and composition are important to the assessment of particle impacts on clouds and global climate.

  15. Uranium - a challenging mining business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadelhofer, J.W.; Wedig, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    The main application of uranium is its use as a fuel for the nuclear electricity generation. Presently about 68,000 t (177 mill. lbs) of uranium are annually required, of which 41,500 (108 mill. lbs) are provided from fresh mine production whereas 26,500 t (69 mill. lbs) are stock drawdown supplies from civil or military sources. Two-thirds of production are recovered by underground mining and about 75% (30,350 t) of the world's uranium mine production are extracted from top ten mines. All major uranium mining companies are making efforts to enlarge their production capacities: The paramount Cameco's Cigar Lake project has been delayed due to mine water inflow. Production is expected to commence by latest in 2010; the nameplate capacity of 6000 t/a should be reached in 2011. AREVA reported plans to invest about Euro 500 to 600 mill. to double its uranium production by 2010. In 2006 Denison Mines and International Uranium Corporation announced that they have entered into an agreement to merge the two companies in order to create a mid-tier, North American-focused uranium producer with the potential annual production of more than 5.5 mill. lbs of U 3 O 8 by 2010. The skyrocketing global electricity demand, growing public acceptance and more favourable policies have initiated a new round of global development of the nuclear industry. Against this backdrop, about 30,000 t/a to 40,000 t/a of additional mine production will be required within the upcoming 20 years to substitute secondary uranium supplies and to meet the expected increased demand; new start-up junior mining companies (e.g. Paladin) will contribute to this increased production. (orig.)

  16. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  17. Uranium Industry. Annual 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, M.S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This report provides a statistical description of activities of the US uranium industry during 1984 and includes a statistical profile of the status of the industry at the end of 1984. It is based on the results of an Energy Information Administration (EIA) survey entitled ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (Form EIA-858). The principal findings of the survey are summarized under two headings - Uranium Raw Materials Activities and Uranium Marketing Activities. The first heading covers exploration and development, uranium resources, mine and mill production, and employment. The second heading covers uranium deliveries and delivery commitments, uranium prices, foreign trade in uranium, inventories, and other marketing activities. 32 figs., 48 tabs

  18. Multi-parameter studies of environmental aerosols with cascade track filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensinger, W.; Guo, S.-L.; Vater, P.; Brandt, R.

    2005-01-01

    Aerosols in the air in a factory processing nuclear reactor fuel material were collected by using cascade Kapton track filters with outer pore sizes of 12.8, 4.0 and 1.0μm consecutively and a conventional filter of glass fiber being behind to collect all aerosol particles left-over. The volume of air passed through the filters was measured by a flow meter. The weight of aerosol particles on each filter was obtained by the weight difference of the filter before and after collection of aerosol particles. α-activity on each filter was measured with a methane gas flow proportional counter. The sizes and elemental compositions of aerosol particles on the filters were analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope and an electron microprobe. Special attention was given to uranium aerosol particles. The median sizes of uranium aerosol particles were obtained being 1.97, 1.33 and 0.72μm on the first, second and third filter, respectively. The median size of all the uranium aerosol particles on the three track filters was 1.25μm

  19. The uranium market: 1986-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewiner, C.; Walton, D.; Sinclair-Smith, D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main conclusions of the 1986 supply and demand report of the Uranium Institute. The probable nuclear generating capacity is estimated for 1986-2000. Previous capacity forecasts (1981-1986) are compared with actual generating capacity. When looking at demand, a distinction has to be made between what reactor operators require to fuel reactors (reactor requirements) and what they intend to purchase (uranium procurements). This distinction is defined and discussed. The interaction between supply and demand is shown and factors affecting trade (eg government policies) are discussed. 1985 was the first year when uranium production was less than reactor requirements. This shortfall will continue for a number of years with the current excess in consumer inventories supplying the difference between reactor requirements and uranium procurements. Uranium demand should exceed production by 1988 but additional capacity should be available from planned and possible restart and possible new facilities. (U.K.)

  20. Whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jinghai; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Frazer, Dave; Castranova, Vince; McBride, Carroll; Knuckles, Travis L; Stapleton, Phoebe A; Minarchick, Valerie C; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R

    2013-05-07

    Inhalation is the most likely exposure route for individuals working with aerosolizable engineered nano-materials (ENM). To properly perform nanoparticle inhalation toxicology studies, the aerosols in a chamber housing the experimental animals must have: 1) a steady concentration maintained at a desired level for the entire exposure period; 2) a homogenous composition free of contaminants; and 3) a stable size distribution with a geometric mean diameter generation of aerosols containing nanoparticles is quite challenging because nanoparticles easily agglomerate. This is largely due to very strong inter-particle forces and the formation of large fractal structures in tens or hundreds of microns in size (6), which are difficult to be broken up. Several common aerosol generators, including nebulizers, fluidized beds, Venturi aspirators and the Wright dust feed, were tested; however, none were able to produce nanoparticle aerosols which satisfy all criteria (5). A whole-body nanoparticle aerosol inhalation exposure system was fabricated, validated and utilized for nano-TiO2 inhalation toxicology studies. Critical components: 1) novel nano-TiO2 aerosol generator; 2) 0.5 m(3) whole-body inhalation exposure chamber; and 3) monitor and control system. Nano-TiO2 aerosols generated from bulk dry nano-TiO2 powders (primary diameter of 21 nm, bulk density of 3.8 g/cm(3)) were delivered into the exposure chamber at a flow rate of 90 LPM (10.8 air changes/hr). Particle size distribution and mass concentration profiles were measured continuously with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI). The aerosol mass concentration (C) was verified gravimetrically (mg/m(3)). The mass (M) of the collected particles was determined as M = (Mpost-Mpre), where Mpre and Mpost are masses of the filter before and after sampling (mg). The mass concentration was calculated as C = M/(Q*t), where Q is sampling flowrate (m(3)/min), and t is the sampling

  1. Critical analysis of the management of waste system originated at the uranium mining and processing. A case study of the Concentrated Unit of Uranium - INB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Valeska Peres de

    2005-01-01

    The uranium world market faced a depreciation of this commodity during the last decades. Recently, decreases in the secondary supply (represented by highly enriched uranium - HEU - stocks detained by the former Soviet Union) turned out the market dependent upon primary supply again. In order to cope with this changing demands and market conditions, new uranium mining/milling projects must start operation, or at least, former uranium production plants must be improved. Environmental questions have been and certainly will continue to be a determinant factor concerning the operational feasibility of these facilities. Mining/milling activities have the potential to cause risks to the human health and to the environment. In case of uranium projects, radiological impacts shall also be taken into consideration. Amongst the most relevant environmental aspects associated with the operation of a uranium project, generated wastes are usually of major concern and deserve appropriate management strategies. As a result the objective of the present work was to examine the waste management system of the Brazilian uranium production unity located at the municipality of Caetite, northeast region of the country. An open pit mine and a milling facility compose this unit. The extraction method employed is acid heap leach (using H 2 SO 4 ). It could be assessed that the overall conceptual management strategy is in agreement with the practices adopted worldwide. Atmospheric impacts, caused by the emissions of radon and aerosols must be investigated in more details. Mathematical simulation revealed that no significant impact in groundwater is expected due to mobilization and transport of radionuclides from the milling wastes. However, the impacts of drainage water, accumulated in the open pit, into groundwater cannot be discarded yet. Screening techniques were applied to assess the potential contribution of the leached ore piles as a 226 Ra source of pollution. Our results did not allow

  2. Carbonaceous aerosols from prescribed burning of a boreal forest ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Cofer, W.R. III; Levine, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    Smoke aerosol and background aerosol particles were collected from the controlled burning of boreal forest where vegetation species and relative mass distributions are known. Chemical mass balances were constructed for the total mass of carbonaceous aerosol particles emitted during the prescribed burn. In addition, a carbonaceous species inventory was developed for aerosol particles presnt under background, smoldering, and full-fire conditions; the production of organic carbon and elemental carbon particles is noted for these two fire regimes. Distributions of the solvent-soluble organic components of the sampled aerosols were generated to identify molecular properties that can be traced to unburned and pyrolyzed materials present in the boreal forest fuels

  3. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  4. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ''Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,'' is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2

  5. Uranium Industry Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-28

    The Uranium Industry Annual provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry for the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and electric utility industries, and the public. The feature article, ``Decommissioning of US Conventional Uranium Production Centers,`` is included. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2.

  6. The DRAGON aerosol research facility to study aerosol behaviour for reactor safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, Detlef; Guentay, Salih

    2008-01-01

    During a severe accident in a nuclear power plant fission products are expected to be released in form of aerosol particles and droplets. To study the behaviour of safety relevant reactor components under aerosol loads and prototypical severe accident conditions the multi-purpose aerosol generation facility DRAGON is used since 1994 for several projects. DRAGON can generate aerosol particles by the evaporation-condensation technique using a plasma torch system, fluidized bed and atomization of particles suspended in a liquid. Soluble, hygroscopic aerosol (i.e. CsOH) and insoluble aerosol particles (i.e. SnO 2 , TiO 2 ) or mixtures of them can be used. DRAGON uses state-of-the-art thermal-hydraulic, data acquisition and aerosol measurement techniques and is mainly composed of a mixing chamber, the plasma torch system, a steam generator, nitrogen gas and compressed air delivery systems, several aerosol delivery piping, gas heaters and several auxiliary systems to provide vacuum, coolant and off-gas treatment. The facility can be operated at system pressure of 5 bars, temperatures of 300 deg. C, flow rates of non-condensable gas of 900 kg/h and steam of 270 kg/h, respectively. A test section under investigation is attached to DRAGON. The paper summarizes and demonstrates with the help of two project examples the capabilities of DRAGON for reactor safety studies. (authors)

  7. Uranium 2007: resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With several countries building nuclear power plants and many more considering the use of nuclear power to produce electricity in order to meet rising demand, the uranium industry has become the focus of considerable attention. In response to rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of under investment. The ''Red Book'', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on official information received from 40 countries. This 22. edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1. January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (author)

  8. Uranium 2007: resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With several countries building nuclear power plants and many more considering the use of nuclear power to produce electricity in order to meet rising demand, the uranium industry has become the focus of considerable attention. In response to rising demand and declining inventories, uranium prices have increased dramatically in recent years. As a result, the uranium industry is undergoing a significant revival, bringing to an end a period of over 20 years of under investment. The ''Red Book'', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. It is based on official information received from 40 countries. This second edition provides a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as of first January 2007, as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantive new information from major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Central Asia, Eastern Europe and North America. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2030 are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (author)

  9. Impact of aerosols on ice crystal size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between aerosols and ice clouds represent one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing from pre-industrial time to the present. In particular, the impact of aerosols on ice crystal effective radius (Rei, which is a key parameter determining ice clouds' net radiative effect, is highly uncertain due to limited and conflicting observational evidence. Here we investigate the effects of aerosols on Rei under different meteorological conditions using 9-year satellite observations. We find that the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings are modulated by water vapor amount in conjunction with several other meteorological parameters. While there is a significant negative correlation between Rei and aerosol loading in moist conditions, consistent with the "Twomey effect" for liquid clouds, a strong positive correlation between the two occurs in dry conditions. Simulations based on a cloud parcel model suggest that water vapor modulates the relative importance of different ice nucleation modes, leading to the opposite aerosol impacts between moist and dry conditions. When ice clouds are decomposed into those generated from deep convection and formed in situ, the water vapor modulation remains in effect for both ice cloud types, although the sensitivities of Rei to aerosols differ noticeably between them due to distinct formation mechanisms. The water vapor modulation can largely explain the difference in the responses of Rei to aerosol loadings in various seasons. A proper representation of the water vapor modulation is essential for an accurate estimate of aerosol–cloud radiative forcing produced by ice clouds.

  10. Production and characterization of monodisperse uranium particles for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knott, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    controlled primarily by the aerosol precursor solution and the production parameters during the aerosol generation - in particular the liquid feed rate and the frequency of the orifice. The final particle morphology is controlled by the precipitation conditions during the conversion from aerosol droplets to solid entities. Small changes to these parameters have a significant influence on the final geometry, size and morphology. The second part of this thesis deals with the characterization of microparticles. A selection of particles was chosen to present the developments over a period of 12 months. Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) was used for various applications, e.g. to verify the elemental content and to assess the size and geometry of the particles. Combined Focused Ion Beam (FIB-SEM) studies revealed the presence of a porous inner structure for all solid particles. Hence, the resulting overall density was less than expected. Time of Flight Secondary Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) studies evaluated the elemental content and demonstrated the need for cleanliness since minute quantities of contaminations could be found in single particles. Micro Raman investigations were used to determine the crystallinity, crystal orientation and uranium species. The measurements showed that particles primarily consist of U_3O_8. Parts consist of Meta-schoepite and U(IV)-hydroxide which indicates residual water inside the crystal lattice. Micro Raman investigations were performed at CEA (Ile de France) and at the TU-Vienna. SIMS measurements were performed at Safeguards Analytical Services - Environmental Sample Laboratory (SGAS-ESL) on the Large Geometry-SIMS (LG-SIMS) with the scope to assess their performance as a QC material. Particles produced at Juelich were also compared directly against existing QC- and reference materials. Investigations and characterization assays on monodisperse microparticles indicate

  11. Provision by the uranium and uranium products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    International uranium market is converted from the buyer market into the seller market. The prices of uranium are high and the market attempts to adapt to changing circumstances. The industry of uranium enrichment satisfies the increasing demands but should to increase ots capacities. On the whole the situation is not stable and every year may change the existing position [ru

  12. Uranium mining in Eastern Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    A problem which simply does not exist in Western Germany is the uranium mining in the South of Eastern Germany (SDAG Wismuth). The cleaning up and control measure which are urgently needed will be a task for more than one generation. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohrhauer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of uranium isotopes in order to enrich the fuel for light water reactors with the light isotope U-235 is an important part of the nuclear fuel cycle. After the basic principals of isotope separation the gaseous diffusion and the centrifuge process are explained. Both these techniques are employed on an industrial scale. In addition a short review is given on other enrichment techniques which have been demonstrated at least on a laboratory scale. After some remarks on the present situation on the enrichment market the progress in the development and the industrial exploitation of the gas centrifuge process by the trinational Urenco-Centec organisation is presented. (orig.)

  14. Organic aerosol formation during the atmospheric degradation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M D; Sokolov, O; Wallington, T J; Takekawa, H; Karasawa, M; Klotz, B; Barnes, I; Becker, K H

    2001-04-01

    Organic aerosol formation during the atmospheric oxidation of toluene was investigated using smog chamber systems. Toluene oxidation was initiated by the UV irradiation of either toluene/air/NOx or toluene/air/CH3ONO/NO mixtures. Aerosol formation was monitored using scanning mobility particle sizers and toluene loss was monitored by in-situ FTIR spectroscopy or GC-FID techniques. The experimental results show that the reaction of OH radicals, NO3 radicals and/or ozone with the first generation products of toluene oxidation are sources of organic aerosol during the atmospheric oxidation of toluene. The aerosol results fall into two groups, aerosol formed in the absence and presence of ozone. An analytical expression for aerosol formation is developed and values are obtained for the yield of the aerosol species. In the absence of ozone the aerosol yield, defined as aerosol formed per unit toluene consumed once a threshold for aerosol formation has been exceeded, is 0.075 +/- 0.004. In the presence of ozone the aerosol yield is 0.108 +/- 0.004. This work provides experimental evidence and a simple theory confirming the formation of aerosol from secondary reactions.

  15. Uranium: do leave it in the ground!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyard, P.

    1990-01-01

    A previous author has argued that it would be best in the long run to consume uranium as much as possible in reactors rather than leave it in the ground in order to save the earth and generations into the far distant future from the evils of radiation. The argument is based on a comparison between the radioactive decay processes of fissioned uranium and uranium left in the earth to decay in its own time. It can be shown that from 300 days after reactor shut down onwards, the spent fuel will generate barely 1% of the radioactive energy that it would were it left untouched in the ground. Counter arguments are presented based largely on the risks to human health and life presented by uranium mining and disasters at nuclear plants such as that at Chernobyl. Illustrations are given of the suffering of people living near uranium mines arising from soil contamination by uranium tailings; the widespread radioactive contamination of the surrounding area and increased cancer mortality rates due to the Chernobyl accident are described. Finally, it is pointed out that uranium serves as a radioactive heat source in the gigantic recycling of rocks and the regeneration of the planet. All these arguments lead to the conclusion that uranium is best left in the earth. (UK)

  16. Uranium 2016: Resources, Production and Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Uranium is the raw material used to produce fuel for long-lived nuclear power facilities, necessary for the generation of significant amounts of base-load low-carbon electricity for decades to come. Although a valuable commodity, declining market prices for uranium in recent years, driven by uncertainties concerning evolutions in the use of nuclear power, have led to the postponement of mine development plans in a number of countries and to some questions being raised about future uranium supply. This 26. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), provides analyses and information from 49 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. The present edition provides the most recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and presents data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It offers updated information on established uranium production centres and mine development plans, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, in order to address long-term uranium supply and demand issues. (authors)

  17. Strategy and perspective for uranium exploration in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Salman, A.B.; Assaf, H.S.; Mahdy, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Uranium exploration started in Egypt about three decades ago. This was performed by applying integrated airborne and ground radiometric prospecting. The latter was conducted upon selected areas having rather favorable geological criteria. These activities resulted in the discovery of great numbers of radiometric anomalies, with several uranium occurrences in various geologic environments in granitic and sedimentary rocks. Some of these uranium occurrences show good potential for developing into workable uranium deposits. Small-scale exploratory tunnelling and drilling works have been carried out at some of these occurrences. Leaching studies and pilot experiments were carried out on technological samples to evaluate ore's suitability for uranium extraction. However, no assured reserves of uranium have been reached yet. The demands for uranium to satisfy the near future Egyptian nuclear power generation necessitates some development in the national strategy for uranium exploration. This will be achieved through intense programmes for ground geophysics and drilling from surface and underground mining works, in addition to radon emanometry and logging of oil and gas wells. Moreover, non conventional procedures for uranium extraction such as heap-leaching may be followed to exploit small-scale uranium deposits. In this developed strategy, the present uranium occurrences are modellized and categorized following the IAEA classification. The characteristics of the present uranium occurrences will be utilized in prospecting new areas. Subsidiary resources in phosphorites, black sands and rare metal deposits could supply additional quantities of uranium, in addition to thorium and rare earth elements. (author). 34 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  18. Uranium conversion; Urankonvertering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Lena; Peterson, Jenny; Wilhelmsen, Katarina [Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    FOI, has performed a study on uranium conversion processes that are of importance in the production of different uranium compounds in the nuclear industry. The same conversion processes are of interest both when production of nuclear fuel and production of fissile material for nuclear weapons are considered. Countries that have nuclear weapons ambitions, with the intention to produce highly enriched uranium for weapons purposes, need some degree of uranium conversion capability depending on the uranium feed material available. This report describes the processes that are needed from uranium mining and milling to the different conversion processes for converting uranium ore concentrate to uranium hexafluoride. Uranium hexafluoride is the uranium compound used in most enrichment facilities. The processes needed to produce uranium dioxide for use in nuclear fuel and the processes needed to convert different uranium compounds to uranium metal - the form of uranium that is used in a nuclear weapon - are also presented. The production of uranium ore concentrate from uranium ore is included since uranium ore concentrate is the feed material required for a uranium conversion facility. Both the chemistry and principles or the different uranium conversion processes and the equipment needed in the processes are described. Since most of the equipment that is used in a uranium conversion facility is similar to that used in conventional chemical industry, it is difficult to determine if certain equipment is considered for uranium conversion or not. However, the chemical conversion processes where UF{sub 6} and UF{sub 4} are present require equipment that is made of corrosion resistant material.

  19. Depleted uranium - influence on the health and environment; Ochudobneny uran - vplyva na zdravie a zivotne prostredie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosskopfova, O [Katedra jadrovej chemie, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Univerzita Komenskeho, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2002-07-01

    The uranium as radioactive element occurs in low concentrations in all components of environment. In the sample of natural uranium the isotope U-235 has the highest share (99.27 weight per cent). Chemical toxicity of uranium is comparable with toxicity of the elements like As and Pb. Depleted uranium is adjoining product in the production of enriched uranium, which is required in the production of the nuclear fuel and in the production of material used in nuclear arms. It mainly includes isotope U-238, and the content of isotopes U-235 and U-234 is sharply lowered. According to NRC depleted uranium is defined like uranium, in which percentile share of isotope U-235 is less than 0.711 weight percent. The activity of depleted uranium from viewpoint of external irradiation does not represent higher risk. Much higher risk for man represent the neurotoxic effects of uranium, which can get into human body by inhaling of dispersed particles, of contaminated dust and aerosols from atmosphere or by consumption of contaminated foodstuffs and water. Basic dangerous of irradiation by depleted uranium are mainly aerosols, which increase the probability of occurrence of lung cancer. The next dangerous is the damage of another organs like kidneys, liver and bones, where these aerosols are transported by blood like oxides from the lungs. In the environmental parts because of presence of natural uranium the depleted uranium is difficultly identifiably by standard detective methods. Thus it is necessary to use suitable radiochemical separative methods in combination with suitable detective method. (author)

  20. Issues in uranium availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schanz, J.J. Jr.; Adams, S.S.; Gordon, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to show the process by which information about uranium reserves and resources is developed, evaluated and used. The following three papers in this volume have been abstracted and indexed for the Energy Data Base: (1) uranium reserve and resource assessment; (2) exploration for uranium in the United States; (3) nuclear power, the uranium industry, and resource development

  1. Australian uranium industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, R K

    1976-04-01

    Various aspects of the Australian uranium industry are discussed including the prospecting, exploration and mining of uranium ores, world supply and demand, the price of uranium and the nuclear fuel cycle. The market for uranium and the future development of the industry are described.

  2. Irradiated uranium reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gal, I.

    1961-12-01

    Task concerned with reprocessing of irradiated uranium covered the following activities: implementing the method and constructing the cell for uranium dissolving; implementing the procedure for extraction of uranium, plutonium and fission products from radioactive uranium solutions; studying the possibilities for using inorganic ion exchangers and adsorbers for separation of U, Pu and fission products

  3. Uranium processing and properties

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Covers a broad spectrum of topics and applications that deal with uranium processing and the properties of uranium Offers extensive coverage of both new and established practices for dealing with uranium supplies in nuclear engineering Promotes the documentation of the state-of-the-art processing techniques utilized for uranium and other specialty metals

  4. Recovering uranium from phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeret, M [Compagnie de Produits Chimiques et Electrometallurgiques Pechiney-Ugine Kuhlmann, 75 - Paris (France)

    1981-06-01

    Processes for the recovery of the uranium contained in phosphates have today become competitive with traditional methods of working uranium sources. These new possibilities will make it possible to meet more rapidly any increases in the demand for uranium: it takes ten years to start working a new uranium deposit, but only two years to build a recovery plant.

  5. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, R.W.; Thomas, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    The status of existing uranium enrichment contracts in the US is reviewed and expected natural uranium requirements for existing domestic uranium enrichment contracts are evaluated. Uncertainty in natural uranium requirements associated with requirements-type and fixed-commitment type contracts is discussed along with implementation of variable tails assay

  6. Uranium enrichment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D.C.; Gagne, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are covered: the status of the Government's existing uranium enrichment services contracts, natural uranium requirements based on the latest contract information, uncertainty in predicting natural uranium requirements based on uranium enrichment contracts, and domestic and foreign demand assumed in enrichment planning

  7. Size-selective performance evaluation of candidate aerosol inlets using polydisperse aerosols

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Presented are detailed techniques for the generation, collection, and analysis of polydisperse calibration aerosols for wind tunnel evaluation of size-selective...

  8. Preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc labeled HSA aerosols of different median diameters for various imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, B.; Kotrappa, P.; Soni, P.S.; Ganatra, R.D. (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India))

    1982-02-01

    The preparation of denatured sup(99m)Tc-labelled human serum albumin (HSA) aerosols of different median diameters is described using the BARC (Bhabha Atomic Research Centre) dry aerosol generation and delivery system. The applications of these radioactive aerosols are demonstrated in aerosol scintigraphy of lungs, mucociliary movement studies and lymphoscintigraphy in rabbits. It is concluded that the BARC system gives a simplified, rapid and versatile procedure for generation of denatured volume tagged HSA aerosols for a variety of clinical applications.

  9. Uranium industry annual 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and related topics. A glossary and appendices are included to assist the reader in interpreting the substantial array of statistical data in this report and to provide background information about the survey

  10. Uranium industry framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, K.

    2008-01-01

    The global uranium market is undergoing a major expansion due to an increase in global demand for uranium, the highest uranium prices in the last 20 years and recognition of the potential greenhouse benefits of nuclear power. Australia holds approximately 27% of the world's uranium resources (recoverable at under US$80/kg U), so is well placed to benefit from the expansion in the global uranium market. Increasing exploration activity due to these factors is resulting in the discovery and delineation of further high grade uranium deposits and extending Australia's strategic position as a reliable and safe supplier of low cost uranium.

  11. Uranium-bearing wastes and their radon emanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomozo; Imamura, Mitsutaka; Gunji, Yasuyoshi

    2007-01-01

    There are no data available with regard to radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes; such data are needed for the assessment of radiation exposure from radon that will be generated in the distant future as one uranium progeny at shallow land disposal sites for uranium-bearing wastes. There are many kinds of uranium-bearing wastes. However, it is not necessary to measure the radon emanation coefficients for all of them for two reasons. First, the radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium are determined by the uranium chemical form, the manner of uranium deposition on the waste matrix, and the size of the particles which constitute the waste matrix. Therefore, only a few representative measurements are sufficient for such uranium-bearing wastes. Second, it is possible to make theoretical calculations of radon emanation coefficients for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. In the present study, simulated uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by dissolved uranium were prepared, their radon emanation coefficients were measured and radon emanation coefficients were calculated theoretically for uranium-bearing wastes contaminated by UO 2 particles before sintering. The obtained radon emanation coefficients are distributed at higher values than those for ubiquitous soils and rocks in the natural environment. Therefore, it is not correct to just compare uranium concentrations among uranium-bearing wastes, ubiquitous soils and rocks in terms of radiation exposure. The radon emanation coefficients obtained in the present study have to be employed together with the uranium concentration in uranium-bearing wastes in order to achieve proper assessment of radiation exposure. (author)

  12. Overview of the uranium prospecting in Uruguay[Study of Uranium prospection in Uruguay]; Panorama de la prospeccion de Uranio en el Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, P; Vaz Chaves, N; Pirelli, H

    1985-07-01

    The report is about Uranium prospection in Uruguay by DINAMIGE experts. They were explained the radioactive properties elements in Uranium and its importance as a fuel oil for electric energy generation.

  13. Uranium in South Africa: 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique, locally developed uranium enrichment process will enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R100 million was spent on exploration during 1985. This was spent primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the reasonably assured resources (RAR) and estimated additional resources - category I (EAR-I) catogories were 483 300 t U. Production during 1985 was 4880 t U. Although a production peaking at over 1200 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceilling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  14. Uranium in South Africa: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique locally developed uranium enrichment process wil enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R300 million was spend on exploration during 1987. This was spend primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the RAR and EAR-I categories were 536 500 t u. Production during 1987 was 3963 t u. Although a production peaking at over 1100 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceiling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  15. Reduction of uranium hexafluoride to uranium tetrafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, I.S.; Do, J.B.; Choi, Y.D.; Park, M.H.; Yun, H.H.; Kim, E.H.; Kim, Y.W.

    1982-01-01

    The single step continuous reduction of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) to uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ) has been investigated. Heat required to initiate and maintain the reaction in the reactor is supplied by the highly exothermic reaction of hydrogen with a small amount of elemental fluorine which is added to the uranium hexafluoride stream. When gases uranium hexafluoride and hydrogen react in a vertical monel pipe reactor, the green product, UF 4 has 2.5g/cc in bulk density and is partly contaminated by incomplete reduction products (UF 5 ,U 2 F 9 ) and the corrosion product, presumably, of monel pipe of the reactor itself, but its assay (93% of UF 4 ) is acceptable for the preparation of uranium metal with magnesium metal. Remaining problems are the handling of uranium hexafluoride, which is easily clogging the flowmeter and gas feeding lines because of extreme sensitivity toward moisture, and a development of gas nozzel for free flow of uranium hexafluoride gas. (Author)

  16. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  17. Uranium - the world picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J.M.; Wright, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The world resources of uranium and the future demand for uranium are discussed. The amount of uranium available depends on the price which users are prepared to pay for its recovery. As the price is increased, there is an incentive to recover uranium from lower grade or more difficult deposits. In view of this, attention is drawn to the development of the uranium industry in Australias

  18. Health survey of occupationally exposed personnel during and after ceasing the activity at Uranium National Company-Feldioara branch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochie, Olivia; Bogdan, Gabriela

    2000-01-01

    The working personnel at the uranium ore mining of National Uranium Company is exposed to risk factors which affect the health condition by generating a specific morbidity. The main characteristic of this morbidity is the prevalence of respiratory system diseases (five times more frequent than in control population). The illness of other organs is not significantly different from non exposed people. The hemograms of uranium mining workers present the following characteristics: hematocrit, hemoglobin and thrombocytes number have normal values; also, within normal bounds but a little bit smaller is the leucocyte number; erythrocyte constants present lower values, particularly in elder people (50-55 years). These studies allowed to draw the conclusion that the presence of radioactive ore adds the risk of internal and external contamination due to radioactive powders, radon and its products generated by alpha decay to other risks specific for the mining activity, such as, unfavorable microclimate, powders containing SiO 2 aerosols, noxious powders and toxic gases. The working conditions, age and habits (smoking, particularly) are supplementary risk factors influencing the health condition of occupationally exposed personnel. (authors)

  19. Facility of aerosol filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duverger de Cuy, G; Regnier, J

    1975-04-18

    Said invention relates to a facility of aerosol filtration, particularly of sodium aerosols. Said facility is of special interest for fast reactors where sodium fires involve the possibility of high concentrations of sodium aerosols which soon clog up conventional filters. The facility intended for continuous operation, includes at the pre-filtering stage, means for increasing the size of the aerosol particles and separating clustered particles (cyclone separator).

  20. Rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    Under Australian environmental controls relating to the management of uranium tailings, it is no longer acceptable practice to search for a rehabilitation strategy at the end of production when the generation of tailings has ceased. The uranium projects currently in production and those being proposed are tightly regulated by the authorities. The waste management plans must consider site specific factors and must include selection of appropriate disposal sites and design for long term containment. The final encapsulation in engineered facilities must take into account the probable routes to the environment of the tailings. Rehabilitation shoud be undertaken by the mining and milling operators to standards approved by appropriate authorities. Appropriate administrative arrangements are required, by way of technical committees and financial bonds to ensure that agreed standards of rehabilitation may be achieved. Past and present experience with the rehabilitation of uranium tailings impoundments in Australia is discussed

  1. Long-term outlook for global natural uranium and uranium enrichment supply and demand situations after the impact of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuhji; Murakami, Tomoko

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the authors propose long-term projections of global nuclear power generation, uranium production, and uranium enrichment capacities by region, and estimate the trade flows of natural uranium and uranium enrichment activities in 2020 and 2035. In spite of the rapid nuclear power generation capacity growth expected especially in Asia, the natural uranium and uranium enrichment trade will not be tightened by 2020 due to the projected increase in both natural uranium production and uranium enrichment capacities, which may cause a drop in natural uranium and uranium enrichment prices. Thus, there is a great possibility that the current projects for capacity expansion will be delayed considerably. However, in the 'high-demand scenario', where nuclear expansion will be accelerated due to growing concerns about global warming and energy security issues, additional investments in uranium production and enrichment facilities will be needed by 2035. In Asia, the self-sufficiency ratio for both natural uranium supply and uranium enrichment activities will remain relatively low until 2035. However, the Herfindahl-Hirschman (HH) index of natural uranium and uranium enrichment activity trade to Asia will be lowered considerably up to 2035, indicating that nuclear capacity expansion can contribute to enhancing energy security in Asia. (author)

  2. Uranium 2001: resources, production and demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The 'Red Book', jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a recognised world reference on uranium. Its contents are based on official information received from 45 countries, supplemented by unofficial information for two others. This edition, the 19., presents the results of a thorough review of world uranium supply and demand as of 1 January 2001 and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry in the areas of exploration, resource estimates, production and reactor-related requirements. It provides substantial new information from all major uranium production centres in Africa, Australia, Eastern Europe and North America and, for the first time, includes a report on Tajikistan. This edition also features international expert analyses and projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements through 2020. (authors)

  3. Uranium mill tailings remedial action technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The uranium milling process involves the hydrometallurgical extraction of uranium from ores and the resultant generation of large quantities of waste referred to as tailings. Uranium mill tailings have been identified as requiring remediation because they contain residual radioactive material that is not removed in the milling process. Potential radiation exposure can result from direct contact with the tailings, from radon gas emitted by the tailings, and from radioactive contamination of groundwater. As a result, the technology developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Uranium Recovery Program have focused on radon control, groundwater contamination and the long-term protection of the containment system. This paper briefly summarizes the UMTRAP and NRC remedial action technology development. 33 references, 9 figures, 5 tables

  4. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  5. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo

    2011-01-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce 99 Mo- 99m Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl x dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of 235 U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  6. Study of filterable materials and protection instruments by the use of radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billard; Chevalier; Pradel

    1960-01-01

    Many filtration problems can be studied by means of radioactive aerosols. For the investigations described in this paper we have chosen the solid disintegration products of radon, the radioactive gas formed from radium, because of the facilities of generation and measurement it offers. Radon and its daughters are in fact always present in the atmosphere in sufficient concentration for certain tests. In order to improve the sensitivity of the measurements, radon from uranium ore can be used. The technique of measuring by counting α particles is rapid and easy to employ. We have thus been able to define a test for filterable substances, and to check filtering installation and individual protection instruments. (author) [fr

  7. Aerosols and Climate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Large warming by elevated aerosols · AERONET – Global network (NASA) · Slide 25 · Slide 26 · Slide 27 · Slide 28 · Slide 29 · Slide 30 · Slide 31 · Long-term trends - Trivandrum · Enhanced warming over Himalayan-Gangetic region · Aerosol Radiative Forcing Over India _ Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment ...

  8. Natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-08-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with natural uranium

  9. The dynamics of aerosol behaviour and fate within spruce canopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ould-Dada, Zitouni

    1996-01-01

    The current work was intended to provide data on aerosol inputs to forest ecosystems and their subsequent fate. The background to the project was the Chernobyl accident which highlighted the importance of forests and other semi-natural ecosystems as a link in the transfer of radioactivity to man. In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, forests were identified as a specific type of semi-natural ecosystem for which radioecological data were almost completely absent within the countries of the European Union. Information on radionuclide behaviour and transfer in forest ecosystems was therefore needed to establish and test radiological assessment models which can be used to evaluate the likely contribution to radiological dose-to-man contaminated forests may make. The objective of this study was thus to provide data on dry deposition, resuspension and field loss of aerosols to forest canopies, in particular those of Norway spruce (Picea abies), from wind tunnel experiments conducted with small scale 'model' canopies. An aerosol generation system was developed to produce aerosol particles in the size range of 0.13-1.37 μm (VMD). Particle size distributions can be controlled within desired limits and with sufficient stability over time allowing the technique to be suitable for use in extended aerosol deposition studies. A full scale dry deposition experiment using 0.82 μm (VMAD) uranium particles was performed in the wind tunnel using Norway spruce saplings of approximately 45 cm height. Deposition velocities (V g ) were obtained and these were related to meteorological measurements (wind speed, friction velocity, turbulence intensity) inside the wind tunnel and LAI of the canopy. The latter was divided into five horizontal layers and both horizontal and vertical variations in deposition were assessed. A V g value of 0.497 cm s -1 was obtained for the canopy as a whole with the highest and lowest fluxes of 2.85 x 10 -8 and 8.14 x 10 -9 μgU cm -2 s -1 occurring at

  10. Papers of the 15. french congress on the aerosols CFA 99; Actes du 15. congres francais sur les aerosols CFA 99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This french congress on the aerosols took place in Paris the 8 and 9 december 1999. It was presented in four main themes: bio-aerosols and filtering; the aerosols metrology; the aerosols in the environment; aerosols physic and applications. Seven papers have been analyzed in INIS data base for their specific interest in the nuclear industry. They concern the aerosol capture simulation, the aerosols sampling in workplace environment, a ring-effect ion generator development for the charge and the neutralization of an aerosol cloud, the radon 222 characterization in a house, a particle re-entrainment, the electrical charge process of beta emitter radioactive aerosols, the simulation of air flows in many filters. The other ones are analyzed in the ETDE data base. (A.L.B.)

  11. Uranium from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    The report concerns the possibilities of extracting uranium from seawater using either 'tidal' and 'pumped' schemes. It was decided to undertake an initial exercise on the pumped scheme. It was to take into account not only the direct energy requirements, but also the indirect energy inputs needed to produce the capital equipment, operating materials, etc. The report begins with a discussion of the technique of energy accounting, and the merits and limitations of the two principal approaches are compared. These are: 'Process Analysis' (or 'Energy Cost of Materials') and 'Input-Output Analysis' (or 'Energy Cost of Money'). A comparison is made between the energy cost of the tidal and pumped schemes, by both methods of analysis. A 'Best Estimate' is compiled calling on both methods, and this indicates that on an energy cost basis the pumped scheme is three times as expensive as the tidal scheme. Intermediate schemes are feasible, however. There is some evidence that the energy cost of an ore refining process with an initial concentration of 0.007% would be of the same order as that of the pumped seawater scheme. The energy cost of generating electricity using seawater uranium in an SGHWR is compared with the present UK generating system as a whole. (U.K.)

  12. Radiative Importance of Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    even greater consequences. Presently we know that through the use of fossil fuel and land-use changes we have increased the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In parallel, we have seen a modest increase of global temperature in the last century. These two observations have been linked as cause and effect by climate models, but this connection is still experimentally not verified. The spatial and seasonal distribution of aerosol forcing is different from that of greenhouse gases, thus generating a different spatial fingerprint of climate change. This fingerprint was suggested as a method to identify the response of the climate system to anthropogenic forcing of greenhouse gases and aerosol. The aerosol fingerprint may be the only way to firmly establish the presence (or absence) of human impact on climate. Aerosol-cloud interaction through the indirect effect will be an important component of establishing this fingerprint.

  13. Uranium 2011: Resources, Production and Demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    In the wake of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, questions are being raised about the future of the uranium market, including as regards the number of reactors expected to be built in the coming years, the amount of uranium required to meet forward demand, the adequacy of identified uranium resources to meet that demand and the ability of the sector to meet reactor requirements in a challenging investment climate. This 24. edition of the 'Red Book', a recognised world reference on uranium jointly prepared by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency, provides analyses and information from 42 producing and consuming countries in order to address these and other questions. It offers a comprehensive review of world uranium supply and demand as well as data on global uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. It also provides substantive new information on established uranium production centres around the world and in countries developing production centres for the first time. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related requirements through 2035, incorporating policy changes following the Fukushima accident, are also featured, along with an analysis of long-term uranium supply and demand issues

  14. Human resource development for uranium production cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, C.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fission energy is a viable option for meeting the ever increasing demand for electricity and high quality process heat in a safe, secured and sustainable manner with minimum carbon foot print and degradation of the environment. The growth of nuclear power has shifted from North America and Europe to Asia, mostly in China and India. Bangladesh, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia and the United Arab Emirates are also in the process of launching nuclear power program. Natural uranium is the basic raw material for U-235 and Pu-239, the fuels for all operating and upcoming nuclear power reactors. The present generation of nuclear power reactors are mostly light water cooled and moderated reactor (LWR) and to a limited extent pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). The LWRs and PHWRs use low enriched uranium (LEU with around 5% U-235) and natural uranium as fuel in the form of high density UO_2 pellets. The uranium production cycle starts with uranium exploration and is followed by mining and milling to produce uranium ore concentrate, commonly known as yellow cake, and ends with mine and mill reclamation and remediation. Natural uranium and its daughter products, radium and radon, are radioactive and health hazardous to varying degrees. Hence, radiological safety is of paramount importance to uranium production cycle and there is a need to review and share best practices in this area. Human Resource Development (HRD) is yet another challenge as most of the experts in this area have retired and have not been replaced by younger generation because of the continuing lull in the uranium market. Besides, uranium geology, exploration, mining and milling do not form a part of the undergraduate or post graduate curriculum in most countries. Hence, the Technical Co-operation activities of the IAEA are required to be augmented and more country specific and regional training and workshop should be conducted at different universities with the involvement of international experts

  15. Electrostatic purification of uranium mine stope atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, G.; Phyper, J.D.; Lowe, L.M.; Chambers, D.B.

    1986-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitators have been and are currently being used to reduce levels of radioactive aerosols in uranium mine stope atmospheres. Historically, while the electrostatic precipitators have been reported to be successful in reducing levels of radioactive aerosols many practical problems have been encountered with their use in the underground mine environment. Electrical short circuiting appears to have been the major problem with the use of precipitators in humid underground environments. On the basis of literature reviewed for this study it seems that the problems encountered in the past can be overcome. The most likely use of a precipitator in an underground uranium mine is to treat some or all of the air immediately upstream of a work station. The possible locations and uses of a precipitator would vary from work station to work station and from mine to mine. The desirability and cost of using elctrostatic precipitators to purify the air entering a work station are application specific. SENES Consultants therefore is not recommending for or against the use of electrostatic precipitators in underground uranium mines. The information provided in this report can be used however to assist in such determinations. 72 refs

  16. Pulmonary aerosol delivery and the importance of growth dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddrell, Allen E; Lewis, David; Church, Tanya; Vehring, Reinhard; Murnane, Darragh; Reid, Jonathan P

    2017-12-01

    Aerosols are dynamic systems, responding to variations in the surrounding environmental conditions by changing in size, composition and phase. Although, widely used in inhalation therapies, details of the processes occurring on aerosol generation and during inhalation have received little attention. Instead, research has focused on improvements to the formulation of the drug prior to aerosolization and the resulting clinical efficacy of the treatment. Here, we highlight the processes that occur during aerosol generation and inhalation, affecting aerosol disposition when deposited and, potentially, impacting total and regional doses. In particular, we examine the response of aerosol particles to the humid environment of the respiratory tract, considering both the capacity of particles to grow by absorbing moisture and the timescale for condensation to occur. [Formula: see text].

  17. Adsorption of radioactive ions on carnauba-wax aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, A.; Keyser, U. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1998-08-01

    A new method based on parallel aerosol size spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry is introduced for the measurement of short-lived radioactive ions, fission products or super-heavy elements produced at accelerators. Furthermore a new aerosol generator is presented.The possibility of controlling and changing the aerosol size distribution in the helium aerosol jet produced by the aerosol generator allows the process of the adsorption and transport of radioactive ions on aerosols to be examined for the first time. This is due to the fact that the distribution is surveyed on-line using a negligible part of its total volume and parallel to the transporting flow. The radioactivity of the transported ions is measured by a germanium detector in offline position. In principle, both an on- or offline position with narrow multi-detector geometry (e.g. {beta}{gamma}{gamma}) is possible. (orig.) With 8 figs., 14 refs.

  18. Uranium management activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.; Marshall, E.; Sideris, T.; Vasa-Sideris, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the missions of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office (ORO) has been the management of the Department's uranium materials. This mission has been accomplished through successful integration of ORO's uranium activities with the rest of the DOE complex. Beginning in the 1980's, several of the facilities in that complex have been shut down and are in the decommissioning process. With the end of the Cold War, the shutdown of many other facilities is planned. As a result, inventories of uranium need to be removed from the Department facilities. These inventories include highly enriched uranium (HEU), low enriched uranium (LEU), normal uranium (NU), and depleted uranium (DU). The uranium materials exist in different chemical forms, including metals, oxides, solutions, and gases. Much of the uranium in these inventories is not needed to support national priorities and programs. (author)

  19. Containment aerosol behaviour simulation studies in the BARC nuclear aerosol test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayya, Y.S.; Sapra, B.K.; Khan, Arshad; Sunny, Faby; Nair, R.N.; Raghunath, Radha; Tripathi, R.M.; Markandeya, S.G.; Puranik, V.D.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Shreekumar, K.P.; Padmanabhan, P.V.A.; Murthy, P.S.S.; Venlataramani, N.

    2005-02-01

    A Nuclear Aerosol Test Facility (NATF) has been built and commissioned at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre to carry out simulation studies on the behaviour of aerosols released into the reactor containment under accident conditions. This report also discusses some new experimental techniques for estimation of density of metallic aggregates. The experimental studies have shown that the dynamic densities of aerosol aggregates are far lower than their material densities as expected by the well-known fractal theory of aggregates. In the context of codes, this has significant bearing in providing a mechanistic basis for the input density parameter used in estimating the aerosol evolution characteristics. The data generated under the quiescent and turbulent conditions and the information on aggregate densities are now being subjected to the validation of the aerosol behaviour codes. (author)

  20. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  1. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  2. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  3. Acceptance of energy technologies: Attitudes, beliefs, norms and behaviour with respect to the use of coal and uranium for generating electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midden, C.J.H.; Daamen, D.D.L.; Verplanken, B.

    1984-01-01

    What is the distribution of attitudes towards the large-scale application of coal and uranium. How can these attitudes be explained from belief systems. What are the perceived probabilities of a number of consequences from these energy sources. What are the consequences of these attitudes for behaviour and behavioural intentions. What normative influences play a role. These questions are addressed on the basis of a national survey held in the Netherlands. Attention is also paid to other aspects of people's evaluations of these energy technologies, e.g. information level, imaginability of accidents, anxiety and involvement with the problems perceived. The study has been designed following an extended and adapted version of the attitude-behaviour model of Fishbein and Ajzen (1975). (author)

  4. Uranium supply/demand projections to 2030 in the OECD/NEA-IAEA ''Red Book''. Nuclear growth projections, global uranium exploration, uranium resources, uranium production and production capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, Robert

    2009-01-01

    World demand for electricity is expected to continue to grow rapidly over the next several decades to meet the needs of an increasing population and economic growth. The recognition by many governments that nuclear power can produce competitively priced, base load electricity that is essentially free of greenhouse gas emissions, combined with the role that nuclear can play in enhancing security of energy supplies, has increased the prospects for growth in nuclear generating capacity. Since the mid-1960s, with the co-operation of their member countries and states, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have jointly prepared periodic updates (currently every 2 years) on world uranium resources, production and demand. These updates have been published by the OECD/NEA in what is commonly known as the ''Red Book''. The 2007 edition replaces the 2005 edition and reflects information current as of 1 st January 2007. Uranium 2007: Resources, Production and Demand presents, in addition to updated resource figures, the results of a recent review of world uranium market fundamentals and provides a statistical profile of the world uranium industry. It contains official data provided by 40 countries (and one Country Report prepared by the IAEA Secretariat) on uranium exploration, resources, production and reactor-related requirements. Projections of nuclear generating capacity and reactor-related uranium requirements to 2030 as well as a discussion of long-term uranium supply and demand issues are also presented. (orig.)

  5. Uranium: a basic evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crull, A.W.

    1978-01-01

    All energy sources and technologies, including uranium and the nuclear industry, are needed to provide power. Public misunderstanding of the nature of uranium and how it works as a fuel may jeopardize nuclear energy as a major option. Basic chemical facts about uranium ore and uranium fuel technology are presented. Some of the major policy decisions that must be made include the enrichment, stockpiling, and pricing of uranium. Investigations and lawsuits pertaining to uranium markets are reviewed, and the point is made that oil companies will probably have to divest their non-oil energy activities. Recommendations for nuclear policies that have been made by the General Accounting Office are discussed briefly

  6. Uranium health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the Summer School on Uranium Health Physics held in Pretoria on the 14 and 15 April 1980.